Sample records for muon critical energy

  1. Low-energy muons via frictional cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu Bao; Allen Caldwell; Daniel Greenwald; Guoxing Xia

    2010-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-energy muon beams are useful for a range of physics experiments. We consider the production of low-energy muon beams with small energy spreads using frictional cooling. As the input beam, we take a surface muon source such as that at the Paul Scherrer Institute. Simulations show that the efficiency of low energy muon production can potentially be raised to 1%, which is significantly higher than that of current schemes.

  2. Muon Collider Physics at Very High Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Berger

    2000-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Muon colliders might greatly extend the energy frontier of collider physics. One can contemplate circular colliders with center-of-mass energies in excess of 10 TeV. Some physics issues that might be relevant at such a machine are discussed.

  3. Proceedings of the International Workshop on Low Energy Muon Science: LEMS`93

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leon, M. [comp.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains papers on research with low energy muons. Topics cover fundamental electroweak physics; muonic atoms and molecules, and muon catalyzed fusion; muon spin research; and muon facilities. These papers have been indexed and cataloged separately.

  4. Analysis of muon radiography of the Toshiba nuclear critical assembly reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, C. L.; Bacon, Jeffery; Borozdin, Konstantin; Fabritius, J. M.; Perry, John; Ramsey, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Ban, Yuichiro; Izumi, Mikio; Sano, Yuji; Yoshida, Noriyuki [Toshiba Corporation, 8 Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8523 (Japan); Miyadera, Haruo [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Toshiba Corporation, 8 Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8523 (Japan); Mizokami, Shinya; Otsuka, Yasuyuki; Yamada, Daichi [Tokyo Electric Power Company, 1-1-3 Uchisaiwai-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Sugita, Tsukasa; Yoshioka, Kenichi [Toshiba Corporation, 4-1 Ukishima-cho, Kawasaki-ku, Kawasaki 210-0862 (Japan)

    2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A 1.2?×?1.2 m{sup 2} muon tracker was moved from Los Alamos to the Toshiba facility at Kawasaki, Japan, where it was used to take ?4 weeks of data radiographing the Toshiba Critical Assembly Reactor with cosmic ray muons. In this paper, we describe the analysis procedure, show results of this experiment, and compare the results to Monte Carlo predictions. The results validate the concept of using cosmic rays to image the damaged cores of the Fukushima Daiichi reactors.

  5. Simulation of neutrons produced by high-energy muons underground

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Lindote; H. M. Araujo; V. A. Kudryavtsev; M. Robinson

    2009-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes the Monte Carlo simulation used to interpret the measurement of the muon-induced neutron flux in the Boulby Underground Laboratory (North Yorkshire, UK), recently performed using a large scintillator veto deployed around the ZEPLIN-II WIMP detector. Version 8.2 of the GEANT4 toolkit was used after relevant benchmarking and validation of neutron production models. In the direct comparison between Monte Carlo and experimental data, we find that the simulation produces a 1.8 times higher neutron rate, which we interpret as over-production in lead by GEANT4. The dominance of this material in neutron production allows us to estimate the absolute neutron yield in lead as (1.31 +/- 0.06) x 10^(-3) neutrons/muon/(g/cm^2) for a mean muon energy of 260 GeV. Simulated nuclear recoils due to muon-induced neutrons in the ZEPLIN-II target volume (~1 year exposure) showed that, although a small rate of events is expected from this source of background in the energy range of interest for dark matter searches, no event survives an anti-coincidence cut with the veto.

  6. Measurement of the nucleon structure function using high energy muons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyers, P.D.

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the inclusive deep inelastic scattering of muons on nucleons in iron using beams of 93 and 215 GeV muons. To perform this measurement, we have built and operated the Multimuon Spectrometer (MMS) in the muon beam at Fermilab. The MMS is a magnetized iron target/spectrometer/calorimeter which provides 5.61 kg/cm/sup 2/ of target, 9% momentum resolution on scattered muons, and a direct measure of total hadronic energy with resolution sigma/sub nu/ = 1.4..sqrt..nu(GeV). In the distributed target, the average beam energies at the interaction are 88.0 and 209 GeV. Using the known form of the radiatively-corrected electromagnetic cross section, we extract the structure function F/sub 2/(x,Q/sup 2/) with a typical precision of 2% over the range 5 < Q/sup 2/ < 200 GeV/sup 2//c/sup 2/. We compare our measurements to the predictions of lowest order quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and find a best fit value of the QCD scale parameter ..lambda../sub LO/ = 230 +- 40/sup stat/ +- 80/sup syst/ MeV/c, assuming R = 0 and without applying Fermi motion corrections. Comparing the cross sections at the two beam energies, we measure R = -0.06 +- 0.06/sup stat/ +- 0.11/sup syst/. Our measurements show qualitative agreement with QCD, but quantitative comparison is hampered by phenomenological uncertainties. The experimental situation is quite good, with substantial agreement between our measurements and those of others. 86 references.

  7. Possible explanation for the low flux of high energy astrophysical muon neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pakvasa, Sandip [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2013-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    I consider the possibility that some exotic neutrino property is responsible for reducing the muon neutrino flux at high energies from distant sources; specifically, (i) neutrino decay and (ii) neutrinos being pseudo-Dirac particles. This would provide a mechanism for the lack of high energy muon events in the Icecube detector.

  8. Compact Muon Production and Collection Scheme for High-Energy Physics Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stratakis, Diktys

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relative immunity of muons to synchrotron radiation suggests that they might be used in place of electrons as probes in fundamental high-energy physics experiments. Muons are commonly produced indirectly through pion decay by interaction of a charged particle beam with a target. However, the large angle and energy dispersion of the initial beams as well as the short muon lifetime limits many potential applications. Here, we describe a fast method for manipulating the longitudinal and transverse phase-space of a divergent pion-muon beam to enable efficient capture and downstream transport with minimum losses. We also discuss the design of a handling system for the removal of unwanted secondary particles from the target region and thus reduce activation of the machine. The compact muon source we describe can be used for fundamental physics research in neutrino experiments.

  9. High-energy electrons from the muon decay in orbit: radiative corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szafron, Robert

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We determine the $\\mathcal{O}(\\alpha)$ correction to the energy spectrum of electrons produced in the decay of muons bound in atoms. We focus on the high-energy end of the spectrum that constitutes a background for the muon-electron conversion and will be precisely measured by the upcoming experiments Mu2e and COMET. The correction suppresses the background by about 20\\%.

  10. Large-acceptance linac for accelerating l9w-energy muons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurennoy, Sergey S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jason, Andrew J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miyadera, Haruo [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a high-gradient linear accelerator for accelerating low-energy muons and pions in a strong solenoidal magnetic field. The acceleration starts immediately after collection of pions from a target by solenoidal magnets and brings muons to a kinetic energy of about 200 MeV over a distance of the order of 10 m. At this energy, both an ionization cooling of the muon beam and its further acceleration in a superconducting linac become feasible. The project presents unique challenges - a very large energy spread in a highly divergent beam, as well as pion and muon decays - requiring large longitudinal and transverse acceptances. One potential solution incorporates a normal-conducting linac consisting of independently fed O-mode RF cavities with wide apertures closed by thin metal windows or grids. The guiding magnetic field is provided by external superconducting solenoids. The cavity choice, overall linac design considerations, and simulation results of muon acceleration are presented. While the primary applications of such a linac are for homeland defense and industry, it can provide muon fluxes high enough to be of interest for physics experiments.

  11. Search for Diffuse Astrophysical Neutrino Flux Using Ultra-High-Energy Upward-Going Muons in Super-Kamiokande I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration; :; M. E. C. Swanson

    2007-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Many astrophysical models predict a diffuse flux of high-energy neutrinos from active galactic nuclei and other extra-galactic sources. At muon energies above 1 TeV, the upward-going muon flux induced by neutrinos from active galactic nuclei is expected to exceed the flux due to atmospheric neutrinos. We have performed a search for this astrophysical neutrino flux by looking for upward-going muons in the highest energy data sample from the Super-Kamiokande detector using 1679.6 live days of data. We found one extremely high energy upward-going muon event, compared with an expected atmospheric neutrino background of 0.46 plus or minus 0.23 events. Using this result, we set an upper limit on the diffuse flux of upward-going muons due to neutrinos from astrophysical sources in the muon energy range 3.16-100 TeV.

  12. A parameterisation of the flux and energy spectrum of single and multiple muons in deep water/ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bazzotti; S. Biagi; G. Carminati; S. Cecchini; T. Chiarusi; G. Giacomelli; A. Margiotta; M. Sioli; M. Spurio

    2009-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper parametric formulas are presented to evaluate the flux of atmospheric muons in the range of vertical depth between 1.5 to 5 km of water equivalent (km w.e.) and up to 85^o for the zenith angle. We take into account their arrival in bundles with different muon multiplicities. The energy of muons inside bundles is then computed considering the muon distance from the bundle axis. This parameterisation relies on a full Monte Carlo simulation of primary Cosmic Ray (CR) interactions, shower propagation in the atmosphere and muon transport in deep water [1]. The primary CR flux and interaction models, in the range in which they can produce muons which may reach 1.5 km w.e., suffer from large experimental uncertainties. We used a primary CR flux and an interaction model able to correctly reproduce the flux, the multiplicity distribution, the spatial distance between muons as measured by the underground MACRO experiment.

  13. Muon Colliders: The Next Frontier

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Yagmur Tourun

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Muon Colliders provide a path to the energy frontier in particle physics but have been regarded to be "at least 20 years away" for 20 years. I will review recent progress in design studies and hardware R&D and show that a Muon Collider can be established as a real option for the post-LHC era if the current vigorous R&D effort revitalized by the Muon Collider Task Force at Fermilab can be supported to its conclusion. All critical technologies are being addressed and no show-stoppers have emerged. Detector backgrounds have been studied in detail and appear to be manageable and the physics can be done with existing detector technology. A muon facility can be built through a staged scenario starting from a low-energy muon source with unprecedented intensity for exquisite reach for rare processes, followed by a Neutrino Factory with ultrapure neutrino beams with unparalleled sensitivity for disentangling neutrino mixing, leading to an energy frontier Muon Collider with excellent energy resolution.

  14. Measurement of the energy spectrum of underground muons at Gran Sasso with a transition radiation detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The MACRO Collaboration; M. Ambrosio et al

    1998-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured directly the residual energy of cosmic ray muons crossing the MACRO detector at the Gran Sasso Laboratory. For this measurement we have used a transition radiation detector consisting of three identical modules, each of about 12 m^2 area, operating in the energy region from 100 GeV to 1 TeV. The results presented here were obtained with the first module collecting data for more than two years. The average single muon energy is found to be 320 +/- 4 (stat.) +/- 11 (syst.) GeV in the rock depth range 3000-6500 hg/cm^2. The results are in agreement with calculations of the energy loss of muons in the rock above the detector.

  15. Criticality Safety | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  16. Prompt muon-induced fission: a probe for nuclear energy dissipation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volker E. Oberacker

    1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We solve the time-dependent Dirac equation for a muon which is initially bound to a fissioning actinide nucleus. The computations are carried out on a 3-D cartesian lattice utilizing the Basis-Spline collocation method. The muon dynamics is sensitive to the nuclear energy dissipation between the outer fission barrier and the scission point. From a comparison with experimental data we find a dissipated energy of about 10 MeV and a fission time delay due to friction of order $2 \\times 10^{-21}$ s.

  17. Optimization of the baseline and the parent muon energy for a low energy neutrino factory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amol Dighe; Srubabati Goswami; Shamayita Ray

    2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the optimal setup for a low energy neutrino factory in order to achieve a 5\\sigma-discovery of a nonzero mixing angle \\theta_{13}, a nonzero CP phase \\delta_{CP}, and the mass hierarchy. We explore parent muon energies in the range 5--16 GeV, and baselines in the range 500--5000 km. We present the results in terms of the reach in sin^2\\theta_{13}, emphasizing the dependence of the optimal baseline on the true value of \\delta_{CP}. We show that the sensitivity of a given setup typically increases with parent muon energy, reaching saturation for higher energies. The saturation energy is larger for longer baselines; we present an estimate of this dependence. In the light of the recent indications of a large \\theta_{13}, we also determine how these preferences would change if indeed a large \\theta_{13} is confirmed. In such a case, the baselines ~2500 km (~1500 km) may be expected to lead to hierarchy determination (\\delta_{CP} discovery) with the minimum exposure.

  18. Forbush decreases and solar events seen in the 10 - 20GeV energy range by the Karlsruhe Muon Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Braun; J. Engler; J. R. Hörandel; J. Milke

    2008-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1993, a muon telescope located at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Karlsruhe Muon Telescope) has been recording the flux of single muons mostly originating from primary cosmic-ray protons with dominant energies in the 10 - 20 GeV range. The data are used to investigate the influence of solar effects on the flux of cosmic-rays measured at Earth. Non-periodic events like Forbush decreases and ground level enhancements are detected in the registered muon flux. A selection of recent events will be presented and compared to data from the Jungfraujoch neutron monitor. The data of the Karlsruhe Muon Telescope help to extend the knowledge about Forbush decreases and ground level enhancements to energies beyond the neutron monitor regime.

  19. Muon Cooling and Future Muon Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel M. Kaplan

    2006-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Muon colliders and neutrino factories are attractive options for achieving the highest lepton-antilepton collision energies and the most precise measurements of the parameters of the neutrino mixing matrix. The performance and cost of these future facilities depends sensitively on how well a beam of muons can be cooled. The recent progress of muon-cooling prototype tests and design studies nourishes the hope that such facilities can be built during the next decade.

  20. Prompt muon-induced fission: a sensitive probe for nuclear energy dissipation and fission dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volker E. Oberacker; A. Sait Umar; Feodor F. Karpeshin

    2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the formation of an excited muonic atom, inner shell transitions may proceed without photon emission by inverse internal conversion, i.e. the muonic excitation energy is transferred to the nucleus. In actinides, the 2p -> 1s and the 3d -> 1s muonic transitions result in excitation of the nuclear giant dipole and giant quadrupole resonances, respectively, which act as doorway states for fission. The nuclear excitation energy is typically 6.5 - 10 MeV. Because the muon lifetime is long compared to the timescale of prompt nuclear fission, the motion of the muon in the Coulomb field of the fissioning nucleus may be utilized to learn about the dynamics of fission.

  1. Muon Muon Collider: Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallardo, J.C.; Palmer, R.B.; /Brookhaven; Tollestrup, A.V.; /Fermilab; Sessler, A.M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Skrinsky, A.N.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Ankenbrandt, C.; Geer, S.; Griffin, J.; Johnstone, C.; Lebrun, P.; McInturff, A.; Mills, Frederick E.; Mokhov, N.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Ng, K.Y.; Noble, R.; Novitski, I.; Popovic, M.; Qian, C.; Van Ginneken, A. /Fermilab /Brookhaven /Wisconsin U., Madison /Tel Aviv U. /Indiana U. /UCLA /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC /Argonne /Sobolev IM, Novosibirsk /UC, Davis /Munich, Tech. U. /Virginia U. /KEK, Tsukuba /DESY /Novosibirsk, IYF /Jefferson Lab /Mississippi U. /SUNY, Stony Brook /MIT /Columbia U. /Fairfield U. /UC, Berkeley; ,

    2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice - we believe - to allow us to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring wich has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design. Muons because of their large mass compared to an electron, do not produce significant synchrotron radiation. As a result there is negligible beamstrahlung and high energy collisions are not limited by this phenomena. In addition, muons can be accelerated in circular devices which will be considerably smaller than two full-energy linacs as required in an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider. A hadron collider would require a CM energy 5 to 10 times higher than 4 TeV to have an equivalent energy reach. Since the accelerator size is limited by the strength of bending magnets, the hadron collider for the same physics reach would have to be much larger than the muon collider. In addition, muon collisions should be cleaner than hadron collisions. There are many detailed particle reactions which are open to a muon collider and the physics of such reactions - what one learns and the necessary luminosity to see interesting events - are described in detail. Most of the physics accesible to an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider could be studied in a muon collider. In addition the production of Higgs bosons in the s-channel will allow the measurement of Higgs masses and total widths to high precision; likewise, t{bar t} and W{sup +}W{sup -} threshold studies would yield m{sub t} and m{sub w} to great accuracy. These reactions are at low center of mass energy (if the MSSM is correct) and the luminosity and {Delta}p/p of the beams required for these measurements is detailed in the Physics Chapter. On the other hand, at 2 + 2 TeV, a luminosity of L {approx} 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} is desirable for studies such as, the scattering of longitudinal W bosons or the production of heavy scalar particles. Not explored in this work, but worth noting, are the opportunities for muon-proton and muon-heavy ion collisions as well as the enormous richness of such a facility for fixed target physics provided by the intense beams of neutrinos, muons, pions, kaons, antiprotons and spallation neutrons. To see all the interesting physics described herein requires a careful study of the operation of a detector in the very large background. Three sources of background have been identified. The first is from any halo accompanying the muon beams in the collider ring. Very carefully prepared beams will have to be injected and maintained. The second is due to the fact that on average 35% of the muon energy appears in its decay electron. The energy of the electron subsequently is converted into EM showers either from the synchrotron radiation they emit in the collider magnetic field or from direct collision with the surrounding material. The decays that occur as the beams traverse the low beta insert are of particular concern for detector backgrounds. A third source of background is e{sup +} - e{sup -} pair creation from {mu}{sup +} - {mu}{sup -} interaction. Studies of

  2. Modeling high-energy cosmic ray induced terrestrial muon flux: A lookup table

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimitra Atri; Adrian L. Melott

    2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    On geological timescales, the Earth is likely to be exposed to an increased flux of high energy cosmic rays (HECRs) from astrophysical sources such as nearby supernovae, gamma ray bursts or by galactic shocks. Typical cosmic ray energies may be much higher than the ~ 1 GeV flux which normally dominates. These high-energy particles strike the Earth's atmosphere initiating an extensive air shower. As the air shower propagates deeper, it ionizes the atmosphere by producing charged secondary particles. Secondary particles such as muons and thermal neutrons produced as a result of nuclear interactions are able to reach the ground, enhancing the radiation dose. Muons contribute 85% to the radiation dose from cosmic rays. This enhanced dose could be potentially harmful to the biosphere. This mechanism has been discussed extensively in literature but has never been quantified. Here, we have developed a lookup table that can be used to quantify this effect by modeling terrestrial muon flux from any arbitrary cosmic ray spectra with 10 GeV - 1 PeV primaries. This will enable us to compute the radiation dose on terrestrial planetary surfaces from a number of astrophysical sources.

  3. High energy neutrino astronomy using upward-going muons in Super-Kamiokande-I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration; :; K. Abe

    2006-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results from several studies used to search for astrophysical sources of high-energy neutrinos using the Super-Kamiokande-I (April 1996 to July 2001) neutrino-induced upward-going muon data. The data set consists of 2359 events with minimum energy 1.6 GeV, of which 1892 are through-going and 467 stop within the detector. The results of several independent analyses are presented, including searches for point sources using directional and temporal information and a search for signatures of cosmic-ray interactions with the interstellar medium in the upward-going muons. No statistically significant evidence for point sources or any diffuse flux from the plane of the galaxy was found, so specific limits on fluxes from likely point sources are calculated. The 90% C.L. upper limits on upward-going muon flux from astronomical sources which are located in the southern hemisphere and always under the horizon for Super-Kamiokande are 1~4x10^{-15} cm^{-2} s^{-1}.

  4. Muon content of ultra-high-energy air showers: Yakutsk data versus simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Glushkov; I. T. Makarov; M. I. Pravdin; I. E. Sleptsov; D. S. Gorbunov; G. I. Rubtsov; S. V. Troitsky

    2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyse a sample of 33 extensive air showers (EAS) with estimated primary energies above 2\\cdot 10^{19} eV and high-quality muon data recorded by the Yakutsk EAS array. We compare, event-by-event, the observed muon density to that expected from CORSIKA simulations for primary protons and iron, using SIBYLL and EPOS hadronic interaction models. The study suggests the presence of two distinct hadronic components, ``light'' and ``heavy''. Simulations with EPOS are in a good agreement with the expected composition in which the light component corresponds to protons and the heavy component to iron-like nuclei. With SYBILL, simulated muon densities for iron primaries are a factor of \\sim 1.5 less than those observed for the heavy component, for the same electromagnetic signal. Assuming two-component proton-iron composition and the EPOS model, the fraction of protons with energies E>10^{19} eV is 0.52^{+0.19}_{-0.20} at 95% confidence level.

  5. Critical Materials Workshop | Department of Energy

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  6. Critical Materials Workshop | Department of Energy

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  7. 2010 Critical Materials Strategy | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

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  8. Department of Energy Critical Materials Strategy Video (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a text version of the "Department of Energy Critical Materials Strategy" video presented at the Critical Materials Workshop, held on April 3, 2012 in Arlington, Virginia.

  9. Muon capture for the front end of a muon collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuffer, D.; /Fermilab; Yoshikawa, C.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the design of the muon capture front end for a {mu}{sup +}-{mu}{sup -} Collider. In the front end, a proton bunch on a target creates secondary pions that drift into a capture transport channel, decaying into muons. A sequence of rf cavities forms the resulting muon beams into strings of bunches of differing energies, aligns the bunches to (nearly) equal central energies, and initiates ionization cooling. The muons are then cooled and accelerated to high energy into a storage ring for high-energy high luminosity collisions. Our initial design is based on the somewhat similar front end of the International Design Study (IDS) neutrino factory.

  10. Perturbations to aquatic photosynthesis due to high-energy cosmic ray induced muon flux in the extragalactic shock model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Lien; Rodriguez, Oscar

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We modify a mathematical model of photosynthesis to quantify the perturbations that high energy muons could make on aquatic primary productivity. Then we apply this in the context of the extragalactic shock model, according to which Earth receives an enhanced dose of high-energy cosmic rays when it is at the galactic north. We obtain considerable reduction in the photosynthesis rates, consistent with potential drops in biodiversity.

  11. Muon Collider Progress: Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael S. Zisman

    2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A muon collider would be a powerful tool for exploring the energy-frontier with leptons, and would complement the studies now under way at the LHC. Such a device would offer several important benefits. Muons, like electrons, are point particles so the full center-of-mass energy is available for particle production. Moreover, on account of their higher mass, muons give rise to very little synchrotron radiation and produce very little beamstrahlung. The first feature permits the use of a circular collider that can make efficient use of the expensive rf system and whose footprint is compatible with an existing laboratory site. The second feature leads to a relatively narrow energy spread at the collision point. Designing an accelerator complex for a muon collider is a challenging task. Firstly, the muons are produced as a tertiary beam, so a high-power proton beam and a target that can withstand it are needed to provide the required luminosity of ~1 \\times 10^34 cm^-2s^-1. Secondly, the beam is initially produced with a large 6D phase space, which necessitates a scheme for reducing the muon beam emittance ("cooling"). Finally, the muon has a short lifetime so all beam manipulations must be done very rapidly. The Muon Accelerator Program, led by Fermilab and including a number of U.S. national laboratories and universities, has undertaken design and R&D activities aimed toward the eventual construction of a muon collider. Design features of such a facility and the supporting R&D program are described.

  12. Muon-proton Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Borie

    2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent proposal to measure the proton form factor by means of muon-proton scattering will use muons which are not ultrarelativistic (and also not nonrelativistic). The usual equations describing the scattering cross section use the approximation that the scattered lepton (usually an electron) is ultrarelativistic, with v/c approximately equal to 1. Here the cross section is calculated for all values of the energy. It agrees with the standard result in the appropriate limit.

  13. Muon Cooling and Future Muon Facilities: The Coming Decade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel M. Kaplan

    2009-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Muon colliders and neutrino factories are attractive options for future facilities aimed at achieving the highest lepton-antilepton collision energies and precision measurements of parameters of the neutrino mixing matrix. The performance and cost of these depend sensitively on how well a beam of muons can be cooled. Recent progress in muon cooling design studies and prototype tests nourishes the hope that such facilities can be built in the decade to come.

  14. CMI Webinar: Energy Materials and Criticality, 2015-2030 | Critical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o . C l a r k CCLEAN ENERGYMaterials

  15. Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave theJuly 30,Crafty Gifts for the EnergyCreditSiteCritical Materials

  16. Status of neutrino factory and muon collider R and D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zisman, M.S.

    2001-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A significant worldwide R and D effort is presently directed toward solving the technical challenges of producing, cooling, accelerating, storing, and eventually colliding beams of muons. Its primary thrust is toward issues critical to a Neutrino Factory, for which R and D efforts are under way in the U.S., via the Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (MC); in Europe, centered at CERN; and in Japan, at KEK. Under study and experimental development are production targets handling intense proton beams (1-4 MW), phase rotation systems to reduce beam energy spread, cooling channels to reduce transverse beam emittance for the acceleration system, and storage rings where muon decays in a long straight section provide a neutrino beam for a long-baseline (3000 km) experiment. Critical experimental activities include development of very high gradient normal conducting RF (NCRF) and superconducting RF (SCRF) cavities, high-power liquid-hydrogen absorbers, and high-field superconducting solenoids. Components and instrumentation that tolerate the intense decay products of the muon beam are being developed for testing. For a high-luminosity collider, muons must be cooled longitudinally as well as transversely, requiring an emittance exchange scheme. In addition to the experimental R and D effort, sophisticated theoretical and simulation tools are needed for the design. Here, the goals, present status, and future R and D plans in these areas will be described.

  17. A Staged Muon Accelerator Facility For Neutrino and Collider Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delahaye, Jean-Pierre; Brice, Stephen; Bross, Alan David; Denisov, Dmitri; Eichten, Estia; Holmes, Stephen; Lipton, Ronald; Neuffer, David; Palmer, Mark Alan; Bogacz, S Alex; Huber, Patrick; Kaplan, Daniel M; Snopok, Pavel; Kirk, Harold G; Palmer, Robert B; Ryne, Robert D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Muon-based facilities offer unique potential to provide capabilities at both the Intensity Frontier with Neutrino Factories and the Energy Frontier with Muon Colliders. They rely on a novel technology with challenging parameters, for which the feasibility is currently being evaluated by the Muon Accelerator Program (MAP). A realistic scenario for a complementary series of staged facilities with increasing complexity and significant physics potential at each stage has been developed. It takes advantage of and leverages the capabilities already planned for Fermilab, especially the strategy for long-term improvement of the accelerator complex being initiated with the Proton Improvement Plan (PIP-II) and the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF). Each stage is designed to provide an R&D platform to validate the technologies required for subsequent stages. The rationale and sequence of the staging process and the critical issues to be addressed at each stage, are presented.

  18. Stochastic cooling in muon colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barletta, W.A.; Sessler, A.M.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of muon production techniques for high energy colliders indicates the need for rapid and effective beam cooling in order that one achieve luminosities > 10{sup 30} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} as required for high energy physics experiments. This paper considers stochastic cooling to increase the phase space density of the muons in the collider. Even at muon energies greater than 100 GeV, the number of muons per bunch must be limited to {approximately}10{sup 3} for the cooling rate to be less than the muon lifetime. With such a small number of muons per bunch, the final beam emittance implied by the luminosity requirement is well below the thermodynamic limit for beam electronics at practical temperatures. Rapid bunch stacking after the cooling process can raise the number of muons per bunch to a level consistent with both the luminosity goals and with practical temperatures for the stochastic cooling electronics. A major advantage of our stochastic cooling/stacking scheme over scenarios that employ only ionization cooling is that the power on the production target can be reduced below 1 MW.

  19. Muon simulation codes MUSIC and MUSUN for underground physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Kudryavtsev

    2008-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper describes two Monte Carlo codes dedicated to muon simulations: MUSIC (MUon SImulation Code) and MUSUN (MUon Simulations UNderground). MUSIC is a package for muon transport through matter. It is particularly useful for propagating muons through large thickness of rock or water, for instance from the surface down to underground/underwater laboratory. MUSUN is designed to use the results of muon transport through rock/water to generate muons in or around underground laboratory taking into account their energy spectrum and angular distribution.

  20. Experimental bond critical point and local energy density properties...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mn-O, Fe-O and Co-O bonded interactions for Abstract: Bond critical point, bcp, and local energy density properties for the electron density, ED, distributions, calculated with...

  1. Muon Cooling, Muon Colliders, and the MICE Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel M. Kaplan on behalf of the MAP; MICE collaborations

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Muon colliders and neutrino factories are attractive options for future facilities aimed at achieving the highest lepton-antilepton collision energies and precision measurements of parameters of the Higgs boson and the neutrino mixing matrix. The performance and cost of these depend on how well a beam of muons can be cooled. Recent progress in muon cooling design studies and prototype tests nourishes the hope that such facilities can be built during the coming decade. The status of the key technologies and their various demonstration experiments is summarized.

  2. Muon Cooling, Muon Colliders, and the MICE Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaplan, Daniel M

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Muon colliders and neutrino factories are attractive options for future facilities aimed at achieving the highest lepton-antilepton collision energies and precision measurements of parameters of the Higgs boson and the neutrino mixing matrix. The performance and cost of these depend on how well a beam of muons can be cooled. Recent progress in muon cooling design studies and prototype tests nourishes the hope that such facilities can be built during the coming decade. The status of the key technologies and their various demonstration experiments is summarized.

  3. Critical Materials Hub | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1.SpaceFluorControlsEnergy Reaffirmed

  4. Critical Decision Handbook | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. DepartmentEnergy This partAsAmanda McAlpinManagers |FullThis Handbook is

  5. Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel M. Kaplan; for the MAP; MICE Collaborations

    2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Muon colliders and neutrino factories are attractive options for future facilities aimed at achieving the highest lepton-antilepton collision energies and precision measurements of Higgs boson and neutrino mixing matrix parameters. The facility performance and cost depend on how well a beam of muons can be cooled. Recent progress in muon cooling design studies and prototype tests nourishes the hope that such facilities could be built starting in the coming decade. The status of the key technologies and their various demonstration experiments is summarized. Prospects "post-P5" are also discussed.

  6. Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaplan, Daniel M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Muon colliders and neutrino factories are attractive options for future facilities aimed at achieving the highest lepton-antilepton collision energies and precision measurements of Higgs boson and neutrino mixing matrix parameters. The facility performance and cost depend on how well a beam of muons can be cooled. Recent progress in muon cooling design studies and prototype tests nourishes the hope that such facilities could be built starting in the coming decade. The status of the key technologies and their various demonstration experiments is summarized. Prospects "post-P5" are also discussed.

  7. "Sustainable energy is critical to Canada's economic future." carleton.ca/sustainable-energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Jeff W.

    "Sustainable energy is critical to Canada's economic future." carleton.ca/sustainable-energy GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN SUSTAINABLE ENERGY SHAPE YOUR FUTURE BASED ON YOUR RESEARCH INTERESTS Sustaining programs in sustainable energy address these crucial challenges in a unique interdisciplinary fashion

  8. Critical Materials Workshop Agenda | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave theJuly 30,Crafty Gifts for the EnergyCreditSite

  9. 2011 Critical Materials Strategy | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCOSystems AnalysisVOLUME I A1/19/1015 Blog Postsofof1

  10. MUON ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BERG,S.J.

    2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the major motivations driving recent interest in FFAGs is their use for the cost-effective acceleration of muons. This paper summarizes the progress in this area that was achieved leading up to and at the FFAG workshop at KEK from July 7-12, 2003. Much of the relevant background and references are also given here, to give a context to the progress we have made.

  11. Quasi-free electron energy in near critical point helium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Findley, Gary L.

    Quasi-free electron energy in near critical point helium Yevgeniy Lushtak a,b , Samantha B, Monroe, LA 71209 Abstract We present for the first time the quasi-free electron energy V0() in helium from low density to the density of the triple point liquid (gaseous helium/liquid helium I

  12. R&D Proposal for the National Muon Acccelerator Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains a description of a multi-year national R&D program aimed at completing a Design Feasibility Study (DFS) for a Muon Collider and, with international participation, a Reference Design Report (RDR) for a muon-based Neutrino Factory. It also includes the supporting component development and experimental efforts that will inform the design studies and permit an initial down-selection of candidate technologies for the ionization cooling and acceleration systems. We intend to carry out this plan with participants from the host national laboratory (Fermilab), those from collaborating U.S. national laboratories (ANL, BNL, Jlab, LBNL, and SNAL), and those from a number of other U.S. laboratories, universities, and SBIR companies. The R&D program that we propose will provide the HEP community with detailed information on future facilities based on intense beams of muons - the Muon Collider and the Neutrino Factory. We believe that these facilities offer the promise of extraordinary physics capabilities. The Muon Collider presents a powerful option to explore the energy frontier and the Neutrino Factory gives the opportunity to perform the most sensitive neutrino oscillation experiments possible, while also opening expanded avenues for the study of new physics in the neutrino sector. The synergy between the two facilities presents the opportunity for an extremely broad physics program and a unique pathway in accelerator facilities. Our work will give clear answers to the questions of expected capabilities and performance of these muon-based facilities, and will provide defensible ranges for their cost. This information, together with the physics insights gained from the next-generation neutrino and LHC experiments, will allow the HEP community to make well-informed decisions regarding the optimal choice of new facilities. We believe that this work is a critical part of any broad strategic program in accelerator R&D and, as the P5 panel has recently indicated, is essential for the long-term health of high-energy physics.

  13. R&D PROPOSAL FOR THE NATIONAL MUON ACCELERATOR PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muon Accelerator Program; Zisman, Michael S.; Geer, Stephen

    2010-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains a description of a multi-year national R&D program aimed at completing a Design Feasibility Study (DFS) for a Muon Collider and, with international participation, a Reference Design Report (RDR) for a muon-based Neutrino Factory. It also includes the supporting component development and experimental efforts that will inform the design studies and permit an initial down-selection of candidate technologies for the ionization cooling and acceleration systems. We intend to carry out this plan with participants from the host national laboratory (Fermilab), those from collaborating U.S. national laboratories (ANL, BNL, Jlab, LBNL, and SNAL), and those from a number of other U.S. laboratories, universities, and SBIR companies. The R&D program that we propose will provide the HEP community with detailed information on future facilities based on intense beams of muons--the Muon Collider and the Neutrino Factory. We believe that these facilities offer the promise of extraordinary physics capabilities. The Muon Collider presents a powerful option to explore the energy frontier and the Neutrino Factory gives the opportunity to perform the most sensitive neutrino oscillation experiments possible, while also opening expanded avenues for the study of new physics in the neutrino sector. The synergy between the two facilities presents the opportunity for an extremely broad physics program and a unique pathway in accelerator facilities. Our work will give clear answers to the questions of expected capabilities and performance of these muon-based facilities, and will provide defensible ranges for their cost. This information, together with the physics insights gained from the next-generation neutrino and LHC experiments, will allow the HEP community to make well-informed decisions regarding the optimal choice of new facilities. We believe that this work is a critical part of any broad strategic program in accelerator R&D and, as the P5 panel has recently indicated, is essential for the long-term health of high-energy physics.

  14. Muon Collider Task Force Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ankenbrandt, C.; Alexahin, Y.; Balbekov, V.; Barzi, E.; Bhat, C.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Bross, A.; Burov, A.; Drozhdin, A.; Finley, D.; Geer, S.; /Fermilab /Argonne /Brookhaven /Jefferson Lab /LBL, Berkeley /MUONS Inc., Batavia /UCLA /UC, Riverside /Mississippi U.

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Muon Colliders offer a possible long term path to lepton-lepton collisions at center-of-mass energies {radical}s {ge} 1 TeV. In October 2006 the Muon Collider Task Force (MCTF) proposed a program of advanced accelerator R&D aimed at developing the Muon Collider concept. The proposed R&D program was motivated by progress on Muon Collider design in general, and in particular, by new ideas that have emerged on muon cooling channel design. The scope of the proposed MCTF R&D program includes muon collider design studies, helical cooling channel design and simulation, high temperature superconducting solenoid studies, an experimental program using beams to test cooling channel RF cavities and a 6D cooling demonstration channel. The first year of MCTF activities are summarized in this report together with a brief description of the anticipated FY08 R&D activities. In its first year the MCTF has made progress on (1) Muon Collider ring studies, (2) 6D cooling channel design and simulation studies with an emphasis on the HCC scheme, (3) beam preparations for the first HPRF cavity beam test, (4) preparations for an HCC four-coil test, (5) further development of the MANX experiment ideas and studies of the muon beam possibilities at Fermilab, (6) studies of how to integrate RF into an HCC in preparation for a component development program, and (7) HTS conductor and magnet studies to prepare for an evaluation of the prospects for of an HTS high-field solenoid build for a muon cooling channel.

  15. Constraints on the energy spectra of charged particles predicted in some model interactions of hadrons with help of the atmospheric muon flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dedenko, L G; Roganova, T M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been shown that muon flux intensities calculated in terms of the EPOS LHC and EPOS 1.99 models at the energy of 10^4 GeV exceed the data of the classical experiments L3+Cosmic, MACRO and LVD on the spectra of atmospheric muons by a factor of 1.9 and below these data at the same energy by a factor of 1.8 in case of the QGSJET II-03 model. It has been concluded that these tested models overestimate (underestimate in case of QGSJET II-03 model) the production of secondary particles with the highest energies in interactions of hadrons by a factor of ~1.5. The LHCf and TOTEM accelerator experiments show also this type of disagreements with these model predictions at highest energies of secondary particles.

  16. Global regularity of critical Schrödinger maps: subthreshold dispersed energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul Smith

    2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the energy-critical Schroedinger map initial value problem with smooth initial data from R^2 into the sphere S^2. Given sufficiently energy-dispersed data with subthreshold energy, we prove that the system admits a unique global smooth solution. This improves earlier analogous conditional results. The key behind this improvement lies in exploiting estimates on the commutator of the Schroedinger map and harmonic map heat flows.

  17. Geant4 simulation of the PSI LEM beam line: energy loss and muonium formation in thin foils and the impact of unmoderated muons on the $\\mu$SR spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khaw, Kim Siang; Crivelli, Paolo; Kirch, Klaus; Morenzoni, Elvezio; Salman, Zaher; Suter, Andreas; Prokscha, Thomas

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The PSI low-energy $\\mu$SR spectrometer is an instrument dedicated to muon spin rotation and relaxation measurements. Knowledge of the muon beam parameters such as spatial, kinetic energy and arrival-time distributions at the sample position are important ingredients to analyze the $\\mu$SR spectra. We present here the measured energy losses in the thin carbon foil of the muon start detector deduced from time-of-flight measurements. Muonium formation in the thin carbon foil (10 nm thickness) of the muon start detector also affect the measurable decay asymmetry and therefore need to be accounted for. Muonium formation and energy losses in the start detector, whose relevance increase with decreasing muon implantation energy ($<10$ keV), have been implemented in Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation to reproduce the measured time-of-flight spectra. Simulated and measured time-of-flight and beam spot agrees only if a small fraction of so called "unmoderated" muons which contaminate the mono-energetic muon beam of the $...

  18. Precision Muon Reconstruction in Double Chooz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Double Chooz collaboration; Y. Abe; J. C. dos Anjos; J. C. Barriere; E. Baussan; I. Bekman; M. Bergevin; T. J. C. Bezerra; L. Bezrukov; E. Blucher; C. Buck; J. Busenitz; A. Cabrera; E. Caden; L. Camilleri; R. Carr; M. Cerrada; P. -J. Chang; E. Chauveau; P. Chimenti; A. P. Collin; E. Conover; J. M. Conrad; J. I. Crespo-Anadón; K. Crum; A. Cucoanes; E. Damon; J. V. Dawson; D. Dietrich; Z. Djurcic; M. Dracos; M. Elnimr; A. Etenko; M. Fallot; F. von Feilitzsch; J. Felde; S. M. Fernandes; V. Fischer; D. Franco; M. Franke; H. Furuta; I. Gil-Botella; L. Giot; M. Göger-Neff; L. F. G. Gonzalez; L. Goodenough; M. C. Goodman; C. Grant; N. Haag; T. Hara; J. Haser; M. Hofmann; G. A. Horton-Smith; A. Hourlier; M. Ishitsuka; J. Jochum; C. Jollet; F. Kaether; L. N. Kalousis; Y. Kamyshkov; D. M. Kaplan; T. Kawasaki; E. Kemp; H. de Kerret; D. Kryn; M. Kuze; T. Lachenmaier; C. E. Lane; T. Lasserre; A. Letourneau; D. Lhuillier; H. P. Lima Jr; M. Lindner; J. M. López-Casta no; J. M. LoSecco; B. Lubsandorzhiev; S. Lucht; J. Maeda; C. Mariani; J. Maricic; J. Martino; T. Matsubara; G. Mention; A. Meregaglia; T. Miletic; R. Milincic; A. Minotti; Y. Nagasaka; Y. Nikitenko; P. Novella; M. Obolensky; L. Oberauer; A. Onillon; A. Osborn; C. Palomares; I. M. Pepe; S. Perasso; P. Pfahler; A. Porta; G. Pronost; J. Reichenbacher; B. Reinhold; M. Röhling; R. Roncin; S. Roth; B. Rybolt; Y. Sakamoto; R. Santorelli; A. C. Schilithz; S. Schönert; S. Schoppmann; M. H. Shaevitz; R. Sharankova; S. Shimojima; V. Sibille; V. Sinev; M. Skorokhvatov; E. Smith; J. Spitz; A. Stahl; I. Stancu; L. F. F. Stokes; M. Strait; A. Stüken; F. Suekane; S. Sukhotin; T. Sumiyoshi; Y. Sun; R. Svoboda; K. Terao; A. Tonazzo; H. H. Trinh Thi; G. Valdiviesso; N. Vassilopoulos; C. Veyssiere; M. Vivier; S. Wagner; H. Watanabe; C. Wiebusch; L. Winslow; M. Wurm; G. Yang; F. Yermia; V. Zimmer

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a muon track reconstruction algorithm for the reactor anti-neutrino experiment Double Chooz. The Double Chooz detector consists of two optically isolated volumes of liquid scintillator viewed by PMTs, and an Outer Veto above these made of crossed scintillator strips. Muons are reconstructed by their Outer Veto hit positions along with timing information from the other two detector volumes. All muons are fit under the hypothesis that they are through-going and ultrarelativistic. If the energy depositions suggest that the muon may have stopped, the reconstruction fits also for this hypothesis and chooses between the two via the relative goodness-of-fit. In the ideal case of a through-going muon intersecting the center of the detector, the resolution is ~40 mm in each transverse dimension. High quality muon reconstruction is an important tool for reducing the impact of the cosmogenic isotope background in Double Chooz.

  19. Magnets for Muon 6D Cooling Channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Rolland [Muons, Inc.; Flanagan, Gene [Muons, Inc.

    2014-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), an innovative technique for six-dimensional (6D) cooling of muon beams using a continuous absorber inside superconducting magnets, has shown considerable promise based on analytic and simulation studies. The implementation of this revolutionary method of muon cooling requires high field superconducting magnets that provide superimposed solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole fields. Novel magnet design concepts are required to provide HCC magnet systems with the desired fields for 6D muon beam cooling. New designs feature simple coil configurations that produce these complex fields with the required characteristics, where new high field conductor materials are particularly advantageous. The object of the program was to develop designs and construction methods for HCC magnets and design a magnet system for a 6D muon beam cooling channel. If successful the program would develop the magnet technologies needed to create bright muon beams for many applications ranging from scientific accelerators and storage rings to beams to study material properties and new sources of energy. Examples of these applications include energy frontier muon colliders, Higgs and neutrino factories, stopping muon beams for studies of rare fundamental interactions and muon catalyzed fusion, and muon sources for cargo screening for homeland security.

  20. SEARCH FOR HIGH-ENERGY MUON NEUTRINOS FROM THE 'NAKED-EYE' GRB 080319B WITH THE IceCube NEUTRINO TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbasi, R.; Aguilar, J. A.; Andeen, K.; Baker, M. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Abdou, Y. [Department of Subatomic and Radiation Physics, University of Gent, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Abu-Zayyad, T. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, River Falls, WI 54022 (United States); Adams, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Ahlers, M. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Auffenberg, J.; Becker, K.-H. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Bai, X. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Barwick, S. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Bay, R. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Alba, J. L. Bazo; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Berdermann, J. [DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen (Germany); Beattie, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Beatty, J. J. [Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bechet, S. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Science Faculty CP230, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Becker, J. K. [Department of Physics, TU Dortmund University, D-44221 Dortmund (Germany)], E-mail: kappes@icecube.wisc.edu (and others)

    2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a search with the IceCube detector for high-energy muon neutrinos from GRB 080319B, one of the brightest gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) ever observed. The fireball model predicts that a mean of 0.1 events should be detected by IceCube for a bulk Lorentz boost of the jet of 300. In both the direct on-time window of 66 s and an extended window of about 300 s around the GRB, no excess was found above background. The 90% CL upper limit on the number of track-like events from the GRB is 2.7, corresponding to a muon neutrino fluence limit of 9.5 x 10{sup -3} erg cm{sup -2} in the energy range between 120 TeV and 2.2 PeV, which contains 90% of the expected events.

  1. Muon Simulations for Super-Kamiokande, KamLAND and CHOOZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alfred Tang; Glenn Horton-Smith; Vitaly A. Kudryavtsev; Alessandra Tonazzo

    2006-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Muon backgrounds at Super-Kamiokande, KamLAND and CHOOZ are calculated using MUSIC. A modified version of the Gaisser sea level muon distribution and a well-tested Monte Carlo integration method are introduced. Average muon energy, flux and rate are tabulated. Plots of average energy and angular distributions are given. Implications on muon tracker design for future experiments are discussed.

  2. Muon capture at PSI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Winter

    2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Measuring the rate of muon capture in hydrogen provides one of the most direct ways to study the axial current of the nucleon. The MuCap experiment uses a negative muon beam stopped in a time projection chamber operated with ultra-pure hydrogen gas. Surrounded by a decay electron detector, the lifetime of muons in hydrogen can be measured to determine the singlet capture rate Lambda_s to a final precision of 1%. The capture rate determines the nucleon's pseudoscalar form factor g_p. A first result, g_p = 7.3 +- 1.1, has been published and the final analysis of the full statistics will reduce the error by a factor of up to 3. Muon capture on the deuteron probes the weak axial current in the two-nucleon system. Within the framework of effective field theories the calculation of such two-nucleon processes involving the axial current requires the knowledge of one additional low energy constant which can be extracted from the doublet capture rate Lambda_d. The same constant then allows to model-independently calculate related processes such as solar pp-fusion or neutrino-deuteron scattering. The MuSun experiment will deduce Lambda_d to better than 1.5%. The experiment uses the MuCap detection setup with a new time projection chamber operated with deuterium at 30K and several hardware upgrades. The system is currently fully commissioned and the main physics data taking will start in 2011.

  3. Free energy and criticality in the nucleon pair breaking process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Guttormsen; R. Chankova; M. Hjorth-Jensen; J. Rekstad; S. Siem; A. Schiller; D. J. Dean

    2003-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental level densities for 171,172Yb, 166,167Er, 161,162Dy, and 148,149Sm are analyzed within the microcanonical ensemble. In the even isotopes at excitation energies E energy F signals the transition from zero to two quasiparticles. For E > 2 MeV, the odd and even isotopes reveal a surprisingly constant F at a critical temperature Tc of appr. 0.5 MeV, indicating the continuous melting of nucleon Cooper pairs as function of excitation energy.

