National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for muon critical energy

  1. Low-energy muons via frictional cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu Bao; Allen Caldwell; Daniel Greenwald; Guoxing Xia

    2010-01-18

    Low-energy muon beams are useful for a range of physics experiments. We consider the production of low-energy muon beams with small energy spreads using frictional cooling. As the input beam, we take a surface muon source such as that at the Paul Scherrer Institute. Simulations show that the efficiency of low energy muon production can potentially be raised to 1%, which is significantly higher than that of current schemes.

  2. Muon Collider Physics at Very High Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Berger

    2000-01-03

    Muon colliders might greatly extend the energy frontier of collider physics. One can contemplate circular colliders with center-of-mass energies in excess of 10 TeV. Some physics issues that might be relevant at such a machine are discussed.

  3. Proceedings of the International Workshop on Low Energy Muon Science: LEMS`93

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leon, M. [comp.

    1994-01-01

    This report contains papers on research with low energy muons. Topics cover fundamental electroweak physics; muonic atoms and molecules, and muon catalyzed fusion; muon spin research; and muon facilities. These papers have been indexed and cataloged separately.

  4. Precise parametrizations of muon energy losses in water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. I. Klimushin; E. V. Bugaev; I. A. Sokalski

    2001-06-01

    The description of muon propagation through large depths of matter, based on a concept of the correction factor, is proposed. The results of Monte-Carlo calculations of this correction factor are presented. The parametrizations for continuous energy loss coefficients, valid in the broad interval of muon energies, and for the correction factor are given. The concrete calculations for pure water are presented.

  5. Analysis of muon radiography of the Toshiba nuclear critical assembly reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, C. L.; Bacon, Jeffery; Borozdin, Konstantin; Fabritius, J. M.; Perry, John; Ramsey, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Ban, Yuichiro; Izumi, Mikio; Sano, Yuji; Yoshida, Noriyuki [Toshiba Corporation, 8 Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8523 (Japan); Miyadera, Haruo [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Toshiba Corporation, 8 Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8523 (Japan); Mizokami, Shinya; Otsuka, Yasuyuki; Yamada, Daichi [Tokyo Electric Power Company, 1-1-3 Uchisaiwai-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Sugita, Tsukasa; Yoshioka, Kenichi [Toshiba Corporation, 4-1 Ukishima-cho, Kawasaki-ku, Kawasaki 210-0862 (Japan)

    2014-01-13

    A 1.2?×?1.2 m{sup 2} muon tracker was moved from Los Alamos to the Toshiba facility at Kawasaki, Japan, where it was used to take ?4 weeks of data radiographing the Toshiba Critical Assembly Reactor with cosmic ray muons. In this paper, we describe the analysis procedure, show results of this experiment, and compare the results to Monte Carlo predictions. The results validate the concept of using cosmic rays to image the damaged cores of the Fukushima Daiichi reactors.

  6. Flux of upward high-energy muons at the multi-component primary energy spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. Ter-Antonyan; P. L. Biermann

    2001-06-07

    The atmospheric neutrino-induced upward muon flux are calculated by using the multi-component primary energy spectrum, CORSIKA EAS simulation code for the reproduction of the atmospheric neutrino spectra and improved parton model for charged-current cross sections. The results are obtained at 0.1-1000 TeV muon energy range and 0-89 degrees zenith angular range.

  7. Simulation of neutrons produced by high-energy muons underground

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Lindote; H. M. Araujo; V. A. Kudryavtsev; M. Robinson

    2009-02-12

    This article describes the Monte Carlo simulation used to interpret the measurement of the muon-induced neutron flux in the Boulby Underground Laboratory (North Yorkshire, UK), recently performed using a large scintillator veto deployed around the ZEPLIN-II WIMP detector. Version 8.2 of the GEANT4 toolkit was used after relevant benchmarking and validation of neutron production models. In the direct comparison between Monte Carlo and experimental data, we find that the simulation produces a 1.8 times higher neutron rate, which we interpret as over-production in lead by GEANT4. The dominance of this material in neutron production allows us to estimate the absolute neutron yield in lead as (1.31 +/- 0.06) x 10^(-3) neutrons/muon/(g/cm^2) for a mean muon energy of 260 GeV. Simulated nuclear recoils due to muon-induced neutrons in the ZEPLIN-II target volume (~1 year exposure) showed that, although a small rate of events is expected from this source of background in the energy range of interest for dark matter searches, no event survives an anti-coincidence cut with the veto.

  8. Criticality Safety | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Nuclear Safety Management American Nuclear Society, Nuclear Criticality Safety Division ANSIANS-8 Standards U.S. Department of Energy Nuclear Criticality Safety Program Orders,...

  9. Measurement of the nucleon structure function using high energy muons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyers, P.D.

    1983-12-01

    We have measured the inclusive deep inelastic scattering of muons on nucleons in iron using beams of 93 and 215 GeV muons. To perform this measurement, we have built and operated the Multimuon Spectrometer (MMS) in the muon beam at Fermilab. The MMS is a magnetized iron target/spectrometer/calorimeter which provides 5.61 kg/cm/sup 2/ of target, 9% momentum resolution on scattered muons, and a direct measure of total hadronic energy with resolution sigma/sub nu/ = 1.4..sqrt..nu(GeV). In the distributed target, the average beam energies at the interaction are 88.0 and 209 GeV. Using the known form of the radiatively-corrected electromagnetic cross section, we extract the structure function F/sub 2/(x,Q/sup 2/) with a typical precision of 2% over the range 5 < Q/sup 2/ < 200 GeV/sup 2//c/sup 2/. We compare our measurements to the predictions of lowest order quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and find a best fit value of the QCD scale parameter ..lambda../sub LO/ = 230 +- 40/sup stat/ +- 80/sup syst/ MeV/c, assuming R = 0 and without applying Fermi motion corrections. Comparing the cross sections at the two beam energies, we measure R = -0.06 +- 0.06/sup stat/ +- 0.11/sup syst/. Our measurements show qualitative agreement with QCD, but quantitative comparison is hampered by phenomenological uncertainties. The experimental situation is quite good, with substantial agreement between our measurements and those of others. 86 references.

  10. Possible explanation for the low flux of high energy astrophysical muon neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pakvasa, Sandip

    2013-05-23

    I consider the possibility that some exotic neutrino property is responsible for reducing the muon neutrino flux at high energies from distant sources; specifically, (i) neutrino decay and (ii) neutrinos being pseudo-Dirac particles. This would provide a mechanism for the lack of high energy muon events in the Icecube detector.

  11. Recherche De Correlations Temporelles Des Muons Cosmiques Avec Macro Et Perte D'Energie Des Nuclearites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moussa, A

    2009-01-01

    The first parts of the thesis recalls the main features of the large MACRO experiment at the underground Gran Sasso Laboratory. It then describes the atmospheric muons measured by the experiment and the selection criteria to obtain and analyze a large sample of cosmic muons. The time series of MACRO muons was analyzed with two complementary approaches: search for the occurrence of bursts of muon events and search for periodicities in the muon time distribution. The Scan Statistics method was used in the first case and the Lomb-Scargle spectral analysis in the second case. The two techniques complete early analyses performed with "folding" methods. It is confirmed that the seasonal variation is the dominant periodic variation, and one also confirms the solar diurnal and sidereal modulations. A separate study concerns the analysis of the energy losses of the hypothetical Nuclearites in different materials and detectors; their importance for the searches performed by the MACRO and the SLIM experiments is discuss...

  12. Muon Colliders: The Next Frontier

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Tourun, Yagmur [Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois, United States

    2010-01-08

    Muon Colliders provide a path to the energy frontier in particle physics but have been regarded to be "at least 20 years away" for 20 years. I will review recent progress in design studies and hardware R&D and show that a Muon Collider can be established as a real option for the post-LHC era if the current vigorous R&D effort revitalized by the Muon Collider Task Force at Fermilab can be supported to its conclusion. All critical technologies are being addressed and no show-stoppers have emerged. Detector backgrounds have been studied in detail and appear to be manageable and the physics can be done with existing detector technology. A muon facility can be built through a staged scenario starting from a low-energy muon source with unprecedented intensity for exquisite reach for rare processes, followed by a Neutrino Factory with ultrapure neutrino beams with unparalleled sensitivity for disentangling neutrino mixing, leading to an energy frontier Muon Collider with excellent energy resolution.

  13. Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, R.

    2009-10-19

    Parameters are given of muon colliders with center of mass energies of 1.5 and 3 TeV. Pion production is from protons on a mercury target. Capture, decay, and phase rotation yields bunch trains of both muon signs. Six dimensional cooling reduces the emittances until the trains are merged into single bunches, one of each sign. Further cooling in 6 dimensions is then applied, followed by final transverse cooling in 50 T solenoids. After acceleration the muons enter the collider ring. Ongoing R&D is discussed.

  14. High-Energy Cosmic-Ray Muons Under Thick Layers of Matter I. a Method to Solve the Transport Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Naumov; S. I. Sinegovsky; E. V. Bugaev

    1993-01-22

    An effective analytical method for calculating energy spectra of cosmic-ray muons at large depths of homogeneous media is developed. The method allows to include an arbitrary (decreasing) muon spectrum at the medium boundary and the energy dependence of both discrete (radiative and photonuclear) and continuous (ionization) muon energy losses, with resonable requirements for the high-energy behavior of the initial spectrum and differential cross sections of the muon-matter interactions. (To be published in the Proceedings of the Second NESTOR International Workshop, 19 -- 21 October 1992, Pylos, Greece.)

  15. A parameterisation of the flux and energy spectrum of single and multiple muons in deep water/ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bazzotti; S. Biagi; G. Carminati; S. Cecchini; T. Chiarusi; G. Giacomelli; A. Margiotta; M. Sioli; M. Spurio

    2009-10-22

    In this paper parametric formulas are presented to evaluate the flux of atmospheric muons in the range of vertical depth between 1.5 to 5 km of water equivalent (km w.e.) and up to 85^o for the zenith angle. We take into account their arrival in bundles with different muon multiplicities. The energy of muons inside bundles is then computed considering the muon distance from the bundle axis. This parameterisation relies on a full Monte Carlo simulation of primary Cosmic Ray (CR) interactions, shower propagation in the atmosphere and muon transport in deep water [1]. The primary CR flux and interaction models, in the range in which they can produce muons which may reach 1.5 km w.e., suffer from large experimental uncertainties. We used a primary CR flux and an interaction model able to correctly reproduce the flux, the multiplicity distribution, the spatial distance between muons as measured by the underground MACRO experiment.

  16. Muon Energy Reconstruction Through the Multiple Scattering Method in the NO$\\mathrm{\

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Psihas Olmedo, Silvia Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Neutrino energy measurements are a crucial component in the experimental study of neutrino oscillations. These measurements are done through the reconstruction of neutrino interactions and energy measurements of their products. This thesis presents the development of a technique to reconstruct the energy of muons from neutrino interactions in the NO$\\mathrm{\

  17. Measurement of the energy spectrum of underground muons at Gran Sasso with a transition radiation detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The MACRO Collaboration; M. Ambrosio et al

    1998-07-09

    We have measured directly the residual energy of cosmic ray muons crossing the MACRO detector at the Gran Sasso Laboratory. For this measurement we have used a transition radiation detector consisting of three identical modules, each of about 12 m^2 area, operating in the energy region from 100 GeV to 1 TeV. The results presented here were obtained with the first module collecting data for more than two years. The average single muon energy is found to be 320 +/- 4 (stat.) +/- 11 (syst.) GeV in the rock depth range 3000-6500 hg/cm^2. The results are in agreement with calculations of the energy loss of muons in the rock above the detector.

  18. High-energy Atmospheric Muon Flux Expected at India-Based Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukanta Panda; Sergei I. Sinegovsky

    2008-02-04

    We calculate the zenith-angle dependence of conventional and prompt high-energy muon fluxes at India-Based Neutrino Observatory (INO) depth. This study demonstrates a possibility to discriminate models of the charm hadroproduction including the low-x QCD behaviour of hadronic cross-sections relevant at very high energies.

  19. Prompt muon-induced fission: a probe for nuclear energy dissipation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volker E. Oberacker

    1999-05-04

    We solve the time-dependent Dirac equation for a muon which is initially bound to a fissioning actinide nucleus. The computations are carried out on a 3-D cartesian lattice utilizing the Basis-Spline collocation method. The muon dynamics is sensitive to the nuclear energy dissipation between the outer fission barrier and the scission point. From a comparison with experimental data we find a dissipated energy of about 10 MeV and a fission time delay due to friction of order $2 \\times 10^{-21}$ s.

  20. Measurement of the atmospheric muon charge ratio at TeV energies with MINOS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamson, P.; Andreopoulos, C.; Arms, K.E.; Armstrong, R.; Auty, D.J.; Avvakumov, S.; Ayres, D.S.; Baller, B.; Barish, B.; Barnes, P.D., Jr.; Barr, G.; /Fermilab /University Coll. London /Rutherford /Minnesota U. /Indiana U. /Sussex U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Argonne /Caltech /LLNL, Livermore /Oxford U.

    2007-05-01

    The 5.4 kton MINOS far detector has been taking charge-separated cosmic ray muon data since the beginning of August, 2003 at a depth of 2070 m.w.e. in the Soudan Underground Laboratory, Minnesota, USA. The data with both forward and reversed magnetic field running configurations were combined to minimize systematic errors in the determination of the underground muon charge ratio. When averaged, two independent analyses find the charge ratio underground to be N{sub {mu}}+/N{sub {mu}}-=1.374{+-}0.004(stat)-0.010{sup +0.012}(sys). Using the map of the Soudan rock overburden, the muon momenta as measured underground were projected to the corresponding values at the surface in the energy range 1-7 TeV. Within this range of energies at the surface, the MINOS data are consistent with the charge ratio being energy independent at the 2 standard deviation level. When the MINOS results are compared with measurements at lower energies, a clear rise in the charge ratio in the energy range 0.3-1.0 TeV is apparent. A qualitative model shows that the rise is consistent with an increasing contribution of kaon decays to the muon charge ratio.

  1. Forbush decreases and solar events seen in the 10 - 20GeV energy range by the Karlsruhe Muon Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Braun; J. Engler; J. R. Hörandel; J. Milke

    2008-10-27

    Since 1993, a muon telescope located at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Karlsruhe Muon Telescope) has been recording the flux of single muons mostly originating from primary cosmic-ray protons with dominant energies in the 10 - 20 GeV range. The data are used to investigate the influence of solar effects on the flux of cosmic-rays measured at Earth. Non-periodic events like Forbush decreases and ground level enhancements are detected in the registered muon flux. A selection of recent events will be presented and compared to data from the Jungfraujoch neutron monitor. The data of the Karlsruhe Muon Telescope help to extend the knowledge about Forbush decreases and ground level enhancements to energies beyond the neutron monitor regime.

  2. Muon Muon Collider: Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallardo, J.C.; Palmer, R.B.; Tollestrup, A.V.; Sessler, A.M.; Skrinsky, A.N.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Geer, S.; Griffin, J.; Johnstone, C.; Lebrun, P.; McInturff, A.; Mills, Frederick E.; Mokhov, N.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Ng, K.Y.; Noble, R.; Novitski, I.; Popovic, M.; Qian, C.; Van Ginneken, A. ,

    2012-04-05

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice - we believe - to allow us to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring wich has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design. Muons because of their large mass compared to an electron, do not produce significant synchrotron radiation. As a result there is negligible beamstrahlung and high energy collisions are not limited by this phenomena. In addition, muons can be accelerated in circular devices which will be considerably smaller than two full-energy linacs as required in an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider. A hadron collider would require a CM energy 5 to 10 times higher than 4 TeV to have an equivalent energy reach. Since the accelerator size is limited by the strength of bending magnets, the hadron collider for the same physics reach would have to be much larger than the muon collider. In addition, muon collisions should be cleaner than hadron collisions. There are many detailed particle reactions which are open to a muon collider and the physics of such reactions - what one learns and the necessary luminosity to see interesting events - are described in detail. Most of the physics accesible to an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider could be studied in a muon collider. In addition the production of Higgs bosons in the s-channel will allow the measurement of Higgs masses and total widths to high precision; likewise, t{bar t} and W{sup +}W{sup -} threshold studies would yield m{sub t} and m{sub w} to great accuracy. These reactions are at low center of mass energy (if the MSSM is correct) and the luminosity and {Delta}p/p of the beams required for these measurements is detailed in the Physics Chapter. On the other hand, at 2 + 2 TeV, a luminosity of L {approx} 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} is desirable for studies such as, the scattering of longitudinal W bosons or the production of heavy scalar particles. Not explored in this work, but worth noting, are the opportunities for muon-proton and muon-heavy ion collisions as well as the enormous richness of such a facility for fixed target physics provided by the intense beams of neutrinos, muons, pions, kaons, antiprotons and spallation neutrons. To see all the interesting physics described herein requires a careful study of the operation of a detector in the very large background. Three sources of background have been identified. The first is from any halo accompanying the muon beams in the collider ring. Very carefully prepared beams will have to be injected and maintained. The second is due to the fact that on average 35% of the muon energy appears in its decay electron. The energy of the electron subsequently is converted into EM showers either from the synchrotron radiation they emit in the collider magnetic field or from direct collision with the surrounding material. The decays that occur as the beams traverse the low beta insert are of particular concern for detector backgrounds. A third source of background is e{sup +} - e{sup -} pair creation from {mu}{sup +} - {mu}{sup -} interaction. Studies of

  3. Prompt muon-induced fission: a sensitive probe for nuclear energy dissipation and fission dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volker E. Oberacker; A. Sait Umar; Feodor F. Karpeshin

    2004-03-30

    Following the formation of an excited muonic atom, inner shell transitions may proceed without photon emission by inverse internal conversion, i.e. the muonic excitation energy is transferred to the nucleus. In actinides, the 2p -> 1s and the 3d -> 1s muonic transitions result in excitation of the nuclear giant dipole and giant quadrupole resonances, respectively, which act as doorway states for fission. The nuclear excitation energy is typically 6.5 - 10 MeV. Because the muon lifetime is long compared to the timescale of prompt nuclear fission, the motion of the muon in the Coulomb field of the fissioning nucleus may be utilized to learn about the dynamics of fission.

  4. Electromagnetic Design of RF Cavities for Accelerating Low-Energy Muons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurennoy, Sergey S.

    2012-05-14

    A high-gradient linear accelerator for accelerating low-energy muons and pions in a strong solenoidal magnetic field has been proposed for homeland defense and industrial applications. The acceleration starts immediately after collection of pions from a target in a solenoidal magnetic field and brings decay muons, which initially have kinetic energies mostly around 15-20 MeV, to 200 MeV over a distance of {approx}10 m. At this energy, both ionization cooling and further, more conventional acceleration of the muon beam become feasible. A normal-conducting linac with external-solenoid focusing can provide the required large beam acceptances. The linac consists of independently fed zero-mode (TM{sub 010}) RF cavities with wide beam apertures closed by thin conducting edge-cooled windows. Electromagnetic design of the cavity, including its RF coupler, tuning and vacuum elements, and field probes, has been developed with the CST MicroWave Studio, and is presented.

  5. Muon content of ultra-high-energy air showers: Yakutsk data versus simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Glushkov; I. T. Makarov; M. I. Pravdin; I. E. Sleptsov; D. S. Gorbunov; G. I. Rubtsov; S. V. Troitsky

    2008-02-18

    We analyse a sample of 33 extensive air showers (EAS) with estimated primary energies above 2\\cdot 10^{19} eV and high-quality muon data recorded by the Yakutsk EAS array. We compare, event-by-event, the observed muon density to that expected from CORSIKA simulations for primary protons and iron, using SIBYLL and EPOS hadronic interaction models. The study suggests the presence of two distinct hadronic components, ``light'' and ``heavy''. Simulations with EPOS are in a good agreement with the expected composition in which the light component corresponds to protons and the heavy component to iron-like nuclei. With SYBILL, simulated muon densities for iron primaries are a factor of \\sim 1.5 less than those observed for the heavy component, for the same electromagnetic signal. Assuming two-component proton-iron composition and the EPOS model, the fraction of protons with energies E>10^{19} eV is 0.52^{+0.19}_{-0.20} at 95% confidence level.

  6. The Department of Energy Releases Strategy on Critical Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Department of Energy Releases Strategy on Critical Materials The Department of Energy Releases Strategy on Critical Materials December 15, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis The Department...

  7. Muon Simulation at the Daya Bay SIte

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mengyun, Guan; Jun, Cao; Changgen, Yang; Yaxuan, Sun; Luk, Kam-Biu

    2006-05-23

    With a pretty good-resolution mountain profile, we simulated the underground muon background at the Daya Bay site. To get the sea-level muon flux parameterization, a modification to the standard Gaisser's formula was introduced according to the world muon data. MUSIC code was used to transport muon through the mountain rock. To deploy the simulation, first we generate a statistic sample of sea-level muon events according to the sea-level muon flux distribution formula; then calculate the slant depth of muon passing through the mountain using an interpolation method based on the digitized data of the mountain; finally transport muons through rock to get underground muon sample, from which we can get results of muon flux, mean energy, energy distribution and angular distribution.

  8. Criticality Safety | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar:IAbout Us » ContactCounty Aims to Save withManagers

  9. The Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zisman, Michael S

    2010-05-17

    We describe the scientific motivation for a new type of accelerator, the muon collider. This accelerator would permit an energy-frontier scientific program and yet would fit on the site of an existing laboratory. Such a device is quite challenging, and requires a substantial R&D program. After describing the ingredients of the facility, the ongoing R&D activities of the Muon Accelerator Program are discussed. A possible U.S. scenario that could lead to a muon collider at Fermilab is briefly mentioned.

  10. The Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2011-01-05

    We describe the scientific motivation for a new type of accelerator, the muon collider. This accelerator would permit an energy-frontier scientific program and yet would fit on the site of an existing laboratory. Such a device is quite challenging, and requires a substantial R&D program. After describing the ingredients of the facility, the ongoing R&D activities of the Muon Accelerator Program are discussed. A possible U.S. scenario that could lead to a muon collider at Fermilab is briefly mentioned.

  11. y Vacuum Polarization in Low Energy Physics: g -2 1. g -2 introduction, history, muon properties, lepton moments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Röder, Beate

    y Vacuum Polarization in Low Energy Physics: g - 2 1. g - 2 introduction, history, muon properties light-by-light scattering contribution 7. Summary and Outlook 105-1 #12;Physics of vacuum polarization Frascati, Frascati, Italy ­ November 9-13, 2009 ­ #12;Physics of vacuum polarization ... Basic principle

  12. The US Muon Accelerator Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torun, Y.; Kirk, H.; Bross, A.; Geer, Steve; Shiltsev, Vladimir; Zisman, M.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2010-05-01

    An accelerator complex that can produce ultra-intense beams of muons presents many opportunities to explore new physics. A facility of this type is unique in that, in a relatively straightforward way, it can present a physics program that can be staged and thus move forward incrementally, addressing exciting new physics at each step. At the request of the US Department of Energy's Office of High Energy Physics, the Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (NFMCC) and the Fermilab Muon Collider Task Force (MCTF) have recently submitted a proposal to create a Muon Accelerator Program that will have, as a primary goal, to deliver a Design Feasibility Study for an energy-frontier Muon Collider by the end of a 7 year R&D program. This paper presents a description of a Muon Collider facility and gives an overview of the proposal.

  13. Muon-proton Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Borie

    2013-02-05

    A recent proposal to measure the proton form factor by means of muon-proton scattering will use muons which are not ultrarelativistic (and also not nonrelativistic). The usual equations describing the scattering cross section use the approximation that the scattered lepton (usually an electron) is ultrarelativistic, with v/c approximately equal to 1. Here the cross section is calculated for all values of the energy. It agrees with the standard result in the appropriate limit.

  14. Department of Energy Critical Materials Strategy Video (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a text version of the "Department of Energy Critical Materials Strategy" video presented at the Critical Materials Workshop, held on April 3, 2012 in Arlington, Virginia.

  15. Muon Cooling and Future Muon Facilities: The Coming Decade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel M. Kaplan

    2009-10-21

    Muon colliders and neutrino factories are attractive options for future facilities aimed at achieving the highest lepton-antilepton collision energies and precision measurements of parameters of the neutrino mixing matrix. The performance and cost of these depend sensitively on how well a beam of muons can be cooled. Recent progress in muon cooling design studies and prototype tests nourishes the hope that such facilities can be built in the decade to come.

  16. Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geer, Steve; /Fermilab

    2009-11-01

    Over the past decade, there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture, and accelerate {Omicron}(10{sup 21}) muons per year. These developments have paved the way for a new type of neutrino source (neutrino factory) and a new type of very high energy lepton-antilepton collider (muon collider). This article reviews the motivation, design, and research and development for future neutrino factories and muon colliders.

  17. Muon colliders and neutrino factories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geer, S.; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture and accelerate {Omicron}(10{sup 21}) muons/year. This development prepares the way for a new type of neutrino source (Neutrino Factory) and a new type of very high energy lepton-antilepton collider (Muon Collider). This article reviews the motivation, design and R&D for Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders.

  18. The knee in the cosmic ray energy spectrum from the simultaneous EAS charged particles and muon density spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bijay, Biplab; Bhadra, Arunava

    2015-01-01

    In this work we examine with the help of Monte Carlo simulation whether a consistent primary energy spectrum of cosmic rays emerges from both the experimentally observed total charged particles and muon size spectra of cosmic ray extensive air showers considering primary composition may or may not change beyond the knee of the energy spectrum. It is found that EAS-TOP observations consistently infer a knee in the primary energy spectrum provided the primary is pure unchanging iron whereas no consistent primary spectrum emerges from simultaneous use of the KASCADE observed total charged particle and muon spectra. However, it is also found that when primary composition changes across the knee the estimation of spectral index of total charged particle spectrum is quite tricky, depends on the choice of selection of points near the knee in the size spectrum.

  19. COSMIC RAY MUONS Anthony Tatum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    Production and Path Effects in The Atmosphere Using Muons to Test Beam Profile Monitor Conclusion #12 Nuclei (Protons) Remaining 11% includes Helium, Carbon and Oxygen among other less abundant elements #12 are the decay product of Pions and Kaons + + #12; The mean energy of muons at the site of production (~15 km

  20. A Small Multi-Wire Telescope for High Energy Cosmic Ray Muon Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maghrabi, Abdullrahnan; Aldosari, A; Almuteri, M

    2016-01-01

    Different types of ground-based detectors have been developed and deployed around the world to monitor and study CR variations. We have designed, constructed and operated a three layer small (20x20 cm2) multiwire proportional chamber MWPC telescope for cosmic ray muon observations. In this paper, the technical aspects of this detector will be briefly discussed. The abilities of the telescope in detecting high nergy cosmic ray muons (primaries higher than 20 GeV) were established. The telescope performs well in this sense and showed comparable results with a 1 m2 scintillator detector.

  1. Study of the muon content of very high-energy EAS measured with the KASCADE-Grande observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arteaga-Velazquez, J C; Bekk, K; Bertaina, M; Bluemer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Cantoni, E; Chiavassa, A; Cossavella, F; Curcio, C; Daumiller, K; de Souza, V; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Engler, J; Fuchs, B; Fuhrmann, D; Gils, H J; Glasstetter, R; Grupen, C; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hoerandel, J R; Huber, D; Huege, T; Kampert, K -H; Kang, D; Klages, H O; Link, K; Luczak, P; Ludwig, M; Mathes, H J; Mayer, H J; Melissas, M; Milke, J; Mitrica, B; Morello, C; Oehlschlaeger, J; Ostapchenko, S; Palmieri, N; Petcu, M; Pierog, T; Rebel, H; Roth, M; Schieler, H; Schoo, S; Schroeder, F G; Sima, O; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Ulrich, H; Weindl, A; Wochele, D; Wochele, J

    2013-01-01

    The KASCADE-Grande detector is an air-shower array devoted to the study of primary cosmic rays with very high-energies (E = 10^{16} - 10^{18} eV). The instrument is composed of different particle detector systems suitable for the detailed study of the properties of Extensive Air Showers (EAS) developed by cosmic rays in the atmosphere. Among the EAS observables studied with the detector, the charged number of particles, the muon content (at different energy thresholds), and the number of electrons are found. By comparing the measurements of these air-shower parameters with the expectations from MC simulations, different hadronic interaction models can be tested at the high-energy regime with the KASCADE-Grande experiment. In this work, the results of a study on the evolution of the muon content of EAS with zenith angle, performed with the KASCADE-Grande instrument, is presented. Measurements are compared with predictions from MC simulations based on the QGSJET II, QGSJET II-04, SIBYLL 2.1 and EPOS 1.99 hadron...

  2. Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel M. Kaplan; for the MAP; MICE Collaborations

    2014-12-10

    Muon colliders and neutrino factories are attractive options for future facilities aimed at achieving the highest lepton-antilepton collision energies and precision measurements of Higgs boson and neutrino mixing matrix parameters. The facility performance and cost depend on how well a beam of muons can be cooled. Recent progress in muon cooling design studies and prototype tests nourishes the hope that such facilities could be built starting in the coming decade. The status of the key technologies and their various demonstration experiments is summarized. Prospects "post-P5" are also discussed.

  3. The US Muon Accelerator Program (MAP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bross, Alan D.; /Fermilab

    2010-12-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of High Energy Physics has recently approved a Muon Accelerator Program (MAP). The primary goal of this effort is to deliver a Design Feasibility Study for a Muon Collider after a 7 year R&D program. This paper presents a brief physics motivation for, and the description of, a Muon Collider facility and then gives an overview of the program. I will then describe in some detail the primary components of the effort.

  4. The US Muon Accelerator Program (MAP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bross, Alan D.

    2011-10-06

    The US Department of Energy Office of High Energy Physics has recently approved a Muon Accelerator Program (MAP). The primary goal of this effort is to deliver a Design Feasibility Study for a Muon Collider after a 7 year R and D program. This paper presents a brief physics motivation for, and the description of, a Muon Collider facility and then gives an overview of the program. I will then describe in some detail the primary components of the effort.

  5. Muons, gravity and time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis J. M. Farley

    2015-08-14

    In the muon storage rings the muons are subject to a very large radial acceleration. The equivalence principle implies a large gravity force. It has no effect on the muon lifetime.

  6. Precision Muon Reconstruction in Double Chooz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Double Chooz collaboration; Y. Abe; J. C. dos Anjos; J. C. Barriere; E. Baussan; I. Bekman; M. Bergevin; T. J. C. Bezerra; L. Bezrukov; E. Blucher; C. Buck; J. Busenitz; A. Cabrera; E. Caden; L. Camilleri; R. Carr; M. Cerrada; P. -J. Chang; E. Chauveau; P. Chimenti; A. P. Collin; E. Conover; J. M. Conrad; J. I. Crespo-Anadón; K. Crum; A. Cucoanes; E. Damon; J. V. Dawson; D. Dietrich; Z. Djurcic; M. Dracos; M. Elnimr; A. Etenko; M. Fallot; F. von Feilitzsch; J. Felde; S. M. Fernandes; V. Fischer; D. Franco; M. Franke; H. Furuta; I. Gil-Botella; L. Giot; M. Göger-Neff; L. F. G. Gonzalez; L. Goodenough; M. C. Goodman; C. Grant; N. Haag; T. Hara; J. Haser; M. Hofmann; G. A. Horton-Smith; A. Hourlier; M. Ishitsuka; J. Jochum; C. Jollet; F. Kaether; L. N. Kalousis; Y. Kamyshkov; D. M. Kaplan; T. Kawasaki; E. Kemp; H. de Kerret; D. Kryn; M. Kuze; T. Lachenmaier; C. E. Lane; T. Lasserre; A. Letourneau; D. Lhuillier; H. P. Lima Jr; M. Lindner; J. M. López-Casta no; J. M. LoSecco; B. Lubsandorzhiev; S. Lucht; J. Maeda; C. Mariani; J. Maricic; J. Martino; T. Matsubara; G. Mention; A. Meregaglia; T. Miletic; R. Milincic; A. Minotti; Y. Nagasaka; Y. Nikitenko; P. Novella; M. Obolensky; L. Oberauer; A. Onillon; A. Osborn; C. Palomares; I. M. Pepe; S. Perasso; P. Pfahler; A. Porta; G. Pronost; J. Reichenbacher; B. Reinhold; M. Röhling; R. Roncin; S. Roth; B. Rybolt; Y. Sakamoto; R. Santorelli; A. C. Schilithz; S. Schönert; S. Schoppmann; M. H. Shaevitz; R. Sharankova; S. Shimojima; V. Sibille; V. Sinev; M. Skorokhvatov; E. Smith; J. Spitz; A. Stahl; I. Stancu; L. F. F. Stokes; M. Strait; A. Stüken; F. Suekane; S. Sukhotin; T. Sumiyoshi; Y. Sun; R. Svoboda; K. Terao; A. Tonazzo; H. H. Trinh Thi; G. Valdiviesso; N. Vassilopoulos; C. Veyssiere; M. Vivier; S. Wagner; H. Watanabe; C. Wiebusch; L. Winslow; M. Wurm; G. Yang; F. Yermia; V. Zimmer

    2014-08-15

    We describe a muon track reconstruction algorithm for the reactor anti-neutrino experiment Double Chooz. The Double Chooz detector consists of two optically isolated volumes of liquid scintillator viewed by PMTs, and an Outer Veto above these made of crossed scintillator strips. Muons are reconstructed by their Outer Veto hit positions along with timing information from the other two detector volumes. All muons are fit under the hypothesis that they are through-going and ultrarelativistic. If the energy depositions suggest that the muon may have stopped, the reconstruction fits also for this hypothesis and chooses between the two via the relative goodness-of-fit. In the ideal case of a through-going muon intersecting the center of the detector, the resolution is ~40 mm in each transverse dimension. High quality muon reconstruction is an important tool for reducing the impact of the cosmogenic isotope background in Double Chooz.

  7. Primary proton spectrum in the energy range $5-10^3$ TeV from the sea level muon spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Lagutin; A. G. Tyumentsev; A. V. Yushkov

    2005-07-07

    Primary proton spectrum in the energy range $5-10^3$ TeV is reconstructed from the sea level muon spectrum with the use of QGSJET01 and SYBILL2.1 interaction models. Heavier nuclei are taken in accordance with the direct measurements data, 100% uncertainty in helium flux is accounted for. The obtained proton intensity strongly contradicts to the available data of balloon experiments, exceeding them at the least by 100% for QGSJET01. This discrepancy is due to the combined effect of primary nucleon flux underestimation in the direct measurements and incorrect description of extensive air shower development. In the latter case it is required earlier shower development and harder spectra of secondary pions and kaons in comparison with QGSJET01. This conclusion is in agreement with the obtained by the KASCADE group on the basis of events rate study.

  8. Magnets for Muon 6D Cooling Channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Rolland; Flanagan, Gene

    2014-09-10

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), an innovative technique for six-dimensional (6D) cooling of muon beams using a continuous absorber inside superconducting magnets, has shown considerable promise based on analytic and simulation studies. The implementation of this revolutionary method of muon cooling requires high field superconducting magnets that provide superimposed solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole fields. Novel magnet design concepts are required to provide HCC magnet systems with the desired fields for 6D muon beam cooling. New designs feature simple coil configurations that produce these complex fields with the required characteristics, where new high field conductor materials are particularly advantageous. The object of the program was to develop designs and construction methods for HCC magnets and design a magnet system for a 6D muon beam cooling channel. If successful the program would develop the magnet technologies needed to create bright muon beams for many applications ranging from scientific accelerators and storage rings to beams to study material properties and new sources of energy. Examples of these applications include energy frontier muon colliders, Higgs and neutrino factories, stopping muon beams for studies of rare fundamental interactions and muon catalyzed fusion, and muon sources for cargo screening for homeland security.

  9. Muon simulations for Super-Kamiokande, KamLAND, and CHOOZ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Alfred; Horton-Smith, Glenn; Kudryavtsev, Vitaly A.; Tonazzo, Alessandra

    2006-09-01

    Muon backgrounds at Super-Kamiokande, KamLAND, and CHOOZ are calculated using MUSIC. A modified version of the Gaisser sea-level muon distribution and a well-tested Monte Carlo integration method are introduced. Average muon energy, flux, and rate are tabulated. Plots of average energy and angular distributions are given. Implications for muon tracker design in future experiments are discussed.

  10. "Sustainable energy is critical to Canada's economic future." carleton.ca/sustainable-energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Jeff W.

    "Sustainable energy is critical to Canada's economic future." carleton.ca/sustainable-energy GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN SUSTAINABLE ENERGY SHAPE YOUR FUTURE BASED ON YOUR RESEARCH INTERESTS Sustaining programs in sustainable energy address these crucial challenges in a unique interdisciplinary fashion

  11. Critical Decision Handbook | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartmentEnergyEvery Thanksgiving,is designed as a practical

  12. Critical Materials Workshop | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartmentEnergyEvery Thanksgiving,is designed as

  13. Critical Materials Workshop | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartmentEnergyEvery Thanksgiving,is designed asAMO hosted a

  14. Global regularity of critical Schrödinger maps: subthreshold dispersed energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul Smith

    2012-12-19

    We consider the energy-critical Schroedinger map initial value problem with smooth initial data from R^2 into the sphere S^2. Given sufficiently energy-dispersed data with subthreshold energy, we prove that the system admits a unique global smooth solution. This improves earlier analogous conditional results. The key behind this improvement lies in exploiting estimates on the commutator of the Schroedinger map and harmonic map heat flows.

  15. 2011 Critical Materials Strategy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12 Beta-3 Racetracks Y-12SimulationDepartment of Energy 201112011

  16. Critical Materials Hub | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electric vehicle (PEV)Day-June2012environment 3D printer laser deposition

  17. Search for high-energy muon neutrinos from the"naked-eye" GRB080319B with the IceCube neutrino telescope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IceCube Collaboration; R. Abbasi

    2009-02-01

    We report on a search with the IceCube detector for high-energy muon neutrinos from GRB080319B, one of the brightest gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) ever observed. The fireball model predicts that a mean of 0.12 events should be detected by IceCube for a bulk Lorentz boost of the jet of 300. In both the direct on-time window of 66 s and an extended window of about 300 s around the GRB, there was no excess found above the background. The 90% C.L. upper limit on the number of track-like events from the GRB is 2.7, corresponding to a muon neutrino fluence limit of 9.0 x 10{sup -3} erg cm{sup -2} in the energy range between 145 TeV and 2.1 PeV, which contains 90% of the expected events.

  18. SEARCH FOR HIGH-ENERGY MUON NEUTRINOS FROM THE 'NAKED-EYE' GRB 080319B WITH THE IceCube NEUTRINO TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbasi, R.; Aguilar, J. A.; Andeen, K.; Baker, M.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Adams, J.; Ahlers, M.; Auffenberg, J.; Becker, K.-H.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Bay, R.; Alba, J. L. Bazo; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Berdermann, J.; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J. J.; Bechet, S.; Becker, J. K.