  4. Semi-classical Analysis of Spin Systems near Critical Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedro Ribeiro; Thierry Paul

    2008-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectral properties of $su(2)$ Hamiltonians are studied for energies near the critical classical energy $\\epsilon_c$ for which the corresponding classical dynamics presents hyperbolic points (HP). A general method leading to an algebraic relation for eigenvalues in the vicinity of $\\epsilon_c$ is obtained in the thermodynamic limit, when the semi-classical parameter $n^{-1}=(2s)^{-1}$ goes to zero (where $s$ is the total spin of the system). Two applications of this method are given and compared with numerics. Matrix elements of observables, computed between states with energy near $\\epsilon_c$, are also computed and shown to be in agreement with the numerical results.

  5. Progress in Absorber R&D for Muon Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. M. Kaplan; E. L. Black; M. Boghosian; K. W. Cassel; R. P. Johnson; S. Geer; C. J. Johnstone; M. Popovic; S. Ishimoto; K. Yoshimura; L. Bandura; M. A. Cummings; A. Dyshkant; D. Hedin; D. Kubik; C. Darve; Y. Kuno; D. Errede; M. Haney; S. Majewski; M. Reep; D. Summers

    2001-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A stored-muon-beam neutrino factory may require transverse ionization cooling of the muon beam. We describe recent progress in research and development on energy absorbers for muon-beam cooling carried out by a collaboration of university and laboratory groups.

  6. U.S. Department of Energy Critical Materials Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, D.; Diamond, D.; Li, J.; Sandalow, D.; Telleen, P.; Wanner, B.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the role of rare earth metals and other materials in the clean energy economy. It was prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) based on data collected and research performed during 2010. Its main conclusions include: (a) Several clean energy technologies -- including wind turbines, electric vehicles, photovoltaic cells and fluorescent lighting -- use materials at risk of supply disruptions in the short term. Those risks will generally decrease in the medium and long term. (b) Clean energy technologies currently constitute about 20 percent of global consumption of critical materials. As clean energy technologies are deployed more widely in the decades ahead, their share of global consumption of critical materials will likely grow. (c) Of the materials analyzed, five rare earth metals (dysprosium, neodymium, terbium, europium and yttrium), as well as indium, are assessed as most critical in the short term. For this purpose, 'criticality' is a measure that combines importance to the clean energy economy and risk of supply disruption. (d) Sound policies and strategic investments can reduce the risk of supply disruptions, especially in the medium and long term. (e) Data with respect to many of the issues considered in this report are sparse. In the report, DOE describes plans to (i) develop its first integrated research agenda addressing critical materials, building on three technical workshops convened by the Department during November and December 2010; (ii) strengthen its capacity for information-gathering on this topic; and (iii) work closely with international partners, including Japan and Europe, to reduce vulnerability to supply disruptions and address critical material needs. DOE will work with other stakeholders -- including interagency colleagues, Congress and the public -- to shape policy tools that strengthen the United States' strategic capabilities. DOE also announces its plan to develop an updated critical materials strategy, based upon additional events and information, by the end of 2011.DOE's strategy with respect to critical materials rests on three pillars. First, diversified global supply chains are essential. To manage supply risk, multiple sources of materials are required. This means taking steps to facilitate extraction, processing and manufacturing here in the United States, as well as encouraging other nations to expedite alternative supplies. In all cases, extraction and processing should be done in an environmentally sound manner. Second, substitutes must be developed. Research leading to material and technology substitutes will improve flexibility and help meet the material needs of the clean energy economy. Third, recycling, reuse and more efficient use could significantly lower world demand for newly extracted materials. Research into recycling processes coupled with well-designed policies will help make recycling economically viable over time.The scope of this report is limited. It does not address the material needs of the entire economy, the entire energy sector or even all clean energy technologies. Time and resource limitations precluded a comprehensive scope. Among the topics that merit additional research are the use of rare earth metals in catalytic converters and in petroleum refining. These topics are discussed briefly in Chapter 2.

  7. Calibration of Muon Reconstruction Algorithms Using an External Muon Tracking System at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SNO Collaboration

    2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    To help constrain the algorithms used in reconstructing high-energy muon events incident on the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO), a muon tracking system was installed. The system consisted of four planes of wire chambers, which were triggered by scintillator panels. The system was integrated with SNO's main data acquisition system and took data for a total of 95 live days. Using cosmic-ray events reconstructed in both the wire chambers and in SNO's water Cherenkov detector, the external muon tracking system was able to constrain the uncertainty on the muon direction to better than 0.6 degrees.

  8. Energy Department Announces Launch of Energy Innovation Hub for Critical

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandard | DepartmentDepartment ofDepartment

  9. Energy Department Announces Launch of Energy Innovation Hub for Critical

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian NuclearandJunetrackEllen O'Kane Tauscher

  10. Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesvilleAbout » Contact Us ContactPracticesWinter (Part

  11. FAQS Job Task Analyses - Criticality Safety | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010Salt |ExelonFAQ: RelocationCriticality Safety FAQS Job Task

  12. Study of upward-going muons in Super-Kamiokande Doctral Program in Fundamental Science and Energy Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokyo, University of

    Study of upward-going muons in Super-Kamiokande Choji Saji Doctral Program in Fundamental Science.Miyata. They always encouraged and supported me. I acknowledge Prof. Y.Totsuka, spokesman of the Super-Kamiokande.Matsuno, Dr. A.L.Stachyra and Mr. D.Shantanu. I would like to thank all the Super-Kamiokande collaborators

  13. SNM detection by active muon interrogation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason, Andrew J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miyadera, Haruo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turchi, Peter J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Muons are charged particles with mass between the electron and proton and can be produced indirectly through pion decay by interaction of a charged-particle beam with a target. There are several distinct features of the muon interaction with matter attractive as a probe for detection of SNM at moderate ranges. These include muon penetration of virtually any amount of material without significant nuclear interaction until stopped by ionization loss in a short distance. When stopped, high-energy penetrating x-rays (in the range of 6 MeV for uranium,) unique to isotopic composition are emitted in the capture process. The subsequent interaction with the nucleus produces additional radiation useful in assessing SNM presence. A focused muon beam can be transported through the atmosphere, at a range limited mainly by beam-size growth through scattering. A muonbeam intensity of > 10{sup 9} /second is required for efficient interrogation and, as in any other technique, dose limits are to be respected. To produce sufficient muons a high-energy (threshold {approx}140 MeV) high-intensity (<1 mA) proton or electron beam is needed implying the use of a linear accelerator to bombard a refractory target. The muon yield is fractionally small, with large angle and energy dispersion, so that efficient collection is necessary in all dimensions of phase space. To accomplish this Los Alamos has proposed a magnetic collection system followed by a unique linear accelerator that provides the requisite phase-space bunching and allows an energy sweep to successively stop muons throughout a large structure such as a sea-going vessel. A possible maritime application would entail fitting the high-gradient accelerators on a large ship with a helicopter-borne detection system. We will describe our experimental results for muon effects and particle collection along with our current design and program for a muon detection system.

  14. atmospheric muon generator: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and energy spectrum are simulated according to a specific model of primary cosmic ray flux, with constraints from measurements of the muon flux with underground experiments. As...

  15. Study of Dispersion of Mass Distribution of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays using a Surface Array of Muon and Electromagnetic Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vícha, Jakub; Nosek, Dalibor; Ebr, Jan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a hypothetical observatory of ultra-high energy cosmic rays consisting of two surface detector arrays that measure independently electromagnetic and muon signals induced by air showers. Using the constant intensity cut method, sets of events ordered according to each of both signal sizes are compared giving the number of matched events. Based on its dependence on the zenith angle, a parameter sensitive to the dispersion of the distribution of the logarithmic mass of cosmic rays is introduced. The results obtained using two post-LHC models of hadronic interactions are very similar and indicate a weak dependence on details of these interactions.

  16. Hot-and-Cold: Using Criticality in the Design of Energy-Efficient Caches Rajeev Balasubramonian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dwarkadas, Sandhya

    Hot-and-Cold: Using Criticality in the Design of Energy-Efficient Caches Rajeev Balasubramonian is designed to be highly energy-efficient (consuming 20% of the dynamic and leakage energy of the hot cache not in the critical path are serviced by a lower energy (and lower performance (cold)) cache bank. The resulting

  17. Guidelines for Preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations at Department of Energy Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This standard provides a framework for generating Criticality Safety Evaluations (CSE) supporting fissionable material operations at Department of Energy (DOE) nonreactor nuclear facilities. This standard imposes no new criticality safety analysis requirements.

  18. Rare muon processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, M.D.; The MEGA Collaboration

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The status of rare muon processes as tests of the standard model is reviewed with the emphasis on results that are expected from experiments in the near future.

  19. Rare muon processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, M.D.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The status of rare muon processes as tests of the standard model is reviewed with the emphasis on results that are expected from experiments in the near future.

  20. Economics in Criticality and Restoration of Energy Infrastructures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, Gale A.; Flaim, Silvio J.; Folga, Stephen M.; Gotham, Douglas J.; McLamore, Michael R.; Novak, Mary H.; Roop, Joe M.; Rossmann, Charles G.; Shamsuddin, Shabbir A.; Zeichner, Lee M.; Stamber, Kevin L.

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Economists, systems analysts, engineers, regulatory specialists, and other experts were assembled from academia, the national laboratories, and the energy industry to discuss present restoration practices (many have already been defined to the level of operational protocols) in the sectors of the energy infrastructure as well as other infrastructures, to identify whether economics, a discipline concerned with the allocation of scarce resources, is explicitly or implicitly a part of restoration strategies, and if there are novel economic techniques and solution methods that could be used help encourage the restoration of energy services more quickly than present practices or to restore service more efficiently from an economic perspective. AcknowledgementsDevelopment of this work into a coherent product with a useful message has occurred thanks to the thoughtful support of several individuals:Kenneth Friedman, Department of Energy, Office of Energy Assurance, provided the impetus for the work, as well as several suggestions and reminders of direction along the way. Funding from DOE/OEA was critical to the completion of this effort.Arnold Baker, Chief Economist, Sandia National Laboratories, and James Peerenboom, Director, Infrastructure Assurance Center, Argonne National Laboratory, provided valuable contacts that helped to populate the authoring team with the proper mix of economists, engineers, and systems and regulatory specialists to meet the objectives of the work.Several individuals provided valuable review of the document at various stages of completion, and provided suggestions that were valuable to the editing process. This list of reviewers includes Jeffrey Roark, Economist, Tennessee Valley Authority; James R. Dalrymple, Manager of Transmission System Services and Transmission/Power Supply, Tennessee Valley Authority; William Mampre, Vice President, EN Engineering; Kevin Degenstein, EN Engineering; and Patrick Wilgang, Department of Energy, Office of Energy Assurance.With many authors, creating a document with a single voice is a difficult task. Louise Maffitt, Senior Research Associate, Institute for Engineering Research and Applications at New Mexico Institute of Mining & Technology (on contract to Sandia National Laboratories) served a vital role in the development of this document by taking the unedited material (in structured format) and refining the basic language so as to make the flow of the document as close to a single voice as one could hope for. Louise's work made the job of reducing the content to a readable length an easier process. Additional editorial suggestions from the authors themselves, particularly from Sam Flaim, Steve Folga, and Doug Gotham, expedited this process.

  1. IUPAC critical evaluation of the rotationalvibrational spectra of water vapor, Part III: Energy levels and transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chance, Kelly

    rotational­ vibrational line positions, transition intensities, and energy levels, with associated critically. These transitions give rise to 18 486 validated energy levels, of which 10 446 and 8040 belong to o-H2 16 O and p-H2IUPAC critical evaluation of the rotational­vibrational spectra of water vapor, Part III: Energy

  2. The energy of the quasi-free electron in near critical point nitrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Findley, Gary L.

    The energy of the quasi-free electron in near critical point nitrogen Yevgeniy Lushtak a,b , C the density dependent quasi-free electron energy V0() in the strongly absorbing gas N2 for the first time. V0-Seitz model, repulsive fluids, quasi-free electron energy, critical point effects PACS: 79.60.-i, 34.80.-i, 82

  3. Muons and Neutrinos 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser

    2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is the written version of the rapporteur talk on Section HE-2, muons and neutrinos, presented at the 30th International Cosmic Ray Conference, Merida, Yucatan, July 11, 2007. Topics include atmospheric muons and neutrinos, solar neutrinos and astrophysical neutrinos as well as calculations and instrumentation related to these topics.

  4. Precision Muon Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorringe, T P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The muon is playing a unique role in sub-atomic physics. Studies of muon decay both determine the overall strength and establish the chiral structure of weak interactions, as well as setting extraordinary limits on charged-lepton-flavor-violating processes. Measurements of the muon's anomalous magnetic moment offer singular sensitivity to the completeness of the standard model and the predictions of many speculative theories. Spectroscopy of muonium and muonic atoms gives unmatched determinations of fundamental quantities including the magnetic moment ratio $\\mu_\\mu / \\mu_p$, lepton mass ratio $m_{\\mu} / m_e$, and proton charge radius $r_p$. Also, muon capture experiments are exploring elusive features of weak interactions involving nucleons and nuclei. We will review the experimental landscape of contemporary high-precision and high-sensitivity experiments with muons. One focus is the novel methods and ingenious techniques that achieve such precision and sensitivity in recent, present, and planned experiment...

  5. Development of a Portable Muon Witness System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Kouzes, Richard T.; Orrell, John L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since understanding and quantifying cosmic ray induced radioactive backgrounds in copper and germanium are important to the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, methods are needed for monitoring the levels of such backgrounds produced in materials being transported and processed for the experiment. This report focuses on work conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to develop a muon witness system as a one way of monitoring induced activities. The operational goal of this apparatus is to characterize cosmic ray exposure of materials. The cosmic ray flux at the Earth’s surface is composed of several types of particles, including neutrons, muons, gamma rays and protons. These particles induce nuclear reactions, generating isotopes that contribute to the radiological background. Underground, the main mechanism of activation is by muon produced spallation neutrons since the hadron component of cosmic rays is removed at depths greater than a few tens of meters. This is a sub-dominant contributor above ground, but muons become predominant in underground experiments. For low-background experiments cosmogenic production of certain isotopes, such as 68Ge and 60Co, must be accounted for in the background budgets. Muons act as minimum ionizing particles, depositing a fixed amount of energy per unit length in a material, and have a very high penetrating power. Using muon flux measurements as a “witness” for the hadron flux, the cosmogenic induced activity can be quantified by correlating the measured muon flux and known hadronic production rates. A publicly available coincident muon cosmic ray detector design, the Berkeley Lab Cosmic Ray Detector (BLCRD), assembled by Juniata College, is evaluated in this work. The performance of the prototype is characterized by assessing its muon flux measurements. This evaluation is done by comparing data taken in identical scenarios with other cosmic ray telescopes. The prototype is made of two plastic scintillator paddles with associated electronics to measure energy depositions in coincidence in the two paddles. For this particular application of the prototype, the measurements performed concentrated on a broad investigation of the dependence of the muon flux on depth underground. These tests were conducted inside at Building 3420/1307 and underground at Building 3425 at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The second half of this report analyzes modifications to the electronics of the BLCRD to make this detector portable. Among other modifications, a battery powered version of these electronics is proposed for the final Muon Witness design.

  6. Fermilab | Science | Particle Physics | Muons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHall A ThisFermilab'sSpace andFermilabMuons

  7. Measurement of cosmic muon charge ratio with the Large Volume Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Yu. Agafonova; M. Aglietta; P. Antonioli; G. Bari; R. Bertoni; V. V. Boyarkin; E. Bressan; G. Bruno; V. L. Dadykin; E. A. Dobrynina; R. I. Enikeev; W. Fulgione; P. Galeotti; M. Garbini; P. L. Ghia; P. Giusti; E. Kemp; A. S. Malgin; B. Miguez; A. Molinario; R. Persiani; I. A. Pless; V. G. Ryasny; O. G. Ryazhskaya; O. Saavedra; G. Sartorelli; M. Selvi; G. C. Trinchero; C. Vigorito; V. F. Yakushev; A. Zichichi

    2015-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The charge ratio ${k \\equiv \\mu^+/\\mu^-}$ for atmospheric muons has been measured using Large Volume Detector (LVD) in the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory, Italy (minimal depth is 3000 m w.e.). To reach this depth muons should have the energy at the sea level greater than 1.3 TeV. The muon charge ratio was defined using the number of the decays of stopping positive muons in the LVD iron structure and the decays of positive and negative muons in scintillator. We have obtained the value of the muon charge ratio ${k}$ ${= 1.26 \\pm 0.04(stat) \\pm 0.11(sys)}$.

  8. Underground Muons in Super-KAMIOKANDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration; presented by J. G. Learned

    1997-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The largest underground neutrino observatory, Super-Kamiokande, located near Kamioka, Japan has been collecting data since April 1996. It is located at a depth of roughly 2.7 kmwe in a zinc mine under a mountain, and has an effective area for detecting entering-stopping and through-going muons of about $1238 m^2$ for muons of $>1.7 GeV$. These events are collected at a rate of 1.5 per day from the lower hemisphere of arrival directions, with 2.5 muons per second in the downgoing direction. We report preliminary results from 229 live days analyzed so far with respect to zenith angle variation of the upcoming muons. These results do not yet have enough statistical weight to discriminate between the favored hypothesis for muon neutrino oscillations and no-oscillations. We report on the search for astrophysical sources of neutrinos and high energy neutrino fluxes from the sun and earth center, as might arise from WIMP annihilations. None are found. We also present a topographical map of the overburden made from the downgoing muons. The detector is performing well, and with several years of data we should be able to make significant progress in this area.

  9. ATLAS Muon Detector Commissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Diehl; for the ATLAS muon collaboration

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS muon spectrometer consists of several major components: Monitored Drift Tubes (MDTs) for precision measurements in the bending plane of the muons, supplemented by Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) in the high eta region; Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) and Thin Gap Chambers (TGCs) for trigger and second coordinate measurement in the barrel and endcap regions, respectively; an optical alignment system to track the relative positions of all chambers; and, finally, the world's largest air-core magnetic toroid system. We will describe the status and commissioning of the muon system with cosmic rays and plans for commissioning with early beams.

  10. GLOBAL WELL-POSEDNESS AND SCATTERING FOR DEFOCUSING ENERGY-CRITICAL NLS IN THE EXTERIOR OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Hart F.

    GLOBAL WELL-POSEDNESS AND SCATTERING FOR DEFOCUSING ENERGY-CRITICAL NLS IN THE EXTERIOR OF BALLS-critical NLS in the exterior of the unit ball in three dimensions. For the initial value problem with Dirichlet in the Sobolev space H1 0 . We also point out that the same strategy can be used to treat the energy

  11. Participation in Muon Collider/Neutrino Factory Research and Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torun, Yagmur

    2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Muon accelerators hold great promise for the future of high energy physics and their construction can be staged to support a broad physics program. Great progress was made over the past decade toward developing the technology for muon beam cooling which is one of the main challenges for building such facilities.

  12. THE POTENTIAL FOR NEUTRINO PHYSICS AT MUON COLLIDERS AND DEDICATED HIGH CURRENT MUON STORAGE RINGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BIGI,I.; BOLTON,T.; FORMAGGIO,J.; HARRIS,D.; MORFIN,J.; SPENTZOURIS,P.; YU,J.; KAYSER,B.; KING,B.J.; MCFARLAND,K.; PETROV,A.; SCHELLMAN,H.; VELASCO,M.; SHROCK,R.

    2000-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Conceptual design studies are underway for both muon colliders and high-current non-colliding muon storage rings that have the potential to become the first true neutrino factories. Muon decays in long straight sections of the storage rings would produce uniquely intense and precisely characterized two-component neutrino beams--muon neutrinos plus electron antineutrinos from negative muon decays and electron neutrinos plus muon antineutrinos from positive muons. This article presents a long-term overview of the prospects for these facilities to greatly extend the capabilities for accelerator-based neutrino physics studies for both high rate and long baseline neutrino experiments. As the first major physics topic, recent experimental results involving neutrino oscillations have motivated a vigorous design effort towards dedicated neutrino factories that would store muon beams of energies 50 GeV or below. These facilities hold the promise of neutrino oscillation experiments with baselines up to intercontinental distances and utilizing well understood beams that contain, for the first time, a substantial component of multi-GeV electron-flavored neutrinos. In deference to the active and fast-moving nature of neutrino oscillation studies, the discussion of long baseline physics at neutrino factories has been limited to a concise general overview of the relevant theory, detector technologies, beam properties, experimental goals and potential physics capabilities. The remainder of the article is devoted to the complementary high rate neutrino experiments that would study neutrino-nucleon and neutrino-electron scattering and would be performed at high performance detectors placed as close as is practical to the neutrino production straight section of muon storage rings in order to exploit beams with transverse dimensions as small as a few tens of centimeters.

  13. A parameterisation of single and multiple muons in the deep water or ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annarita Margiotta

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new parameterisation of atmospheric muons deep underwater (or ice) is presented. It takes into account the simultaneous arrival of muons in bundle giving the multiplicity of the events and the muon energy spectrum as a function of their lateral distribution in a shower.

  14. The LHCb Muon System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lenzi, Michela

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to provide fast muon triggering and efficient offline muon identification is an essential feature of the LHCb experiment. The muon detector is required to have a high efficiency over a large area and an appropriate time resolution to identify the bunch crossing for level–0 triggers. The LHCb muon detector consists of five stations equipped with 1368 Multi Wire Proportional Chambers and 12 Gas Electron Multiplier chambers. The technical design of the chambers is briefly presented and the Quality Control procedures during the various construction steps are described. The method developed for gas gain uniformity measurement is also described together with the results on efficiency of detectors fully equipped with the front–end electronics, obtained from tests with cosmic rays.

  15. Advanced Critical Advanced Energy Retrofit Education and Training...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    project fields (including energy auditors, building operators, energy managers, and commissioning authorities), this project addresses the need for clearly defined competencies in...

  16. Recent progress in neutrino factory and muon collider research within the Muon Collaboration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. M. Alsharoa; Charles M. Ankenbrandt; Muzaffer Atac; Bruno R. Autin; Valeri I. Balbekov; Vernon D. Barger; Odette Benary; J. Bennett; Michael S. Berger; J. Scott Berg; Martin Berz; Edgar Black; Alain Blondel; S. Alex Bogacz; M. Bonesini; Stephen B. Bracker; Alan D. Bross; Luca Bruno; Elizabeth J. Buckley-Geer; Allen Caldwell; Mario Campanelli; Kevin W. Cassel; Swapan Chattopadhyay; Weiren Chou; David B. Cline; Linda R. Coney; Janet M. Conrad; John N. Corlett; Lucien Cremaldi; Mary Anne Cummings; Christine Darve; Fritz DeJongh; et. al.

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the status of our effort to realize a first neutrino factory and the progress made in understanding the problems associated with the collection and cooling of muons towards that end. We summarize the physics that can be done with neutrino factories as well as with intense cold beams of muons. The physics potential of muon colliders is reviewed, both as Higgs Factories and compact high energy lepton colliders. The status and timescale of our research and development effort is reviewed as well as the latest designs in cooling channels including the promise of ring coolers in achieving longitudinal and transverse cooling simultaneously. We detail the efforts being made to mount an international cooling experiment to demonstrate the ionization cooling of muons.

  17. Mixed-Criticality Multiprocessor Real-Time Systems: Energy Consumption vs Deadline Misses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Mixed-Criticality Multiprocessor Real-Time Systems: Energy Consumption vs Deadline Misses Vincent that using the best compromise, the energy consumption can be reduced up to 17% while the percentage the energy consumption of MC systems. The energy consumption of embedded real-time systems is indeed

  18. CRITICAL MINERALS AND EMERGING ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES Statement of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    quantities. The most prominent examples are gallium, indium and tellurium in photovoltaic solar cells in Science and Technology. Finally, I briefly describe the activities of a panel on which I serve now, organized under the auspices of the American Physical Society. This panel's work focuses on critical

  19. Zero Energy Buildings: A Critical Look at the Definition; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torcellini, P.; Pless, S.; Deru, M.; Crawley, D.

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A net zero-energy building (ZEB) is a residential or commercial building with greatly reduced energy needs through efficiency gains such that the balance of energy needs can be supplied with renewable technologies. Despite the excitement over the phrase ''zero energy'', we lack a common definition, or even a common understanding, of what it means. In this paper, we use a sample of current generation low-energy buildings to explore the concept of zero energy: what it means, why a clear and measurable definition is needed, and how we have progressed toward the ZEB goal.

  20. Type II Blow Up for the Four Dimensional Energy Critical Semi Linear Heat Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rémi, Schweyer

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the energy critical four dimensional semi linear heat equation \\partial tu-\\Deltau-u3 = 0. We show the existence of type II finite time blow up solutions and give a sharp description of the corresponding singularity formation. These solutions concentrate a universal bubble of energy in the critical topology u(t,r)-1/{\\lambda} Q(r/{\\lambda})\\rightarrow u* in $\\dot{H}^1$ where the blow up profile is given by the Talenti Aubin soliton Q(r)= 1/(1 +r^2/8) and with speed {\\lambda}(t) ~(T-t)/|log(T - t)|^2 as t\\rightarrowT. Our approach uses a robust energy method approach developped for the study of geometrical dispersive problems, and lies in the continuation of the study of the energy critical harmonic heat flow and the energy critical four dimensional wave equation.

  1. Study of high pressure gas filled RF cavities for muon collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yonehara, Katsuya

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Muon collider is a considerable candidate of the next-generation high-energy lepton collider machine. Operating an RF cavity in a multi-Tesla magnet is a critical requirement in a muon accelerator and a cooling channel. However, the maximum RF gradient in a vacuum RF cavity is strongly limited by an external magnetic field. Dense hydrogen gas filled RF cavity has been proposed since it is functional of generating a high RF accelerating gradient in a strong magnetic field and making an ionization cooling process at the same time. A critical issue of the cavity is a beam- induced plasma that consumes a considerable amount of RF power. The gas filled RF test cell was made and measured the RF loading due to a beam-induced plasma by using an intense proton beam at Fermilab. By doping an electronegative gas in dense hydrogen, the plasma loading effect is significantly mitigated. The result shows that the cavity is functional with a muon collider beam. Recent progress is shown in this presentation.

  2. The Department of Energy Releases Strategy on Critical Materials |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015 - JanuaryTank 48H TreatmentEnergyEnergy NationalDepartment

  3. On the critical flame radius and minimum ignition energy for spherical flame initiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ju, Yiguang

    , methane, and propane). The emphasis is placed on investigating the critical flame radius controlling to the cube of the critical flame radius. Furthermore, preferential diffusion of heat and mass (i.e. the Lewis igni- tion energy. Ã? 2010 The Combustion Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved

  4. Electrons from Muon Decay in Bound State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rashid M. Djilkibaev; Rostislav V. Konoplich

    2009-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results of a study of the muon decay in orbit (DIO) contribution to the signal region of muon - electron conversion. Electrons from DIO are the dominant source of background for muon - electron conversion experiments because the endpoint of DIO electrons is the same as the energy of electrons from elastic muon - electron conversion. The probability of DIO contribution to the signal region was considered for a tracker with Gaussian resolution function and with a realistic resolution function obtained in the application of pattern recognition and momentum reconstruction Kalman filter based procedure to GEANT simulated DIO events. It is found that the existence of non Gaussian tails in the realistic resolution function does not lead to a significant increase in DIO contribution to the signal region. The probability of DIO contribution to the calorimeter signal was studied in dependence on the resolution, assuming a Gaussian resolution function of calorimeter. In this study the geometrical acceptance played an important role, suppressing DIO contribution of the intermediate range electrons from muon decay in orbit.

  5. Precision Muon Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. P. Gorringe; D. W. Hertzog

    2015-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The muon is playing a unique role in sub-atomic physics. Studies of muon decay both determine the overall strength and establish the chiral structure of weak interactions, as well as setting extraordinary limits on charged-lepton-flavor-violating processes. Measurements of the muon's anomalous magnetic moment offer singular sensitivity to the completeness of the standard model and the predictions of many speculative theories. Spectroscopy of muonium and muonic atoms gives unmatched determinations of fundamental quantities including the magnetic moment ratio $\\mu_\\mu / \\mu_p$, lepton mass ratio $m_{\\mu} / m_e$, and proton charge radius $r_p$. Also, muon capture experiments are exploring elusive features of weak interactions involving nucleons and nuclei. We will review the experimental landscape of contemporary high-precision and high-sensitivity experiments with muons. One focus is the novel methods and ingenious techniques that achieve such precision and sensitivity in recent, present, and planned experiments. Another focus is the uncommonly broad and topical range of questions in atomic, nuclear and particle physics that such experiments explore.

  6. Complete Muon Cooling Channel Design and Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuffer, D.V.; /Fermilab; Ankenbrandt, C.M.; Johnson, R.P.; Yoshikawa, C.Y.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia; Derbenev, Y.S.; Morozov, V.S.; /Jefferson Lab

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Considerable progress has been made in developing promising subsystems for muon beam cooling channels to provide the extraordinary reduction of emittances required for an energy-frontier muon collider. However, it has not yet been demonstrated that the various proposed cooling subsystems can be consolidated into an integrated end-to-end design. Presented here are concepts to address the matching of transverse emittances between subsystems through an extension of the theoretical framework of the Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), which allows a general analytical approach to guide the transition from one set of cooling channel parameters to another.

  7. Complete Muon Cooling Channel Design and Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Y. Yoshikawa, C.M. Ankenbrandt, R.P. Johnson, Y.S. Derbenev, V.S. Morozov, D.V. Neuffer, K. Yonehara

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Considerable progress has been made in developing promising subsystems for muon beam cooling channels to provide the extraordinary reduction of emittances required for an energy-frontier muon collider. However, it has not yet been demonstrated that the various proposed cooling subsystems can be consolidated into an integrated end-to-end design. Presented here are concepts to address the matching of transverse emittances between subsystems through an extension of the theoretical framework of the Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), which allows a general analytical approach to guide the transition from one set of cooling channel parameters to another.

  8. Stochastic Cooling in Muon Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barletta, W.A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research Division Stochastic Cooling in Muon Colliders W.A.AC03-76SFOOO98. STOCHASTIC COOLING IN MUON COLLIDERS Williamcan consider the stochastic cooling option as more than a

  9. Muon Reconstruction and Identification in CMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everett, A. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, 47906 (United States)

    2010-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the design strategies and status of the CMS muon reconstruction and identification identification software. Muon reconstruction and identification is accomplished through a variety of complementary algorithms. The CMS muon reconstruction software is based on a Kalman filter technique and reconstructs muons in the standalone muon system, using information from all three types of muon detectors, and links the resulting muon tracks with tracks reconstructed in the silicon tracker. In addition, a muon identification algorithm has been developed which tries to identify muons with high efficiency while maintaining a low probability of misidentification. The muon identification algorithm is complementary by design to the muon reconstruction algorithm that starts track reconstruction in the muon detectors. The identification algorithm accepts reconstructed tracks from the inner tracker and attempts to quantify the muon compatibility for each track using associated calorimeter and muon detector hit information. The performance status is based on detailed detector simulations as well as initial studies using cosmic muon data.

  10. On the critical flame radius and minimum ignition energy for spherical flame initiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Zheng; Burke, M. P.; Ju, Yiguang

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spherical flame initiation from an ignition kernel is studied theoretically and numerically using different fuel/oxygen/helium/argon mixtures (fuel: hydrogen, methane, and propane). The emphasis is placed on investigating the critical flame radius controlling spherical flame initiation and its correlation with the minimum ignition energy. It is found that the critical flame radius is different from the flame thickness and the flame ball radius and that their relationship depends strongly on the Lewis number. Three different flame regimes in terms of the Lewis number are observed and a new criterion for the critical flame radius is introduced. For mixtures with Lewis number larger than a critical Lewis number above unity, the critical flame radius is smaller than the flame ball radius but larger than the flame thickness. As a result, the minimum ignition energy can be substantially over-predicted (under-predicted) based on the flame ball radius (the flame thickness). The results also show that the minimum ignition energy for successful spherical flame initiation is proportional to the cube of the critical flame radius. Furthermore, preferential diffusion of heat and mass (i.e. the Lewis number effect) is found to play an important role in both spherical flame initiation and flame kernel evolution after ignition. It is shown that the critical flame radius and the minimum ignition energy increase significantly with the Lewis number. Therefore, for transportation fuels with large Lewis numbers, blending of small molecule fuels or thermal and catalytic cracking will significantly reduce the minimum ignition energy.

  11. Muon Cooling Channels Eberhard Keil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keil, Eberhard

    Muon Cooling Channels Eberhard Keil Katharinenstr. 17, DE-10711 Berlin, Germany Abstract Parameters of muon cooling channels are discussed that achieve cooling of a muon beam from initial to final emittances in all three degrees of freedom in a given length. Published theories of ionisation cooling yield

  12. Critical_Materials_Summary.pdf | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1.SpaceFluorControlsEnergy

  13. V-003: Suse Update For Mozillafirefox - Critical | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group current C3EDepartment of EnergyThe following presentationsExecuteSUSE

  14. U.S. Department of Energy - Critical Materials Strategy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  15. President's 2014 Budget Proposes Critical Investments in Clean Energy |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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  16. Quality Assurance for Critical Decision Reviews RM | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010In addition to analysis3EnergyThe purpose of

  17. Areas of Critical Environmental Concern | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: Energy Resources JumpAnaconda,AnzaArcade, California:complete?

  18. Energy Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy Chinaof EnergyImpactOn July 2, 2014 inJohn Schuelerutility cost, hours

  19. Department of Energy Releases its 2011 Critical Materials Strategy |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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  20. CHP: Enabling Resilient Energy Infrastructure for Critical Facilities -

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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  1. Energy Department Releases New Critical Materials Strategy | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010 SNF &DepartmentEnergyEfficiency |Framework

  2. FAQS Reference Guide - Criticality Safety (NNSA) | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010Salt |ExelonFAQ:DepartmentDepartment ofEnergy

  3. FAQS Reference Guide - Criticality Safety | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010Salt |ExelonFAQ:DepartmentDepartment ofEnergySafety

  4. Fuel Cells for Critical Communications Backup Power | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdfTechnologies Program (FCTP)Overviewgreen h y d r o g eforCells

  5. Nuclear Criticality Safety Guide for Fire Protection | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartment of Energy NorthB O|Work ForceNovemberof

  6. Increasing Access to Materials Critical to the Clean Energy Economy |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732on Armed ServicesDepartment ofEnergy the Way We|Department

  7. The Department of Energy's Critical Materials Strategy | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative JC3 RSS SeptemberRenewable Energy, U.S. DepartmentTechnologyEnergy The Department

  8. Title 50 CFR 226 Designated Critical Habitat | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThePty LtdOpenHabitat Jump to: navigation,

  9. What is the Energy Innovation Hub for Critical Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhat is a “Shut-down” in the SynchrotronNews,What is

  10. Testing Subgroup Workshop on Critical Property Needs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic| DepartmentDepartment ofTankTest Site SwedenEnergyTesting Subgroup

  11. Zero Energy Buildings: A Critical Look at the Definition; Preprint

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhatY-12 recognizedThesisZero-KnowledgeStatusZero

  12. Advanced Critical Advanced Energy Retrofit Education and Training and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of1 AAccelerated agingDepartment of EnergyeffortTIF

  13. TETRA MUON COOLING RING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KAHN,S.A.FERNOW,R.C.BALBEKOV,V.RAJA,R.USUBOV,Z.

    2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a brief overview of recent simulation activities on the design of neutrino factories. Simulation work is ongoing on many aspects of a potential facility, including proton drivers, pion collection and decay channels, phase rotation, ionization cooling, and muon accelerators.

  14. Computational Method for Improved Forewarning of Critical Events - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  15. The Department of Energy Releases Strategy on Critical Materials |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic| DepartmentDepartmentThe DoD Siting

  16. Muon acceleration in cosmic-ray sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, Spencer R.; Mikkelsen, Rune E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Becker Tjus, Julia [Fakultät für Physik and Astronomie, Theoretische Physik I, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Many models of ultra-high energy cosmic-ray production involve acceleration in linear accelerators located in gamma-ray bursts, magnetars, or other sources. These transient sources have short lifetimes, which necessitate very high accelerating gradients, up to 10{sup 13} keV cm{sup –1}. At gradients above 1.6 keV cm{sup –1}, muons produced by hadronic interactions undergo significant acceleration before they decay. This muon acceleration hardens the neutrino energy spectrum and greatly increases the high-energy neutrino flux. Using the IceCube high-energy diffuse neutrino flux limits, we set two-dimensional limits on the source opacity and matter density, as a function of accelerating gradient. These limits put strong constraints on different models of particle acceleration, particularly those based on plasma wake-field acceleration, and limit models for sources like gamma-ray bursts and magnetars.

  17. Critical Review The Role of PAS Kinase in Regulating Energy Metabolism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutter, Jared

    the molecular mechanisms reg- ulating cellular energy balance is of great importance in com- bating obesityCritical Review The Role of PAS Kinase in Regulating Energy Metabolism Huai-Xiang Hao and Jared Rutter Department of Biochemistry, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT, USA Summary

  18. Chu: President's 2013 Energy Budget Makes Critical Investments in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  19. Iowa lab gets critical materials research center | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  20. Electric Motors and Critical Materials | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  1. Chu: President's 2013 Energy Budget Makes Critical Investments in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  2. Secretary Chu Announces Completion of Critical Energy Conservation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  3. Fuel Cells for Critical Communications Backup Power | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdf Flash2006-52.pdf0.pdfDepartment ofEnergy 3 Fuel Cell2|&Fuel Cellsat

  4. Increasing Access to Materials Critical to the Clean Energy Economy |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of BlytheDepartment of Energy IRSJulyIncandescent LightingofDepartment

  5. Advanced Critical Advanced Energy Retrofit Education and Training and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is alwaysISO 50001Energy Efficiency Grants

  6. Recent results from COMPASS muon scattering measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Capozza, Luigi [Irfu/SPhN - CEA Saclay, 91190 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Collaboration: COMPASS Collaboration

    2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A sample of recent results in muon scattering measurements from the COMPASS experiment at CERN will be reviewed. These include high energy processes with longitudinally polarised proton and deuteron targets. High energy polarised measurements provide important constraints for studying the nucleon spin structure and thus permit to test the applicability of the theoretical framework of factorisation theorems and perturbative QCD. Specifically, latest results on longitudinal quark polarisation, quark helicity densities and gluon polarisation will be reviewed.

  7. The muon system of the Daya Bay Reactor antineutrino experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daya Bay Collaboration

    2014-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Daya Bay experiment consists of functionally identical antineutrino detectors immersed in pools of ultrapure water in three well-separated underground experimental halls near two nuclear reactor complexes. These pools serve both as shields against natural, low-energy radiation, and as water Cherenkov detectors that efficiently detect cosmic muons using arrays of photomultiplier tubes. Each pool is covered by a plane of resistive plate chambers as an additional means of detecting muons. Design, construction, operation, and performance of these muon detectors are described.

  8. The Muon System of the Daya Bay Reactor Antineutrino Experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    An, F. P.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Brown, R. E.; Chasman, C.; Dale, E.; Diwan, M. V.; Gill, R.; Hans, S.; Isvan, Z.; Jaffe, D. E.; Kettell, S. H.; Littenberg, L.; Pearson, C. E.; Qian, X.; Theman, H.; Viren, B.; Worcester, E.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, C.

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Daya Bay experiment consists of functionally identical antineutrino detectors immersed in pools of ultrapure water in three well-separated underground experimental halls near two nuclear reactor complexes. These pools serve both as shields against natural, low-energy radiation, and as water Cherenkov detectors that efficiently detect cosmic muons using arrays of photomultiplier tubes. Each pool is covered by a plane of resistive plate chambers as an additional means of detecting muons. Design, construction, operation, and performance of these muon detectors are described. (auth)

  9. Trends in robotics: A summary of the Department of Energy`s critical technology roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eicker, P.J.

    1998-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology roadmaps serve as pathways to the future. They call attention to future needs for research and development; provide a structure for organizing technology forecasts and programs; and help communicate technological needs and expectations among end users and the research and development (R and D) community. Critical Technology roadmaps, of which the Robotics and Intelligent Machines (RIM) Roadmap is one example, focus on enabling or cross-cutting technologies that address the needs of multiple US Department of Energy (DOE) offices. Critical Technology roadmaps must be responsive to mission needs of the offices; must clearly indicate how the science and technology can improve DOE capabilities; and must describe an aggressive vision for the future of the technology itself. The RIM Roadmap defines a DOE research and development path for the period beginning today, and continuing through the year 2020. Its purpose is to identify, select and develop objectives that will satisfy near- and long-term challenges posed by DOE`s mission objectives. If implemented, this roadmap will support DOE`s mission needs while simultaneously advancing the state-of-the-art of RIM. For the purposes of this document, RIM refers to systems composed of machines, sensors, computers and software that deliver processes to DOE operations. The RIM Roadmap describes how such systems will revolutionize DOE processes, most notably manufacturing, hazardous and remote operations, and monitoring and surveillance. The advances in DOE operations and RIM discussed in this document will be possible due to the developments in many other areas of science and technology, including computing, communication, electronics and micro-engineering. Modern software engineering techniques will permit the implementation of inherently safe RIM systems that will depend heavily on software.

  10. High field solenoids for muon cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, M.A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field Solenoids for Muon Cooling M. A. Green a , Y. EyssaField Solenoids for Muon Cooling · M. A. Green a, Y. EyssaABSTRA CT The proposed cooling system for the muon collider

  11. Superconducting solenoids for the Muon collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, M.A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    muon collider has superconducting solenoids as an integralLBNL-44303 SCMAG-690 Superconducting Solenoids for the MuonDE-AC03-76SFOOO98. J Superconducting Solenoids for the Muon

  12. The Effect of Extending the Length of the Coupling Coils in a MuonIonization Cooling Channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Michael A.

    2007-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    RF cavities are used to re-accelerate muons that have beencooled by absorbers that are in low beta regions of a muon ionizationcooling channel. A superconducting coupling magnet (or magnets) arearound or among the RF cavities of a muon ionization-cooling channel. Thefield from the magnet guides the muons so that they are kept within theiris of the RF cavities that are used to accelerate the muons. Thisreport compares the use of a single short coupling magnet with anextended coupling magnet that has one or more superconducting coils aspart of a muon-cooling channel of the same design as the muon ionizationcooling experiment (MICE). Whether the superconducting magnet is shortand thick or long and this affects the magnet stored energy and the peakfield in the winding. The magnetic field distribution also affects is themuon beam optics in the cooling cell of a muon coolingchannel.

  13. From Neutrino Factory to Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geer, S.; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories require a muon source capable of producing and capturing {Omicron}(10{sup 21}) muons/year. This paper reviews the similarities and differences between Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider accelerator complexes, the ongoing R&D needed for a Muon Collider that goes beyond Neutrino Factory R&D, and some thoughts about how a Neutrino Factory on the CERN site might eventually be upgraded to a Muon Collider.

  14. Energy of the Quasi-free Electron in Supercritical Krypton near the Critical Point Luxi Li and C. M. Evans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Cherice M.

    Energy of the Quasi-free Electron in Supercritical Krypton near the Critical Point Luxi Li and C. M by the quasi-free electron that arises from field ionization of the dopant, and the zero point kinetic energy of the free electron. The overall decrease in the shift of the dopant ionization energy near the critical

  15. Imaging and sensing based on muon tomography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morris, Christopher L; Saunders, Alexander; Sossong, Michael James; Schultz, Larry Joe; Green, J. Andrew; Borozdin, Konstantin N; Hengartner, Nicolas W; Smith, Richard A; Colthart, James M; Klugh, David C; Scoggins, Gary E; Vineyard, David C

    2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques, apparatus and systems for detecting particles such as muons for imaging applications. Subtraction techniques are described to enhance the processing of the muon tomography data.

  16. Commissioning of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer with Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The ATLAS Collaboration

    2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider has collected several hundred million cosmic ray events during 2008 and 2009. These data were used to commission the Muon Spectrometer and to study the performance of the trigger and tracking chambers, their alignment, the detector control system, the data acquisition and the analysis programs. We present the performance in the relevant parameters that determine the quality of the muon measurement. We discuss the single element efficiency, resolution and noise rates, the calibration method of the detector response and of the alignment system, the track reconstruction efficiency and the momentum measurement. The results show that the detector is close to the design performance and that the Muon Spectrometer is ready to detect muons produced in high energy proton-proton collisions.

  17. Semi-analytic approximations for production of atmospheric muons and neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser

    2001-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Simple approximations for fluxes of atmospheric muons and muon neutrinos are developed which display explicitly how the fluxes depend on primary cosmic ray energy and on features of pion production. For energies of approximately 10 GeV and above the results are sufficiently accurate to calculate response functions and to use for estimates of systematic uncertainties.

  18. Helical Muon Beam Cooling Channel Engineering Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashikhin, V.S.; Lopes, M.L.; Romanov, G.V.; Tartaglia, M.A.; Yonehara, K.; Yu, M.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab; Flanagan, G.; Johnson, R.P.; Kazakevich, G.M.; Marhauser, F.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), a novel technique for six-dimensional (6D) ionization cooling of muon beams, has shown considerable promise based on analytic and simulation studies. However, the implementation of this revolutionary method of muon cooling requires new techniques for the integration of hydrogen-pressurized, high-power RF cavities into the low-temperature superconducting magnets of the HCC. We present the progress toward a conceptual design for the integration of 805 MHz RF cavities into a 10 T Nb{sub 3}Sn based HCC test section. We include discussions on the pressure and thermal barriers needed within the cryostat to maintain operation of the magnet at 4.2 K while operating the RF and energy absorber at a higher temperature. Additionally, we include progress on the Nb{sub 3}Sn helical solenoid design.

  19. An update of muon capture on hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Pastore; F. Myhrer; K. Kubodera

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The successful precision measurement of the rate of muon capture on a proton by the MuCap Collaboration allows for a stringent test of the current theoretical understanding of this process. Chiral perturbation theory, which is a low-energy effective field theory that preserves the symmetries and the pattern of symmetry breaking in the underlying theory of QCD, offers a systematic framework for describing $\\mu p$ capture and provides a basic test of QCD at the hadronic level. We describe how this effective theory with no free parameters reproduces the measured capture rate. A recent study has addressed new sources of uncertainties that were not considered in the previous works, and we review to what extent these uncertainties are now under control. Finally, the rationale for studying muon capture on the deuteron and some recent theoretical developments regarding this process are discussed.

  20. Observable measures of critical behavior in high-energy nuclear collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudolph C. Hwa

    2000-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Critical behaviors of quark-hadron phase transition in high-energy heavy-ion collisions are investigated with the aim of identifying hadronic observables. The surface of the plasma cylinder is mapped onto a 2D lattice. The Ising model is used to simulate configurations corresponding to cross-over transitions in accordance to the findings of QCD lattice gauge theory. Hadrons are formed in clusters of all sizes. Various measures are examined to quantify the fluctuations of the cluster sizes and of the voids among the clusters. The canonical power-law behaviors near the critical temperature are found for appropriately chosen measures. Since the temperature is not directly observable, attention is given to the problem of finding observable measures. It is demonstrated that for the measures considered the dependence on the final-state randomization is weak. Thus the critical behavior of the measures proposed is likely to survive the scattering effect of the hadron gas in the final state.

  1. Muon ID - taking care of lower momenta muons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milstene, C.; Fisk, G.; Para, A.; /Fermilab

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Muon package under study, the tracks are extrapolated using an algorithm which accounts for the magnetic field and the ionization (dE/dx). We improved the calculation of the field dependent term to increase the muon detection efficiency at lower momenta using a Runge-Kutta method. The muon identification and hadron separation in b-bbar jets is reported with the improved software. In the same framework, the utilization of the Kalman filter is introduced. The principle of the Kalman filter is described in some detail with the propagation matrix, with the Runge-Kutta term included, and the effect on low momenta for low momenta single muons particles is described.

  2. Muon Acceleration - RLA and FFAG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alex Bogacz

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various acceleration schemes for muons are presented. The overall goal of the acceleration systems: large acceptance acceleration to 25 GeV and 'beam shaping' can be accomplished by various fixed field accelerators at different stages. They involve three superconducting linacs: a single pass linear Pre-accelerator followed by a pair of multi-pass Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA) and finally a non-scaling FFAG ring. The present baseline acceleration scenario has been optimized to take maximum advantage of appropriate acceleration scheme at a given stage. The solenoid based Pre-accelerator offers very large acceptance and facilitates correction of energy gain across the bunch and significant longitudinal compression trough induced synchrotron motion. However, far off-crest acceleration reduces the effective acceleration gradient and adds complexity through the requirement of individual RF phase control for each cavity. The RLAs offer very efficient usage of high gradient superconducting RF and ability to adjust path-length after each linac pass through individual return arcs with uniformly periodic FODO optics suitable for chromatic compensation of emittance dilution with sextupoles. However, they require spreaders/recombiners switchyards at both linac ends and significant total length of the arcs. The non-scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) ring combines compactness with very large chromatic acceptance (twice the injection energy) and it allows for large number of passes through the RF (at least eight, possibly as high as 15).

  3. Muon Beam Helical Cooling Channel Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Rolland; Ankenbrandt, Charles; Flanagan, G.; Kazakevich, G.M.; Marhauser, Frank; Neubauer, Michael; Roberts, T.; Yoshikawa, C.; Derbenev, Yaroslav; Morozov, Vasiliy; Kashikhin, V.S.; Lopes, Mattlock; Tollestrup, A.; Yonehara, Katsuya; Zloblin, A.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) achieves effective ionization cooling of the six-dimensional (6d) phase space of a muon beam by means of a series of 21st century inventions. In the HCC, hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities enable high RF gradients in strong external magnetic fields. The theory of the HCC, which requires a magnetic field with solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole components, demonstrates that dispersion in the gaseous hydrogen energy absorber provides effective emittance exchange to enable longitudinal ionization cooling. The 10-year development of a practical implementation of a muon-beam cooling device has involved a series of technical innovations and experiments that imply that an HCC of less than 300 m length can cool the 6d emittance of a muon beam by six orders of magnitude. We describe the design and construction plans for a prototype HCC module based on oxygen-doped hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities that are loaded with dielectric, fed by magnetrons, and operate in a superconducting helical solenoid magnet.

  4. Muon catalyzed fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breunlich, W.H.; Cargnelli, M.; Marton, J.; Naegele, N.; Pawlek, P.; Scrinzi, A.; Werner, J.; Zmeskal, J.; Bistirlich, J.; Crowe, K.M.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an overview of the program and results of our experiment performed by a European-American collatoration at the Swiss Institute of Nuclear Research. Systematic investigations of the low temperature region (23K to 300K) reveal a surprisingly rich physics of mesoatomic and mesomolecular processes, unparalleled in other systems of isotopic hydrogen mixtures. A dramatic density dependence of the reaction rates is found. The rich structure in the time spectra of the fusion neutrons observed at low gas density yields first evidence for new effects, most likely strong contributions from reactions of hot muonic atoms. The important question of muon losses due to He sticking is investigated by different methods and over a wide range of tritium concentrations.

  5. Muon density enhancement with a tapered capillary method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomono, D.; Ishida, K.; Matsuzaki, T. [Advanced Meson Science Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0193 (Japan); Kojima, T. M.; Ikeda, T.; Iwai, Y. [Atomic Physics Laboratory, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0193 (Japan); Tokuda, M. [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Advanced Meson Science Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0193 (Japan); Kanazawa, Y. [Department of Physics, Sophia University, 7-1 Kioicho, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Matsuda, Y. [Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Iwasaki, M. [Advanced Meson Science Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0193 (Japan); Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Yamazaki, Y. [Atomic Physics Laboratory, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0193 (Japan); Department of Physics, Sophia University, 7-1 Kioicho, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan)

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The focusing effect of a muon beam with a tapered capillary method has been investigated in a range from 4.2 MeV to 9.2 MeV (i.e. from 30 MeV/c to 45 MeV/c in momentum). We injected the muon beam into a pair of narrowing (tapered) plates and tubes made of glass, copper and gold-coated copper, and measured the energy distribution of the muon leaving from the outlet. The plates were tilted from an inlet of 40 mm to an outlet of 20 mm. The density enhancement was more prominent with the plates made of heavier elements. The largest beam density enhancement at 10 mm downstream of the outlet was 1.3 with the gold-coated copper narrowing plates. The enhancement was composed of muons scattered with a small angle. Their energy was slightly less than that of the initial beam. This effect did not depend on the surface roughness. The result strongly suggests a simple and effective way to increase the muon beam density for a small target.

  6. A measurement of the muon-induced neutron yield in lead at a depth of 2850 m water equivalent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reichhart, L.; Ghag, C. [School of Physics and Astronomy, SUPA University of Edinburgh, UK and High Energy Physics Group, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London (United Kingdom)] [School of Physics and Astronomy, SUPA University of Edinburgh, UK and High Energy Physics Group, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London (United Kingdom); Lindote, A.; Chepel, V.; DeViveiros, L.; Lopes, M. I.; Neves, F.; Pinto da Cunha, J.; Silva, C.; Solovov, V. N. [LIP-Coimbra and Department of Physics of the University of Coimbra (Portugal)] [LIP-Coimbra and Department of Physics of the University of Coimbra (Portugal); Akimov, D. Yu.; Belov, V. A.; Burenkov, A. A.; Kobyakin, A. S.; Kovalenko, A. G.; Stekhanov, V. N. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Araújo, H. M.; Bewick, A.; Currie, A.; Horn, M. [High Energy Physics Group, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London (United Kingdom)] [High Energy Physics Group, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London (United Kingdom); and others

    2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from the measurement of the neutron production rate in lead by high energy cosmic-ray muons at a depth of 2850 m water equivalent (mean muon energy of 260 GeV). A tonne-scale highly segmented plastic scintillator detector was utilised to detect both the energy depositions from the traversing muons as well as the delayed radiative capture signals of the induced neutrons. Complementary Monte Carlo simulations reproduce well the distributions of muons and detected muon-induced neutrons. Absolute agreement between simulation and data is of the order of 25%. By comparing the measured and simulated neutron capture rates a neutron yield in pure lead of (5.78{sub ?0.28}{sup +0.21})×10{sup ?3} neutrons/muon/(g/cm{sup 2}) has been obtained.

  7. Energy Management for Time-Critical Energy Harvesting Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydin, Hakan

    -based architecture to dynamically adjust CPU frequencies and radio transmit speeds of sensor nodes, hence regulate such as solar, wind or wa- ter flow, WSN nodes potentially have perpetual energy supply. However, given technique saves computation energy by simultaneously reducing CPU supply voltage and frequency. The DMS

  8. Energy of the quasi-free electron in supercritical argon near the critical point C.M. Evans1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Cherice M.

    Energy of the quasi-free electron in supercritical argon near the critical point C.M. Evans1 to the interaction between argon and the quasi-free electron arising from field ionization of the dopant. The energy by the ionic core, V0(P) is the quasi-free electron energy in the perturbing medium, and P is the perturber

  9. SIMULATIONS OF A MUON LINAC FOR A NEUTRINO FACTORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin Beard, Alex Bogacz ,Slawomir Bogacz, Vasiliy Morozov, Yves Roblin

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Neutrino Factory baseline design involves a complex chain of accelerators including a single-pass linac, two recirculating linacs and an FFAG. The first linac follows the capture and bunching section and accelerates the muons from about 244 to 900 MeV. It must accept a high emittance beam about 30 cm wide with a 10% energy spread. This linac uses counterwound, shielded superconducting solenoids and 201 MHz superconducting cavities. Simulations have been carried out using several codes including Zgoubi, OptiM, GPT, Elegant and G4beamline, both to determine the optics and to estimate the radiation loads on the elements due to beam loss and muon decay.

  10. Computational Needs for Muon Accelerators J. Scott Berg a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berg, J. Scott

    Computational Needs for Muon Accelerators J. Scott Berg a a Brookhaven National Laboratory that are transported can have energy spreads of ±30% or more. The required emittances necessitate accurate tracking or a model which includes end fields; and accurately design and simulate a beam line where the transported

  11. Underground Muon Counters as a Tool for Composition Analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. D. Supanitsky; A. Etchegoyen; G. Medina-Tanco; I. Allekotte; M. Gómez Berisso; M. C. Medina

    2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The transition energy from galactic to extragalactic cosmic ray sources is still uncertain, but it should be associated either with the region of the spectrum known as the second knee or with the ankle. The baseline design of the Pierre Auger Observatory was optimized for the highest energies. The surface array is fully efficient above $3 \\times 10^{18}$ eV and, even if the hybrid mode can extend this range below $10^{18}$ eV, the second knee and a considerable portion of the wide ankle structure are left outside its operating range. Therefore, in order to encompass these spectral features and gain further insight into the cosmic ray composition variation along the transition region, enhancements to the surface and fluorescence components of the baseline design are being implemented that will lower the full efficiency regime of the Observatory down to $\\sim 10^{17}$ eV. The surface enhancements consist of a graded infilled area of standard Auger water Cherenkov detectors deployed in two triangular grids of 433 m and 750 m of spacing. Each surface station inside this area will have an associated muon counter detector. The fluorescence enhancement, on the other hand, consists of three additional fluorescence telescopes with higher elevation angle ($30^\\circ-58^\\circ$) than the ones in operation at present. The aim of this paper is threefold. We study the effect of the segmentation of the muon counters and find an analytical expression to correct for the under counting due to muon pile-up. We also present a detailed method to reconstruct the muon lateral distribution function for the 750 m spacing array. Finally, we study the mass discrimination potential of a new parameter, the number of muons at 600 m from the shower axis, obtained by fitting the muon data with the above mentioned reconstruction method.

  12. The MICE Muon Beam Line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apollonio, Marco [High Energy Physics Group, Department of Physics, Imperial College London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) at RAL, muons are produced and transported in a dedicated beam line connecting the production point (target) to the cooling channel. We discuss the main features of the beamline, meant to provide muons with momenta between 140 MeV/c and 240 MeV/c and emittances up to 10 mm rad, which is accomplished by means of a diffuser. Matching procedures to the MICE cooling channel are also described. In summer 2010 we performed an intense data taking campaign to finalize the calibration of the MICE Particle Identification (PID) detectors and the understanding of the beam line, which completes the STEPI phase of MICE. We highlight the main results from these data.

  13. UNDERGROUND MUONS IN SUPER-KAMIOKANDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokyo, University of

    HE 4.1.23 UNDERGROUND MUONS IN SUPER-KAMIOKANDE The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration, presented by J The largest underground neutrino observatory, Super-Kamiokande, located near Kamioka, Japan has been for muons ver- sus zenith angle in Super-Kamiokande. The lled region is for muons with more than 1.7 Ge

  14. The New Energy Management Frontier: The Critical Role of a Systematic Management Approach in Making Technology Improvements Successful

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feldman, J.

    The New Energy Management Frontier: The Critical Role of a Systematic Management Approach in Making Technology Improvements Successful Jon Feldman Senior Consultant Hatch Consulting Mississauga, Ontario, Canada ABSTRACT Improvements... in technology certainly playa pivotal role in the quest for increased energy efficiency. However, sophisticated industrial energy users are increasingly learning that technology alone cannot drive long-tenn, sustainable reductions in energy cost. The role...

  15. Improvement of the Track-based Alignment Procedure of the CMS Muon System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, Nick Jogesh

    2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is used to explore subatomic interactions through proton-proton collisions. The resulting out- burst of particles from these high energy collisions is then tracked...

  16. Muon Acceleration in Cosmic-ray Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer R. Klein; Rune Mikkelsen; Julia K. Becker Tjus

    2012-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Many models of ultra-high energy cosmic-ray production involve acceleration in linear accelerators located in Gamma-Ray Bursts magnetars, or other sources. These source models require very high accelerating gradients, $10^{13}$ keV/cm, with the minimum gradient set by the length of the source. At gradients above 1.6 keV/cm, muons produced by hadronic interactions undergo significant acceleration before they decay. This acceleration hardens the neutrino energy spectrum and greatly increases the high-energy neutrino flux. We rule out many models of linear acceleration, setting strong constraints on plasma wakefield accelerators and on models for sources like Gamma Ray Bursts and magnetars.

  17. Advanced Thermal Energy Storage: Novel Tuning of Critical Fluctuations for Advanced Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HEATS Project: NAVITASMAX is developing a novel thermal energy storage solution. This innovative technology is based on simple and complex supercritical fluids— substances where distinct liquid and gas phases do not exist, and tuning the properties of these fluid systems to increase their ability to store more heat. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in NAVITASMAX’s system during the day and released at night—when the sun is not shining—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in NAVITASMAX’s system at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours.

  18. IUPAC critical evaluation of the rotationalvibrational spectra of water vapor. Part I--Energy levels and transition wavenumbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chance, Kelly

    Keywords: Water vapor Transition wavenumbers Atmospheric physics Energy levels MARVEL Information systemIUPAC critical evaluation of the rotational­vibrational spectra of water vapor. Part I--Energy levels and transition wavenumbers for H2 17 O and H2 18 O Jonathan Tennyson a,Ã, Peter F. Bernath b

  19. Solution High-Energy Burst Assembly (SHEBA) results from subprompt critical experiments with uranyl fluoride fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappiello, C.C.; Butterfield, K.B.; Sanchez, R.G. [and others

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solution High-Energy Burst Assembly (SHEBA) was originally constructed during 1980 and was designed to be a clean free-field geometry, right-circular, cylindrically symmetric critical assembly employing U(5%)O{sub 2}F{sub 2} solution as fuel. A second version of SHEBA, employing the same fuel but equipped with a fuel pump and shielding pit, was commissioned in 1993. This report includes data and operating experience for the 1993 SHEBA only. Solution-fueled benchmark work focused on the development of experimental measurements of the characterization of SHEBA; a summary of the results are given. A description of the system and the experimental results are given in some detail in the report. Experiments were designed to: (1) study the behavior of nuclear excursions in a low-enrichment solution, (2) evaluate accidental criticality alarm detectors for fuel-processing facilities, (3) provide radiation spectra and dose measurements to benchmark radiation transport calculations on a low-enrichment solution system similar to centrifuge enrichment plants, and (4) provide radiation fields to calibrate personnel dosimetry. 15 refs., 37 figs., 10 tabs.

  20. The Defocusing Energy-Critical Wave Equation with a Cubic Convolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Changxing Miao; Junyong Zhang; Jiqiang Zheng

    2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we study the theory of the global well-posedness and scattering for the energy-critical wave equation with a cubic convolution nonlinearity $u_{tt}-\\Delta u+(|x|^{-4}\\ast|u|^2)u=0$ in spatial dimension $d \\geq 5$. The main difficulties are the absence of the classical finite speed of propagation (i.e. the monotonic local energy estimate on the light cone), which is a fundamental property to show the global well-posedness and then to obtain scattering for the wave equations with the local nonlinearity $u_{tt}-\\Delta u+|u|^\\frac4{d-2}u=0$. To compensate it, we resort to the extended causality and utilize the strategy derived from concentration compactness ideas. Then, the proof of the global well-posedness and scattering is reduced to show the nonexistence of the three enemies: finite time blowup; soliton-like solutions and low-to-high cascade. We will utilize the Morawetz estimate, the extended causality and the potential energy concentration to preclude the above three enemies.

  1. Radiative corrections to real and virtual muon Compton scattering revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Kaiser

    2010-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate in closed analytical form the one-photon loop radiative corrections to muon Compton scattering $\\mu^- \\gamma \\to \\mu^- \\gamma $. Ultraviolet and infrared divergencies are both treated in dimensional regularization. Infrared finiteness of the (virtual) radiative corrections is achieved (in the standard way) by including soft photon radiation below an energy cut-off $\\lambda$. We find that the anomalous magnetic moment $\\alpha/2\\pi$ provides only a very small portion of the full radiative corrections. Furthermore, we extend our calculation of radiative corrections to the muon-nucleus bremsstrahlung process (or virtual muon Compton scattering $\\mu^-\\gamma_0^* \\to \\mu^- \\gamma $). These results are particularly relevant for analyzing the COMPASS experiment at CERN in which muon-nucleus bremsstrahlung serves to calibrate the Primakoff scattering of high-energy pions off a heavy nucleus with the aim of measuring the pion electric and magnetic polarizabilities. We find agreement with an earlier calculation of these radiative corrections based on a different method.

  2. MUON CAPTURE IN THE FRONT END OF THE IDS NEUTRINO D. Neuffer, Fermilab, Batavia, IL 60510, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    paper discusses the muon capture and cooling system. In this system we follow ref. [2], and set 201 to (nearly) equal central energies, and initiates ionization cooling. The muons are then accelerated to high the scope of a future neutrino Factory facility. INTRODUCTION The goal of the IDS Neutrino Factory

  3. Hydrogen-filled RF Cavities for Muon Beam Cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CHARLES, Ankenbrandt

    2009-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Ionization cooling requires low-Z energy absorbers immersed in a strong magnetic field and high-gradient, large-aperture RF cavities to be able to cool a muon beam as quickly as the short muon lifetime requires. RF cavities that operate in vacuum are vulnerable to dark-current- generated breakdown, which is exacerbated by strong magnetic fields, and they require extra safety windows that degrade cooling, to separate RF regions from hydrogen energy absorbers. RF cavities pressurized with dense hydrogen gas will be developed that use the same gas volume to provide the energy absorber and the RF acceleration needed for ionization cooling. The breakdown suppression by the dense gas will allow the cavities to operate in strong magnetic fields. Measurements of the operation of such a cavity will be made as functions of external magnetic field and charged particle beam intensity and compared with models to understand the characteristics of this technology and to develop mitigating strategies if necessary.

  4. Neutrino-induced upward stopping muons in Super-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A total of 137 upward stopping muons of minimum energy 1.6 GeV are observed by Super-Kamiokande during 516 detector live days. The measured muon flux is 0.39+/-0.04(stat.)+/-0.02(syst.)x10^{-13}cm^{-2}s^{-1}sr^{-1} compared to an expected flux of 0.73+/-0.16(theo.)x10^{-13}cm^{-2}s^{-1}sr^{-1}. Using our previously-published measurement of the upward through-going muon flux, we calculate the stopping/through-going flux ratio R}, which has less theoretical uncertainty. The measured value of R=0.22+/-0.02(stat.)+/-0.01(syst.) is significantly smaller than the value 0.37^{+0.05}_{-0.04}(theo.) expected using the best theoretical information (the probability that the measured R is a statistical fluctuation below the expected value is 0.39%). A simultaneous fitting to zenith angle distributions of upward stopping and through-going muons gives a result which is consistent with the hypothesis of neutrino oscillations with the parameters sin^2 2\\theta >0.7 and 1.5x10^{-3} Super-Kamiokande using the contained atmospheric neutrino events.

  5. AMIGA, Auger Muons and Infill for the Ground Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Etchegoyen, A

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pierre Auger Observatory is planned to be upgraded so that the energy spectrum of cosmic rays can be studied down to 0.1 EeV and the muon component of showers can be determined. The former will lead to a spectrum measured by one technique from 0.1 EeV to beyond 100 EeV while the latter will aid identification of the primary particles. These enhancements consist of three high elevation telescopes (HEAT) and an infilled area having both surface detectors and underground muon counters (AMIGA). The surface array of the Auger Observatory will be enhanced over a 23.5 km2 area by 85 detector pairs laid out as a graded array of water-Cherenkov detectors and 30 m2 buried muon scintillator counters. The spacings in the array will be 433 and 750 m. The muon detectors will comprise highly segmented scintillators with optical fibres ending on multi-anode phototubes. The AMIGA complex will be centred 6.0 km away from the fluorescence detector installation at Coihueco and will be overlooked by the HEAT telescopes. We de...

  6. Measurement of the Charge Ratio of Cosmic Muons using CMS Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Aldaya; P. Garcia-Abia

    2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed the measurement of the cosmic ray muon charge ratio, as a function of the muon momentum, using data collected by the CMS experiment, exploiting the capabilities of the muon barrel drift tube (DT) chambers. The cosmic muon charge ratio is defined as the ratio of the number of positive- to negative-charge muons. Cosmic ray muons result from the interaction of high-energy cosmic-ray particles (mainly protons and nuclei), entering the upper layers of the atmosphere, with air nuclei. Since these collisions favour positive meson production, there is an asymmetry in the charge composition and more positive muons are expected. The data samples were collected at the \\textit{Magnet Test and Cosmic Challenge} (MTCC). While the MTCC itself was a crucial milestone in the CMS detector construction, not having physics studies among its primary goals, it provided the first opportunity to obtain physics results and test the full analysis chain using real data in CMS before the LHC startup, together with a complementary check of the detector performance.

  7. Introduction to Mini Muon Tracker

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borozdin, Konstantin N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a mini muon tracker developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory we performed experiments of simple landscapes of various materials, including TNT, 9501, lead, tungsten, aluminium, and water. Most common scenes are four two inches thick step wedges of different dimensions: 12-inch x 12-inch, 12-inch x 9-inch, 12-inch x 6-inch, and 12-inch x 3-inch; and a one three inches thick hemisphere of lead with spherical hollow, and a similar full lead sphere.

  8. Life Cycle Energy and Climate Change Implication of Nanotechnologies: A Critical Review Hyung Chul Kim and Vasilis Fthenakis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and health impacts of nano-technologies triggered a recent surge of life cycle assessment (LCA) studies in parallel with the progress of nanotechnologies by employing life-cycle assessment (LCA) that is widely1 Life Cycle Energy and Climate Change Implication of Nanotechnologies: A Critical Review Hyung

  9. Impact of Distributed Energy Resources on the Reliability of a Critical Telecommunications Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, D.; Atcitty, C.; Zuffranieri, J.; Arent, D.

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Telecommunications has been identified by the Department of Homeland Security as a critical infrastructure to the United States. Failures in the power systems supporting major telecommunications service nodes are a main contributor to major telecommunications outages, as documented by analyses of Federal Communications Commission (FCC) outage reports by the National Reliability Steering Committee (under auspices of the Alliance for Telecommunications Industry Solutions). There are two major issues that are having increasing impact on the sensitivity of the power distribution to telecommunication facilities: deregulation of the power industry, and changing weather patterns. A logical approach to improve the robustness of telecommunication facilities would be to increase the depth and breadth of technologies available to restore power in the face of power outages. Distributed energy resources such as fuel cells and gas turbines could provide one more onsite electric power source to provide backup power, if batteries and diesel generators fail. But does the diversity in power sources actually increase the reliability of offered power to the office equipment, or does the complexity of installing and managing the extended power system induce more potential faults and higher failure rates? This report analyzes a system involving a telecommunications facility consisting of two switch-bays and a satellite reception system.

  10. Commissioning of the ATLAS Muon Trigger Selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elisa Musto

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of the three-level ATLAS muon trigger as evaluated by using LHC data is presented. Events have been selected by using only the hardware-based Level-1 trigger in order to commission and to subsequently enable the (software-based) selections of the High Level Trigger. Studies aiming at selecting prompt muons from J/{\\psi} and at reducing non prompt muon contamination have been performed. A brief overview on how the muon triggers evolve with increasing luminosity is given.

  11. Our Next Two Steps for Fukushima Daiichi Muon Tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyadera, Haruo [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    After the vast disasters caused by the great earthquake and tsunami in eastern Japan, we proposed applying our Muon Tomography (MT) technique to help and improve the emergency situation at Fukushima Daiichi using cosmic-ray muons. A reactor-tomography team was formed at LANL which was supported by the Laboratory as a response to a request by the former Japanese Prime Minister, Naoto Kan. Our goal is to help the Japanese people and support remediation of the reactors. At LANL, we have carried out a proof-of-principle technical demonstration and simulation studies that established the feasibility of MT to image a reactor core. This proposal covers the next two critical steps for Fukushima Daiichi Muon Imaging: (1) undertake case study mock-up experiments of Fukushima Daiichi, and (2) system optimization. We requested funding to the US and Japanese government to assess damage of reactors at Fukushima Daiichi. The two steps will bring our project to the 'ready-to-go' level.

  12. Guidelines for preparing criticality safety evaluations at Department of Energy non-reactor nuclear facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains guidelines that should be followed when preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations that will be used to demonstrate the safety of operations performed at DOE non-reactor nuclear facilities. Adherence to these guidelines will provide consistency and uniformity in criticality safety evaluations (CSEs) across the complex and will document compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480.24.

  13. A parameterisation of single and multiple muons in the deep water or ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Becherini; A. Margiotta; M. Sioli; M. Spurio

    2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric muons play an important role in underwater/ice neutrino detectors. In this paper, a parameterisation of the flux of single and multiple muon events, their lateral distribution and of their energy spectrum is presented. The kinematics parameters were modelled starting from a full Monte Carlo simulation of the interaction of primary cosmic rays with atmospheric nuclei; secondary muons reaching the sea level were propagated in the deep water. The parametric formulas are valid for a vertical depth of 1.5-5 km w.e. and up to 85 deg for the zenith angle, and can be used as input for a fast simulation of atmospheric muons in underwater/ice detectors.

  14. 20 - 50 GeV muon storage rings for a neutrino factory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rees, G.H.; /Rutherford; Johnstone, C.; /Fermilab; Meot, F.; /DAPNIA, Saclay

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Muon decay rings are under study as part of an International Scoping Study (ISS) for a future Neutrino Factory. Both isosceles triangle- and racetrack-shaped rings are being considered for a 20 GeV muon energy, but with upgrade potentials of 40 or 50 GeV. Both rings are designed with long straights to optimize directional muon decay. The neutrinos from muon decay pass to one or two distant detectors; the racetrack ring has one very long production straight aligned with one detector while the triangular ring has two straights which can be aligned with two detectors. Decay ring specifications and lattice studies are the primary topic of this paper. Injection, collimation, and the RF system are covered in a second contribution to these proceedings.

  15. The Program in Muon and Neutrino Physics Super Beams, Cold Muon Beams, Neutrino Factory and the Muon Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raja, R; Gallardo, J; Geer, S; Kaplan, D; McDonald, K F; Palmer, R; Sessler, Andrew M; Skrinsky, A N; Summers, D; Tigner, Maury; Tollestrup, Alvin V; Wurtele, J S; Zisman, M S; Raja, Rajendran

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We outline in detail a staging scenario for realizing the Neutrino Factory and the Muon Collider. As a first stage we envisage building an intense proton source that can be used to perform high intensity conventional neutrino beam experiments ("Superbeams"). While this is in progress, we perform R&D in collecting, cooling and accelerating muons which leads to the next two stages of "Cold Muon Beams" and the Neutrino Factory. Further progress in Muon Cooling especially in the area of emittance exchange will lead us to the Muon Collider. A staged scenario such as this opens up new physics avenues at each step and will provide a long range base program for particle physics.

  16. Lateral Distribution for Aligned Events in Muon Groups Deep Underground

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. L. Tsyabuk; R. A. Mukhamedshin; Yu. V. Stenkin

    2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper concerns the so-called aligned events observed in cosmic rays. The phenomenon of the alignment of the most energetic subcores of gamma-ray--hadron ($\\gamma-h$) families (particles of the highest energies in the central EAS core) was firstly found in the "Pamir" emulsion chamber experiment and related to a coplanar particle production at $E_0>10^{16}$ eV. Here a separation distribution (distances between pairs of muons) for aligned events has been analyzed throughout muon groups measured by Baksan Underground Scintillation Telescope (BUST) for threshold energies $0.85 \\div 3.2$ TeV during a period of 7.7 years. Only muon groups of multiplicity $m\\geq 4$ with inclined trajectories for an interval of zenith angles $50^\\circ - 60^\\circ$ were selected for the analysis. The analysis has revealed that the distribution complies with the exponential law. Meanwhile the distributions become steeper with the increase of threshold energy. There has been no difference between the lateral distribution of all the groups and the distribution of the aligned groups.

  17. Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) - A critical evaluation by LCA and recommendations for improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Sebastien; Abeck, Heike; Bali, Nishil; Horvath, Arpad

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Horvath A (2007). Leadership in Energy and EnvironmentalLife Cycle Management Leadership in Energy and Environmentaland Background. LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental

  18. A threat analysis framework as applied to critical infrastructures in the Energy Sector.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michalski, John T.; Duggan, David Patrick

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need to protect national critical infrastructure has led to the development of a threat analysis framework. The threat analysis framework can be used to identify the elements required to quantify threats against critical infrastructure assets and provide a means of distributing actionable threat information to critical infrastructure entities for the protection of infrastructure assets. This document identifies and describes five key elements needed to perform a comprehensive analysis of threat: the identification of an adversary, the development of generic threat profiles, the identification of generic attack paths, the discovery of adversary intent, and the identification of mitigation strategies.

  19. Muon Cooling via Ionization Andrea Kay Forget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    decay, as a result of their short lives many of the known cooling techniques (electron, stochastic this cooling technique has never been used many bugs need to be worked out, such as the setup and layout for muon ionization cooling to work efficiently. I. INTRODUCTION Muons need a faster beam cooling technique

  20. Theoretical Electron Density Distributions for Fe-and Cu-Sulfide Earth Materials: A Connection between Bond Length, Bond Critical Point Properties, Local Energy Densities,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downs, Robert T.

    , Biomolecular and Chemical Sciences, UniVersity of Western Australia, Australia ReceiVed: August 7, 2006 between Bond Length, Bond Critical Point Properties, Local Energy Densities, and Bonded Interactions G. V; In Final Form: December 6, 2006 Bond critical point and local energy density properties together with net

  1. Solution High-Energy Burst Assembly (SHEBA) results from subprompt critical experiments with uranyl fluoride fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappiello, C.C.; Butterfield, K.B.; Sanchez, R.G.; Bounds, J.A.; Kimpland, R.H.; Damjanovich, R.P.; Jaegers, P.J.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments were performed to measure a variety of parameters for SHEBA: behavior of the facility during transient and steady-state operation; characteristics of the SHEBA fuel; delayed-critical solution height vs solution temperature; initial reactor period and reactivity vs solution height; calibration of power level vs reactor power instrumentation readings; flux profile in SHEBA; radiation levels and neutron spectra outside the assembly for code verification and criticality alarm and dosimetry purposes; and effect on reactivity of voids in the fuel.

  2. A Pionic Hadron Explains the Muon Magnetic Moment Anomaly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainer W. Schiel; John P. Ralston

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A significant discrepancy exists between experiment and calculations of the muon's magnetic moment. We find that standard formulas for the hadronic vacuum polarization term have overlooked pionic states known to exist. Coulomb binding alone guarantees $\\pi^+ \\pi^-$ states that quantum mechanically mix with the $\\rho$ meson. A simple 2-state mixing model explains the magnetic moment discrepancy for a mixing angle of order $\\alpha \\sim 10^{-2}$. The relevant physical state is predicted to give a tiny observable bump in the ratio R(s) of $e^+ e^-$ annihilation at a low energy not previously searched. The burden of proof is reversed for claims that conventional physics cannot explain the muon's anomalous moment.

  3. Open-Midplane Dipoles for a Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weggel, R.; Gupta, R.; Kolonko, J., Scanlan, R., Cline, D., Ding, X., Anerella, M., Kirk, H., Palmer, B., Schmalzle, J.

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    For a muon collider with copious decay particles in the plane of the storage ring, open-midplane dipoles (OMD) may be preferable to tungsten-shielded cosine-theta dipoles of large aperture. The OMD should have its midplane completely free of material, so as to dodge the radiation from decaying muons. Analysis funded by a Phase I SBIR suggests that a field of 10-20 T should be feasible, with homogeneity of 1 x 10{sup -4} and energy deposition low enough for conduction cooling to 4.2 K helium. If funded, a Phase II SBIR would refine the analysis and build and test a proof-of-principle magnet. A Phase I SBIR has advanced the feasibility of open-midplane dipoles for the storage ring of a muon collider. A proposed Phase II SBIR would refine these predictions of stresses, deformations, field quality and energy deposition. Design optimizations would continue, leading to the fabrication and test, for the first time, of a proof-of-principle dipole of truly open-midplane design.

  4. Neutrinos from Decaying Muons, Pions, Kaons and Neutrons in Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reetanjali Moharana; Nayantara Gupta

    2012-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In the internal shock model of gamma ray bursts ultrahigh energy muons, pions, neutrons and kaons are likely to be produced in the interactions of shock accelerated relativistic protons with low energy photons (KeV-MeV). These particles subsequently decay to high energy neutrinos/antineutrinos and other secondaries. In the high internal magnetic fields of gamma ray bursts, the ultrahigh energy charged particles ($\\mu^+$, $\\pi^+$, $K^+$) lose energy significantly due to synchrotron radiations before decaying into secondary high energy neutrinos and antineutrinos. The relativistic neutrons decay to high energy antineutrinos, protons and electrons. We have calculated the total neutrino flux (neutrino and antineutrino) considering the decay channels of ultrahigh energy muons, pions, neutrons and kaons. We have shown that the total neutrino flux generated in neutron decay can be higher than that produced in $\\mu^+$ and $\\pi^+$ decay. The charged kaons being heavier than pions, lose energy slowly and their secondary total neutrino flux is more than that from muons and pions at very high energy. Our detailed calculations on secondary particle production in $p\\gamma$ interactions give the total neutrino fluxes and their flavour ratios expected on earth. Depending on the values of the parameters (luminosity, Lorentz factor, variability time, spectral indices and break energy in the photon spectrum) of a gamma ray burst the contributions to the total neutrino flux from the decay of different particles (muon, pion, neutron and kaon) may vary and they would also be reflected on the neutrino flavour ratios.

  5. The program in muon and neutrino physics: Superbeams, cold muon beams, neutrino factory and the muon collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Raja et al.

    2001-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of a Muon Collider was first proposed by Budker [10] and by Skrinsky [11] in the 60s and early 70s. However, there was little substance to the concept until the idea of ionization cooling was developed by Skrinsky and Parkhomchuk [12]. The ionization cooling approach was expanded by Neufer [13] and then by Palmer [14], whose work led to the formation of the Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (MC) [3] in 1995. The concept of a neutrino source based on a pion storage ring was originally considered by Koshkarev [18]. However, the intensity of the muons created within the ring from pion decay was too low to provide a useful neutrino source. The Muon Collider concept provided a way to produce a very intense muon source. The physics potential of neutrino beams produced by muon storage rings was investigated by Geer in 1997 at a Fermilab workshop [19, 20] where it became evident that the neutrino beams produced by muon storage rings needed for the muon collider were exciting on their own merit. The neutrino factory concept quickly captured the imagination of the particle physics community, driven in large part by the exciting atmospheric neutrino deficit results from the SuperKamiokande experiment. As a result, the MC realized that a Neutrino Factory could be an important first step toward a Muon Collider and the physics that could be addressed by a Neutrino Factory was interesting in its own right. With this in mind, the MC has shifted its primary emphasis toward the issues relevant to a Neutrino Factory. There is also considerable international activity on Neutrino Factories, with international conferences held at Lyon in 1999, Monterey in 2000 [21], Tsukuba in 2001 [22], and another planned for London in 2002.

  6. A Detector Scenario for the MuonCollider Cooling Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    : Meson Lab at Fermilab: Power Supplies (two floors) Cooling Apparatus Muon Beamline shielding shieldingA Detector Scenario for the Muon­Collider Cooling Experiment C. Lu, K.T. McDonald and E.J. Prebys the emittance of the muon beam to 3% accuracy before and after the muon cooling apparatus. 1 #12; Possible site

  7. Global well-posedness and scattering for the energy-critical, defocusing Hartree equation for radial data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Changxing Miao; Guixiang Xu; Lifeng Zhao

    2007-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the defocusing, $\\dot{H}^1$-critical Hartree equation for the radial data in all dimensions $(n\\geq 5)$. We show the global well-posedness and scattering results in the energy space. The new ingredient in this paper is that we first take advantage of the term $\\displaystyle - \\int_{I}\\int_{|x|\\leq A|I|^{1/2}}|u|^{2}\\Delta \\Big(\\frac{1}{|x|}\\Big)dxdt$ in the localized Morawetz identity to rule out the possibility of energy concentration, instead of the classical Morawetz estimate dependent of the nonlinearity.

  8. Critical Materials:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1.SpaceFluorControlsEnergy ReaffirmedCriticalApril

  9. Identifying Nuclear Materials Using Tagged Muons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. L. Morris; J. D. Bacon; K. Borodzin; J. M. Durham; J. M. Fabritius II; E. Guardincerri; A. Hecht; E. C. Milner; H. Miyadera; J. O. Perry; D. Poulson

    2014-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental results from a new technique that uses neutrons generated by stopped cosmic-ray muons to identify nuclear materials are described. The neutrons are used to tag muon-induced fission events in actinides and laminography is used to form images of the stopping material. This technique allows the imaging of uranium objects tagged using muon tracking detectors located above or to the side of the objects. The specificity of the technique to significant quantities of nuclear material along with its insensitivity to spatial details may provide a new method for the task of warhead verification for future arms reduction treaties.

  10. Identifying Nuclear Materials Using Tagged Muons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, C L; Borodzin, K; Durham, J M; Fabritius, J M; Guardincerri, E; Hecht, A; Milner, E C; Miyadera, H; Perry, J O; Poulson, D

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental results from a new technique that uses neutrons generated by stopped cosmic-ray muons to identify nuclear materials are described. The neutrons are used to tag muon-induced fission events in actinides and laminography is used to form images of the stopping material. This technique allows the imaging of uranium objects tagged using muon tracking detectors located above or to the side of the objects. The specificity of the technique to significant quantities of nuclear material along with its insensitivity to spatial details may provide a new method for the task of warhead verification for future arms reduction treaties.

  11. Imaging Fukushima Daiichi reactors with muons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyadera, Haruo; Borozdin, Konstantin N.; Greene, Steve J.; Milner, Edward C.; Morris, Christopher L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Lukic, Zarija [Computational Cosmology Center, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Masuda, Koji [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Perry, John O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of imaging the Fukushima Daiichi reactors with cosmic-ray muons to assess the damage to the reactors is presented. Muon scattering imaging has high sensitivity for detecting uranium fuel and debris even through thick concrete walls and a reactor pressure vessel. Technical demonstrations using a reactor mockup, detector radiation test at Fukushima Daiichi, and simulation studies have been carried out. These studies establish feasibility for the reactor imaging. A few months of measurement will reveal the spatial distribution of the reactor fuel. The muon scattering technique would be the best and probably the only way for Fukushima Daiichi to make this determination in the near future.

  12. Phase space barriers and dividing surfaces in the absence of critical points of the potential energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phase space barriers and dividing surfaces in the absence of critical points of the potential Kingdom (Dated: November 1, 2010) Abstract We consider the existence of invariant manifolds in phase space in the relevant regions of configuration space. We point out that such situations occur in a number of important

  13. Cosmic ray muon charge ratio in the MINOS far detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beall, Erik B; /Minnesota U.

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MINOS Far Detector is a 5.4 kiloton (5.2 kt steel plus 0.2 kt scintillator plus aluminum skin) magnetized tracking calorimeter located 710 meters underground in the Soudan mine in Northern Minnesota. MINOS is the first large, deep underground detector with a magnetic field and thus capable of making measurements of the momentum and charge of cosmic ray muons. Despite encountering unexpected anomalies in distributions of the charge ratio (N{sub {mu}{sup +}}/N{sub {mu}{sup -}}) of cosmic muons, a method of canceling systematic errors is proposed and demonstrated. The result is R{sub eff} = 1.346 {+-} 0.002 (stat) {+-} 0.016 (syst) for the averaged charge ratio, and a result for a rising fit to slant depth of R(X) = 1.300 {+-} 0.008 (stat) {+-} 0.016 (syst) + (1.8 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -5} x X, valid over the range of slant depths from 2000 < X < 6000 MWE. This slant depth range corresponds to minimum surface muon energies between 750 GeV and 5 TeV.

  14. A critical review of single fuel and interfuel substitution residential energy demand models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Raymond Steve

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this paper is to formulate a model of residential energy demand that adequately analyzes all aspects of residential consumer energy demand behavior and properly treats the penetration of new technologies, ...

  15. Muon capture rates within the projected QRPA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danilo Sande Santos; Arturo R. Samana; Francisco Krmpoti?; Alejandro J. Dimarco

    2012-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The conservation of the number of particles within the QRPA plays an important role in the evaluation muon capture rates in all light nuclei with A \\precsim 30 . The violation of the CVC by the Coulomb field in this mass region is of minor importance, but this effect could be quite relevant for medium and heavy nuclei studied previously. The extreme sensitivity of the muon capture rates on the 'pp' coupling strength in nuclei with large neutron excess when described within the QRPA is pointed out. We reckon that the comparison between theory and data for the inclusive muon capture is not a fully satisfactory test on the nuclear model that is used. The exclusive muon transitions are much more robust for such a purpose.

  16. Theoretical survey of muon catalyzed fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leon, M.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main steps in the muon-catalyzed d-t fusion cycle are given in this report. Most of the stages are very fast, and therefore do not contribute significantly to the cycling time. Thus at liquid H/sub 2/ densities (/phi/ = 1 in the standard convention) the time for stopping the negative muon, its subsequent capture and deexcitation to the ground state is estimated to be /approximately/ 10/sup/minus/11/ sec./sup 1/ The muon spends essentially all of its time in either the (d..mu..) ground state, waiting for transfer to a (t..mu..) ground state to occur, or in the (t..mu..) ground state, writing for molecular formation to occur. Following the formation of this ''mesomolecule'' (actually a muonic molecular ion), deexcitation and fusion are again fast. Then the muon is (usually) liberated to go around again. We will discuss these steps in some detail. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Investigations of fast neutron production by 190 GeV/c muon interactions on graphite target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chazal, V; Cook, B; Henrikson, H; Jonkmans, G; Paic, A; Mascarenhas, N; Vogel, P; Vuilleumier, J L

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The production of fast neutrons (1 MeV - 1 GeV) in high energy muon-nucleus interactions is poorly understood, yet it is fundamental to the understanding of the background in many underground experiments. The aim of the present experiment (CERN NA55) was to measure spallation neutrons produced by 190 GeV/c muons scattering on carbon target. We have investigated the energy spectrum and angular distribution of spallation neutrons, and we report the result of our measurement of the neutron production differential cross section.

  18. Critical Subcriticals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution4 Department of Energy CarlsbadWinterAnyone » Critical

  19. Validation of the Monte Carlo criticality program KENO IV and the Hansen-Roach sixteen-energy-group-cross sections for high-assay uranium systems. [KENO IV criticality code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Handley, G. R.; Masters, L. C.; Stachowiak, R. V.

    1981-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Validation of the Monte Carlo criticality code, KENO IV, and the Hansen-Roach sixteen-energy-group cross sections was accomplished by calculating the effective neutron multiplication constant, k/sub eff/, of 29 experimentally critical assemblies which had uranium enrichments of 92.6% or higher in the uranium-235 isotope. The experiments were chosen so that a large variety of geometries and of neutron energy spectra were covered. Problems, calculating the k/sub eff/ of systems with high-uranium-concentration uranyl nitrate solution that were minimally reflected or unreflected, resulted in the separate examination of five cases.

  20. High Resolution Muon Computed Tomography at Neutrino Beam Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suerfu, Burkhant

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) has an indispensable role in constructing 3D images of objects made from light materials. However, limited by absorption coefficients, X-rays cannot deeply penetrate materials such as copper and lead. Here we show via simulation that muon beams can provide high resolution tomographic images of dense objects and of structures within the interior of dense objects. The effects of resolution broadening from multiple scattering diminish with increasing muon momentum. As the momentum of the muon increases, the contrast of the image goes down and therefore requires higher resolution in the muon spectrometer to resolve the image. The variance of the measured muon momentum reaches a minimum and then increases with increasing muon momentum. The impact of the increase in variance is to require a higher integrated muon flux to reduce fluctuations. The flux requirements and level of contrast needed for high resolution muon computed tomography are well matched to the muons produced in the pio...

  1. Delayed muons in extensive air showers and double-front showers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beisembaev, R. U.; Vavilov, Yu. N., E-mail: yuvavil@mail.ru; Vildanov, N. G.; Kruglov, A. V.; Stepanov, A. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Institute of Physics (Russian Federation); Takibaev, J. S. [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University (Kazakhstan)

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of a long-term experiment performed in the period between 1995 and 2006 with the aid of the MUON-T underground (20 mwe) scintillation facility arranged at the Tien Shan mountain research station at an altitude of 3340 m above sea level are presented. The time distribution of delayed muons with an energy in excess of 5 GeV in extensive air showers of energy not lower than 106 GeV with respect to the shower front was obtained with a high statistical significance in the delay interval between 30 and 150 ns. An effect of the geomagnetic field in detecting delayed muons in extensive air showers was discovered. This effect leads to the asymmetry of their appearance with respect to the north-south direction. The connection between delayed muons and extensive air showers featuring two fronts separated by a time interval of several tens of to two hundred nanoseconds is discussed. This connection gives sufficient grounds to assume that delayed muons originate from the decays of pions and kaons produced in the second, delayed, front of extensive air showers.

  2. The Program in Muon and Neutrino Physics: Super Beams, Cold Muon Beams,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Program in Muon and Neutrino Physics: Super Beams, Cold Muon Beams, Neutrino Factory.1 Neutrino Oscillation Physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 - 1 3.1.1 Evidence-oscillation physics at a Neutrino Factory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 - 16 iii #12;3.4 Physics that can be done

  3. Neutrino Radiation Challenges and Proposed Solutions for Many-TeV Muon Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. J. King

    2000-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino radiation is expected to impose major design and siting constraints on many-TeV muon colliders. Previous predictions for radiation doses at TeV energy scales are briefly reviewed and then modified for extension to the many-TeV energy regime. The energy-cubed dependence of lower energy colliders is found to soften to an increase of slightly less than quadratic when averaged over the plane of the collider ring and slightly less than linear for the radiation hot spots downstream from straight sections in the collider ring. Despite this, the numerical values are judged to be sufficiently high that any many-TeV muon colliders will likely be constructed on large isolated sites specifically chosen to minimize or eliminate human exposure to the neutrino radiation. It is pointed out that such sites would be of an appropriate size scale to also house future proton-proton and electron-positron colliders at the high energy frontier, which naturally leads to conjecture on the possibilities for a new world laboratory for high energy physics. Radiation dose predictions are also presented for the speculative possibility of linear muon colliders. These have greatly reduced radiation constraints relative to circular muon colliders because radiation is only emitted in two pencil beams directed along the axes of the opposing linacs.

  4. R&D Toward a Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zisman, Michael S

    2011-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant progress has been made in recent years in R&D towards a neutrino factory and muon collider. The U.S. Muon Accelerator Program (MAP) has been formed recently to expedite the R&D efforts. This paper will review the U.S. MAP R&D programs for a neutrino factory and muon collider. Muon ionization cooling research is the key element of the program. The first muon ionization cooling demonstration experiment, MICE (Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment), is under construction now at RAL (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory) in the UK. The current status of MICE will be described.

  5. Investigation of the relative abundance of heavy versus light nuclei in primary cosmic rays using underground muon bundles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sundaralingam, N.