    2009-08-20

    We report on a search with the IceCube detector for high-energy muon neutrinos from GRB 080319B, one of the brightest gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) ever observed. The fireball model predicts that a mean of 0.1 events should be detected by IceCube for a bulk Lorentz boost of the jet of 300. In both the direct on-time window of 66 s and an extended window of about 300 s around the GRB, no excess was found above background. The 90% CL upper limit on the number of track-like events from the GRB is 2.7, corresponding to a muon neutrino fluence limit of 9.5 x 10{sup -3} erg cm{sup -2} in the energy range between 120 TeV and 2.2 PeV, which contains 90% of the expected events.

  19. A controlling norm for energy-critical Schrödinger maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin Dodson; Paul Smith

    2013-02-15

    We consider energy-critical Schroedinger maps with target either the sphere S^2 or hyperbolic plane H^2 and establish that a unique solution may be continued so long as a certain space-time L^4 norm remains bounded. This reduces the large data global wellposedness problem to that of controlling this norm.

  20. U.S. Department of Energy - Critical Materials Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-12-01

    The Critical Materials Strategy builds on the Department’s previous work in this area and provides a foundation for future action. This Strategy is a first step toward a comprehensive response to the challenges before us. We hope it will also encourage others to engage in a dialogue about these issues and work together to achieve our Nation’s clean energy goals.

  1. Muon Cooling Progress and Prospects for an S-channel Muon Collider Higgs Factory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummings, Mary Anne

    2015-01-01

    Muon-based accelerators have the potential to enable facilities at both the Intensity and the Energy Frontiers. Muon storage rings can serve as high precision neutrino sources, and a muon collider is an ideal technology for a TeV or multi-TeV collider. Progress in muon accelerator designs has advanced steadily in recent years. In regard to 6D muon cooling, detailed and realistic designs now exist that provide more than 5 order-of-magnitude emittance reduction. Furthermore, detector performance studies indicate that with suitable pixelation and timing resolution, backgrounds in the collider detectors can be significantly reduced thus enabling high quality physics results. Thanks to these and other advances in design and simulation of muon systems, technology development, and systems demonstrations, muon storage-ring-based neutrino sources and a muon collider appear more feasible than ever before. A muon collider is now arguably among the most compelling approaches to a multi-TeV lepton collider and an S-Channe...

  2. Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) - A critical evaluation by LCA and recommendations for improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Sebastien; Abeck, Heike; Bali, Nishil; Horvath, Arpad

    2007-01-01

    and Environmental Design (LEED): A critical evaluation byand Environmental Design (LEED) A critical evaluation by LCAGoal, Scope and Background. LEED (Leadership in Energy and

  3. Semi-classical Analysis of Spin Systems near Critical Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedro Ribeiro; Thierry Paul

    2008-06-19

    The spectral properties of $su(2)$ Hamiltonians are studied for energies near the critical classical energy $\\epsilon_c$ for which the corresponding classical dynamics presents hyperbolic points (HP). A general method leading to an algebraic relation for eigenvalues in the vicinity of $\\epsilon_c$ is obtained in the thermodynamic limit, when the semi-classical parameter $n^{-1}=(2s)^{-1}$ goes to zero (where $s$ is the total spin of the system). Two applications of this method are given and compared with numerics. Matrix elements of observables, computed between states with energy near $\\epsilon_c$, are also computed and shown to be in agreement with the numerical results.

  4. U.S. Department of Energy Critical Materials Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, D.; Diamond, D.; Li, J.; Sandalow, D.; Telleen, P.; Wanner, B.

    2010-12-01

    This report examines the role of rare earth metals and other materials in the clean energy economy. It was prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) based on data collected and research performed during 2010. Its main conclusions include: (a) Several clean energy technologies -- including wind turbines, electric vehicles, photovoltaic cells and fluorescent lighting -- use materials at risk of supply disruptions in the short term. Those risks will generally decrease in the medium and long term. (b) Clean energy technologies currently constitute about 20 percent of global consumption of critical materials. As clean energy technologies are deployed more widely in the decades ahead, their share of global consumption of critical materials will likely grow. (c) Of the materials analyzed, five rare earth metals (dysprosium, neodymium, terbium, europium and yttrium), as well as indium, are assessed as most critical in the short term. For this purpose, 'criticality' is a measure that combines importance to the clean energy economy and risk of supply disruption. (d) Sound policies and strategic investments can reduce the risk of supply disruptions, especially in the medium and long term. (e) Data with respect to many of the issues considered in this report are sparse. In the report, DOE describes plans to (i) develop its first integrated research agenda addressing critical materials, building on three technical workshops convened by the Department during November and December 2010; (ii) strengthen its capacity for information-gathering on this topic; and (iii) work closely with international partners, including Japan and Europe, to reduce vulnerability to supply disruptions and address critical material needs. DOE will work with other stakeholders -- including interagency colleagues, Congress and the public -- to shape policy tools that strengthen the United States' strategic capabilities. DOE also announces its plan to develop an updated critical materials strategy, based upon additional events and information, by the end of 2011.DOE's strategy with respect to critical materials rests on three pillars. First, diversified global supply chains are essential. To manage supply risk, multiple sources of materials are required. This means taking steps to facilitate extraction, processing and manufacturing here in the United States, as well as encouraging other nations to expedite alternative supplies. In all cases, extraction and processing should be done in an environmentally sound manner. Second, substitutes must be developed. Research leading to material and technology substitutes will improve flexibility and help meet the material needs of the clean energy economy. Third, recycling, reuse and more efficient use could significantly lower world demand for newly extracted materials. Research into recycling processes coupled with well-designed policies will help make recycling economically viable over time.The scope of this report is limited. It does not address the material needs of the entire economy, the entire energy sector or even all clean energy technologies. Time and resource limitations precluded a comprehensive scope. Among the topics that merit additional research are the use of rare earth metals in catalytic converters and in petroleum refining. These topics are discussed briefly in Chapter 2.

  5. Chapter 12. The Muon Kicker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory - Experiment 821

    per fill with direct muon injection, compared to pion injection. The disadvantage of direct muonChapter 12. The Muon Kicker Revised September 1994 12.1. Introduction and Overview Direct muon injection into the storage ring is accomplished by giving the muon beam a 10 milliradian kick at a quarter

  6. Measurements of integral muon intensity at large zenith angles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. N. Dmitrieva; D. V. Chernov; R. P. Kokoulin; K. G. Kompaniets; G. Mannocchi; A. A. Petrukhin; O. Saavedra; V. V. Shutenko; D. A. Timashkov; G. Trinchero; I. I. Yashin

    2006-11-28

    High-statistics data on near-horizontal muons collected with Russian-Italian coordinate detector DECOR are analyzed. Precise measurements of muon angular distributions in zenith angle interval from 60 to 90 degrees have been performed. In total, more than 20 million muons are selected. Dependences of the absolute integral muon intensity on zenith angle for several threshold energies ranging from 1.7 GeV to 7.2 GeV are derived. Results for this region of zenith angles and threshold energies have been obtained for the first time. The dependence of integral intensity on zenith angle and threshold energy is well fitted by a simple analytical formula.

  7. Progress on muon{sup +}muon{sup {minus}} colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, R.B.

    1997-05-01

    Advantages and disadvantages of muon colliders are discussed. Recent results of calculations of the radiation hazard from muon decay neutrinos are presented. This is a significant problem for machines with center of mass energy of 4 TeV, but of no consequence for lower energies. Plans are outlined for future theoretical and experimental studies. Besides continued work on the parameters of a 4 TeV collider, studies are now starting on a machine near 100 GeV that could be a factory for the s-channel production of Higgs particles. Proposals are also presented for a demonstration of ionization cooling and of the required targeting, pion capture, and phase rotation rf.

  8. CHARACTERISTICS OF MUON PAIR PRODUCTION IN P-P COLLISIONS AT VERY HIGH ENERGIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of corrections necessary for measurements made with nuclear targets. Cross-sections are given for J of scaling violation is seen in a comparison with lower energy data. The measured cross-section is found of Philosophy ABSTRACT The reaction P + P + + + (anything) has been measured at the CERN Intersecting Storage

  9. Muons and Neutrinos 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser

    2008-01-29

    This paper is the written version of the rapporteur talk on Section HE-2, muons and neutrinos, presented at the 30th International Cosmic Ray Conference, Merida, Yucatan, July 11, 2007. Topics include atmospheric muons and neutrinos, solar neutrinos and astrophysical neutrinos as well as calculations and instrumentation related to these topics.

  10. Global well-posedness and scattering in the energy space for critical ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Global well-posedness and scattering in the energy space for critical nonlinear ... scattering and global L10 spacetime bounds for energy class solutions to the ...

  11. Constraining the fraction of primary gamma rays at ultra-high energies from the muon data of the Yakutsk extensive-air-shower array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Glushkov; D. S. Gorbunov; I. T. Makarov; M. I. Pravdin; G. I. Rubtsov; I. E. Sleptsov; S. V. Troitsky

    2007-01-09

    By making use of the data on the total signal and on the muon component of the air showers detected by the Yakutsk array, we analyze, in the frameworks of the recently suggested event-by-event approach, how large the fraction of primary gamma-rays at ultra-high energies can be. We derive upper limits on the photon fraction in the integral flux of primary cosmic rays. At the 95% confidence level (CL), these limits are 22% for primary energies E_0>4\\cdot 10^{19}eV and 12% for E_0>2\\cdot 10^{19}eV. Despite the presence of muonless events, the data are consistent with complete absence of photons at least at 95% CL. The sensitivity of the results to systematic uncertainties, in particular to those of the energy determination for non-photon primaries, is discussed.

  12. Energy Department Announces Launch of Energy Innovation Hub for Critical

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment ofOffice ofof EnergyPlants"OEEnergyMaterials Research |

  13. Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electric vehicle (PEV)Day-June2012environment 3D printer laserDavid

  14. Measurement of Cosmic-ray Muons and Muon-induced Neutrons in the Aberdeen Tunnel Underground Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blyth, S C; Chen, X C; Chu, M C; Cui, K X; Hahn, R L; Ho, T H; Hsiung, Y B; Hu, B Z; Kwan, K K; Kwok, M W; Kwok, T; Lau, Y P; Leung, J K C; Leung, K Y; Lin, G L; Lin, Y C; Luk, K B; Luk, W H; Ngai, H Y; Ngan, S Y; Pun, C S J; Shih, K; Tam, Y H; Tsang, R H M; Wang, C H; Wong, C M; Wong, H L; Wong, K K; Yeh, M; Zhang, B J

    2015-01-01

    We measured the muon flux and the production rate of muon-induced neutrons at a depth of 611 meters water equivalent. Our apparatus comprises of three layers of crossed plastic scintillator hodoscopes for tracking the incident cosmic-ray muons, and 760 L of gadolinium-doped liquid scintillator for both neutron production and detection targets. The vertical muon intensity was measured to be $I_{\\mu}$ = (5.7 $\\pm$ 0.6) $\\times$ 10$^{-6}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ sr$^{-1}$. The muon-induced neutron yield in the liquid scintillator was determined to be $Y_{n}$ = (1.19 $\\pm$ 0.08(stat.) $\\pm$ 0.21(syst.)) $\\times$ 10$^{-4}$ neutrons / ($\\mu$ g cm$^{-2}$). A fitting to recently measured neutron yields at different depths gave a muon energy dependence of $\\left\\langle E_{\\mu} \\right\\rangle^{0.76 \\pm 0.03}$ for scintillator targets.

  15. Guidelines for Preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations at Department of Energy Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-02-07

    This standard provides a framework for generating Criticality Safety Evaluations (CSE) supporting fissionable material operations at Department of Energy (DOE) nonreactor nuclear facilities. This standard imposes no new criticality safety analysis requirements.

  16. Performance of the CLEO III LiF-TEA Ring Imaging Cherenkov Detector in a High Energy Muon Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Artuso, M; Azfar, F; Efimov, A; Kopp, S E; Mountain, R; Majumder, G; Schuh, S; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Viehhauser, G; Wang, J C; Coan, T E; Fadeev, V; Volobuev, I P; Ye, J; Anderson, S; Kubota, Y; Smith, A; Lipeles, E

    2000-01-01

    The CLEO III Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector uses LiF radiators to generate Cherenkov photons which are then detected by proportional wire chambers using a mixture of CH$_4$ and TEA gases. The first two photon detector modules which were constructed, were taken to Fermilab and tested in a beam dump that provided high momentum muons. We report on results using both plane and "sawtooth" shaped radiators. Specifically, we discuss the number of photoelectrons observed per ring and the angular resolution. The particle separation ability is shown to be sufficient for the physics of CLEO III.

  17. Performance of the CLEO III LiF-TEA Ring Imaging Cherenkov Detector in a High Energy Muon Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Artuso; R. Ayad; F. Azfar; A. Efimov; S. Kopp; R. Mountain; G. Majumder; S. Schuh; T. Skwarnicki; S. Stone; G. Viehhauser; J. C. Wang; T. Coan; V. Fadeyev; I. Volobouev; J. Ye; S. Anderson; Y. Kubota; A. Smith; E. Lipeles

    1999-10-26

    The CLEO III Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector uses LiF radiators to generate Cherenkov photons which are then detected by proportional wire chambers using a mixture of CH$_4$ and TEA gases. The first two photon detector modules which were constructed, were taken to Fermilab and tested in a beam dump that provided high momentum muons. We report on results using both plane and "sawtooth" shaped radiators. Specifically, we discuss the number of photoelectrons observed per ring and the angular resolution. The particle separation ability is shown to be sufficient for the physics of CLEO III.

  18. A parameterisation of single and multiple muons in the deep water or ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annarita Margiotta

    2006-02-01

    A new parameterisation of atmospheric muons deep underwater (or ice) is presented. It takes into account the simultaneous arrival of muons in bundle giving the multiplicity of the events and the muon energy spectrum as a function of their lateral distribution in a shower.

  19. Constraints on muon-specific dark forces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savely G. Karshenboim; David McKeen; Maxim Pospelov

    2014-01-23

    The recent measurement of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen allows for the most precise extraction of the charge radius of the proton which is currently in conflict with other determinations based on $e-p$ scattering and hydrogen spectroscopy. This discrepancy could be the result of some new muon-specific force with O(1-100) MeV force carrier---in this paper we concentrate on vector mediators. Such an explanation faces challenges from the constraints imposed by the $g-2$ of the muon and electron as well as precision spectroscopy of muonic atoms. In this work we complement the family of constraints by calculating the contribution of hypothetical forces to the muonium hyperfine structure. We also compute the two-loop contribution to the electron parity violating amplitude due to a muon loop, which is sensitive to the muon axial-vector coupling. Overall, we find that the combination of low-energy constraints favors the mass of the mediator to be below 10 MeV, and that a certain degree of tuning is required between vector and axial-vector couplings of new vector particles to muons in order to satisfy constraints from muon $g-2$. However, we also observe that in the absence of a consistent standard model embedding, high energy weak-charged processes accompanied by the emission of new vector particles are strongly enhanced by $(E/m_V)^2$, with $E$ a characteristic energy scale and $m_V$ the mass of the mediator. In particular, leptonic $W$ decays impose the strongest constraints on such models completely disfavoring the remainder of the parameter space.

  20. Electrons from Muon Decay in Bound State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rashid M. Djilkibaev; Rostislav V. Konoplich

    2009-02-12

    We present results of a study of the muon decay in orbit (DIO) contribution to the signal region of muon - electron conversion. Electrons from DIO are the dominant source of background for muon - electron conversion experiments because the endpoint of DIO electrons is the same as the energy of electrons from elastic muon - electron conversion. The probability of DIO contribution to the signal region was considered for a tracker with Gaussian resolution function and with a realistic resolution function obtained in the application of pattern recognition and momentum reconstruction Kalman filter based procedure to GEANT simulated DIO events. It is found that the existence of non Gaussian tails in the realistic resolution function does not lead to a significant increase in DIO contribution to the signal region. The probability of DIO contribution to the calorimeter signal was studied in dependence on the resolution, assuming a Gaussian resolution function of calorimeter. In this study the geometrical acceptance played an important role, suppressing DIO contribution of the intermediate range electrons from muon decay in orbit.

  1. Study of high pressure gas filled RF cavities for muon collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yonehara, Katsuya

    2015-01-01

    Muon collider is a considerable candidate of the next-generation high-energy lepton collider machine. Operating an RF cavity in a multi-Tesla magnet is a critical requirement in a muon accelerator and a cooling channel. However, the maximum RF gradient in a vacuum RF cavity is strongly limited by an external magnetic field. Dense hydrogen gas filled RF cavity has been proposed since it is functional of generating a high RF accelerating gradient in a strong magnetic field and making an ionization cooling process at the same time. A critical issue of the cavity is a beam- induced plasma that consumes a considerable amount of RF power. The gas filled RF test cell was made and measured the RF loading due to a beam-induced plasma by using an intense proton beam at Fermilab. By doping an electronegative gas in dense hydrogen, the plasma loading effect is significantly mitigated. The result shows that the cavity is functional with a muon collider beam. Recent progress is shown in this presentation.

  2. Energy: Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of the National Infrastructure Protection Plan (NIPP) Base Plan, a comprehensive risk management framework that defines critical infrastructure protection (CIP) roles and...

  3. Stochastic Cooling in Muon Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barletta, W.A.

    2008-01-01

    Research Division Stochastic Cooling in Muon Colliders W.A.AC03-76SFOOO98. STOCHASTIC COOLING IN MUON COLLIDERS Williamcan consider the stochastic cooling option as more than a

  4. PHYSICAL REVIEW D VOLUME 53, NUMBER 1 1 JANUARY 1996 Measurement of the negative muon spectrum between 0.3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morselli, Aldo

    Particle Astrophysics Labor&y, New Mexico State University, Las Cmes, New Mexico 88003 M. P. De Pascale, A is momentum dependent; the low energy muon flux peaks around 150 g/cm' and higher energy muons penetrate calculations has created a renewed interest in the muon spectra as a function of the atmospheric depth (e

  5. Muon Cooling Channels Eberhard Keil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keil, Eberhard

    Muon Cooling Channels Eberhard Keil Katharinenstr. 17, DE-10711 Berlin, Germany Abstract Parameters of muon cooling channels are discussed that achieve cooling of a muon beam from initial to final emittances in all three degrees of freedom in a given length. Published theories of ionisation cooling yield

  6. SMOOTH TYPE II BLOW UP SOLUTIONS TO THE FOUR DIMENSIONAL ENERGY CRITICAL WAVE EQUATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raphaël, Pierre

    SMOOTH TYPE II BLOW UP SOLUTIONS TO THE FOUR DIMENSIONAL ENERGY CRITICAL WAVE EQUATION MATTHIEU HILLAIRET AND PIERRE RAPHA¨EL Abstract. We exhibit C type II blow up solutions to the focusing energy critical wave equation in dimension N = 4. These solutions admit near blow up time a decomposiiton u(t, x

  7. Edinburgh Research Explorer Influencing household energy practices: a critical review of UK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    Edinburgh Research Explorer Influencing household energy practices: a critical review of UK smart & Webb, J 2014, 'Influencing household energy practices: a critical review of UK smart metering standards Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/ licenses/by/3.0), which permits unrestricted use

  8. Measurement of the Positive Muon Lifetime and Determination of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    measured. The experiment used a time-structured, low-energy muon beam and a segmented plastic scintillator array to record more than 2x10sup 12 decays. Two different stopping...

  9. CROSS SECTION MEASUREMENTS FOR CHARM PRODUCTION BY MUONS AND PHOTONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, A.R.

    2013-01-01

    Production by Muons and Photons A.Rc Clark, K.J, Johnson,section for 178(100)-GeV photons is 750 _ ) nb, too small tohigh-energy rise in the photon-nucleon total cross sectiono

  10. Performance of the ATLAS muon trigger in pp collisions at ?s = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-03-13

    The performance of the ATLAS muon trigger system is evaluated with proton–proton collision data collected in 2012 at the Large Hadron Collider at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. It is primarily evaluated using events containing a pair of muons from the decay of Z bosons. The efficiency of the single-muon trigger is measured for muons with transverse momentum 25 T more »top quarks. The muon trigger shows highly uniform and stable performance. Thus, the performance is compared to the prediction of a detailed simulation.« less

  11. Muon acceleration in cosmic-ray sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, Spencer R.; Mikkelsen, Rune E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Becker Tjus, Julia [Fakultät für Physik and Astronomie, Theoretische Physik I, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2013-12-20

    Many models of ultra-high energy cosmic-ray production involve acceleration in linear accelerators located in gamma-ray bursts, magnetars, or other sources. These transient sources have short lifetimes, which necessitate very high accelerating gradients, up to 10{sup 13} keV cm{sup –1}. At gradients above 1.6 keV cm{sup –1}, muons produced by hadronic interactions undergo significant acceleration before they decay. This muon acceleration hardens the neutrino energy spectrum and greatly increases the high-energy neutrino flux. Using the IceCube high-energy diffuse neutrino flux limits, we set two-dimensional limits on the source opacity and matter density, as a function of accelerating gradient. These limits put strong constraints on different models of particle acceleration, particularly those based on plasma wake-field acceleration, and limit models for sources like gamma-ray bursts and magnetars.

  12. The muon system of the Daya Bay Reactor antineutrino experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daya Bay Collaboration

    2014-11-28

    The Daya Bay experiment consists of functionally identical antineutrino detectors immersed in pools of ultrapure water in three well-separated underground experimental halls near two nuclear reactor complexes. These pools serve both as shields against natural, low-energy radiation, and as water Cherenkov detectors that efficiently detect cosmic muons using arrays of photomultiplier tubes. Each pool is covered by a plane of resistive plate chambers as an additional means of detecting muons. Design, construction, operation, and performance of these muon detectors are described.

  13. The Muon System of the Daya Bay Reactor Antineutrino Experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    An, F. P.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Brown, R. E.; Chasman, C.; Dale, E.; Diwan, M. V.; Gill, R.; Hans, S.; Isvan, Z.; Jaffe, D. E.; Kettell, S. H.; Littenberg, L.; Pearson, C. E.; Qian, X.; Theman, H.; Viren, B.; Worcester, E.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, C.

    2015-02-01

    The Daya Bay experiment consists of functionally identical antineutrino detectors immersed in pools of ultrapure water in three well-separated underground experimental halls near two nuclear reactor complexes. These pools serve both as shields against natural, low-energy radiation, and as water Cherenkov detectors that efficiently detect cosmic muons using arrays of photomultiplier tubes. Each pool is covered by a plane of resistive plate chambers as an additional means of detecting muons. Design, construction, operation, and performance of these muon detectors are described. (auth)

  14. The Muon System of the Daya Bay Reactor Antineutrino Experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    An, F. P.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Brown, R. E.; Chasman, C.; Dale, E.; Diwan, M. V.; Gill, R.; Hans, S.; Isvan, Z.; Jaffe, D. E.; et al

    2014-10-05

    The Daya Bay experiment consists of functionally identical antineutrino detectors immersed in pools of ultrapure water in three well-separated underground experimental halls near two nuclear reactor complexes. These pools serve both as shields against natural, low-energy radiation, and as water Cherenkov detectors that efficiently detect cosmic muons using arrays of photomultiplier tubes. Each pool is covered by a plane of resistive plate chambers as an additional means of detecting muons. Design, construction, operation, and performance of these muon detectors are described. (auth)

  15. Search for high-energy muon neutrinos from the "naked-eye" GRB080319B with the IceCube neutrino telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbasi, R.; IceCube Collaboration

    2009-01-01

    muon neutrinos from the “naked-eye” GRB 080319B with themuon neutrinos from the “naked-eye” GRB080319B with theof 5.3 even visible to the naked eye for a short period of

  16. Muon Acceleration with RLA and Non-scaling FFAG Arcs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasiliy Morozov,Alex Bogacz,Dejan Trbojevic

    2010-05-01

    Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA) are the most likely means to achieve the rapid acceleration of shortlived muons to multi-GeV energies required for Neutrino Factories and TeV energies required for Muon Colliders. In this paper, we present a novel return-arc optics design based on a Non Scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (NS-FFAG) lattice that allows 5 and 9 GeV/c muons of both charges to be transported in the same string of magnets. The return arcs are made up of super cells with each super cell consisting of three triplets. By employing combined function magnets with dipole, quadrupole, sextupole and octupole magnetic field components, each super cell is designed to be achromatic and to have zero initial and final periodic orbit offsets for both 5 and 9 GeV/c muon momenta. This solution would reduce the number of arcs by a factor of 2, simplifying the overall design.

  17. Muon acceleration with RLA and non-scaling FFAG ARCS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morozov, V.S.; Trbojevic, D.; Bogacz, A.

    2010-05-23

    Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA) are the most likely means to achieve the rapid acceleration of short-lived muons to multi-GeV energies required for Neutrino Factories and TeV energies required for Muon Colliders. In this paper, we present a novel return-arc optics design based on a Non Scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (NS-FFAG) lattice that allows 5 and 9 GeV/c muons of both charges to be transported in the same string of magnets. The return arcs are made up of super cells with each super cell consisting of three triplets. By employing combined function magnets with dipole, quadrupole, sextupole and octupole magnetic field components, each super cell is designed to be achromatic and to have zero initial and final periodic orbit offsets for both 5 and 9 GeV/c muon momenta. This solution would reduce the number of arcs by a factor of 2, simplifying the overall design.

  18. The Muon g2 Experiment at Gerry Bunce for the Muon g2 Collaboration 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory - Experiment 821

    )=2. a is approximately 0.001 for the muon (and electron). Standard Model contributions come from electromagnetic be obtained from measurements of e + e \\Gamma !hadrons, measured now very accurately at lower center of mass energies in the VEPP2M machine at Novosibirsk. [2] The present theoretical error on g­2 is \\Sigma0:7 ppm

  19. High field solenoids for muon cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Field Solenoids for Muon Cooling M. A. Green a , Y. EyssaField Solenoids for Muon Cooling · M. A. Green a, Y. EyssaABSTRA CT The proposed cooling system for the muon collider

  20. Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Policy & International Affairs Why does it matter? Four clean energy technologies-wind turbines, electric vehicles, photovoltaic cells and fluorescent lighting-use materials at...

  1. Muons for a Neutrino Factory and a Muon Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    @princeton.edu Fact'99, Lyon, France July 6, 1999 Muon Collider main page: http://www.cap.bnl.gov/mumu/mu home page the proton requirements. · Goal: 0.1/p delivered for physics use. 2 #12;The Muon Source · Pion production beam pulse shock heating of target. ­ Resulting pressure wave may disperse liquid (or crack solid

  2. Electron-Muon Ranger: performance in the MICE Muon Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Adams; A. Alekou; M. Apollonio; R. Asfandiyarov; G. Barber; P. Barclay; A. de Bari; R. Bayes; V. Bayliss; P. Bene; R. Bertoni; V. J. Blackmore; A. Blondel; S. Blot; M. Bogomilov; M. Bonesini; C. N. Booth; D. Bowring; S. Boyd; T. W. Bradshaw; U. Bravar; A. D. Bross; F. Cadoux; M. Capponi; T. Carlisle; G. Cecchet; C. Charnley; F. Chignoli; D. Cline; J. H. Cobb; G. Colling; N. Collomb; L. Coney; P. Cooke; M. Courthold; L. M. Cremaldi; S. Debieux; A. DeMello; A. Dick; A. Dobbs; P. Dornan; F. Drielsma; F. Filthaut; T. Fitzpatrick; P. Franchini; V. Francis; L. Fry; A. Gallagher; R. Gamet; R. Gardener; S. Gourlay; A. Grant; J. S. Graulich; J. Greis; S. Griffiths; P. Hanlet; O. M. Hansen; G. G. Hanson; T. L. Hart; T. Hartnett; T. Hayler; C. Heidt; M. Hills; P. Hodgson; C. Hunt; C. Husi; A. Iaciofano; S. Ishimoto; G. Kafka; D. M. Kaplan; Y. Karadzhov; Y. K. Kim; Y. Kuno; P. Kyberd; J-B Lagrange; J. Langlands; W. Lau; M. Leonova; D. Li; A. Lintern; M. Littlefield; K. Long; T. Luo; C. Macwaters; B. Martlew; J. Martyniak; F. Masciocchi; R. Mazza; S. Middleton; A. Moretti; A. Moss; A. Muir; I. Mullacrane; J. J. Nebrensky; D. Neuffer; A. Nichols; R. Nicholson; L. Nicola; E. Noah Messomo; J. C. Nugent; A. Oates; Y. Onel; D. Orestano; E. Overton; P. Owens; V. Palladino; J. Pasternak; F. Pastore; C. Pidcott; M. Popovic; R. Preece; S. Prestemon; D. Rajaram; S. Ramberger; M. A. Rayner; S. Ricciardi; T. J. Roberts; M. Robinson; C. Rogers; K. Ronald; K. Rothenfusser; P. Rubinov; P. Rucinski; H. Sakamato; D. A. Sanders; R. Sandstrom; E. Santos; T. Savidge; P. J. Smith; P. Snopok; F. J. P. Soler; D. Speirs; T. Stanley; G. Stokes; D. J. Summers; J. Tarrant; I. Taylor; L. Tortora; Y. Torun; R. Tsenov; C. D. Tunnell; M. A. Uchida; G. Vankova-Kirilova; S. Virostek; M. Vretenar; P. Warburton; S. Watson; C. White; C. G. Whyte; A. Wilson; H. Wisting; X. Yang; A. Young; M. Zisman

    2015-11-03

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a detailed study of ionization cooling to evaluate the feasibility of the technique. To carry out this program, MICE requires an efficient particle-identification (PID) system to identify muons. The Electron-Muon Ranger (EMR) is a fully-active tracking-calorimeter that forms part of the PID system and tags muons that traverse the cooling channel without decaying. The detector is capable of identifying electrons with an efficiency of 98.6%, providing a purity for the MICE beam that exceeds 99.8%. The EMR also proved to be a powerful tool for the reconstruction of muon momenta in the range 100-280 MeV/$c$.

  3. Electron-Muon Ranger: performance in the MICE Muon Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, D; Apollonio, M; Asfandiyarov, R; Barber, G; Barclay, P; de Bari, A; Bayes, R; Bayliss, V; Bene, P; Bertoni, R; Blackmore, V J; Blondel, A; Blot, S; Bogomilov, M; Bonesini, M; Booth, C N; Bowring, D; Boyd, S; Brashaw, T W; Bravar, U; Bross, A D; Cadoux, F; Capponi, M; Carlisle, T; Cecchet, G; Charnley, C; Chignoli, F; Cline, D; Cobb, J H; Colling, G; Collomb, N; Coney, L; Cooke, P; Courthold, M; Cremaldi, L M; Debieux, S; DeMello, A; Dick, A; Dobbs, A; Dornan, P; Drielsma, F; Filthaut, F; Fitzpatrick, T; Franchini, P; Francis, V; Freemire, B; Fry, L; Gallagher, A; Gamet, R; Gardener, R; Gourlay, S; Grant, A; Graulich, J S; Greis, J; Griffiths, S; Hanlet, P; Hansen, O M; Hanson, G G; Hart, T L; Hartnett, T; Hayler, T; Heidt, C; Hills, M; Hodgson, P; Hunt, C; Husi, C; Iaciofano, A; Ishimoto, S; Kafka, G; Kaplan, D M; Karadzhov, Y; Kim, Y K; Kuno, Y; Kyberd, P; Lagrange, J-B; Langlands, J; Lau, W; Leonova, M; Li, D; Lintern, A; Littlefield, M; Long, K; Luo, T; Macwaters, C; Martlew, B; Martyniak, J; Masciocchi, F; Mazza, R; Middleton, S; Moretti, A; Moss, A; Muir, A; Mullacrane, I; Nebrensky, J J; Neuffer, D; Nichols, A; Nicholson, R; Nicola, L; Messomo, E Noah; Nugent, J C; Oates, A; Onel, Y; Orestano, D; Overton, E; Owens, P; Palladino, V; Pasternak, J; Pastore, F; Pidcott, C; Popovic, M; Preece, R; Prestemon, S; Rajaram, D; Ramberger, S; Rayner, M A; Ricciardi, S; Roberts, T J; Robinson, M; Rogers, C; Ronald, K; Rothenfusser, K; Rubinov, P; Rucinski, P; Sakamato, H; Sanders, D A; Sandstrom, R; Santos, E; Savidge, T; Smith, P J; Snopok, P; Soler, F J P; Speirs, D; Stanley, T; Stokes, G; Summers, D J; Tarrant, J; Taylor, I; Tortora, L; Torun, Y; Tsenov, R; Tunnell, C D; Uchida, M A; Vankova-Kirilova, G; Virostek, S; Vretenar, M; Warburton, P; Watson, S; White, C; Whyte, C G; Wilson, A; Wisting, H; Yang, X; Young, A; Zisman, M

    2015-01-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a detailed study of ionization cooling to evaluate the feasibility of the technique. To carry out this program, MICE requires an efficient particle-identification (PID) system to identify muons. The Electron-Muon Ranger (EMR) is a fully-active tracking-calorimeter that forms part of the PID system and tags muons that traverse the cooling channel without decaying. The detector is capable of identifying electrons with an efficiency of 98.6%, providing a purity for the MICE beam that exceeds 99.8%. The EMR also proved to be a powerful tool for the reconstruction of muon momenta in the range 100-280 MeV/$c$.

  4. Measurement of muon plus proton final states in $\

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walton, T; Aliaga, L; Altinok, O; Bodek, A; Bravar, A; Budd, H; Bustamante, M J; Butkevich, A; Caicedo, D A Martinez; Carneiro, M F; Castromonte, C M; Christy, M E; Chvojka, J; da Motta, H; Datta, M; Devan, J; Dytman, S A; Díaz, G A; Eberly, B; Felix, J; Fields, L; Fine, R; Fiorentini, G A; Gago, A M; Gallagher, H; Gran, R; Harris, D A; Higuera, A; Hurtado, K; Kleykamp, J; Kordosky, M; Kulagin, S A; Le, T; Maher, E; Manly, S; Mann, W A; Marshall, C M; Mari, C Martin; McFarland, K S; McGivern, C L; McGowan, A M; Messerly, B; Miller, J; Mislivec, A; Morfín, J G; Mousseau, J; Muhlbeier, T; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Norrick, A; Osta, J; Paolone, V; Park, J; Patrick, C E; Perdue, G N; Rakotondravohitra, L; Ransome, R D; Ray, H; Ren, L; Rodrigues, P A; Schellman, H; Schmitz, D W; Simon, C; Snider, F D; Sobczyk, J T; Salinas, C J Solano; Tagg, N; Tice, B G; Valencia, E; Wolcott, J; Wospakrik, M; Zavala, G; Zhang, D; Ziemer, B P

    2014-01-01

    A study of charged-current muon neutrino scattering on hydrocarbon in which the final state includes a muon and a proton and no pions is presented. Although this signature has the topology of neutrino quasielastic scattering from neutrons, the event sample contains contributions from both quasielastic and inelastic processes where pions are absorbed in the nucleus. The analysis accepts events with muon production angles up to 70$^{\\circ}$ and proton kinetic energies greater than 110~MeV. The extracted cross section, when based completely on hadronic kinematics, is well-described by a simple relativistic Fermi gas nuclear model including the neutrino event generator modeling for inelastic processes and particle transportation through the nucleus. This is in contrast to the quasielastic cross section based on muon kinematics, which is best described by an extended model that incorporates multi-nucleon correlations. This measurement guides the formulation of a complete description of neutrino-nucleus interaction...

  5. Muon Pair Production in ep Collisions at HERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aktas, A; Anthonis, T; Asmone, A; Babaev, A; Backovic, S; Bähr, J; Baranov, P; Barrelet, E; Bartel, Wulfrin; Baumgartner, S; Becker, J; Beckingham, M; Behnke, O; Behrendt, O; Belousov, A; Berger, C; Berger, N; Berndt, T; Bizot, J C; Böhme, J; Boenig, M O; Boudry, V; Bracinik, J; Braunschweig, W; Brisson, V; Broker, H B; Brown, D P; Bruncko, Dusan; Büsser, F W; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Caron, S; Cassol-Brunner, F; Cerny, K; Chekelian, V; Collard, Caroline; Contreras, J G; Coppens, Y R; Coughlan, J A; Cousinou, M C; Cox, B E; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Dau, W D; Daum, K; Delcourt, B; Delerue, N; Demirchyan, R; de Roeck, A; Desch, Klaus; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dingfelder, J; Dodonov, V; Dowell, John D; Dubak, A; Duprel, C; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eichler, R; Eisele, F; Ellerbrock, M; Elsen, E; Erdmann, M; Erdmann, W; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Ferencei, J; Fleischer, M; Fleischmann, P; Fleming, Y H; Flucke, G; Flügge, G; Fomenko, A; Foresti, I; Formánek, J; Franke, G; Frising, G; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gabathuler, K; Garvey, J; Gassner, J; Gayler, J; Gerhards, R; Gerlich, C; Ghazaryan, S; Görlich, L; Gogitidze, N; Gorbounov, S; Grab, C; Grabskii, V; Grässler, Herbert; Greenshaw, T; Gregori, M; Grindhammer, G; Haidt, Dieter; Hajduk, L; Haller, J; Heinzelmann, G; Henderson, R C W; Henschel, H; Henshaw, O; Heremans, R; Herrera-Corral, G; Herynek, I; Heuer, R D; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hladky, J; Hoting, P; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R P; Hovhannisyan, A; Ibbotson, M; Ismail, M; Jacquet, M; Janauschek, L; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jönsson, L B; Johnson, C; Johnson, D P; Jung, H; Kant, D; Kapichine, M; Karlsson, M; Katzy, J; Keller, N; Kennedy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, T; Knies, G; Knutsson, A; Koblitz, B; Kolya, S D; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Koutouev, R; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kroseberg, J; Kuckens, J; Kuhr, T; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastoviicka, T; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Leiner, B; Lemrani, R; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; List, B; Lobodzinska, E; Loktionova, N A; López-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Lüders, H; Lüders, S; Lüke, D; Lux, T; Lytkin, L; Makankine, A; Malden, N; Malinovskii, E I; Mangano, S; Marage, P; Marks, J; Marshall, R; Martisikova, M; Martyn, H U; Martyniak, J; Maxfield, S J; Meer, D; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Michine, S; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz, I; Milstead, D; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morozov, I; Morris, J V; Mozer, M; Müller, K; Murn, P; Nagovizin, V; Naroska, Beate; Naumann, J; Naumann, T; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C B; Nikitin, D K; Nowak, G; Nozicka, M; Olivier, B; Olsson, J E; Ossoskov, G; Ozerov, D; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Peez, M; Pérez, E; Perieanu, A; Petrukhin, A; Pitzl, D; Pöschl, R; Portheault, B; Povh, B; Raicevic, N; Rauschenberger, J; Reimer, P; Reisert, B; Risler, C; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A A; Rurikova, Z; Rusakov, S V; Rybicki, K; Sankey, D P C; Sauvan, E; Schatzel, S; Scheins, J; Schilling, F P; Schleper, P; Schmidt, S; Schmitt, S; Schneider, M; Schoeffel, L; Schöning, A; Schröder, V; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schwanenberger, C; Sedlak, K; Sefkow, F; Shevyakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Sirois, Y; Sloan, T; Smirnov, P; Soloviev, Yu; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, A; Spitzer, H; Stamen, R; Stella, B; Stiewe, J; Strauch, I; Straumann, U; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Tomasz, F; Traynor, D; Truöl, P; Tsipolitis, G; Tsurin, I; Turnau, J; Tzamariudaki, E; Uraev, A; Urban, M; Usik, A; Valkár, S; Valkárová, A; Vallée, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vargas-Trevino, A; Vasilev, S; Vazdik, Ya A; Veelken, C; Vest, A; Vichnevski, A; Vinokurova, S; Volchinski, V; Wacker, K; Wagner, J; Waugh, B; Weber, G; Weber, R; Wegener, D; Werner, C; Werner, N; Wessels, M; Wessling, B; Winde, M; Winter, G G; Wissing, C; Woerling, E E; Wünsch, E; Yan, W; Zaicek, J; Zaleisak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhokin, A; Zohrabyan, H G; Zomer, F

    2003-01-01

    Cross sections for the production of two isolated muons up to high di-muon masses are measured in ep collisions at HERA with the H1 detector in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 71 pb^-1 at a centre of mass energy of sqrt{s} = 319 GeV. The results are in good agreement with Standard Model predictions, the dominant process being photon-photon interactions. Additional muons or electrons are searched for in events with two high transverse momentum muons using the full data sample corresponding to 114 pb^-1, where data at sqrt{s} = 301 GeV and sqrt{s} = 319 GeV are combined. Both the di-lepton sample and the tri-lepton sample agree well with the predictions.