    1993-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We study multiple muon events (muon bundles) recorded underground at a depth of 2090 mwe. To penetrate to this depth, the muons must have energies above 0.8 TeV at the Earth`s surface; the primary cosmic ray nuclei which give rise to the observed muon bundles have energies at incidence upon the upper atmosphere of 10 to 10{sup 5}TeV. The events are detected using the Soudan 2 experiment`s fine grained tracking calorimeter which is surrounded by a 14 m {times}10 m {times} 31 m proportional tube array (the ``active shield``). Muon bundles which have at least one muon traversing the calorimeter, are reconstructed using tracks in the calorimeter together with hit patterns in the proportional tube shield. All ionization pulses are required to be coincident within 3 microseconds. A goal of this study is to investigate the relative nuclear abundances in the primary cosmic radiation around the ``knee`` region (10{sup 3} {minus} 10{sup 4} TeV) of the incident energy spectrum. Four models for the nuclear composition of cosmic rays are considered: The Linsley model, the Constant Mass Composition model (CMC), the Maryland model and the Proton-poor model. A Monte Carlo which incorporates one model at a time is used to simulate events which are then reconstructed using the same computer algorithms that are used for the data. Identical cuts and selections are applied to the data and to the simulated events.

  6. Energy: Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific Plan as

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  7. 50 Years After the MoonShot Speech, Critical Advancements in Clean Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you0 ARRA Newsletters 2010 ARRA Newsletters201416-17, 2015SunShot Initiative

  8. ARPA-E Workshop on Rare Earth and Critical Materials | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you0 ARRA Newsletters 2010 ARRAA LiquidAL2010-03.pdfAMOSmith and Lee ScottARPA-E

  9. U-105:Oracle Java SE Critical Patch Update Advisory | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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  10. PULSED-FOCUSING RECIRCULATING LINACS FOR MUON ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Rolland PAUL

    2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the muon has a short lifetime, fast acceleration is essential for high-energy applications such as muon colliders, Higgs factories, or neutrino factories. The best one can do is to make a linear accelerator with the highest possible accelerating gradient to make the accelerating time as short as possible. However, the cost of such a single linear accelerator is prohibitively large due to expensive power sources, cavities, tunnels, and related infrastructure. As was demonstrated in the Thomas Jefferson Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), an elegant solution to reduce cost is to use magnetic return arcs to recirculate the beam through the accelerating RF cavities many times, where they gain energy on each pass. In such a Recirculating Linear Accelerator (RLA), the magnetic focusing strength diminishes as the beam energy increases in a conventional linac that has constant strength quadrupoles. After some number of passes the focusing strength is insufficient to keep the beam from going unstable and being lost. In this project, the use of fast pulsed quadrupoles in the linac sections was considered for stronger focusing as a function of time to allow more successive passes of a muon beam in a recirculating linear accelerator. In one simulation, it was shown that the number of passes could be increased from 8 to 12 using pulsed magnet designs that have been developed and tested. This could reduce the cost of linac sections of a muon RLA by 8/12, where more improvement is still possible. The expense of a greater number of passes and corresponding number of return arcs was also addressed in this project by exploring the use of ramped or FFAG-style magnets in the return arcs. A better solution, invented in this project, is to use combined-function dipole-quadrupole magnets to simultaneously transport two beams of different energies through one magnet string to reduce costs of return arcs by almost a factor of two. A patent application was filed for this invention and a detailed report published in Physical Review Special Topics. A scaled model using an electron beam was developed and proposed to test the concept of a dog bone RLA with combined-function return arcs. The efforts supported by this grant were reported in a series of contributions to particle accelerator conferences that are reproduced in the appendices and summarized in the body of this report.

  11. Muon Emittance Exchange with a Potato Slicer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Summers, D J; Acosta, J G; Cremaldi, L M; Oliveros, S J; Perera, L P; Neuffer, D V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a novel scheme for final muon ionization cooling with quadrupole doublets followed by emittance exchange in vacuum to achieve the small beam sizes needed by a muon collider. A flat muon beam with a series of quadrupole doublet half cells appears to provide the strong focusing required for final cooling. Each quadrupole doublet has a low beta region occupied by a dense, low Z absorber. After final cooling, normalized transverse, longitudinal, and angular momentum emittances of 0.100, 2.5, and 0.200 mm-rad are exchanged into 0.025, 70, and 0.0 mm-rad. A skew quadrupole triplet transforms a round muon bunch with modest angular momentum into a flat bunch with no angular momentum. Thin electrostatic septa efficiently slice the flat bunch into 17 parts. The 17 bunches are interleaved into a 3.7 meter long train with RF deflector cavities. Snap bunch coalescence combines the muon bunch train longitudinally in a 21 GeV ring in 55 microseconds, one quarter of a synchrotron oscillation period. A linear long ...

  12. Muon spin depolarization in nonmagnetic metals doped with paramagnetic impurities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heffner, R.H.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The diffusion of muons and their magnetic interactions are treated by describing the physics to be learned from experiments which measure muon depolarization in metallic hosts doped with dilute concentrations of magnetic impurities. (GHT)

  13. Use of dielectric material in muon accelerator RF cavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    French, Katheryn Decker

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The building of a muon collider is motivated by the desire to collide point-like particles while reducing the limitations imposed by synchrotron radiation. The many challenges unique to muon accelerators are derived from ...

  14. Muon Collider Final Cooling in 30-50 T Solenoids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, R.B.; Fernow, R.C.; Lederman, J.

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Muon ionization cooling to the required normalized rms emittance of 25 microns transverse, and 72 mm longitudinal, can be achieved with liquid hydrogen in high field solenoids, provided that the momenta are low enough. At low momenta, the longitudinal emittance rises from the negative slope of energy loss versus energy. Assuming initial emittances that have been achieved in six dimensional cooling simulations, optimized designs are given using solenoid fields limited to 30, 40, and 50 T. The required final emittances are achieved for the two higher field cases. Preliminary simulations of transverse cooling in hydrogen, at low energies, suggests that muon collider emittance requirements can be met using solenoid fields of 40 T or more. It might also be acceptable with 30 T. But these simulations did not include hydrogen windows,matching or reacceleration, whose performance, with one exception, was based on numerical estimates. Full simulations of more stages are planned. The design and simulation of hydrogen windows must be included, and space charge effects, and absorber heating, calculated.

  15. Guidelines for Preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations at Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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  16. Energy Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific Plan as

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandard | DepartmentDepartment of Energy Corps Takes

  17. Critical coupling and coherent perfect absorption for ranges of energies due to a complex gain and loss symmetric system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasan, Mohammad, E-mail: mohammadhasan786@gmail.com [ISRO Satellite Centre (ISAC), Bangalore-560017 (India); Ghatak, Ananya, E-mail: gananya04@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221005 (India); Mandal, Bhabani Prasad, E-mail: bhabani.mandal@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221005 (India)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a non-Hermitian medium with a gain and loss symmetric, exponentially damped potential distribution to demonstrate different scattering features analytically. The condition for critical coupling (CC) for unidirectional wave and coherent perfect absorption (CPA) for bidirectional waves are obtained analytically for this system. The energy points at which total absorption occurs are shown to be the spectral singular points for the time reversed system. The possible energies at which CC occurs for left and right incidence are different. We further obtain periodic intervals with increasing periodicity of energy for CC and CPA to occur in this system. -- Highlights: •Energy ranges for CC and CPA are obtained explicitly for complex WS potential. •Analytical conditions for CC and CPA for PT symmetric WS potential are obtained. •Conditions for left and right CC are shown to be different. •Conditions for CC and CPA are shown to be that of SS for the time reversed system. •Our model shows the great flexibility of frequencies for CC and CPA.

  18. Detection of Ionizing Radiation by Plasma-Panel Sensors: Cosmic Muons, Ion Beams, and Cancer Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedman, Dr. Peter S. [Integrated Sensors, LLC; Ferretti, Claudio [University of Michigan; Ball, Robert [University of Michigan; Beene, James R [ORNL; Ben Moshe, M. [Tel Aviv University; Benhammou, Yan [Tel Aviv University; Chapman, J. Wehrley [University of Michigan; Levin, Daniel S. [University of Michigan; Silver, Yiftah [Tel Aviv University; Weaverdyck, Curtis [University of Michigan; Zhou, Bing [University of Michigan; Etzion, E [Tel Aviv University; Moshe, M. [Tel Aviv University; Bentefour, E [Ion Beam Applications

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The plasma panel sensor is an ionizing photon and particle radiation detector derived from PDP technology with high gain and nanosecond response. Experimental results in detecting cosmic ray muons and beta particles from radioactive sources are described along with applications including high energy and nuclear physics, homeland security and cancer therapeutics.

  19. Muon Fluence Measurements for Homeland Security Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ankney, Austin S.; Berguson, Timothy J.; Borgardt, James D.; Kouzes, Richard T.

    2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report focuses on work conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to better characterize aspects of backgrounds in RPMs deployed for homeland security purposes. Two polyvinyl toluene scintillators were utilized with supporting NIM electronics to measure the muon coincidence rate. Muon spallation is one mechanism by which background neutrons are produced. The measurements performed concentrated on a broad investigation of the dependence of the muon flux on a) variations in solid angle subtended by the detector; b) the detector inclination with the horizontal; c) depth underground; and d) diurnal effects. These tests were conducted inside at Building 318/133, outdoors at Building 331G, and underground at Building 3425 at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  20. Muon Tracking to Detect Special Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwellenbach, D. [NSTec; Dreesen, W. [NSTec; Green, J. A. [NSTec; Tibbitts, A. [NSTec; Schotik, G. [NSTec; Borozdin, K. [LANL; Bacon, J. [LANL; Midera, H. [LANL; Milner, C. [LANL; Morris, C. [LANL; Perry, J. [LANL; Barrett, S. [UW; Perry, K. [UW; Scott, A. [UW; Wright, C. [UW; Aberle, D. [NSTec

    2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous experiments have proven that nuclear assemblies can be imaged and identified inside of shipping containers using vertical trajectory cosmic-ray muons with two-sided imaging. These experiments have further demonstrated that nuclear assemblies can be identified by detecting fission products in coincidence with tracked muons. By developing these technologies, advanced sensors can be designed for a variety of warhead monitoring and detection applications. The focus of this project is to develop tomographic-mode imaging using near-horizontal trajectory muons in conjunction with secondary particle detectors. This will allow imaging in-situ without the need to relocate the objects and will enable differentiation of special nuclear material (SNM) from other high-Z materials.

  1. Muon (g-2) Technical Design Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Grange; V. Guarino; P. Winter; K. Wood; H. Zhao; R. M. Carey; D. Gastler; E. Hazen; N. Kinnaird; J. P. Miller; J. Mott; B. L. Roberts; J. Benante; J. Crnkovic; W. M. Morse; H. Sayed; V. Tishchenko; V. P. Druzhinin; B. I. Khazin; I. A. Koop; I. Logashenko; Y. M. Shatunov; E. Solodov; M. Korostelev; D. Newton; A. Wolski; R. Bjorkquist; N. Eggert; A. Frankenthal; L. Gibbons; S. Kim; A. Mikhailichenko; Y. Orlov; D. Rubin; D. Sweigart; D. Allspach; G. Annala; E. Barzi; K. Bourland; G. Brown; B. C. K. Casey; S. Chappa; M. E. Convery; B. Drendel; H. Friedsam; T. Gadfort; K. Hardin; S. Hawke; S. Hayes; W. Jaskierny; C. Johnstone; J. Johnstone; V. Kashikhin; C. Kendziora; B. Kiburg; A. Klebaner; I. Kourbanis; J. Kyle; N. Larson; A. Leveling; A. L. Lyon; D. Markley; D. McArthur; K. W. Merritt; N. Mokhov; J. P. Morgan; H. Nguyen; J-F. Ostiguy; A. Para; C. C. Polly M. Popovic; E. Ramberg; M. Rominsky; D. Schoo; R. Schultz; D. Still; A. K. Soha; S. Strigonov; G. Tassotto; D. Turrioni; E. Villegas; E. Voirin; G. Velev; D. Wolff; C. Worel; J-Y. Wu; R. Zifko; K. Jungmann; C. J. G. Onderwater; P. T. Debevec; S. Ganguly; M. Kasten; S. Leo; K. Pitts; C. Schlesier; M. Gaisser; S. Haciomeroglu; Y-I. Kim; S. Lee; M-J Lee; Y. K. Semertzidis; K. Giovanetti; V. A. Baranov; V. N. Duginov; N. V. Khomutov; V. A. Krylov; N. A. Kuchinskiy; V. P. Volnykh; C. Crawford; R. Fatemi; W. P. Gohn; T. P. Gorringe; W. Korsch; B. Plaster; A. Anastasi; D. Babusci; S. Dabagov; C. Ferrari; A. Fioretti; C. Gabbanini; D. Hampai; A. Palladino; G. Venanzoni; T. Bowcock; J. Carroll; B. King; S. Maxfield; K. McCormick; A. Smith; T. Teubner; M. Whitley; M. Wormald; R. Chislett; S. Kilani; M. Lancaster; E. Motuk; T. Stuttard; M. Warren; D. Flay; D. Kawall; Z. Meadows; T. Chupp; R. Raymond; A. Tewlsey-Booth; M. J. Syphers; D. Tarazona; C. Ankenbrandt; M. A. Cummings; R. P. Johnson; C. Yoshikawa; S. Catalonotti; R. Di Stefano; M. Iacovacci; S. Mastroianni; S. Chattopadhyay; M. Eads; M. Fortner; D. Hedin; N. Pohlman; A. de Gouvea; H. Schellman; L. Welty-Rieger; T. Itahashi; Y. Kuno; K. Yai; F. Azfar; S. Henry; G. D. Alkhazov; V. L. Golovtsov; P. V. Neustroev; L. N. Uvarov; A. A. Vasilyev; A. A. Vorobyov; M. B. Zhalov; L. Cerrito; F. Gray; G. Di Sciascio; D. Moricciani; C. Fu; X. Ji; L. Li; H. Yang; D. Stöckinger; G. Cantatore; D. Cauz; M. Karuza; G. Pauletta; L. Santi; S. Bae\\ssler; M. Bychkov; E. Frlez; D. Pocanic; L. P. Alonzi; M. Fertl; A. Fienberg; N. Froemming; A. Garcia; D. W. Hertzog J. Kaspar; P. Kammel; R. Osofsky; M. Smith; E. Swanson; T. van Wechel; K. Lynch

    2015-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Muon (g-2) Experiment, E989 at Fermilab, will measure the muon anomalous magnetic moment a factor-of-four more precisely than was done in E821 at the Brookhaven National Laboratory AGS. The E821 result appears to be greater than the Standard-Model prediction by more than three standard deviations. When combined with expected improvement in the Standard-Model hadronic contributions, E989 should be able to determine definitively whether or not the E821 result is evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model. After a review of the physics motivation and the basic technique, which will use the muon storage ring built at BNL and now relocated to Fermilab, the design of the new experiment is presented. This document was created in partial fulfillment of the requirements necessary to obtain DOE CD-2/3 approval.

  2. An assessment of criticality safety at the Department of Energy Rocky Flats Plant, Golden, Colorado, July--September 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattson, Roger J.

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a report on the 1989 independent Criticality Safety Assessment of the Rocky Flats Plant, primarily in response to public concerns that nuclear criticality accidents involving plutonium may have occurred at this nuclear weapon component fabrication and processing plant. The report evaluates environmental issues, fissile material storage practices, ventilation system problem areas, and criticality safety practices. While no evidence of a criticality accident was found, several recommendations are made for criticality safety improvements. 9 tabs.

  3. Characterisation of the muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, D; Alekou, A; Apollonio, M; Asfandiyarov, R; Back, J; Barber, G; Barclay, P; de Bari, A; Bayes, R; Baynham, D E; Bertoni, R; Blackmore, V J; Blondel, A; Blot, S; Bogomilov, M; Bonesini, M; Booth, C N; Bowring, D; Boyd, S; Bradshaw, T W; Bravar, U; Bross, A D; Capponi, M; Carlisle, T; Cecchet, G; Charnley, G; Cobb, J H; Colling, D; Collomb, N; Coney, L; Cooke, P; Courthold, M; Cremaldi, L M; DeMello, A; Dick, A; Dobbs, A; Dornan, P; Fayer, S; Filthaut, F; Fish, A; Fitzpatrick, T; Fletcher, R; Forrest, D; Francis, V; Freemire, B; Fry, L; Gallagher, A; Gamet, R; Gourlay, S; Grant, A; Graulich, J S; Griffiths, S; Hanlet, P; Hansen, O M; Hanson, G G; Harrison, P; Hart, T L; Hartnett, T; Hayler, T; Heidt, C; Hills, M; Hodgson, P; Hunt, C; Iaciofano, A; Ishimoto, S; Kafka, G; Kaplan, D M; Karadzhov, Y; Kim, Y K; Kolev, D; Kuno, Y; Kyberd, P; Lau, W; Leaver, J; Leonova, M; Li, D; Lintern, A; Littlefield, M; Long, K; Lucchini, G; Luo, T; Macwaters, C; Martlew, B; Martyniak, J; Middleton, S; Moretti, A; Moss, A; Muir, A; Mullacrane, I; Nebrensky, J J; Neuffer, D; Nichols, A; Nicholson, R; Nugent, J C; Onel, Y; Orestano, D; Overton, E; Owens, P; Palladino, V; Palmer, R B; Pasternak, J; Pastore, F; Pidcott, C; Popovic, M; Preece, R; Prestemon, S; Rajaram, D; Ramberger, S; Rayner, M A; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Roberts, T J; Robinson, M; Rogers, C; Ronald, K; Rubinov, P; Rucinski, R; Rusinov, I; Sakamoto, H; Sanders, D A; Santos, E; Savidge, T; Smith, P J; Snopok, P; Soler, F J P; Summers, D J; Takahashi, M; Tarrant, J; Taylor, I; Tortora, L; Torun, Y; Tsenov, R; Tunnell, C D; Vankova, G; Verguilov, V; Virostek, S; Vretenar, M; Walaron, K; Watson, S; White, C; Whyte, C G; Wilson, A; Wisting, H; Zisman, M

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel single-particle technique to measure emittance has been developed and used to characterise seventeen different muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE). The muon beams, whose mean momenta vary from 171 to 281 MeV/c, have emittances of approximately 1.5--2.3 \\pi mm-rad horizontally and 0.6--1.0 \\pi mm-rad vertically, a horizontal dispersion of 90--190 mm and momentum spreads of about 25 MeV/c. There is reasonable agreement between the measured parameters of the beams and the results of simulations. The beams are found to meet the requirements of MICE.

  4. T-535: Oracle Critical Patch Update - January 2011 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic SafetyGeothermal/Ground-Sourcepnnl.govSystems-Level Analysis

  5. Cosmic-ray Muon Flux In Belgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banjanac, R.; Dragic, A.; Jokovic, D.; Udovicic, V. [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Puzovic, J.; Anicin, I. [Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Two identical plastic scintillator detectors, of prismatic shape (50x23x5)cm similar to NE102, were used for continuous monitoring of cosmic-ray intensity. Muon {delta}E spectra have been taken at five minute intervals, simultaneously from the detector situated on the ground level and from the second one at the depth of 25 m.w.e in the low-level underground laboratory. Sum of all the spectra for the years 2002-2004 has been used to determine the cosmic-ray muon flux at the ground level and in the underground laboratory.

  6. Market barriers to energy efficiency: A critical reappraisal of the rationale for public policies to promote energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golove, W.H.; Eto, J.H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report reviews current perspectives on market barriers to energy efficiency. Ratepayer-funded utility energy-efficiency programs are likely to change in scope, size, and nature as the deregulation process proceeds; the authors research focuses on understanding to what extent some form of future intervention may be warranted and how they might judge the success of particular interventions, especially those funded by ratepayers. They find that challenges to the existence of market barriers have, for the most part, failed to provide a testable alternative explanation for evidence suggesting that there is a substantial ``efficiency gap`` between a consumer`s actual investments in energy efficiency and those that appear to be in the consumer`s own interest. They then suggest that differences of opinion about the appropriateness of public policies stem not from disputes about whether market barriers exist, but from different perceptions of the magnitude of the barriers, and the efficacy and (possibly unintended) consequences of policies designed to overcome them. They conclude that there are compelling justifications for future energy-efficiency policies. Nevertheless, in order to succeed, they must be based on a sound understanding of the market problems they seek to correct and a realistic assessment of their likely efficacy. This understanding can only emerge from detailed investigations of the current operation of individual markets.

  7. Energy Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific Plan as

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 Federal Register /of Energy 3 BTOWebinarSupplies;IceUrinalsHeatinginput

  8. No Small Task: How Small Businesses are Critical to our Energy Future |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many DevilsForumEnginesVacant Under Secretary for Science and

  9. Combined Heat and Power: Enabling Resilient Energy Infrastructure for Critical Facilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave the White Flag"Department of8,catalystsDepartment ofStates

  10. Energy: Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific Plan as

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandard |inHVAC |Departmentinput to the National Infrastructure

  11. Measuring Muon-Induced Neutrons with Liquid Scintillation Detector at Soudan Mine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Zhang; D. -M. Mei

    2014-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a direct detection of muon-induced high energy neutrons with a 12-liter neutron detector fabricated with EJ-301 liquid scintillator operating at Soudan Mine for about two years. The detector response to energy from a few MeV up to $\\sim$ 20 MeV has been calibrated using radioactive sources and cosmic-ray muons. Subsequently, we have calculated the scintillation efficiency for nuclear recoils, up to a few hundred MeV, using Birks' law in the Monte Carlo simulation. Data from an exposure of 655.1 days were analyzed and neutron-induced recoil events were observed in the energy region from 4 MeV to 50 MeV, corresponding to fast neutrons with kinetic energy up to a few hundred MeV, depending on the scattering angle. Combining with the Monte Carlo simulation, the muon-induced fast neutron flux is determined to be $(2.3 \\pm 0.52 (sta.) \\pm 0.99 (sys.) ) \\times10^{-9}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ (E$_{n}$ $>$ 20 MeV), in a reasonable agreement with the model prediction. The muon flux is found to be ($1.65\\pm 0.02 (sta.) \\pm 0.1 (sys.) ) \\times10^{-7}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ (E$_{\\mu}$ $>$ 1 GeV), consistent with other measurements. As a result, the muon-induced high energy gamma-ray flux is simulated to be 7.08 $\\times$10$^{-7}$cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ (E$_{\\gamma}$ $>$ 1 MeV) for the depth of Soudan.

  12. Global well-posedness of the energy critical Nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation with small initial data in H^1(T^3)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herr, Sebastian; Tzvetkov, Nikolay

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A refined trilinear Strichartz estimate for solutions to the Schr\\"odinger equation on the flat rational torus T^3 is derived. By a suitable modification of critical function space theory this is applied to prove a small data global well-posedness result for the quintic Nonlinear Schr\\"odinger Equation in H^s(T^3) for all s \\geq 1. This is the first energy-critical global well-posedness result in the setting of compact manifolds.

  13. First calculation of cosmic-ray muon spallation backgrounds for MeV astrophysical neutrino signals in Super-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Shirley Weishi

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When muons travel through matter, their energy losses lead to nuclear breakup ("spallation") processes. The delayed decays of unstable daughter nuclei produced by cosmic-ray muons are important backgrounds for low-energy astrophysical neutrino experiments, e.g., those seeking to detect solar neutrino or Diffuse Supernova Neutrino Background (DSNB) signals. Even though Super-Kamiokande has strong general cuts to reduce these spallation-induced backgrounds, the remaining rate before additional cuts for specific signals is much larger than the signal rates for kinetic energies of about 6 -- 18 MeV. Surprisingly, there is no published calculation of the production and properties of these backgrounds in water, though there are such studies for scintillator. Using the simulation code FLUKA and theoretical insights, we detail how muons lose energy in water, produce secondary particles, how and where these secondaries produce isotopes, and the properties of the backgrounds from their decays. We reproduce Super-Kamiok...

  14. Alpha-muon sticking and chaos in muon-catalysed "in flight" d-t fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sachie Kimura; Aldo Bonasera

    2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the alpha-muon sticking coefficient in the muon-catalysed ``in flight" d-t fusion in the framework of the Constrained Molecular Dynamics model. Especially the influence of muonic chaotic dynamics on the sticking coefficient is brought into focus. The chaotic motion of the muon affects not only the fusion cross section but also the $\\mu-\\alpha$ sticking coefficient. Chaotic systems lead to larger enhancements with respect to regular systems because of the reduction of the tunneling region. Moreover they give smaller sticking probabilities than those of regular events. By utilizing a characteristic of the chaotic dynamics one can avoid losing the muon in the $\\mu$CF cycle. We propose the application of the so-called ``microwave ionization of a Rydberg atom" to the present case which could lead to the enhancement of the reactivation process by using X-rays.

  15. Impact of Distributed Energy Resources on the Reliability of Critical Telecommunications Facilities: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, D. G.; Arent, D. J.; Johnson, L.

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper documents a probabilistic risk assessment of existing and alternative power supply systems at a large telecommunications office. The analysis characterizes the increase in the reliability of power supply through the use of two alternative power configurations. Failures in the power systems supporting major telecommunications service nodes are a main contributor to significant telecommunications outages. A logical approach to improving the robustness of telecommunication facilities is to increase the depth and breadth of technologies available to restore power during power outages. Distributed energy resources such as fuel cells and gas turbines could provide additional on-site electric power sources to provide backup power, if batteries and diesel generators fail. The analysis is based on a hierarchical Bayesian approach and focuses on the failure probability associated with each of three possible facility configurations, along with assessment of the uncertainty or confidence level in the probability of failure. A risk-based characterization of final best configuration is presented.

  16. Spallation Backgrounds in Super-Kamiokande Are Made in Muon-Induced Showers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirley Weishi Li; John F. Beacom

    2015-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Crucial questions about solar and supernova neutrinos remain unanswered. Super-Kamiokande has the exposure needed for progress, but detector backgrounds are a limiting factor. A leading component is the beta decays of isotopes produced by cosmic-ray muons and their secondaries, which initiate nuclear spallation reactions. Cuts of events after and surrounding muon tracks reduce this spallation decay background by $\\simeq 90\\%$ (at a cost of $\\simeq 20\\%$ deadtime), but its rate at 6--18 MeV is still dominant. A better way to cut this background was suggested in a Super-Kamiokande paper [Bays {\\it et al.}, Phys.~Rev.~D {\\bf 85}, 052007 (2012)] on a search for the diffuse supernova neutrino background. They found that spallation decays above 16 MeV were preceded near the same location by a peak in the apparent Cherenkov light profile from the muon; a more aggressive cut was applied to a limited section of the muon track, leading to decreased background without increased deadtime. We put their empirical discovery on a firm theoretical foundation. We show that almost all spallation decay isotopes are produced by muon-induced showers and that these showers are rare enough and energetic enough to be identifiable. This is the first such demonstration for any detector. We detail how the physics of showers explains the peak in the muon Cherenkov light profile and other Super-K observations. Our results provide a physical basis for practical improvements in background rejection that will benefit multiple studies. For solar neutrinos, in particular, it should be possible to dramatically reduce backgrounds at energies as low as 6 MeV.

  17. BNL -66968 CAP-265-Muon-99C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    stage of ionization cooling for the muon collider requires a multistage liquid lithium lens. This system on the Be window. We describe beam optics, the liquid lithium pressure vessel, pump options, power supplies stages of 1 cooling is obtained by passing the beam though a conducting light metal rod which acts

  18. Design and commissioning of a high magnetic field muon spin relaxation spectrometer at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lord, J. S.; McKenzie, I.; Baker, P. J.; Cottrell, S. P.; Giblin, S. R.; Hillier, A. D.; Holsman, B. H.; King, P. J. C.; Nightingale, J. B.; Pratt, F. L.; Rhodes, N. J. [ISIS Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Blundell, S. J.; Lancaster, T. [Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, Oxford University, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Good, J.; Mitchell, R.; Owczarkowski, M.; Poli, S. [Cryogenic Limited, 30 Acton Park Industrial Estate, The Vale, Acton, London W3 7QE (United Kingdom); Scheuermann, R. [Laboratory for Muon Spin Spectroscopy, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Salman, Z. [ISIS Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, Oxford University, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The high magnetic field (HiFi) muon instrument at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source is a state-of-the-art spectrometer designed to provide applied magnetic fields up to 5 T for muon studies of condensed matter and molecular systems. The spectrometer is optimised for time-differential muon spin relaxation studies at a pulsed muon source. We describe the challenges involved in its design and construction, detailing, in particular, the magnet and detector performance. Commissioning experiments have been conducted and the results are presented to demonstrate the scientific capabilities of the new instrument.

  19. Beam energy dependence of the expansion dynamics in relativistic heavy ion collisions: Indications for the critical end point?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy A. Lacey

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The flow harmonic $v_{n}$ and the emission source radii $R_{\\text{out}}$, $R_{\\text{side}}$ and $R_{\\text{long}}$ are studied for a broad range of centrality selections and beam collision energies in Au+Au ($\\sqrt{s_{NN}}= 7.7 - 200$ GeV) and Pb+Pb ($\\sqrt{s_{NN}}= 2.76$ TeV) collisions at RHIC and the LHC respectively. They validate the acoustic scaling patterns expected for hydrodynamic-like expansion over the entire range of beam energies studied. The combined data sets allow estimates for the \\sqsn\\ dependence of the mean expansion speed $\\left$, emission duration $\\left$ and the viscous coefficients $\\left$ that encode the magnitude of the specific shear viscosity $\\left$. The estimates indicate initial-state model independent values of $\\left$ which are larger for the plasma produced at 2.76 TeV (LHC) compared to that produced at 200 GeV (RHIC) ($\\left_{\\text{LHC}}=2.2\\pm 0.2$ and $\\left_{\\text{RHIC}}=1.3\\pm 0.2$). They also show a non-monotonic \\sqsn\\ dependence for $\\left$, $\\left$ and $\\left$, with minima for $\\left$ and $\\left$, and a complimentary maximum for $\\left$. These dependencies signal a significant change in reaction dynamics in a narrow span of $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$, which may be linked to reaction trajectories close to the critical end point (CEP) in the phase diagram for nuclear matter.

  20. Mitigating Radiation Impact on Superconducting Magnets of the Higgs Factory Muon Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mokhov, Nikolai; Kashikhin, Vadim V; Striganov, Sergei I; Tropin, Igor S; Zlobin, Alexander V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent discovery of a Higgs boson boosted interest in a low-energy medium-luminosity Muon Collider as a Higgs Factory (HF). A preliminary design of the HF storage ring (SR) is based on cos-theta Nb3Sn superconducting (SC) magnets with the coil inner diameter ranging from 50 cm in the interaction region to 16 cm in the arc. The coil cross-sections were chosen based on the operation margin, field quality and quench protection considerations to provide an adequate space for the beam pipe, helium channel and inner absorber (liner). With the 62.5-GeV muon energy and 2 x 10^12 muons per bunch, the electrons from muon decays deposit about 300 kW in the SC magnets, or unprecedented 1 kW/m dynamic heat load, which corresponds to a multi-MW room temperature equivalent. Based on the detailed MARS15 model built and intense simulations, a sophisticated protection system was designed for the entire SR to bring the peak power density in the SC coils safely below the quench limit and reduce the dynamic heat load to the cold ...

  1. Critical exponents and phase transition in gold nuclei fragmentation at energies 10.6 and 4.0 GeV/nucleon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Kudzia; B. Wilczynska; H. Wilczynski

    2002-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    An attempt to extract critical exponents gamma, beta and tau from data on gold nuclei fragmentation due to interactions with nuclear emulsion at energies 4.0 A GeV and 10.6 A GeV is presented. Based on analysis of Campi's 2nd charge moments, two subsets of data at each energy are selected from the inclusive data, corresponding to 'liquid' and 'gas' phases. The extracted values of critical exponents from the selected data sets are in agreement with predictions of 'liquid-gas' model of phase transition.

  2. Physics validation studies for muon collider detector background simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, Aaron Owen; /Northern Illinois U.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the broad discipline of physics, the study of the fundamental forces of nature and the most basic constituents of the universe belongs to the field of particle physics. While frequently referred to as 'high-energy physics,' or by the acronym 'HEP,' particle physics is not driven just by the quest for ever-greater energies in particle accelerators. Rather, particle physics is seen as having three distinct areas of focus: the cosmic, intensity, and energy frontiers. These three frontiers all provide different, but complementary, views of the basic building blocks of the universe. Currently, the energy frontier is the realm of hadron colliders like the Tevatron at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) or the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. While the LHC is expected to be adequate for explorations up to 14 TeV for the next decade, the long development lead time for modern colliders necessitates research and development efforts in the present for the next generation of colliders. This paper focuses on one such next-generation machine: a muon collider. Specifically, this paper focuses on Monte Carlo simulations of beam-induced backgrounds vis-a-vis detector region contamination. Initial validation studies of a few muon collider physics background processes using G4beamline have been undertaken and results presented. While these investigations have revealed a number of hurdles to getting G4beamline up to the level of more established simulation suites, such as MARS, the close communication between us, as users, and the G4beamline developer, Tom Roberts, has allowed for rapid implementation of user-desired features. The main example of user-desired feature implementation, as it applies to this project, is Bethe-Heitler muon production. Regarding the neutron interaction issues, we continue to study the specifics of how GEANT4 implements nuclear interactions. The GEANT4 collaboration has been contacted regarding the minor discrepancies in the neutron interaction cross sections for boron. While corrections to the data files themselves are simple to implement and distribute, it is quite possible, however, that coding changes may be required in G4beamline or even in GEANT4 to fully correct nuclear interactions. Regardless, these studies are ongoing and future results will be reflected in updated releases of G4beamline.

  3. Critical Materials Hub

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Critical materials, including some rare earth elements that possess unique magnetic, catalytic, and luminescent properties, are key resources needed to manufacture products for the clean energy economy. These materials are so critical to the technologies that enable wind turbines, solar panels, electric vehicles, and energy-efficient lighting that DOE's 2010 and 2011 Critical Materials Strategy reported that supply challenges for five rare earth metals—dysprosium, neodymium, terbium, europium, and yttrium—could affect clean energy technology deployment in the coming years.1, 2

  4. High Resolution Muon Computed Tomography at Neutrino Beam Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burkhant Suerfu; Christopher G. Tully

    2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) has an indispensable role in constructing 3D images of objects made from light materials. However, limited by absorption coefficients, X-rays cannot deeply penetrate materials such as copper and lead. Here we show via simulation that muon beams can provide high resolution tomographic images of dense objects and of structures within the interior of dense objects. The effects of resolution broadening from multiple scattering diminish with increasing muon momentum. As the momentum of the muon increases, the contrast of the image goes down and therefore requires higher resolution in the muon spectrometer to resolve the image. The variance of the measured muon momentum reaches a minimum and then increases with increasing muon momentum. The impact of the increase in variance is to require a higher integrated muon flux to reduce fluctuations. The flux requirements and level of contrast needed for high resolution muon computed tomography are well matched to the muons produced in the pion decay pipe at a neutrino beam facility and what can be achieved for momentum resolution in a muon spectrometer. Such an imaging system can be applied in archaeology, art history, engineering, material identification and whenever there is a need to image inside a transportable object constructed of dense materials.

  5. Critical Drivers for Safety Culture: Examining Department of Energy and U.S. Army Operational Experiences - 12382

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowes, Elizabeth A. [The S.M. Stoller Corporation, Broomfield, Colorado (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluating operational incidents can provide a window into the drivers most critical to establishing and maintaining a strong safety culture, thereby minimizing the potential project risk associated with safety incidents. By examining U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) versus U.S. Army drivers in terms of regulatory and contract requirements, programs implemented to address the requirements, and example case studies of operational events, a view of the elements most critical to making a positive influence on safety culture is presented. Four case studies are used in this evaluation; two from DOE and two from U.S. Army experiences. Although the standards guiding operations at these facilities are different, there are many similarities in the level of hazards, as well as the causes and the potential consequences of the events presented. Two of the incidents examined, one from a DOE operation and the other from a U.S. Army facility, resulted in workers receiving chemical burns. The remaining two incidents are similar in that significant conduct of operations failures occurred resulting in high-level radioactive waste (in the case of the DOE facility) or chemical agent (in the case of the Army facility) being transferred outside of engineering controls. A review of the investigation reports for all four events indicates the primary causes to be failures in work planning leading to ineffective hazard evaluation and control, lack of procedure adherence, and most importantly, lack of management oversight to effectively reinforce expectations for safe work planning and execution. DOE and Army safety programs are similar, and although there are some differences in contractual requirements, the expectations for safe performance are essentially the same. This analysis concludes that instilling a positive safety culture comes down to management leadership and engagement to (1) cultivate an environment that values a questioning attitude and (2) continually reinforce expectations for the appropriate level of rigor in work planning and procedure adherence. A review of the root causes and key contributing causes to the events indicate: - Three of the four root cause analyses cite lack of management engagement (oversight, involvement, ability to recognize issues, etc.) as a root cause to the events. - Two of the four root cause analyses cite work planning failures as a root cause to the events and all cause analyses reflect work planning failures as contributing factors to the events. - All events with the exception of the Tuba City plant shutdown indicate procedure noncompliance as a key contributor; in the case of Tuba City the procedure issues were primarily related to a lack of procedures, or a lack of sufficiently detailed procedures. - All events included discussion or suggestion of a lack of a questioning attitude, either on the part of management/supervision, work planners, or workers. This analysis suggests that the most critical drivers to safety culture are: - Management engagement, - Effective work planning and procedures, and - Procedure adherence with a questioning attitude to ensure procedural problems are identified and fixed. In high-hazard operational environments the importance of robust work planning processes and procedure adherence cannot be overstated. However, having the processes by themselves is not enough. Management must actively engage in expectation setting and ensure work planning that meets expectations for hazard analysis and control, develop a culture that encourages incident reporting and a questioning attitude, and routinely observe work performance to reinforce expectations for adherence to procedures/work control documents. In conclusion, the most critical driver to achieving a workforce culture that supports safe and effective project performance can be summarized as follows: 'Management engagement to continually reinforce expectations for work planning processes and procedure adherence in an environment that cultivates a questioning attitude'. (authors)

  6. Feasibility Study of Compact Gas-Filled Storage Ring for 6D Cooling of Muon Beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Garren, J. Kolonlo

    2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The future of elementary particle physics in the USA depends in part on the development of new machines such as the International Linear Collider, Muon Collider and Neutrino Factories which can produce particle beams of higher energy, intensity, or particle type than now exists. These beams will enable the continued exploration of the world of elementary particles and interactions. In addition, the associated development of new technologies and machines such as a Muon Ring Cooler is essential. This project was to undertake a feasibility study of a compact gas-filled storage ring for 6D cooling of muon beams. The ultimate goal, in Phase III, was to build, test, and operate a demonstration storage ring. The preferred lattice for the storage ring was determined and dynamic simulations of particles through the lattice were performed. A conceptual design and drawing of the magnets were made and a study of the RF cavity and possible injection/ejection scheme made. Commercial applications for the device were investigated and the writing of the Phase II proposal completed. The research findings conclude that a compact gas-filled storage ring for 6D cooling of muon beams is possible with further research and development.

  7. Relativistic QRPA calculation of muon capture rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Marketin; N. Paar; T. Niksic; D. Vretenar

    2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The relativistic proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (PN-RQRPA) is applied in the calculation of total muon capture rates on a large set of nuclei from $^{12}$C to $^{244}$Pu, for which experimental values are available. The microscopic theoretical framework is based on the Relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov (RHB) model for the nuclear ground state, and transitions to excited states are calculated using the PN-RQRPA. The calculation is fully consistent, i.e., the same interactions are used both in the RHB equations that determine the quasiparticle basis, and in the matrix equations of the PN-RQRPA. The calculated capture rates are sensitive to the in-medium quenching of the axial-vector coupling constant. By reducing this constant from its free-nucleon value $g_A = 1.262$ by 10% for all multipole transitions, the calculation reproduces the experimental muon capture rates to better than 10% accuracy.

  8. Progress in Muon Cooling Research and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel M. Kaplan; for the MuCool Collaboration

    2003-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The MuCool R&D program is described. The aim of MuCool is to develop all key pieces of hardware required for ionization cooling of a muon beam. This effort will lead to a more detailed understanding of the construction and operating costs of such hardware, as well as to optimized designs that can be used to build a Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider. This work is being undertaken by a broad collaboration including physicists and engineers from many national laboratories and universities in the U.S. and abroad. The intended schedule of work will lead to ionization cooling being well enough established that a construction decision for a Neutrino Factory could be taken before the end of this decade based on a solid technical foundation.

  9. Critical cavity in the stretched fluid studied using square-gradient density-functional model with triple-parabolic free energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masao Iwamatsu

    2009-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The generic square-gradient density-functional model with triple-parabolic free energy is used to study the stability of a cavity introduced into the stretched liquid. The various properties of the critical cavity, which is the largest stable cavity within the liquid, are compared with those of the critical bubble of the homogeneous bubble nucleation. It is found that the size of the critical cavity is always smaller than that of the critical bubble, while the work of formation of the former is always higher than the latter in accordance with the conjectures made by Punnathanam and Corti [J. Chem. Phys. {\\bf 119}, 10224 (2003)] deduced from the Lennard-Jones fluids. Therefore their conjectures about the critical cavity size and the work of formation would be more general and valid even for other types of liquid such as metallic liquid or amorphous. However, the scaling relations they found for the critical cavity in the Lennard-Jones fluid are marginally satisfied only near the spinodal.

  10. Critical Materials Workshop Plenary Session Videos | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Critical Materials Workshop Plenary Session Videos Critical Materials Workshop Plenary Session Videos Welcome and Overview of Workshop and Energy Innovation Hubs Speakers * Dr. Leo...

  11. CP-safe Gravity Mediation and Muon g-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sho Iwamoto; Tsutomu T. Yanagida; Norimi Yokozaki

    2015-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a CP-safe gravity mediation model, where the phases of the Higgs B parameter, scalar trilinear couplings and gaugino mass parameters are all aligned. Since all dangerous CP violating phases are suppressed, we are now safe to consider low-energy SUSY scenarios. As an application, we consider a gravity mediation model explaining the observed muon $g-2$ anomaly. The CP-safe property originates in two simple assumptions: SUSY breaking in the K\\"ahler potential and a shift symmetry of a SUSY breaking field $Z$. As a result of the shift symmetry, the imaginary part of $Z$ behaves as a QCD axion, leading to an intriguing possibility: the strong CP problem in QCD and the SUSY CP problem are solved simultaneously.

  12. Measurement of Neutral Particle Contamination in the MICE Muon Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rob Roy Fletcher; Linda Coney; Gail Hanson

    2011-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is being built at the ISIS proton synchrotron at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) to measure ionization cooling of a muon beam. During recent data-taking, it was determined that there is a significant background contamination of neutral particles populating the MICE muon beam. This contamination creates unwanted triggers in MICE, thus reducing the percentage of useful data taken during running. This paper describes the analysis done with time-of-flight detectors, used to measure and identify the source of the contamination in both positive and negative muon beams.

  13. atlas muon endcap: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Trigger, an additional fast read-out (FRO) chain with moderate spatial resolution but low latency is necessary. To conduct fast track reconstruction and muon pt determination...

  14. Status of the International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    target mechanism in the ISIS ring. MUON BEAM LINE Althoughthose located within the ISIS shielded enclosure are beingdelay installation until the next ISIS shutdown (planned for

  15. Toroidal magnetic detector for high resolution measurement of muon momenta

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonanos, P.

    1992-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A muon detector system including central and end air-core superconducting toroids and muon detectors enclosing a central calorimeter/detector. Muon detectors are positioned outside of toroids and all muon trajectory measurements are made in a nonmagnetic environment. Internal support for each magnet structure is provided by sheets, located at frequent and regularly spaced azimuthal planes, which interconnect the structural walls of the toroidal magnets. In a preferred embodiment, the shape of the toroidal magnet volume is adjusted to provide constant resolution over a wide range of rapidity. 4 figs.

  16. Search for Gluino-Mediated Supersymmetry in Events With Bottom-Quark Jets and Missing Transverse Energy With the Compact Muon Solenoid Detector at the Large Hadron Collider With Proton-Proton Collisions at 8 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Harold

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    calorimeters. These energy deposit towers are clustered byof the energies in the clustered towers, and the directionare reconstructed from energy depositions, or towers, in the

  17. nuSTORM - Neutrinos from STORed Muons: Letter of Intent to the Fermilab Physics Advisory Committee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyberd, P.; Smith, D.R.; /Brunel U.; Coney, L.; /UC, Riverside; Pascoli, S.; /Durham U., IPPP; Ankenbrandt, C.; Brice, S.J.; Bross, A.D.; Cease, H.; Kopp, J.; Mokhov, N.; Morfin, J.; /Fermilab /Yerkes Observ. /Glasgow U. /Imperial Coll., London /Valencia U. /Jefferson Lab /Kyoto U. /Northwestern U. /Osaka U.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The idea of using a muon storage ring to produce a high-energy ({approx_equal} 50 GeV) neutrino beam for experiments was first discussed by Koshkarev in 1974. A detailed description of a muon storage ring for neutrino oscillation experiments was first produced by Neuffer in 1980. In his paper, Neuffer studied muon decay rings with E{sub {mu}} of 8, 4.5 and 1.5 GeV. With his 4.5 GeV ring design, he achieved a figure of merit of {approx_equal} 6 x 10{sup 9} useful neutrinos per 3 x 10{sup 13} protons on target. The facility we describe here ({nu}STORM) is essentially the same facility proposed in 1980 and would utilize a 3-4 GeV/c muon storage ring to study eV-scale oscillation physics and, in addition, could add significantly to our understanding of {nu}{sub e} and {nu}{sub {mu}} cross sections. In particular the facility can: (1) address the large {Delta}m{sup 2} oscillation regime and make a major contribution to the study of sterile neutrinos, (2) make precision {nu}{sub e} and {bar {nu}}{sub e} cross-section measurements, (3) provide a technology ({mu} decay ring) test demonstration and {mu} beam diagnostics test bed, and (4) provide a precisely understood {nu} beam for detector studies. The facility is the simplest implementation of the Neutrino Factory concept. In our case, 60 GeV/c protons are used to produce pions off a conventional solid target. The pions are collected with a focusing device (horn or lithium lens) and are then transported to, and injected into, a storage ring. The pions that decay in the first straight of the ring can yield a muon that is captured in the ring. The circulating muons then subsequently decay into electrons and neutrinos. We are starting with a storage ring design that is optimized for 3.8 GeV/c muon momentum. This momentum was selected to maximize the physics reach for both oscillation and the cross section physics. See Fig. 1 for a schematic of the facility.

  18. Parameter choices for a muon recirculating linear accelerator from 5 to 63 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, J. S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A recirculating linear accelerator (RLA) has been proposed to accelerate muons from 5 to 63 GeV for a muon collider. It should be usable both for a Higgs factory and as a stage for a higher energy collider. First, the constraints due to the beam loading are computed. Next, an expression for the longitudinal emittance growth to lowest order in the longitudinal emittance is worked out. After finding the longitudinal expression, a simplified model that describes the arcs and their approximate expression for the time of flight dependence on energy in those arcs is found. Finally, these results are used to estimate the parameters required for the RLA arcs and the linac phase.

  19. Muon Accelerator Program (MAP) | Homepage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'.SolarUSAdvanced MaterialsMultivariateMuncrief

  20. Critical Materials:

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    lighting. 14 (bottom) Criticality ratings of shortlisted raw 76 materials. 15 77 2. Technology Assessment and Potential 78 This section reviews the major trends within...

  1. Criticality Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Alsaed

    2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003) presents the methodology for evaluating potential criticality situations in the monitored geologic repository. As stated in the referenced Topical Report, the detailed methodology for performing the disposal criticality analyses will be documented in model reports. Many of the models developed in support of the Topical Report differ from the definition of models as given in the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management procedure AP-SIII.10Q, ''Models'', in that they are procedural, rather than mathematical. These model reports document the detailed methodology necessary to implement the approach presented in the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report and provide calculations utilizing the methodology. Thus, the governing procedure for this type of report is AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses''. The ''Criticality Model'' is of this latter type, providing a process evaluating the criticality potential of in-package and external configurations. The purpose of this analysis is to layout the process for calculating the criticality potential for various in-package and external configurations and to calculate lower-bound tolerance limit (LBTL) values and determine range of applicability (ROA) parameters. The LBTL calculations and the ROA determinations are performed using selected benchmark experiments that are applicable to various waste forms and various in-package and external configurations. The waste forms considered in this calculation are pressurized water reactor (PWR), boiling water reactor (BWR), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Training Research Isotope General Atomic (TRIGA), Enrico Fermi, Shippingport pressurized water reactor, Shippingport light water breeder reactor (LWBR), N-Reactor, Melt and Dilute, and Fort Saint Vrain Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The scope of this analysis is to document the criticality computational method. The criticality computational method will be used for evaluating the criticality potential of configurations of fissionable materials (in-package and external to the waste package) within the repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada for all waste packages/waste forms. The criticality computational method is also applicable to preclosure configurations. The criticality computational method is a component of the methodology presented in ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003). How the criticality computational method fits in the overall disposal criticality analysis methodology is illustrated in Figure 1 (YMP 2003, Figure 3). This calculation will not provide direct input to the total system performance assessment for license application. It is to be used as necessary to determine the criticality potential of configuration classes as determined by the configuration probability analysis of the configuration generator model (BSC 2003a).

  2. Spectrum and Charge Ratio of Vertical Cosmic Ray Muons up to Momenta of 2.5 TeV/c

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmelling, M.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst.; Hashim, N.O.; /Kenyatta U. Coll.; Grupen, C.; /Siegen U.; Luitz, S.; /SLAC; Maciuc, F.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst.; Mailov, A.; /Siegen U.; Muller, A.-S.; /Karlsruhe, Inst. Technol.; Sander, H.-G.; /Mainz U., Inst. Phys.; Schmeling, S.; /CERN; Tcaciuc, R.; /Siegen U.; Wachsmuth, H.; /CERN; Zuber, K.; /Dresden, Tech. U.

    2012-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The ALEPH detector at LEP has been used to measure the momentum spectrum and charge ratio of vertical cosmic ray muons underground. The sea-level cosmic ray muon spectrum for momenta up to 2.5 TeV/c has been obtained by correcting for the overburden of 320 meter water equivalent (mwe). The results are compared with Monte Carlo models for air shower development in the atmosphere. From the analysis of the spectrum the total flux and the spectral index of the cosmic ray primaries is inferred. The charge ratio suggests a dominantly light composition of cosmic ray primaries with energies up to 10{sup 15} eV.

  3. Measurement of the flux and zenith-angle distribution of upward through-going muons by Super-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration

    1999-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A total of 614 upward through-going muons of minimum energy 1.6 GeV are observed by Super-Kamiokande during 537 detector live days. The measured muon flux is 1.74+/-0.07(stat.)+/-0.02(sys.)x10^{-13}cm^{-2}s^{-1}sr^{-1} compared to an expected flux of 1.97+/-0.44(theo.)x10^{-13}cm^{-2}s^{-1}sr^{-1}. The absolute measured flux is in agreement with the prediction within the errors. However, the zenith angle dependence of the observed upward through-going muon flux does not agree with no-oscillation predictions. The observed distortion in shape is consistent with the \

  4. Muons for a Muon-Collider Kirk T. McDonald

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    . ­ LANL has experience with superconductng magnets in high radiation areas. · Other Radiological Issues951 Long Term: Provide a facility to test key components of the front-end of a muon collider-term radiological issues. 6 #12;Why BNL? The BNL AGS has proton beam parameters conditions closest to those

  5. KT McDonald Muon Accelerator Program Advisory Committee Review (FNAL) July 11, 2012 1 Target and Absorbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Advisory Committee Review (FNAL) July 11, 2012 2 Mission Target: · Maximum production of ± of energies particles in He-gas-cooled tungsten beads ­ inside solenoid magnets. · Low-Z solid/liquid muon absorbers includes the production target and the magnetized pion-decay channel. This system is about 50 m long

  6. Muon Figures: 2001/04/19 Chris Waltham

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Learned, John

    wall is a less dense mix of gabbro and granite. The depths of various parts of the detector are given environment around SNO. The solid curved line is the hanging wall - foot wall interface at the level of SNO) and replaced with back#12;ll. The grid is 1000' (#25;300m) square. p Muon Track Light from Muon Xf PSUP Impact

  7. Helical channel design and technology for cooling of muon beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yonehara, K; /Fermilab; Derbenev, Y.S.; /Jefferson Lab; Johnson, R.P.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel magnetic helical channel designs for capture and cooling of bright muon beams are being developed using numerical simulations based on new inventions such as helical solenoid (HS) magnets and hydrogen-pressurized RF (HPRF) cavities. We are close to the factor of a million six-dimensional phase space (6D) reduction needed for muon colliders. Recent experimental and simulation results are presented.

  8. Muon neutrino disappearance at MINOS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, R.; /Indiana U.

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A strong case has been made by several experiments that neutrinos oscillate, although important questions remain as to the mechanisms and precise values of the parameters. In the standard picture, two parameters describe the nature of how the neutrinos oscillate: the mass-squared difference between states and the mixing angle. The purpose of this thesis is to use data from the MINOS experiment to precisely measure the parameters associated with oscillations first observed in studies of atmospheric neutrinos. MINOS utilizes two similar detectors to observe the oscillatory nature of neutrinos. The Near Detector, located 1 km from the source, observes the unoscillated energy spectrum while the Far Detector, located 735 km away, is positioned to see the oscillation signal. Using the data in the Near Detector, a prediction of the expected neutrino spectrum at the Far Detector assuming no oscillations is made. By comparing this prediction with the MINOS data, the atmospheric mixing parameters are measured to be {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2} = 2.45{sub +0.12}{sup -0.12} x 10{sub -3} eV{sup 2} and sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 32}) = 1.00{sub -0.04}{sup +0.00} (> 0.90 at 90% confidence level).

  9. Muon spin rotation studies of niobium for superconducting RF applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grassellino, A; Kolb, P; Laxdal, R; Lockyer, N S; Longuevergne, D; Sonier, J E

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we investigate superconducting properties of niobium samples via application of the muon spin rotation/relaxation (muSR) technique. We employ for the first time the muSR technique to study samples that are cutout from large and small grain 1.5 GHz radio frequency (RF) single cell niobium cavities. The RF test of these cavities was accompanied by full temperature mapping to characterize the RF losses in each of the samples. Results of the muSR measurements show that standard cavity surface treatments like mild baking and buffered chemical polishing (BCP) performed on the studied samples affect their surface pinning strength. We find an interesting correlation between high field RF losses and field dependence of the sample magnetic volume fraction measured via muSR. The muSR line width observed in ZF-muSR measurements matches the behavior of Nb samples doped with minute amounts of Ta or N impurities. An upper bound for the upper critical field Hc2 of these cutouts is found.

  10. Neutrino factory and muon collider collaboration R and D activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zisman, Michael S.; Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaborat

    2001-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (MC) comprises about 140 U.S. and non-U.S. accelerator and particle physicists. The MC is carrying out an R and D program aimed at validating the critical design concepts required for the construction of such machines. We are committed to encouraging international cooperation and coordination of the R and D effort. Main activities of the MC include a Targetry program, a MUCOOL program, a component development program, and a theory and simulation effort. Moreover, the MC has participated in several feasibility studies for a complete Neutrino Factory facility, with the aim of identifying any additional R and D activities needed to prepare a Zeroth-order Design Report (ZDR) in about two years and a Conceptual Design report (CDR) about two years thereafter. In this paper, the R and D goals in each area will be indicated, and the present status and future plans of the R and D program will be described.

  11. Radiation effects in a muon collider ring and dipole magnet protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mokhov, N V; Novitski, I; Zlobin, A V

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The requirements and operating conditions for a Muon Collider Storage Ring (MCSR) pose significant challenges to superconducting magnets. The dipole magnets should provide a high magnetic field to reduce the ring circumference and thus maximize the number of muon collisions during their lifetime. One third of the beam energy is continuously deposited along the lattice by the decay electrons at the rate of 0.5 kW/m for a 1.5-TeV c.o.m. and a luminosity of 1034 cm-2s-1. Unlike dipoles in proton machines, the MCSR dipoles should allow this dynamic heat load to escape the magnet helium volume in the horizontal plane, predominantly towards the ring center. This paper presents the analysis and comparison of radiation effects in MCSR based on two dipole magnets designs. Tungsten masks in the interconnect regions are used in both cases to mitigate the unprecedented dynamic heat deposition and radiation in the magnet coils.

  12. Search for Light Resonances Decaying into Pairs of Muons as a Signal of New Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, S. [Yerevan Physics Institute(Armenia)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for groups of collimated muons is performed using a data sample collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 35 inverse picobarns. The analysis searches for production of new low-mass states decaying into pairs of muons and is designed to achieve high sensitivity to a broad range of models predicting leptonic jet signatures. With no excess observed over the background expectation, upper limits on the production cross section times branching fraction times acceptance are set, ranging from 0.1 to 0.5 pb at the 95% CL depending on event topology. In addition, the results are interpreted in several benchmark models in the context of supersymmetry with a new light dark sector exploring previously inaccessible parameter space.

  13. A range muon tomography performance study for the detection of explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuellar, Leticia [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borozdin, Konstantin N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chung, Andrew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nicolas, Hengartner W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morris, Christopher [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schultz, Larry J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reimus, Nathaniel P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bacon, Jeffrey D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vogan - Mc Neil, Wendy [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soft cosmic ray tomography has been shown to successfully discriminate materials with various density levels due to their ability to deeply penetrate matter, allowing sensitivity to atomic number, radiation length and density. Because the multiple muon scattering signal from high Z-materials is very strong, the technology is well suited to the detection of the illicit transportation of special and radiological nuclear materials. In addition, a recent detection technique based on measuring the lower energy particles that do not traverse the material (range radiography), allows to discriminate low and medium Z-materials. This is shown in [4] using Monte Carlo simulations. More recently, using a mini muon tracker developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, we performed various experiments to try out the radiation length technology. This paper presents the results from real experiments and evaluates the likelihood that soft cosmic ray tomography may be applied to detect high-explosives.

  14. Performance of the ATLAS Muon Trigger in Run I and Upgrades for Run II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobayashi, Dai; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has taken data at a centre-of-mass energy between 900 GeV and 8 TeV during Run I (2009-2013). The LHC delivered an integrated luminosity of about 20fb-1 in 2012, which required dedicated strategies to guard the highest possible physics output while reducing effectively the event rate. The Muon High Level Trigger has successfully adapted to the changing environment of a low luminosity in 2010 to the luminosities encountered in 2012. The selection strategy has been optimized for the various physics analyses involving muons in the final state. We will present the excellent performance achieved during Run I. In preparation for the next data taking period (Run II) several hardware and software upgrades to the ATLAS Muon Trigger have been performed to deal with the increased trigger rate expected at higher center of mass energy and increased instantaneous luminosity. We will highlight the development of novel algorithms that have been developed to maintain a h...

  15. Performance of the ATLAS Muon Trigger in Run I and Upgrades for Run II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobayashi, Dai; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has taken data at a centre-of-mass energy between 900 GeV and 8 TeV during Run I (2009-2013). The LHC delivered an integrated luminosity of about 20 fb?1 in 2012, which required dedicated strategies to guard the highest possible physics output while reducing effectively the event rate. The Muon High Level Trigger has successfully adapted to the changing environment of a low luminosity in 2010 to the luminosities encountered in 2012. The selection strategy has been optimized for the various physics analyses involving muons in the final state. We will present the excellent performance achieved during Run I. In preparation for the next data taking period (Run II) several hardware and software upgrades to the ATLAS Muon Trigger have been performed to deal with the increased trigger rate expected at higher center of mass energy and increased instantaneous luminosity. We will highlight the development of novel algorithms that have been developed to maintain ...

  16. Novel linac structures for low-beta ions and for muons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurennoy, Sergey S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of two innovative linacs is discussed. (1) High-efficiency normal-conducting accelerating structures for ions with beam velocities in the range of a few percent of the speed of light. Two existing accelerator technologies - the H-mode resonator cavities and transverse beam focusing by permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ) - are merged to create efficient structures for light-ion beams of considerable currents. The inter-digital H-mode accelerator with PMQ focusing (IH-PMQ) has the shunt impedance 10-20 times higher than the standard drift-tube linac. Results of the combined 3-D modeling for an IH-PMQ accelerator tank - electromagnetic computations, beam-dynamics simulations, and thermal-stress analysis - are presented. H-PMQ structures following a short RFQ accelerator can be used in the front end of ion linacs or in stand-alone applications like a compact mobile deuteron-beam accelerator up to a few MeV. (2) A large-acceptance high-gradient linac for accelerating low-energy muons in a strong solenoidal magnetic field. When a proton beam hits a target, many low-energy pions are produced almost isotropically, in addition to a small number of high-energy pions in the forward direction. We propose to collect and accelerate copious muons created as the low-energy pions decay. The acceleration should bring muons to a kinetic energy of {approx}200 MeV in about 10 m, where both an ionization cooling of the muon beam and its further acceleration in a superconducting linac become feasible. One potential solution is a normal-conducting linac consisting of independently fed O-mode RF cavities with wide apertures closed by thin metal windows or grids. The guiding magnetic field is provided by external superconducting solenoids. The cavity choice, overall linac design considerations, and simulation results of muon acceleration are presented. Potential applications range from basic research to homeland defense to industry and medicine.

  17. Neutrinos from STORed Muons - nuSTORM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bross, Alan [Fermilab

    2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of LSND and MiniBooNE, along with the recent papers on a possible reactor neutrino flux anomaly, give tantalizing hints of new physics. Models beyond the nSM have been developed to explain these results and involve one or more additional neutrinos that are non-interacting or “sterile." Neutrino beams produced from the decay of muons in a racetrack-like decay ring provide a powerful way to study this potential new physics. In this talk, I will describe the facility, nuSTORM, and an appropriate far detector for neutrino oscillation searches at short baseline. I will present sensitivity plots that indicate that this experimental approach can provide well over 5 s confirmation or rejection of the LSND/MinBooNE results. In addition I will explain how the facility can be used to make neutrino interaction cross section measurements important to the next generation of long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments and, in general, add significantly to the study of neutrino interactions. The unique n beam available at the nuSTORM facility has the potential to be transformational in our approach to n interaction physics, offering a “n light source” to physicists from a number of disciplines. Finally, I will describe how nuSTORM can be used to facilitate accelerator R&D for future muon-based accelerator facilities.

  18. Optimising a Muon Spectrometer for Measurements at the ISIS Pulsed Muon Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giblin, S R; King, P J C; Tomlinson, S; Jago, S J S; Randall, L J; Roberts, M J; Norris, J; Howarth, S; Mutamba, Q B; Rhodes, N J; Akeroyd, F

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work describes the development of a state-of-the-art muon spectrometer for the ISIS pulsed muon source. Conceived as a major upgrade of the highly successful EMU instrument, emphasis has been placed on making effective use of the enhanced flux now available at the ISIS source. This has been achieved both through the development of a highly segmented detector array and enhanced data acquisition electronics. The pulsed nature of the ISIS beam is particularly suited to the development of novel experiments involving external stimuli, and therefore the ability to sequence external equipment has been added to the acquisition system. Finally, the opportunity has also been taken to improve both the magnetic field and temperature range provided by the spectrometer, to better equip the instrument for running the future ISIS user programme.

  19. Stability of critical bubble in stretched fluid of square-gradient density-functional model with triple-parabolic free energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masao Iwamatsu; Yutaka Okabe

    2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The square-gradient density-functional model with triple-parabolic free energy, that was used previously to study the homogeneous bubble nucleation [J. Chem. Phys. 129, 104508 (2008)], is used to study the stability of the critical bubble nucleated within the bulk under-saturated stretched fluid. The stability of the bubble is studied by solving the Schr\\"odinger equation for the fluctuation. The negative eigenvalue corresponds to the unstable growing mode of the fluctuation. Our results show that there is only one negative eigenvalue whose eigenfunction represents the fluctuation that corresponds to the isotropically growing or shrinking nucleus. In particular, this negative eigenvalue survives up to the spinodal point. Therefore the critical bubble is not fractal or ramified near the spinodal.

  20. A Critical Analysis of the Viability and Impacts of Solar Energy Carve-Outs in Renewable Portfolio Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Aaron D.

    2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerous states have implemented legislation to advance the use of specific renewable energy resources, most notably solar. However, solar energy is accompanied by several deficiencies – including high costs, limited ...

  1. Critical Materials Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave theJuly 30,Crafty Gifts for the EnergyCreditSite |CriticalCritical

  2. Critical Materials Workshop Agenda

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave theJuly 30,Crafty Gifts for the EnergyCreditSite |CriticalCritical

  3. Positive muon and the positron as probes of defects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn, K G

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The positive muon and the positron are each being used nowadays to investigate defects in condensed matter. A brief summary of the experimental methods employed with each particle is given in this paper. Similarities and differences between the behavior of the two leptons when implanted in consensed matter are pointed out, and by means of a comparison between muon and positron data in Al it is shown that the combination of muon and positron experiments can serve as a useful new probe of defects in solids.

  4. The MICE Muon Beam on ISIS and the beam-line instrumentation of the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogomilov, M. [University of Sofia (Bulgaria); et al.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), which is under construction at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), will demonstrate the principle of ionization cooling as a technique for the reduction of the phase-space volume occupied by a muon beam. Ionization cooling channels are required for the Neutrino Factory and the Muon Collider. MICE will evaluate in detail the performance of a single lattice cell of the Feasibility Study 2 cooling channel. The MICE Muon Beam has been constructed at the ISIS synchrotron at RAL, and in MICE Step I, it has been characterized using the MICE beam-instrumentation system. In this paper, the MICE Muon Beam and beam-line instrumentation are described. The muon rate is presented as a function of the beam loss generated by the MICE target dipping into the ISIS proton beam. For a 1 V signal from the ISIS beam-loss monitors downstream of our target we obtain a 30 KHz instantaneous muon rate, with a neglible pion contamination in the beam.

  5. The MICE Muon Beam on ISIS and the beam-line instrumentation of the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICE Collaboration

    2012-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), which is under construction at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), will demonstrate the principle of ionization cooling as a technique for the reduction of the phase-space volume occupied by a muon beam. Ionization cooling channels are required for the Neutrino Factory and the Muon Collider. MICE will evaluate in detail the performance of a single lattice cell of the Feasibility Study 2 cooling channel. The MICE Muon Beam has been constructed at the ISIS synchrotron at RAL, and in MICE Step I, it has been characterized using the MICE beam-instrumentation system. In this paper, the MICE Muon Beam and beam-line instrumentation are described. The muon rate is presented as a function of the beam loss generated by the MICE target dipping into the ISIS proton beam. For a 1 V signal from the ISIS beam-loss monitors downstream of our target we obtain a 30 KHz instantaneous muon rate, with a neglible pion contamination in the beam.

  6. Anomalous Lagrangians and the radiative muon capture in hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Smejkal; E. Truhlik; F. C. Khanna

    2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure of an anomalous Lagrangian of the pi-rho-omega-a_1 system is investigated within the hidden local SU(2)_R x SU(2)_L symmetry approach. The interaction of the external electromagnetic and weak vector and axial-vector fields with the above hadron system is included. The Lagrangian of interest contains the anomalous Wess-Zumino term following from the well known Wess-Zumino-Witten action and six independent homogenous terms. It is characterized by four constants that are to be determined from a fit to the data on various elementary reactions. Present data allows one to extract the constants with a good accuracy. The homogenous part of the Lagrangian has been applied in the study of anomalous processes that could enhance the high energy tail of the spectrum of photons, produced in the radiative muon capture in hydrogen. It should be noted that recently, an intensive search for such enhancement processes has been carried in the literature, in an attempt to resolve the so called "g_P puzzle": an about 50 % difference between the theoretical prediction of the value of the induced pseudoscalar constant g_P and its value extracted from the high energy tail of the photon spectrum, measured in the precision TRIUMF experiment. Here, more details on the studied material are presented and new results, obtained by using the Wess-Zumino term, are provided.

  7. HIGH FIELD SOLENOID FOR MUON COOLING.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KAHN, S.A.; ALSHARO'A, M.; HANLET, P.; JOHNSON, R.P.; KUCHNIR, M.; NEWSHAM, F.; GUPTA, R.C.; PALMER, R.B.; WILLEN, E.

    2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnets made with high-temperature superconducting (HTS) coils operating at low temperatures have the potential to produce extremely high fields for use in accelerators and beam lines. The specific application of interest that we are proposing is to use a very high field (of the order of 50 Tesla) solenoid to provide a very small beta region for the final stages of cooling for a muon collider. With the commercial availability of HTS conductor based on BSCCO technology with high current carrying capacity at 4.2 K, very high field solenoid magnets should be possible. In this paper we will evaluate the technical issues associated with building this magnet. In particular we address how to mitigate the high Lorentz stresses associated with this high field magnet.

  8. First direct observation of muon antineutrino disappearance

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamson, P [Fermilab; Andreopoulos, C [Rutherford; Auty, D J [Sussex U.; Ayres, D S [Argonne; Backhouse, C [Oxford U.; Barr, G [Oxford U.; Bishai, M [Brookhaven; Blake, A [Cambridge U.; Bock, G J [Fermilab; Boehnlein, D J [/Fermilab; Bogert, D [Fermilab; Harvard U., Phys. Dept.

    2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This letter reports the first direct observation of muon antineutrino disappearance. The MINOS experiment has taken data with an accelerator beam optimized for ??? production, accumulating an exposure of 1.71 x 1020 protons on target. In the Far Detector, 97 charged current ??? events are observed. The no-oscillation hypothesis predicts 156 events and is excluded at 6.3?. The best fit to oscillation yields |?m?2| = (3.36-0.40 +0.46(stat.) ± 0.06(syst.)) x 10-3 eV2, sin2(2 ??) = 0.86-0.12+0.11 (stat.) ± 0.01(syst.). The MINOS ?? and ??? measurements are consistent at the 2.0% confidence level, assuming identical underlying oscillation parameters.

  9. Analysis of the multigroup model for muon tomography based threat detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, J. O.; Bacon, J. D.; Borozdin, K. N.; Fabritius, J. M.; Morris, C. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We compare different algorithms for detecting a 5?cm tungsten cube using cosmic ray muon technology. In each case, a simple tomographic technique was used for position reconstruction, but the scattering angles were used differently to obtain a density signal. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to compare images made using average angle squared, median angle squared, average of the squared angle, and a multi-energy group fit of the angular distributions for scenes with and without a 5?cm tungsten cube. The receiver operating characteristic curves show that the multi-energy group treatment of the scattering angle distributions is the superior method for image reconstruction.

  10. Muon Radiography at LANL | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhavenMassachusetts Regions National ScienceModeling ofMore Heat thanMuon

  11. Investigation of quasielastic muon-neutrino scattering on nuclei at E{sub v} < 1 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agababyan, N. M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Ammosov, V. V. [Institute for High Energy Physics (Russian Federation); Atayan, M.; Grigoryan, N.; Gulkanyan, H. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Armenia); Ivanilov, A. A. [Institute for High Energy Physics (Russian Federation)], E-mail: ivanilov@ihep.ru; Karamyan, Zh. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Armenia); Korotkov, B. A. [Institute for High Energy Physics (Russian Federation)

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Quasielastic muon-neutrino scattering on nuclei of propane-Freon mixture at energies in the range E{sub v} < 1 GeV is studied. The multiplicity, momentum, and emission-angle distributions of final protons are measured along with the dependence of the mean values for these distributions on the neutrino energy in the range 0.2 < E{sub v} < 1 GeV.

  12. Muon tomography imaging algorithms for nuclear threat detection inside large volume containers with the Muon Portal detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riggi, S; Bandieramonte, M; Becciani, U; Costa, A; La Rocca, P; Massimino, P; Petta, C; Pistagna, C; Riggi, F; Sciacca, E; Vitello, F

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Muon tomographic visualization techniques try to reconstruct a 3D image as close as possible to the real localization of the objects being probed. Statistical algorithms under test for the reconstruction of muon tomographic images in the Muon Portal Project are here discussed. Autocorrelation analysis and clustering algorithms have been employed within the context of methods based on the Point Of Closest Approach (POCA) reconstruction tool. An iterative method based on the log-likelihood approach was also implemented. Relative merits of all such methods are discussed, with reference to full Geant4 simulations of different scenarios, incorporating medium and high-Z objects inside a container.

  13. The Critical Materials Institute | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program The NIF andPoints of ContactDepartmentThe Critical

  14. atmospheric muon flux: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I. Sarcevic 1997-10-15 9 Measurement of the atmospheric muon flux with the ANTARES detector CERN Preprints Summary: ANTARES is a submarine neutrino telescope deployed in the...

  15. atmospheric muon charge: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the CMS detector HEP - Experiment (arXiv) Summary: A measurement is presented of the flux ratio of positive and negative muons from cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere,...

  16. R&D Toward a Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zisman, Michael S

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the need for a future 6D cooling experiment. A community-and planning for a future 6D muon cooling experiment. Tablepossible 6D cooling experiment at some future time. However,

  17. Superconducting magnets for muon capture and phase rotation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, M.A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Various Cases for Superconducti ng Magnets Inside andTransactions on Applied Superconductivity 7, No 2. P 642 (LBNL-43998 SC-MAG-683 SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS FOR MUON

  18. Superconducting magnets for muon capture and phase rotation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, M.A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBNL-43998 SC-MAG-683 SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS FOR MUONDE-AC03-76SF00098. Green SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS FOR MUONet ai, "The Use of Superconducting Solenoids in a Muon

  19. Interpretation of the atmospheric muon charge ratio in MINOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philip Schreiner; Maury Goodman

    2007-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    MINOS is the first large magnetic detector deep underground and is the first to measure the muon charge ratio with high statistics in the region near 1 TeV.\\cite{bib:adamson} An approximate formula for the muon charge ratio can be expressed in terms of $\\epsilon_\\pi$ = 115 GeV, $\\epsilon_K$ = 850 GeV and $\\ec$. The implications for K production in the atmosphere will be discussed.

  20. Measurement of muon plus proton final states in ? ? interactions on hydrocarbon at ‹ E? › = 4.2 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Walton, T.; Betancourt, M.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Bustamante, M.?J.; Butkevich, A.; Martinez Caicedo, D.?A.; et al

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of charged-current muon neutrino scattering on hydrocarbon in which the final state includes a muon, at least one proton, and no pions is presented. Although this signature has the topology of neutrino quasielastic scattering from neutrons, the event sample contains contributions from quasielastic and inelastic processes where pions are absorbed in the nucleus. The analysis accepts events with muon production angles up to 70° and proton kinetic energies greater than 110 MeV. The cross section, when based completely on hadronic kinematics, is well described by a relativistic Fermi gas nuclear model including the neutrino event generator modeling formore »inelastic processes and particle transportation through the nucleus. This is in contrast to the quasielastic cross section based on muon kinematics, which is best described by an extended model that incorporates multinucleon correlations. This measurement guides the formulation of a complete description of neutrino-nucleus interactions that encompasses the hadronic as well as the leptonic aspects of this process.« less

  1. Measurement of muon plus proton final states in ? ? interactions on hydrocarbon at ‹ E? › = 4.2 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Walton, T.; Betancourt, M.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Bustamante, M.?J.; Butkevich, A.; Martinez Caicedo, D.?A.; Carneiro, M.?F.; Castromonte, C.?M.; Christy, M.?E.; Chvojka, J.; da Motta, H.; Datta, M.; Devan, J.; Dytman, S.?A.; Díaz, G.?A.; Eberly, B.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Fiorentini, G.?A.; Gago, A.?M.; Gallagher, H.; Gran, R.; Harris, D.?A.; Higuera, A.; Hurtado, K.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Kulagin, S.?A.; Le, T.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W.?A.; Marshall, C.?M.; Martin Mari, C.; McFarland, K.?S.; McGivern, C.?L.; McGowan, A.?M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J.?G.; Mousseau, J.; Muhlbeier, T.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J.?K.; Norrick, A.; Osta, J.; Paolone, V.; Park, J.; Patrick, C.?E.; Perdue, G.?N.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ransome, R.?D.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rodrigues, P.?A.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Schmitz, D.?W.; Simon, C.; Snider, F.?D.; Sobczyk, J.?T.; Solano Salinas, C.?J.; Tagg, N.; Tice, B.?G.; Valencia, E.; Wolcott, J.; Wospakrik, M.; Zavala, G.; Zhang, D.; Ziemer, B.?P.

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of charged-current muon neutrino scattering on hydrocarbon in which the final state includes a muon, at least one proton, and no pions is presented. Although this signature has the topology of neutrino quasielastic scattering from neutrons, the event sample contains contributions from quasielastic and inelastic processes where pions are absorbed in the nucleus. The analysis accepts events with muon production angles up to 70° and proton kinetic energies greater than 110 MeV. The cross section, when based completely on hadronic kinematics, is well described by a relativistic Fermi gas nuclear model including the neutrino event generator modeling for inelastic processes and particle transportation through the nucleus. This is in contrast to the quasielastic cross section based on muon kinematics, which is best described by an extended model that incorporates multinucleon correlations. This measurement guides the formulation of a complete description of neutrino-nucleus interactions that encompasses the hadronic as well as the leptonic aspects of this process.

  2. Neutrino-induced upward-going muons in Super-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Habig; for the Super-Kamiokande Collaboration

    1999-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Upward-going muons observed by the Super-Kamiokande detector are produced by high-energy atmospheric neutrinos which interact in rock around the detector. Those which pass completely through the detector have a mean parent neutrino energy of ~100 GeV, while those which range out inside the detector come from neutrinos of mean energy ~10 GeV. The neutrino baseline varies with the observed muon zenith angle, allowing for an independent test via nu-mu disappearance of the neutrino oscillations observed in the Super-Kamiokande contained events. 614 upward through-going and 137 upward stopping muons were observed over 537 (516) live days, resulting in a flux of Phi_t=1.74\\pm0.07(stat.)\\pm0.02(sys.), Phi_s=0.380\\pm0.038(stat.)^{+0.019}_{-0.016}(sys.) x10^{-13}cm^{-2}s^{-1}sr^{-1}. The observed stopping/through-going ratio R=0.218\\pm0.023(stat.)^{+0.014}_{-0.013}(syst.) is 2.9 sigma lower than the expectation of 0.368^{+0.049}_{-0.044}(theo.). Both the shape of the zenith angle distribution of the observed flux and this low ratio are inconsistent with the null oscillation hypothesis, but are compatible with the previously observed nu-mu nu-tau oscillations. Taken as a whole, the addition of these higher energy nu-mu data to the contained neutrino events provides a better measurement of the oscillation parameters, narrowing the allowed parameter range to sin^22theta >~0.9 and 1.5x10^{-3}eV^2 <~ \\Delta m^2 <~6x10^{-3} at 90% confidence.

  3. Progress on muon parametric-resonance ionization cooling channel development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V.S. Morozov, Ya.S. Derbenev, A. Afanasev, K.B. Beard, R.P. Johnson, B. Erdelyi, J.A. Maloney

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) is intended as the final 6D cooling stage of a high-luminosity muon collider. To implement PIC, a continuous-field twin-helix magnetic channel was developed. A 6D cooling with stochastic effects off is demonstrated in a GEANT4/G4beamline model of a system where wedge-shaped Be absorbers are placed at the appropriate dispersion points in the twin-helix channel and are followed by short rf cavities. To proceed to cooling simulations with stochastics on, compensation of the beam aberrations from one absorber to another is required. Initial results on aberration compensation using a set of various-order continuous multipole fields are presented. As another avenue to mitigate the aberration effect, we optimize the cooling channel's period length. We observe a parasitic parametric resonance naturally occurring in the channel's horizontal plane due to the periodic beam energy modulation caused by the absorbers and rf. We discuss options for compensating this resonance and/or properly combining it with the induced half-integer parametric resonance needed for PIC.

  4. A Coil Manufacturing Procedure for the ALICE Muon Arm Dipole Magnet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swoboda, D; CERN. Geneva

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large Dipole Magnet is required for the Muon Arm spectrometer of the ALICE experiment[1,2]. The main parameters and basic design options of the dipole magnet have been described in [3]. The coils of the magnet will be wound from hollow Aluminium conductor of 50x50 mm² cross-section with a 30 mm diameter cooling hole in the centre. Different manufacturing techniques may be envisaged for the fabrication of the excitation coils. In this note we propose a procedure to construct the coils from straight extruded bars of half turn length. The different steps necessary to bend a half turn are described. A method to form complete turns, pancakes and the total coil is explained. A possible insulation process is presented. Advantages and critical areas of the coil construction process are highlighted in the conclusions. References [1]ALICE TP, CERN/LHCC 95-71 [2]ALICE TP Addendum, CERN/LHCC 96-32 [3]A Warm Magnet for the ALICE Muon Arm, ALICE 96/24, W.Flegel, D.Swoboda, CERN List of Figures Figure 1 Coil ...

  5. First calculation of cosmic-ray muon spallation backgrounds for MeV astrophysical neutrino signals in Super-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirley Weishi Li; John F. Beacom

    2014-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    When muons travel through matter, their energy losses lead to nuclear breakup ("spallation") processes. The delayed decays of unstable daughter nuclei produced by cosmic-ray muons are important backgrounds for low-energy astrophysical neutrino experiments, e.g., those seeking to detect solar neutrino or Diffuse Supernova Neutrino Background (DSNB) signals. Even though Super-Kamiokande has strong general cuts to reduce these spallation-induced backgrounds, the remaining rate before additional cuts for specific signals is much larger than the signal rates for kinetic energies of about 6 -- 18 MeV. Surprisingly, there is no published calculation of the production and properties of these backgrounds in water, though there are such studies for scintillator. Using the simulation code FLUKA and theoretical insights, we detail how muons lose energy in water, produce secondary particles, how and where these secondaries produce isotopes, and the properties of the backgrounds from their decays. We reproduce Super-Kamiokande measurements of the total background to within a factor of 2, which is good given that the isotope yields vary by orders of magnitude and that some details of the experiment are unknown to us at this level. Our results break aggregate data into component isotopes, reveal their separate production mechanisms, and preserve correlations between them. We outline how to implement more effective background rejection techniques using this information. Reducing backgrounds in solar and DSNB studies by even a factor of a few could help lead to important new discoveries.

  6. Construction and performance of a silicon photomultiplier/extruded scintillator tail-catcher and muon-tracker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The CALICE Collaboration

    2012-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A prototype module for an International Linear Collider (ILC) detector was built, installed, and tested between 2006 and 2009 at CERN and Fermilab as part of the CALICE test beam program, in order to study the possibilities of extending energy sampling behind a hadronic calorimeter and to study the possibilities of providing muon tracking. The "tail catcher/muon tracker" (TCMT) is composed of 320 extruded scintillator strips (dimensions 1000 mm x 50 mm x 5 mm) packaged in 16 one-meter square planes interleaved between steel plates. The scintillator strips were read out with wavelength shifting fibers and silicon photomultipliers. The planes were arranged with alternating horizontal and vertical strip orientations. Data were collected for muons and pions in the energy range 6 GeV to 80 GeV. Utilizing data taken in 2006, this paper describes the design and construction of the TCMT, performance characteristics, and a beam-based evaluation of the ability of the TCMT to improve hadronic energy resolution in a prototype ILC detector. For a typical configuration of an ILC detector with a coil situated outside a calorimeter system with a thickness of 5.5 nuclear interaction lengths, a TCMT would improve relative energy resolution by 6-16 % for pions between 20 and 80 GeV.

  7. Muon transfer from hydrogen to helium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bystritskii, V.M.; Dzhelepov, V.P.; Petrukhin, V.I.; Rudenko, A.I.; Suvorov, V.M.; Filchenkov, V.V.; Khovanskii, N.N.; Khomenko, B.A.

    1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is found that ..mu../sup -/ mesons stopped in a gas mixture of hydrogen, helium, and xenon (hydrogen pressure about 20 atmospheres, helium and xenon densities relative to hydrogen 0.05--2 and approx.10/sup -4/ respectively) are transferred from the p..mu.. atoms in the ground state to helium atoms at a rate lambda/sub He/ = (3.6 +- 1.0)x10/sup 8/ sec/sup -1/. The result is in good agreement with the calculations in which a novel mesic-molecular mechanism of p..mu..-atom charge exchange with helium nuclei is taken into account. The dependence of the probability for p..mu..-atom formation in the ground state on the helium density is measured. An analysis of this dependence and a comparison of it with the corresponding data for ..pi../sup -/ mesons indicate that muons can also be transferred from excited levels of p..mu.. atoms at a rate higher than in the case of p..pi.. atoms (transfer constant ..lambda../sub ..mu../ = 3.8 +- 0.3 compared with ..lambda../sub ..pi../ = 1.84 +- 0.09).

  8. Critical Materials Strategy Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1.SpaceFluorControlsEnergy ReaffirmedCritical Materials

  9. Robust energy transfer mechanism and critically balanced turbulence via non-resonant triads in nonlinear wave systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miguel D. Bustamante; Brenda Quinn

    2013-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A robust energy transfer mechanism is found in nonlinear wave systems, which favours transfers towards modes interacting via non-resonant triads, applicable in meteorology, nonlinear optics and plasma wave turbulence. Transfer efficiency is maximal when the frequency mismatch of the non-resonant triad balances the system's nonlinear frequency: at intermediate levels of oscillation amplitudes an instability is triggered that explores unstable manifolds of periodic orbits, so turbulent cascades are most efficient at intermediate nonlinearity. Numerical simulations confirm analytical predictions.

  10. ICOOL: A SIMULATION CODE FOR IONIZATION COOLING OF MUON BEAMS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FERNOW,R.C.

    1999-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Current ideas [1,2] for designing a high luminosity muon collider require significant cooling of the phase space of the muon beams. The only known method that can cool the beams in a time comparable to the muon lifetime is ionization cooling [3,4]. This method requires directing the particles in the beam at a large angle through a low Z absorber material in a strong focusing magnetic channel and then restoring the longitudinal momentum with an rf cavity. We have developed a new 3-D tracking code ICOOL for examining possible configurations for muon cooling. A cooling system is described in terms of a series of longitudinal regions with associated material and field properties. The tracking takes place in a coordinate system that follows a reference orbit through the system. The code takes into account decays and interactions of {approx}50-500 MeV/c muons in matter. Material geometry regions include cylinders and wedges. A number of analytic models are provided for describing the field configurations. Simple diagnostics are built into the code, including calculation of emittances and correlations, longitudinal traces, histograms and scatter plots. A number of auxiliary files can be generated for post-processing analysis by the user.

  11. NREL Investigates Critical Properties of Perovskite Halides Solar Cells (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights in Science, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency Visit | National Nuclear 1 NATIONALexamines

  12. Charge Separation for Muon Collider Cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, R.B.; Fernow; R.C.

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Most schemes for six dimensional muon ionization cooling work for only one sign. It is then necessary to have charge separation prior to that cooling. Schemes of charge separation using bent solenoids are described, and their simulated performances reported. It is found that for efficient separation, it should take place at somewhat higher momenta than commonly used for the cooling. Charge separation using bent solenoids can be effective if carefully designed. Bent solenoids can generate dispersion from 'momentum drift', but can spoil emittance from 'amplitude drift'. Abrupt entry into a bent solenoid causes emittance growth, but matching using integral {lambda} lengths, or Norem's method, corrects this problem. Reverse bending removes the dispersion and reduces 'amplitude drift', but only if there is no rf until after all bending. The main problem is bunch lengthening and distortion from the long transports without rf. At 230 MeV/c, even with a higher field of 3 T, non-linearities increase the 6D emittance by 117% and give 13% loss, which is not acceptable. Raising the momentum from 230 to 300 MeV gives a 6D emittance growth of 38% and the loss 5%, which may be acceptable. Raising the momentum further to 400 MeV/c gives very good results: 6D growth of 24% and 2.5% loss. Further optimization should include the acceleration to the higher momenta prior to the separation, and the higher momentum cooling immediately after it. The longitudinal phase space prior to the separation should be rotated to minimize the total bunch lengthening.

  13. Nuclear Waste Imaging and Spent Fuel Verification by Muon Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonkmans, G; Jewett, C; Thompson, M

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper explores the use of cosmic ray muons to image the contents of shielded containers and detect high-Z special nuclear materials inside them. Cosmic ray muons are a naturally occurring form of radiation, are highly penetrating and exhibit large scattering angles on high Z materials. Specifically, we investigated how radiographic and tomographic techniques can be effective for non-invasive nuclear waste characterization and for nuclear material accountancy of spent fuel inside dry storage containers. We show that the tracking of individual muons, as they enter and exit a structure, can potentially improve the accuracy and availability of data on nuclear waste and the contents of Dry Storage Containers (DSC) used for spent fuel storage at CANDU plants. This could be achieved in near real time, with the potential for unattended and remotely monitored operations. We show that the expected sensitivity, in the case of the DSC, exceeds the IAEA detection target for nuclear material accountancy.

  14. Improvements to the LC Muon tracking and identification software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milstene, C.; Fisk, G.; Para, A.

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This note summarizes the evolution of the Muon-ID package originally written by R. Markeloff at NIU. The original method used a helical swimmer to extrapolate the tracks from the interaction point and to collect hits in all sub-detectors: the electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters and muon detector. The package was modified to replace the swimmer by a stepper which does account for both the effects of the magnetic field and for the losses by ionization in the material encountered by the particle. The modified package shows a substantial improvement in the efficiency of muon identification. Further improvement should be reached by accounting for stochastic processes via the utilization of a Kalman filter.

  15. Experimental investigation of muon-catalyzed t + t fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogdanova, L. N. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, State Scientific Center of Russian Federation (Russian Federation); Bom, V. R. [Delft University of Technology (Netherlands); Demin, A. M. [All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics, Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Russian Federation); Demin, D. L. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dzhelepov Laboratory of Nuclear Problems (Russian Federation); Eijk, C. W. E. van [Delft University of Technology (Netherlands); Filchagin, S. V. [All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics, Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Russian Federation); Filchenkov, V. V.; Grafov, N. N. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dzhelepov Laboratory of Nuclear Problems (Russian Federation)], E-mail: grafov@nusun.jinr.ru; Grishechkin, S. K. [All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics, Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Russian Federation); Gritsaj, K. I.; Konin, A. D. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dzhelepov Laboratory of Nuclear Problems (Russian Federation); Kuryakin, A. V. [All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics, Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Russian Federation); Medved', S. V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dzhelepov Laboratory of Nuclear Problems (Russian Federation); Musyaev, R. K. [All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics, Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Russian Federation); Rudenko, A. I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dzhelepov Laboratory of Nuclear Problems (Russian Federation); Tumkin, D. P.; Vinogradov, Yu. I.; Yukhimchuk, A. A. [All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics, Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Russian Federation); Yukhimchuk, S. A.; Zinov, V. G. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dzhelepov Laboratory of Nuclear Problems (Russian Federation)] (and others)

    2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The muon-catalyzed fusion ({mu}CF) process in tritium was studied by the {mu}CF collaboration on the muon beam of the JINR Phasotron. The measurements were carried out with a liquid tritium target at the temperature 22 K and density approximately 1.25 of the liquid hydrogen density (LHD). Parameters of the {mu}CF cycle were determined: the tt{mu} muonic molecule formation rate {lambda}{sub tt{mu}} = 2.84(0.32) {mu}s{sup -1}, the tt{mu} fusion reaction rate {lambda}{sub f} = 15.6(2.0) {mu}s{sup -1}, and the probability of muon sticking to helium {omega}{sub tt}= 13.9(1.5)%. The results agree with those obtained earlier by other groups, but better accuracy was achieved due to our unique experimental method.

  16. MUON COLLIDER PROGRESS Robert B. Palmer (BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    MUON COLLIDER PROGRESS Robert B. Palmer (BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York) Abstract A complete scheme for muon production, cooling, ac- celeration and storage in a collider ring is presented. Pa and phase rotation yields bunch trains of both muon signs. Six di- mensional cooling reduces

  17. Muon g-2 Anomaly and Dark Leptonic Gauge Boson

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Hye-Sung [W& M

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the major motivations to search for a dark gauge boson of MeV-GeV scale is the long-standing muon g-2 anomaly. Because of active searches such as fixed target experiments and rare meson decays, the muon g-2 favored parameter region has been rapidly reduced. With the most recent data, it is practically excluded now in the popular dark photon model. We overview the issue and investigate a potentially alternative model based on the gauged lepton number or U(1)_L, which is under different experimental constraints.

  18. Doped H(2)-Filled RF Cavities for Muon Beam Cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yonehara, K.; Chung, M.; Jansson, A.; Hu, M.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; /Fermilab; Alsharo'a, M.; Johnson, R.P.; Neubauer, M.; Sah, R.; /Muons Inc., Batavia; Rose, D.V.; /Voss Sci., Albuquerque

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RF cavities pressurized with hydrogen gas may provide effective muon beam ionization cooling needed for muon colliders. Recent 805 MHz test cell studies reported below include the first use of SF{sub 6} dopant to reduce the effects of the electrons that will be produced by the ionization cooling process in hydrogen or helium. Measurements of maximum gradient in the Paschen region are compared to a simulation model for a 0.01% SF{sub 6} doping of hydrogen. The observed good agreement of the model with the measurements is a prerequisite to the investigation of other dopants.

  19. Muon-Induced Background Study for Underground Laboratories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. -M. Mei; A. Hime

    2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a comprehensive study of the cosmic-ray muon flux and induced activity as a function of overburden along with a convenient parameterization of the salient fluxes and differential distributions for a suite of underground laboratories ranging in depth from $\\sim$1 to 8 km.w.e.. Particular attention is given to the muon-induced fast neutron activity for the underground sites and we develop a Depth-Sensitivity-Relation to characterize the effect of such background in experiments searching for WIMP dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay.

  20. Lowest Order Hadronic Contribution to the Muon g-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher Aubin; Tom Blum

    2005-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the most recent lattice results for the lowest-order hadronic contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment using 2+1 flavor improved staggered fermions. A precise fit to the low-q^2 region of the vacuum polarization is necessary to accurately extract the muon g-2. To obtain this fit, we use staggered chiral perturbation theory with the inclusion of the vector particles as resonances, to evaluate the vacuum polarization. We discuss the preliminary fit results and attendant systematic uncertainties, paying particular attention to the relative contributions of the pions and vector mesons.

  1. ANGULAR MEASUREMENTS OF HTS CRITICAL CURRENT FOR HIGH FIELD SOLENOIDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turrioni, D.; Barzi, E.; Lamm, M.; Lombardo, V.; Zlobin, A. V. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Batavia, Illinois, 60510 (United States); Thieme, C. [American Superconductor (AMSC) Westborough, MA, 01581 (United States)

    2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An experiment is in the works at Fermilab to confirm that ionization cooling is an efficient way to shrink the size of a muon beam. This would pave the way for Muon Collider machines, which however require in their last stages of acceleration very high field solenoids. The use of high temperature superconducting materials (HTS) is being considered for these magnets using Helium or higher temperature refrigeration. A sample holder was designed to perform critical current (I{sub c}) measurements of HTS conductors under externally applied magnetic fields varying from zero to 90 degree with respect to the c-axis. This was performed in an ample range of temperatures and magnetic field values. A description of the test setup and results for (Bi,Pb){sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} (BSCCO-2223) tapes, and Second Generation HTS in the form of 348 superconductor are presented.