  6. Learning Curves For Energy Technology: A Critical Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamasb, Tooraj; Kohler, Jonathan

    hydro 0.48% 2.8% 8 Waste to electricity 41.5% 57.9% 9 Nuclear light water reactor 37.6% 53.2% 10 Wind - onshore 13.1% 15.7% 11 Solar thermal power 2.2% 22.5% 12 Wind – offshore 1.0% 8.3% Table 1: Learning by doing rates using single-factor curves... Farms, Energy Policy, Vol. 33, 133-150. Klassen, G., Miketa, A., Larsen, K., and Sundqvist, T. (2002). The Impact of R&D on Innovation for Wind Energy in Denmark, Germany, and the United Kingdom, paper presented at the International Energy Workshop...

  7. Semi-analytic approximations for production of atmospheric muons and neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser

    2001-04-19

    Simple approximations for fluxes of atmospheric muons and muon neutrinos are developed which display explicitly how the fluxes depend on primary cosmic ray energy and on features of pion production. For energies of approximately 10 GeV and above the results are sufficiently accurate to calculate response functions and to use for estimates of systematic uncertainties.

  8. Energy Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015 Infographic courtesy of the White House.Christopher Russell EnergyEnergy

  9. Increasing Access to Materials Critical to the Clean Energy Economy |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof Energy ServicesContractingManagementSuccess,EnergyServices

  10. A new muon-pion collection and transport system design using superconducting solenoids based on CSNS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Ran; Xu, Wenzhen; Ni, Xiaojie; Pan, Ziwen; Ye, Bangjiao

    2015-01-01

    A new muon and pion capture system was proposed at the under-conduction China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS). Using about 4 % of the pulsed proton beam (1.6 GeV, 4 kW and 1 Hz) of CSNS to bombard a cylindrical graphite target inside a superconducting solenoid both surface muons and pions can be acquired. The acceptance of this novel capture system - a graphite target wrapped up by a superconducting solenoid - is larger than the normal muon beam lines using quadrupoles at one side of the separated muon target. The muon and pion production at different capture magnetic fields was calculated by Geant4, the bending angle of the capture solenoid with respect to the proton beam was also optimized in simulation to achieve more muons and pions and to reduce proton dosages to following beam elements. According to the layout of the muon experimental area reserved at the CSNS project, a preliminary muon beam line was designed with multi-propose muon spin rotation areas(surface, decay and low-energy muons). Finally, hi...

  11. Critical Decision 2 (CD-2) Approval Template | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartmentEnergyEvery Thanksgiving,

  12. Critical_Materials_Summary.pdf | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartmentEnergyEvery Thanksgiving,is designed asAMO

  13. U.S. Department of Energy - Critical Materials Strategy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaicsStateof Energy| DepartmentFuel and15, 2011 U.S.Energy 1

  14. Energy of the excess electron in methane and ethane near the critical point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Findley, Gary L.

    Energy of the excess electron in methane and ethane near the critical point Xianbo Shi a,b , Luxi in ethane are presented as a function of perturber number density at various noncritical temperatures to the simple alka- nes methane and ethane. The quasi-free electron energy V0(P) [9­15] and the electron

  15. Electric Motors and Critical Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatementofApril 25,EVtheEnergy ClimateandMotors and

  16. Energy Department Releases New Critical Materials Strategy | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015 Infographic courtesy ofDepartmentPortland Public SchoolsEnergy New

  17. Secretary Chu Announces Completion of Critical Energy Conservation

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterestedReplacement-2-AA-1 SECTIONEnergyHeavy-Duty TrucksProgramof

  18. Quality Assurance for Critical Decision Reviews RM | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested PartiesBuildingBudget || DepartmentPutting Solar-Services » ProgramQuality

  19. Testing Subgroup Workshop on Critical Property Needs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  20. Iowa lab gets critical materials research center | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

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  1. Department of Energy Releases its 2011 Critical Materials Strategy |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electricLaboratory |EducationDepartment5-3:Washington, D.C. -Department of

  2. Areas of Critical Environmental Concern | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYork Jump| OpenExploration AtArchbaldArdicaabout yourAreas

  3. CHP: Enabling Resilient Energy Infrastructure for Critical Facilities -

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l DeInsulation at04-86) (AllProvision for0 350.1TariffReport, March

  4. CRAD, NNSA - Criticality Safety (CS) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l DeInsulation at04-86)ContractorsCNGFact SLCriticality Safety (CS).

  5. Chu: President's 2013 Energy Budget Makes Critical Investments in

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment of EnergyResearchersOctoberCharles Rousseaux -A. SmithDevelops

  6. Muon Beam Helical Cooling Channel Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Rolland; Ankenbrandt, Charles; Flanagan, G.; Kazakevich, G.M.; Marhauser, Frank; Neubauer, Michael; Roberts, T.; Yoshikawa, C.; Derbenev, Yaroslav; Morozov, Vasiliy; Kashikhin, V.S.; Lopes, Mattlock; Tollestrup, A.; Yonehara, Katsuya; Zloblin, A.

    2013-06-01

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) achieves effective ionization cooling of the six-dimensional (6d) phase space of a muon beam by means of a series of 21st century inventions. In the HCC, hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities enable high RF gradients in strong external magnetic fields. The theory of the HCC, which requires a magnetic field with solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole components, demonstrates that dispersion in the gaseous hydrogen energy absorber provides effective emittance exchange to enable longitudinal ionization cooling. The 10-year development of a practical implementation of a muon-beam cooling device has involved a series of technical innovations and experiments that imply that an HCC of less than 300 m length can cool the 6d emittance of a muon beam by six orders of magnitude. We describe the design and construction plans for a prototype HCC module based on oxygen-doped hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities that are loaded with dielectric, fed by magnetrons, and operate in a superconducting helical solenoid magnet.

  7. Energy of the Quasi-free Electron in Supercritical Krypton near the Critical Point Luxi Li and C. M. Evans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Findley, Gary L.

    Energy of the Quasi-free Electron in Supercritical Krypton near the Critical Point Luxi Li and C. M by the quasi-free electron that arises from field ionization of the dopant, and the zero point kinetic energy of the free electron. The overall decrease in the shift of the dopant ionization energy near the critical

  8. The Muon Anomalous Magnetic Moment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc Knecht

    2014-12-03

    The calculations entering the prediction of the standard model value for the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon $a_\\mu$ are reviewed, and compared to the very accurate experimental measurement. The situation for the electron is discussed in parallel.

  9. Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science Seminar Series Polymer Membranes for Energy and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    and barrier packaging. His research group focuses on structure/property correlation development for Excellence in Industrial Gases Technology (2008), and the Strategic Environmental Research and DevelopmentInstitute for Critical Technology and Applied Science Seminar Series Polymer Membranes for Energy

  10. Chapter 6: Innovating Clean Energy Technologies in Advanced Manufacturing | Critical Materials Technology Assessment

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergy Headquarters Categorical| Department of Energy5: Lighting, HVAC,Critical Materials

  11. Lower bound on the critical energy for the onset of chaos and the chaotic dynamical aperture of large accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guersey, Y. (Department of Natural Sciences, Baruch College of The City University of New York, 17 Lexington Avenue, New York 10010 (United States)); Alhassid, Y. (Center for Theoretical Physics, Sloane Physics Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Conneticut 06511 (United States) Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (United States))

    1992-02-15

    A generic nonintegrable Hamiltonian system is characterized by a critical energy above which chaotic motion sets in. A general method of finding a lower bound to this critical energy that does not require a solution of the equations of motion is discussed. Below the critical energy, the motion is regular everywhere on the energy surface and no instabilities can develop. The method is applied to a practical situation encountered in modern large accelerators, where the transverse motion of the particles in an arrangement of quadrupole, sextupole, and octupole magnetic elements may become chaotic. The chaotic dynamical aperture of the beam is calculated as a function of a dimensionless strength parameter. The estimated critical energy is compared with that obtained from detailed studies of the Poincare sections of the above system at various energies.

  12. Muon and Tau Neutrinos Spectra from Solar Flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Fargion; F. Moscato

    2004-05-03

    Solar neutrino flares and mixing are considered. Most power-full solar flare as the ones occurred on 23th February 1956, September 29th 1989, 28th October and on 2nd-4th November 2003 are sources of cosmic rays, X, gamma and neutrino bursts. These flares took place both on front or in the edge and in the hidden solar disk. The observed and estimated total flare energy should be a source of a prompt secondary neutrino burst originated, by proton-proton-pion production on the sun itself; a more delayed and spread neutrino flux signal arise by the solar charged flare particles reaching the terrestrial atmosphere. Our first estimates of neutrino signals in largest underground detectors hint for few events in correlation with, gamma,radio onser. Our approximated spectra for muons and taus from these rare solar eruption are shown over the most common background. The muon and tau signature is very peculiar and characteristic over electron and anti-electron neutrino fluxes. The rise of muon neutrinos will be detectable above the minimal muon threshold of 113 MeV. The rarest tau appearence will be possible only for hardest solar neutrino energies above 3.471 GeV

  13. Extending theories on muon-specific interactions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Carlson, Carl E.; Freid, Michael C.

    2015-11-23

    The proton radius puzzle, the discrepancy between the proton radius measured in muonic hydrogen and electronic hydrogen, has yet to be resolved. There are suggestions that beyond the standard model (BSM) physics could resolve both this puzzle and the muon anomalous magnetic moment discrepancy. Karshenboim et al. point out that simple, nonrenormalizable, models in this direction involving new vector bosons have serious problems when confronting high energy data. The prime example is radiative corrections to W to ?? decay which exceed experimental bounds. We show how embedding the model in a larger and arguably renormalizable theory restores gauge invariance ofmore »the vector particle interactions and controls the high energy behavior of decay and scattering amplitudes. Thus BSM explanations of the proton radius puzzle can still be viable.« less

  14. Critical Materials Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Critical Materials Workshop U.S. Department of Energy April 3, 2012 eere.energy.gov Dr. Leo Christodoulou Program Manager Advanced Manufacturing Office Energy Efficiency and...

  15. Energy Reductions Due to Cosolvent Addition to Near Critical CO2 Extraction of Organic Chemicals from Water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kingsley, G.; Moses, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    DUE TO COSOLVENT ADDITION TO NEAR CRITICAL CO EXTRACTION OF 2 . ORGANIC CHEMICALS FROM WATER GEORGE KINGSLEY, JOHN M. MOSES, CRITICAL FLUID SYSTEMS, INC. CA}lliRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS Near-critical carbon dioxide was used in conjunction... the organic is solvated into the solvent, it must be separated fran that solvent. Once again we are faced with an energy intensive distillation. It is here that the use of con:iensed gases, also known as critical fluids, can make liquid-liquid extraction...

  16. Energy of the quasi-free electron in supercritical argon near the critical point C.M. Evans1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Findley, Gary L.

    Energy of the quasi-free electron in supercritical argon near the critical point C.M. Evans1 to the interaction between argon and the quasi-free electron arising from field ionization of the dopant. The energy by the ionic core, V0(P) is the quasi-free electron energy in the perturbing medium, and P is the perturber

  17. Improved Measurement of the Positive Muon Lifetime and Determination of the Fermi Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MuLan Collaboration; D. B. Chitwood; T. I. Banks; M. J. Barnes; S. Battu; R. M. Carey; S. Cheekatmalla; S. M. Clayton; J. Crnkovic; K. M. Crowe; P. T. Debevec; S. Dhamija; W. Earle; A. Gafarov; K. Giovanetti; T. P. Gorringe; F. E. Gray; M. Hance; D. W. Hertzog; M. F. Hare; P. Kammel; B. Kiburg; J. Kunkle; B. Lauss; I. Logashenko; K. R. Lynch; R. McNabb; J. P. Miller; F. Mulhauser; C. J. G. Onderwater; C. S. Ozben; Q. Peng; C. C. Polly; S. Rath; B. L. Roberts; V. Tishchenko; G. D. Wait; J. Wasserman; D. M. Webber; P. Winter; P. A. Zolnierczuk

    2008-02-08

    The mean life of the positive muon has been measured to a precision of 11 ppm using a low-energy, pulsed muon beam stopped in a ferromagnetic target, which was surrounded by a scintillator detector array. The result, tau_mu = 2.197013(24) us, is in excellent agreement with the previous world average. The new world average tau_mu = 2.197019(21) us determines the Fermi constant G_F = 1.166371(6) x 10^-5 GeV^-2 (5 ppm). Additionally, the precision measurement of the positive muon lifetime is needed to determine the nucleon pseudoscalar coupling g_P.

  18. Search for Two-Particle Muon Decay to Positron and Goldstone Massless Boson (FAMILON)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreev, V A; Demidova, E V; Duginov, V N; Elkin, Y V; Gordeev, V A; Gritsai, K I; Gustov, S A; Ivochkin, V G; Karasev, E M; Khlopov, M Ya; Komarov, E N; Kosianenko, S V; Krivshich, A G; Levchenko, M P; Mamedov, T N; Mirokhin, I V; Olshevsky, V G; Scheglov, Y; Scherbakov, G V; Schkurenko, Y P; Sokolov, A Yu; Stoykov, A V; Vorobyev, S I; Zhdanov, A A; Zhukov, V A; Elkin, Yu.V.; Scheglov, Yu.A.; Schkurenko, Yu.P.

    2006-01-01

    The experimental test of possible expansion for the Higgs sector is proposed. The lepton family violation will be studied. To reach this goal we are going to carry out the search for the scalar Goldstone boson in the neutrinoless muon decay mu+ to e+ and alpha. The asymmetry of the muon decay near the high energy edge of Michel spectrum is to be measured. To examine previous TRIUMF data the experiment FAMILON is prepared at the surface muon beam of JINR (Dubna) accelerator. The setup consist of the precision magnetic spectrometer and the device for muSR - analysis.

  19. Search for Two-Particle Muon Decay to Positron and Goldstone Massless Boson (FAMILON)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Andreev; V. S. Demidov; E. V. Demidova; V. N. Duginov; Yu. V. Elkin; V. A. Gordeev; K. I. Gritsai; S. A. Gustov; V. G. Ivochkin; E. M. Karasev; M. Yu. Khlopov; E. N. Komarov; S. V. Kosianenko; A. G. Krivshich; M. P. Levchenko; T. N. Mamedov; I. V. Mirokhin; V. G. Olshevsky; Yu. A. Scheglov; G. V. Scherbakov; A. Yu. Sokolov; Yu. P. Schkurenko; A. V. Stoykov; S. I. Vorobyev; A. A. Zhdanov; V. A. Zhukov

    2006-12-28

    The experimental test of possible expansion for the Higgs sector is proposed. The lepton family violation will be studied. To reach this goal we are going to carry out the search for the scalar Goldstone boson in the neutrinoless muon decay mu+ to e+ and alpha. The asymmetry of the muon decay near the high energy edge of Michel spectrum is to be measured. To examine previous TRIUMF data the experiment FAMILON is prepared at the surface muon beam of JINR (Dubna) accelerator. The setup consist of the precision magnetic spectrometer and the device for muSR - analysis.

  20. MICE: the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment. Step I: First Measurement of Emittance with Particle Physics Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U. Bravar; M. Bogomilov; Y. Karadzhov; D. Kolev; I. Russinov; R. Tsenov; L. Wang; F. Y. Xu; S. X. Zheng; R. Bertoni; M. Bonesini; R. Mazza; V. Palladino; G. Cecchet; A. de Bari; M. Capponi; A. Iaciofano; D. Orestano; F. Pastore; L. Tortora; S. Ishimoto; S. Suzuki; K. Yoshimura; Y. Mori; Y. Kuno; H. Sakamoto; A. Sato; T. Yano; M. Yoshida; F. Filthaut; M. Vretenar; S. Ramberger; A. Blondel; F. Cadoux; F. Masciocchi; J. S. Graulich; V. Verguilov; H. Wisting; C. Petitjean; R. Seviour; M. Ellis; P. Kyberd; M. Littlefield; J. J. Nebrensky; D. Forrest; F. J. P. Soler; K. Walaron; P. Cooke; R. Gamet; A. Alecou; M. Apollonio; G. Barber; A. Dobbs; P. Dornan; A. Fish; R. Hare; A. Jamdagni; V. Kasey; M. Khaleeq; K. Long; J. Pasternak; H. Sakamoto; T. Sashalmi; V. Blackmore; J. Cobb; W. Lau; M. Rayner; C. D. Tunnell; H. Witte; S. Yang; J. Alexander; G. Charnley; S. Griffiths; B. Martlew; A. Moss; I. Mullacrane; A. Oats; S. York; R. Apsimon; R. J. Alexander; P. Barclay; D. E. Baynham; T. W. Bradshaw; M. Courthold; R. Edgecock T. Hayler; M. Hills; T. Jones; N. McCubbin; W. J. Murray; C. Nelson; A. Nicholls; P. R. Norton; C. Prior; J. H. Rochford; C. Rogers; W. Spensley; K. Tilley; C. N. Booth; P. Hodgson; R. Nicholson; E. Overton; M. Robinson; P. Smith; D. Adey; J. Back; S. Boyd; P. Harrison; J. Norem; A. D. Bross; S. Geer; A. Moretti; D. Neuffer; M. Popovic; Z. Qian; R. Raja; R. Stefanski; M. A. C. Cummings; T. J. Roberts; A. DeMello; M. A. Green; D. Li; A. M. Sessler; S. Virostek; M. S. Zisman; B. Freemire; P. Hanlet; D. Huang; G. Kafka; D. M. Kaplan; P. Snopok; Y. Torun; Y. Onel; D. Cline; K. Lee; Y. Fukui; X. Yang; R. A. Rimmer; L. M. Cremaldi; T. L. Hart; D. J. Summers; L. Coney; R. Fletcher; G. G. Hanson; C. Heidt; J. Gallardo; S. Kahn; H. Kirk; R. B. Palmer

    2013-07-30

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a strategic R&D project intended to demonstrate the only practical solution to providing high brilliance beams necessary for a neutrino factory or muon collider. MICE is under development at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the United Kingdom. It comprises a dedicated beamline to generate a range of input muon emittances and momenta, with time-of-flight and Cherenkov detectors to ensure a pure muon beam. The emittance of the incoming beam will be measured in the upstream magnetic spectrometer with a scintillating fiber tracker. A cooling cell will then follow, alternating energy loss in Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) absorbers to RF cavity acceleration. A second spectrometer, identical to the first, and a second muon identification system will measure the outgoing emittance. In the 2010 run at RAL the muon beamline and most detectors were fully commissioned and a first measurement of the emittance of the muon beam with particle physics (time-of-flight) detectors was performed. The analysis of these data was recently completed and is discussed in this paper. Future steps for MICE, where beam emittance and emittance reduction (cooling) are to be measured with greater accuracy, are also presented.

  1. Pion contamination in the MICE muon beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Adams; A. Alekou; M. Apollonio; R. Asfandiyarov; G. Barber; P. Barclay; A. de Bari; R. Bayes; V. Bayliss; R. Bertoni; V. J. Blackmore; A. Blondel; S. Blot; M. Bogomilov; M. Bonesini; C. N. Booth; D. Bowring; S. Boyd; T. W. Bradshaw; U. Bravar; A. D. Bross; M. Capponi; T. Carlisle; G. Cecchet; C. Charnley; F. Chignoli; D. Cline; J. H. Cobb; G. Colling; N. Collomb; L. Coney; P. Cooke; M. Courthold; L. M. Cremaldi; A. DeMello; A. Dick; A. Dobbs; P. Dornan; M. Drews; F. Drielsma; F. Filthaut; T. Fitzpatrick; P. Franchini; V. Francis; L. Fry; A. Gallagher; R. Gamet; R. Gardener; S. Gourlay; A. Grant; J. R. Greis; S. Griffiths; P. Hanlet; O. M. Hansen; G. G. Hanson; T. L. Hart; T. Hartnett; T. Hayler; C. Heidt; M. Hills; P. Hodgson; C. Hunt; A. Iaciofano; S. Ishimoto; G. Kafka; D. M. Kaplan; Y. Karadzhov; Y. K. Kim; Y. Kuno; P. Kyberd; J-B Lagrange; J. Langlands; W. Lau; M. Leonova; D. Li; A. Lintern; M. Littlefield; K. Long; T. Luo; C. Macwaters; B. Martlew; J. Martyniak; R. Mazza; S. Middleton; A. Moretti; A. Moss; A. Muir; I. Mullacrane; J. J. Nebrensky; D. Neuffer; A. Nichols; R. Nicholson; J. C. Nugent; A. Oates; Y. Onel; D. Orestano; E. Overton; P. Owens; V. Palladino; J. Pasternak; F. Pastore; C. Pidcott; M. Popovic; R. Preece; S. Prestemon; D. Rajaram; S. Ramberger; M. A. Rayner; S. Ricciardi; T. J. Roberts; M. Robinson; C. Rogers; K. Ronald; P. Rubinov; P. Rucinski; H. Sakamato; D. A. Sanders; E. Santos; T. Savidge; P. J. Smith; P. Snopok; F. J. P. Soler; D. Speirs; T. Stanley; G. Stokes; D. J. Summers; J. Tarrant; I. Taylor; L. Tortora; Y. Torun; R. Tsenov; C. D. Tunnell; M. A. Uchida; G. Vankova-Kirilova; S. Virostek; M. Vretenar; P. Warburton; S. Watson; C. White; C. G. Whyte; A. Wilson; M. Winter; X. Yang; A. Young; M. Zisman

    2015-11-03

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a systematic investigation of ionization cooling with muon beams of momentum between 140 and 240\\,MeV/c at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS facility. The measurement of ionization cooling in MICE relies on the selection of a pure sample of muons that traverse the experiment. To make this selection, the MICE Muon Beam is designed to deliver a beam of muons with less than $\\sim$1\\% contamination. To make the final muon selection, MICE employs a particle-identification (PID) system upstream and downstream of the cooling cell. The PID system includes time-of-flight hodoscopes, threshold-Cherenkov counters and calorimetry. The upper limit for the pion contamination measured in this paper is $f_\\pi contamination requirements of the study of ionization cooling.

  2. Pion contamination in the MICE muon beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, D; Apollonio, M; Asfandiyarov, R; Barber, G; Barclay, P; de Bari, A; Bayes, R; Bayliss, V; Bertoni, R; Blackmore, V J; Blondel, A; Blot, S; Bogomilov, M; Bonesini, M; Booth, C N; Bowring, D; Boyd, S; Bradshaw, T W; Bravar, U; Bross, A D; Capponi, M; Carlisle, T; Cecchet, G; Charnley, C; Chignoli, F; Cline, D; Cobb, J H; Colling, G; Collomb, N; Coney, L; Cooke, P; Courthold, M; Cremaldi, L M; DeMello, A; Dick, A; Dobbs, A; Dornan, P; Drews, M; Drielsma, F; Filthaut, F; Fitzpatrick, T; Franchini, P; Francis, V; Fry, L; Gallagher, A; Gamet, R; Gardener, R; Gourlay, S; Grant, A; Greis, J R; Griffiths, S; Hanlet, P; Hansen, O M; Hanson, G G; Hart, T L; Hartnett, T; Hayler, T; Heidt, C; Hills, M; Hodgson, P; Hunt, C; Iaciofano, A; Ishimoto, S; Kafka, G; Kaplan, D M; Karadzhov, Y; Kim, Y K; Kuno, Y; Kyberd, P; Lagrange, J-B; Langlands, J; Lau, W; Leonova, M; Li, D; Lintern, A; Littlefield, M; Long, K; Luo, T; Macwaters, C; Martlew, B; Martyniak, J; Mazza, R; Middleton, S; Moretti, A; Moss, A; Muir, A; Mullacrane, I; Nebrensky, J J; Neuffer, D; Nichols, A; Nicholson, R; Nugent, J C; Oates, A; Onel, Y; Orestano, D; Overton, E; Owens, P; Palladino, V; Pasternak, J; Pastore, F; Pidcott, C; Popovic, M; Preece, R; Prestemon, S; Rajaram, D; Ramberger, S; Rayner, M A; Ricciardi, S; Roberts, T J; Robinson, M; Rogers, C; Ronald, K; Rubinov, P; Rucinski, P; Sakamato, H; Sanders, D A; Santos, E; Savidge, T; Smith, P J; Snopok, P; Soler, F J P; Speirs, D; Stanley, T; Stokes, G; Summers, D J; Tarrant, J; Taylor, I; Tortora, L; Torun, Y; Tsenov, R; Tunnell, C D; Uchida, M A; Vankova-Kirilova, G; Virostek, S; Vretenar, M; Warburton, P; Watson, S; White, C; Whyte, C G; Wilson, A; Winter, M; Yang, X; Young, A; Zisman, M

    2015-01-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a systematic investigation of ionization cooling with muon beams of momentum between 140 and 240\\,MeV/c at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS facility. The measurement of ionization cooling in MICE relies on the selection of a pure sample of muons that traverse the experiment. To make this selection, the MICE Muon Beam is designed to deliver a beam of muons with less than $\\sim$1\\% contamination. To make the final muon selection, MICE employs a particle-identification (PID) system upstream and downstream of the cooling cell. The PID system includes time-of-flight hodoscopes, threshold-Cherenkov counters and calorimetry. The upper limit for the pion contamination measured in this paper is $f_\\pi contamination requirements of the study of ionization cooling.

  3. Abstract Bioenergy is a critical part of renewable energy solution to today's energy crisis that threatens world economic growth. Corn ethanol has been growing rapidly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gu, Tingyue

    .1 Introduction An integrated approach using different forms of renewable energy such as wind, solar, and biomass127 Abstract Bioenergy is a critical part of renewable energy solution to today's energy crisis as energy crops on poor lands that are otherwise vacant. However, lignocellu- losic biomass is notoriously

  4. Combined Heat and Power. Enabling Resilient Energy Infrastructure for Critical Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hampson, Anne; Bourgeois, Tom; Dillingham, Gavin; Panzarella, Isaac

    2013-03-01

    This report provides context for combined heat and power (CHP) in critical infrastructure applications, as well as case studies and policies promoting CHP in critical infrastructure.

  5. Superallowed 0(+)-> 0(+) nuclear beta decays: A critical survey with tests of the conserved vector current hypothesis and the standard model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, John C.; Towner, IS.

    2005-01-01

    A complete and critical survey is presented of all half-life, decay-energy, and branching-ratio measurements related to 20 superallowed 0(+)-> 0(+) decays... to three parts in 10(4). These data are also used to set a new limit on any possible scalar interaction (assuming maximum parity violation) of C-S/C-V = -(0.00005 +/- 0.00130). The average Ft value obtained from the survey, when combined with the muon...

  6. Physics Opportunities at a Muon Collider Kirk T. McDonald

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    of TeV of constituent CoM energy. . That a Muon Collider is the best option to accomplish the above. 2 solenoids (to avoid buildup of angular momentum). The Energy Spread Rises due to ``Straggling'' # Must reduce energy spread by a wedge absorber at a momentum dispersion point: Absorber wedge Nominal energy

  7. Our Next Two Steps for Fukushima Daiichi Muon Tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyadera, Haruo

    2012-04-11

    After the vast disasters caused by the great earthquake and tsunami in eastern Japan, we proposed applying our Muon Tomography (MT) technique to help and improve the emergency situation at Fukushima Daiichi using cosmic-ray muons. A reactor-tomography team was formed at LANL which was supported by the Laboratory as a response to a request by the former Japanese Prime Minister, Naoto Kan. Our goal is to help the Japanese people and support remediation of the reactors. At LANL, we have carried out a proof-of-principle technical demonstration and simulation studies that established the feasibility of MT to image a reactor core. This proposal covers the next two critical steps for Fukushima Daiichi Muon Imaging: (1) undertake case study mock-up experiments of Fukushima Daiichi, and (2) system optimization. We requested funding to the US and Japanese government to assess damage of reactors at Fukushima Daiichi. The two steps will bring our project to the 'ready-to-go' level.

  8. RECENT PROGRESS TOWARD A MUON RECIRCULATING LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slawomir Bogacz, Vasiliy Morozov, Yves Roblin, Kevin Beard

    2012-07-01

    Both Neutrino Factories (NF) and Muon Colliders (MC) require very rapid acceleration due to the short lifetime of muons. After a capture and bunching section, a linac raises the energy to about 900 MeV, and is followed by one or more Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA), possibly followed by a Rapid Cycling Synchnotron (RCS) or Fixed-Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) ring. A RLA reuses the expensive RF linac section for a number of passes at the price of having to deal with different energies within the same linac. Various techniques including pulsed focusing quadruopoles, beta frequency beating, and multipass arcs have been investigated via simulations to improve the performance and reduce the cost of such RLAs.

  9. A parameterisation of single and multiple muons in the deep water or ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Becherini; A. Margiotta; M. Sioli; M. Spurio

    2005-07-19

    Atmospheric muons play an important role in underwater/ice neutrino detectors. In this paper, a parameterisation of the flux of single and multiple muon events, their lateral distribution and of their energy spectrum is presented. The kinematics parameters were modelled starting from a full Monte Carlo simulation of the interaction of primary cosmic rays with atmospheric nuclei; secondary muons reaching the sea level were propagated in the deep water. The parametric formulas are valid for a vertical depth of 1.5-5 km w.e. and up to 85 deg for the zenith angle, and can be used as input for a fast simulation of atmospheric muons in underwater/ice detectors.

  10. Time calibration with atmospheric muon tracks in the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrián-Martínez, S; André, M; Anton, G; Ardid, M; Aubert, J -J; Baret, B; Barrios-Martí, J; Basa, S; Bertin, V; Biagi, S; Bogazzi, C; Bormuth, R; Bou-Cabo, M; Bouwhuis, M C; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Busto, J; Capone, A; Caramete, L; Carr, J; Chiarusi, T; Circella, M; Coniglione, R; Costantini, H; Coyle, P; Creusot, A; Dekeyser, I; Deschamps, A; De Bonis, G; Distefano, C; Donzaud, C; Dornic, D; Drouhin, D; Dumas, A; Eberl, T; Elsässer, D; Enzenhöfer, A; Fehn, K; Felis, I; Fermani, P; Flaminio, V; Folger, F; Fusco, L A; Galatà, S; Gay, P; Geißelsöder, S; Geyer, K; Giordano, V; Gleixner, A; Gracia-Ruiz, R; Gómez-González, J P; Graf, K; van Haren, H; Heijboer, A J; Hello, Y; Hernández-Rey, J J; Herrero, A; Hößl, J; Hofestädt, J; Hugon, C; James, C W; de Jong, M; Kadler, M; Kalekin, O; Katz, U; Kießling, D; Kooijman, P; Kouchner, A; Kreykenbohm, I; Kulikovskiy, V; Lahmann, R; Lambard, G; Lattuada, D; Lefèvre, D; Leonora, E; Loucatos, S; Mangano, S; Marcelin, M; Margiotta, A; Marinelli, A; Martínez-Mora, J A; Martini, S; Mathieu, A; Michael, T; Migliozzi, P; Moussa, A; Mueller, C; Neff, M; Nezri, E; P?v?la?, G E; Pellegrino, C; Perrina, C; Piattelli, P; Popa, V; Pradier, T; Racca, C; Riccobene, G; Richter, R; Roensch, K; Rostovtsev, A; Saldaña, M; Samtleben, D F E; Sánchez-Losa, A; Sanguineti, M; Sapienza, P; Schmid, J; Schnabel, J; Schulte, S; Schüssler, F; Seitz, T; Sieger, C; Spurio, M; Steijger, J J M; Stolarczyk, Th; Taiuti, M; Tamburini, C; Trovato, A; Tselengidou, M; Tönnis, C; Turpin, D; Vallage, B; Vallée, C; Van Elewyck, V; Visser, E; Vivolo, D; Wagner, S; Wilms, J; Zornoza, J D; Zúñiga, J

    2015-01-01

    The ANTARES experiment consists of an array of photomultipliers distributed along 12 lines and located deep underwater in the Mediterranean Sea. It searches for astrophysical neutrinos collecting the Cherenkov light induced by the charged particles, mainly muons, produced in neutrino interactions around the detector. Since at energies of $\\sim$10 TeV the muon and the incident neutrino are almost collinear, it is possible to use the ANTARES detector as a neutrino telescope and identify a source of neutrinos in the sky starting from a precise reconstruction of the muon trajectory. To get this result, the arrival times of the Cherenkov photons must be accurately measured. A to perform time calibrations with the precision required to have optimal performances of the instrument is described. The reconstructed tracks of the atmospheric muons in the ANTARES detector are used to determine the relative time offsets between photomultipliers. Currently, this method is used to obtain the time calibration constants for ph...

  11. Lateral Distribution for Aligned Events in Muon Groups Deep Underground

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. L. Tsyabuk; R. A. Mukhamedshin; Yu. V. Stenkin

    2007-01-09

    The paper concerns the so-called aligned events observed in cosmic rays. The phenomenon of the alignment of the most energetic subcores of gamma-ray--hadron ($\\gamma-h$) families (particles of the highest energies in the central EAS core) was firstly found in the "Pamir" emulsion chamber experiment and related to a coplanar particle production at $E_0>10^{16}$ eV. Here a separation distribution (distances between pairs of muons) for aligned events has been analyzed throughout muon groups measured by Baksan Underground Scintillation Telescope (BUST) for threshold energies $0.85 \\div 3.2$ TeV during a period of 7.7 years. Only muon groups of multiplicity $m\\geq 4$ with inclined trajectories for an interval of zenith angles $50^\\circ - 60^\\circ$ were selected for the analysis. The analysis has revealed that the distribution complies with the exponential law. Meanwhile the distributions become steeper with the increase of threshold energy. There has been no difference between the lateral distribution of all the groups and the distribution of the aligned groups.

  12. The Defocusing Energy-Critical Wave Equation with a Cubic Convolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Changxing Miao; Junyong Zhang; Jiqiang Zheng

    2014-10-10

    In this paper, we study the theory of the global well-posedness and scattering for the energy-critical wave equation with a cubic convolution nonlinearity $u_{tt}-\\Delta u+(|x|^{-4}\\ast|u|^2)u=0$ in spatial dimension $d \\geq 5$. The main difficulties are the absence of the classical finite speed of propagation (i.e. the monotonic local energy estimate on the light cone), which is a fundamental property to show the global well-posedness and then to obtain scattering for the wave equations with the local nonlinearity $u_{tt}-\\Delta u+|u|^\\frac4{d-2}u=0$. To compensate it, we resort to the extended causality and utilize the strategy derived from concentration compactness ideas. Then, the proof of the global well-posedness and scattering is reduced to show the nonexistence of the three enemies: finite time blowup; soliton-like solutions and low-to-high cascade. We will utilize the Morawetz estimate, the extended causality and the potential energy concentration to preclude the above three enemies.

  13. Energy Management for Time-Critical Energy Harvesting Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydin, Hakan

    this problem, we present a set of Harvesting Aware Speed Selection (HASS) algo- rithms. We use an epoch such as solar, wind or wa- ter flow, WSN nodes potentially have perpetual energy supply. However, given saving techniques, Dy- namic Voltage Scaling (DVS) [2] and Dynamic Modulation Scaling (DMS) [18]. The DVS

  14. Muon Cooling via Ionization Andrea Kay Forget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    1 Muon Cooling via Ionization Andrea Kay Forget Department of Physics, Wayne State University decay, as a result of their short lives many of the known cooling techniques (electron, stochastic, and laser cooling) cannot be used to properly cool muons that are being used in proposed accelerators

  15. Muon Flux at the Geographical South Pole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. Bai; T. K. Gaisser; A. Karle; K. Rawlins; G. M. Spiczak; Todor Stanev

    2006-02-17

    The muon flux at the South-Pole was measured for five zenith angles, $0^{\\circ}$, $15^{\\circ}$, $35^{\\circ}$, $82.13^{\\circ}$ and $85.15^{\\circ}$ with a scintillator muon telescope incorporating ice Cherenkov tank detectors as the absorber. We compare the measurements with other data and with calculations.

  16. Detector Background at Muon Colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mokhov, N.V.; Striganov, S.I.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Physics goals of a Muon Collider (MC) can only be reached with appropriate design of the ring, interaction region (IR), high-field superconducting magnets, machine-detector interface (MDI) and detector. Results of the most recent realistic simulation studies are presented for a 1.5-TeV MC. It is shown that appropriately designed IR and MDI with sophisticated shielding in the detector have a potential to substantially suppress the background rates in the MC detector. The main characteristics of backgrounds are studied.

  17. Fermilab | Science | Particle Physics | Muons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you not find whatGasEnergyfeature photo featureParticleDarkMuons photo

  18. FFAGS FOR MUON ACCELERATION J. Scott Berg, Stephen Kahn, Robert Palmer, Dejan Trbojevic,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keil, Eberhard

    the desired energy gain. An alter- native method for muon acceleration is using a fixed field alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerator. Such an accelera- tor has a very large energy acceptance (a factor of two with time. The arc must be able to transmit a beam over a wide range of energies. The first difficulty

  19. Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) - A critical evaluation by LCA and recommendations for improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Sebastien; Abeck, Heike; Bali, Nishil; Horvath, Arpad

    2007-01-01

    LEED): A critical evaluation by LCA and recommendations forimprovement. Int J LCA 12 (special issue 1) 46-57. LifeLEED) A critical evaluation by LCA and recommendations for

  20. Advanced Thermal Energy Storage: Novel Tuning of Critical Fluctuations for Advanced Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-12-01

    HEATS Project: NAVITASMAX is developing a novel thermal energy storage solution. This innovative technology is based on simple and complex supercritical fluids— substances where distinct liquid and gas phases do not exist, and tuning the properties of these fluid systems to increase their ability to store more heat. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in NAVITASMAX’s system during the day and released at night—when the sun is not shining—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in NAVITASMAX’s system at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours.

  1. A Pionic Hadron Explains the Muon Magnetic Moment Anomaly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainer W. Schiel; John P. Ralston

    2007-10-01

    A significant discrepancy exists between experiment and calculations of the muon's magnetic moment. We find that standard formulas for the hadronic vacuum polarization term have overlooked pionic states known to exist. Coulomb binding alone guarantees $\\pi^+ \\pi^-$ states that quantum mechanically mix with the $\\rho$ meson. A simple 2-state mixing model explains the magnetic moment discrepancy for a mixing angle of order $\\alpha \\sim 10^{-2}$. The relevant physical state is predicted to give a tiny observable bump in the ratio R(s) of $e^+ e^-$ annihilation at a low energy not previously searched. The burden of proof is reversed for claims that conventional physics cannot explain the muon's anomalous moment.

  2. Neutrinos from Decaying Muons, Pions, Kaons and Neutrons in Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reetanjali Moharana; Nayantara Gupta

    2012-05-27

    In the internal shock model of gamma ray bursts ultrahigh energy muons, pions, neutrons and kaons are likely to be produced in the interactions of shock accelerated relativistic protons with low energy photons (KeV-MeV). These particles subsequently decay to high energy neutrinos/antineutrinos and other secondaries. In the high internal magnetic fields of gamma ray bursts, the ultrahigh energy charged particles ($\\mu^+$, $\\pi^+$, $K^+$) lose energy significantly due to synchrotron radiations before decaying into secondary high energy neutrinos and antineutrinos. The relativistic neutrons decay to high energy antineutrinos, protons and electrons. We have calculated the total neutrino flux (neutrino and antineutrino) considering the decay channels of ultrahigh energy muons, pions, neutrons and kaons. We have shown that the total neutrino flux generated in neutron decay can be higher than that produced in $\\mu^+$ and $\\pi^+$ decay. The charged kaons being heavier than pions, lose energy slowly and their secondary total neutrino flux is more than that from muons and pions at very high energy. Our detailed calculations on secondary particle production in $p\\gamma$ interactions give the total neutrino fluxes and their flavour ratios expected on earth. Depending on the values of the parameters (luminosity, Lorentz factor, variability time, spectral indices and break energy in the photon spectrum) of a gamma ray burst the contributions to the total neutrino flux from the decay of different particles (muon, pion, neutron and kaon) may vary and they would also be reflected on the neutrino flavour ratios.

  3. Cosmic Muon Detector Using Proportional Chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dezs? Varga; Zoltán Gál; Gerg? Hamar; Janka Sára Molnár; Éva Oláh; Péter Pázmándi

    2015-07-28

    A set of classical multi-wire proportional chambers were designed and constructed with the main purpose of efficient cosmic muon detection. These detectors are relatively simple to construct, and at the same time are low cost, making them ideal for educational purposes. The detector layers have efficiencies above 99% for minimum ionizing cosmic muons, and their position resolution is about 1 cm, that is, particle trajectories are clearly observable. Visualization of straight tracks is possible using an LED array, with the discriminated and latched signal driving the display. Due to the exceptional operating stability of the chambers, the design can also be used for cosmic muon telescopes.

  4. Imaging Fukushima Daiichi reactors with muons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyadera, Haruo; Borozdin, Konstantin N.; Greene, Steve J.; Milner, Edward C.; Morris, Christopher L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Lukic, Zarija [Computational Cosmology Center, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Masuda, Koji [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Perry, John O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    A study of imaging the Fukushima Daiichi reactors with cosmic-ray muons to assess the damage to the reactors is presented. Muon scattering imaging has high sensitivity for detecting uranium fuel and debris even through thick concrete walls and a reactor pressure vessel. Technical demonstrations using a reactor mockup, detector radiation test at Fukushima Daiichi, and simulation studies have been carried out. These studies establish feasibility for the reactor imaging. A few months of measurement will reveal the spatial distribution of the reactor fuel. The muon scattering technique would be the best and probably the only way for Fukushima Daiichi to make this determination in the near future.

  5. Life Cycle Energy and Climate Change Implication of Nanotechnologies: A Critical Review Hyung Chul Kim and Vasilis Fthenakis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Life Cycle Energy and Climate Change Implication of Nanotechnologies: A Critical Review Hyung Center Dearborn, MI. Email: hkim41@ford.com Summary The potential environmental here often rely on inventory data estimated from literature values and parametric analyses based

  6. Muons for a Muon-Collider Kirk T. McDonald

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    ://www.cap.bnl.gov/mumu/mu home page.html Muon Collider R&D Status Report: http://www.cap.bnl.gov/mumu/status report.html Muon � 10-10 (mm)3 . · Initial pulse length only 1-2 ns. The Source · The muons come from the decay of soft pulse shock heating of target. ­ Resulting pressure wave may disperse liquid (or crack solid). ­ Damage

  7. Impact of Distributed Energy Resources on the Reliability of a Critical Telecommunications Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, D.; Atcitty, C.; Zuffranieri, J.; Arent, D.

    2006-03-01

    Telecommunications has been identified by the Department of Homeland Security as a critical infrastructure to the United States. Failures in the power systems supporting major telecommunications service nodes are a main contributor to major telecommunications outages, as documented by analyses of Federal Communications Commission (FCC) outage reports by the National Reliability Steering Committee (under auspices of the Alliance for Telecommunications Industry Solutions). There are two major issues that are having increasing impact on the sensitivity of the power distribution to telecommunication facilities: deregulation of the power industry, and changing weather patterns. A logical approach to improve the robustness of telecommunication facilities would be to increase the depth and breadth of technologies available to restore power in the face of power outages. Distributed energy resources such as fuel cells and gas turbines could provide one more onsite electric power source to provide backup power, if batteries and diesel generators fail. But does the diversity in power sources actually increase the reliability of offered power to the office equipment, or does the complexity of installing and managing the extended power system induce more potential faults and higher failure rates? This report analyzes a system involving a telecommunications facility consisting of two switch-bays and a satellite reception system.

  8. The Cosmic Ray Muon Flux at WIPP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esch, E I; Hime, A; Pichlmaier, A; Reifarth, R; Wollnik, H

    2005-01-01

    In this work a measurement of the muon intensity at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM, USA is presented. WIPP is a salt mine with a depth of 655 m. The vertical muon flux was measured with a two panels scintillator coincidence setup to Phi_{vert}=3.10(+0.05/-0.07)*10^(-7)s^(-1)cm^(-2)sr^(-1).

  9. The Cosmic Ray Muon Flux at WIPP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. -I. Esch; T. J. Bowles; A. Hime; A. Pichlmaier; R. Reifarth; H. Wollnik

    2004-08-25

    In this work a measurement of the muon intensity at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM, USA is presented. WIPP is a salt mine with a depth of 655 m. The vertical muon flux was measured with a two panels scintillator coincidence setup to Phi_{vert}=3.10(+0.05/-0.07)*10^(-7)s^(-1)cm^(-2)sr^(-1).

  10. Search for high-energy muon neutrinos from the "naked-eye" GRB080319B with the IceCube neutrino telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbasi, R.; IceCube Collaboration

    2009-01-01

    one of the brightest gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) ever observed.cosmic high-energy neutrinos, gamma-ray-burst, GRB 080319BLong duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are thought to

  11. Theoretical Electron Density Distributions for Fe-and Cu-Sulfide Earth Materials: A Connection between Bond Length, Bond Critical Point Properties, Local Energy Densities,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downs, Robert T.

    between Bond Length, Bond Critical Point Properties, Local Energy Densities, and Bonded Interactions G. V; In Final Form: December 6, 2006 Bond critical point and local energy density properties together with netTheoretical Electron Density Distributions for Fe- and Cu-Sulfide Earth Materials: A Connection

  12. The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration Physics Opportunities with Muon Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    (s). ­ Can store muons in rings. ­ Lower cost of acceleration. · But muons decay. ­ Secondary neutrino experiments based on innovative particle sources. · A full range of new phenomena can be investigated accelerators with a more cost-effective technology, that is capable of extension to 10's of TeV of constituent

  13. SCALED ELECTRON MODEL OF A DOGBONE MUON RLA WITH MULTI-PASS ARCS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin Beard, Rolland Johnson, Vasiliy Morozov, Yves Roblin, Andrew Hutton, Geoffrey Krafft, Slawomir Bogacz

    2012-07-01

    The design of a dogbone RLA with linear-field multi-pass arcs was earlier developed for accelerating muons in a Neutrino Factory and a Muon Collider. It allows for efficient use of expensive RF while the multi-pass arc design based on linear combined-function magnets exhibits a number of advantages over separate-arc or pulsed-arc designs. Such an RLA may have applications going beyond muon acceleration. This paper describes a possible straightforward test of this concept by scaling a GeV scale muon design for electrons. Scaling muon momenta by the muon-to-electron mass ratio leads to a scheme, in which a 4.5 MeV electron beam is injected at the middle of a 3 MeV/pass linac with two double-pass return arcs and is accelerated to 18 MeV in 4.5 passes. All spatial dimensions including the orbit distortion are scaled by a factor of 7.5, which arises from scaling the 200 MHz muon RF to a readily available at CEBAF 1.5 GHz. The footprint of a complete RLA fits in an area of 25 by 7 m. The scheme utilizes only fixed magnetic fields including injection and extraction. The hardware requirements are not very demanding, making it straightforward to implement. In this report, we have shown first of all that measuring the energy spectrum of the fast neutrons in the liquid scintillators allows one to distinguish the two chemical forms of plutonium. In addition, combining this information with the Feynman 2-neutron and 3-neutron correlations allows one to extract the {alpha}-ratio without explicitly knowing the multiplication. Given the {alpha}-ratio one can then extract the multiplication as well as the {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu masses directly from the moment equations.

  14. Solution High-Energy Burst Assembly (SHEBA) results from subprompt critical experiments with uranyl fluoride fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappiello, C.C.; Butterfield, K.B.; Sanchez, R.G.; Bounds, J.A.; Kimpland, R.H.; Damjanovich, R.P.; Jaegers, P.J.

    1997-08-01

    Experiments were performed to measure a variety of parameters for SHEBA: behavior of the facility during transient and steady-state operation; characteristics of the SHEBA fuel; delayed-critical solution height vs solution temperature; initial reactor period and reactivity vs solution height; calibration of power level vs reactor power instrumentation readings; flux profile in SHEBA; radiation levels and neutron spectra outside the assembly for code verification and criticality alarm and dosimetry purposes; and effect on reactivity of voids in the fuel.

  15. Investigation of the relative abundance of heavy versus light nuclei in primary cosmic rays using underground muon bundles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sundaralingam, N.

    1993-06-08

    We study multiple muon events (muon bundles) recorded underground at a depth of 2090 mwe. To penetrate to this depth, the muons must have energies above 0.8 TeV at the Earth`s surface; the primary cosmic ray nuclei which give rise to the observed muon bundles have energies at incidence upon the upper atmosphere of 10 to 10{sup 5}TeV. The events are detected using the Soudan 2 experiment`s fine grained tracking calorimeter which is surrounded by a 14 m {times}10 m {times} 31 m proportional tube array (the ``active shield``). Muon bundles which have at least one muon traversing the calorimeter, are reconstructed using tracks in the calorimeter together with hit patterns in the proportional tube shield. All ionization pulses are required to be coincident within 3 microseconds. A goal of this study is to investigate the relative nuclear abundances in the primary cosmic radiation around the ``knee`` region (10{sup 3} {minus} 10{sup 4} TeV) of the incident energy spectrum. Four models for the nuclear composition of cosmic rays are considered: The Linsley model, the Constant Mass Composition model (CMC), the Maryland model and the Proton-poor model. A Monte Carlo which incorporates one model at a time is used to simulate events which are then reconstructed using the same computer algorithms that are used for the data. Identical cuts and selections are applied to the data and to the simulated events.

  16. PULSED-FOCUSING RECIRCULATING LINACS FOR MUON ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Rolland PAUL

    2014-12-31

    Since the muon has a short lifetime, fast acceleration is essential for high-energy applications such as muon colliders, Higgs factories, or neutrino factories. The best one can do is to make a linear accelerator with the highest possible accelerating gradient to make the accelerating time as short as possible. However, the cost of such a single linear accelerator is prohibitively large due to expensive power sources, cavities, tunnels, and related infrastructure. As was demonstrated in the Thomas Jefferson Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), an elegant solution to reduce cost is to use magnetic return arcs to recirculate the beam through the accelerating RF cavities many times, where they gain energy on each pass. In such a Recirculating Linear Accelerator (RLA), the magnetic focusing strength diminishes as the beam energy increases in a conventional linac that has constant strength quadrupoles. After some number of passes the focusing strength is insufficient to keep the beam from going unstable and being lost. In this project, the use of fast pulsed quadrupoles in the linac sections was considered for stronger focusing as a function of time to allow more successive passes of a muon beam in a recirculating linear accelerator. In one simulation, it was shown that the number of passes could be increased from 8 to 12 using pulsed magnet designs that have been developed and tested. This could reduce the cost of linac sections of a muon RLA by 8/12, where more improvement is still possible. The expense of a greater number of passes and corresponding number of return arcs was also addressed in this project by exploring the use of ramped or FFAG-style magnets in the return arcs. A better solution, invented in this project, is to use combined-function dipole-quadrupole magnets to simultaneously transport two beams of different energies through one magnet string to reduce costs of return arcs by almost a factor of two. A patent application was filed for this invention and a detailed report published in Physical Review Special Topics. A scaled model using an electron beam was developed and proposed to test the concept of a dog bone RLA with combined-function return arcs. The efforts supported by this grant were reported in a series of contributions to particle accelerator conferences that are reproduced in the appendices and summarized in the body of this report.

  17. Exploring Geometries of SRF Cavities for a Future Muon Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geng, Rong-Li

    application of super- conducting RF cavities in a future muon collider. Such RF cavities are expected to workExploring Geometries of SRF Cavities for a Future Muon Collider Rong-Li Geng LEPP, Cornell

  18. DESIGN OF HIGH INTENSITY MUON SOURCES HISHAM KAMAL SAYED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    /19/15 OUTLINE Goal : Op0mize number of useful muons Involved systems: - Carbon parameters: Carbon target length, radius, and 0lt angle to solenoid axis 2 momentum spread Challenges with muon beams: - Short life0me ~ 2

  19. Use of dielectric material in muon accelerator RF cavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    French, Katheryn Decker

    2011-01-01

    The building of a muon collider is motivated by the desire to collide point-like particles while reducing the limitations imposed by synchrotron radiation. The many challenges unique to muon accelerators are derived from ...

  20. Distortions of Experimental Muon Arrival Time Distributions of Extensive Air Showers by the Observation Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Haeusler; A. F. Badea; H. Rebel; I. M. Brancus; J. Oehlschlaeger

    2001-10-17

    Event-by-event measured arrival time distributions of Extensive Air Shower (EAS) muons are affected and distorted by various interrelated effects which originate from the time resolution of the timing detectors, from fluctuations of the reference time and the number (multiplicity) of detected muons spanning the arrival time distribution of the individual EAS events. The origin of these effects is discussed, and different correction procedures, which involve detailed simulations, are proposed and illustrated. The discussed distortions are relevant for relatively small observation distances (R < 200 m) from the EAS core. Their significance decreases with increasing observation distance and increasing primary energies. Local arrival time distributions which refer to the observed arrival time of the first local muon prove to be less sensitive to the mass of the primary. This feature points to the necessity of arrival time measurements with additional information on the curvature of the EAS disk.

  1. Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) - A critical evaluation by LCA and recommendations for improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Sebastien; Abeck, Heike; Bali, Nishil; Horvath, Arpad

    2007-01-01

    use, global warming, non-renewable energy consumption, andglobal warming potential (GWP), 68% of electricity consumption, and 39% of total energy

  2. Measurement of the Muon content of Extensive Air Showers with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Espadanal; for the Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2015-05-20

    Several methods developed within the Pierre Auger Collaboration for the estimation of the muonic component of the Extensive Air Showers observed in the surface Cherenkov detectors are described. The results derived from the data show a deficit of muons predicted by the current hadronic interactions models at ultra-high energies.

  3. Neutrino Physics at a Muon Collider K.T. McDonald

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    GeV: light Higgs, calibrate on Z0. Cost: > 1$B. Could the case be strengthened by ancillary physics-energy (and ) beams exist in the early stages of a muon collider. 2 #12;Summary of Ancillary Physics than a horn. Bottom line: Present understanding of ancillary physics capabilities does not provide

  4. Muon (g-2) Technical Design Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Grange; V. Guarino; P. Winter; K. Wood; H. Zhao; R. M. Carey; D. Gastler; E. Hazen; N. Kinnaird; J. P. Miller; J. Mott; B. L. Roberts; J. Benante; J. Crnkovic; W. M. Morse; H. Sayed; V. Tishchenko; V. P. Druzhinin; B. I. Khazin; I. A. Koop; I. Logashenko; Y. M. Shatunov; E. Solodov; M. Korostelev; D. Newton; A. Wolski; R. Bjorkquist; N. Eggert; A. Frankenthal; L. Gibbons; S. Kim; A. Mikhailichenko; Y. Orlov; D. Rubin; D. Sweigart; D. Allspach; G. Annala; E. Barzi; K. Bourland; G. Brown; B. C. K. Casey; S. Chappa; M. E. Convery; B. Drendel; H. Friedsam; T. Gadfort; K. Hardin; S. Hawke; S. Hayes; W. Jaskierny; C. Johnstone; J. Johnstone; V. Kashikhin; C. Kendziora; B. Kiburg; A. Klebaner; I. Kourbanis; J. Kyle; N. Larson; A. Leveling; A. L. Lyon; D. Markley; D. McArthur; K. W. Merritt; N. Mokhov; J. P. Morgan; H. Nguyen; J-F. Ostiguy; A. Para; C. C. Polly M. Popovic; E. Ramberg; M. Rominsky; D. Schoo; R. Schultz; D. Still; A. K. Soha; S. Strigonov; G. Tassotto; D. Turrioni; E. Villegas; E. Voirin; G. Velev; D. Wolff; C. Worel; J-Y. Wu; R. Zifko; K. Jungmann; C. J. G. Onderwater; P. T. Debevec; S. Ganguly; M. Kasten; S. Leo; K. Pitts; C. Schlesier; M. Gaisser; S. Haciomeroglu; Y-I. Kim; S. Lee; M-J Lee; Y. K. Semertzidis; K. Giovanetti; V. A. Baranov; V. N. Duginov; N. V. Khomutov; V. A. Krylov; N. A. Kuchinskiy; V. P. Volnykh; C. Crawford; R. Fatemi; W. P. Gohn; T. P. Gorringe; W. Korsch; B. Plaster; A. Anastasi; D. Babusci; S. Dabagov; C. Ferrari; A. Fioretti; C. Gabbanini; D. Hampai; A. Palladino; G. Venanzoni; T. Bowcock; J. Carroll; B. King; S. Maxfield; K. McCormick; A. Smith; T. Teubner; M. Whitley; M. Wormald; R. Chislett; S. Kilani; M. Lancaster; E. Motuk; T. Stuttard; M. Warren; D. Flay; D. Kawall; Z. Meadows; T. Chupp; R. Raymond; A. Tewlsey-Booth; M. J. Syphers; D. Tarazona; C. Ankenbrandt; M. A. Cummings; R. P. Johnson; C. Yoshikawa; S. Catalonotti; R. Di Stefano; M. Iacovacci; S. Mastroianni; S. Chattopadhyay; M. Eads; M. Fortner; D. Hedin; N. Pohlman; A. de Gouvea; H. Schellman; L. Welty-Rieger; T. Itahashi; Y. Kuno; K. Yai; F. Azfar; S. Henry; G. D. Alkhazov; V. L. Golovtsov; P. V. Neustroev; L. N. Uvarov; A. A. Vasilyev; A. A. Vorobyov; M. B. Zhalov; L. Cerrito; F. Gray; G. Di Sciascio; D. Moricciani; C. Fu; X. Ji; L. Li; H. Yang; D. Stöckinger; G. Cantatore; D. Cauz; M. Karuza; G. Pauletta; L. Santi; S. Bae\\ssler; M. Bychkov; E. Frlez; D. Pocanic; L. P. Alonzi; M. Fertl; A. Fienberg; N. Froemming; A. Garcia; D. W. Hertzog J. Kaspar; P. Kammel; R. Osofsky; M. Smith; E. Swanson; T. van Wechel; K. Lynch

    2015-01-27

    The Muon (g-2) Experiment, E989 at Fermilab, will measure the muon anomalous magnetic moment a factor-of-four more precisely than was done in E821 at the Brookhaven National Laboratory AGS. The E821 result appears to be greater than the Standard-Model prediction by more than three standard deviations. When combined with expected improvement in the Standard-Model hadronic contributions, E989 should be able to determine definitively whether or not the E821 result is evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model. After a review of the physics motivation and the basic technique, which will use the muon storage ring built at BNL and now relocated to Fermilab, the design of the new experiment is presented. This document was created in partial fulfillment of the requirements necessary to obtain DOE CD-2/3 approval.

  5. High Intensity Muon Beams in Osaka -MuSIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    High Intensity Muon Beams in Osaka - MuSIC Yoshitaka Kuno Osaka Unviersity, Osaka, Japan ! THB2014 ·Muon Transport ·COMET ·MuSIC facility at Osaka University ·MuSIC stage-I for µSR ·PRISM demonstration at MuSIC ·Phase Rotation at FFAG ·Summary #12;Muon Beam Sources #12;ISIS EM, RIKEN-RAL J-PARC, MUSE

  6. Pion/Muon Beam and Monitoring Revised February 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory - Experiment 821

    injection scheme used in the CERN experiment, [1] a pion beam was formed and directed parallel to, but just. This technique of direct muon injection has two benefits: i) the number of stored muons per fill is increased, and produced the ``flash'' following injection which presented such a challenge to the muon decay electron

  7. Characterisation of the muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, D.; et al.,

    2013-10-01

    A novel single-particle technique to measure emittance has been developed and used to characterise seventeen different muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE). The muon beams, whose mean momenta vary from 171 to 281 MeV/c, have emittances of approximately 1.5--2.3 \\pi mm-rad horizontally and 0.6--1.0 \\pi mm-rad vertically, a horizontal dispersion of 90--190 mm and momentum spreads of about 25 MeV/c. There is reasonable agreement between the measured parameters of the beams and the results of simulations. The beams are found to meet the requirements of MICE.

  8. Validation of Nuclear Criticality Safety Software and 27 energy group ENDF/B-IV cross sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, B.L. Jr.

    1994-08-01

    The validation documented in this report is based on calculations that were executed during June through August 1992, and was completed in June 1993. The statistical analyses in Appendix C and Appendix D were completed in October 1993. This validation gives Portsmouth NCS personnel a basis for performing computerized KENO V.a calculations using the Martin Marietta Nuclear Criticality Safety Software. The first portion of the document outlines basic information in regard to validation of NCSS using ENDF/B-IV 27-group cross sections on the IBM 3090 at ORNL. A basic discussion of the NCSS system is provided, some discussion on the validation database and validation in general. Then follows a detailed description of the statistical analysis which was applied. The results of this validation indicate that the NCSS software may be used with confidence for criticality calculations at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. When the validation results are treated as a single group, there is 95% confidence that 99.9% of future calculations of similar critical systems will have a calculated K{sub eff} > 0.9616. Based on this result the Portsmouth Nuclear Criticality Safety Department has adopted the calculational acceptance criteria that a k{sub eff} + 2{sigma} {le} 0.95 is safety subcritical. The validation of NCSS on the IBM 3090 at ORNL was extended to include NCSS on the IBM 3090 at K-25.

  9. J/Psi suppression, percolation model and the critical energy density in AA collisions at SPS and RHIC energies with the account of centrality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Feofilov; O. Kochebina

    2009-07-09

    Experimental data on the onset of a so-called anomalous J/psi suppression in PbPb collisions at the SPS are considered in the framework of string percolation model. This onset is observed at a certain collision centrality, characterized by the number of nucleons-participants (Npart) related to the impact-parameter. Modified Bjorken formula calculations are performed for the local energy densities in AA collisions at different impact-parameters and with detailed account of the latest data available on the charged particles densities at midrapidity. Finally we compare variations of mean local energy and of string densities and match the occurrence of the critical percolation phenomenon with the critical energy density value, considering them at the same values of Npart. Similar analysis was performed for recent RHIC data and the results are discussed.

  10. Measuring Muon-Induced Neutrons with Liquid Scintillation Detector at Soudan Mine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Zhang; D. -M. Mei

    2014-11-26

    We report a direct detection of muon-induced high energy neutrons with a 12-liter neutron detector fabricated with EJ-301 liquid scintillator operating at Soudan Mine for about two years. The detector response to energy from a few MeV up to $\\sim$ 20 MeV has been calibrated using radioactive sources and cosmic-ray muons. Subsequently, we have calculated the scintillation efficiency for nuclear recoils, up to a few hundred MeV, using Birks' law in the Monte Carlo simulation. Data from an exposure of 655.1 days were analyzed and neutron-induced recoil events were observed in the energy region from 4 MeV to 50 MeV, corresponding to fast neutrons with kinetic energy up to a few hundred MeV, depending on the scattering angle. Combining with the Monte Carlo simulation, the muon-induced fast neutron flux is determined to be $(2.3 \\pm 0.52 (sta.) \\pm 0.99 (sys.) ) \\times10^{-9}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ (E$_{n}$ $>$ 20 MeV), in a reasonable agreement with the model prediction. The muon flux is found to be ($1.65\\pm 0.02 (sta.) \\pm 0.1 (sys.) ) \\times10^{-7}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ (E$_{\\mu}$ $>$ 1 GeV), consistent with other measurements. As a result, the muon-induced high energy gamma-ray flux is simulated to be 7.08 $\\times$10$^{-7}$cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ (E$_{\\gamma}$ $>$ 1 MeV) for the depth of Soudan.

  11. A critical review of single fuel and interfuel substitution residential energy demand models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Raymond Steve

    1978-01-01

    The overall purpose of this paper is to formulate a model of residential energy demand that adequately analyzes all aspects of residential consumer energy demand behavior and properly treats the penetration of new technologies, ...

  12. Alpha-muon sticking and chaos in muon-catalysed "in flight" d-t fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sachie Kimura; Aldo Bonasera

    2006-07-31

    We discuss the alpha-muon sticking coefficient in the muon-catalysed ``in flight" d-t fusion in the framework of the Constrained Molecular Dynamics model. Especially the influence of muonic chaotic dynamics on the sticking coefficient is brought into focus. The chaotic motion of the muon affects not only the fusion cross section but also the $\\mu-\\alpha$ sticking coefficient. Chaotic systems lead to larger enhancements with respect to regular systems because of the reduction of the tunneling region. Moreover they give smaller sticking probabilities than those of regular events. By utilizing a characteristic of the chaotic dynamics one can avoid losing the muon in the $\\mu$CF cycle. We propose the application of the so-called ``microwave ionization of a Rydberg atom" to the present case which could lead to the enhancement of the reactivation process by using X-rays.

  13. Critical Review The Role of PAS Kinase in Regulating Energy Metabolism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutter, Jared

    and dysregula- tion. Therefore, understanding the regulation of cellular fuel and energy metabolism is of great in nutrient sensing, metabolic regulation, and energy homeostasis, and is a potential therapeutic target and metabolic disease. All living organisms require energy to fuel viability, growth, and reproduction. ATP

  14. Muons for a MuonCollider Kirk T. McDonald

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    ://www.cap.bnl.gov/mumu/mu home page.html Muon Collider R&D Status Report: http://www.cap.bnl.gov/mumu/status report.html Muon­D emittance of 2 \\Theta 10 \\Gamma10 (�mm) 3 . ffl Initial pulse length only 1­2 ns. The Source ffl). 3 #12; Targetry Issues ffl Is a liquid jet target viable? -- 1­ns beam pulse ) shock heating

  15. Spallation Backgrounds in Super-Kamiokande Are Made in Muon-Induced Showers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirley Weishi Li; John F. Beacom

    2015-04-28

    Crucial questions about solar and supernova neutrinos remain unanswered. Super-Kamiokande has the exposure needed for progress, but detector backgrounds are a limiting factor. A leading component is the beta decays of isotopes produced by cosmic-ray muons and their secondaries, which initiate nuclear spallation reactions. Cuts of events after and surrounding muon tracks reduce this spallation decay background by $\\simeq 90\\%$ (at a cost of $\\simeq 20\\%$ deadtime), but its rate at 6--18 MeV is still dominant. A better way to cut this background was suggested in a Super-Kamiokande paper [Bays {\\it et al.}, Phys.~Rev.~D {\\bf 85}, 052007 (2012)] on a search for the diffuse supernova neutrino background. They found that spallation decays above 16 MeV were preceded near the same location by a peak in the apparent Cherenkov light profile from the muon; a more aggressive cut was applied to a limited section of the muon track, leading to decreased background without increased deadtime. We put their empirical discovery on a firm theoretical foundation. We show that almost all spallation decay isotopes are produced by muon-induced showers and that these showers are rare enough and energetic enough to be identifiable. This is the first such demonstration for any detector. We detail how the physics of showers explains the peak in the muon Cherenkov light profile and other Super-K observations. Our results provide a physical basis for practical improvements in background rejection that will benefit multiple studies. For solar neutrinos, in particular, it should be possible to dramatically reduce backgrounds at energies as low as 6 MeV.

  16. Precision Measurements at a Muon Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Dawson

    1995-12-08

    We discuss the potential for making precision measurements of $M_W$ and $M_T$ at a muon collider and the motivations for each measurement. A comparison is made with the precision measurements expected at other facilities. The measurement of the top quark decay width is also discussed.

  17. Thermal Conductivity of Electrons and Muons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gnedin, Oleg Y.

    Thermal Conductivity of Electrons and Muons in Neutron Star Cores O.Y. Gnedin and D.G. Yakovlev A thermal conductivity of dense matter (ae ? ¸ 10 14 g cm \\Gamma3 ) in neutron star cores with various expressions valid for a wide class of models of dense matter. 1 #12; 1 Introduction Thermal conductivity

  18. Critical Materials:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Extraction Separation Processes for Critical Materials in 30- 21 Stage Test Facility (Bruce Moyer) ......

  19. Design and commissioning of a high magnetic field muon spin relaxation spectrometer at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lord, J. S.; McKenzie, I.; Baker, P. J.; Cottrell, S. P.; Giblin, S. R.; Hillier, A. D.; Holsman, B. H.; King, P. J. C.; Nightingale, J. B.; Pratt, F. L.; Rhodes, N. J.; Blundell, S. J.; Lancaster, T.; Good, J.; Mitchell, R.; Owczarkowski, M.; Poli, S.; Scheuermann, R.; Salman, Z.

    2011-07-15

    The high magnetic field (HiFi) muon instrument at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source is a state-of-the-art spectrometer designed to provide applied magnetic fields up to 5 T for muon studies of condensed matter and molecular systems. The spectrometer is optimised for time-differential muon spin relaxation studies at a pulsed muon source. We describe the challenges involved in its design and construction, detailing, in particular, the magnet and detector performance. Commissioning experiments have been conducted and the results are presented to demonstrate the scientific capabilities of the new instrument.

  20. T-535: Oracle Critical Patch Update - January 2011 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLEStatutory Authority SustainXSystem for Award35: Oracle Critical

  1. MULTIPASS MUON RLA RETURN ARCS BASED ON LINEAR COMBINED-FUNCTION MAGNETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasiliy Morozov, Alex Bogacz, Yves Roblin, Kevin Beard

    2011-09-01

    Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA) are an efficient way of accelerating short-lived muons to the multi-GeV energies required for Neutrino Factories and TeV energies required for Muon Colliders. In this paper we present a design of a two-pass RLA return arc based on linear combined function magnets, in which both charge muons with momenta different by a factor of two are transported through the same string of magnets. The arc is composed of 60{sup o}-bending symmetric super cells allowing for a simple arc geometry closing. By adjusting the dipole and quadrupole components of the combined-function magnets, each super cell is designed to be achromatic and to have zero initial and final periodic orbit offsets for both muon momenta. Such a design provides a greater compactness than, for instance, an FFAG lattice with its regular alternating bends and is expected to possess a large dynamic aperture characteristic of linear-field lattices.

  2. Physics validation studies for muon collider detector background simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, Aaron Owen; /Northern Illinois U.

    2011-07-01

    Within the broad discipline of physics, the study of the fundamental forces of nature and the most basic constituents of the universe belongs to the field of particle physics. While frequently referred to as 'high-energy physics,' or by the acronym 'HEP,' particle physics is not driven just by the quest for ever-greater energies in particle accelerators. Rather, particle physics is seen as having three distinct areas of focus: the cosmic, intensity, and energy frontiers. These three frontiers all provide different, but complementary, views of the basic building blocks of the universe. Currently, the energy frontier is the realm of hadron colliders like the Tevatron at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) or the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. While the LHC is expected to be adequate for explorations up to 14 TeV for the next decade, the long development lead time for modern colliders necessitates research and development efforts in the present for the next generation of colliders. This paper focuses on one such next-generation machine: a muon collider. Specifically, this paper focuses on Monte Carlo simulations of beam-induced backgrounds vis-a-vis detector region contamination. Initial validation studies of a few muon collider physics background processes using G4beamline have been undertaken and results presented. While these investigations have revealed a number of hurdles to getting G4beamline up to the level of more established simulation suites, such as MARS, the close communication between us, as users, and the G4beamline developer, Tom Roberts, has allowed for rapid implementation of user-desired features. The main example of user-desired feature implementation, as it applies to this project, is Bethe-Heitler muon production. Regarding the neutron interaction issues, we continue to study the specifics of how GEANT4 implements nuclear interactions. The GEANT4 collaboration has been contacted regarding the minor discrepancies in the neutron interaction cross sections for boron. While corrections to the data files themselves are simple to implement and distribute, it is quite possible, however, that coding changes may be required in G4beamline or even in GEANT4 to fully correct nuclear interactions. Regardless, these studies are ongoing and future results will be reflected in updated releases of G4beamline.

  3. Hybrid Rings of Fixed 8T Superconducting Magnets and Iron Magnets Rapidly Cycling between -2T and +2T for a Muon Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. J. Summers

    2001-08-01

    Two 2200m radius hybrid rings of fixed superconducting magnets and iron magnets ramping at 200 Hz and 330 Hz are used to accelerate muons. Muons are given 25 GeV of RF energy per orbit. Acceleration is from 250 GeV/c to 2400 GeV/c and requires a total of 86 orbits in both rings; 82% of the muons survive. The total power consumption of the iron dipoles is 4 megawatts. Stranded copper conductors and thin Metglas laminations are used to reduce power losses.

  4. Hybrid Rings of Fixed 8T Superconducting Magnets and Iron Magnets Rapidly Cycling between -2T and +2T for a Muon Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Summers, D J

    2001-01-01

    Two 2200m radius hybrid rings of fixed superconducting magnets and iron magnets ramping at 200 Hz and 330 Hz are used to accelerate muons. Muons are given 25 GeV of RF energy per orbit. Acceleration is from 250 GeV/c to 2400 GeV/c and requires a total of 86 orbits in both rings; 82% of the muons survive. The total power consumption of the iron dipoles is 4 megawatts. Stranded copper conductors and thin Metglas laminations are used to reduce power losses.

  5. Critical Vacancy-Driven Phenomena in High-Energy Ion-Implanted Silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haynes, T E

    2008-11-11

    High-energy (MeV) ion implantation is now being rapidly introduced into integrated circuit manufacturing because it promises process simplification and improved device performance. However, high-energy implantation introduces an imbalance of excess vacancies and vacancy-cluster defects in the near-surface region of a silicon crystal. These defects interact with dopants affecting diffusion and electrical activation during subsequent processing. The objective of this project was to develop sufficient understanding of the physical mechanisms underlying the evolution of these defects and interactions with dopant atoms to enable accurate prediction and control of dopant diffusion and defect configurations during processing. This project supported the DOE mission in science and technology by extending ongoing Basic Energy Sciences programs in ion-solid physics and x-ray scattering at ORNL into new areas. It also strengthened the national capability for advanced processing of electronic materials, an enabling technology for DOE programs in energy conversion, use, and defense.

  6. Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) - A critical evaluation by LCA and recommendations for improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humbert, Sebastien; Abeck, Heike; Bali, Nishil; Horvath, Arpad

    2007-01-01

    nuclear energy. The ratios for ecoinvent are approximately 30% lower than for EIO-LCA.LCA and ecoinvent is stemming from the fact that in Europe a higher fraction of electricity comes from hydropower and nuclear

  7. Critical Materials Hub

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Critical materials, including some rare earth elements that possess unique magnetic, catalytic, and luminescent properties, are key resources needed to manufacture products for the clean energy economy. These materials are so critical to the technologies that enable wind turbines, solar panels, electric vehicles, and energy-efficient lighting that DOE's 2010 and 2011 Critical Materials Strategy reported that supply challenges for five rare earth metals—dysprosium, neodymium, terbium, europium, and yttrium—could affect clean energy technology deployment in the coming years.1, 2

  8. Irradiation of Nuclear Track Emulsions with Thermal Neutrons, Heavy Ions, and Muons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. A. Artemenkov; V. Bradnova; A. A. Zaitsev; P. I. Zarubin; I. G. Zarubina; R. R. Kattabekov; K. Z. Mamatkulov; V. V. Rusakova

    2015-08-11

    Exposures of test samples of nuclear track emulsion were analyzed. Angular and energy correlations of products originating from the thermal-neutron-induced reaction n$_{th} + ^{10}$B $\\rightarrow ^{7}$Li $+ (\\gamma) + \\alpha$ were studied in nuclear tack emulsions enriched in boron. Nuclear track emulsions were also irradiated with $^{86}$Kr$^{+17}$ and $^{132}$Xe$^{+26}$ of energy about 1.2 MeV per nucleon. Measurements of ranges of heavy ions in nuclear track emulsions made it possible to determine their energies on the basis of the SRIM model. The formation of high-multiplicity nuclear stars was observed upon irradiating nuclear track emulsions with ultrarelativistic muons. Kinematical features studied in this exposure of nuclear track emulsions for events of the muon-induced splitting of carbon nuclei to three alpha particles are indicative of the nuclear-diffraction interaction mechanism.