  2. Updated Estimate of the Muon Magnetic Moment Using Revised Results from e+e- Annihilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davier, M; Höcker, A; Zhang, Z; Davier, Michel

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new evaluation of the hadronic vacuum polarization contribution to the muon magnetic moment is presented. We take into account the reanalysis of the low-energy e+e- annihilation cross section into hadrons by the CMD-2 Collaboration. The agreement between e+e- and tau spectral functions in the pi pi channel is found to be much improved. Nevertheless, significant discrepancies remain in the center-of-mass energy range between 0.85 and 1.0 GeV, so that we refrain from averaging the two data sets. The values found for the lowest-order hadronic vacuum polarization contributions are a_mu[had,LO] = (696.3 +- 6.2[exp] +- 3.6[rad])e-10 (e+e- -based) and a_mu[had,LO] = (711.0 +- 5.0[exp] +- 0.8[rad] +- 2.8[SU2])e-10 (tau-based), where the errors have been separated according to their sources: experimental, missing radiative corrections in e+e- data, and isospin breaking. The corresponding Standard Model predictions for the muon magnetic anomaly read a_mu = (11,659,180.9 +- 7.2[had] +- 3.5[LBL] +- 0.4[QED+EW])e-10 (e+...

  3. A measurement of neutrino oscillations with muon neutrinos in the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, Stephen James; /William-Mary Coll.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental evidence has established that neutrino flavor states evolve over time. A neutrino of a particular flavor that travels some distance can be detected in a different neutrino flavor state. The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long-baseline experiment that is designed to study this phenomenon, called neutrino oscillations. MINOS is based at Fermilab near Chicago, IL, and consists of two detectors: the Near Detector located at Fermilab, and the Far Detector, which is located in an old iron mine in Soudan, MN. Both detectors are exposed to a beam of muon neutrinos from the NuMI beamline, and MINOS measures the fraction of muon neutrinos that disappear after traveling the 734 km between the two detectors. One can measure the atmospheric neutrino mass splitting and mixing angle by observing the energy-dependence of this muon neutrino disappearance. MINOS has made several prior measurements of these parameters. Here I describe recently-developed techniques used to enhance our sensitivity to the oscillation parameters, and I present the results obtained when they are applied to a dataset that is twice as large as has been previously analyzed. We measure the mass splitting {Delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2} = (2.32{sub -0.08}{sup +0.12}) x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}/c{sup 4} and the mixing angle sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 32}) > 0.90 at 90% C.L. These results comprise the world's best measurement of the atmospheric neutrino mass splitting. Alternative disappearance models are also tested. The neutrino decay hypothesis is disfavored at 7.2{sigma} and the neutrino quantum decoherence hypothesis is disfavored at 9.0{sigma}.

  4. A MUON STORAGE RING FOR NEUTRINO OSCILLATIONS EXPERIMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    856 A MUON STORAGE RING FOR NEUTRINO OSCILLATIONS EXPERIMENTS David Cline University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wl 53706 David Neuffer Fermilab,* Batavia, IL 60510 ABSTRACT · + decay in a ~- Storage Ring can as a possible first ~ storage ring. INTRODUCTION Recent experimental reports 1'2 of a non-zero ~ mass and of e

  5. Integration and commissioning of the ATLAS Muon spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alberto Belloni; for the ATLAS collaboration

    2008-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is currently waiting to record the first collision data in spring 2009. Its muon spectrometer is designed to achieve a momentum resolution of 10% pT(mu) = 1 TeV/c. The spectrometer consists of a system of three superconducting air-core toroid magnets and is instrumented with three layers of Monitored Drift Tube chambers (Cathode Strip Chambers in the extreme forward region) as precision detectors. Resistive Plate Chambers in the barrel and Thin Gap Chambers in the endcap regions provide a fast trigger system. The spectrometer passed important milestones in the last year. The most notable milestone was the installation of the inner layer of endcap muon chambers, which constituted the last big piece of the ATLAS detector to be lowered in the ATLAS cavern. In addition, during the last two years most of the muon detectors were commissioned with cosmic rays while being assembled in the underground experimental cavern. We will report on our experience with the precision and trigger chambers, the optical spectrometer alignment system, the level-1 trigger, and the ATLAS data acquisition system. Results of the global performance of the muon system from data with magnetic field will also be presented.

  6. Design of the Muon Lifetime Experiment By Steve Kliewer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    the lifetime of the Muon particle. This planned device will use 4, low voltage, classroom safe scintillator detectors and a data acquisition electronics board developed by Quarknet of FermiLab. Analysis, low voltage, classroom safe, detectors 2. DAQ: use the electronics developed by Quarknet (QNET2) 3

  7. Extraction of Neutrino Flux from the Inclusive Muon Cross Section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murata, Tomoya

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied a method to extract neutrino flux from the data of neutrino-nucleus reaction by using maximum entropy method. We demonstrate a promising example to extract neutrino flux from the inclusive cross section of muon production without selecting a particular reaction process such as quasi-elastic nucleon knockout.

  8. Extraction of Neutrino Flux from the Inclusive Muon Cross Section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomoya Murata; Toru Sato

    2015-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied a method to extract neutrino flux from the data of neutrino-nucleus reaction by using maximum entropy method. We demonstrate a promising example to extract neutrino flux from the inclusive cross section of muon production without selecting a particular reaction process such as quasi-elastic nucleon knockout.

  9. The Solenoid Muon Capture System for the MELC Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    calculation of the magnetic field for the MELC setup are presented. Production of muon from pion decay as low as --~2 Tesla. In the vicinity of the solenoid axis there are targets, consisting of thin tungsten production backward is determined by the location of targets along the solenoid axis and by spacing of target

  10. Muon Performance in the Presence of High Pile-up in ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tülin Varol

    2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2012, the LHC is operated at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV in a mode leading up to 40 inelastic pp collisions per bunch crossing. The identification and reconstruction of muons produced in hard collisions is difficult in this challenging environment. Di-muon decays of Z bosons have been used to study the muon momentum resolution as well as the muon identification and reconstruction efficiencies of the ATLAS detector as a function of the muon transverse momentum from 15 GeV to 100 GeV and the number of inelastic collisions per event. These studies show that the muon momentum resolution, muon identification and reconstruction efficiencies are independent of the amount of pile-up present in an event.

  11. Letter of intent: a muon to electron conversion experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carey, R.M.; Lynch, K.R.; Miller, J.P.; Roberts, B.L.; /Boston U.; Marciano, W.J.; Semertzidis, Y.; Yamin, P.; /Brookhaven; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; /UC, Berkeley; Ankenbrandt, C.M.; Bernstein, R.H.; Bogert, D.; /Fermilab /Idaho State U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Moscow, INR /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MUONS Inc., Batavia /Syracuse U. /Virginia U.

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We are writing this letter to express our interest in pursuing an experiment at Fermilab to search for neutrinoless conversion of muons into electrons in the field of a nucleus, which is a lepton flavor-violating (LFV) reaction. The sensitivity goal of this experiment represents an improvement of more than a factor of 10,000 over existing limits. It would provide the most sensitive test of LFV, a unique and essential window on new physics unavailable at the high energy frontier. We present a conceptual scheme that would exploit the existing Fermilab Accumulator and Debuncher rings to generate the required characteristics of the primary proton beam. The proposal requires only modest modifications to the accelerator complex beyond those already planned for the NOvA experiment, with which this experiment would be fully compatible; however, it could also benefit significantly from possible upgrades such as the 'Project X' linac. We include the conceptual design of the muon beam and the experimental apparatus, which use the previously proposed MECO experiment as a starting point.

  12. Inverse neutrinoless double beta decay revisited: Neutrinos, Higgs triplets, and a muon collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodejohann, Werner [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Postfach 103980, D-69029 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We revisit the process of inverse neutrinoless double beta decay (e{sup -}e{sup -{yields}}W{sup -}W{sup -}) at future linear colliders. The cases of Majorana neutrino and Higgs triplet exchange are considered. We also discuss the processes e{sup -{mu}-{yields}}W{sup -}W{sup -} and {mu}{sup -{mu}-{yields}}W{sup -}W{sup -}, which are motivated by the possibility of muon colliders. For heavy neutrino exchange, we show that masses up to 10{sup 6} (10{sup 5}) GeV could be probed for ee and e{mu} machines, respectively. The stringent limits for mixing of heavy neutrinos with muons render {mu}{sup -{mu}-{yields}}W{sup -}W{sup -} less promising, even though this process is not constrained by limits from neutrinoless double beta decay. If Higgs triplets are responsible for inverse neutrinoless double beta decay, observable signals are only possible if a very narrow resonance is met. We also consider unitarity aspects of the process in case both Higgs triplets and neutrinos are exchanged. An exact seesaw relation connecting low energy data with heavy neutrino and triplet parameters is found.

  13. A study of muon neutrino disappearance in the MINOS detectors and the NuMI beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ling, Jiajie; /South Carolina U.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is now substantial evidence that the proper description of neutrino involves two representations related by the 3 x 3 PMNS matrix characterized by either distinct mass or flavor. The parameters of this mixing matrix, three angles and a phase, as well as the mass differences between the three mass eigenstates must be determined experimentally. The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search experiment is designed to study the flavor composition of a beam of muon neutrinos as it travels between the Near Detector at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory at 1 km from the target, and the Far Detector in the Soudan iron mine in Minnesota at 735 km from the target. From the comparison of reconstructed neutrino energy spectra at the near and far location, precise measurements of neutrino oscillation parameters from muon neutrino disappearance and electron neutrino appearance are expected. It is very important to know the neutrino flux coming from the source in order to achieve the main goal of the MINOS experiment: precise measurements of the atmospheric mass splitting |{Delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2}|, sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub 23}. The goal of my thesis is to accurately predict the neutrino flux for the MINOS experiment and measure the neutrino mixing angle and atmospheric mass splitting.

  14. Radiation effects in a muon collider ring and dipole magnet protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mokhov, N.V.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Novitski, I.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The requirements and operating conditions for a Muon Collider Storage Ring (MCSR) pose significant challenges to superconducting magnets. The dipole magnets should provide a high magnetic field to reduce the ring circumference and thus maximize the number of muon collisions during their lifetime. One third of the beam energy is continuously deposited along the lattice by the decay electrons at the rate of 0.5 kW/m for a 1.5-TeV c.o.m. and a luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. Unlike dipoles in proton machines, the MCSR dipoles should allow this dynamic heat load to escape the magnet helium volume in the horizontal plane, predominantly towards the ring center. This paper presents the analysis and comparison of radiation effects in MCSR based on two dipole magnets designs. Tungsten masks in the interconnect regions are used in both cases to mitigate the unprecedented dynamic heat deposition and radiation in the magnet coils.

  15. ELASTIC AND INELASTIC Y PRODUCTION BY MUONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loken, S.C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48.under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48. Ui-u ELASTIC AND INELASTIC

  16. Determining neutrino oscillation parameters from atmospheric muon neutrino disappearance with three years of IceCube DeepCore data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aartsen, M G; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Ahrens, M; Altmann, D; Anderson, T; Arguelles, C; Arlen, T C; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beatty, J J; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; BenZvi, S; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, A; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bos, F; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Bretz, H -P; Brown, A M; Brunner, J; Buzinsky, N; Casey, J; Casier, M; Cheung, E; Chirkin, D; Christov, A; Christy, B; Clark, K; Classen, L; Clevermann, F; Coenders, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; Day, M; de André, J P A M; De Clercq, C; De Ridder, S; Desiati, P; de Vries, K D; de With, M; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eberhardt, B; Eichmann, B; Eisch, J; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Felde, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gaior, R; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gier, D; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Gonzalez, J G; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grant, D; Gretskov, P; Groh, J C; Groß, A; Ha, C; Haack, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallen, P; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Hebecker, D; Heereman, D; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hellwig, D; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huang, F; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Jero, K; Jlelati, O; Jurkovic, M; Kaminsky, B; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kauer, M; Keivani, A; Kelley, J L; Kheirandish, A; Kiryluk, J; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Koob, A; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Kriesten, A; Krings, K; Kroll, G; Kroll, M; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Lanfranchi, J L; Larsen, D T; Larson, M J; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Leuermann, M; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maggi, G; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Maunu, R; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Medici, M; Meli, A; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Middlemas, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Niederhausen, H; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Omairat, A; O'Murchadha, A; Palczewski, T; Paul, L; Penek, Ö; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Pérez de los; Pfendner, C; Pieloth, D; Pinat, E; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Pütz, J; Quinnan, M; Rädel, L; Rameez, M; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Rees, I; Reimann, R; Relich, M; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Robertson, S; Rodrigues, J P; Rongen, M; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Sander, H -G; Sandroos, J; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Shanidze, R; Smith, M W E; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stanisha, N A; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Strotjohann, N L; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Tepe, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Terliuk, A; Teši?, G; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Tobin, M N; Tosi, D; Tselengidou, M; Unger, E; Usner, M; Vallecorsa, S; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Wallraff, M; Weaver, Ch; Wellons, M; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Whitehorn, N; Wichary, C; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zoll, M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a measurement of neutrino oscillations via atmospheric muon neutrino disappearance with three years of data of the completed IceCube neutrino detector. DeepCore, a region of denser instrumentation, enables the detection and reconstruction of atmospheric muon neutrinos between 10\\,GeV and 100\\,GeV, where a strong disappearance signal is expected. The detector volume surrounding DeepCore is used as a veto region to suppress the atmospheric muon background. Neutrino events are selected where the detected Cherenkov photons of the secondary particles minimally scatter, and the neutrino energy and arrival direction are reconstructed. Both variables are used to obtain the neutrino oscillation parameters from the data, with the best fit given by $\\Delta m^2_{32}=2.72^{+0.19}_{-0.20}\\times 10^{-3}\\,\\mathrm{eV}^2$ and $\\sin^2\\theta_{23} = 0.53^{+0.09}_{-0.12}$ (normal mass hierarchy assumed). The results are compatible and comparable in precision to those of dedicated oscillation experiments.

  17. Determining neutrino oscillation parameters from atmospheric muon neutrino disappearance with three years of IceCube DeepCore data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IceCube Collaboration; M. G. Aartsen; M. Ackermann; J. Adams; J. A. Aguilar; M. Ahlers; M. Ahrens; D. Altmann; T. Anderson; C. Arguelles; T. C. Arlen; J. Auffenberg; X. Bai; S. W. Barwick; V. Baum; R. Bay; J. J. Beatty; J. Becker Tjus; K. -H. Becker; S. BenZvi; P. Berghaus; D. Berley; E. Bernardini; A. Bernhard; D. Z. Besson; G. Binder; D. Bindig; M. Bissok; E. Blaufuss; J. Blumenthal; D. J. Boersma; C. Bohm; F. Bos; D. Bose; S. Böser; O. Botner; L. Brayeur; H. -P. Bretz; A. M. Brown; J. Brunner; N. Buzinsky; J. Casey; M. Casier; E. Cheung; D. Chirkin; A. Christov; B. Christy; K. Clark; L. Classen; F. Clevermann; S. Coenders; D. F. Cowen; A. H. Cruz Silva; J. Daughhetee; J. C. Davis; M. Day; J. P. A. M. de André; C. De Clercq; S. De Ridder; P. Desiati; K. D. de Vries; M. de With; T. DeYoung; J. C. Díaz-Vélez; M. Dunkman; R. Eagan; B. Eberhardt; B. Eichmann; J. Eisch; S. Euler; P. A. Evenson; O. Fadiran; A. R. Fazely; A. Fedynitch; J. Feintzeig; J. Felde; T. Feusels; K. Filimonov; C. Finley; T. Fischer-Wasels; S. Flis; A. Franckowiak; K. Frantzen; T. Fuchs; T. K. Gaisser; R. Gaior; J. Gallagher; L. Gerhardt; D. Gier; L. Gladstone; T. Glüsenkamp; A. Goldschmidt; G. Golup; J. G. Gonzalez; J. A. Goodman; D. Góra; D. Grant; P. Gretskov; J. C. Groh; A. Groß; C. Ha; C. Haack; A. Haj Ismail; P. Hallen; A. Hallgren; F. Halzen; K. Hanson; D. Hebecker; D. Heereman; D. Heinen; K. Helbing; R. Hellauer; D. Hellwig; S. Hickford; G. C. Hill; K. D. Hoffman; R. Hoffmann; A. Homeier; K. Hoshina; F. Huang; W. Huelsnitz; P. O. Hulth; K. Hultqvist; S. Hussain; A. Ishihara; E. Jacobi; J. Jacobsen; G. S. Japaridze; K. Jero; O. Jlelati; M. Jurkovic; B. Kaminsky; A. Kappes; T. Karg; A. Karle; M. Kauer; A. Keivani; J. L. Kelley; A. Kheirandish; J. Kiryluk; J. Kläs; S. R. Klein; J. -H. Köhne; G. Kohnen; H. Kolanoski; A. Koob; L. Köpke; C. Kopper; S. Kopper; D. J. Koskinen; M. Kowalski; A. Kriesten; K. Krings; G. Kroll; M. Kroll; J. Kunnen; N. Kurahashi; T. Kuwabara; M. Labare; J. L. Lanfranchi; D. T. Larsen; M. J. Larson; M. Lesiak-Bzdak; M. Leuermann; J. Lünemann; J. Madsen; G. Maggi; R. Maruyama; K. Mase; H. S. Matis; R. Maunu; F. McNally; K. Meagher; M. Medici; A. Meli; T. Meures; S. Miarecki; E. Middell; E. Middlemas; N. Milke; J. Miller; L. Mohrmann; T. Montaruli; R. Morse; R. Nahnhauer; U. Naumann; H. Niederhausen; S. C. Nowicki; D. R. Nygren; A. Obertacke; S. Odrowski; A. Olivas; A. Omairat; A. O'Murchadha; T. Palczewski; L. Paul; Ö. Penek; J. A. Pepper; C. Pérez de los Heros; C. Pfendner; D. Pieloth; E. Pinat; J. Posselt; P. B. Price; G. T. Przybylski; J. Pütz; M. Quinnan; L. Rädel; M. Rameez; K. Rawlins; P. Redl; I. Rees; R. Reimann; M. Relich; E. Resconi; W. Rhode; M. Richman; B. Riedel; S. Robertson; J. P. Rodrigues; M. Rongen; C. Rott; T. Ruhe; B. Ruzybayev; D. Ryckbosch; S. M. Saba; H. -G. Sander; J. Sandroos; M. Santander; S. Sarkar; K. Schatto; F. Scheriau; T. Schmidt; M. Schmitz; S. Schoenen; S. Schöneberg; A. Schönwald; A. Schukraft; L. Schulte; O. Schulz; D. Seckel; Y. Sestayo; S. Seunarine; R. Shanidze; M. W. E. Smith; D. Soldin; G. M. Spiczak; C. Spiering; M. Stamatikos; T. Stanev; N. A. Stanisha; A. Stasik; T. Stezelberger; R. G. Stokstad; A. Stößl; E. A. Strahler; R. Ström; N. L. Strotjohann; G. W. Sullivan; H. Taavola; I. Taboada; A. Tamburro; A. Tepe; S. Ter-Antonyan; A. Terliuk; G. Teši?; S. Tilav; P. A. Toale; M. N. Tobin; D. Tosi; M. Tselengidou; E. Unger; M. Usner; S. Vallecorsa; N. van Eijndhoven; J. Vandenbroucke; J. van Santen; M. Vehring; M. Voge; M. Vraeghe; C. Walck; M. Wallraff; Ch. Weaver; M. Wellons; C. Wendt; S. Westerhoff; B. J. Whelan; N. Whitehorn; C. Wichary; K. Wiebe; C. H. Wiebusch; D. R. Williams; H. Wissing; M. Wolf; T. R. Wood; K. Woschnagg; D. L. Xu; X. W. Xu; J. P. Yanez; G. Yodh; S. Yoshida; P. Zarzhitsky; J. Ziemann; M. Zoll

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a measurement of neutrino oscillations via atmospheric muon neutrino disappearance with three years of data of the completed IceCube neutrino detector. DeepCore, a region of denser instrumentation, enables the detection and reconstruction of atmospheric muon neutrinos between 10\\,GeV and 100\\,GeV, where a strong disappearance signal is expected. The detector volume surrounding DeepCore is used as a veto region to suppress the atmospheric muon background. Neutrino events are selected where the detected Cherenkov photons of the secondary particles minimally scatter, and the neutrino energy and arrival direction are reconstructed. Both variables are used to obtain the neutrino oscillation parameters from the data, with the best fit given by $\\Delta m^2_{32}=2.72^{+0.19}_{-0.20}\\times 10^{-3}\\,\\mathrm{eV}^2$ and $\\sin^2\\theta_{23} = 0.53^{+0.09}_{-0.12}$ (normal mass hierarchy assumed). The results are compatible and comparable in precision to those of dedicated oscillation experiments.

  18. Final Technical Report on STTR Project DE-FG02-04ER86191 Hydrogen Cryostat for Muon Beam Cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Rolland P.

    2008-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The project was to develop cryostat designs that could be used for muon beam cooling channels where hydrogen would circulate through refrigerators and the beam-cooling channel to simultaneously refrigerate 1) high-temperature-superconductor (HTS) magnet coils, 2) cold copper RF cavities, and 3) the hydrogen that is heated by the muon beam. In an application where a large amount of hydrogen is naturally present because it is the optimum ionization cooling material, it was reasonable to explore its use with HTS magnets and cold, but not superconducting, RF cavities. In this project we developed computer programs for simulations and analysis and conducted experimental programs to examine the parameters and technological limitations of the materials and designs of Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) components (magnet conductor, RF cavities, absorber windows, heat transport, energy absorber, and refrigerant).The project showed that although a hydrogen cryostat is not the optimum solution for muon ionization cooling channels, the studies of the cooling channel components that define the cryostat requirements led to fundamental advances. In particular, two new lines of promising development were opened up, regarding very high field HTS magnets and the HS concept, that have led to new proposals and funded projects.

  19. Lecture notes for criticality safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fullwood, R.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These lecture notes for criticality safety are prepared for the training of Department of Energy supervisory, project management, and administrative staff. Technical training and basic mathematics are assumed. The notes are designed for a two-day course, taught by two lecturers. Video tapes may be used at the options of the instructors. The notes provide all the materials that are necessary but outside reading will assist in the fullest understanding. The course begins with a nuclear physics overview. The reader is led from the macroscopic world into the microscopic world of atoms and the elementary particles that constitute atoms. The particles, their masses and sizes and properties associated with radioactive decay and fission are introduced along with Einstein's mass-energy equivalence. Radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, radiation penetration, shielding and health-effects are discussed to understand protection in case of a criticality accident. Fission, the fission products, particles and energy released are presented to appreciate the dangers of criticality. Nuclear cross sections are introduced to understand the effectiveness of slow neutrons to produce fission. Chain reactors are presented as an economy; effective use of the neutrons from fission leads to more fission resulting in a power reactor or a criticality excursion. The six-factor formula is presented for managing the neutron budget. This leads to concepts of material and geometric buckling which are used in simple calculations to assure safety from criticality. Experimental measurements and computer code calculations of criticality are discussed. To emphasize the reality, historical criticality accidents are presented in a table with major ones discussed to provide lessons-learned. Finally, standards, NRC guides and regulations, and DOE orders relating to criticality protection are presented.

  20. Search for physics beyond the standard model in final states with a lepton and missing transverse energy in proton-proton collisions at s = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A.?M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V.?M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E.?A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D’Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Keaveney, J.; Kim, T.?J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G.?P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A.?P.?R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Dildick, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A.?A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G.?G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J.?M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G.?H.; Aldá Júnior, W.?L.; Alves, G.?A.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Dos Reis Martins, T.; Pol, M.?E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E.?M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Malek, M.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W.?L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E.?J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C.?A.; Dias, F.?A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T.?R.; Gregores, E.?M.; Mercadante, P.?G.; Novaes, S.?F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J.?G.; Chen, G.?M.; Chen, H.?S.; Chen, M.; Du, R.; Jiang, C.?H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Plestina, R.; Tao, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, Y.; Li, Q.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S.?J.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Chaparro Sierra, L.?F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J.?P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J.?C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P.?A.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Mahmoud, M.?A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M.?J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J.?L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I.?N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J.?B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E.?C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Boudoul, G.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C.?A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J.?D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for new physics in proton-proton collisions having final states with an electron or muon and missing transverse energy is presented.

  1. Search for single production of scalar leptoquarks in p anti-p collisions decaying into muons and quarks with the D0 detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a search for second generation leptoquarks (LQ{sub 2}) which decay into a muon plus quark in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV in the D0 detector using an integrated luminosity of about 300 pb{sup -1}. No evidence for a leptoquark signal is observed and an upper bound on the product of the cross section for single leptoquark production times branching fraction {beta} into a quark and a muon was determined for second generation scalar leptoquarks as a function of the leptoquark mass. This result has been combined with a previously published D0 search for leptoquark pair production to obtain leptoquark mass limits as a function of the leptoquark-muon-quark coupling, {lambda}. Assuming {lambda} = 1, lower limits on the mass of a second generation scalar leptoquark coupling to a u quark and a muon are m{sub LQ{sub 2}} > 274 GeV and m{sub LQ{sub 2}} > 226 GeV for {beta} = 1 and {beta} = 1/2, respectively.

  2. Measurement of muon plus proton final states in $?_?$ Interactions on Hydrocarbon at $\\langle$$E_?$$\\rangle$ = 4.2 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Walton; M. Betancourt; L. Aliaga; O. Altinok; A. Bodek; A. Bravar; H. Budd; M. J. Bustamante; A. Butkevich; D. A. Martinez Caicedo; M. F. Carneiro; C. M. Castromonte; M. E. Christy; J. Chvojka; H. da Motta; M. Datta; J. Devan; S. A. Dytman; G. A. Díaz; B. Eberly; J. Felix; L. Fields; R. Fine; G. A. Fiorentini; A. M. Gago; H. Gallagher; R. Gran; D. A. Harris; A. Higuera; K. Hurtado; J. Kleykamp; M. Kordosky; S. A. Kulagin; T. Le; E. Maher; S. Manly; W. A. Mann; C. M. Marshall; C. Martin Mari; K. S. McFarland; C. L. McGivern; A. M. McGowan; B. Messerly; J. Miller; A. Mislivec; J. G. Morfín; J. Mousseau; T. Muhlbeier; D. Naples; J. K. Nelson; A. Norrick; J. Osta; V. Paolone; J. Park; C. E. Patrick; G. N. Perdue; L. Rakotondravohitra; R. D. Ransome; H. Ray; L. Ren; P. A. Rodrigues; D. Ruterbories; H. Schellman; D. W. Schmitz; C. Simon; F. D. Snider; J. T. Sobczyk; C. J. Solano Salinas; N. Tagg; B. G. Tice; E. Valencia; J. Wolcott; M. Wospakrik; G. Zavala; D. Zhang; B. P. Ziemer

    2015-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of charged-current muon neutrino scattering on hydrocarbon in which the final state includes a muon and a proton and no pions is presented. Although this signature has the topology of neutrino quasielastic scattering from neutrons, the event sample contains contributions from both quasielastic and inelastic processes where pions are absorbed in the nucleus. The analysis accepts events with muon production angles up to 70$^{\\circ}$ and proton kinetic energies greater than 110 MeV. The extracted cross section, when based completely on hadronic kinematics, is well-described by a simple relativistic Fermi gas nuclear model including the neutrino event generator modeling for inelastic processes and particle transportation through the nucleus. This is in contrast to the quasielastic cross section based on muon kinematics, which is best described by an extended model that incorporates multi-nucleon correlations. This measurement guides the formulation of a complete description of neutrino-nucleus interactions that encompasses the hadronic as well as the leptonic aspects of this process.

  3. Critical Materials Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alex King

    2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King talks about the goals of the Critical Materials Institute in diversifying the supply of critical materials, developing substitute materials, developing tools and techniques for recycling critical materials, and forecasting materials needs to avoid future shortages.

  4. Critical Materials Institute

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Alex King

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King talks about the goals of the Critical Materials Institute in diversifying the supply of critical materials, developing substitute materials, developing tools and techniques for recycling critical materials, and forecasting materials needs to avoid future shortages.

  5. The scattering of muons in low Z materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Attwood; P. Bell; S. Bull; T. McMahon; J. Wilson; R. Fernow; P. Gruber; A. Jamdagni; K. Long; E. McKigney; P. Savage; M. Curtis-Rouse; T. R. Edgecock; M. Ellis; J. Lidbury; W. J. Murray; P. Norton; K. Peach; K. Ishida; Y. Matsuda; K. Nagamine; S. Nakamura; G. M. Marshall; S. Benveniste; D. Cline; Y. Fukui; K. Lee; Y. Pischalnikov; S. Holmes; A. Bogacz

    2005-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the measurement of the scattering of 172 MeV/c muons in assorted materials, including liquid hydrogen, motivated by the need to understand ionization cooling for muon acceleration. Data are compared with predictions from the Geant 4 simulation code and this simulation is used to deconvolute detector effects. The scattering distributions obtained are compared with the Moliere theory of multiple scattering and, in the case of liquid hydrogen, with ELMS. With the exception of ELMS, none of the models are found to provide a good description of the data. The results suggest that ionization cooling will work better than would be predicted by Geant 4.7.0p01.

  6. Reducing backgrounds in the higgs factory muon collider detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mokhov, N. V.; Tropin, I. S.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A preliminary design of the 125-GeV Higgs Factory (HF) Muon Collider (MC) has identified an enormous background loads on the HF detector. This is related to the twelve times higher muon decay probability at HF compared to that previously studied for the 1.5-TeV MC. As a result of MARS15 optimization studies, it is shown that with a carefully designed protection system in the interaction region, in the machine-detector interface and inside the detector one can reduce the background rates to a manageable level similar to that achieved for the optimized 1.5-TeV case. The main characteristics of the HF detector background are presented for the configuration found.

  7. Design of Helical Cooling Channel for Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yonehara, Katsuya; /Fermilab

    2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast muon beam six dimensional (6D) phase space cooling is essential for muon colliders. The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) uses hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities imbedded in a magnet system with solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole components that provide the continuous dispersion needed for emittance exchange and effective 6D beam cooling. A series of HCC segments, each with sequentially smaller aperture, higher magnetic field, and higher RF frequency to match the beam size as it is cooled, has been optimized by numerical simulation to achieve a factor of 10{sup 5} emittance reduction in a 300 m long channel with only a 40% loss of beam. Conceptual designs of the hardware required for this HCC system and the status of the RF studies and HTS helical solenoid magnet prototypes are described.

  8. A search for two body muon decay signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Bayes; J. Bueno; Yu. I. Davydov; P. Depommier; W. Faszer; M. C. Fujiwara; C. A. Gagliardi; A. Gaponenko; D. R. Gill; A. Grossheim; P. Gumplinger; M. D. Hasinoff; R. S. Henderson; A. Hillairet; J. Hu; D. D. Koetke; R. P. MacDonald; G. M. Marshall; E. L. Mathie; R. E. Mischke; K. Olchanski; A. Olin; R. Openshaw; J. -M. Poutissou; R. Poutissou; V. Selivanov; G. Sheffer; B. Shin; T. D. S. Stanislaus; R. Tacik; R. E. Tribble

    2015-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Lepton family number violation is tested by searching for $\\mu^+\\to e^+X^0$ decays among the 5.8$\\times 10^8$ positive muon decay events analyzed by the TWIST collaboration. Limits are set on the production of both massless and massive $X^0$ bosons. The large angular acceptance of this experiment allows limits to be placed on anisotropic $\\mu^+\\to e^+X^0$ decays, which can arise from interactions violating both lepton flavor and parity conservation. Branching ratio limits of order $10^{-5}$ are obtained for bosons with masses of 13 - 80 MeV/c$^2$ and with different decay asymmetries. For bosons with masses less than 13 MeV/c$^{2}$ the asymmetry dependence is much stronger and the 90% limit on the branching ratio varies up to $5.8 \\times 10^{-5}$. This is the first study that explicitly evaluates the limits for anisotropic two body muon decays.

  9. The scattering of muons in low Z materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MuScat Collaboration; D. Attwood; P. Bell; S. Bull; T. McMahon; J. Wilson; R. Fernow; P. Gruber; A. Jamdagni; K. Long; E. McKigney; P. Savage; M. Curtis-Rouse; T. R. Edgecock; M. Ellis; J. Lidbury; W. J. Murray; P. Norton; K. Peach; K. Ishida; Y. Matsuda; K. Nagamine; S. Nakamura; G. M. Marshall; S. Benveniste; D. Cline; Y. Fukui; K. Lee; Y. Pischalnikov; S. Holmes; A. Bogacz

    2005-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the measurement of the scattering of 172 MeV/c muons in assorted materials, including liquid hydrogen, motivated by the need to understand ionisation cooling for muon acceleration. Data are compared with predictions from the Geant 4 simulation code and this simulation is used to deconvolute detector effects. The scattering distributions obtained are compared with the Moliere theory of multiple scattering and, in the case of liquid hydrogen, with ELMS. With the exception of ELMS, none of the models are found to provide a good description of the data. The results suggest that ionisation cooling will work better than would be predicted by Geant 4.7.0p01.

  10. FEASIBILITY STUDY II OF A MUON BASED NEUTRINO SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GALLARDO,J.C.; OZAKI,S.; PALMER,R.B.; ZISMAN,M.

    2001-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of using a muon storage ring to provide a well characterized beam of muon and electron neutrinos (a Neutrino Factory) has been under study for a number of years now at various laboratories throughout the world. The physics program of a Neutrino Factoryis focused on the relatively unexplored neutrino sector. In conjunction with a detector located a suitable distance from the neutrino source, the facility would make valuable contributions to the study of neutrino masses and lepton mixing. A Neutrino Factory is expected to improve the measurement accuracy of sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 23}) and {Delta}m{sup 2}{sub 32} and provide measurements of sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 13}) and the sign of {Delta}m{sup 2}{sub 32}. It may also be able to measure CP violation in the lepton sector.

  11. Superconducting helical solenoid systems for muon cooling experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashikhin, Vladimir S.; Andreev, Nikolai; /Fermilab; Johnson, Rolland P.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia; Kashikhin, Vadim V.; Lamm, Michael J.; Romanov, Gennady; Yonehara, Katsuya; Zlobin, Alexander V.; /Fermilab

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel configurations of superconducting magnet system for Muon Beam Cooling Experiment is under design at Fermilab. The magnet system has to generate longitudinal and transverse dipole and quadrupole helical magnetic fields providing a muon beam motion along helical orbit. It was found that such complicated field configuration can be formed by a set of circular coils shifted in transverse directions in such a way that their centers lay on the center of the helical beam orbit. Closed beam orbit configurations were also proposed and investigated. This paper describes the magnetic and mechanical designs and parameters of such magnetic system based on a NbTi Rutherford type cable. The helical solenoid fabrication, assembly and quench protection issues are presented.

  12. Discussion - Next Step for Fukushima Daiichi Muon Tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyadera, Haruo [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Specification of Fukushima Daiichi Muon Tomography (FMT): (1) 18-feet (5.5-m) drift tube, 2-inch (5-cm) diameter; (2) 108 tubes per layer; (3) Unit layer = 2 layer (detection efficiency: 0.96 x 0.96 = 92%); (4) 12 or 16 layer per module; (5) 16 layers allows momentum analysis at 30% level; (6) 2 module per super module (5.5 x 11 m{sup 2}); and (7) FMT = 2 super module. By deploying MMT next to a research reactor, we will be able to measure the impact of low level radiation fields on muon tomography and reconstruction processes. Radiation level during reactor operation is {approx}50 {micro}Sv/h which provides similar radiation environment of inside the FMT radiation shield at Fukushima Daiichi. We will implement coincidence algorithm on the FPGA board.

  13. Study of high field superconducting solenoids for muon beam cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashikhin, V.V.; Barzi, E.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Lamm, Michael J.; /FERMILAB; Sadovskiy, Y.; /Moscow Phys. Eng. Inst.; Zlobin, Alexander V; /Fermilab

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The final beam cooling stages of a possible Muon Collider may require DC solenoid magnets with magnetic fields of 40-50 T in an aperture of 40-50 mm. In this paper we study possible solutions towards creating DC fields of that order using available superconductors. Several magnetic and mechanical designs, optimized for the maximum performance are presented and compared in terms of cost and size.

  14. Muon-induced backgrounds in the CUORICINO experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreotti, E.; Arnaboldi, C.; Avignone III, F. T.; Balata, M.; Bandac, I.; Barucci, M.; Beeman, J. W.; Bellini, F.; Bloxham, T.; Brofferio, C.; Bryant, A.; Bucci, C.; Canonica, L.; Capelli, S.; Carbone, L.; Carrettoni, M.; Clemenza, M.; Cremonesi, O.; Creswick, R. J.; Domizio, S. Di; Dolinski, M. J.; Ejzak, L.; Faccini, R.; Farach, H. A.; Ferri, E.; Ferroni, F.; Fiorini, E.; Foggetta, L.; Giachero, A.; Gironi, L.; Giuliani, A.; Gorla, P.; Guardincerri, E.; Gutierrez, T. D.; Haller, E. E.; Kadel, R.; Kazkaz, K.; Kraft, S.; Kogler, L.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Maiano, C.; Maruyama, R. H.; Martinez, C.; Martinez, M.; Mizouni, L.; Morganti, S.; Nisi, S.; Nones, C.; Norman, E. B.; Nucciotti, A.; Orio, F.; Pallavicini, M.; Palmieri, V.; Pattavina, L.; Pavan, M.; Pedretti, M.; Pessina, G.; Pirro, S.; Previtali, E.; Risegari, L.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rusconi, C.; Salvioni, C.; Sangiorgio, S.; Schaeffer, D.; Scielzo, N. D.; Sisti, M.; Smith, A. R.; Tomei, C.; Ventura, G.; Vignati, M.

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To better understand the contribution of cosmic ray muons to the CUORICINO background, ten plastic scintillator detectors were installed at the CUORICINO siteand operated during the final 3 months of the experiment. From these measurements, an upper limit of 0.0021 counts/(keV.kg.yr) (95percent c.l.) was obtained on the cosmicray induced background in the neutrinoless double beta decay region of interest. The measurements were also compared to Geant4 simulations.

  15. Optical Alignment System for the PHENIX Muon Tracking Chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Murata; A. Al-Jamel; R. L. Armendariz; M. L. Brooks; T. Horaguchi; N. Kamihara; H. Kobayashi; D. M. Lee; T. -A. Shibata; W. E. Sondheim

    2002-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A micron-precision optical alignment system (OASys) for the PHENIX muon tracking chambers is developed. To ensure the required mass resolution of vector meson detection, the relative alignment between three tracking station chambers must be monitored with a precision of 25$\\mu$m. The OASys is a straightness monitoring system comprised of a light source, lens and CCD camera, used for determining the initial placement as well as for monitoring the time dependent movement of the chambers on a micron scale.

  16. Critical technologies research: Opportunities for DOE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies have identified a number of critical technologies that are essential to the nation`s defense, economic competitiveness, energy independence, and betterment of public health. The National Critical Technologies Panel (NCTP) has identified the following critical technology areas: Aeronautics and Surface Transportation; Biotechnology and Life Sciences; Energy and Environment; Information and Communications; Manufacturing; and Materials. Sponsored by the Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Research (OER), the Critical Technologies Research Workshop was held in May 1992. Approximately 100 scientists, engineers, and managers from the national laboratories, industry, academia, and govemment participated. The objective of the Berkeley Workshop was to advance the role of the DOE multiprogram energy laboratories in critical technologies research by describing, defining, and illustrating research areas, opportunities, resources, and key decisions necessary to achieve national research goals. An agenda was developed that looked at DOE`s capabilities and options for research in critical technologies and provided a forum for industry, academia, govemment, and the national laboratories to address: Critical technology research needs; existing research activities and resources; capabilities of the national laboratories; and opportunities for national laboratories, industries, and universities. The Workshop included plenary sessions in which presentations by technology and policy leaders set the context for further inquiry into critical technology issues and research opportunities. Separate sessions then focused on each of the following major areas of technology: Advanced materials; biotechnology and life sciences; energy and environment; information and communication; and manufacturing and transportation.

  17. Spontaneous Muon Emission during Fission, a New Nuclear Radioactivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. B. Ion; M. L. D. Ion; Reveica Ion-Mihai

    2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the essential theoretical predictions for the nuclear muonic radioactivity are presented by using a special fission-like model similar with that used in description of the pionic emission during fission. Hence, a fission-like model for the muonic radioactivity takes into account the essential degree of freedom of the system: muon-fissility, muon-fission barrier height, etc. Using this model it was shown that most of the SHE-nuclei lie in the region where the muonic fissility parameters attain their limiting value X=1. Hence, the SHE-region is characterized by the absence of a classical barrier toward spontaneous muon and pion emissions. Numerical estimations on the yields for the natural muonic radioactivities of the transuranium elements as well numerical values for barrier heights are given only for even-even parent nuclei. Some experimental results from LCP-identification emission spectrum are reviewed. Also, the experimental results obtained by Khryachkov et al, using new spectrometer for investigation of ternary nuclear fission, are presented. The OPERA-experiment proposed to perform search for muonic radioactivity from lead nuclei, in the low background conditions offered by the Gran Sasso underground Laboratory (LNGS), is discussed.

  18. Radiation Testing of Electronics for the CMS Endcap Muon System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Bylsma; D. Cady; A. Celik; L. S. Durkin; J. Gilmore; J. Haley; V. Khotilovich; S. Lakdawala; J. Liu; M. Matveev; B. P. Padley; J. Roberts; J. Roe; A. Safonov; I. Suarez; D. Wood; I. Zawisza

    2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The electronics used in the data readout and triggering system for the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) particle accelerator at CERN are exposed to high radiation levels. This radiation can cause permanent damage to the electronic circuitry, as well as temporary effects such as data corruption induced by Single Event Upsets. Once the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) accelerator upgrades are completed it will have five times higher instantaneous luminosity than LHC, allowing for detection of rare physics processes, new particles and interactions. Tests have been performed to determine the effects of radiation on the electronic components to be used for the Endcap Muon electronics project currently being designed for installation in the CMS experiment in 2013. During these tests the digital components on the test boards were operating with active data readout while being irradiated with 55 MeV protons. In reactor tests, components were exposed to 30 years equivalent levels of neutron radiation expected at the HL-LHC. The highest total ionizing dose (TID) for the muon system is expected at the inner-most portion of the CMS detector, with 8900 rad over ten years. Our results show that Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) components selected for the new electronics will operate reliably in the CMS radiation environment.

  19. First Look at Muon Chicane Chris Rogers,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    radioactive Probably part of target remote handling area Beam dump has to handle significant beam energy for this momentum range e.g. used by mu2e experiments e.g. used by 6d cooling channels e.g. used by stellarators becomes radioactive Probably part of target remote handling area Beam dump has to handle significant

  20. CRITICALITY SAFETY TRAINING AT FLUOR HANFORD (FH)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TOFFER, H.

    2005-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fluor Hanford Criticality Safety engineers are extensively trained. The objectives and requirements for training are derived from Department of Energy (DOE) and American National Standards Institute/American Nuclear Society Standards (ANSI/ANS), and are captured in the Hanford Criticality Safety Program manual, HNF-7098. Qualification cards have been established for the general Criticality Safety Engineer (CSE) analyst, CSEs who support specific facilities, and for the facility Criticality Safety Representatives (CSRs). Refresher training and continuous education in the discipline are emphasized. Weekly Brown Bag Sessions keep the criticality safety engineers informed of the latest developments and historic perspectives.

  1. Test of a 1.8 Tesla, 400 Hz Dipole for a Muon Synchrotron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. J. Summers; L. M. Cremaldi; T. L. Hart; L. P. Perera; M. Reep; H. Witte; S. Hansen; M. L. Lopes; J. Reidy, Jr.

    2012-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A 1.8 T dipole magnet using thin grain oriented silicon steel laminations has been constructed as a prototype for a muon synchrotron ramping at 400 Hz. Following the practice in large 3 phase transformers and our own Opera-2d simulations, joints are mitred to take advantage of the magnetic properties of the steel which are much better in the direction in which the steel was rolled. Measurements with a Hysteresigraph 5500 and Epstein frame show a high magnetic permeability which minimizes stored energy in the yoke allowing the magnet to ramp quickly with modest voltage. Coercivity is low which minimizes hysteresis losses. A power supply with a fast Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) switch and a capacitor was constructed. Coils are wound with 12 gauge copper wire. Thin wire and laminations minimize eddy current losses. The magnetic field was measured with a peak sensing Hall probe.

  2. Test of a 1.8 Tesla, 400 Hz Dipole for a Muon Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Summers, D.J.; Cremaldi, L.M.; Hart, T.L.; Perera, L.P.; Reep, M.; /Mississippi U.; Witte, H.; /Brookhaven; Hansen, S.; Lopes, M.L.; /Fermilab; Reidy Jr., J.; /Oxford High School

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 1.8 T dipole magnet using thin grain oriented silicon steel laminations has been constructed as a prototype for a muon synchrotron ramping at 400 Hz. Following the practice in large 3 phase transformers and our own Opera-2d simulations, joints are mitred to take advantage of the magnetic properties of the steel which are much better in the direction in which the steel was rolled. Measurements with a Hysteresigraph 5500 and Epstein frame show a high magnetic permeability which minimizes stored energy in the yoke allowing the magnet to ramp quickly with modest voltage. Coercivity is low which minimizes hysteresis losses. A power supply with a fast Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) switch and a capacitor was constructed. Coils are wound with 12 gauge copper wire. Thin wire and laminations minimize eddy current losses. The magnetic field was measured with a peak sensing Hall probe.

  3. Distinguishing a SM-like MSSM Higgs boson from SM Higgs boson at muon collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jai Kumar Singhal; Sardar Singh; Ashok K Nagawat

    2005-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the possibility of distinguishing the SM-like MSSM Higgs boson from the SM Higgs boson via Higgs boson pair production at future muon collider. We study the behavior of the production cross section in SM and MSSM with Higgs boson mass for various choices of MSSM parameters tan \\beta and m\\sub A. We observe that at fixed CM energy, in the SM, the total cross section increases with the increase in Higgs boson mass whereas this trend is reversed for the MSSM case. The changes that occur for the MSSM case in comparison to the SM predictions are quantified in terms of the relative percentage deviation in cross section. The observed large deviations in cross section for different choices of Higgs mass suggest that the measurements of the cross section could possibly distinguish the SM-like MSSM Higgs boson from the SM Higgs boson.

  4. Search for pair production of the scalar top quark in the electron+muon final state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Altona, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G.A.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the result of a search for the pair production of the lightest supersymmetric partner of the top quark ({tilde t}{sub 1}) in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb{sup -1}. The scalar top quarks are assumed to decay into a b quark, a charged lepton, and a scalar neutrino ({tilde {nu}}), and the search is performed in the electron plus muon final state. No significant excess of events above the standard model prediction is detected, and improved exclusion limits at the 95% C.L. are set in the (M{sub {tilde t}{sub 1}}, M{sub {tilde {nu}}}) mass plane.

  5. A PULSED MODULATOR POWER SUPPLY FOR THE G-2 MUON STORAGE RING INJECTION KICKER.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MI,J.LEE,Y.Y.MORSE,W.M.PAI,C.I.PAPPAS,G.C.SANDERS,Y.SEMERTIZIDIS,Y.,ET AL.