  9. Energy Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific Plan as

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPL EnergyPlus,DepartmentFederalJuly 8, 2015 Through

  10. On the correlation between the photoexcitation pathways and the critical energies required for ablation of poly(methyl methacrylate): A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conforti, Patrick F.; Prasad, Manish; Garrison, Barbara J.

    2008-05-15

    The energetics initiating ablation in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) are studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The critical energy to initiate ablation in PMMA following the absorption of photons is investigated for two penetration depths along a range of fluences using a coarse-grained, hybrid Monte Carlo-MD scheme. Both heating and direct bond scission are simulated separately after photon absorption with additional transformation of material occurring via chemical reactions following the photochemical bond cleavage. For a given type of absorption and reaction channel, a critical energy can well describe the amount of energy required to initiate ablation. The simulations show a decrease in the critical energy when a greater amount of photochemistry is introduced in the system. The simulations complement experimental studies and elucidate how enhanced photochemistry lowers ablation thresholds in polymer substrates.

  11. Simulations Study of Muon Response in the Peripheral Regions of the Iron Calorimeter Detector at the India-based Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanishka, R; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Indumathi, D; Sinha, Nita

    2015-01-01

    The magnetized Iron CALorimeter detector (ICAL) which is proposed to be built in the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) laboratory, aims to study atmospheric neutrino oscillations primarily through charged current interactions of muon neutrinos and anti-neutrinos with the detector. The response of muons and charge identification efficiency, angle and energy resolution as a function of muon momentum and direction are studied from GEANT4-based simulations in the peripheral regions of the detector. This completes the characterisation of ICAL with respect to muons over the entire detector and has implications for the sensitivity of ICAL to the oscillation parameters and mass hierarchy compared to the studies where only the resolutions and efficiencies of the central region of ICAL were assumed for the entire detector. Selection criteria for track reconstruction in the peripheral region of the detector were determined from the detector response. On applying these, for the 1--20 GeV energy region of interest fo...

  12. An assessment of criticality safety at the Department of Energy Rocky Flats Plant, Golden, Colorado, July--September 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattson, Roger J.

    1989-09-01

    This is a report on the 1989 independent Criticality Safety Assessment of the Rocky Flats Plant, primarily in response to public concerns that nuclear criticality accidents involving plutonium may have occurred at this nuclear weapon component fabrication and processing plant. The report evaluates environmental issues, fissile material storage practices, ventilation system problem areas, and criticality safety practices. While no evidence of a criticality accident was found, several recommendations are made for criticality safety improvements. 9 tabs.

  13. CP-safe Gravity Mediation and Muon g-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sho Iwamoto; Tsutomu T. Yanagida; Norimi Yokozaki

    2015-02-03

    We propose a CP-safe gravity mediation model, where the phases of the Higgs B parameter, scalar trilinear couplings and gaugino mass parameters are all aligned. Since all dangerous CP violating phases are suppressed, we are now safe to consider low-energy SUSY scenarios. As an application, we consider a gravity mediation model explaining the observed muon $g-2$ anomaly. The CP-safe property originates in two simple assumptions: SUSY breaking in the K\\"ahler potential and a shift symmetry of a SUSY breaking field $Z$. As a result of the shift symmetry, the imaginary part of $Z$ behaves as a QCD axion, leading to an intriguing possibility: the strong CP problem in QCD and the SUSY CP problem are solved simultaneously.

  14. Mercury Handling for the Target System for a Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graves, Van B [ORNL; Mcdonald, K [Princeton University; Kirk, H. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Weggel, Robert [Particle Beam Laser, Inc.; Souchlas, Nicholas [Particle Beam Laser, Inc.; Sayed, H [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Ding, X [University of California, Los Angeles

    2012-01-01

    The baseline target concept for a Muon Collider or Neutrino Factory is a free-stream mercury jet being impacted by an 8-GeV proton beam. The target is located within a 20-T magnetic field, which captures the generated pions that are conducted to a downstream decay channel. Both the mercury and the proton beam are introduced at slight downward angles to the magnetic axis. A pool of mercury serves as a receiving reservoir for the mercury and a dump for the unexpended proton beam. The impact energy of the remaining beam and jet are substantial, and it is required that splashes and waves be controlled in order to minimize the potential for interference of pion production at the target. Design issues discussed in this paper include the nozzle, splash mitigation in the mercury pool, the mercury containment vessel, and the mercury recirculation system.

  15. Toroidal magnetic detector for high resolution measurement of muon momenta

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonanos, P.

    1992-01-07

    A muon detector system including central and end air-core superconducting toroids and muon detectors enclosing a central calorimeter/detector. Muon detectors are positioned outside of toroids and all muon trajectory measurements are made in a nonmagnetic environment. Internal support for each magnet structure is provided by sheets, located at frequent and regularly spaced azimuthal planes, which interconnect the structural walls of the toroidal magnets. In a preferred embodiment, the shape of the toroidal magnet volume is adjusted to provide constant resolution over a wide range of rapidity. 4 figs.

  16. First Measurement of Muon Neutrino Charged Current Quasielastic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Charged Current Quasielastic (CCQE) Double Differential Cross Section Using a high statistics sample of muon neutrino charged current quasielastic (CCQE) events, we report...

  17. Measurement of Neutral Particle Contamination in the MICE Muon Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rob Roy Fletcher; Linda Coney; Gail Hanson

    2011-05-03

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is being built at the ISIS proton synchrotron at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) to measure ionization cooling of a muon beam. During recent data-taking, it was determined that there is a significant background contamination of neutral particles populating the MICE muon beam. This contamination creates unwanted triggers in MICE, thus reducing the percentage of useful data taken during running. This paper describes the analysis done with time-of-flight detectors, used to measure and identify the source of the contamination in both positive and negative muon beams.

  18. Pion and muon decays beyond the standard model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herczeg, P.

    1988-01-01

    We review and discuss the information provided by charged pion and muon decays on physics beyond the minimal standard model. 109 refs., 3 tabs.

  19. The performance of the MICE muon beam line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, Mark Alastair

    2011-10-06

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment is one lattice cell of a cooling channel suitable for conditioning the muon beam at the front end of a Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider. The beam line designed to transport muons into MICE has been installed, and data was collected in 2010. In this paper the method of reconstructing longitudinal momentum and transverse trace space using two timing detectors is discussed, and a preliminary simulation of the performance of a measured beam in the cooling channel is presented.

  20. Muon Figures: 2001/04/19 Chris Waltham

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Learned, John

    TO SAVE SPACE. Figure 6: Muon event: PMT hit times in ns. OMITTED TO SAVE SPACE. A B C W E N S Figure 7

  1. SIMULATION STUDY OF BACKGROUND PARTICLES IN THE MUON TELESCOPE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SIMULATION STUDY OF BACKGROUND PARTICLES IN THE MUON TELESCOPE DETECTOR AT THE STAR EXPERIMENT Matthew Breen Thanks to Dr. Mioduszewski and Yanfang Liu Overview Background ...

  2. Energy: Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific Plan as

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLfor Innovative SolarSavingsAugust 26, 2013Localhigh-resolutioninput to

  3. No Small Task: How Small Businesses are Critical to our Energy Future |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties -DepartmentAvailable forSite |n t e g r i t y - S e r v i c e - E

  4. U-105:Oracle Java SE Critical Patch Update Advisory | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaicsStateof Energy TwoEvent at theArbitrary Code5:Oracle Java

  5. 50 Years After the MoonShot Speech, Critical Advancements in Clean Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment| Department ofApplianceU.S.Department of Energy suppose

  6. nuSTORM - Neutrinos from STORed Muons: Letter of Intent to the Fermilab Physics Advisory Committee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyberd, P.; Smith, D.R.; Coney, L.; Pascoli, S.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Brice, S.J.; Bross, A.D.; Cease, H.; Kopp, J.; Mokhov, N.; Morfin, J.; /Fermilab /Yerkes Observ. /Glasgow U. /Imperial Coll., London /Valencia U. /Jefferson Lab /Kyoto U. /Northwestern U. /Osaka U.

    2012-06-01

    The idea of using a muon storage ring to produce a high-energy ({approx_equal} 50 GeV) neutrino beam for experiments was first discussed by Koshkarev in 1974. A detailed description of a muon storage ring for neutrino oscillation experiments was first produced by Neuffer in 1980. In his paper, Neuffer studied muon decay rings with E{sub {mu}} of 8, 4.5 and 1.5 GeV. With his 4.5 GeV ring design, he achieved a figure of merit of {approx_equal} 6 x 10{sup 9} useful neutrinos per 3 x 10{sup 13} protons on target. The facility we describe here ({nu}STORM) is essentially the same facility proposed in 1980 and would utilize a 3-4 GeV/c muon storage ring to study eV-scale oscillation physics and, in addition, could add significantly to our understanding of {nu}{sub e} and {nu}{sub {mu}} cross sections. In particular the facility can: (1) address the large {Delta}m{sup 2} oscillation regime and make a major contribution to the study of sterile neutrinos, (2) make precision {nu}{sub e} and {bar {nu}}{sub e} cross-section measurements, (3) provide a technology ({mu} decay ring) test demonstration and {mu} beam diagnostics test bed, and (4) provide a precisely understood {nu} beam for detector studies. The facility is the simplest implementation of the Neutrino Factory concept. In our case, 60 GeV/c protons are used to produce pions off a conventional solid target. The pions are collected with a focusing device (horn or lithium lens) and are then transported to, and injected into, a storage ring. The pions that decay in the first straight of the ring can yield a muon that is captured in the ring. The circulating muons then subsequently decay into electrons and neutrinos. We are starting with a storage ring design that is optimized for 3.8 GeV/c muon momentum. This momentum was selected to maximize the physics reach for both oscillation and the cross section physics. See Fig. 1 for a schematic of the facility.

  7. Parameter choices for a muon recirculating linear accelerator from 5 to 63 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, J. S.

    2014-06-19

    A recirculating linear accelerator (RLA) has been proposed to accelerate muons from 5 to 63 GeV for a muon collider. It should be usable both for a Higgs factory and as a stage for a higher energy collider. First, the constraints due to the beam loading are computed. Next, an expression for the longitudinal emittance growth to lowest order in the longitudinal emittance is worked out. After finding the longitudinal expression, a simplified model that describes the arcs and their approximate expression for the time of flight dependence on energy in those arcs is found. Finally, these results are used to estimate the parameters required for the RLA arcs and the linac phase.

  8. Level density of the Hénon-Heiles system above the critical barrier Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Brack; J. Kaidel; P. Winkler; S. N. Fedotkin

    2005-11-05

    We discuss the coarse-grained level density of the H\\'enon-Heiles system above the barrier energy, where the system is nearly chaotic. We use periodic orbit theory to approximate its oscillating part semiclassically via Gutzwiller's semiclassical trace formula (extended by uniform approximations for the contributions of bifurcating orbits). Including only a few stable and unstable orbits, we reproduce the quantum-mechanical density of states very accurately. We also present a perturbative calculation of the stabilities of two infinite series of orbits (R$_n$ and L$_m$), emanating from the shortest librating straight-line orbit (A) in a bifurcation cascade just below the barrier, which at the barrier have two common asymptotic Lyapunov exponents $\\chi_{\\rm R}$ and $\\chi_{\\rm L}$.

  9. A Fusion Development Facility on the Critical Path to Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, V. S.; Stambaugh, R

    2011-01-01

    A fusion development facility (FDF) based on the tokamak approach with normal conducting magnetic field coils is presented. FDF is envisioned as a facility with the dual objective of carrying forward advanced tokamak (AT) physics and enabling the development of fusion energy applications. AT physics enables the design of a compact steady-state machine of moderate gain that can provide the neutron fluence required for FDF's nuclear science development objective. A compact device offers a uniquely viable path for research and development in closing the fusion fuel cycle because of the demand to consume only a moderate quantity of the limited supply of tritium fuel before the technology is in hand for breeding tritium.

  10. A fusion development facility on the critical path to fusion energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, Dr. Vincent; Canik, John; Peng, Yueng Kay Martin

    2011-01-01

    A fusion development facility (FDF) based on the tokamak approach with normal conducting magnetic field coils is presented. FDF is envisioned as a facility with the dual objective of carrying forward advanced tokamak (AT) physics and enabling the development of fusion energy applications. AT physics enables the design of a compact steady-state machine of moderate gain that can provide the neutron fluence required for FDF s nuclear science development objective. A compact device offers a uniquely viable path for research and development in closing the fusion fuel cycle because of the demand to consume only a moderate quantity of the limited supply of tritium fuel before the technology is in hand for breeding tritium.

  11. Critical exponents and phase transition in gold nuclei fragmentation at energies 10.6 and 4.0 GeV/nucleon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Kudzia; B. Wilczynska; H. Wilczynski

    2002-07-25

    An attempt to extract critical exponents gamma, beta and tau from data on gold nuclei fragmentation due to interactions with nuclear emulsion at energies 4.0 A GeV and 10.6 A GeV is presented. Based on analysis of Campi's 2nd charge moments, two subsets of data at each energy are selected from the inclusive data, corresponding to 'liquid' and 'gas' phases. The extracted values of critical exponents from the selected data sets are in agreement with predictions of 'liquid-gas' model of phase transition.

  12. Criticality Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Alsaed

    2004-09-14

    The ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003) presents the methodology for evaluating potential criticality situations in the monitored geologic repository. As stated in the referenced Topical Report, the detailed methodology for performing the disposal criticality analyses will be documented in model reports. Many of the models developed in support of the Topical Report differ from the definition of models as given in the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management procedure AP-SIII.10Q, ''Models'', in that they are procedural, rather than mathematical. These model reports document the detailed methodology necessary to implement the approach presented in the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report and provide calculations utilizing the methodology. Thus, the governing procedure for this type of report is AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses''. The ''Criticality Model'' is of this latter type, providing a process evaluating the criticality potential of in-package and external configurations. The purpose of this analysis is to layout the process for calculating the criticality potential for various in-package and external configurations and to calculate lower-bound tolerance limit (LBTL) values and determine range of applicability (ROA) parameters. The LBTL calculations and the ROA determinations are performed using selected benchmark experiments that are applicable to various waste forms and various in-package and external configurations. The waste forms considered in this calculation are pressurized water reactor (PWR), boiling water reactor (BWR), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Training Research Isotope General Atomic (TRIGA), Enrico Fermi, Shippingport pressurized water reactor, Shippingport light water breeder reactor (LWBR), N-Reactor, Melt and Dilute, and Fort Saint Vrain Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The scope of this analysis is to document the criticality computational method. The criticality computational method will be used for evaluating the criticality potential of configurations of fissionable materials (in-package and external to the waste package) within the repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada for all waste packages/waste forms. The criticality computational method is also applicable to preclosure configurations. The criticality computational method is a component of the methodology presented in ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003). How the criticality computational method fits in the overall disposal criticality analysis methodology is illustrated in Figure 1 (YMP 2003, Figure 3). This calculation will not provide direct input to the total system performance assessment for license application. It is to be used as necessary to determine the criticality potential of configuration classes as determined by the configuration probability analysis of the configuration generator model (BSC 2003a).

  13. The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration The R&D Program for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    , BNL http://puhep1.princeton.edu/mumu/target/ Kirk T. McDonald June 15, 2000 1 #12; The Neutrino with phase­rotation via rf (to compress the bunch energy). Kirk T. McDonald June 15, 2000 2 #12; The Neutrino For 1.5 MW beam Kirk T. McDonald June 15, 2000 3 #12; The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider

  14. Search for muon signal from dark matter annihilations in the Sun with the Baksan Underground Scintillator Telescope for 24.12 years

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boliev, M.M.; Demidov, S.V.; Mikheyev, S.P.; Suvorova, O.V. E-mail: demidov@ms2.inr.ac.ru E-mail: suvorova@cpc.inr.ac.ru

    2013-09-01

    We present a new dataset analysis of the neutrino experiment at the Baksan Underground Scintillator Telescope with muon energy threshold about 1 GeV for the longest exposure time toward the Sun. In search for a signal from self-annihilations of dark matter particles in the center of the Sun we use an updated sample of upward through-going muons for 24.12 years of live time. No observable excess has been found in measured muons relative to expected background from neutrinos of atmospheric origin. We present an improved data analysis procedure and describe it in detail. We set the 90% C.L. new upper limits on expected neutrino and muon fluxes from dark matter annihilations in the Sun, on the corresponding annihilation rates and cross sections of their elastic scattering off proton.

  15. The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration Physics Opportunities with Muon Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    . -- ) Enhanced coupling to Higgs boson(s). -- ) Can store muons in rings. -- ) Lower cost of acceleration. ffl experiments based on innovative particle sources. ffl A full range of new phenomena can be investigated For this we need accelerators with a more cost­effective technology, that is capable of extension to 10's

  16. Measurement of the Positive Muon Lifetime and Determination of the Fermi Constant to Part-per-Million Precision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. M. Webber; V. Tishchenko; Q. ~Peng; S. Battu; R. M. Carey; D. B. Chitwood; J. Crnkovic; P. T. Debevec; S. Dhamija; W. Earle; A. Gafarov; K. Giovanetti; T. P. Gorringe; F. E. Gray; Z. Hartwig; D. W. Hertzog; B. Johnson; P. Kammel; B. Kiburg; S. Kizilgul; J. Kunkle; B. Lauss; I. Logashenko; K. R. Lynch; R. McNabb; J. P. Miller; F. Mulhauser; C. J. G. Onderwater; J. Phillips; S. Rath; B. L. Roberts; P. Winter; B. Wolfe

    2010-12-06

    We report a measurement of the positive muon lifetime to a precision of 1.0 parts per million (ppm); it is the most precise particle lifetime ever measured. The experiment used a time-structured, low-energy muon beam and a segmented plastic scintillator array to record more than 2 x 10^{12} decays. Two different stopping target configurations were employed in independent data-taking periods. The combined results give tau_{mu^+}(MuLan) = 2196980.3(2.2) ps, more than 15 times as precise as any previous experiment. The muon lifetime gives the most precise value for the Fermi constant: G_F(MuLan) = 1.1663788 (7) x 10^-5 GeV^-2 (0.6 ppm). It is also used to extract the mu^-p singlet capture rate, which determines the proton's weak induced pseudoscalar coupling g_P.

  17. Precise determination of muon and electromagnetic shower contents from shower universality property

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Yushkov; M. Ambrosio; C. Aramo; F. Guarino; D. D'Urso; L. Valore

    2010-04-21

    We consider two new aspects of Extensive Air Shower development universality allowing to make accurate estimation of muon and electromagnetic (EM) shower contents in two independent ways. In the first case, to get muon (or EM) signal in water Cherenkov tanks or in scintillator detectors it is enough to know the vertical depth of shower maximum and the total signal in the ground detector. In the second case, the EM signal can be calculated from the primary particle energy and the zenith angle. In both cases the parametrizations of muon and EM signals are almost independent on primary particle nature, energy and zenith angle. Implications of the considered properties for mass composition and hadronic interaction studies are briefly discussed. The present study is performed on 28000 of proton, oxygen and iron showers, generated with CORSIKA 6.735 for $E^{-1}$ spectrum in the energy range log(E/eV)=18.5-20.0 and uniformly distributed in cos^2(theta) in zenith angle interval theta=0-65 degrees for QGSJET II/Fluka interaction models.

  18. The ALICE muon spectrometer: trigger detectors and quarkonia detection in p-p collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gagliardi, Martino

    This work was carried out in the context of the optimisation of the performances of the muon spectrometer of the forthcoming ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC, CERN). The aim of ALICE is the study of nuclear matter at the highest energy densities ever accessed experimentally. More in detail, the focus is on the expected phase transition to a deconfined phase of matter where the degrees of freedom are those of quarks and gluons: the Quark-Gluon Plasma. The conditions for QGP formation are expected to be achieved in highly relativistic heavy ion collisions. The energy in the centre of mass of Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC will be 5.5 TeV per nucleon pair. The ALICE physics program also includes data-taking in p-p collisions at the centre-of-mass-energy of 14 TeV. The ALICE muon spectrometer has been designed for the detection of heavy quarkonia through their muon decay: both theoretical predictions and experimental data obtained at SPS and RHIC indicate that the production of these resonances sho...

  19. Matched Optics of Muon RLA and Non-Scaling FFAG ARCS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V.S. Morozov, S.A. Bogacz, Y. Roblin, K.B. Beard, D. Trbojevic

    2011-03-01

    Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA) are an efficient way of accelerating short-lived muons to multi-GeV energies required for Neutrino Factories and TeV energies required for Muon Colliders. To reduce the number of required return arcs, we employ a Non-Scaling Fixed-Field Alternating-Gradient (NS-FFAG) arc lattice design. We present a complete linear optics design of a muon RLA with two-pass linear NS-FFAG droplet return arcs. The arcs are composed of symmetric cells with each cell designed using combined function magnets with dipole and quadrupole magnetic field components so that the cell is achromatic and has zero initial and final periodic orbit offsets for both passes’ energies. Matching to the linac is accomplished by adjusting linac quadrupole strengths so that the linac optics on each pass is matched to the arc optics. We adjust the difference of the path lengths and therefore of the times of flight of the two momenta in each arc to ensure proper synchronization with the linac. We investigate the dynamic aperture and momentum acceptance of the arcs.

  20. GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION FOR THE NEW MUON COLLIDER HISHAM SAYED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION FOR THE NEW MUON COLLIDER FRONT END HISHAM SAYED BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY FRONT END MEETING 01-28-2014 #12;GLOBALLY OPTIMIZING MUON TARGET & FRONT END 325 Sayed BNL #12;INTRODUCTION & LAYOUT Ã? High performance Optimization Tools on NERSC Ã? Target

  1. SHIELDING STUDIES FOR THE MUON COLLIDER TARGET NICHOLAS SOUCHLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    SHIELDING STUDIES FOR THE MUON COLLIDER TARGET NICHOLAS SOUCHLAS BNL Nov 30, 2010 1 #12;MUON). 6. CRYOGENIC COOLING FOR THE SC SOLENOIDS. 7. MERCURY COLLECTING TANK AND REMOVAL SYSTEM. 8. SHIELDING CONFIGURATIONS (WC BEADS+H2O). 2 #12;REQUIREMENTS/LIMITATIONS PROTON BEAM AND MERCURY JET

  2. The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration Considerations on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Plenary Meeting, KEK Jan 24, 2006 http://puhep1.princeton.edu/mumu/target/ (Presented by M. Zisman) Kirk T.) Kirk T. McDonald ISS Plenary Meeting, KEK, Jan 24, 2006 2 #12;The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider". Kirk T. McDonald ISS Plenary Meeting, KEK, Jan 24, 2006 3 #12;The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider

  3. CMS TECHNICAL DESIGN REPORT FOR THE MUON ENDCAP GEM UPGRADE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colaleo, A; Sharma, A; Tytgat, M

    2015-01-01

    This report describes both the technical design and the expected performance of the Phase-II upgrade, using Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors, of the first endcap station of the CMS muon system. The upgrade is targeted for the second long shutdown of the CERN LHC and is designed to improve the muon trigger and tracking performance at high luminosity. The GEM detectors will add redundancy to the muon system in the 1.6 technology to operate in the high radiation environment present in that region. The first muon endcap station will be instrumented with a double layer of triple-GEM chambers in the 1.6 < |?| < 2.2 region. The detector front-end electronics uses the custom designed VFAT3 chip to provide both fast input for the level-1 muon trigger ...

  4. Path-integral Monte Carlo simulation of 3 vibrational shifts for CO2 in ,,He...n clusters critically tests the HeCO2 potential energy surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le Roy, Robert J.

    Path-integral Monte Carlo simulation of 3 vibrational shifts for CO2 in ,,He...n clusters critically tests the He­CO2 potential energy surface Hui Li,1 Nicholas Blinov,2,3 Pierre-Nicholas Roy,1 2009; accepted 20 February 2009; published online 9 April 2009 Path-integral Monte Carlo simulations

  5. Search for the gamma-branch of the shape isomers of separated U isotopes using muon for nuclide excitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mireshghi, A.

    1982-12-01

    We have searched for back-decay gamma rays from the shape isomeric states in /sup 235/U, /sup 236/U, and /sup 238/U possibly excited in muon radiationless transition. The energies and intensities of gamma rays following muon atomic capture were measured as a function of time after muon stopping. Background was suppressed by requiring that the candidate gamma ray be followed by another gamma ray (..mu..-capture gamma ray). The prompt gamma-ray spectra included the U-muonic x rays. The measured /sup 235/U and /sup 238/U x-ray energies were in good agreement with previously reported results. The x-ray spectrum from /sup 236/U has not been previously reported. The /sup 236/U spectrum is very similar to that of /sup 238/U, except that the K x-rays exhibit an isotope shift of approximately 20 keV, the /sup 236/U energies being higher. In the analysis of the delayed spectra of /sup 236/U and /sup 238/U using the GAMANL peak searching program, and with an effective lower-limit detection efficiency of .15% per stopping muon, no candidate gamma rays for the back decay transitions from the shape isomeric state were observed.

  6. Beam Dynamics Studies for the First Muon Linac of the Neutrino Factory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Bontoiu,M. Aslaninejad,J. Pozimski,Alex Bogacz

    2010-05-01

    Within the Neutrino Factory Project the muon acceleration process involves a complex chain of accelerators including a (single-pass) linac, two recirculating linacs and an FFAG. The linac consists of RF cavities and iron shielded solenoids for transverse focusing and has been previously designed relying on idealized field models. However, to predict accurately the transport and acceleration of a high emittance 30 cm wide beam with 10 % energy spread requires detailed knowledge of fringe field distributions. This article presents results of the front-to-end tracking of the muon beam through numerically simulated realistic field distributions for the shielded solenoids and the RF fields. Real and phase space evolution of the beam has been studied along the linac and the results are presented and discussed.

  7. Search for Light Resonances Decaying into Pairs of Muons as a Signal of New Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, S. [Yerevan Physics Institute(Armenia)

    2011-07-01

    A search for groups of collimated muons is performed using a data sample collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 35 inverse picobarns. The analysis searches for production of new low-mass states decaying into pairs of muons and is designed to achieve high sensitivity to a broad range of models predicting leptonic jet signatures. With no excess observed over the background expectation, upper limits on the production cross section times branching fraction times acceptance are set, ranging from 0.1 to 0.5 pb at the 95% CL depending on event topology. In addition, the results are interpreted in several benchmark models in the context of supersymmetry with a new light dark sector exploring previously inaccessible parameter space.

  8. Performance of the ATLAS Muon Trigger in Run I and Upgrades for Run II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobayashi, Dai; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has taken data at a centre-of-mass energy between 900 GeV and 8 TeV during Run I (2009-2013). The LHC delivered an integrated luminosity of about 20fb-1 in 2012, which required dedicated strategies to guard the highest possible physics output while reducing effectively the event rate. The Muon High Level Trigger has successfully adapted to the changing environment of a low luminosity in 2010 to the luminosities encountered in 2012. The selection strategy has been optimized for the various physics analyses involving muons in the final state. We will present the excellent performance achieved during Run I. In preparation for the next data taking period (Run II) several hardware and software upgrades to the ATLAS Muon Trigger have been performed to deal with the increased trigger rate expected at higher center of mass energy and increased instantaneous luminosity. We will highlight the development of novel algorithms that have been developed to maintain a h...

  9. Performance of the ATLAS Muon Trigger in Run I and Upgrades for Run II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobayashi, Dai; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has taken data at a centre-of-mass energy between 900 GeV and 8 TeV during Run I (2009-2013). The LHC delivered an integrated luminosity of about 20 fb?1 in 2012, which required dedicated strategies to guard the highest possible physics output while reducing effectively the event rate. The Muon High Level Trigger has successfully adapted to the changing environment of a low luminosity in 2010 to the luminosities encountered in 2012. The selection strategy has been optimized for the various physics analyses involving muons in the final state. We will present the excellent performance achieved during Run I. In preparation for the next data taking period (Run II) several hardware and software upgrades to the ATLAS Muon Trigger have been performed to deal with the increased trigger rate expected at higher center of mass energy and increased instantaneous luminosity. We will highlight the development of novel algorithms that have been developed to maintain ...

  10. Critical cavity in the stretched fluid studied using square-gradient density-functional model with triple-parabolic free energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masao Iwamatsu

    2009-04-04

    The generic square-gradient density-functional model with triple-parabolic free energy is used to study the stability of a cavity introduced into the stretched liquid. The various properties of the critical cavity, which is the largest stable cavity within the liquid, are compared with those of the critical bubble of the homogeneous bubble nucleation. It is found that the size of the critical cavity is always smaller than that of the critical bubble, while the work of formation of the former is always higher than the latter in accordance with the conjectures made by Punnathanam and Corti [J. Chem. Phys. {\\bf 119}, 10224 (2003)] deduced from the Lennard-Jones fluids. Therefore their conjectures about the critical cavity size and the work of formation would be more general and valid even for other types of liquid such as metallic liquid or amorphous. However, the scaling relations they found for the critical cavity in the Lennard-Jones fluid are marginally satisfied only near the spinodal.

  11. Searching for onset of quark deconfinement and critical point of QGP phase transition from rapidity distribution in high energy collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Fu-Hu; Lacey, Roy A

    2015-01-01

    Experimental results of the rapidity distributions of negatively charged pions produced in proton-proton (p-p) and beryllium-beryllium (Be-Be) collisions at different beam momentums, measured by the NA61/SHINE Collaboration at the super proton synchrotron (SPS), are described by a revised (three-source) Landau hydrodynamic model. The squared speed-of-sound parameter c^2_s is then extracted from the width of rapidity distribution. There is a knee point appearing at about 40A GeV/c (or 8.8 GeV) in the dependence of c^2_s on incident beam momentum (or center-of-mass energy). This knee point can be possibly regarded as the onset of deconfinement of the quarks and gluons in proton-proton collisions, and the critical point of phase transition from hadronic matter to quark-gluon plasma (QGP) in nucleus-nucleus collisions. It is possible that the quark deconfinement and QGP phase transition happen initially in collisions at 8.8 GeV.

  12. Construccion, calibracion evaluacion del sistema link de alineamiento del espectrometro de muones del experimento CMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calderon A T

    Construccion, calibracion evaluacion del sistema link de alineamiento del espectrometro de muones del experimento CMS

  13. DYNAMICS OF DECAY ELECTRONS AND SYNCHROTRON RADIATION IN A TEV MUON COLLIDER*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McIntyre, Peter

    ) in a TeV muon col- lider present major challenges as heat loads to the super- conducting magnetsDYNAMICS OF DECAY ELECTRONS AND SYNCHROTRON RADIATION IN A TEV MUON COLLIDER* P. McIntyre and A problems are mitigated. 1 MUON DECAY IN A MUON COLLIDER Ankenbrandt et al. [1] summarize the design

  14. A new part-per-million measurement of the positive muon lifetime and determination of the Fermi Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David M. Webber

    2011-09-29

    The Fermi Constant, G_F, describes the strength of the weak force and is determined most precisely from the mean life of the positive muon, tau_mu. Advances in theory have reduced the theoretical uncertainty on G_F as calculated from tau_mu to a few tenths of a part per million (ppm). Until recently, the remaining uncertainty on G_F was entirely experimental and dominated by the uncertainty on tau_mu. We report the MuLan collaboration's recent 1.0 ppm measurement of the positive muon lifetime. This measurement is over a factor of 15 more precise than any previous measurement, and is the most precise particle lifetime ever measured. The experiment used a time-structured low-energy muon beam and an array of plastic scintillators read-out by waveform digitizers and a fast data acquisition system to record over 2 times 10^{12} muon decays. Two different in-vacuum muon-stopping targets were used in separate data-taking periods. The results from these two data-taking periods are in excellent agreement. The combined results give tau_{mu^+}({MuLan})=2196980.3(2.2) ps. This measurement of the muon lifetime gives the most precise value for the Fermi Constant: G_F({MuLan}) = 1.1663788 (7) \\times 10^{-5} {GeV}^{-2} (0.6 ppm). The lifetime is also used to extract the mu^-p singlet capture rate, which determines the proton's weak induced pseudoscalar coupling g_P.

  15. President's 2014 Budget Proposes Critical Investments in Clean...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    President's 2014 Budget Proposes Critical Investments in Clean Energy President's 2014 Budget Proposes Critical Investments in Clean Energy April 17, 2013 - 2:01pm Addthis...

  16. The MICE Muon Beam on ISIS and the beam-line instrumentation of the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICE Collaboration

    2012-03-23

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), which is under construction at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), will demonstrate the principle of ionization cooling as a technique for the reduction of the phase-space volume occupied by a muon beam. Ionization cooling channels are required for the Neutrino Factory and the Muon Collider. MICE will evaluate in detail the performance of a single lattice cell of the Feasibility Study 2 cooling channel. The MICE Muon Beam has been constructed at the ISIS synchrotron at RAL, and in MICE Step I, it has been characterized using the MICE beam-instrumentation system. In this paper, the MICE Muon Beam and beam-line instrumentation are described. The muon rate is presented as a function of the beam loss generated by the MICE target dipping into the ISIS proton beam. For a 1 V signal from the ISIS beam-loss monitors downstream of our target we obtain a 30 KHz instantaneous muon rate, with a neglible pion contamination in the beam.

  17. The MICE Muon Beam on ISIS and the beam-line instrumentation of the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogomilov, M.; et al.

    2012-05-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), which is under construction at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), will demonstrate the principle of ionization cooling as a technique for the reduction of the phase-space volume occupied by a muon beam. Ionization cooling channels are required for the Neutrino Factory and the Muon Collider. MICE will evaluate in detail the performance of a single lattice cell of the Feasibility Study 2 cooling channel. The MICE Muon Beam has been constructed at the ISIS synchrotron at RAL, and in MICE Step I, it has been characterized using the MICE beam-instrumentation system. In this paper, the MICE Muon Beam and beam-line instrumentation are described. The muon rate is presented as a function of the beam loss generated by the MICE target dipping into the ISIS proton beam. For a 1 V signal from the ISIS beam-loss monitors downstream of our target we obtain a 30 KHz instantaneous muon rate, with a neglible pion contamination in the beam.

  18. First direct observation of muon antineutrino disappearance

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamson, P.

    2011-07-05

    This letter reports the first direct observation of muon antineutrino disappearance. The MINOS experiment has taken data with an accelerator beam optimized for ??? production, accumulating an exposure of 1.71 x 1020 protons on target. In the Far Detector, 97 charged current ??? events are observed. The no-oscillation hypothesis predicts 156 events and is excluded at 6.3?. The best fit to oscillation yields |?m?2| = (3.36-0.40 +0.46(stat.) ± 0.06(syst.)) x 10-3 eV2, sin2(2 ??) = 0.86-0.12+0.11 (stat.) ± 0.01(syst.). The MINOS ?? and ??? measurements are consistent at the 2.0% confidence level, assuming identical underlying oscillation parameters.

  19. Design and Construction of Large Size Micromegas Chambers for the Upgrade of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lösel, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Large area Micromegas detectors will be employed for the first time in high-energy physics experiments. A total surface of about $\\mathbf{150~m^2}$ of the forward regions of the Muon Spectrometer of the ATLAS detector at LHC will be equipped with 8-layer Micromegas modules. Each layer covers more than $\\mathbf{2~m^2}$ for a total active area of $\\mathbf{1200~m^2}$. Together with the small strip Thin Gap Chambers they will compose the two New Small Wheels, which will replace the innermost stations of the ATLAS endcap muon tracking system in the 2018/19 shutdown. In order to achieve a 15$\\mathbf{\\%}$ transverse momentum resolution for $\\mathbf{1~TeV}$ muons, in addition to an excellent intrinsic resolution, the mechanical precision of each plane of the assembled module must be as good as $\\mathbf{30~\\mu m}$ along the precision coordinate and $\\mathbf{80~\\mu m}$ perpendicular to the chamber. The design and construction procedure of the Micromegas modules will be presented, as well as the design for the assembly ...

  20. Isolated electrons and muons in events with missing transverse momentum at HERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreev, V; Anthonis, T; Astvatsatourov, A; Babaev, A; Bähr, J; Baranov, P S; Barrelet, E; Bartel, Wulfrin; Baumgartner, S; Becker, J; Beckingham, M; Beglarian, A; Behnke, O; Belousov, A; Berger, C; Berndt, T; Bizot, J C; Böhme, J; Boudry, V; Bracinik, J; Braunschweig, W; Brisson, V; Broker, H B; Brown, D P; Bruncko, Dusan; Büsser, F W; Bunyatyan, A; Burrage, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Caron, S; Cassol-Brunner, F; Chekelian, V; Clarke, D; Collard, Caroline; Contreras, J G; Coppens, Y R; Coughlan, J A; Cousinou, M C; Cox, B E; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Dau, W D; Daum, K; Davidsson, M; Delcourt, B; Delerue, N; Demirchyan, R A; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C A; Dingfelder, J; Dixon, P; Dodonov, V; Dowell, John D; Dubak, A; Duprel, C; Eckerlin, G; Eckstein, D; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eichler, R; Eisele, Franz; Ellerbrock, M; Elsen, E; Erdmann, M; Erdmann, W; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Ferencei, J; Ferron, S; Fleischer, M; Fleischmann, P; Fleming, Y H; Flucke, G; Flügge, G; Fomenko, A; Foresti, I; Formánek, J; Franke, G; Frising, G; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gabathuler, K; Garvey, J; Gassner, J; Gayler, J; Gerhards, R; Gerlich, C; Ghazaryan, S; Görlich, L; Gogitidze, N; Gorbounov, S; Grab, C; Grabskii, V; Grässler, Herbert; Greenshaw, T; Grindhammer, G; Haidt, Dieter; Hajduk, L; Haller, J; Heinemann, B; Heinzelmann, G; Henderson, R C W; Henschel, H; Henshaw, O; Heremans, R; Herrera-Corral, G; Herynek, I; Hildebrandt, M; Hilgers, M; Hiller, K H; Hladky, J; Hoting, P; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R P; Hovhannisyan, A V; Ibbotson, M; Issever, C; Jacquet, M; Jaffré, M; Janauschek, L; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jönsson, L B; Johnson, C; Johnson, D P; Jones, M A S; Jung, H; Kant, D; Kapichine, M; Karlsson, M; Karschnick, O; Katzy, J; Keil, F; Keller, N; Kennedy, J; Kenyon, Ian Richard; Kiesling, C; Kjellberg, P; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, T; Knies, G; Koblitz, B; Kolya, S D; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Koutouev, R; Koutov, A; Kroseberg, J; Krüger, K; Kueckens, J; Kuhr, T; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastoviicka, T; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Leiner, B; Lemrani, R; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; List, B; Lobodzinska, E; Lobodzinski, B; Loktionova, N A; Lubimov, V; Lüders, S; Lüke, D; Lytkin, L; Malden, N; Malinovskii, E I; Mangano, S; Marage, P; Marks, J; Marshall, R; Martyn, H U; Martyniak, J; Maxfield, S J; Meer, D; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Michine, S; Mikocki, S; Milstead, D; Mohrdieck, S; Mondragón, M N; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Müller, K; Murn, P; Nagovizin, V; Naroska, Beate; Naumann, J; Naumann, T; Newman, P R; Niebergall, F; Niebuhr, C B; Nowak, G; Nozicka, M; Olivier, B; Olsson, J E; Ozerov, D; Panassik, V; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Peez, M; Pérez, E; Petrukhin, A; Phillips, J P; Pitzl, D; Pöschl, R; Potachnikova, I; Povh, B; Rauschenberger, J; Reimer, P; Reisert, B; Risler, C; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A A; Rusakov, S V; Rybicki, K; Sankey, D P C; Sauvan, E; Schatzel, S; Scheins, J; Schilling, F P; Schleper, P; Schmidt, D; Schmidt, S; Schmitt, S; Schneider, M; Schoeffel, L; Schöning, A; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, V; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schwanenberger, C; Sedlak, K; Sefkow, F; Shevyakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Sirois, Y; Sloan, Terence; Smirnov, P; Soloviev, Yu; South, D; Spaskov, V N; Specka, A E; Spitzer, H; Stamen, R; Stella, B; Stiewe, J; Strauch, I; Straumann, U; Chechelnitskii, S; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Tomasz, F; Traynor, D; Truöl, P; Tsipolitis, G; Tsurin, I; Turnau, J; Turney, J E; Tzamariudaki, E; Uraev, A; Urban, M; Usik, A; Valkár, S; Valkárová, A; Vallée, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vargas-Trevino, A; Vasilev, S; Vazdik, Ya A; Veelken, C; Vest, A; Vichnevski, A; Volchinski, V; Wacker, K; Wagner, J; Wallny, R; Waugh, B; Weber, G; Weber, R; Wegener, D; Werner, C; Werner, N; Wessels, M; Wessling, B; Winde, M; Winter, G G; Wissing, C; Woerling, E E; Wünsch, E; Wyatt, A C; Zácek, J; Zaleisak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhokin, A; Zomer, F; Zur Nedden, M

    2003-01-01

    A search for events with a high energy isolated electron or muon and missing transverse momentum has been performed at the electron-proton collider HERA using an integrated luminosity of 13.6 pb-1 in e-p scattering and 104.7 pb-1 in e+p scattering. Within the Standard Model such events are expected to be mainly due to W boson production with subsequent leptonic decay. In e-p interactions one event is observed in the electron channel and none in the muon channel, consistent with the expectation of the Standard Model. In the e+p data a total of 18 events are seen in the electron and muon channels compared to an expectation of 12.4 \\pm 1.7 dominated by W production (9.4 \\pm 1.6). Whilst the overall observed number of events is broadly in agreement with the number predicted by the Standard Model, there is an excess of events with transverse momentum of the hadronic system greater than 25 GeV with 10 events found compared to 2.9 \\pm 0.5 expected. The results are used to determine the cross section for events with ...

  1. Balancing particle absorption with structural support of the muon beam stop in muons-to-electrons experimental chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majewski, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is seeking a full conversion from muon to electron. The design for Mu2e is based off MECO, another proposed experiment that sought a full conversion from muon to electron at Brookhaven National Laboratory in the 1990s. Mu2e will provide sensitivity that is four times the sensitivity of the previous experiment, SINDRUM II. Discovering muon to electron conversions could help explain physics beyond the standard model of the particle physics.

  2. Detecting Special Nuclear Material Using Muon-Induced Neutron Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Guardincerri; J. D. Bacon; K. Borodzin; J. M. Durham; J. M. Fabritius II; A. Hecht; E. C. Milner; H. Miyadera; C. L. Morris; J. O. Perry; D. Poulson

    2015-03-25

    The penetrating ability of cosmic ray muons makes them an attractive probe for imaging dense materials. Here, we describe experimental results from a new technique that uses neutrons generated by cosmic-ray muons to identify the presence of special nuclear material (SNM). Neutrons emitted from SNM are used to tag muon-induced fission events in actinides and laminography is used to form images of the stopping material. This technique allows the imaging of SNM-bearing objects tagged using muon tracking detectors located above or to the side of the objects, and may have potential applications in warhead verification scenarios. During the experiment described here we did not attempt to distinguish the type or grade of the SNM.

  3. Fermilab | Newsroom | Press Releases | May 8, 2013: Muon g-2...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High Res Crews work to attach the red stabilizing apparatus to the Muon g-2 rings at Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York in preparation for moving them over land and sea to...

  4. Superconducting magnets for muon capture and phase rotation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    of Various Cases for Superconducti ng Magnets Inside andTransactions on Applied Superconductivity 7, No 2. P 642 (LBNL-43998 SC-MAG-683 SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS FOR MUON

  5. Study of cosmic ray events with high muon multiplicity using the ALICE detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ALICE Collaboration

    2015-07-27

    ALICE is one of four large experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider near Geneva, specially designed to study particle production in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Located 52 meters underground with 28 meters of overburden rock, it has also been used to detect muons produced by cosmic ray interactions in the upper atmosphere. In this paper, we present the multiplicity distribution of these atmospheric muons and its comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. This analysis exploits the large size and excellent tracking capability of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber. A special emphasis is given to the study of high multiplicity events containing more than 100 reconstructed muons and corresponding to a muon areal density $\\rho_{\\mu} > 5.9~$m$^{-2}$. Similar events have been studied in previous underground experiments such as ALEPH and DELPHI at LEP. While these experiments were able to reproduce the measured muon multiplicity distribution with Monte Carlo simulations at low and intermediate multiplicities, their simulations failed to describe the frequency of the highest multiplicity events. In this work we show that the high multiplicity events observed in ALICE stem from primary cosmic rays with energies above $10^{16}$ eV and that the frequency of these events can be successfully described by assuming a heavy mass composition of primary cosmic rays in this energy range. The development of the resulting air showers was simulated using the latest version of QGSJET to model hadronic interactions. This observation places significant constraints on alternative, more exotic, production mechanisms for these events.

  6. Measurement of muon plus proton final states in ? ? interactions on hydrocarbon at ‹ E? › = 4.2 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Walton, T.; Betancourt, M.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Bustamante, M.?J.; Butkevich, A.; Martinez Caicedo, D.?A.; et al

    2015-04-01

    A study of charged-current muon neutrino scattering on hydrocarbon in which the final state includes a muon, at least one proton, and no pions is presented. Although this signature has the topology of neutrino quasielastic scattering from neutrons, the event sample contains contributions from quasielastic and inelastic processes where pions are absorbed in the nucleus. The analysis accepts events with muon production angles up to 70° and proton kinetic energies greater than 110 MeV. The cross section, when based completely on hadronic kinematics, is well described by a relativistic Fermi gas nuclear model including the neutrino event generator modeling formore »inelastic processes and particle transportation through the nucleus. This is in contrast to the quasielastic cross section based on muon kinematics, which is best described by an extended model that incorporates multinucleon correlations. This measurement guides the formulation of a complete description of neutrino-nucleus interactions that encompasses the hadronic as well as the leptonic aspects of this process.« less

  7. Measurement of muon plus proton final states in ?? interactions on hydrocarbon at ? > = 4.2 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Walton, T.

    2015-04-01

    A study of charged-current muon neutrino scattering on hydrocarbon in which the final state includes a muon, at least one proton, and no pions is presented. Although this signature has the topology of neutrino quasielastic scattering from neutrons, the event sample contains contributions from quasielastic and inelastic processes where pions are absorbed in the nucleus. The analysis accepts events with muon production angles up to 70° and proton kinetic energies greater than 110 MeV. The cross section, when based completely on hadronic kinematics, is well described by a relativistic Fermi gas nuclear model including the neutrino event generator modeling formore »inelastic processes and particle transportation through the nucleus. This is in contrast to the quasielastic cross section based on muon kinematics, which is best described by an extended model that incorporates multinucleon correlations. As a result, this measurement guides the formulation of a complete description of neutrino-nucleus interactions that encompasses the hadronic as well as the leptonic aspects of this process.« less

  8. Measurement of muon plus proton final states in ? ? interactions on hydrocarbon at ‹ E? › = 4.2 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Walton, T.; Betancourt, M.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Bustamante, M.?J.; Butkevich, A.; Martinez Caicedo, D.?A.; Carneiro, M.?F.; Castromonte, C.?M.; Christy, M.?E.; Chvojka, J.; da Motta, H.; Datta, M.; Devan, J.; Dytman, S.?A.; Díaz, G.?A.; Eberly, B.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Fiorentini, G.?A.; Gago, A.?M.; Gallagher, H.; Gran, R.; Harris, D.?A.; Higuera, A.; Hurtado, K.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Kulagin, S.?A.; Le, T.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W.?A.; Marshall, C.?M.; Martin Mari, C.; McFarland, K.?S.; McGivern, C.?L.; McGowan, A.?M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J.?G.; Mousseau, J.; Muhlbeier, T.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J.?K.; Norrick, A.; Osta, J.; Paolone, V.; Park, J.; Patrick, C.?E.; Perdue, G.?N.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ransome, R.?D.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rodrigues, P.?A.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Schmitz, D.?W.; Simon, C.; Snider, F.?D.; Sobczyk, J.?T.; Solano Salinas, C.?J.; Tagg, N.; Tice, B.?G.; Valencia, E.; Wolcott, J.; Wospakrik, M.; Zavala, G.; Zhang, D.; Ziemer, B.?P.; (MINERvA Collaboration)

    2015-04-01

    A study of charged-current muon neutrino scattering on hydrocarbon in which the final state includes a muon, at least one proton, and no pions is presented. Although this signature has the topology of neutrino quasielastic scattering from neutrons, the event sample contains contributions from quasielastic and inelastic processes where pions are absorbed in the nucleus. The analysis accepts events with muon production angles up to 70° and proton kinetic energies greater than 110 MeV. The cross section, when based completely on hadronic kinematics, is well described by a relativistic Fermi gas nuclear model including the neutrino event generator modeling for inelastic processes and particle transportation through the nucleus. This is in contrast to the quasielastic cross section based on muon kinematics, which is best described by an extended model that incorporates multinucleon correlations. This measurement guides the formulation of a complete description of neutrino-nucleus interactions that encompasses the hadronic as well as the leptonic aspects of this process.

  9. Discovering Tau and Muon Solar Neutrino Flares above backgrounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Fargion; F. Moscato

    2004-07-11

    Solar neutrino flares astronomy is at the edge of its discover. High energy flare particles (protons, alpha) whose self scattering within the solar corona is source of a rich prompt charged pions are also source of sharp solar neutrino "burst" (at tens-hundred MeV) produced by their pion-muon primary decay in flight. This brief (minute) solar neutrino "burst" at largest peak overcome by four-five order of magnitude the steady atmospheric neutrino noise at the Earth. Later on, solar flare particles hitting the terrestrial atmosphere may marginally increase the atmospheric neutrino flux without relevant consequences. Largest prompt "burst" solar neutrino flare may be detected in present or better in future largest neutrino underground neutrino detectors. Our estimate for the recent and exceptional October - November 2003 solar flares gives a number of events above or just near unity for Super-Kamiokande. The neutrino spectra may reflect in a subtle way the neutrino flavour mixing in flight. A surprising tau appearance may even occur for a hard ({E}_{nu}_{mu}--> {E}_{nu}_{tau} > 4 GeV) flare spectra. A comparison of the solar neutrino flare (at their birth place on Sun and after oscillation on the arrival on the Earth) with other neutrino foreground is here described and it offer an independent road map to disentangle the neutrino flavour puzzles and its secret flavour mixing angles .

  10. Muon Anomaly and Dark Parity Violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hooman Davoudiasl; Hye-Sung Lee; William J. Marciano

    2012-07-06

    The muon anomalous magnetic moment exhibits a 3.6 \\sigma discrepancy between experiment and theory. One explanation requires the existence of a light vector boson, Z_d (the dark Z), with mass 10 - 500 MeV that couples weakly to the electromagnetic current through kinetic mixing. Support for such a solution also comes from astrophysics conjectures regarding the utility of a U(1)_d gauge symmetry in the dark matter sector. In that scenario, we show that mass mixing between the Z_d and ordinary Z boson introduces a new source of "dark" parity violation which is potentially observable in atomic and polarized electron scattering experiments. Restrictive bounds on the mixing (m_{Z_d} / m_Z) \\delta are found from existing atomic parity violation results, \\delta^2 < 2 x 10^{-5}. Combined with future planned and proposed polarized electron scattering experiments, a sensitivity of \\delta^2 ~ 10^{-6} is expected to be reached, thereby complementing direct searches for the Z_d boson.

  11. Stability of critical bubble in stretched fluid of square-gradient density-functional model with triple-parabolic free energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masao Iwamatsu; Yutaka Okabe

    2010-06-11

    The square-gradient density-functional model with triple-parabolic free energy, that was used previously to study the homogeneous bubble nucleation [J. Chem. Phys. 129, 104508 (2008)], is used to study the stability of the critical bubble nucleated within the bulk under-saturated stretched fluid. The stability of the bubble is studied by solving the Schr\\"odinger equation for the fluctuation. The negative eigenvalue corresponds to the unstable growing mode of the fluctuation. Our results show that there is only one negative eigenvalue whose eigenfunction represents the fluctuation that corresponds to the isotropically growing or shrinking nucleus. In particular, this negative eigenvalue survives up to the spinodal point. Therefore the critical bubble is not fractal or ramified near the spinodal.

  12. SINGLE BUNCH COLLECTIVE EFFECTS IN MUON COLLIDERS Wen-Hao Cheng, Andrew M. Sessler, Jonathan S. Wurtele

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    experiences can be modeled as having two parts, one is due to the radio frequency (rf) cavities, and the other of Energy under contract No. EDDEFG-03-95ER-40936, DE-AC03-76SF00098 and DE-AC02- 76CHO3000 where Krf(z) = e the impacts and the cures of collective instabilities for the muon collider. Some important simula- tion

  13. Elliptic flow of muons from heavy-flavour hadron decays at forward...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Elliptic flow of muons from heavy-flavour hadron decays at forward rapidity in Pb-Pb collisions at sNN2.76 TeV Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Elliptic flow of muons...

  14. A New ATLAS Muon CSC Readout System with System on Chip Technology...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A New ATLAS Muon CSC Readout System with System on Chip Technology on ATCA Platform Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A New ATLAS Muon CSC Readout System with System on...

  15. A Critical Analysis of the Viability and Impacts of Solar Energy Carve-Outs in Renewable Portfolio Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Aaron D.

    2010-12-17

    Numerous states have implemented legislation to advance the use of specific renewable energy resources, most notably solar. However, solar energy is accompanied by several deficiencies – including high costs, limited ...

  16. The New Energy Management Frontier: The Critical Role of a Systematic Management Approach in Making Technology Improvements Successful 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feldman, J.

    2003-01-01

    , coincided with savings in resource usage worth in excess of $750,000 per year. Actual improvements were achieved through implementing policies and procedures, an energy management information system plus better utilization of compressed air systems... playa pivotal role in the quest for increased energy efficiency. However, sophisticated industrial energy users are increasingly learning that technology alone cannot drive long-tenn, sustainable reductions in energy cost. The role of people within...

  17. Validation of nuclear criticality safety software and 27 energy group ENDF/B-IV cross sections. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, B.L. Jr. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States); D`Aquila, D.M. [Lockheed Martin Utility Services, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The original validation report, POEF-T-3636, was documented in August 1994. The document was based on calculations that were executed during June through August 1992. The statistical analyses in Appendix C and Appendix D were completed in October 1993. This revision is written to clarify the margin of safety being used at Portsmouth for nuclear criticality safety calculations. This validation gives Portsmouth NCS personnel a basis for performing computerized KENO V.a calculations using the Lockheed Martin Nuclear Criticality Safety Software. The first portion of the document outlines basic information in regard to validation of NCSS using ENDF/B-IV 27-group cross sections on the IBM3090 at ORNL. A basic discussion of the NCSS system is provided, some discussion on the validation database and validation in general. Then follows a detailed description of the statistical analysis which was applied. The results of this validation indicate that the NCSS software may be used with confidence for criticality calculations at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. For calculations of Portsmouth systems using the specified codes and systems covered by this validation, a maximum k{sub eff} including 2{sigma} of 0.9605 or lower shall be considered as subcritical to ensure a calculational margin of safety of 0.02. The validation of NCSS on the IBM 3090 at ORNL was extended to include NCSS on the IBM 3090 at K-25.

  18. System Wide Dynamic Power Management for Weakly Hard Real-Time Systems Energy reduction is critical to increase the mobility and battery life for today's pervasive computing systems. At the same

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quan, Gang

    System Wide Dynamic Power Management for Weakly Hard Real-Time Systems Abstract Energy reduction time, energy reduction must be subject to the real-time constraints and quality of service (Qo of Service, I/O devices 1 Introduction Energy conservation has come to be recognized as a critical issue

  19. Electron-muon heat conduction in neutron star cores via the exchange of transverse plasmons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. S. Shternin; D. G. Yakovlev

    2007-05-14

    We calculate the thermal conductivity of electrons and muons kappa_{e-mu} produced owing to electromagnetic interactions of charged particles in neutron star cores and show that these interactions are dominated by the exchange of transverse plasmons (via the Landau damping of these plasmons in nonsuperconducting matter and via a specific plasma screening in the presence of proton superconductivity). For normal protons, the Landau damping strongly reduces kappa_{e-mu} and makes it temperature independent. Proton superconductivity suppresses the reduction and restores the Fermi-liquid behavior kappa_{e-mu} ~ 1/T. Comparing with the thermal conductivity of neutrons kappa_n, we obtain kappa_{e-mu}> kappa_n for T>2 GK in normal matter and for any T in superconducting matter with proton critical temperatures T_c>3e9 K. The results are described by simple analytic formulae.

  20. Measurements of the electron and muon inclusive cross-sections in proton–proton collisions at ?s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    This Letter presents measurements of the differential cross-sections for inclusive electron and muon production in proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of ?s = 7 TeV using data collected by the ATLAS detector ...

  1. The Atmospheric Muon Charge Ratio at the MINOS Near Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Jong, J.K.; /IIT, Chicago /Oxford U.

    2011-11-01

    The magnetized MINOS near detector can accurately determine the charge sign of atmospheric muons, this facilitates a measurement of the atmospheric muon charge ratio. To reduce the systematic error associated with geometric bias and acceptance we have combined equal periods of data obtained with opposite magnetic field polarities. We report a charge ratio of 1.2666 {+-} 0.0015(stat.){sub -0.0088}{sup +0.0096}(syst.) at a mean E{sub {mu},0{sup cos}}({theta}) = 63 GeV. This measurement is consistent with the world average but significantly lower than the earlier observation at the MINOS far detector. This increase is shown to be consistent with the hypothesis that a greater fraction of the observed muons arise from kaon decay within the cosmic ray shower.

  2. Nuclear Waste Imaging and Spent Fuel Verification by Muon Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonkmans, G; Jewett, C; Thompson, M

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the use of cosmic ray muons to image the contents of shielded containers and detect high-Z special nuclear materials inside them. Cosmic ray muons are a naturally occurring form of radiation, are highly penetrating and exhibit large scattering angles on high Z materials. Specifically, we investigated how radiographic and tomographic techniques can be effective for non-invasive nuclear waste characterization and for nuclear material accountancy of spent fuel inside dry storage containers. We show that the tracking of individual muons, as they enter and exit a structure, can potentially improve the accuracy and availability of data on nuclear waste and the contents of Dry Storage Containers (DSC) used for spent fuel storage at CANDU plants. This could be achieved in near real time, with the potential for unattended and remotely monitored operations. We show that the expected sensitivity, in the case of the DSC, exceeds the IAEA detection target for nuclear material accountancy.

  3. Intense Muon Beams for Experiments at Project X

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.M. Ankenbrandt, R.P. Johnson, C. Y. Yoshikawa, V.S. Kashikhin, D.V. Neuffer, J. Miller, R.A. Rimmer

    2011-03-01

    A coherent approach for providing muon beams to several experiments for the intensity-frontier program at Project X is described. Concepts developed for the front end of a muon collider/neutrino factory facility, such as phase rotation and ionization cooling, are applied, but with significant differences. High-intensity experiments typically require high-duty-factor beams pulsed at a time interval commensurate with the muon lifetime. It is challenging to provide large RF voltages at high duty factor, especially in the presence of intense radiation and strong magnetic fields, which may preclude the use of superconducting RF cavities. As an alternative, cavities made of materials such as ultra-pure Al and Be, which become very good –but not super– conductors at cryogenic temperatures, can be used.

  4. Alternative muon frontend for the International Design Study (IDS) A. Alekou, Imperial College, London, UK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Alternative muon front­end for the International Design Study (IDS) A. Alekou, Imperial College discuss alternative designs of the muon capture front end of the Neutrino Factory International Design measurements of neutrino oscillation parame­ ters. The present paper discusses alternative muon capture

  5. Scaling properties of critical bubble of homogeneous nucleation in stretched fluid of square-gradient density-functional model with triple-parabolic free energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masao Iwamatsu

    2008-08-07

    The square-gradient density-functional model with triple-parabolic free energy is used to study homogeneous bubble nucleation in a stretched liquid to check the scaling rule for the work of formation of the critical bubble as a function of scaled undersaturation $\\Delta\\mu/\\Delta\\mu_{\\rm spin}$, the difference in chemical potential $\\Delta\\mu$ between the bulk undersaturated and saturated liquid divided by $\\Delta\\mu_{\\rm spin}$ between the liquid spinodal and saturated liquid. In contrast to our study, a similar density-functional study for a Lennard-Jones liquid by Shen and Debenedetti [J. Chem. Phys. {\\bf 114}, 4149 (2001)] found that not only the work of formation but other various quantities related to the critical bubble show the scaling rule, however, we found virtually no scaling relationships in our model near the coexistence. Although some quantities show almost perfect scaling relations near the spinodal, the work of formation divided by the value deduced from the classical nucleation theory shows no scaling in this model even though it correctly vanishes at the spinodal. Furthermore, the critical bubble does not show any anomaly near the spinodal as predicted many years ago. In particular, our model does not show diverging interfacial width at the spinodal, which is due to the fact that compressibility remains finite until the spinodal is reached in our parabolic models.

  6. Critical Materials:

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartmentEnergyEvery Thanksgiving,is designed asAMO hosted

  7. Muon-Induced Background Study for Underground Laboratories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. -M. Mei; A. Hime

    2005-12-06

    We provide a comprehensive study of the cosmic-ray muon flux and induced activity as a function of overburden along with a convenient parameterization of the salient fluxes and differential distributions for a suite of underground laboratories ranging in depth from $\\sim$1 to 8 km.w.e.. Particular attention is given to the muon-induced fast neutron activity for the underground sites and we develop a Depth-Sensitivity-Relation to characterize the effect of such background in experiments searching for WIMP dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay.

  8. A New Measurement of the Muon Magnetic Anomaly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Jungmann; :; g-2 collaboration

    2000-02-08

    The muon magnetic anomaly may contain contributions from physics beyond the standard model. At the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) a precision experiment aims for a measurement of the muon magnetic anomaly $a_{\\mu}$ to 0.35 ppm, where conclusions about various theoretical approaches beyond standard theory can be expected. The difference between the spin precession and cyclotron frequencies is measured in a magnetic storage ring with highly homogeneous field. Data taking is in progress and part of all recorded data has been analyzed. Combining all experimental results to date yields preliminarily $a_{\\mu}(expt)=1~165~921(5) \\cdot 10^{-9}$ (4 ppm) in agreement with standard theory.

  9. Anomalous magnetic moment of the muon in a dispersive approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladyslav Pauk; Marc Vanderhaeghen

    2014-09-03

    We present a new general dispersive formalism for evaluating the hadronic light-by-light scattering contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon. In the suggested approach, this correction is related to the imaginary part of the muon's electromagnetic vertex function. The latter may be directly related to measurable hadronic processes by means of unitarity and analyticity. As a test we apply the introduced formalism to the case of meson pole exchanges and find agreement with the direct two-loop calculation.

  10. Muon g-2 Anomaly and Dark Leptonic Gauge Boson

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Hye-Sung [W& M

    2014-11-01

    One of the major motivations to search for a dark gauge boson of MeV-GeV scale is the long-standing muon g-2 anomaly. Because of active searches such as fixed target experiments and rare meson decays, the muon g-2 favored parameter region has been rapidly reduced. With the most recent data, it is practically excluded now in the popular dark photon model. We overview the issue and investigate a potentially alternative model based on the gauged lepton number or U(1)_L, which is under different experimental constraints.

  11. Lowest Order Hadronic Contribution to the Muon g-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher Aubin; Tom Blum

    2005-09-20

    We present the most recent lattice results for the lowest-order hadronic contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment using 2+1 flavor improved staggered fermions. A precise fit to the low-q^2 region of the vacuum polarization is necessary to accurately extract the muon g-2. To obtain this fit, we use staggered chiral perturbation theory with the inclusion of the vector particles as resonances, to evaluate the vacuum polarization. We discuss the preliminary fit results and attendant systematic uncertainties, paying particular attention to the relative contributions of the pions and vector mesons.

  12. Design and Construction of Large Size Micromegas Chambers for the Upgrade of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philipp Lösel; Ralph Müller

    2015-08-11

    Large area Micromegas detectors will be employed for the first time in high-energy physics experiments. A total surface of about $\\mathbf{150~m^2}$ of the forward regions of the Muon Spectrometer of the ATLAS detector at LHC will be equipped with 8-layer Micromegas modules. Each layer covers more than $\\mathbf{2~m^2}$ for a total active area of $\\mathbf{1200~m^2}$. Together with the small strip Thin Gap Chambers they will compose the two New Small Wheels, which will replace the innermost stations of the ATLAS endcap muon tracking system in the 2018/19 shutdown. In order to achieve a 15$\\mathbf{\\%}$ transverse momentum resolution for $\\mathbf{1~TeV}$ muons, in addition to an excellent intrinsic resolution, the mechanical precision of each plane of the assembled module must be as good as $\\mathbf{30~\\mu m}$ along the precision coordinate and $\\mathbf{80~\\mu m}$ perpendicular to the chamber. The design and construction procedure of the Micromegas modules will be presented, as well as the design for the assembly of modules onto the New Small Wheel. Emphasis will be on the methods developed to achieve the challenging mechanical precision. Measurements and simulations of deformations created on chamber prototypes as a function of thermal gradients, internal stress (mesh tension and module fixation on supports) and gas over-pressure were essential in the development of the final design. During installation and operation all deformations and relative misalignments will be monitored by an optical alignment system and compensated in the tracking software.

  13. A measurement of neutrino oscillations with muon neutrinos in the MINOS experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, Stephen James; /William-Mary Coll.

    2011-01-01

    Experimental evidence has established that neutrino flavor states evolve over time. A neutrino of a particular flavor that travels some distance can be detected in a different neutrino flavor state. The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long-baseline experiment that is designed to study this phenomenon, called neutrino oscillations. MINOS is based at Fermilab near Chicago, IL, and consists of two detectors: the Near Detector located at Fermilab, and the Far Detector, which is located in an old iron mine in Soudan, MN. Both detectors are exposed to a beam of muon neutrinos from the NuMI beamline, and MINOS measures the fraction of muon neutrinos that disappear after traveling the 734 km between the two detectors. One can measure the atmospheric neutrino mass splitting and mixing angle by observing the energy-dependence of this muon neutrino disappearance. MINOS has made several prior measurements of these parameters. Here I describe recently-developed techniques used to enhance our sensitivity to the oscillation parameters, and I present the results obtained when they are applied to a dataset that is twice as large as has been previously analyzed. We measure the mass splitting {Delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2} = (2.32{sub -0.08}{sup +0.12}) x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}/c{sup 4} and the mixing angle sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 32}) > 0.90 at 90% C.L. These results comprise the world's best measurement of the atmospheric neutrino mass splitting. Alternative disappearance models are also tested. The neutrino decay hypothesis is disfavored at 7.2{sigma} and the neutrino quantum decoherence hypothesis is disfavored at 9.0{sigma}.

  14. Measurement of Muon Neutrino Quasi-Elastic Scattering on a Hydrocarbon Target at E_{\

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiorentini, G A; Rodrigues, P A; Aliaga, L; Altinok, O; Bodek, A; Boehnlein, D; Bradford, R; Brooks, W K; Budd, H; Butkevich, A; Caicedo, D A M; Castromonte, C M; Christy, M E; Chvojka, J; da Motta, H; Damiani, D S; Danko, I; Datta, M; Day, M; DeMaat, R; Devan, J; Diaz, G A; Dytman, S A; Eberly, B; Edmondson, D A; Felix, J; Fields, L; Fitzpatrick, T; Gago, A M; Gallagher, H; Gobbi, B; Gran, R; Harris, D A; Higuera, A; Howley, I J; Hurtado, K; Jerkins, M; Kafka, T; Kanter, M O; Keppel, C; Kordosky, M; Krajeski, A H; Kulagin, S A; Le, T; Leister, A G; Maggi, G; Maher, E; Manly, S; Mann, W A; Marshall, C M; McFarland, K S; McGivern, C L; McGowan, A M; Mislivec, A; Morfin, J G; Mousseau, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Ochoa, N; O'Connor, C D; Osta, J; Palomino, J L; Paolone, V; Park, J; Patrick, C E; Perdue, G N; Pena, C; Rakotondravohitra, L; Ransome, R D; Ray, H; Ren, L; Sassin, K E; Schellman, H; Schneider, R M; Schulte, E C; Sedita, P; Simon, C; Snider, F D; Snyder, M C; Sobczyk, J T; Salinas, C J Solano; Tagg, N; Tan, W; Tice, B G; Tzanakos, G; Velasquez, J P; Walding, J; Walton, T; Wolcott, J; Wolthuis, B A; Zavala, G; Zhang, D; Ziemer, B P

    2013-01-01

    We report a study of muon neutrino charged-current quasi-elastic events in the segmented scintillator inner tracker of the MINERvA experiment running in the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab. The events were selected by requiring a {\\mu}^- and low calorimetric recoil energy separated from the interaction vertex. We measure the flux-averaged differential cross-section, d{\\sigma}/dQ^2, and study the low energy particle content of the final state. Deviations are found between the measured d{\\sigma}/dQ^2 and the expectations of a model of independent nucleons in a relativistic Fermi gas. We also observe an excess of energy near the vertex consistent with multiple protons in the final state.

  15. Production of Charged Hadrons in Muon Deep Inelastic Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammed Sultan Al-Buriahi; Mohammed Tarek Hussein; Mohammed Tawfik Ghoneim

    2015-08-06

    The production of charged hadrons, in muon Deep inelastic scattering (DIS), at light and heavy target is presented. The particles produced by the interaction with Xenon (Xe) is compared with that produced by the interaction with Deuteron (D), to obtain information on cascading process, forward-backward productions, and the rapidity distribution in different bins of the invariant mass of the interacting system W.

  16. A MUON STORAGE RING FOR NEUTRINO OSCILLATIONS EXPERIMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    856 A MUON STORAGE RING FOR NEUTRINO OSCILLATIONS EXPERIMENTS David Cline University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wl 53706 David Neuffer Fermilab,* Batavia, IL 60510 ABSTRACT · + decay in a ~- Storage Ring can as a possible first ~ storage ring. INTRODUCTION Recent experimental reports 1'2 of a non-zero ~ mass and of e

  17. Neutrinos from Stored Muons nuSTORM: Expression of Interest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adey, D; Ankenbrandt, C M; Asfandiyarov, R; Back, J J; Barker, G; Baussan, E; Bayes, R; Bhadra, S; Blackmore, V; Blondel, A; Bogacz, S A; Booth, C; Boyd, S B; Bravar, A; Brice, S J; Bross, A D; Cadoux, F; Cease, H; Cervera, A; Cobb, J; Colling, D; Coney, L; Dobbs, A; Dobson, J; Donini, A; Dornan, P J; Dracos, M; Dufour, F; Edgecock, R; Evans, J; Geelhoed, M; George, M A; Ghosh, T; de Gouvea, A; Gomez-Cadenas, J J; Haesler, A; Hanson, G; Harrison, P F; Hartz, M; Hernandez, P; Hernando-Morata, J A; Hodgson, P J; Huber, P; Izmaylov, A; Karadhzov, Y; Kobilarcik, T; Kopp, J; Kormos, L; Korzenev, A; Kurup, A; Kuno, Y; Kyberd, P; Lagrange, J P; Laing, A M; Link, J; Liu, A; Long, K R; McCauley, N; McDonald, K T; Mahn, K; Martin, C; Martin, J; Mena, O; Mishra, S R; Mokhov, N; Morfin, J; Mori, Y; Murray, W; Neuffer, D; Nichol, R; Noah, E; Palmer, M A; Parke, S; Pascoli, S; Pasternak, J; Popovic, M; Ratoff, P; Ravonel, M; Rayner, M; Ricciardi, S; Rogers, C; Rubinov, P; Santos, E; Sato, A; Scantamburlo, E; Sedgbeer, J K; Smith, D R; Smith, P J; Sobczyk, J T; Soldner-Rembold, S; Soler, F J P; Sorel, M; Stahl, A; Stanco, L; Stamoulis, P; Striganov, S; Tanaka, H; Taylor, I J; Touramanis, C; Tunnell, C D; Uchida, Y; Vassilopoulos, N; Wascko, M O; Wilking, M J; Weber, A; Wildner, E; Winter, W; Yang, U K

    2013-01-01

    The nuSTORM facility has been designed to deliver beams of electron and muon neutrinos from the decay of a stored muon beam with a central momentum of 3.8 GeV/c and a momentum spread of 10%. The facility is unique in that it will: serve the future long- and short-baseline neutrino-oscillation programmes by providing definitive measurements of electron-neutrino- and muon-neutrino-nucleus cross sections with percent-level precision; allow searches for sterile neutrinos of exquisite sensitivity to be carried out; and constitute the essential first step in the incremental development of muon accelerators as a powerful new technique for particle physics. Of the world's proton-accelerator laboratories, only CERN and FNAL have the infrastructure required to mount nuSTORM. Since no siting decision has yet been taken, the purpose of this Expression of Interest (EoI) is to request the resources required to: investigate in detail how nuSTORM could be implemented at CERN; and develop options for decisive European contrib...

  18. The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration Large Underground Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Kirk T. McDonald Princeton University June 26, 2001 Meeting with Brierley Associates Ithaca, NY http://puhep1.princeton.edu/~mcdonald/nufact/ Kirk T. McDonald June 26, 2001 1 #12; The Neutrino Factory for neutrino detectors. Kirk T. McDonald June 26, 2001 2 #12; The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider

  19. Fermilab Muon Campus g-2 Cryogenic Distribution Remote Control System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pei, L; Klebaner, A; Soyars, W; Bossert, R

    2015-01-01

    The Muon Campus (MC) is able to measure Muon g-2 with high precision and comparing its value to the theoretical prediction. The MC has four 300 KW screw compressors and four liquid helium refrigerators. The centerpiece of the Muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab is a large, 50-foot-diameter superconducting muon storage ring. This one-of-a-kind ring, made of steel, aluminum and superconducting wire, was built for the previous g-2 experiment at Brookhaven. Due to each subsystem has to be far away from each other and be placed in the distant location, therefore, Siemens Process Control System PCS7-400, Automation Direct DL205 & DL05 PLC, Synoptic and Fermilab ACNET HMI are the ideal choices as the MC g-2 cryogenic distribution real-time and on-Line remote control system. This paper presents a method which has been successfully used by many Fermilab distribution cryogenic real-time and On-Line remote control systems.

  20. Shielded RF Lattice for the Muon Front End Chris Rogers,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Shielded RF Lattice for the Muon Front End Chris Rogers, Accelerator Science and Technology Centre (ASTeC), Rutherford Appleton Laboratory #12; Shielded RF Lattice I wanted to remind folks a lot of slides apologies I've tried to break it up a bit #12; Part 1 Shielded Lattice Baseline

  1. PION PRODUCTION FOR NEUTRINO FACTORIES AND MUON COLLIDERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    PION PRODUCTION FOR NEUTRINO FACTORIES AND MUON COLLIDERS Workshop on Applications of High production for nufact/mu-collider - N.V. Mokhov Outline · Pion Production and Collection · Event Generators-independent analysis of HARP data 2 #12;AHIPA Workshop, Fermilab, October 19-21, 2009 Pion production for nufact

  2. Neutrinos from Stored Muons nuSTORM: Expression of Interest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Adey; S. K. Agarwalla; C. M. Ankenbrandt; R. Asfandiyarov; J. J. Back; G. Barker; E. Baussan; R. Bayes; S. Bhadra; V. Blackmore; A. Blondel; S. A. Bogacz; C. Booth; S. B. Boyd; A. Bravar; S. J. Brice; A. D. Bross; F. Cadoux; H. Cease; A. Cervera; J. Cobb; D. Colling; L. Coney; A. Dobbs; J. Dobson; A. Donini; P. J. Dornan; M. Dracos; F. Dufour; R. Edgecock; J. Evans; M. A. George; T. Ghosh; A. deGouvea; J. J. Gomez-Cadenas; A. Haesler; G. Hanson; M. Geelhoed; P. F. Harrison; M. Hartz; P. Hernandez; J. A. Hernando-Morata; P. J. Hodgson; P. Huber; A. Izmaylov; Y. Karadhzov; T. Kobilarcik; J. Kopp; L. Kormos; A. Korzenev; A. Kurup; Y. Kuno; P. Kyberd; J. P. Lagrange; A. M. Laing; J. Link; A. Liu; K. R. Long; N. McCauley; K. T. McDonald; K. Mahn; C. Martin; J. Martin; O. Mena; S. R. Mishra; N. Mokhov; J. Morfin; Y. Mori; W. Murray; D. Neuffer; R. Nichol; E. Noah; M. A. Palmer; S. Parke; S. Pascoli; J. Pasternak; M. Popovic; P. Ratoff; M. Ravonel; M. Rayner; S. Ricciardi; C. Rogers; P. Rubinov; E. Santos; A. Sato; E. Scantamburlo; J. K. Sedgbeer; D. R. Smith; P. J. Smith; J. T. Sobczyk; S. Soldner-Rembold; F. J. P. Soler; M. Sorel; A. Stahl; L. Stanco; P. Stamoulis; S. Striganov; H. Tanaka; I. J. Taylor; C. Touramanis; C. D. Tunnel; Y. Uchida; N. Vassilopoulos; M. O. Wascko; A. Weber; E. Wildner; M. J. Wilking; W. Winter; U. K. Yang

    2013-05-07

    The nuSTORM facility has been designed to deliver beams of electron and muon neutrinos from the decay of a stored muon beam with a central momentum of 3.8 GeV/c and a momentum spread of 10%. The facility is unique in that it will: serve the future long- and short-baseline neutrino-oscillation programmes by providing definitive measurements of electron-neutrino- and muon-neutrino-nucleus cross sections with percent-level precision; allow searches for sterile neutrinos of exquisite sensitivity to be carried out; and constitute the essential first step in the incremental development of muon accelerators as a powerful new technique for particle physics. Of the world's proton-accelerator laboratories, only CERN and FNAL have the infrastructure required to mount nuSTORM. Since no siting decision has yet been taken, the purpose of this Expression of Interest (EoI) is to request the resources required to: investigate in detail how nuSTORM could be implemented at CERN; and develop options for decisive European contributions to the nuSTORM facility and experimental programme wherever the facility is sited. The EoI defines a two-year programme culminating in the delivery of a Technical Design Report.