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the pulse modulator power supplies used to drive the kicker magnets that inject the muon beam into the 8-2 storage ring that has been built at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Three modulators built into coaxial structures consisting of a series circuit of an energy storage capacitor, a damping resistor and a fast thyratron switch are used to energize three magnets that kick the beam into the proper orbit. A 100 kV charging power supply is used to charge the capacitor to 95kV. The damping resistor shapes the magnet current waveform to a 450 nanosecond half-sine to match the injection requirements. This paper discusses the modulator design, construction and operation.

  6. A Pulsed Modulator Power Supply for the g-2 Muon Storage Ring Injection Kicker

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mi,J.; Lee, Y.Y.; Morse, W. M.; Pai, C.; Pappas, G.; Sanders, R.; Semertzidis, Y.

    1999-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the pulse modulator power supplies used to drive the kicker magnets that inject the muon beam into the g-2 storage ring that has been built at Brookhaven. Three modulators built into coaxial structures consisting of a series circuit of an energy storage capacitor, damping resistor and a fast thyratron switch are used to energize three magnets that kick the beam into the proper orbit. A 100 kV charging power supply is used to charge the capacitor to 95 kV. the damping resistor shapes the magnet current waveform to a 450 nanosecond half-sine to match the injection requirements. this paper discusses the modulator design, construction and operation.

  7. Muon Radiography at LANL | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Muon Radiography at LANL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science Applications of Nuclear Science...

  8. Progress on a Cavity with Beryllium Walls for Muon Ionization Cooling Channel R&D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowring, D.L.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ON A CAVITY WITH BERYLLIUM WALLS FOR MUON IONIZATION COOLINGFabricating a cavity with beryllium walls would mitigatepillbox RF cavity with beryllium walls, in order to evaluate

  9. Project X ICD-2 and its upgrades for Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebedev, Valeri; Nagaitsev, Sergei; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the Initial Configuration Document for Fermilab's Project X and considers its possible upgrades for neutrino factory or muon collider.

  10. Critical Gravity in Four Dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lue, H. [China Economics and Management Academy, Central University of Finance and Economics, Beijing 100081 (China); Institute for Advanced Study, Shenzhen University, Nanhai Avenue 3688, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Pope, C. N. [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge University, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 OWA (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We study four-dimensional gravity theories that are rendered renormalizable by the inclusion of curvature-squared terms to the usual Einstein action with a cosmological constant. By choosing the parameters appropriately, the massive scalar mode can be eliminated and the massive spin-2 mode can become massless. This ''critical'' theory may be viewed as a four-dimensional analogue of chiral topologically massive gravity, or of critical 'new massive gravity' with a cosmological constant, in three dimensions. We find that the on-shell energy for the remaining massless gravitons vanishes. There are also logarithmic spin-2 modes, which have positive energy. The mass and entropy of standard Schwarzschild-type black holes vanish. The critical theory might provide a consistent toy model for quantum gravity in four dimensions.

  11. Energy Department Announces Launch of Energy Innovation Hub for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Launch of Energy Innovation Hub for Critical Materials Research Energy Department Announces Launch of Energy Innovation Hub for Critical Materials Research May 31, 2012 - 5:56pm...

  12. Critical technologies research: Opportunities for DOE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies have identified a number of critical technologies that are essential to the nation's defense, economic competitiveness, energy independence, and betterment of public health. The National Critical Technologies Panel (NCTP) has identified the following critical technology areas: Aeronautics and Surface Transportation; Biotechnology and Life Sciences; Energy and Environment; Information and Communications; Manufacturing; and Materials. Sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Research (OER), the Critical Technologies Research Workshop was held in May 1992. Approximately 100 scientists, engineers, and managers from the national laboratories, industry, academia, and govemment participated. The objective of the Berkeley Workshop was to advance the role of the DOE multiprogram energy laboratories in critical technologies research by describing, defining, and illustrating research areas, opportunities, resources, and key decisions necessary to achieve national research goals. An agenda was developed that looked at DOE's capabilities and options for research in critical technologies and provided a forum for industry, academia, govemment, and the national laboratories to address: Critical technology research needs; existing research activities and resources; capabilities of the national laboratories; and opportunities for national laboratories, industries, and universities. The Workshop included plenary sessions in which presentations by technology and policy leaders set the context for further inquiry into critical technology issues and research opportunities. Separate sessions then focused on each of the following major areas of technology: Advanced materials; biotechnology and life sciences; energy and environment; information and communication; and manufacturing and transportation.

  13. Anomalous critical fields in quantum critical superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Putzke, C.; Walmsley, P.; Fletcher, J.D.; Malone, L.; Vignolles, D.; Proust, C.; Badoux, S.; See, P.; Beere, H.E.; Ritchie, D.A.; Kasahara, S.; Mizukami, Y.; Shibauchi, T.; Matsuda, Y.; Carrington, A.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -temperature superconductivity. However, the exact mechanism by which this occurs remains poorly understood. The iron-pnictide superconductor BaFe2(As1?xPx)2 is perhaps the clearest example to date of a high temperature quantum critical superconductor, and so it is a... mixing of antiferromagnetism and superconductivity, suggesting that a highly unusual vortex state is realised in quantum critical superconductors. Quantum critical points (QCPs) can be associated with a variety of different order-disorder phenomena...

  14. Jack Steinberger and the Muon-Neutrino

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 Investigation PeerNOON... No matter what chipJackJack Jack

  15. Magnetic fusion energy plasma interactive and high heat flux components. Volume I. Technical assessment of the critical issues and problem areas in the plasma materials interaction field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conn, R.W.; Gauster, W.B.; Heifetz, D.; Marmar, E.; Wilson, K.L. (eds.)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technical assessment of the critical issues and problem areas in the field of plasma materials interactions (PMI) in magnetic fusion devices shows these problems to be central for near-term experiments, for intermediate-range reactor devices including D-T burning physics experiments, and for long-term reactor machines. Critical technical issues are ones central to understanding and successful operation of existing and near-term experiments/reactors or devices of great importance for the long run, i.e., ones which will require an extensive, long-term development effort and thus should receive attention now. Four subgroups were formed to assess the critical PMI issues along four major lines: (1) PMI and plasma confinement physics experiments; (2) plasma-edge modelling and theory; (3) surface physics; and (4) materials technology for in-vessel components and the first wall. The report which follows is divided into four major sections, one for each of these topics.

  16. Proposal for the award of thin-walled precision aluminium alloy tubes for the Atlas Muon Spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposal for the award of thin-walled precision aluminium alloy tubes for the Atlas Muon Spectrometer

  17. JEMMRLA - Electron Model of a Muon RLA with Multi-pass Arcs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogacz, Slawomir Alex; Krafft, Geoffrey A.; Morozov, Vasiliy S.; Roblin, Yves R.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a demonstration experiment for a new concept of a 'dogbone' RLA with multi-pass return arcs -- JEMMRLA (Jlab Electron Model of Muon RLA). Such an RLA with linear-field multi-pass arcs was introduced for rapid acceleration of muons for the next generation of Muon Facilities. It allows for efficient use of expensive RF while the multi-pass arc design based on linear combined-function magnets exhibits a number of advantages over separate-arc or pulsed-arc designs. Here we describe a test of this concept by scaling a GeV scale muon design for electrons. Scaling muon momenta by the muon-to-electron mass ratio leads to a scheme, in which a 4.5 MeV electron beam is injected in the middle of a 3 MeV/pass linac with two double-pass return arcs and is accelerated to 18 MeV in 4.5 passes. All spatial dimensions including the orbit distortion are scaled by a factor of 7.5, which arises from scaling the 200 MHz muon RF to a readily available 1.5 GHz. The hardware requirements are not very demanding making it straightforward to implement. Such an RLA may have applications going beyond muon acceleration: in medical isotope production, radiation cancer therapy and homeland security.

  18. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 538 (2005) 159177 Muon acceleration in FFAG rings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keil, Eberhard

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 538 (2005) 159­177 Muon acceleration in FFAG August 2004 Available online 3 November 2004 Abstract Muon acceleration from 6 or 10 to 20 GeV in fixed-field alternating gradient (FFAG) rings is considered. The novel physics issues associated with non-scaling FFAG

  19. Muon-induced backgrounds in the CUORICINO experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreotti, E; Arnaboldi, C; Avignone, F T; Balata, M; Bandac, I; Barucci, M; Beeman, J W; Bellini, F; Bloxham, T; Brofferio, C; Bryant, A; Bucci, C; Canonica, L; Capelli, S; Carbone, L; Carrettoni, M; Clemenza, M; Cremonesi, O; Creswick, R J; Domizio, S D; Dolinski, M J; Ejzak, L; Faccini, R; Farach, H A; Ferri, E; Ferroni, F; Firoini, E; Foggetta, L; Giachero, A; Gironi, L; Giuliani, A; Gorla, P; Guardincerri, E; Gutierrez, T D; Haller, E E; Kadel, R; Kazkaz, K; Kraft, S; Kogler, L; Kolomensky, Y G; Maiano, C; Maruyama, R H; Martinez, C; Martinez, M; Mizouni, L; Morganti, S; Nisi, S; Nones, C; Norman, E B; Nucciotti, A; Orio, F; Pallavicini, M; Palmieri, V; Pattavina, L; Pavan, M; Pedretti, M; Pessina, G; Pirro, S; Previtali, E; Risegari, L; Rosenfeld, C; Rusconi, C; Salvioni, C; Sangiorgio, S; Schaeffer, D; Scielzo, N D; Sisti, M; Smith, A R; Tomei, C; Ventura, G; Vignati, M

    2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    To better understand the contribution of cosmic ray muons to the CUORICINO background, ten plastic scintillator detectors were installed at the CUORICINO site and operated during 3 months of the CUORICINO experiment. From these measurements, an upper limit of 0.0021 counts/keV {center_dot} kg {center_dot} yr (95% C.L.) was obtained on the cosmic ray induced background in the neutrinoless double beta decay region of interest. The measurements were compared to Geant4 simulations, which are similar to those that will be used to estimate the backgrounds in CUORE.

  20. Holographic calculation of hadronic contributions to muon g-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Deog Ki; Matsuzaki, Shinya [Department of Physics, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Doyoun [Frontier Physics Research Division and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the gauge-gravity duality, we compute the leading order hadronic (HLO) contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of muon, a{sub {mu}}{sup HLO}. Holographic renormalization is used to obtain a finite vacuum polarization. We find a{sub {mu}}{sup HLO}=470.5x10{sup -10} in anti-de Sitter/QCD with two light flavors, which is compared with the currently revised BABAR data estimated from e{sup +}e{sup -{yields}{pi}+{pi}-} events, a{sub {mu}}{sup HLO}[{pi}{pi}]=(514.1{+-}3.8)x10{sup -10}.

  1. The New Muon g-2 Experiment at Fermilab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Grange for the E989 collaboration

    2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Precision measurements of fundamental quantities have played a key role in pointing the way forward in developing our understanding of the universe. Though the enormously successful Standard Model (SM) describes the breadth of both historical and modern experimental particle physics data, it is necessarily incomplete. The muon $g-2$ experiment executed at Brookhaven concluded in 2001 and measured a discrepancy of more than three standard deviations compared to the Standard Model calculation. Arguably, this remains the strongest hint of physics beyond the SM. A new initiative at Fermilab is under construction to improve the experimental accuracy four-fold. The current status is presented here.

  2. The development of novel materials with unique properties is critical to advances in industry, medicine, energy systems, microelectronics, aeronautics and many other

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Novel Materials The development of novel materials with unique properties is critical to advances and applications. definition novel materials research focuses on improving the performance of materials of products and applications. at-a-glance researCH ProGrams in nuclear fuels and materials, biomaterials

  3. Critical Materials Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AMO hosted a public workshop on Tuesday, April 3, 2012 in Arlington, VA to provide background information on critical materials assessment, the current research within DOE related to critical...

  4. Nuclear Multifragmentation Critical Exponents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfgang Bauer; William Friedman

    1994-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the critical exponents of nuclear multi-fragmentation have not been determined conclusively yet.

  5. Critical Infrastructure Networks and Supernetworks: New Tools for Dynamics,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Critical Infrastructure Networks and Supernetworks: New Tools for Dynamics, Network Efficiency Variational Inequalities · A New Network Performance/Efficiency Measure with Applications to Critical, Communication, and Energy Networks #12;Components of Common Physical Networks Network System Nodes Links Flows

  6. Critical phenomena in perfect fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David W. Neilsen; Matthew W. Choptuik

    1999-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the gravitational collapse of a spherically symmetric, perfect fluid with equation of state P = (Gamma -1)rho. We restrict attention to the ultrarelativistic (``kinetic-energy-dominated'', ``scale-free'') limit where black hole formation is anticipated to turn on at infinitesimal black hole mass (Type II behavior). Critical solutions (those which sit at the threshold of black hole formation in parametrized families of collapse) are found by solving the system of ODEs which result from a self-similar ansatz, and by solving the full Einstein/fluid PDEs in spherical symmetry. These latter PDE solutions (``simulations'') extend the pioneering work of Evans and Coleman (Gamma = 4/3) and verify that the continuously self-similar solutions previously found by Maison and Hara et al for $1.05 Gamma_dn are nodal points rather than focal points as previously reported. We also find a critical solution for Gamma = 2, and present evidence that it is continuously self-similar and Type II. Mass-scaling exponents for all of the critical solutions are calculated by evolving near-critical initial data, with results which confirm and extend previous calculations based on linear perturbation theory. Finally, we comment on critical solutions generated with an ideal-gas equation of state.

  7. Parametric-resonance ionization cooling of muon beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morozov, V. S.; Derbenev, Ya. S.; Afanasev, A.; Johnson, R. P.; Erdelyi, B.; Maloney, J. A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States); Muons, Inc., Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States) and George Washington University, Washington, D.C. 20052 (United States); Muons, Inc., Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois 60115 (United States)

    2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) is proposed as the final 6D cooling stage of a high-luminosity muon collider. Combining muon ionization cooling with parametric resonant dynamics should allow an order of magnitude smaller final equilibrium transverse beam emittances than conventional ionization cooling alone. In this scheme, a half-integer parametric resonance is induced in a cooling channel causing the beam to be naturally focused with the period of the channel's free oscillations. Thin absorbers placed at the focal points then cool the beam's angular divergence through the usual ionization cooling mechanism where each absorber is followed by RF cavities. A special continuous-field twin-helix magnetic channel with correlated behavior of the horizontal and vertical betatron motions and dispersion was developed for PIC. We present the results of modeling PIC in such a channel using GEANT4/G4beamline. We discuss the challenge of precise beam aberration control from one absorber to another over a wide angular spread.

  8. The Energy - Water Connection: Can We Sustain Critical Resources and Make them Reliable, Affordable, and Environmentally Sound?(LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McMahon, Jim

    2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Summer Lecture Series 2006: Jim McMahon of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division (EETD) is head of the Energy Analysis Department in EETD, which provides technical analysis to the Department of Energy on things like energy efficiency appliance standards. McMahon and his colleagues helped the nation save tens of billions of dollars in energy costs since the standards program began. Now his Water-Energy Technology Team (WETT) is applying its expertise to the linked problem of energy and water. Each of us requires more than 500 gallons per person per day for food production, plus an additional 465 gallons to produce household electricity. WETT hopes to mine some of the numerous opportunities to save energy and water by applying new technologies.

  9. 978-1-4799-4394-4/14/$31.00 c 2014 IEEE Towards Energy Proportionality for Large-Scale Latency-Critical Workloads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozyrakis, Christos

    978-1-4799-4394-4/14/$31.00 c 2014 IEEE Towards Energy Proportionality for Large-Scale Latency University Google, Inc. Abstract Reducing the energy footprint of warehouse-scale computer (WSC) systems is key to their affordability, yet difficult to achieve in practice. The lack of energy proportionality

  10. Observation of seasonal variation of atmospheric multiple-muon events in the MINOS Near and Far Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adamson, P; Aurisano, A; Barr, G; Bishai, M; Blake, A; Bock, G J; Bogert, D; Cao, S V; Castromonte, C M; Childress, S; Coelho, J A B; Corwin, L; Cronin-Hennessy, D; de Jong, J K; Devan, A V; Devenish, N E; Diwan, M V; Escobar, C O; Evans, J J; Falk, E; Feldman, G J; Frohne, M V; Gallagher, H R; Gomes, R A; Goodman, M C; Gouffon, P; Graf, N; Gran, R; Grzelak, K; Habig, A; Hahn, S R; Hartnell, J; Hatcher, R; Holin, A; Huang, J; Hylen, J; Irwin, G M; Isvan, Z; James, C; Jensen, D; Kafka, T; Kasahara, S M S; Koizumi, G; Kordosky, M; Kreymer, A; Lang, K; Ling, J; Litchfield, P J; Lucas, P; Mann, W A; Marshak, M L; Mayer, N; McGivern, C; Medeiros, M M; Mehdiyev, R; Meier, J R; Messier, M D; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Sher, S Moed; Moore, C D; Mualem, L; Musser, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Newman, H B; Nichol, R J; Nowak, J A; Connor, J O; Orchanian, M; Osprey, S; Pahlka, R B; Paley, J; Patterson, R B; Pawloski, G; Perch, A; Phan-Budd, S; Plunkett, R K; Poonthottathil, N; Qiu, X; Radovic, A; Rebel, B; Rosenfeld, C; Rubin, H A; Sanchez, M C; Schneps, J; Schreckenberger, A; Schreiner, P; Sharma, R; Sousa, A; Tagg, N; Talaga, R L; Thomas, J; Thomson, M A; Tian, X; Timmons, A; Tognini, S C; Toner, R; Torretta, D; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Viren, B; Weber, A; Webb, R C; White, C; Whitehead, L; Whitehead, L H; Wojcicki, S G; Zwaska, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first observation of seasonal modulations in the rates of cosmic ray multiple-muon events at two underground sites, the MINOS Near Detector with an overburden of 225 mwe, and the MINOS Far Detector site at 2100 mwe. At the deeper site, multiple-muon events with muons separated by more than 8 m exhibit a seasonal rate that peaks during the summer, similar to that of single-muon events. In contrast and unexpectedly, the rate of multiple-muon events with muons separated by less than 5-8 m, and the rate of multiple-muon events in the smaller, shallower Near Detector, exhibit a seasonal rate modulation that peaks in the winter.

  11. Production of high-energy ?neutrinos from young neutron stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. F. Burgio; B. Link

    2006-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Young, rapidly rotating neutron stars could accelerate protons to energies of $\\sim 1$ PeV close to the stellar surface, which scatter with x-rays from the stellar surface through the $\\Delta$ resonance and produce pions. The pions subsequently decay to produce muon neutrinos. We find that the energy spectrum of muon neutrinos consists of a sharp rise at $\\sim 50$ TeV, corresponding to the onset of the resonance, above which the flux drops as $\\epsilon_\

  12. A new method for imaging nuclear threats using cosmic ray muons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, C. L.; Bacon, Jeffrey; Borozdin, Konstantin; Miyadera, Haruo; Perry, John; Rose, Evan; Watson, Scott; White, Tim [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Aberle, Derek; Green, J. Andrew; McDuff, George G. [National Security Technologies, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States)] [National Security Technologies, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Luki?, Zarija [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Milner, Edward C. [Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX 75205 (United States)] [Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX 75205 (United States)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Muon tomography is a technique that uses cosmic ray muons to generate three dimensional images of volumes using information contained in the Coulomb scattering of the muons. Advantages of this technique are the ability of cosmic rays to penetrate significant overburden and the absence of any additional dose delivered to subjects under study above the natural cosmic ray flux. Disadvantages include the relatively long exposure times and poor position resolution and complex algorithms needed for reconstruction. Here we demonstrate a new method for obtaining improved position resolution and statistical precision for objects with spherical symmetry.

  13. Muon decays in the Earth's atmosphere, time dilatation and relativity of simultaneity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. H. Field

    2009-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Observation of the decay of muons produced in the Earth's atmosphere by cosmic ray interactions provides a graphic illustration of the counter-intuitive space-time predictions of special relativity theory. Muons at rest in the atmosphere decaying simultaneously are subject to a universal time-dilatation effect when viewed from a moving frame and so are also observed to decay simultaneously in all such frames, whereas the decays of muons with different proper frames show relativity of simultaneity when observed from different inertial frames.

  14. Criticality Model Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.M. Scaglione

    2003-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the ''Criticality Model Report'' is to validate the MCNP (CRWMS M&O 1998h) code's ability to accurately predict the effective neutron multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) for a range of conditions spanned by various critical configurations representative of the potential configurations commercial reactor assemblies stored in a waste package may take. Results of this work are an indication of the accuracy of MCNP for calculating eigenvalues, which will be used as input for criticality analyses for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage at the proposed Monitored Geologic Repository. The scope of this report is to document the development and validation of the criticality model. The scope of the criticality model is only applicable to commercial pressurized water reactor fuel. Valid ranges are established as part of the validation of the criticality model. This model activity follows the description in BSC (2002a).

  15. First measurement of top quark pair production cross-section in muon plus hadronic tau final states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; /Florida State U.

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation presents the first measurement of top quark pair production cross-section in events containing a muon and a tau lepton. The measurement was done with 1 fb{sup -1} of data collected during April 2002 through February 2006 using the D0 detector at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider, located at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois. Events containing one isolated muon, one tau which decays hadronically, missing transverse energy, and two or more jets (at least one of which must be tagged as a heavy flavor jet) were selected. Twenty-nine candidate events were observed with an expected background of 9.16 events. The top quark pair production cross-section is measured to be {sigma}(t{bar t}) = 8.0{sub -2.4}{sup +2.8}(stat){sub -1.7}{sup +1.8}(syst) {+-} 0.5(lumi) pb. Assuming a top quark pair production cross-section of 6.77 pb for Monte Carlo signal top events without a real tau, the measured {sigma} x BR is {sigma}(t{bar t}) x BR(t{bar t} {yields} {mu} + {tau} + 2{nu} + 2b) = 0.18{sub -0.11}{sup +0.13}(stat){sub -0.09}{sup +0.09}(syst) {+-} 0.01(lumi) pb.

  16. GUT-inspired SUSY and the muon g-2 anomaly: prospects for LHC 14 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kowalska, Kamila; Sessolo, Enrico Maria; Williams, Andrew J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the possibility that the muon g-2 anomaly, $\\delta(g-2)$, finds its origins in low energy supersymmetry (SUSY). In the general MSSM the parameter space consistent with $\\delta(g-2)$ and correct dark matter relic density of the lightest neutralino easily evades the present direct LHC limits on sparticle masses and also lies to a large extent beyond future LHC sensitivity. The situation is quite different in GUT-defined scenarios where input SUSY parameters are no longer independent. We analyze to what extent the LHC can probe a broad class of GUT-inspired SUSY models with gaugino non-universality that are currently in agreement with the bounds from $\\delta(g-2)$, as well as with the relic density and the Higgs mass measurement. To this end we perform a detailed numerical simulation of several searches for electroweakino and slepton production at the LHC and derive projections for the LHC 14 TeV run. We show that, within GUT-scale SUSY there is still plenty of room for the explanation of the muon an...

  17. SEARCH FOR MUON NEUTRINOS FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS WITH THE IceCube NEUTRINO TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbasi, R.; Aguilar, J. A.; Andeen, K.; Baker, M. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Abdou, Y. [Department of Subatomic and Radiation Physics, University of Gent, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Abu-Zayyad, T. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, River Falls, WI 54022 (United States); Adams, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Ahlers, M. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Auffenberg, J.; Becker, K.-H. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Bai, X. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Barwick, S. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Bay, R. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bazo Alba, J. L.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Berdermann, J. [DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen (Germany); Beattie, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Beatty, J. J. [Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bechet, S. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Science Faculty CP230, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Becker, J. K. [Department of Physics, TU Dortmund University, D-44221 Dortmund (Germany)

    2010-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of searches for high-energy muon neutrinos from 41 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in the northern sky with the IceCube detector in its 22 string configuration active in 2007/2008. The searches cover both the prompt and a possible precursor emission as well as a model-independent, wide time window of -1 hr to +3 hr around each GRB. In contrast to previous searches with a large GRB population, we do not utilize a standard Waxman-Bahcall GRB flux for the prompt emission but calculate individual neutrino spectra for all 41 GRBs from the burst parameters measured by satellites. For all of the three time windows, the best estimate for the number of signal events is zero. Therefore, we place 90% CL upper limits on the fluence from the prompt phase of 3.7 x 10{sup -3} erg cm{sup -2} (72 TeV-6.5 PeV) and on the fluence from the precursor phase of 2.3 x 10{sup -3} erg cm{sup -2} (2.2-55 TeV), where the quoted energy ranges contain 90% of the expected signal events in the detector. The 90% CL upper limit for the wide time window is 2.7 x 10{sup -3} erg cm{sup -2} (3 TeV-2.8 PeV) assuming an E {sup -2} flux.

  18. 2011 Annual Criticality Safety Program Performance Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrea Hoffman

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2011 review of the INL Criticality Safety Program has determined that the program is robust and effective. The review was prepared for, and fulfills Contract Data Requirements List (CDRL) item H.20, 'Annual Criticality Safety Program performance summary that includes the status of assessments, issues, corrective actions, infractions, requirements management, training, and programmatic support.' This performance summary addresses the status of these important elements of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Assessments - Assessments in 2011 were planned and scheduled. The scheduled assessments included a Criticality Safety Program Effectiveness Review, Criticality Control Area Inspections, a Protection of Controlled Unclassified Information Inspection, an Assessment of Criticality Safety SQA, and this management assessment of the Criticality Safety Program. All of the assessments were completed with the exception of the 'Effectiveness Review' for SSPSF, which was delayed due to emerging work. Although minor issues were identified in the assessments, no issues or combination of issues indicated that the INL Criticality Safety Program was ineffective. The identification of issues demonstrates the importance of an assessment program to the overall health and effectiveness of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Issues and Corrective Actions - There are relatively few criticality safety related issues in the Laboratory ICAMS system. Most were identified by Criticality Safety Program assessments. No issues indicate ineffectiveness in the INL Criticality Safety Program. All of the issues are being worked and there are no imminent criticality concerns. Infractions - There was one criticality safety related violation in 2011. On January 18, 2011, it was discovered that a fuel plate bundle in the Nuclear Materials Inspection and Storage (NMIS) facility exceeded the fissionable mass limit, resulting in a technical safety requirement (TSR) violation. The TSR limits fuel plate bundles to 1085 grams U-235, which is the maximum loading of an ATR fuel element. The overloaded fuel plate bundle contained 1097 grams U-235 and was assembled under an 1100 gram U-235 limit in 1982. In 2003, the limit was reduced to 1085 grams citing a new criticality safety evaluation for ATR fuel elements. The fuel plate bundle inventories were not checked for compliance prior to implementing the reduced limit. A subsequent review of the NMIS inventory did not identify further violations. Requirements Management - The INL Criticality Safety program is organized and well documented. The source requirements for the INL Criticality Safety Program are from 10 CFR 830.204, DOE Order 420.1B, Chapter III, 'Nuclear Criticality Safety,' ANSI/ANS 8-series Industry Standards, and DOE Standards. These source requirements are documented in LRD-18001, 'INL Criticality Safety Program Requirements Manual.' The majority of the criticality safety source requirements are contained in DOE Order 420.1B because it invokes all of the ANSI/ANS 8-Series Standards. DOE Order 420.1B also invokes several DOE Standards, including DOE-STD-3007, 'Guidelines for Preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations at Department of Energy Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities.' DOE Order 420.1B contains requirements for DOE 'Heads of Field Elements' to approve the criticality safety program and specific elements of the program, namely, the qualification of criticality staff and the method for preparing criticality safety evaluations. This was accomplished by the approval of SAR-400, 'INL Standardized Nuclear Safety Basis Manual,' Chapter 6, 'Prevention of Inadvertent Criticality.' Chapter 6 of SAR-400 contains sufficient detail and/or reference to the specific DOE and contractor documents that adequately describe the INL Criticality Safety Program per the elements specified in DOE Order 420.1B. The Safety Evaluation Report for SAR-400 specifically recognizes that the approval of SAR-400 approves the INL Criticality Safety Program. No new source requirements were released in 2011. A revision to LRD-18001 is

  19. YALINA facility a sub-critical Accelerator- Driven System (ADS) for nuclear energy research facility description and an overview of the research program (1997-2008).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gohar, Y.; Smith, D. L.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The YALINA facility is a zero-power, sub-critical assembly driven by a conventional neutron generator. It was conceived, constructed, and put into operation at the Radiation Physics and Chemistry Problems Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus located in Minsk-Sosny, Belarus. This facility was conceived for the purpose of investigating the static and dynamic neutronics properties of accelerator driven sub-critical systems, and to serve as a neutron source for investigating the properties of nuclear reactions, in particular transmutation reactions involving minor-actinide nuclei. This report provides a detailed description of this facility and documents the progress of research carried out there during a period of approximately a decade since the facility was conceived and built until the end of 2008. During its history of development and operation to date (1997-2008), the YALINA facility has hosted several foreign groups that worked with the resident staff as collaborators. The participation of Argonne National Laboratory in the YALINA research programs commenced in 2005. For obvious reasons, special emphasis is placed in this report on the work at YALINA facility that has involved Argonne's participation. Attention is given here to the experimental program at YALINA facility as well as to analytical investigations aimed at validating codes and computational procedures and at providing a better understanding of the physics and operational behavior of the YALINA facility in particular, and ADS systems in general, during the period 1997-2008.

  20. Reference handbook: Nuclear criticality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose for this handbook is to provide Rocky Flats personnel with the information necessary to understand the basic principles underlying a nuclear criticality.

  1. Characterising encapsulated nuclear waste using cosmic-ray muon tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarkson, Anthony; Hoek, Matthias; Ireland, David G; Johnstone, John R; Kaiser, Ralf; Keri, Tibor; Lumsden, Scott; Mahon, David F; McKinnon, Bryan; Murray, Morgan; Nutbeam-Tuffs, Siân; Shearer, Craig; Yang, Guangliang; Zimmerman, Colin

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tomographic imaging techniques using the Coulomb scattering of cosmic-ray muons have been shown previously to successfully identify and characterise low- and high-Z materials within an air matrix using a prototype scintillating-fibre tracker system. Those studies were performed as the first in a series to assess the feasibility of this technology and image reconstruction techniques in characterising the potential high-Z contents of legacy nuclear waste containers for the UK Nuclear Industry. The present work continues the feasibility study and presents the first images reconstructed from experimental data collected using this small-scale prototype system of low- and high-Z materials encapsulated within a concrete-filled stainless-steel container. Clear discrimination is observed between the thick steel casing, the concrete matrix and the sample materials assayed. These reconstructed objects are presented and discussed in detail alongside the implications for future industrial scenarios.

  2. Characterising encapsulated nuclear waste using cosmic-ray muon tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anthony Clarkson; David J. Hamilton; Matthias Hoek; David G. Ireland; John R. Johnstone; Ralf Kaiser; Tibor Keri; Scott Lumsden; David F. Mahon; Bryan McKinnon; Morgan Murray; Siân Nutbeam-Tuffs; Craig Shearer; Guangliang Yang; Colin Zimmerman

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Tomographic imaging techniques using the Coulomb scattering of cosmic-ray muons have been shown previously to successfully identify and characterise low- and high-Z materials within an air matrix using a prototype scintillating-fibre tracker system. Those studies were performed as the first in a series to assess the feasibility of this technology and image reconstruction techniques in characterising the potential high-Z contents of legacy nuclear waste containers for the UK Nuclear Industry. The present work continues the feasibility study and presents the first images reconstructed from experimental data collected using this small-scale prototype system of low- and high-Z materials encapsulated within a concrete-filled stainless-steel container. Clear discrimination is observed between the thick steel casing, the concrete matrix and the sample materials assayed. These reconstructed objects are presented and discussed in detail alongside the implications for future industrial scenarios.

  3. Injection/Extraction Studies for the Muon FFAG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasternak, J. [Imperial College London, Department of Physics, London (United Kingdom); STFC/RAL/ISIS, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon (United Kingdom); Aslaninejad, M. [Imperial College London, Department of Physics, London (United Kingdom); Berg, J. Scott [BNL, Upton, Long Island, New York (United States); Kelliher, D. J.; Machida, S. [STFC/ASTeC/RAL, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon (United Kingdom)

    2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The non-scaling fixed field alternating gradient (NS-FFAG) ring is a candidate muon accelerator in the Neutrino Factory complex according to the present baseline, which is currently being addressed by the International Design Study (IDS-NF). In order to achieve small orbit excursion, motivated by magnet cost reduction, and small time of flight variation, dictated by the need to use high RF frequency, lattices with a very compact cell structure and short straight sections are required. The resulting geometry dictates very difficult constraints on the injection/extraction systems. Beam dynamics in the non-scaling FFAG is studied using codes capable of correctly tracking with large transverse amplitude and momentum spread. The feasibility of injection/extraction is studied and various implementations focusing on minimization of kicker/septum strength are presented. Finally the parameters of the resulting kicker magnets are estimated.

  4. INTERACTION OF MUON BEAM WITH PLASMA DEVELOPED DURING IONIZATION COOLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Ahmed, D. Kaplan, T. Roberts, L. Spentzouris, K. Beard

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle-in-cell simulations involving the interaction of muon beam (peak density 10{sup 18} m{sup 3}) with Li plasma (ionized medium) of density 10{sup 16}-10{sup 22} m{sup -3} have been performed. This study aimed to understand the effects of plasma on an incoming beam in order to explore scenario developed during the process of ionization cooling. The computer code takes into account the self-consistent electromagnetic effects of beam interacting with plasma. This study shows that the beam can pass through the plasma of densities four order of magnitude higher than its peak density. The low density plasmas are wiped out by the beam, however, the resonance is observed for densities of similar order. Study reveals the signature of plasma wakefield acceleration.

  5. Vulnerability of critical infrastructures : identifying critical nodes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, Roger Gary; Robinson, David Gerald

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research was the development of tools and techniques for the identification of critical nodes within critical infrastructures. These are nodes that, if disrupted through natural events or terrorist action, would cause the most widespread, immediate damage. This research focuses on one particular element of the national infrastructure: the bulk power system. Through the identification of critical elements and the quantification of the consequences of their failure, site-specific vulnerability analyses can be focused at those locations where additional security measures could be effectively implemented. In particular, with appropriate sizing and placement within the grid, distributed generation in the form of regional power parks may reduce or even prevent the impact of widespread network power outages. Even without additional security measures, increased awareness of sensitive power grid locations can provide a basis for more effective national, state and local emergency planning. A number of methods for identifying critical nodes were investigated: small-world (or network theory), polyhedral dynamics, and an artificial intelligence-based search method - particle swarm optimization. PSO was found to be the only viable approach and was applied to a variety of industry accepted test networks to validate the ability of the approach to identify sets of critical nodes. The approach was coded in a software package called Buzzard and integrated with a traditional power flow code. A number of industry accepted test networks were employed to validate the approach. The techniques (and software) are not unique to power grid network, but could be applied to a variety of complex, interacting infrastructures.

  6. Measurement of the atmospheric neutrino energy spectrum from 100 GeV to 400 TeV with IceCube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IceCube Collaboration; R. Abbasi; Y. Abdou; T. Abu-Zayyad; J. Adams; J. A. Aguilar; M. Ahlers; K. Andeen; J. Auffenberg; X. Bai; M. Baker; S. W. Barwick; R. Bay; J. L. Bazo Alba; K. Beattie; J. J. Beatty; S. Bechet; J. K. Becker; K. -H. Becker; M. L. Benabderrahmane; S. BenZvi; J. Berdermann; P. Berghaus; D. Berley; E. Bernardini; D. Bertrand; D. Z. Besson; M. Bissok; E. Blaufuss; J. Blumenthal; D. J. Boersma; C. Bohm; D. Bose; S. Böser; O. Botner; J. Braun; S. Buitink; M. Carson; D. Chirkin; B. Christy; J. Clem; F. Clevermann; S. Cohen; C. Colnard; D. F. Cowen; M. V. D'Agostino; M. Danninger; J. C. Davis; C. De Clercq; L. Demirörs; O. Depaepe; F. Descamps; P. Desiati; G. de Vries-Uiterweerd; T. DeYoung; J. C. Díaz-Vélez; M. Dierckxsens; J. Dreyer; J. P. Dumm; M. R. Duvoort; R. Ehrlich; J. Eisch; R. W. Ellsworth; O. Engdegård; S. Euler; P. A. Evenson; O. Fadiran; A. R. Fazely; A. Fedynitch; T. Feusels; K. Filimonov; C. Finley; M. M. Foerster; B. D. Fox; A. Franckowiak; R. Franke; T. K. Gaisser; J. Gallagher; M. Geisler; L. Gerhardt; L. Gladstone; T. Glüsenkamp; A. Goldschmidt; J. A. Goodman; D. Grant; T. Griesel; A. Groß; S. Grullon; M. Gurtner; C. Ha; A. Hallgren; F. Halzen; K. Han; K. Hanson; K. Helbing; P. Herquet; S. Hickford; G. C. Hill; K. D. Hoffman; A. Homeier; K. Hoshina; D. Hubert; W. Huelsnitz; J. -P. Hülß; P. O. Hulth; K. Hultqvist; S. Hussain; A. Ishihara; J. Jacobsen; G. S. Japaridze; H. Johansson; J. M. Joseph; K. -H. Kampert; T. Karg; A. Karle; J. L. Kelley; N. Kemming; P. Kenny; J. Kiryluk; F. Kislat; S. R. Klein; J. -H. Köhne; G. Kohnen; H. Kolanoski; L. Köpke; D. J. Koskinen; M. Kowalski; T. Kowarik; M. Krasberg; T. Krings; G. Kroll; K. Kuehn; T. Kuwabara; M. Labare; S. Lafebre; K. Laihem; H. Landsman; M. J. Larson; R. Lauer; R. Lehmann; J. Lünemann; J. Madsen; P. Majumdar; A. Marotta; R. Maruyama; K. Mase; H. S. Matis; M. Matusik; K. Meagher; M. Merck; P. Mészáros; T. Meures; E. Middell; N. Milke; J. Miller; T. Montaruli; A. R. Morse; S. M. Movit; R. Nahnhauer; J. W. Nam; U. Naumann; P. Nießen; D. R. Nygren; S. Odrowski; A. Olivas; M. Olivo; A. O'Murchadha; M. Ono; S. Panknin; L. Paul; C. Pérez de los Heros; J. Petrovic; A. Piegsa; D. Pieloth; R. Porrata; J. Posselt; P. B. Price; M. Prikockis; G. T. Przybylski; K. Rawlins; P. Redl; E. Resconi; W. Rhode; M. Ribordy; A. Rizzo; J. P. Rodrigues; P. Roth; F. Rothmaier; C. Rott; T. Ruhe; D. Rutledge; B. Ruzybayev; D. Ryckbosch; H. -G. Sander; M. Santander; S. Sarkar; K. Schatto; S. Schlenstedt; T. Schmidt; A. Schukraft; A. Schultes; O. Schulz; M. Schunck; D. Seckel; B. Semburg; S. H. Seo; Y. Sestayo; S. Seunarine; A. Silvestri; K. Singh; A. Slipak; G. M. Spiczak; C. Spiering; M. Stamatikos; B. T. Stanev; G. Stephens; T. Stezelberger; R. G. Stokstad; S. Stoyanov; E. A. Strahler; T. Straszheim; G. W. Sullivan; Q. Swillens; H. Taavola; I. Taboada; A. Tamburro; O. Tarasova; A. Tepe; S. Ter-Antonyan; S. Tilav; P. A. Toale; S. Toscano; D. Tosi; D. Tur?an; N. van Eijndhoven; J. Vandenbroucke; A. Van Overloop; J. van Santen; M. Voge; B. Voigt; C. Walck; T. Waldenmaier; M. Wallraff; M. Walter; Ch. Weaver; C. Wendt; S. Westerhoff; N. Whitehorn; K. Wiebe; C. H. Wiebusch; G. Wikström; D. R. Williams; R. Wischnewski; H. Wissing; M. Wolf; K. Woschnagg; C. Xu; X. W. Xu; G. Yodh; S. Yoshida; P. Zarzhitsky

    2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement of the atmospheric muon neutrino energy spectrum from 100 GeV to 400 TeV was performed using a data sample of about 18,000 up-going atmospheric muon neutrino events in IceCube. Boosted decision trees were used for event selection to reject mis-reconstructed atmospheric muons and obtain a sample of up-going muon neutrino events. Background contamination in the final event sample is less than one percent. This is the first measurement of atmospheric neutrinos up to 400 TeV, and is fundamental to understanding the impact of this neutrino background on astrophysical neutrino observations with IceCube. The measured spectrum is consistent with predictions for the atmospheric muon neutrino plus muon antineutrino flux.

  7. STUDY OF RARE PROCESSES INDUCED BY 209-GeV MUONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, W.H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Chicago cyclotron magnet (CCM) just upstream of thethe Chicago cyclo­ tron magnet (CCM) for targetting on theshield V» A M Q Neutrino beam CCM P Muon Laboratory XBL80I0-

  8. Search for muon neutrinos from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the IceCube neutrino telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbasi, R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2009, GCN: The Gamma ray bursts Coordinates Network, http://for muon neutrinos from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the IceCubeMereghetti, S. 2004, in Gamma-ray Bursts: 30 Years of

  9. A Charge Separation Study to Enable the Design of a Complete Muon Cooling Channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshikawa, C. [Muons, Inc.; Ankenbrandt, Charles M. [Muons, Inc.; Johnson, Rolland P. [Muons, Inc.; Derbenev, Yaroslav [JLAB; Morozov, Vasiliy [JLAB; Neuffer, David [FNAL; Yonehara, K. [FNAL

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The most promising designs for 6D muon cooling channels operate on a specific sign of electric charge. In particular, the Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) and Rectilinear RFOFO designs are the leading candidates to become the baseline 6D cooling channel in the Muon Accelerator Program (MAP). Time constraints prevented the design of a realistic charge separator, so a simplified study was performed to emulate the effects of charge separation on muons exiting the front end of a muon collider. The output of the study provides particle distributions that the competing designs will use as input into their cooling channels. We report here on the study of the charge separator that created the simulated particles.

  10. A Test Stand for the Muon Trigger Development for the CMS Experiment at the LHC 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakdawala, Samir

    2013-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of the flagship experiments in particle physics operating at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). CMS was built to search for signatures of Higgs bosons, supersymmetry, and other new phenomena. The coming upgrade...

  11. MICE: The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment: Phase Space Cooling Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, T. L. [University of Mississippi-Oxford, University, MS 38677 (United States)

    2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    MICE is an experimental demonstration of muon ionization cooling using a section of an ionization cooling channel and a muon beam. The muons are produced by the decay of pions from a target dipping into the ISIS proton beam at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). The channel includes liquid-hydrogen absorbers providing transverse and longitudinal momentum loss and high-gradient radiofrequency (RF) cavities for longitudinal reacceleration, all packed into a solenoidal magnetic channel. MICE will reduce the beam transverse emittance by about 10% for muon momenta between 140 and 240 MeV/c. Time-of-flight (TOF) counters, threshold Cherenkov counters, and a calorimeter will identify background electrons and pions. Spectrometers before and after the cooling section will measure the beam transmission and input and output emittances with an absolute precision of 0.1%.

  12. Modeling the high-field section of a muon helical cooling channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zlobin, A.V.; Barzi, E.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Lamm, M.J.; Lombardo, V.; Lopes, M.L.; Yu, M.; /Fermilab; Johnson, R.P.; Flanagan, G.; Kahn, S.A.; Turenne, M.; /MUONS Inc., Batavia

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the conceptual design and parameters of a short model of a high-field helical solenoid for muon beam cooling. Structural materials choices, fabrication techniques and first test results are discussed.

  13. Critical Reading School COMSC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    Critical Reading School COMSC To become an effective researcher requires the ability to rapidly this is to read and critique relevant academic and scientific materials. The means by which these materials are accessed has changed dramatically over recent years, but the core skills of critical reading remain

  14. Cold nuclear fusion and muon-catalyzed fusion. (Latest citations from the INSPEC database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning a nuclear fusion process which occurs at lower temperatures and pressures than conventional fusion reactions. The references describe theoretical and experimental results for a proposed muon-catalyzed fusion reactor, and for studies on muon sticking and reactivation. The temperature dependence of fusion rates, and resolution of some engineering challenges are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  15. A magnetic spectrometer measurement of the charge ratio of energetic cosmic ray muons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Benjamin Jefferson

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A MAGNETIC SPECTROIIETER MEASUREPIENT OF THE CHARGE PATIO OF ENEIFGFTIC COSMIC RAY MUONS A Thesis BENJAMIN JEF1'EIHSON BATFIKN, JR. Submdtted to the Graduate College of the Texas AAM University in Daltial full'Ills, 'ent of the requirellents... magnet ~ 2 Schematic representation of the magnets, counters and spark chambers to form a spectrometer-telescope. A typical muon trajectory is shown. . . . . . . . ~ 3 End view of the eighteen-lamina magnet. 4 The winding process 5 The complete...

  16. Evidences of high energy protons with energies beyond 0.4 GeV in the solar particle spectrum as responsible for the cosmic rays solar diurnal anisotropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. E. Navia; C. R. A. Augusto; M. B. Robba; K. H. Tsui

    2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis on the daily variations of cosmic ray muons with $E_{\\mu}\\geq 0.2 GeV$ based on the data of two directional muon telescopes at sea level and with a rigidity of response to cosmic proton spectrum above 0.4 GV is presented. The analysis covers two months of observations and in 60% of days, abrupt transitions between a low to a high muon intensity and vice-verse is observed, the period of high muon intensity is from $\\sim 8.0h$ up to $\\sim 19.0h$ (local time) and coincides with the period when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) lines overtake the Earth. This behavior strongly suggest that the high muon intensity is due to a contribution of solar protons (ions) on the muon intensity produced by the galactic cosmic rays, responsible for the low muon intensity. This implies that the solar particle spectrum extends to energies beyond 1 GeV. We show that this picture can explain the solar daily variation origin, and it is a most accurate scenario than the assumption of corotating galactic cosmic ray with the IMF lines, specially in the high rigidity region. Obtained results are consistent with the data reported in others papers. Some aspects on the sensitivity of our muon telescopes are also presented.

  17. Quantum critical benchmark for density functional theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul E. Grabowski; Kieron Burke

    2014-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Two electrons at the threshold of ionization represent a severe test case for electronic structure theory. A pseudospectral method yields a very accurate density of the two-electron ion with nuclear charge close to the critical value. Highly accurate energy components and potentials of Kohn-Sham density functional theory are given, as well as a useful parametrization of the critical density. The challenges for density functional approximations and the strength of correlation are also discussed.

  18. Muon spin rotation in heavy-electron pauli-limit superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michal, V. P., E-mail: vincent.michal@cea.fr [INAC/SPSMS, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (France)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The formalism for analyzing the magnetic field distribution in the vortex lattice of Pauli-limit heavy-electron superconductors is applied to the evaluation of the vortex lattice static linewidth relevant to the muon spin rotation ({mu}SR) experiment. Based on the Ginzburg-Landau expansion for the superconductor free energy, we study the evolution with respect to the external field of the static linewidth both in the limit of independent vortices (low magnetic field) with a variational expression for the order parameter and in the near H{sub c2}{sup P}(T) regime with an extension of the Abrikosov analysis to Pauli-limit superconductors. We conclude that in the Ginzburg-Landau regime in the Pauli-limit, anomalous variations of the static linewidth with the applied field are predicted as a result of the superconductor spin response around a vortex core that dominates the usual charge-response screening supercurrents. We propose the effect as a benchmark for studying new puzzling vortex lattice properties recently observed in CeCoIn{sub 5}.