  3. The energy band gap of a semiconductor material critically influences the operating wavelength in an optoelectronic device. Realization of any desired band gap, or even spatially graded band gaps, is important

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :00 PM; ERC 490 School for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy #12;The energy band gap of a semiconductor material critically influences the operating wavelength for applications such as lasers, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), solar cells, and detectors. New band gaps can

  4. Inverse neutrinoless double beta decay revisited: Neutrinos, Higgs triplets, and a muon collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodejohann, Werner [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Postfach 103980, D-69029 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-06-01

    We revisit the process of inverse neutrinoless double beta decay (e{sup -}e{sup -{yields}}W{sup -}W{sup -}) at future linear colliders. The cases of Majorana neutrino and Higgs triplet exchange are considered. We also discuss the processes e{sup -{mu}-{yields}}W{sup -}W{sup -} and {mu}{sup -{mu}-{yields}}W{sup -}W{sup -}, which are motivated by the possibility of muon colliders. For heavy neutrino exchange, we show that masses up to 10{sup 6} (10{sup 5}) GeV could be probed for ee and e{mu} machines, respectively. The stringent limits for mixing of heavy neutrinos with muons render {mu}{sup -{mu}-{yields}}W{sup -}W{sup -} less promising, even though this process is not constrained by limits from neutrinoless double beta decay. If Higgs triplets are responsible for inverse neutrinoless double beta decay, observable signals are only possible if a very narrow resonance is met. We also consider unitarity aspects of the process in case both Higgs triplets and neutrinos are exchanged. An exact seesaw relation connecting low energy data with heavy neutrino and triplet parameters is found.

  5. A study of muon neutrino disappearance in the MINOS detectors and the NuMI beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ling, Jiajie; /South Carolina U.

    2010-07-01

    There is now substantial evidence that the proper description of neutrino involves two representations related by the 3 x 3 PMNS matrix characterized by either distinct mass or flavor. The parameters of this mixing matrix, three angles and a phase, as well as the mass differences between the three mass eigenstates must be determined experimentally. The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search experiment is designed to study the flavor composition of a beam of muon neutrinos as it travels between the Near Detector at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory at 1 km from the target, and the Far Detector in the Soudan iron mine in Minnesota at 735 km from the target. From the comparison of reconstructed neutrino energy spectra at the near and far location, precise measurements of neutrino oscillation parameters from muon neutrino disappearance and electron neutrino appearance are expected. It is very important to know the neutrino flux coming from the source in order to achieve the main goal of the MINOS experiment: precise measurements of the atmospheric mass splitting |{Delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2}|, sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub 23}. The goal of my thesis is to accurately predict the neutrino flux for the MINOS experiment and measure the neutrino mixing angle and atmospheric mass splitting.

  6. Adler function and hadronic contribution to the muon g-2 in a nonlocal chiral quark model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorokhov, Alexander E.

    2004-11-01

    The behavior of the vector Adler function at spacelike momenta is studied in the framework of a covariant chiral quark model with instantonlike quark-quark interaction. This function describes the transition between the high-energy asymptotically free region of almost massless current quarks to the low-energy hadronized regime with massive constituent quarks. The model reproduces the Adler function and V-A correlator extracted from the ALEPH and OPAL data on hadronic {tau} lepton decays, transformed into the Euclidean domain via dispersion relations. The leading order contribution from the hadronic part of the photon vacuum polarization to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, a{sub {mu}}{sup hvp(1)}, is estimated.

  7. February 9, 2002 Muon Collaboration Technical Board

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    of gaseous helium at 66 K or 22 K in a closed loop configuration. Phased Temperature Approach/Pulse- ~3-15 MJ · Possible Rep Rate High Temp- >10/hr · High Temperature Helium Delivery- ~66 K · Low Temperature Helium Delivery- ~22 K · Energy Removal Rate (Low Temp)- ~25 kJ/s · Energy Removal Rate (High Temp

  8. Robust energy transfer mechanism and critically balanced turbulence via non-resonant triads in nonlinear wave systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miguel D. Bustamante; Brenda Quinn

    2013-09-02

    A robust energy transfer mechanism is found in nonlinear wave systems, which favours transfers towards modes interacting via non-resonant triads, applicable in meteorology, nonlinear optics and plasma wave turbulence. Transfer efficiency is maximal when the frequency mismatch of the non-resonant triad balances the system's nonlinear frequency: at intermediate levels of oscillation amplitudes an instability is triggered that explores unstable manifolds of periodic orbits, so turbulent cascades are most efficient at intermediate nonlinearity. Numerical simulations confirm analytical predictions.

  9. NREL Investigates Critical Properties of Perovskite Halides Solar Cells (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights in Science, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework usesof EnergyY-12 NationalNO FEAR Act NoticefuelTechnologyResults

  10. Lecture notes for criticality safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fullwood, R.

    1992-03-01

    These lecture notes for criticality safety are prepared for the training of Department of Energy supervisory, project management, and administrative staff. Technical training and basic mathematics are assumed. The notes are designed for a two-day course, taught by two lecturers. Video tapes may be used at the options of the instructors. The notes provide all the materials that are necessary but outside reading will assist in the fullest understanding. The course begins with a nuclear physics overview. The reader is led from the macroscopic world into the microscopic world of atoms and the elementary particles that constitute atoms. The particles, their masses and sizes and properties associated with radioactive decay and fission are introduced along with Einstein's mass-energy equivalence. Radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, radiation penetration, shielding and health-effects are discussed to understand protection in case of a criticality accident. Fission, the fission products, particles and energy released are presented to appreciate the dangers of criticality. Nuclear cross sections are introduced to understand the effectiveness of slow neutrons to produce fission. Chain reactors are presented as an economy; effective use of the neutrons from fission leads to more fission resulting in a power reactor or a criticality excursion. The six-factor formula is presented for managing the neutron budget. This leads to concepts of material and geometric buckling which are used in simple calculations to assure safety from criticality. Experimental measurements and computer code calculations of criticality are discussed. To emphasize the reality, historical criticality accidents are presented in a table with major ones discussed to provide lessons-learned. Finally, standards, NRC guides and regulations, and DOE orders relating to criticality protection are presented.

  11. Measurement of muon plus proton final states in $?_?$ Interactions on Hydrocarbon at $\\langle$$E_?$$\\rangle$ = 4.2 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Walton; M. Betancourt; L. Aliaga; O. Altinok; A. Bodek; A. Bravar; H. Budd; M. J. Bustamante; A. Butkevich; D. A. Martinez Caicedo; M. F. Carneiro; C. M. Castromonte; M. E. Christy; J. Chvojka; H. da Motta; M. Datta; J. Devan; S. A. Dytman; G. A. Díaz; B. Eberly; J. Felix; L. Fields; R. Fine; G. A. Fiorentini; A. M. Gago; H. Gallagher; R. Gran; D. A. Harris; A. Higuera; K. Hurtado; J. Kleykamp; M. Kordosky; S. A. Kulagin; T. Le; E. Maher; S. Manly; W. A. Mann; C. M. Marshall; C. Martin Mari; K. S. McFarland; C. L. McGivern; A. M. McGowan; B. Messerly; J. Miller; A. Mislivec; J. G. Morfín; J. Mousseau; T. Muhlbeier; D. Naples; J. K. Nelson; A. Norrick; J. Osta; V. Paolone; J. Park; C. E. Patrick; G. N. Perdue; L. Rakotondravohitra; R. D. Ransome; H. Ray; L. Ren; P. A. Rodrigues; D. Ruterbories; H. Schellman; D. W. Schmitz; C. Simon; F. D. Snider; J. T. Sobczyk; C. J. Solano Salinas; N. Tagg; B. G. Tice; E. Valencia; J. Wolcott; M. Wospakrik; G. Zavala; D. Zhang; B. P. Ziemer

    2015-04-06

    A study of charged-current muon neutrino scattering on hydrocarbon in which the final state includes a muon and a proton and no pions is presented. Although this signature has the topology of neutrino quasielastic scattering from neutrons, the event sample contains contributions from both quasielastic and inelastic processes where pions are absorbed in the nucleus. The analysis accepts events with muon production angles up to 70$^{\\circ}$ and proton kinetic energies greater than 110 MeV. The extracted cross section, when based completely on hadronic kinematics, is well-described by a simple relativistic Fermi gas nuclear model including the neutrino event generator modeling for inelastic processes and particle transportation through the nucleus. This is in contrast to the quasielastic cross section based on muon kinematics, which is best described by an extended model that incorporates multi-nucleon correlations. This measurement guides the formulation of a complete description of neutrino-nucleus interactions that encompasses the hadronic as well as the leptonic aspects of this process.

  12. Critical Materials Institute

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Alex King

    2013-06-05

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King talks about the goals of the Critical Materials Institute in diversifying the supply of critical materials, developing substitute materials, developing tools and techniques for recycling critical materials, and forecasting materials needs to avoid future shortages.

  13. The scattering of muons in low Z materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MuScat Collaboration; D. Attwood; P. Bell; S. Bull; T. McMahon; J. Wilson; R. Fernow; P. Gruber; A. Jamdagni; K. Long; E. McKigney; P. Savage; M. Curtis-Rouse; T. R. Edgecock; M. Ellis; J. Lidbury; W. J. Murray; P. Norton; K. Peach; K. Ishida; Y. Matsuda; K. Nagamine; S. Nakamura; G. M. Marshall; S. Benveniste; D. Cline; Y. Fukui; K. Lee; Y. Pischalnikov; S. Holmes; A. Bogacz

    2005-12-02

    This paper presents the measurement of the scattering of 172 MeV/c muons in assorted materials, including liquid hydrogen, motivated by the need to understand ionisation cooling for muon acceleration. Data are compared with predictions from the Geant 4 simulation code and this simulation is used to deconvolute detector effects. The scattering distributions obtained are compared with the Moliere theory of multiple scattering and, in the case of liquid hydrogen, with ELMS. With the exception of ELMS, none of the models are found to provide a good description of the data. The results suggest that ionisation cooling will work better than would be predicted by Geant 4.7.0p01.

  14. Analysis of ordinary and radiative muon capture in liquid hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shung-ichi Ando; Fred Myhrer; Kuniharu Kubodera

    2001-10-04

    A simultaneous analysis is made of the measured rates of ordinary muon capture (OMC) and radiative muon capture (RMC) in liquid hydrogen, using theoretical estimates for the relevant atomic capture rates that have been obtained in chiral perturbation theory with the use of the most recent values of the coupling constants. We reexamine the basic formulas for relating the atomic OMC and RMC rates to the liquid-hydrogen OMC and RMC rates, respectively. Although the analysis is significantly influenced by ambiguity in the molecular state population, we can demonstrate that, while the OMC data can be reproduced, the RMC data can be explained only with unrealistic values of the coupling constants; the degree of difficulty becomes even more severe when we try to explain the OMC and RMC data simultaneously.

  15. Discussion - Next Step for Fukushima Daiichi Muon Tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyadera, Haruo

    2012-08-13

    Specification of Fukushima Daiichi Muon Tomography (FMT): (1) 18-feet (5.5-m) drift tube, 2-inch (5-cm) diameter; (2) 108 tubes per layer; (3) Unit layer = 2 layer (detection efficiency: 0.96 x 0.96 = 92%); (4) 12 or 16 layer per module; (5) 16 layers allows momentum analysis at 30% level; (6) 2 module per super module (5.5 x 11 m{sup 2}); and (7) FMT = 2 super module. By deploying MMT next to a research reactor, we will be able to measure the impact of low level radiation fields on muon tomography and reconstruction processes. Radiation level during reactor operation is {approx}50 {micro}Sv/h which provides similar radiation environment of inside the FMT radiation shield at Fukushima Daiichi. We will implement coincidence algorithm on the FPGA board.

  16. FEASIBILITY STUDY II OF A MUON BASED NEUTRINO SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GALLARDO,J.C.; OZAKI,S.; PALMER,R.B.; ZISMAN,M.

    2001-06-30

    The concept of using a muon storage ring to provide a well characterized beam of muon and electron neutrinos (a Neutrino Factory) has been under study for a number of years now at various laboratories throughout the world. The physics program of a Neutrino Factoryis focused on the relatively unexplored neutrino sector. In conjunction with a detector located a suitable distance from the neutrino source, the facility would make valuable contributions to the study of neutrino masses and lepton mixing. A Neutrino Factory is expected to improve the measurement accuracy of sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 23}) and {Delta}m{sup 2}{sub 32} and provide measurements of sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 13}) and the sign of {Delta}m{sup 2}{sub 32}. It may also be able to measure CP violation in the lepton sector.

  17. The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration Tests of Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    .edu/mumu/target/ Kirk T. McDonald December 15, 2000 1 #12; The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration The Need collection efficiency. Solution: a moving target, such as a liquid metal jet. Kirk T. McDonald December 15 0.16 858 0.35 80 y 2.9 Bismuth 83 9.7 271 1610 0.12 857 0.079 120 1.3 y liquid Kirk T. Mc

  18. ATLAS Muon Spectrometer Upgrades for the High Luminosity LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valderanis, Chrysostomos; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS Muon Spectrometer Upgrades for the High Luminosity LHC The luminosity of the LHC will increase up to 2x10^34 cm-2s-1 after the long shutdown in 2019 (phase-1 upgrade) and up to 7x10^34 cm-2s-1 after the long shutdown in 2025 (phase-2 upgrade). In order to cope with the increased particle fluxes, upgrades are envisioned for the ATLAS muon spectrometer. At phase-1, the current innermost stations of the ATLAS muon endcap tracking system (the Small Wheels) will be upgraded with 2x4-layer modules of Micromega detectors, sandwiched by two 4 layer modules of small strip Thin Gap Chambers on either side. Each 4-layer module of the so-called New Small Wheels covers a surface area of approximately 2 to 3 m2 for a total active area of 1200 m2 each for the two technologies. On such large area detectors, the mechanical precision (30 \\mu m along the precision coordinate and 80 \\mu m along the beam) is a key point and must be controlled and monitored along the process of construction and integration. The design and re...

  19. Spontaneous Muon Emission during Fission, a New Nuclear Radioactivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. B. Ion; M. L. D. Ion; Reveica Ion-Mihai

    2011-01-24

    In this paper the essential theoretical predictions for the nuclear muonic radioactivity are presented by using a special fission-like model similar with that used in description of the pionic emission during fission. Hence, a fission-like model for the muonic radioactivity takes into account the essential degree of freedom of the system: muon-fissility, muon-fission barrier height, etc. Using this model it was shown that most of the SHE-nuclei lie in the region where the muonic fissility parameters attain their limiting value X=1. Hence, the SHE-region is characterized by the absence of a classical barrier toward spontaneous muon and pion emissions. Numerical estimations on the yields for the natural muonic radioactivities of the transuranium elements as well numerical values for barrier heights are given only for even-even parent nuclei. Some experimental results from LCP-identification emission spectrum are reviewed. Also, the experimental results obtained by Khryachkov et al, using new spectrometer for investigation of ternary nuclear fission, are presented. The OPERA-experiment proposed to perform search for muonic radioactivity from lead nuclei, in the low background conditions offered by the Gran Sasso underground Laboratory (LNGS), is discussed.

  20. NuFact03, June 04 -11, New York Funneling pions and muons.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    9/9/2004 NuFact03, June 04 -11, New York Funneling pions and muons. 1 Funneling 's and µ's Bruno, New York Funneling pions and muons. 2 Proton Beam Parameters 4Beam power [MW] 50Repetition frequency bunch 140Number of bunches #12;9/9/2004 NuFact03, June 04 -11, New York Funneling pions and muons. 3 Why

  1. Critical technologies research: Opportunities for DOE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    Recent studies have identified a number of critical technologies that are essential to the nation`s defense, economic competitiveness, energy independence, and betterment of public health. The National Critical Technologies Panel (NCTP) has identified the following critical technology areas: Aeronautics and Surface Transportation; Biotechnology and Life Sciences; Energy and Environment; Information and Communications; Manufacturing; and Materials. Sponsored by the Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Research (OER), the Critical Technologies Research Workshop was held in May 1992. Approximately 100 scientists, engineers, and managers from the national laboratories, industry, academia, and govemment participated. The objective of the Berkeley Workshop was to advance the role of the DOE multiprogram energy laboratories in critical technologies research by describing, defining, and illustrating research areas, opportunities, resources, and key decisions necessary to achieve national research goals. An agenda was developed that looked at DOE`s capabilities and options for research in critical technologies and provided a forum for industry, academia, govemment, and the national laboratories to address: Critical technology research needs; existing research activities and resources; capabilities of the national laboratories; and opportunities for national laboratories, industries, and universities. The Workshop included plenary sessions in which presentations by technology and policy leaders set the context for further inquiry into critical technology issues and research opportunities. Separate sessions then focused on each of the following major areas of technology: Advanced materials; biotechnology and life sciences; energy and environment; information and communication; and manufacturing and transportation.

  2. Distinguishing a SM-like MSSM Higgs boson from SM Higgs boson at muon collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jai Kumar Singhal; Sardar Singh; Ashok K Nagawat

    2005-07-26

    We explore the possibility of distinguishing the SM-like MSSM Higgs boson from the SM Higgs boson via Higgs boson pair production at future muon collider. We study the behavior of the production cross section in SM and MSSM with Higgs boson mass for various choices of MSSM parameters tan \\beta and m\\sub A. We observe that at fixed CM energy, in the SM, the total cross section increases with the increase in Higgs boson mass whereas this trend is reversed for the MSSM case. The changes that occur for the MSSM case in comparison to the SM predictions are quantified in terms of the relative percentage deviation in cross section. The observed large deviations in cross section for different choices of Higgs mass suggest that the measurements of the cross section could possibly distinguish the SM-like MSSM Higgs boson from the SM Higgs boson.

  3. Test of a 1.8 Tesla, 400 Hz Dipole for a Muon Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Summers, D.J.; Cremaldi, L.M.; Hart, T.L.; Perera, L.P.; Reep, M.; /Mississippi U.; Witte, H.; /Brookhaven; Hansen, S.; Lopes, M.L.; /Fermilab; Reidy Jr., J.; /Oxford High School

    2012-05-01

    A 1.8 T dipole magnet using thin grain oriented silicon steel laminations has been constructed as a prototype for a muon synchrotron ramping at 400 Hz. Following the practice in large 3 phase transformers and our own Opera-2d simulations, joints are mitred to take advantage of the magnetic properties of the steel which are much better in the direction in which the steel was rolled. Measurements with a Hysteresigraph 5500 and Epstein frame show a high magnetic permeability which minimizes stored energy in the yoke allowing the magnet to ramp quickly with modest voltage. Coercivity is low which minimizes hysteresis losses. A power supply with a fast Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) switch and a capacitor was constructed. Coils are wound with 12 gauge copper wire. Thin wire and laminations minimize eddy current losses. The magnetic field was measured with a peak sensing Hall probe.

  4. Test of a 1.8 Tesla, 400 Hz Dipole for a Muon Synchrotron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. J. Summers; L. M. Cremaldi; T. L. Hart; L. P. Perera; M. Reep; H. Witte; S. Hansen; M. L. Lopes; J. Reidy, Jr.

    2012-07-28

    A 1.8 T dipole magnet using thin grain oriented silicon steel laminations has been constructed as a prototype for a muon synchrotron ramping at 400 Hz. Following the practice in large 3 phase transformers and our own Opera-2d simulations, joints are mitred to take advantage of the magnetic properties of the steel which are much better in the direction in which the steel was rolled. Measurements with a Hysteresigraph 5500 and Epstein frame show a high magnetic permeability which minimizes stored energy in the yoke allowing the magnet to ramp quickly with modest voltage. Coercivity is low which minimizes hysteresis losses. A power supply with a fast Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) switch and a capacitor was constructed. Coils are wound with 12 gauge copper wire. Thin wire and laminations minimize eddy current losses. The magnetic field was measured with a peak sensing Hall probe.

  5. Project X ICD-2 and its upgrades for Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebedev, Valeri; Nagaitsev, Sergei; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    This paper reviews the Initial Configuration Document for Fermilab's Project X and considers its possible upgrades for neutrino factory or muon collider.

  6. Muon Radiography at LANL | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Muon Radiography at LANL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science Applications of Nuclear Science...

  7. Progress on a Cavity with Beryllium Walls for Muon Ionization Cooling Channel R&D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowring, D.L.

    2014-01-01

    ON A CAVITY WITH BERYLLIUM WALLS FOR MUON IONIZATION COOLINGFabricating a cavity with beryllium walls would mitigatepillbox RF cavity with beryllium walls, in order to evaluate

  8. Identifying and Overcoming Critical Barriers to Widespread Second...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Overcoming Critical Barriers to Widespread Second Use of PEV Batteries Neubauer, J.; Smith, K.; Wood, E.; Pesaran, A. 25 ENERGY STORAGE; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY...

  9. Critical technologies research: Opportunities for DOE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    Recent studies have identified a number of critical technologies that are essential to the nation's defense, economic competitiveness, energy independence, and betterment of public health. The National Critical Technologies Panel (NCTP) has identified the following critical technology areas: Aeronautics and Surface Transportation; Biotechnology and Life Sciences; Energy and Environment; Information and Communications; Manufacturing; and Materials. Sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Research (OER), the Critical Technologies Research Workshop was held in May 1992. Approximately 100 scientists, engineers, and managers from the national laboratories, industry, academia, and govemment participated. The objective of the Berkeley Workshop was to advance the role of the DOE multiprogram energy laboratories in critical technologies research by describing, defining, and illustrating research areas, opportunities, resources, and key decisions necessary to achieve national research goals. An agenda was developed that looked at DOE's capabilities and options for research in critical technologies and provided a forum for industry, academia, govemment, and the national laboratories to address: Critical technology research needs; existing research activities and resources; capabilities of the national laboratories; and opportunities for national laboratories, industries, and universities. The Workshop included plenary sessions in which presentations by technology and policy leaders set the context for further inquiry into critical technology issues and research opportunities. Separate sessions then focused on each of the following major areas of technology: Advanced materials; biotechnology and life sciences; energy and environment; information and communication; and manufacturing and transportation.

  10. Search for physics beyond the standard model in final states with a lepton and missing transverse energy in proton-proton collisions at s = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A.?M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; et al

    2015-05-22

    A search for new physics in proton-proton collisions having final states with an electron or muon and missing transverse energy is presented.

  11. Search for physics beyond the standard model in final states with a lepton and missing transverse energy in proton-proton collisions at s = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A.?M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V.?M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E.?A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Roland, B.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D’Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Keaveney, J.; Kim, T.?J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G.?P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A.?P.?R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Dildick, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A.?A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G.?G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Liao, J.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J.?M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G.?H.; Aldá Júnior, W.?L.; Alves, G.?A.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Dos Reis Martins, T.; Pol, M.?E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E.?M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Malek, M.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W.?L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E.?J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C.?A.; Dias, F.?A.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T.?R.; Gregores, E.?M.; Mercadante, P.?G.; Novaes, S.?F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J.?G.; Chen, G.?M.; Chen, H.?S.; Chen, M.; Du, R.; Jiang, C.?H.; Liang, D.; Liang, S.; Plestina, R.; Tao, J.; Wang, X.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Guo, Y.; Li, Q.; Li, W.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S.?J.; Wang, D.; Zhang, L.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Chaparro Sierra, L.?F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J.?P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J.?C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P.?A.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Mahmoud, M.?A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M.?J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J.?L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I.?N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J.?B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E.?C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Boudoul, G.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C.?A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J.?D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.

    2015-05-01

    A search for new physics in proton-proton collisions having final states with an electron or muon and missing transverse energy is presented.

  12. Atmospheric Neutrino Induced Muons in the MINOS Far Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahman, Dipu; /Minnesota U.

    2007-02-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. The MINOS Far Detector, located in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Soudan MN, has been collecting data since August 2003. The scope of this dissertation involves identifying the atmospheric neutrino induced muons that are created by the neutrinos interacting with the rock surrounding the detector cavern, performing a neutrino oscillation search by measuring the oscillation parameter values of {Delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 23}, and searching for CPT violation by measuring the charge ratio for the atmospheric neutrino induced muons. A series of selection cuts are applied to the data set in order to extract the neutrino induced muons. As a result, a total of 148 candidate events are selected. The oscillation search is performed by measuring the low to high muon momentum ratio in the data sample and comparing it to the same ratio in the Monte Carlo simulation in the absence of neutrino oscillation. The measured double ratios for the ''all events'' (A) and high resolution (HR) samples are R{sub A} = R{sub low/high}{sup data}/R{sub low/high}{sup MC} = 0.60{sub -0.10}{sup +0.11}(stat) {+-} 0.08(syst) and R{sub HR} = R{sub low/high}{sup data}/R{sub low/high}{sup MC} = 0.58{sub -0.11}{sup +0.14}(stat) {+-} 0.05(syst), respectively. Both event samples show a significant deviation from unity giving a strong indication of neutrino oscillation. A combined momentum and zenith angle oscillation fit is performed using the method of maximum log-likelihood with a grid search in the parameter space of {Delta}m{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}. The best fit point for both event samples occurs at {Delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2} = 1.3 x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}, and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 23} = 1. This result is compatible with previous measurements from the Super Kamiokande experiment and Soudan 2 experiments. The MINOS Far Detector is the first underground neutrino detector to be able to distinguish the charge of the muons. The measured charge is used to test the rate of the neutrino to the anti-neutrino oscillations by measuring the neutrino induced muon charge ratio. Using the high resolution sample, the {mu}{sup +} to {mu}{sup -} double charge ratio has been determined to be R{sub CPT} = R{sub {mu}{sup -}/{mu}{sup +}}{sup data}/R{sub {mu}{sup -}/{mu}{sup +}}{sup MC} = 0.90{sub -0.18}{sup +0.24}(stat) {+-} 0.09(syst). With the uncertainties added in quadrature, the CPT double ratio is consistent with unity showing no indication for CPT violation.

  13. An investigation of the spin structure of the proton in deep inelastic scattering of polarised muons on polarised protons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashman, John Gavin; Baum, G; Beaufays, J; Bee, C P; Benchouk, C; Bird, I G; Brown, S C; Caputo, M C; Cheung, H W K; Chima, J S; Cibarowski, J; Clifft, R W; Coignet, G; Combley, F; Court, G R; D'Agostini, Giulio; Drees, J; Düren, M; Dyce, N; Edwards, A W; Edwards, M; Ernst, T; Ferrero, M I; Francis, D; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gamet, R; Gibson, V; Gillies, James D; Grafström, P; Hamacher, K; Von Harrach, D; Hayman, P J; Holt, J R; Hughes, V W; Jacholkowska, A; Jones, T; Kabuss, E M; Korzen, B; Krüner, U; Kullander, Sven; Landgraf, U; Lanske, D; Lattenstrom, F; Lindqvist, T; Loken, J G; Matthews, N; Mizuno, Y; Mönig, K; Montanet, François; Nagy, E; Nassalski, J P; Niinikoski, T O; Norton, P R; Oakham, F G; Oppenheim, R F; Osborne, A M; Papavassiliou, V; Pavel, N; Peroni, C; Peschel, H; Piegaia, R; Pietrzyk, B; Pietrzyk, U; Povh, B; Renton, P B; Rieubland, Jean Michel; Rijllart, A; Rith, K; Rondio, Ewa; Ropelewski, Leszek; Salmon, D P; Sandacz, A; Schröder, T B; Schüler, K P; Schultze, K; Shibata, T A; Sloan, Terence; Staiano, A; Stier, H E; Stock, J T; Taylor, G N; Thompson, J C; Walcher, T; Tóth, J; Urbàn, L; Wallucks, W; Wheeler, S; Williams, D A; Williams, W S C; Wimpenny, S J; Windmolders, R; Womersley, W J; Ziemons, K

    1989-01-01

    An investigation of the spin structure of the proton in deep inelastic scattering of polarised muons on polarised protons

  14. GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION OF THE MUON COLLIDER/NEUTRINO FACTORY FRONT END

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION OF THE MUON COLLIDER/NEUTRINO FACTORY FRONT END HISHAM SAYED BROOKHAVEN MEETING 10 September 2013 #12;GLOBALLY OPTIMIZING MUON TARGET & FRONT END 9/10/13 2 in bunches #12;INTRODUCTION & LAYOUT Ã? High performance Optimization Tools on NERSC Ã? Target: Ã?

  15. The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration The R&D Program for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Subpanel on Long­Range Plans for US HEP http://puhep1.princeton.edu/mumu/target/ Kirk T. McDonald April 19 intense proton pulses. Kirk T. McDonald April 19, 2001 2 #12; The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider. Kirk T. McDonald April 19, 2001 3 #12; The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration 2. Long

  16. Neutron production by cosmic-ray muons at shallow depth J. Busenitz,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piepke, Andreas G.

    Neutron production by cosmic-ray muons at shallow depth F. Boehm,3 J. Busenitz,1 B. Cook,3 G Received 23 June 2000; published 12 October 2000 The yield of neutrons produced by cosmic ray muons of one and two neutron captures was determined. Modeling the neutron capture efficiency allowed us

  17. JEMMRLA - Electron Model of a Muon RLA with Multi-pass Arcs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogacz, Slawomir Alex; Krafft, Geoffrey A.; Morozov, Vasiliy S.; Roblin, Yves R.

    2013-06-01

    We propose a demonstration experiment for a new concept of a 'dogbone' RLA with multi-pass return arcs -- JEMMRLA (Jlab Electron Model of Muon RLA). Such an RLA with linear-field multi-pass arcs was introduced for rapid acceleration of muons for the next generation of Muon Facilities. It allows for efficient use of expensive RF while the multi-pass arc design based on linear combined-function magnets exhibits a number of advantages over separate-arc or pulsed-arc designs. Here we describe a test of this concept by scaling a GeV scale muon design for electrons. Scaling muon momenta by the muon-to-electron mass ratio leads to a scheme, in which a 4.5 MeV electron beam is injected in the middle of a 3 MeV/pass linac with two double-pass return arcs and is accelerated to 18 MeV in 4.5 passes. All spatial dimensions including the orbit distortion are scaled by a factor of 7.5, which arises from scaling the 200 MHz muon RF to a readily available 1.5 GHz. The hardware requirements are not very demanding making it straightforward to implement. Such an RLA may have applications going beyond muon acceleration: in medical isotope production, radiation cancer therapy and homeland security.

  18. Lithium Lens ANSYS Mechanical Simula3on for Muon g-2 R. Schultz, P. Hurh (FNAL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Lithium Lens ANSYS Mechanical Simula3on for Muon g-2 R. Schultz, P. Hurh (FNAL) § The Lithium Collec;on Lens was used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider, is roughly 1e6 pulses per month § Muon g-2 intends to use the Lithium Collec

  19. A search for W+- H ---> muon-neutrino b anti-b production at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anastasoaie, Carmen Miruna; /Nijmegen U.

    2008-02-01

    All known experimental results on fundamental particles and their interactions can be described to great accuracy by a theory called the Standard Model. In the Standard Model of particle physics, the masses of particles are explained through the Higgs mechanism. The Higgs boson is the only Standard Model particle not discovered yet, and its observation or exclusion is an important test of the Standard Model. While the Standard Model predicts that a Higgs boson should exist, it does not exactly predict its mass. Direct searches have excluded a Higgs with m{sub H} < 114.4 GeV at 95% confidence level, while indirect measurements indicate that the mass should be less than 144 GeV. This analysis looks for W{sup {+-}}H {yields} {mu}{nu}{sub {mu}}b{bar b} in 1 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector in p{bar p} collisions with {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The analysis strategy relies on the tracking, calorimetry and muon reconstruction of the D0 experiment. The signature is a muon, missing transverse energy (E{sub T}) to account for the neutrino and two b-jets. The Higgs mass is reconstructed using the invariant mass of the two jets. Backgrounds are W{sup {+-}}b{bar b}, W{sup {+-}} c{bar c}, W{sup {+-}} + light jets (W{sup {+-}}jj) (and the corresponding backgrounds with a Z boson), t{bar t}, single top production, and QCD multijet background.

  20. The rest masses of the electron and muon and of the stable mesons and baryons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. L. Koschmieder

    2007-07-30

    The rest masses of the electron, the muon and of the stable mesons and baryons can be explained, within 1% accuracy, with the standing wave model, which uses only photons, neutrinos, charge and the weak nuclear force. We do not need hypothetical particles for the explanation of the masses of the electron, muon, mesons and baryons. We can also explain the charge of the electron, the spin of the electron, of the muon and of the stable baryons, without any additional assumption. We also have determined the rest masses of the electron-, muon- and tau neutrinos and found that the mass of the electron neutrino is equal to the fine structure constant times the mass of the muon neutrino.

  1. Critical Materials Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AMO hosted a public workshop on Tuesday, April 3, 2012 in Arlington, VA to provide background information on critical materials assessment, the current research within DOE related to critical...

  2. First measurement of radioactive isotope production through cosmic-ray muon spallation in Super-Kamiokande IV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,

    2015-01-01

    Cosmic-ray-muon spallation-induced radioactive isotopes with $\\beta$ decays are one of the major backgrounds for solar, reactor, and supernova relic neutrino experiments. Unlike in scintillator, production yields for cosmogenic backgrounds in water have not been exclusively measured before, yet they are becoming more and more important in next generation neutrino experiments designed to search for rare signals. We have analyzed the low-energy trigger data collected at Super-Kamiokande-IV in order to determine the production rates of $^{12}$B, $^{12}$N, $^{16}$N, $^{11}$Be, $^9$Li, $^8$He, $^9$C, $^8$Li, $^8$B and $^{15}$C. These rates were extracted from fits to time differences between parent muons and subsequent daughter $\\beta$'s by fixing the known isotope lifetimes. Since $^9$Li can fake an inverse-beta-decay reaction chain via a $\\beta + n$ cascade decay, producing an irreducible background with detected energy up to a dozen MeV, a dedicated study is needed for evaluating its impact on future measuremen...

  3. First measurement of radioactive isotope production through cosmic-ray muon spallation in Super-Kamiokande IV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Super-Kamiokande Collaboration

    2015-09-28

    Cosmic-ray-muon spallation-induced radioactive isotopes with $\\beta$ decays are one of the major backgrounds for solar, reactor, and supernova relic neutrino experiments. Unlike in scintillator, production yields for cosmogenic backgrounds in water have not been exclusively measured before, yet they are becoming more and more important in next generation neutrino experiments designed to search for rare signals. We have analyzed the low-energy trigger data collected at Super-Kamiokande-IV in order to determine the production rates of $^{12}$B, $^{12}$N, $^{16}$N, $^{11}$Be, $^9$Li, $^8$He, $^9$C, $^8$Li, $^8$B and $^{15}$C. These rates were extracted from fits to time differences between parent muons and subsequent daughter $\\beta$'s by fixing the known isotope lifetimes. Since $^9$Li can fake an inverse-beta-decay reaction chain via a $\\beta + n$ cascade decay, producing an irreducible background with detected energy up to a dozen MeV, a dedicated study is needed for evaluating its impact on future measurements, the application of a neutron tagging technique using correlated triggers was found to improve this $^9$Li measurement. The measured yields were generally found to be comparable with theoretical calculations based on the simulation code FLUKA.

  4. nuSTORM and A Path to a Muon Collider

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adey, David; Bayes, Ryan; Bross, Alan; Snopok, Pavel

    2015-05-20

    Our article reviews the current status of the nuSTORM facility and shows how it can be utilized to perform the next step on the path toward the realization of a ?+?- collider. This review includes the physics motivation behind nuSTORM, a detailed description of the facility and the neutrino beams it can produce, and a summary of the short-baseline neutrino oscillation physics program that can be carried out at the facility. The idea for nuSTORM (the production of neutrino beams from the decay of muons in a racetrack-like decay ring) was discussed in the literature more than 30 years agomore »in the context of searching for noninteracting (sterile) neutrinos. However, only in the past 5 years has the concept been fully developed, motivated in large part by the facility's unmatched reach in addressing the evolving data on oscillations involving sterile neutrinos. Finally, this article reviews the basics of the ?+?-collider concept and describes how nuSTORM provides a platform to test advanced concepts for six-dimensional muon ionization cooling.« less

  5. The primary cosmic ray composition between 10**15 and 10**16 eV from Extensive Air Showers electromagnetic and TeV muon data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aglietta, M; Antonioli, P; Arneodo, F; Bergamasco, L; Bertaina, M; Castagnoli, C; Castellina, A; Chiavassa, A; Cini, G; D'Ettorre-Piazzoli, B; Di Sciascio, G; Fulgione, W; Galeotti, P; Ghia, P L; Iacovacci, M; Mannocchi, G; Morello, C; Navarra, G; Saavedra, O; Stamerra, A; Trinchero, G C; Valchierotti, S; Vallania, P; Vernetto, S; Vigorito, C; Ambrosio, M; Antolini, R; Baldini, A; Barbarino, G C; Barish, B C; Battistoni, G; Bellotti, R; Bemporad, C; Bernardini, P; Bilokon, H; Bloise, C; Bower, C; Brigida, M; Cafagna, F; Campana, D; Carboni, M; Cecchini, S; Cei, F; Choudhary, B C; Coutu, S; De Cataldo, G; Dekhissi, H; De Marzo, C; De Mitri, I; De Vincenzi, M; Di Credico, A; Forti, C; Fusco, P; Giacomelli, G; Giannini, G; Giglietto, N; Giorgini, M; Grassi, M; Grillo, A; Gustavino, C; Habig, A; Hanson, K; Heinz, R; Iarocci, E; Katsavounidis, E; Katsavounidis, I; Kearns, E; Kim, H; Kyriazopoulou, S; Lamanna, E; Lane, C; Levin, D S; Lipari, P; Longo, M J; Loparco, F; Maaroufi, F; Mancarella, G; Mandrioli, G; Margiotta, A; Marini, A; Martello, D; Marzari-Chiesa, A; Mazziotta, M N; Michael, D G; Monacelli, P; Montaruli, T; Monteno, M; Mufson, S L; Musser, J; Nicolò, D; Nolty, R; Orth, C; Osteria, G; Palamara, O; Patera, V; Patrizii, L; Pazzi, R; Peck, C W; Perrone, L; Petrera, S; Popa, V; Rainó, A; Reynoldson, J; Ronga, F; Satriano, C; Scapparone, E; Scholberg, K; Sciubba, A; Sioli, M; Sitta, M; Spinelli, P; Spinetti, M; Spurio, M; Steinberg, R; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Surdo, A; Tarle, G; Togo, V; Vakili, M; Walter, C W; Webb, R

    2004-01-01

    The cosmic ray primary composition in the energy range between 10**15 and 10**16 eV, i.e., around the "knee" of the primary spectrum, has been studied through the combined measurements of the EAS-TOP air shower array (2005 m a.s.l., 10**5 m**2 collecting area) and the MACRO underground detector (963 m a.s.l., 3100 m w.e. of minimum rock overburden, 920 m**2 effective area) at the National Gran Sasso Laboratories. The used observables are the air shower size (Ne) measured by EAS-TOP and the muon number (Nmu) recorded by MACRO. The two detectors are separated on average by 1200 m of rock, and located at a respective zenith angle of about 30 degrees. The energy threshold at the surface for muons reaching the MACRO depth is approximately 1.3 TeV. Such muons are produced in the early stages of the shower development and in a kinematic region quite different from the one relevant for the usual Nmu-Ne studies. The measurement leads to a primary composition becoming heavier at the knee of the primary spectrum, the kn...