  19. A Critical "Dimension" in a Shell Model for Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Giuliani; Mogens H. Jensen; Victor Yakhot

    2001-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the GOY shell model within the scenario of a critical dimension in fully developed turbulence. By changing the conserved quantities, one can continuously vary an ``effective dimension'' between $d=2$ and $d=3$. We identify a critical point between these two situations where the flux of energy changes sign and the helicity flux diverges. Close to the critical point the energy spectrum exhibits a turbulent scaling regime followed by a plateau of thermal equilibrium. We identify scaling laws and perform a rescaling argument to derive a relation between the critical exponents. We further discuss the distribution function of the energy flux.

  20. A review of criticality accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stratton, W R; Smith, D R

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Criticality accidents and the characteristics of prompt power excursions are discussed. Forty-one accidental power transients are reviewed. In each case where available, enough detail is given to help visualize the physical situation, the cause or causes of the accident, the history and characteristics of the transient, the energy release, and the consequences, if any, to personnel and property. Excursions associated with large power reactors are not included in this study, except that some information on the major accident at the Chernobyl reactor in April 1986 is provided in the Appendix. 67 refs., 21 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. EMSL - Energy Materials & Processes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy Energy Materials and Processes focuses on the dynamic transformation mechanisms and physical and chemical properties at critical interfaces in catalysts and energy materials...

  2. Four Critical Needs to Change the Hydrate Energy Paradigm from Assessment to Production: The 2007 Report to Congress by the U.S. Federal methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahajan,D.; Sloan, D.; Brewer, P.; Dutta, N.; Johnson, A.; Jones, E.; Juenger, K.; Kastner, M.; Masutani, S.; Swenson, R.; Whelan, J.; Wilson, s.; Woolsey, R.

    2009-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This work summarizes a two-year study by the U.S. Federal Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee recommending the future needs for federally-supported hydrate research. The Report was submitted to the US Congress on August 14, 2007 and includes four recommendations regarding (a) permafrost hydrate production testing, (b) marine hydrate viability assessment (c) climate effect of hydrates, and (d) international cooperation. A secure supply of natural gas is a vital goal of the U.S. national energy policy because natural gas is the cleanest and most widely used of all fossil fuels. The inherent cleanliness of natural gas, with the lowest CO2 emission per unit of heat energy of any fossil fuel, means substituting gas for coal and fuel oil will reduce emissions that can exacerbate the greenhouse effect. Both a fuel and a feedstock, a secure and reasonably priced supply of natural gas is important to industry, electric power generators, large and small commercial enterprises, and homeowners. Because each volume of solid gas hydrate contains as much as 164 standard volumes of methane, hydrates can be viewed as a concentrated form of natural gas equivalent to compressed gas but less concentrated than liquefied natural gas (LNG). Natural hydrate accumulations worldwide are estimated to contain 700,000 TCF of natural gas, of which 200,000 TCF are located within the United States. Compared with the current national annual consumption of 22 TCF, this estimate of in-place gas in enormous. Clearly, if only a fraction of the hydrated methane is recoverable, hydrates could constitute a substantial component of the future energy portfolio of the Nation (Figure 1). However, recovery poses a major technical and commercial challenge. Such numbers have sparked interest in natural gas hydrates as a potential, long-term source of energy, as well as concerns about any potential impact the release of methane from hydrates might have on the environment. Energy-hungry countries such as India and Japan are outspending the United States on hydrate science and engineering R&D by a factor of 10, and may bring this resource to market as much as a decade before the United States.

  3. Tank farms criticality safety manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FORT, L.A.

    2003-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This document defines the Tank Farms Contractor (TFC) criticality safety program, as required by Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Subpart 830.204(b)(6), ''Documented Safety Analysis'' (10 CFR 830.204 (b)(6)), and US Department of Energy (DOE) 0 420.1A, Facility Safety, Section 4.3, ''Criticality Safety.'' In addition, this document contains certain best management practices, adopted by TFC management based on successful Hanford Site facility practices. Requirements in this manual are based on the contractor requirements document (CRD) found in Attachment 2 of DOE 0 420.1A, Section 4.3, ''Nuclear Criticality Safety,'' and the cited revisions of applicable standards published jointly by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and the American Nuclear Society (ANS) as listed in Appendix A. As an informational device, requirements directly imposed by the CRD or ANSI/ANS Standards are shown in boldface. Requirements developed as best management practices through experience and maintained consistent with Hanford Site practice are shown in italics. Recommendations and explanatory material are provided in plain type.

  4. Muon Catalyzed Fusion in 3 K Solid Deuterium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. E. Knowles; A. Adamczak; J. M. Bailey; G. A. Beer; J. L. Beveridge; M. C. Fujiwara; T. M. Huber; R. Jacot-Guillarmod; P. Kammel; S. K. Kim; A. R. Kunselman; G. M. Marshall; C. J. Martoff; G. R. Mason; F. Mulhauser; A. Olin; C. Petitjean; T. A. Porcelli; J. Zmeskal

    1997-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Muon catalyzed fusion in deuterium has traditionally been studied in gaseous and liquid targets. The TRIUMF solid-hydrogen-layer target system has been used to study the fusion reaction rates in the solid phase of D_2 at a target temperature of 3 K. Products of two distinct branches of the reaction were observed; neutrons by a liquid organic scintillator, and protons by a silicon detector located inside the target system. The effective molecular formation rate from the upper hyperfine state of $\\mu d$ and the hyperfine transition rate have been measured: $\\tilde{\\lambda}_(3/2)=2.71(7)_{stat.}(32)_{syst.} \\mu/s$, and $\\tilde{\\lambda}_{(3/2)(1/2)} =34.2(8)_{stat.}(1)_{syst.} \\mu /s$. The molecular formation rate is consistent with other recent measurements, but not with the theory for isolated molecules. The discrepancy may be due to incomplete thermalization, an effect which was investigated by Monte Carlo calculations. Information on branching ratio parameters for the s and p wave d+d nuclear interaction has been extracted.

  5. Energy and Direction Estimation of Neutrinos in muonless events at ICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ajmi, Ali

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we study events without identifiable muon tracks in the Iron Calorimeter detector at the India-based Neutrino Observatory. Such events are dominated by high energy (E$_\

  6. DOE-STD-3007-93 CN-1; DOE Standard Guidelines For Preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations at Department of Energy Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No Significant6-2002 October SENSITIVEFAQs for3006-95

  7. Technique Reveals Critical Physics in Deep Regions of Solar Cells (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights in Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2D AlloysTrails News HomeAgreements (BPAs)

  8. Americas' Energy Leaders Take Action to Realize Energy and Climate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    renewable energy, cleaner fossil fuels, critical infrastructure, and energy poverty alleviation. DOE's Assistant Secretary for Policy and International Affairs David...

  9. About Critical Materials | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Become agovEducationWelcome toAbout AboutAbout CAMD

  10. Critical thickness in silicone thermosets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deopura, Manish, 1975-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Critical thickness effects are utilized to achieve high fracture toughness in brittle polymers. The postulate of critical thickness, which is: "Macroscopically brittle polymers deform in a ductile fashion below a critical ...

  11. Observation of Disappearance of Muon Neutrinos in the NuMI Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavlovic, Zarko; /Texas U.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a two detector long-baseline neutrino experiment designed to study the disappearance of muon neutrinos. MINOS will test the {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}} oscillation hypothesis and measure precisely {Delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 23} oscillation parameters. The source of neutrinos for MINOS experiment is Fermilab's Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beamline. The energy spectrum and the composition of the beam is measured at two locations, one close to the source and the other 735 km down-stream in the Soudan Mine Underground Laboratory in northern Minnesota. The precision measurement of the oscillation parameters requires an accurate prediction of the neutrino flux at the Far Detector. This thesis discusses the calculation of the neutrino flux at the Far Detector and its uncertainties. A technique that uses the Near Detector data to constrain the uncertainties in the calculation of the flux is described. The data corresponding to an exposure of 2.5 x 10{sup 20} protons on the NuMI target is presented and an energy dependent disappearance pattern predicted by neutrino oscillation hypotheses is observed in the Far Detector data. The fit to MINOS data, for given exposure, yields the best fit values for {Delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 23} to be (2.38{sub -0.16}{sup +0.20}) x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}/c{sup 4} and 1.00{sub -0.08}, respectively.

  12. A measurement of hadron production cross sections for the simulation of accelerator neutrino beams and a search for muon-neutrino to electron-neutrino oscillations in the delta m**2 about equals 1-eV**2 region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitz, David W.; /Columbia U.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement of hadron production cross-sections for the simulation of accelerator neutrino beams and a search for muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations in the {Delta}m{sup 2} {approx} 1 eV{sup 2} region. This dissertation presents measurements from two different high energy physics experiments with a very strong connection: the Hadron Production (HARP) experiment located at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland, and the Mini Booster Neutrino Experiment (Mini-BooNE) located at Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois.

  13. Quantum Criticality at the Origin of Life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vattay, Gabor; Csabai, Istvan; Kaufmann, Ali Nassimi an Stuart A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Why life persists at the edge of chaos is a question at the very heart of evolution. Here we show that molecules taking part in biochemical processes from small molecules to proteins are critical quantum mechanically. Electronic Hamiltonians of biomolecules are tuned exactly to the critical point of the metal-insulator transition separating the Anderson localized insulator phase from the conducting disordered metal phase. Using tools from Random Matrix Theory we confirm that the energy level statistics of these biomolecules show the universal transitional distribution of the metal-insulator critical point and the wave functions are multifractals in accordance with the theory of Anderson transitions. The findings point to the existence of a universal mechanism of charge transport in living matter. The revealed bio-conductor material is neither a metal nor an insulator but a new quantum critical material which can exist only in highly evolved systems and has unique material properties.

  14. Quantum Criticality at the Origin of Life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabor Vattay; Dennis Salahub; Istvan Csabai; Ali Nassimi; Stuart A. Kaufmann

    2015-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Why life persists at the edge of chaos is a question at the very heart of evolution. Here we show that molecules taking part in biochemical processes from small molecules to proteins are critical quantum mechanically. Electronic Hamiltonians of biomolecules are tuned exactly to the critical point of the metal-insulator transition separating the Anderson localized insulator phase from the conducting disordered metal phase. Using tools from Random Matrix Theory we confirm that the energy level statistics of these biomolecules show the universal transitional distribution of the metal-insulator critical point and the wave functions are multifractals in accordance with the theory of Anderson transitions. The findings point to the existence of a universal mechanism of charge transport in living matter. The revealed bio-conductor material is neither a metal nor an insulator but a new quantum critical material which can exist only in highly evolved systems and has unique material properties.

  15. Measurement of the charge ratio of atmospheric muons with the CMS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a measurement of the ratio of positive to negative muon fluxes from cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere, using data collected by the CMS detector both at ground level and in the underground experimental cavern at the CERN LHC. Muons were detected in the momentum range from 5 GeV/c to 1 TeV/c. The surface flux ratio is measured to be 1.2766 \\pm 0.0032(stat.) \\pm 0.0032 (syst.), independent of the muon momentum, below 100 GeV/c. This is the most precise measurement to date. At higher momenta the data are consistent with an increase of the charge ratio, in agreement with cosmic ray shower models and compatible with previous measurements by deep-underground experiments.

  16. Assessing the Feasibility of Interrogating Nuclear Waste Storage Silos using Cosmic-ray Muons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ambrosino, F; Cimmino, L; D'Alessandro, R; Ireland, D G; Kaiser, R; Mahon, D F; Mori, N; Noli, P; Saracino, G; Shearer, C; Viliani, L; Yang, G

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Muon radiography is a fast growing field in applied scientific research. In recent years, many detector technologies and imaging techniques using the Coulomb scattering and absorption properties of cosmic-ray muons have been developed for the non-destructive assay of various structures across a wide range of applications. This work presents the first results that assess the feasibility of using muons to interrogate waste silos within the UK Nuclear Industry. Two such approaches, using different techniques that exploit each of these properties, have previously been published, and show promising results from both simulation and experimental data for the detection of shielded high-Z materials and density variations from volcanic assay. Both detector systems are based on scintillator and photomultiplier technologies. Results from dedicated simulation studies using both these technologies and image reconstruction techniques are presented for an intermediate-sized nuclear waste storage facility filled with concrete...

  17. Compact storage ring to search for the muon electric dipole moment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Adelmann; K. Kirch; C. J. G. Onderwater; T. Schietinger

    2009-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the concept of a compact storage ring of less than 0.5 m orbit radius to search for the electric dipole moment of the muon ($d_\\mu$) by adapting the "frozen spin" method. At existing muon facilities a statistics limited sensitivity of $d_\\mu \\sim 5 \\times 10^{-23} \\ecm$ can be achieved within one year of data taking. Reaching this precision would demonstrate the viability of this novel technique to directly search for charged particle EDMs and already test a number of Standard Model extensions. At a future, high-power muon facility a statistical reach of $d_\\mu \\sim 5 \\times 10^{-25} \\ecm$ seems realistic with this setup.

  18. ATLAS Great Lakes Tier-2 Computing and Muon Calibration Center Commissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shawn McKee

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Large-scale computing in ATLAS is based on a grid-linked system of tiered computing centers. The ATLAS Great Lakes Tier-2 came online in September 2006 and now is commissioning with full capacity to provide significant computing power and services to the USATLAS community. Our Tier-2 Center also host the Michigan Muon Calibration Center which is responsible for daily calibrations of the ATLAS Monitored Drift Tubes for ATLAS endcap muon system. During the first LHC beam period in 2008 and following ATLAS global cosmic ray data taking period, the Calibration Center received a large data stream from the muon detector to derive the drift tube timing offsets and time-to-space functions with a turn-around time of 24 hours. We will present the Calibration Center commissioning status and our plan for the first LHC beam collisions in 2009.

  19. Measurement of helium-3 and deuterium stopping power ratio for negative muons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. M. Bystritsky; V. V. Gerasimov; J. Wozniak

    2006-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement method and results measuring of the stopping power ratio of helium-3 and deuterium atoms for muons slowed down in the D/$^3$He mixture are presented. Measurements were performed at four values of pure $^3$He gas target densities, $\\phi_{He} = 0.0337, 0.0355, 0.0359, 0.0363$ (normalized to the liquid hydrogen density) and at a density 0.0585 of the D/$^3$He mixture. The experiment was carried out at PSI muon beam $\\mu$E4 with the momentum P$\\mu =34.0$ MeV/c. The measured value of the mean stopping ratio $S_{^3He/D}$ is $1.66\\pm 0.04$. This value can also be interpreted as the value of mean reduced ratio of probabilities for muon capture by helium-3 and deuterium atoms.

  20. Simulation of the Ionization Cooling of Muons in Linear RF Systems G. Penn, J.S. Wurtele, Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    Simulation of the Ionization Cooling of Muons in Linear RF Systems G. Penn, J.S. Wurtele National Labs, Berkeley, CA 94720 Abstract Ionization cooling of muon beams is a crucial component of the proposed muon collider and neutrino factory. Cur- rent studies of cooling channels predominantly use simula

  1. A study of muon neutrino disappearance with the MINOS detectors and the NuMI neutrino beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, John Stuart; /Cambridge U.

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the results of an analysis of {nu}{sub {mu}} disappearance with the MINOS experiment, which studies the neutrino beam produced by the NuMI facility at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The rates and energy spectra of charged current {nu}{sub {mu}} interactions are measured in two similar detectors, located at distances of 1 km and 735 km along the NuMI beamline. The Near Detector provides accurate measurements of the initial beam composition and energy, while the Far Detector is sensitive to the effects of neutrino oscillations. The analysis uses data collected between May 2005 and March 2007, corresponding to an exposure of 2.5 x 10{sup 20} protons on target. As part of the analysis, sophisticated software was developed to identify muon tracks in the detectors and to reconstruct muon kinematics. Events with reconstructed tracks were then analyzed using a multivariate technique to efficiently isolate a pure sample of charged current {nu}{sub {mu}} events. An extrapolation method was also developed, which produces accurate predictions of the Far Detector neutrino energy spectrum, based on data collected at the Near Detector. Finally, several techniques to improve the sensitivity of an oscillation measurement were implemented, and a full study of the systematic uncertainties was performed. Extrapolating from observations at the Near Detector, 733 {+-} 29 Far Detector events were expected in the absence of oscillations, but only 563 events were observed. This deficit in event rate corresponds to a significance of 4.3 standard deviations. The deficit is energy dependent and clear distortion of the Far Detector energy spectrum is observed. A maximum likelihood analysis, which fully accounts for systematic uncertainties, is used to determine the allowed regions for the oscillation parameters and identifies the best fit values as {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2} = 2.29{sub -0.14}{sup +0.14} x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 23} > 0.953 (68% confidence level). The models of neutrino decoherence and decay are disfavored at the 5.0{sigma} and 3.2{sigma} levels respectively, while the no oscillation model is excluded at the 9.4{sigma} level.

  2. On the study of the Higgs properties at a muon collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mario Greco

    2015-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of the Higgs particle at 125 GeV is demanding a detailed knowledge of the properties of this fundamental component of the Standard Model. To that aim various proposals of electron and muon colliders have been put forward for precision studies of the partial widths of the various decay channels. It is shown that in the case of a Higgs factory through a muon collider, sizeable radiative effects - of order of 50% - must be carefully taken into account for a precise measurement of the leptonic and total widths of the Higgs particle. Similar effects do not apply in the case of Higgs production in electron-positron colliders.

  3. Track fitting by Kalman Filter method for a prototype cosmic ray muon detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tapasi Ghosh; Subhasis Chattopadhyay

    2009-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a track fitting procedure based on Kalman Filter technique for an Iron Calorimeter (ICAL) prototype detector when the detector is flushed with single muon tracks. The relevant track parameters i.e., momentum, direction and charge are reconstructed and analyzed. This paper discusses the design of the prototype detector, its geometry simulation by Geant4, and the detector response with the cosmic ray muons. Finally we show the resolution of reconstructed momenta and also the charge identification efficiency of $\\mu^+$ and $\\mu^-$ events in the magnetized ICAL.

  4. Shadowing in inelastic scattering of muons on carbon, calcium and lead at low x$_{Bj}$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, M R; Anthony, P L; Averill, D A; Baker, M D; Baller, B R; Banerjee, A; Bhatti, A A; Bratzler, U; Braun, H M; Breidung, H; Busza, W; Carroll, T J; Clark, H L; Conrad, J M; Davisson, R; Derado, I; Dhawan, S K; Dietrich, F S; Dougherty, W; Dreyer, T; Eckardt, V; Ecker, U; Erdmann, M; Fang, G Y; Figiel, J; Finlay, R W; Gebauer, H J; Geesaman, D F; Griffioen, K A; Guo, R S; Haas, J; Halliwell, C; Hantke, D; Hicks, K H; Hughes, V W; Jackson, H E; Jaffe, D E; Jancso, G; Jansen, D M; Jin, Z; Kaufman, S; Kennedy, R D; Kinney, E R; Kirk, T; Kobrak, H G E; Kotwal, A V; Kunori, S; Lord, J J; Lubatti, H J; McLeod, D; Madden, P; Magill, S; Manz, A; Melanson, H; Michael, D G; Montgomery, H E; Morfín, J G; Nickerson, R B; Novák, J; O'Day, S; Olkiewicz, K; Osborne, L; Otten, R; Papavassiliou, V; Pawlik, B; Pipkin, F M; Potterveld, D H; Ramberg, E J; Röser, A; Ryan, J J; Salgado, C W; Salvarani, A; Schellman, H; Schmitt, M; Schmitz, N; Schüler, K P; Siegert, G; Skuja, A; Snow, G A; Soldner, S; Rembold, U; Spentzouris, P; Stier, H E; Stopa, P; Swanson, R A; Venkataramania, H; Wilhelm, M; Wilson, R; Wittek, W; Wolbers, S A; Zghiche, A; Zhao, T

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear shadowing is observed in the per-nucleon cross-sections of positive muons on carbon, calcium and lead as compared to deuterium. The data were taken by Fermilab experiment E665 using inelastically scattered muons of mean incident momentum 470 GeV/c. Cross-section ratios are presented in the kinematic region 0.0001 < XBj <0.56 and 0.1 < Q**2 < 80 GeVc. The data are consistent with no significant nu or Q**2 dependence at fixed XBj. As XBj decreases, the size of the shadowing effect, as well as its A dependence, are found to approach the corresponding measurements in photoproduction.

  5. Shadowing in Inelastic Scattering of Muons on Carbon, Calcium and Lead at Low XBj

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermilab E665 Collaboration

    1995-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear shadowing is observed in the per-nucleon cross-sections of positive muons on carbon, calcium and lead as compared to deuterium. The data were taken by Fermilab experiment E665 using inelastically scattered muons of mean incident momentum 470 GeV/c. Cross-section ratios are presented in the kinematic region 0.0001 < XBj <0.56 and 0.1 < Q**2 < 80 GeVc. The data are consistent with no significant nu or Q**2 dependence at fixed XBj. As XBj decreases, the size of the shadowing effect, as well as its A dependence, are found to approach the corresponding measurements in photoproduction.

  6. Muon decays in the Earth's atmosphere, differential aging and the paradox of the twins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. H. Field

    2009-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Observation of the decay of muons produced in the Earth's atmosphere by cosmic ray interactions provides a graphic illustration of the counter-intuitive space-time predictions of special relativity theory. Muons at rest in the atmosphere, decaying simultaneously, are subject to a universal time-dilatation effect when viewed from a moving frame and so are also observed to decay simultaneously in all such frames. The analysis of this example reveals the underlying physics of the differential aging effect in Langevin's travelling-twin thought experiment.

  7. Flesh and Blood, or Merely Ghosts? Some Comments on the Multi-Muon Study at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew J. Strassler

    2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent paper by the CDF collaboration suggests (but does not claim) an anomalous event sample containing muons produced with large impact parameter, often with high multiplicity and at small angles from one another. This curious hint of a signal is potentially consistent with the hidden valley scenario, as well as with some other classes of models. Despite its tenuous nature, this hint highlights the experimental difficulties raised by such signals, and merits some consideration. Some of the simplest interpretations of the data, such as a light neutral particle decaying to muon and/or tau pairs, are largely disfavored; three-body decays to $\\tau\\tau\

  8. Measurement of Neutron and Muon Fluxes 100~m Underground with the SciBath Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, Lance

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SciBath detector is an 80 liter liquid scintillator detector read out by a three dimensional grid of 768 wavelength-shifting fibers. Initially conceived as a fine-grained charged particle detector for neutrino studies that could image charged particle tracks in all directions, it is also sensitive to fast neutrons (15-200 MeV). In fall of 2011 the apparatus performed a three month run to measure cosmic-induced muons and neutrons 100~meters underground in the FNAL MINOS near-detector area. Data from this run has been analyzed and resulted in measurements of the cosmic muon flux as \

  9. Hadronic light-by-light scattering contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment from lattice QCD

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Blum, Thomas [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Chowdhury, Saumitra [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Hayakawa, Masashi [Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Izubuchi, Taku [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The form factor that yields the light-by-light scattering contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment is computed in lattice QCD+QED and QED. A non-perturbative treatment of QED is used and is checked against perturbation theory. The hadronic contribution is calculated for unphysical quark and muon masses, and only the diagram with a single quark loop is computed. Statistically significant signals are obtained. Initial results appear promising, and the prospect for a complete calculation with physical masses and controlled errors is discussed.

  10. Limits to the muon flux from neutralino annihilations in the Sun with the AMANDA detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The AMANDA collaboration; M. Ackermann

    2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for an excess of muon-neutrinos from neutralino annihilations in the Sun has been performed with the AMANDA-II neutrino detector using data collected in 143.7 days of live-time in 2001. No excess over the expected atmospheric neutrino background has been observed. An upper limit at 90% confidence level has been obtained on the annihilation rate of captured neutralinos in the Sun, as well as the corresponding muon flux limit at the Earth, both as functions of the neutralino mass in the range 100 GeV-5000 GeV.

  11. Measurement of the atmospheric muon depth intensity relation with the NEMO Phase-2 tower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Aiello; F. Ameli; M. Anghinolfi; G. Barbarino; E. Barbarito; F. Barbato; N. Beverini; S. Biagi; B. Bouhadef; C. Bozza; G. Cacopardo; M. Calamai; C. Calì; A. Capone; F. Caruso; A. Ceres; T. Chiarusi; M. Circella; R. Cocimano; R. Coniglione; M. Costa; G. Cuttone; C. D'Amato; A. D'Amico; G. De Bonis; V. De Luca; N. Deniskina; G. De Rosa; F. Di Capua; C. Distefano; P. Fermani; L. A. Fusco; F. Garufi; V. Giordano; A. Gmerk; R. Grasso; G. Grella; C. Hugon; M. Imbesi; V. Kulikovskiy; G. Larosa; D. Lattuada; K. P. Leismueller; E. Leonora; P. Litrico; A. Lonardo; F. Longhitano; D. Lo Presti; E. Maccioni; A. Margiotta; A. Martini; R. Masullo; P. Migliozzi; E. Migneco; A. Miraglia; C. M. Mollo; M. Mongelli; M. Morganti; P. Musico; M. Musumeci; C. A. Nicolau; A. Orlando; R. Papaleo; C. Pellegrino; M. G. Pellegriti; C. Perrina; P. Piattelli; C. Pugliatti; S. Pulvirenti; A. Orselli; F. Raffaelli; N. Randazzo; G. Riccobene; A. Rovelli; M. Sanguineti; P. Sapienza; V. Sciacca; I. Sgura; F. Simeone; V. Sipala; F. Speziale; M. Spina; A. Spitaleri; M. Spurio; S. M. Stellacci; M. Taiuti; G. Terreni; L. Trasatti; A. Trovato; C. Ventura; P. Vicini; S. Viola; D. Vivolo

    2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the analysis of the data collected with the NEMO Phase-2 tower, deployed at 3500 m depth about 80 km off-shore Capo Passero (Italy), are presented. Cherenkov photons detected with the photomultipliers tubes were used to reconstruct the tracks of atmospheric muons. Their zenith-angle distribution was measured and the results compared with Monte Carlo simulations. An evaluation of the systematic effects due to uncertainties on environmental and detector parameters is also included. The associated depth intensity relation was evaluated and compared with previous measurements and theoretical predictions. With the present analysis, the muon depth intensity relation has been measured up to 13 km of water equivalent.

  12. Measurement of W + gamma Production in the W to Muon Decay Channel in Proton - Anti-proton Collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanimoto, Naho

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The production cross section and the kinematic properties of the decay products of W{gamma} in the W {yields} {mu}{nu} decay channel from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV are presented. The measurement use the high p{sub T} muon data from the upgraded Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). The data were collected between March 2002 and September 2003. The total integrated luminosities are 192 pb{sup -1} with the muon detector which covers the pseudorapidity region of |{eta}| {le} 0.6 and 175 pb{sup -1} with the muon detector covering the region 0.6 {le} |{eta}| {le} 1.0. In the Standard Model the {mu}{nu}{gamma} final states occur due to W{gamma} {yields} {mu}{nu}{gamma} production and via muon Bremsstrahlung, W {yields} {mu}{nu} {yields} {mu}{nu}{gamma}. W bosons are selected in their muon decay mode. Additionally, photons with transverse energy above 7 GeV, pseudorapidity in the central region (|{eta}| < 1.1) and muon-photon angular separation {Delta}R({mu},{gamma}) > 0.7 are selected. The author observes a total of 128 W{gamma} candidates, whereas the Standard Model expectation is 142.4 {+-} 9.5 events. The W{gamma} production cross section is found to be {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} {mu}{nu}{gamma}) = 16.3 {+-} 2.3(stat.) {+-} 1.8(syst.) {+-} 1.2(lum.) [pb]. The theoretical prediction for this cross section is {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} l{nu}{gamma}) = 19.3 {+-} 1.4(th.) [pb]. The Standard Model predictions for several kinematic + variables are compared with data for E{sub T}{sup {gamma}} > 7 GeV and {Delta}R({mu},{gamma}) > 0.7. The measured cross section and the photon and W boson production kinematics are found to agree with the Standard Model predictions.

  13. Critical QCD in Nuclear Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. G. Antoniou; Y. F. Contoyiannis; F. K. Diakonos; G. Mavromanolakis

    2005-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed study of correlated scalars, produced in collisions of nuclei and associated with the $\\sigma$-field fluctuations, $(\\delta \\sigma)^2= $, at the QCD critical point (critical fluctuations), is performed on the basis of a critical event generator (Critical Monte-Carlo) developed in our previous work. The aim of this analysis is to reveal suitable observables of critical QCD in the multiparticle environment of simulated events and select appropriate signatures of the critical point, associated with new and strong effects in nuclear collisions.

  14. Study of cosmic ray interaction model based on atmospheric muons for the neutrino flux calculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanuki, T.; Honda, M.; Kajita, T.; Kasahara, K.; Midorikawa, S. [International Center for Elementary Particle Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Shibaura Institute of Technology, 307 Fukasaku, Minuma-ku, Saitama 337-8570 (Japan); Faculty of Software and Information Technology, Aomori University, 2-3-1 Kobata, Aomori, Aomori 030-0943 (Japan)

    2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the hadronic interaction for the calculation of the atmospheric neutrino flux by summarizing the accurately measured atmospheric muon flux data and comparing with simulations. We find the atmospheric muon and neutrino fluxes respond to errors in the {pi}-production of the hadronic interaction similarly, and compare the atmospheric muon flux calculated using the HKKM04 [M. Honda, T. Kajita, K. Kasahara, and S. Midorikawa, Phys. Rev. D 70, 043008 (2004).] code with experimental measurements. The {mu}{sup +}+{mu}{sup -} data show good agreement in the 1{approx}30 GeV/c range, but a large disagreement above 30 GeV/c. The {mu}{sup +}/{mu}{sup -} ratio shows sizable differences at lower and higher momenta for opposite directions. As the disagreements are considered to be due to assumptions in the hadronic interaction model, we try to improve it phenomenologically based on the quark parton model. The improved interaction model reproduces the observed muon flux data well. The calculation of the atmospheric neutrino flux will be reported in the following paper [M. Honda et al., Phys. Rev. D 75, 043006 (2007).].

  15. Identification problems of muon and electron events in the Super-Kamiokande detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K Mitsui; T Kitamura; T Wada; K Okei

    2002-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In the measurement of atmospheric nu_e and nu_mu fluxes, the calculations of the Super Kamiokande group for the distinction between muon-like and electronlike events observed in the water Cerenkov detector have initially assumed a misidentification probability of less than 1 % and later 2 % for the sub-GeV range. In the multi-GeV range, they compared only the observed behaviors of ring patterns of muon and electron events, and claimed a 3 % mis-identification. However, the expressions and the calculation method do not include the fluctuation properties due to the stochastic nature of the processes which determine the expected number of photoelectrons (p.e.) produced by muons and electrons. Our full Monte Carlo (MC) simulations including the fluctuations of photoelectron production show that the total mis-identification rate for electrons and muons should be larger than or equal to 20 % for sub-GeV region. Even in the multi-GeV region we expect a mis-identification rate of several % based on our MC simulations taking into account the ring patterns. The mis-identified events are mostly of muonic origin.

  16. Spallation Backgrounds in Super-Kamiokande Are Made in Muon-Induced Showers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Shirley Weishi

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Crucial questions about solar and supernova neutrinos remain unanswered. Super-Kamiokande has the exposure needed for progress, but detector backgrounds are a limiting factor. A leading component is the beta decays of isotopes produced by cosmic-ray muons and their secondaries, which initiate nuclear spallation reactions. Cuts of events after and surrounding muon tracks reduce this spallation decay background by $\\simeq 90\\%$ (at a cost of $\\simeq 20\\%$ deadtime), but its rate at 6 -- 18 MeV is still dominant. A better way to cut this background was suggested in a Super-Kamiokande paper [Bays {\\it et al.}, Phys.~Rev.~D {\\bf 85}, 052007 (2012)] on a search for the diffuse supernova neutrino background. They found that spallation decays above 16 MeV were preceded near the same location by a peak in the apparent Cherenkov light profile from the muon; a more aggressive cut was applied to a limited section of the muon track, leading to decreased background without increased deadtime. We put their empirical discove...

  17. Search for Dark Matter WIMPs using Upward-Going Muons in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokyo, University of

    Search for Dark Matter WIMPs using Upward-Going Muons in Super{Kamiokande S. Desai, for the Super{Kamiokande searches for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) with the Super-Kamiokande detector using neutrino, for the Super{Kamiokande Collaboration the Universe as a cosmological relic from the Big Bang. The most likely

  18. Search for Muon Neutrino Oscillations in Kamiokande and Super-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokyo, University of

    Search for Muon Neutrino Oscillations in Kamiokande and Super-Kamiokande ( ) 9 #12;Acknowledgments.Totsuka, spokesman of Kamiokande and Super-Kamiokande ex- periments. His deep insight into physics and experiments was indispensable to Kamiokande and Super-Kamiokande experiments. I also thank to ICRR stas, Prof. Y.Suzuki, Prof. T

  19. Hadronic contributions to the muon anomalous magnetic moment Workshop. $(g-2)_?$: Quo vadis? Workshop. Mini proceedings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurice Benayoun; Johan Bijnens; Tom Blum; Irinel Caprini; Gilberto Colangelo; Henryk Czy?; Achim Denig; Cesareo A. Dominguez; Simon Eidelman; Christian S. Fischer; Paolo Gauzzi; Yuping Guo; Andreas Hafner; Masashi Hayakawa; Gregorio Herdoiza; Martin Hoferichter; Guangshun Huang; Karl Jansen; Fred Jegerlehner; Benedikt Kloss; Bastian Kubis; Zhiqing Liu; William Marciano; Pere Masjuan; Harvey B. Meyer; Tsutomu Mibe; Andreas Nyffeler; Vladimir Pascalutsa; Vladyslav Pauk; Michael R. Pennington; Santiago Peris; Christoph F. Redmer; Pablo Sanchez-Puertas; Boris Shwartz; Evgeny Solodov; Dominik Stoeckinger; Thomas Teubner; Marc Unverzagt; Marc Vanderhaeghen; Magnus Wolke

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the mini-proceedings of the workshops Hadronic contributions to the muon anomalous magnetic moment: strategies for improvements of the accuracy of the theoretical prediction and $(g-2)_{\\mu}$: Quo vadis?, both held in Mainz from April 1$^{\\rm rst}$ to 5$^{\\rm th}$ and from April 7$^{\\rm th}$ to 10$^{\\rm th}$, 2014, respectively.

  20. Neutron production by cosmic-ray muons at shallow depth J. Busenitz,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piepke, Andreas G.

    neutrino and proton decay experiments, as well as dark matter searches even though often at greater depth for cold dark matter 3 , and is presently at shallow depth; muon-induced neutrons repre- sent a major at a shallow depth of 32 meters of water equivalent has been measured. The Palo Verde neutrino detector

  1. Comparison of Zgoubi and S-Code regarding the FFAG Muon acceleration. J. Fourrier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Comparison of Zgoubi and S-Code regarding the FFAG Muon acceleration. J. Fourrier IN2P3, LPSC designs have been done and tracking studies are on their way using codes such as MAD, S-Code or Zgoubi. In order to cross-check results so obtained, we have performed comparisons between S-Code and Zgoubi

  2. At EMSL, nanoscience and nanotechnology play a critical, crosscutting role in our mission to integrate experimental and computational resources for innovations that support the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the nation. As a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    At EMSL, nanoscience and nanotechnology play a critical, crosscutting role in our mission capabilities with various applications in nanoscience and nanotechnology. Along with in-house staff expertise

  3. A Measurement of Neutrino Charged Current Interactions and a Search for Muon Neutrino Disappearance with the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakajima, Yasuhiro; /Kyoto U.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we report on a measurement of muon neutrino inclusive charged current interactions on carbon in the few GeV region, using the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam. The all neutrino mode data collected in the SciBooNE experiment is used for this analysis. We collected high-statistics CC interaction sample at SciBooNE, and extracted energy dependent inclusive charged current interaction rates and cross sections for a wide energy range from 0.25 GeV to {approx}3 GeV. We measure the interaction rates with 6-15% precision, and the cross sections with 10-30% precision. We also made an energy integrated measurements, with the precisions of 3% for the rate, and 8% for the cross section measurements. This is the first measurement of the CC inclusive cross section on carbon around 1 GeV. This inclusive interaction measurement is nearly free from effects of hadron re-interactions in the nucleus. Hence, it is complementary to other exclusive cross section measurements, and essential to understand the neutrino interaction cross sections in the few GeV region, which is relevant to ongoing and future neutrino oscillation experiments. This analysis also provides the normalization for SciBooNE's previous cross section ratio measurements for charged current coherent pion production and neutral current neutral pion production. Then, a precise comparison between our previous measurements and the model predictions becomes possible. The result of the interaction rate measurement is used to constrain the product of the neutrino flux and the cross section at the other experiment on the Fermilab Booster Neutrino Beam: Mini-BooNE. We conducted a search for short-baseline muon neutrino disappearance using data both from SciBooNE and MiniBooNE, to test a possible neutrino oscillation with sterile neutrinos which is suggested by the LSND experiment. With this constraint by SciBooNE, we significantly reduced the flux and the cross section uncertainties at MiniBooNE, and achieved the world best sensitivity for the {nu}{sub {mu}} disappearance at 0.5 < {Delta}m{sup 2} < 30 (eV{sup 2}). We found no significant oscillation signal, and set one of the world strongest limits for the sterile neutrino models.

  4. A Theory of Pattern Recognition for the Discrimination between Muon and Electron in the Super-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. I. Galkin; A. M. Anokhina; E. Konishi; A. Misaki

    2007-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The standard Super-Kamiokande analysis uses an estimator for particle identification by which it discriminates electrons (electron nutrinos) from muons (muon nutrinos). Use of this estimator has led to the claim of a significant deficiency of muons (muon nutrinos), suggesting the existence of neutrino oscillations. We investigate three areas of concern for the Super-Kamiokande estimator: the separation of the spatial part from the angular part in the probability functions, the neglect of fluctuations in the Cherenkov light in different physical processes due to the charged particles concerned, and the point-like approximation for the emission of Cherenkov light. We show that the first two factors are important for the consideration of stochastic processes in the generation of the Cherenkov light, and that the point-like assumption oversimplifies the estimation of the Cherenkov light quantities. We develop a new discrimination procedure for separating electron neutrinos from muon neutrinos, based on detailed simulations carried out with GEANT~3.21 and with newly derived mean angular distribution functions for the charged particles concerned (muons and electrons/positrons), as well as the corresponding functions for the relative fluctuations. These angular distribution functions are constructed introducing a ``moving point'' approximation. The application of our procedure between the discrimination between electron and muon to the analysis of the experimental data in SK will be made in a subsequent paper.

  5. Criticality & Recovery Preparedness: ePHI Systems Criticality Designation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Criticality & Recovery Preparedness: ePHI Systems 5100 EX.A Criticality Designation 1. Primary source of PHI for pre-research; or secondary source of PHI for research/pre-research; secondary source of PHI for treatment, payment or healthcare operations; or teaching Criticality mapped to Recovery

  6. Critical currents of YBCO tapes and Bi-2212 wires at different temperatures and magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lombardo, V.; Barzi, e.; Turrioni, D.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Design studies for the cooling channel of a Muon Collider call for straight and helical solenoids generating field well in excess of the critical fields of state of the art Low Temperature Superconductors (LTS) such as Nb{sub 3}Sn or NbTi. Therefore, High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) will need to be used for the manufacturing of all or certain sections of such magnets to be able to generate and withstand the field levels at the cryogenic temperatures required by the new machine. In this work, two major High Temperature Superconductors - Bi2212 round wires and YBCO coated conductor tapes - are investigated to understand how critical current density of such conductors scales as a function of external field and operating temperature. This is vital information to make conductor choices depending on the application and to proceed with the design of such magnets.

  7. Proceedings of the Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety Project Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, R.G. [comp.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the proceedings of the annual Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety Project (NCTSP) Workshop held in Monterey, California, on April 16--28, 1993. The NCTSP was sponsored by the Department of Energy and organized by the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility. The report is divided into six sections reflecting the sessions outlined on the workshop agenda.

  8. Critical pulse power components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarjeant, W.J.; Rohwein, G.J.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Critical components for pulsed power conditioning systems will be reviewed. Particular emphasis will be placed on those components requiring significant development efforts. Capacitors, for example, are one of the weakest elements in high-power pulsed systems, especially when operation at high-repetition frequencies for extended periods of time are necessary. Switches are by far the weakest active components of pulse power systems. In particular, opening switches are essentially nonexistent for most applications. Insulaton in all systems and components requires development and improvement. Efforts under way in technology base development of pulse power components will be discussed.

  9. Critically damped quantum search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Mizel

    2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Although measurement and unitary processes can accomplish any quantum evolution in principle, thinking in terms of dissipation and damping can be powerful. We propose a modification of Grover's algorithm in which the idea of damping plays a natural role. Remarkably, we have found that there is a critical damping value that divides between the quantum $O(\\sqrt{N})$ and classical O(N) search regimes. In addition, by allowing the damping to vary in a fashion we describe, one obtains a fixed-point quantum search algorithm in which ignorance of the number of targets increases the number of oracle queries only by a factor of 1.5.

  10. Nuclear Engineering Nuclear Criticality Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    development, Nuclear Operations Division (NOD) waste management and storage activities and other laboratoryNuclear Engineering Nuclear Criticality Safety The Nuclear Engineering Division (NE) of Argonne National Laboratory is experienced in performing criticality safety and shielding evaluations for nuclear

  11. CASE CRITICAL Keystone XL Pipeline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    CASE CRITICAL Keystone XL Pipeline: A Line in the Sand? Case Critical is presented by ASU's Global Professor, ASU's School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning The Keystone XL Pipeline, a large

  12. An Indirect Search for WIMPs in the Sun using 3109.6 days of upward-going muons in Super-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanaka, T; Hayato, Y; Iida, T; Kameda, J; Koshio, Y; Kouzuma, Y; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakayama, S; Obayashi, Y; Sekiya, H; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeda, A; Takenaga, Y; Ueno, K; Ueshima, K; Yamada, S; Yokozawa, T; Ishihara, C; Hazama, S; Kaji, H; Kajita, T; Kaneyuki, K; McLachlan, T; Okumura, K; Shimizu, Y; Tanimoto, N; Dufour, F; Kearns, E; Litos3, M; Raaf, J L; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Cravens, J P; Bays, K; Kropp, W R; Mine, S; Regis, C; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Ganezer, K S; Hill, J; Keig, W E; Jang, J S; Kim, J Y; Lim, I T; Albert, J B; Scholberg, K; Walter, C W; Wendell, R; Wongjirad, T; Ishizuka, T; Tasaka, S; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Smith, S; Martens, K; Vagins, M; Watanabe, Y; Hasegawa, T; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Kobayashi, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakamura, K; Nishikawa, K; Nishino, H; Oyama, Y; Sakashita, K; Sekiguchi, T; Tsukamoto, T; Suzuki, A T; Takeuchi, Y; Ikeda, M; Minamino, A; Nakaya, T; Labarga, L; Fukuda, Y; Itow, Y; Mitsuka, G; Jung, C K; McGrew, C; Lopez, G; Yanagisawa, C; Tamura, N; Ishino, H; Kibayashi, A; Sakuda, M; Kuno, Y; Yoshida, M; Kim, S B; Yang, B S; Okazawa, H; Choi, Y; Nishijima, K; Yokosawa, Y; Koshiba, M; Totsuka, Y; Yokoyama, M; Chen, S; Heng, Y; Yang, Z; Zhang, H; Kielczewska, D; Mijakowski, P; Connolly, K; Dziomba, M; Thrane, E

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the result of an indirect search for high energy neutrinos from WIMP annihilation in the Sun using upward-going muon (upmu) events at Super-Kamiokande. Datasets from SKI-SKIII (3109.6 days) were used for the analysis. We looked for an excess of neutrino signal from the Sun as compared with the expected atmospheric neutrino background in three upmu categories: stopping, non-showering, and showering. No significant excess was observed. The 90% C.L. upper limits of upward-going muon flux induced by WIMPs of 100 GeV/c$^2$ were 6.4$\\times10^{-15}$ cm$^{-2}$ sec$^{-1}$ and 4.0$\\times10^{-15}$ cm$^{-2}$ sec$^{-1}$ for the soft and hard annihilation channels, respectively. These limits correspond to upper limits of 4.5$\\times10^{-39}$ cm$^{-2}$ and 2.7$\\times10^{-40}$ cm$^{-2}$ for spin-dependent WIMP-nucleon scattering cross sections in the soft and hard annihilation channels, respectively.

  13. PROTON BEAM REQUIREMENTS FOR A NEUTRINO FACTORY AND MUON COLLIDER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Table 1 summarizes the NF proton driver parameters obtainedboth facilities. Table 1. Proton driver requirements for arepetition frequency (Hz) Proton energy (GeV) Proton rms

  14. ANNUAL TRILATERAL U.S. - EU - JAPAN CONFERENCE ON CRITICAL MATERIALS...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ANNUAL TRILATERAL U.S. - EU - JAPAN CONFERENCE ON CRITICAL MATERIALS FOR A CLEAN ENERGY FUTURE, SEPTEMBER 8-9, 2014 ANNUAL TRILATERAL U.S. - EU - JAPAN CONFERENCE ON CRITICAL...

  15. Mind the gap on Icecube: Cosmic neutrino spectrum and muon anomalous magnetic moment in the gauged L_{\\mu} - L_{\\tau} model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Araki, Takeshi; Konishi, Yasufumi; Ota, Toshihiko; Sato, Joe; Shimomura, Takashi

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy spectrum of cosmic neutrinos, which was recently reported by the IceCube collaboration, shows a gap between 400 TeV and 1 PeV. An unknown neutrino interaction mediated by a field with a mass of the MeV scale is one of the possible solutions to this gap. We examine if the leptonic gauge interaction L_{\\mu} - L_{\\tau} can simultaneously explain the two phenomena in the lepton sector: the gap in the cosmic neutrino spectrum and the unsettled disagreement in muon anomalous magnetic moment. We illustrate that there remains the regions in the model parameter space, which account for both the problems. Our results also provide a hint for the distance to the source of the high-energy cosmic neutrinos.

  16. Transportation Science and the Dynamics of Critical Infrastructure Networks with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Inequalities · A New Network Performance/Efficiency Measure with Applications to Critical Infrastructure, and Energy Networks #12;Components of Common Physical Networks Network System Nodes Links Flows Transportation Intersections, Homes, Workplaces, Airports, Railyards Roads, Airline Routes, Railroad Track

  17. Terra-Gen Powers Coso Geothermal Facility Obtains Critical Federal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Obtains Critical Federal Permit to Increase Its Renewable Energy Generation Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Terra-Gen Powers Coso...

  18. 3 LANSCE: Mission-Critical for National Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . LANSCE is a mission-critical facility for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the Department of Energy (DOE). In 2011, the NNSA renewed the memorandum of understanding that affirms

  19. DECISION-MAKING AND THE VULNERABILITY OF INTERDEPENDENT CRITICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hai

    , telecommunications, water supply, wastewater, electric power and other energy infrastructure. Event databasesDECISION-MAKING AND THE VULNERABILITY OF INTERDEPENDENT CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE Zimmerman, R interdependencies, extreme events, vulnerability assessment 1 Introduction The provision of infrastructure services

  20. Disclaimers | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasRelease Date: Contact:Disclaimers NOTICE: Information from this