  6. Measurement of Muon Neutrino Quasi-Elastic Scattering on a Hydrocarbon Target at E_? ~ 3.5 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The MINERvA collaboration; G. A. Fiorentini; D. W. Schmitz; P. A. Rodrigues; L. Aliaga; O. Altinok; B. Baldin; A. Baumbaugh; A. Bodek; D. Boehnlein; S. Boyd; R. Bradford; W. K. Brooks; H. Budd; A. Butkevich; D. A. Martinez Caicedo; C. M. Castromonte; M. E. Christy; H. Chung; J. Chvojka; M. Clark; H. da Motta; D. S. Damiani; I. Danko; M. Datta; M. Day; R. DeMaat; J. Devan; E. Draeger; S. A. Dytman; G. A. Díaz; B. Eberly; D. A. Edmondson; J. Felix; T. Fitzpatrick; L. Fields; A. M. Gago; H. Gallagher; C. A. George; J. A. Gielata; C. Gingu; B. Gobbi; R. Gran; N. Grossman; J. Hanson; D. A. Harris; J. Heaton; A. Higuera; I. J. Howley; K. Hurtado; M. Jerkins; T. Kafka; J. Kaisen; M. O. Kanter; C. E. Keppel; J. Kilmer; M. Kordosky; A. H. Krajeski; S. A. Kulagin; T. Le; H. Lee; A. G. Leister; G. Locke; G. Maggi; E. Maher; S. Manly; W. A. Mann; C. M. Marshall; K. S. McFarland; C. L. McGivern; A. M. McGowan; A. Mislivec; J. G. Morf?; J. Mousseau; D. Naples; J. K. Nelson; G. Niculescu; I. Niculescu; N. Ochoa; C. D. O'Connor; J. Olsen; B. Osmanov; J. Osta; J. L. Palomino; V. Paolone; J. Park; C. E. Patrick; G. N. Perdue; C. Peña; L. Rakotondravohitra; R. D. Ransome; H. Ray; L. Ren; C. Rude; K. E. Sassin; H. Schellman; R. M. Schneider; E. C. Schulte; C. Simon; F. D. Snider; M. C. Snyder; J. T. Sobczyk; C. J. Solano Salinas; N. Tagg; W. Tan; B. G. Tice; G. Tzanakos; J. P. Velásquez; J. Walding; T. Walton; J. Wolcott; B. A. Wolthuis; N. Woodward; G. Zavala; H. B. Zeng; D. Zhang; L. Y. Zhu; B. P. Ziemer

    2014-03-30

    We report a study of muon neutrino charged-current quasi-elastic events in the segmented scintillator inner tracker of the MINERvA experiment running in the NuMI neutrino beam at Fermilab. The events were selected by requiring a {\\mu}^- and low calorimetric recoil energy separated from the interaction vertex. We measure the flux-averaged differential cross-section, d{\\sigma}/dQ^2, and study the low energy particle content of the final state. Deviations are found between the measured d{\\sigma}/dQ^2 and the expectations of a model of independent nucleons in a relativistic Fermi gas. We also observe an excess of energy near the vertex consistent with multiple protons in the final state.

  7. Calculation of Doublet Capture Rate for Muon Capture in Deuterium within Chiral Effective Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Adam, Jr.; M. Tater; E. Truhlik; E. Epelbaum; R. Machleidt; P. Ricci

    2012-01-31

    The doublet capture rate of the negative muon capture in deuterium is calculated employing the nuclear wave functions generated from accurate nucleon-nucleon potentials constructed at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order of heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory and the weak meson exchange current operator derived within the same formalism. All but one of the low-energy constants that enter the calculation were fixed from pion-nucleon and nucleon-nucleon scattering data. The low-energy constant d^R (c_D), which cannot be determined from the purely two-nucleon data, was extracted recently from the triton beta-decay and the binding energies of the three-nucleon systems. The calculated values of the doublet capture rates show a rather large spread for the used values of the d^R. Precise measurement of the doublet capture rate in the future will not only help to constrain the value of d^R, but also provide a highly nontrivial test of the nuclear chiral EFT framework. Besides, the precise knowledge of the constant d^R will allow for consistent calculations of other two-nucleon weak processes, such as proton-proton fusion and solar neutrino scattering on deuterons, which are important for astrophysics.

  8. Observation of seasonal variation of atmospheric multiple-muon events in the MINOS Near and Far Detectors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamson, P.; Bishai, M.; Diwan, M. V.; Isvan, Z.; Ling, J.; Viren, B.

    2015-06-09

    We report the first observation of seasonal modulations in the rates of cosmic ray multiple-muon events at two underground sites, the MINOS Near Detector with an overburden of 225 mwe, and the MINOS Far Detector site at 2100 mwe. At the deeper site, multiple-muon events with muons separated by more than 8 m exhibit a seasonal rate that peaks during the summer, similar to that of single-muon events. Conversely, the rate of multiple-muon events with muons separated by less than 5–8 m, and the rate of multiple-muon events in the smaller, shallower Near Detector, exhibit a seasonal rate modulation thatmore »peaks in the winter.« less

  9. Monitoring the Critical Zone using Time-Lapse Digital Photography. Within the critical zone, important interconnected physical, chemical, and biological processes influence the mass and energy exchange that governs everything from biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papuga, Shirley A.

    , important interconnected physical, chemical, and biological processes influence the mass and energy exchange Focal length: 0.2m to Resolution: 3 MP Power: Solar Panel/Marine Battery Orientation: into main wind; the cost of a traditional snow sensor is about $700 which does not include the price of the datalogger

  10. Criticality Model Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.M. Scaglione

    2003-03-12

    The purpose of the ''Criticality Model Report'' is to validate the MCNP (CRWMS M&O 1998h) code's ability to accurately predict the effective neutron multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) for a range of conditions spanned by various critical configurations representative of the potential configurations commercial reactor assemblies stored in a waste package may take. Results of this work are an indication of the accuracy of MCNP for calculating eigenvalues, which will be used as input for criticality analyses for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage at the proposed Monitored Geologic Repository. The scope of this report is to document the development and validation of the criticality model. The scope of the criticality model is only applicable to commercial pressurized water reactor fuel. Valid ranges are established as part of the validation of the criticality model. This model activity follows the description in BSC (2002a).

  11. Transport at criticality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Buchel; C. Pagnutti

    2009-12-16

    We study second order phase transitions in non-conformal holographic models of gauge theory/string theory correspondence at finite temperature and zero chemical potential. We compute critical exponents of the bulk viscosity near the transition and interpret our results in the framework of available models of dynamical critical phenomena. Intriguingly, although some of the models we discuss belong to different static universality classes, they appear to share the same dynamical critical exponent.

  12. Injection/Extraction Studies for the Muon FFAG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasternak, J.; Berg, J. Scott; Kelliher, D. J.; Machida, S.

    2010-03-30

    The non-scaling fixed field alternating gradient (NS-FFAG) ring is a candidate muon accelerator in the Neutrino Factory complex according to the present baseline, which is currently being addressed by the International Design Study (IDS-NF). In order to achieve small orbit excursion, motivated by magnet cost reduction, and small time of flight variation, dictated by the need to use high RF frequency, lattices with a very compact cell structure and short straight sections are required. The resulting geometry dictates very difficult constraints on the injection/extraction systems. Beam dynamics in the non-scaling FFAG is studied using codes capable of correctly tracking with large transverse amplitude and momentum spread. The feasibility of injection/extraction is studied and various implementations focusing on minimization of kicker/septum strength are presented. Finally the parameters of the resulting kicker magnets are estimated.

  13. Characterising encapsulated nuclear waste using cosmic-ray muon tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarkson, Anthony; Hoek, Matthias; Ireland, David G; Johnstone, John R; Kaiser, Ralf; Keri, Tibor; Lumsden, Scott; Mahon, David F; McKinnon, Bryan; Murray, Morgan; Nutbeam-Tuffs, Siân; Shearer, Craig; Yang, Guangliang; Zimmerman, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Tomographic imaging techniques using the Coulomb scattering of cosmic-ray muons have been shown previously to successfully identify and characterise low- and high-Z materials within an air matrix using a prototype scintillating-fibre tracker system. Those studies were performed as the first in a series to assess the feasibility of this technology and image reconstruction techniques in characterising the potential high-Z contents of legacy nuclear waste containers for the UK Nuclear Industry. The present work continues the feasibility study and presents the first images reconstructed from experimental data collected using this small-scale prototype system of low- and high-Z materials encapsulated within a concrete-filled stainless-steel container. Clear discrimination is observed between the thick steel casing, the concrete matrix and the sample materials assayed. These reconstructed objects are presented and discussed in detail alongside the implications for future industrial scenarios.

  14. INTERACTION OF MUON BEAM WITH PLASMA DEVELOPED DURING IONIZATION COOLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Ahmed, D. Kaplan, T. Roberts, L. Spentzouris, K. Beard

    2012-07-01

    Particle-in-cell simulations involving the interaction of muon beam (peak density 10{sup 18} m{sup 3}) with Li plasma (ionized medium) of density 10{sup 16}-10{sup 22} m{sup -3} have been performed. This study aimed to understand the effects of plasma on an incoming beam in order to explore scenario developed during the process of ionization cooling. The computer code takes into account the self-consistent electromagnetic effects of beam interacting with plasma. This study shows that the beam can pass through the plasma of densities four order of magnitude higher than its peak density. The low density plasmas are wiped out by the beam, however, the resonance is observed for densities of similar order. Study reveals the signature of plasma wakefield acceleration.

  15. Characterising encapsulated nuclear waste using cosmic-ray muon tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anthony Clarkson; David J. Hamilton; Matthias Hoek; David G. Ireland; John R. Johnstone; Ralf Kaiser; Tibor Keri; Scott Lumsden; David F. Mahon; Bryan McKinnon; Morgan Murray; Siân Nutbeam-Tuffs; Craig Shearer; Guangliang Yang; Colin Zimmerman

    2014-10-27

    Tomographic imaging techniques using the Coulomb scattering of cosmic-ray muons have been shown previously to successfully identify and characterise low- and high-Z materials within an air matrix using a prototype scintillating-fibre tracker system. Those studies were performed as the first in a series to assess the feasibility of this technology and image reconstruction techniques in characterising the potential high-Z contents of legacy nuclear waste containers for the UK Nuclear Industry. The present work continues the feasibility study and presents the first images reconstructed from experimental data collected using this small-scale prototype system of low- and high-Z materials encapsulated within a concrete-filled stainless-steel container. Clear discrimination is observed between the thick steel casing, the concrete matrix and the sample materials assayed. These reconstructed objects are presented and discussed in detail alongside the implications for future industrial scenarios.

  16. Superconducting solenoids for muon-cooling in the neutrino factory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, M.A.; Miller, J.R.; Prestemon, S.

    2001-05-12

    The cooling channel for a neutrino factory consists of a series of alternating field solenoidal cells. The first section of the bunching cooling channel consists of 41 cells that are 2.75-m long. The second section of the cooling channel consists of 44 cells that are 1.65-m long. Each cell consists of a single large solenoid with an average diameter of 1.5 m and a pair of flux reversal solenoids that have an average diameter of 0.7 to 0.9 meters. The magnetic induction on axis reaches a peak value of about 5 T at the end of the second section of the cooling channel. The peak on axis field gradients in flux reversal section approaches 33 T/m. This report describes the two types of superconducting solenoid magnet sections for the muon-cooling channel of the proposed neutrino factory.

  17. Reference handbook: Nuclear criticality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-06

    The purpose for this handbook is to provide Rocky Flats personnel with the information necessary to understand the basic principles underlying a nuclear criticality.

  18. A Measurement of the muon neutrino charged current quasielastic interaction and a test of Lorentz violation with the MiniBooNE experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katori, Teppei; /Indiana U.

    2008-12-01

    The Mini-Booster neutrino experiment (MiniBooNE) at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) is designed to search for {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} appearance neutrino oscillations. Muon neutrino charged-current quasi-elastic (CCQE) interactions ({nu}{sub {mu}} + n {yields} {mu} + p) make up roughly 40% of our data sample, and it is used to constrain the background and cross sections for the oscillation analysis. Using high-statistics MiniBooNE CCQE data, the muon-neutrino CCQE cross section is measured. The nuclear model is tuned precisely using the MiniBooNE data. The measured total cross section is {sigma} = (1.058 {+-} 0.003 (stat) {+-} 0.111 (syst)) x 10{sup -38} cm{sup 2} at the MiniBooNE muon neutrino beam energy (700-800 MeV). {nu}{sub e} appearance candidate data is also used to search for Lorentz violation. Lorentz symmetry is one of the most fundamental symmetries in modern physics. Neutrino oscillations offer a new method to test it. We found that the MiniBooNE result is not well-described using Lorentz violation, however further investigation is required for a more conclusive result.

  19. 2011 Annual Criticality Safety Program Performance Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrea Hoffman

    2011-12-01

    The 2011 review of the INL Criticality Safety Program has determined that the program is robust and effective. The review was prepared for, and fulfills Contract Data Requirements List (CDRL) item H.20, 'Annual Criticality Safety Program performance summary that includes the status of assessments, issues, corrective actions, infractions, requirements management, training, and programmatic support.' This performance summary addresses the status of these important elements of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Assessments - Assessments in 2011 were planned and scheduled. The scheduled assessments included a Criticality Safety Program Effectiveness Review, Criticality Control Area Inspections, a Protection of Controlled Unclassified Information Inspection, an Assessment of Criticality Safety SQA, and this management assessment of the Criticality Safety Program. All of the assessments were completed with the exception of the 'Effectiveness Review' for SSPSF, which was delayed due to emerging work. Although minor issues were identified in the assessments, no issues or combination of issues indicated that the INL Criticality Safety Program was ineffective. The identification of issues demonstrates the importance of an assessment program to the overall health and effectiveness of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Issues and Corrective Actions - There are relatively few criticality safety related issues in the Laboratory ICAMS system. Most were identified by Criticality Safety Program assessments. No issues indicate ineffectiveness in the INL Criticality Safety Program. All of the issues are being worked and there are no imminent criticality concerns. Infractions - There was one criticality safety related violation in 2011. On January 18, 2011, it was discovered that a fuel plate bundle in the Nuclear Materials Inspection and Storage (NMIS) facility exceeded the fissionable mass limit, resulting in a technical safety requirement (TSR) violation. The TSR limits fuel plate bundles to 1085 grams U-235, which is the maximum loading of an ATR fuel element. The overloaded fuel plate bundle contained 1097 grams U-235 and was assembled under an 1100 gram U-235 limit in 1982. In 2003, the limit was reduced to 1085 grams citing a new criticality safety evaluation for ATR fuel elements. The fuel plate bundle inventories were not checked for compliance prior to implementing the reduced limit. A subsequent review of the NMIS inventory did not identify further violations. Requirements Management - The INL Criticality Safety program is organized and well documented. The source requirements for the INL Criticality Safety Program are from 10 CFR 830.204, DOE Order 420.1B, Chapter III, 'Nuclear Criticality Safety,' ANSI/ANS 8-series Industry Standards, and DOE Standards. These source requirements are documented in LRD-18001, 'INL Criticality Safety Program Requirements Manual.' The majority of the criticality safety source requirements are contained in DOE Order 420.1B because it invokes all of the ANSI/ANS 8-Series Standards. DOE Order 420.1B also invokes several DOE Standards, including DOE-STD-3007, 'Guidelines for Preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations at Department of Energy Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities.' DOE Order 420.1B contains requirements for DOE 'Heads of Field Elements' to approve the criticality safety program and specific elements of the program, namely, the qualification of criticality staff and the method for preparing criticality safety evaluations. This was accomplished by the approval of SAR-400, 'INL Standardized Nuclear Safety Basis Manual,' Chapter 6, 'Prevention of Inadvertent Criticality.' Chapter 6 of SAR-400 contains sufficient detail and/or reference to the specific DOE and contractor documents that adequately describe the INL Criticality Safety Program per the elements specified in DOE Order 420.1B. The Safety Evaluation Report for SAR-400 specifically recognizes that the approval of SAR-400 approves the INL Criticality Safety Program. No new source requirements were released in 2011. A revision to LRD-18001 is

  20. CAP: Criticality AnCAP: Criticality An Efficient Speculatip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torrellas, Josep

    - Tracks running tasks andg their context Novel components of CAPNovel components of CAP - Critical path builder Builds path and analyzes graph - Critical path predictor #12;CAP OvCAP Ov T ll t th hTo collect the critical path calculation is easyp y o find critical path #12;Critical PatCritical Pat T i i l l t d

  1. Vulnerability of critical infrastructures : identifying critical nodes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, Roger Gary; Robinson, David Gerald

    2004-06-01

    The objective of this research was the development of tools and techniques for the identification of critical nodes within critical infrastructures. These are nodes that, if disrupted through natural events or terrorist action, would cause the most widespread, immediate damage. This research focuses on one particular element of the national infrastructure: the bulk power system. Through the identification of critical elements and the quantification of the consequences of their failure, site-specific vulnerability analyses can be focused at those locations where additional security measures could be effectively implemented. In particular, with appropriate sizing and placement within the grid, distributed generation in the form of regional power parks may reduce or even prevent the impact of widespread network power outages. Even without additional security measures, increased awareness of sensitive power grid locations can provide a basis for more effective national, state and local emergency planning. A number of methods for identifying critical nodes were investigated: small-world (or network theory), polyhedral dynamics, and an artificial intelligence-based search method - particle swarm optimization. PSO was found to be the only viable approach and was applied to a variety of industry accepted test networks to validate the ability of the approach to identify sets of critical nodes. The approach was coded in a software package called Buzzard and integrated with a traditional power flow code. A number of industry accepted test networks were employed to validate the approach. The techniques (and software) are not unique to power grid network, but could be applied to a variety of complex, interacting infrastructures.

  2. MICE: The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment: Phase Space Cooling Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, T. L.

    2010-03-30

    MICE is an experimental demonstration of muon ionization cooling using a section of an ionization cooling channel and a muon beam. The muons are produced by the decay of pions from a target dipping into the ISIS proton beam at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). The channel includes liquid-hydrogen absorbers providing transverse and longitudinal momentum loss and high-gradient radiofrequency (RF) cavities for longitudinal reacceleration, all packed into a solenoidal magnetic channel. MICE will reduce the beam transverse emittance by about 10% for muon momenta between 140 and 240 MeV/c. Time-of-flight (TOF) counters, threshold Cherenkov counters, and a calorimeter will identify background electrons and pions. Spectrometers before and after the cooling section will measure the beam transmission and input and output emittances with an absolute precision of 0.1%.

  3. Search for muon neutrinos from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the IceCube neutrino telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbasi, R.

    2010-01-01

    2009, GCN: The Gamma ray bursts Coordinates Network, http://for muon neutrinos from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the IceCubeMereghetti, S. 2004, in Gamma-ray Bursts: 30 Years of

  4. Underground muons from the direction of Cygnus X-3 during the January 1991 radio flare

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The Soudan 2 Collaboration

    1991-08-01

    Muons recorded in the Soudan 2 underground nucleon decay detector from January 1989 to February 1991 have been examined for any correlation with the radio flares of Cyguns X-3 observed during this period. On two nearby days during the radio flare of January 1991 a total of 32 muons within 2.0{degrees} of the Cyguns X-3 direction were observed when 11.4 were expected.

  5. Muon Collider/Neutrino Factory Targetry R&D 2009-2012 Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    in collection pool (beam dump) 0.4 FTE engineer effort × 1 year H. Kirk, K. McDonald (July 10, 2009) #12;Muon, Latvia) 0.2 scientist effort × 3 years Travel $20k ·Use of a Pb-Bi alloy rather than Hg (?) H. Kirk, K for high TC solenoid ·0.3 engineer effort × 2 years H. Kirk, K. McDonald (July 10, 2009) #12;Muon Collider

  6. ATLAS Muon TGCTrigger Electronics Hi-pT ASIC Extended URD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fukunaga, Chikara

    ATLAS Muon TGCTrigger Electronics Hi-pT ASIC Extended URD Version 0 June,2000 1 Hi-pT ASIC Design in every block. There may be, therefore, maximum six hi-pT tracks found by a chip if each chip find-Packard G-link protocol. #12;ATLAS Muon TGCTrigger Electronics Hi-pT ASIC Extended URD Version 0 June,2000 2

  7. Review of Nevada Site Office Criticality Safety Assessments at the Criticality Experiments Facility and Training Assembly for Criticality Safety and Appraisal of the Criticality Experiments Facility Startup Plan, October 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report provides the results of an independent oversight review of criticality safety assessment activities conducted by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Nevada Site Office

  8. Security Risk Assessment Methodologies (RAM) for Critical Infrastructu...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Building Energy Efficiency Find More Like This Return to Search Security Risk Assessment Methodologies (RAM) for Critical Infrastructures Sandia National Laboratories...

  9. Incoherent transport in clean quantum critical metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard A. Davison; Blaise Goutéraux; Sean A. Hartnoll

    2015-07-25

    In a clean quantum critical metal, and in the absence of umklapp, most d.c. conductivities are formally infinite due to momentum conservation. However, there is a particular combination of the charge and heat currents which has a finite, universal conductivity. In this paper, we describe the physics of this conductivity $\\sigma_Q$ in quantum critical metals obtained by charge doping a strongly interacting conformal field theory. We show that it satisfies an Einstein relation and controls the diffusivity of a conserved charge in the metal. We compute $\\sigma_Q$ in a class of theories with holographic gravitational duals. Finally, we show how the temperature scaling of $\\sigma_Q$ depends on certain critical exponents characterizing the quantum critical metal. The holographic results are found to be reproduced by the scaling analysis, with the charge density operator becoming marginal in the emergent low energy quantum critical theory.

  10. Incoherent transport in clean quantum critical metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davison, Richard A; Hartnoll, Sean A

    2015-01-01

    In a clean quantum critical metal, and in the absence of umklapp, most d.c. conductivities are formally infinite due to momentum conservation. However, there is a particular combination of the charge and heat currents which has a finite, universal conductivity. In this paper, we describe the physics of this conductivity $\\sigma_Q$ in quantum critical metals obtained by charge doping a strongly interacting conformal field theory. We show that it satisfies an Einstein relation and controls the diffusivity of a conserved charge in the metal. We compute $\\sigma_Q$ in a class of theories with holographic gravitational duals. Finally, we show how the temperature scaling of $\\sigma_Q$ depends on certain critical exponents characterizing the quantum critical metal. The holographic results are found to be reproduced by the scaling analysis, with the charge density operator becoming marginal in the emergent low energy quantum critical theory.

  11. Criticality Code Validation Exercises with TSUNAMI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    In the criticality code validation of common systems, many paths may exist to a correct bias, bias uncertainty, and upper subcritical limit. The challenge for the criticality analyst is to select an efficient, defensible, and safe methodology to consistently obtain the correct values. One method of testing criticality code validation techniques is to use a sample system with a known bias as a test application and determine whether the methods employed can reproduce the known bias. In this paper, a low-enriched uranium (LEU) lattice critical experiment with a known bias is used as the test application, and numerous other LEU experiments are used as the benchmarks for the criticality code validation exercises using traditional and advanced parametric techniques. The parameters explored are enrichment, energy of average lethargy causing fission (EALF), and the TSUNAMI integral index ck with experiments with varying degrees of similarity. This paper is an extension of a previously published summary.

  12. Must Criticism Be Constructive?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geuss, Raymond

    2012-10-01

    ’ criti - cism is somehow defective, objectionable, or inappropriate. It is part of the responsibility of a critic, it is assumed, not simply to denigrate some institution, social arrangement, or form of action, but to do so while pro- viding at least... to the third of my three dimensions. In cases of ‘full-blown’ criticism the first and second of these aspects are explicitly connected. I would not usually think I had in front of me a case of ‘criti - cism’ — or at any rate of ‘criticism’ in the full...

  13. The Energy - Water Connection: Can We Sustain Critical Resources and Make them Reliable, Affordable, and Environmentally Sound?(LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McMahon, Jim

    2011-04-28

    Summer Lecture Series 2006: Jim McMahon of Berkeley Lab's Environmental Energy Technologies Division (EETD) is head of the Energy Analysis Department in EETD, which provides technical analysis to the Department of Energy on things like energy efficiency appliance standards. McMahon and his colleagues helped the nation save tens of billions of dollars in energy costs since the standards program began. Now his Water-Energy Technology Team (WETT) is applying its expertise to the linked problem of energy and water. Each of us requires more than 500 gallons per person per day for food production, plus an additional 465 gallons to produce household electricity. WETT hopes to mine some of the numerous opportunities to save energy and water by applying new technologies.

  14. Journal of Nuclear Energy. Vol. 22. pp. 579 to 586. Pergamon Press 1968. Printed in Northern Ireland ON THE CRITICAL PROBLEM FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siewert, Charles E.

    of the authors (0. J. S.) to North Carolina State University. t United States Atomic Energy Commission PreJournal of Nuclear Energy. Vol. 22. pp. 579 to 586. Pergamon Press 1968. Printed in Northern

  15. 978-1-4799-4394-4/14/$31.00 c 2014 IEEE Towards Energy Proportionality for Large-Scale Latency-Critical Workloads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozyrakis, Christos

    978-1-4799-4394-4/14/$31.00 c 2014 IEEE Towards Energy Proportionality for Large-Scale Latency University Google, Inc. Abstract Reducing the energy footprint of warehouse-scale computer (WSC) systems is key to their affordability, yet difficult to achieve in practice. The lack of energy proportionality

  16. The Critical Materials Institute | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDidDevelopment TopMetathesisSediments and Related J. BennettThe Critical

  17. Critical Materials Workshop Agenda

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Critical Materials Workshop Sheraton Crystal City 1800 Jefferson Davis Highway, Arlington, VA April 3, 2012, 8 am - 5 pm Time (EDT) Activity Speaker 8:00 am - 9:00 am Registration...

  18. CRITICAL MATERIALS INSTITUTE PROJECTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    INL National Technology Roadmap for Critical Materials 4 4-3 4.3.3 McCall, Scott LLNL Additive Manufacturing of Permanent Magnets 2 2-1 2.1.2 Turchi, Patrice LLNL Materials...

  19. Production of high-energy ?neutrinos from young neutron stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. F. Burgio; B. Link

    2006-09-20

    Young, rapidly rotating neutron stars could accelerate protons to energies of $\\sim 1$ PeV close to the stellar surface, which scatter with x-rays from the stellar surface through the $\\Delta$ resonance and produce pions. The pions subsequently decay to produce muon neutrinos. We find that the energy spectrum of muon neutrinos consists of a sharp rise at $\\sim 50$ TeV, corresponding to the onset of the resonance, above which the flux drops as $\\epsilon_\

  20. State Policies Provide Critical Support for Renewable Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2009-01-01

    types of state policies have been critical to the growth of renewable energy,types of state policies for supporting electricity generation from geothermal and other forms of renewable energy:

  1. Critical thickness in silicone thermosets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deopura, Manish, 1975-

    2005-01-01

    Critical thickness effects are utilized to achieve high fracture toughness in brittle polymers. The postulate of critical thickness, which is: "Macroscopically brittle polymers deform in a ductile fashion below a critical ...

  2. Detector Optimization Studies and Light Higgs Decay into Muons at CLIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Grefe

    2014-02-12

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is a concept for a future $e^{+}e^{-}$ linear collider with a center-of-mass energy of up to 3 TeV. The design of a CLIC experiment is driven by the requirements related to the physics goals, as well as by the experimental conditions. For example, the short time between two bunch crossings of 0.5 ns and the backgrounds due to beamstrahlung have direct impact on the design of a CLIC experiment. The Silicon Detector (SiD) is one of the concepts currently being discussed as a possible detector for the International Linear Collider (ILC). In this thesis we develop a modified version of the SiD simulation model for CLIC, taking into account the specific experimental conditions. In addition, we developed a software tool to investigate the impact of beam-related backgrounds on the detector by overlaying events from different simulated event samples. Moreover, we present full simulation studies, determining the performance of the calorimeter and tracking systems. We show that the track reconstruction in the all-silicon tracker of SiD is robust in the presence of the backgrounds at CLIC. Furthermore, we investigate tungsten as a dense absorber material for the hadronic calorimeter, which allows for the construction of a compact hadronic calorimeter that fulfills the requirements on the energy resolution and shower containment without a significant increase of the coil radius. Finally, the measurement of the decays of light Higgs bosons into two muons is studied in full simulation. We find that with an integrated luminosity of 2 ab$^{-1}$, corresponding to 4 years of data taking at CLIC, the respective Higgs branching ratio can be determined with a statistical uncertainty of approximately 15%.

  3. Abstract--Energy is the most critical resource in the life of a wireless sensor node. Therefore, its usage must be optimized to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    simulations. Moreover, we also quantify the gain achieved in terms of lifetime by considering overhead energy dramatically decrease, if the overhead energy component is neglected during routing decisions. Index Terms, low-cost, low-power electronic devices coupled with sensing and wireless communication capabilities

  4. Feasibility study of heavy ion beams and compound target materials for muon production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaebum Son; Ju Hahn Lee; Gi Dong Kim; Yong Kyun Kim

    2015-07-15

    We have investigated the feasibility of using compound materials as target for muon production by virtue of simulations using a GEANT4 toolkit. A graphite and two thermostable compound materials, beryllium oxide (BeO) and boron carbide (B4C) were considered as muon production targets and their muon production rates for 600-MeV proton beam were calculated and compared. For thermal analysis, total heat deposited on the targets by the proton beams and the secondary particles was calculated with a MCNPX code, and then the temperature distribution of target was derived from the calculated heat by using an ANSYS code with consideration for heat transfer mechanisms, such as thermal conduction and thermal radiation. In addition, we have investigated whether the heavy ion beams can be utilized for muon production. For various beam species such as 3He2, 4He, 7Li, 10B and 12C, their muon production rates were calculated and compared with that obtained for a proton beam.

  5. Feasibility study of heavy ion beams and compound target materials for muon production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Son, Jaebum; Kim, Gi Dong; Kim, Yong Kyun

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the feasibility of using compound materials as target for muon production by virtue of simulations using a GEANT4 toolkit. A graphite and two thermostable compound materials, beryllium oxide (BeO) and boron carbide (B4C) were considered as muon production targets and their muon production rates for 600-MeV proton beam were calculated and compared. For thermal analysis, total heat deposited on the targets by the proton beams and the secondary particles was calculated with a MCNPX code, and then the temperature distribution of target was derived from the calculated heat by using an ANSYS code with consideration for heat transfer mechanisms, such as thermal conduction and thermal radiation. In addition, we have investigated whether the heavy ion beams can be utilized for muon production. For various beam species such as 3He2, 4He, 7Li, 10B and 12C, their muon production rates were calculated and compared with that obtained for a proton beam.

  6. YALINA facility a sub-critical Accelerator- Driven System (ADS) for nuclear energy research facility description and an overview of the research program (1997-2008).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gohar, Y.; Smith, D. L.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-04-28

    The YALINA facility is a zero-power, sub-critical assembly driven by a conventional neutron generator. It was conceived, constructed, and put into operation at the Radiation Physics and Chemistry Problems Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus located in Minsk-Sosny, Belarus. This facility was conceived for the purpose of investigating the static and dynamic neutronics properties of accelerator driven sub-critical systems, and to serve as a neutron source for investigating the properties of nuclear reactions, in particular transmutation reactions involving minor-actinide nuclei. This report provides a detailed description of this facility and documents the progress of research carried out there during a period of approximately a decade since the facility was conceived and built until the end of 2008. During its history of development and operation to date (1997-2008), the YALINA facility has hosted several foreign groups that worked with the resident staff as collaborators. The participation of Argonne National Laboratory in the YALINA research programs commenced in 2005. For obvious reasons, special emphasis is placed in this report on the work at YALINA facility that has involved Argonne's participation. Attention is given here to the experimental program at YALINA facility as well as to analytical investigations aimed at validating codes and computational procedures and at providing a better understanding of the physics and operational behavior of the YALINA facility in particular, and ADS systems in general, during the period 1997-2008.

  7. A measurement of hadron production cross sections for the simulation of accelerator neutrino beams and a search for muon-neutrino to electron-neutrino oscillations in the delta m**2 about equals 1-eV**2 region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitz, David W.; /Columbia U.

    2008-01-01

    A measurement of hadron production cross-sections for the simulation of accelerator neutrino beams and a search for muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations in the {Delta}m{sup 2} {approx} 1 eV{sup 2} region. This dissertation presents measurements from two different high energy physics experiments with a very strong connection: the Hadron Production (HARP) experiment located at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland, and the Mini Booster Neutrino Experiment (Mini-BooNE) located at Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois.

  8. CMI Webinar: Energy Materials and Criticality, 2015-2030 | Critical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L OBransenBusinessInitialRadiologicalMaterials Institute CMI

  9. Evidences of high energy protons with energies beyond 0.4 GeV in the solar particle spectrum as responsible for the cosmic rays solar diurnal anisotropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. E. Navia; C. R. A. Augusto; M. B. Robba; K. H. Tsui

    2007-06-26

    Analysis on the daily variations of cosmic ray muons with $E_{\\mu}\\geq 0.2 GeV$ based on the data of two directional muon telescopes at sea level and with a rigidity of response to cosmic proton spectrum above 0.4 GV is presented. The analysis covers two months of observations and in 60% of days, abrupt transitions between a low to a high muon intensity and vice-verse is observed, the period of high muon intensity is from $\\sim 8.0h$ up to $\\sim 19.0h$ (local time) and coincides with the period when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) lines overtake the Earth. This behavior strongly suggest that the high muon intensity is due to a contribution of solar protons (ions) on the muon intensity produced by the galactic cosmic rays, responsible for the low muon intensity. This implies that the solar particle spectrum extends to energies beyond 1 GeV. We show that this picture can explain the solar daily variation origin, and it is a most accurate scenario than the assumption of corotating galactic cosmic ray with the IMF lines, specially in the high rigidity region. Obtained results are consistent with the data reported in others papers. Some aspects on the sensitivity of our muon telescopes are also presented.

  10. BEAM-POWER DEPOSITION IN A 4-MW TARGET STATION FOR A MUON COLLIDER OR A NEUTRINO FACTORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    BEAM-POWER DEPOSITION IN A 4-MW TARGET STATION FOR A MUON COLLIDER OR A NEUTRINO FACTORY (IPAC11 with shielding out to 1.2 m radius. W-C shielding likely needed beyond the target station, where ~ 800 kW power-carbide + water shielding of superconducting magnets for the target station at a Muon Collider or Neutrino Factory

  11. Compact storage ring to search for the muon electric dipole moment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Adelmann; K. Kirch; C. J. G. Onderwater; T. Schietinger

    2009-06-25

    We present the concept of a compact storage ring of less than 0.5 m orbit radius to search for the electric dipole moment of the muon ($d_\\mu$) by adapting the "frozen spin" method. At existing muon facilities a statistics limited sensitivity of $d_\\mu \\sim 5 \\times 10^{-23} \\ecm$ can be achieved within one year of data taking. Reaching this precision would demonstrate the viability of this novel technique to directly search for charged particle EDMs and already test a number of Standard Model extensions. At a future, high-power muon facility a statistical reach of $d_\\mu \\sim 5 \\times 10^{-25} \\ecm$ seems realistic with this setup.

  12. Measurement of the charge ratio of atmospheric muons with the CMS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2010-08-01

    We present a measurement of the ratio of positive to negative muon fluxes from cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere, using data collected by the CMS detector both at ground level and in the underground experimental cavern at the CERN LHC. Muons were detected in the momentum range from 5 GeV/c to 1 TeV/c. The surface flux ratio is measured to be 1.2766 \\pm 0.0032(stat.) \\pm 0.0032 (syst.), independent of the muon momentum, below 100 GeV/c. This is the most precise measurement to date. At higher momenta the data are consistent with an increase of the charge ratio, in agreement with cosmic ray shower models and compatible with previous measurements by deep-underground experiments.

  13. Cosmic-muon flux and annual modulation in Borexino at 3800 m water-equivalent depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Bellini; J. Benziger; D. Bick; G. Bonfini; D. Bravo; M. Buizza Avanzini; B. Caccianiga; L. Cadonati; F. Calaprice; C. Carraro; P. Cavalcante; A. Chavarria; A. Chepurnov; D. D'Angelo; S. Davini; A. Derbin; A. Etenko; F. von Feilitzsch; K. Fomenko; D. Franco; C. Galbiati; S. Gazzana; C. Ghiano; M. Giammarchi; M. Goeger-Neff; A. Goretti; L. Grandi; E. Guardincerri; C. Hagner; S. Hardy; Aldo Ianni; Andrea Ianni; D. Korablev; G. Korga; Y. Koshio; D. Kryn; M. Laubenstein; T. Lewke; E. Litvinovich; B. Loer; F. Lombardi; P. Lombardi; L. Ludhova; I. Machulin; S. Manecki; W. Maneschg; G. Manuzio; Q. Meindl; E. Meroni; L. Miramonti; M. Misiaszek; D. Montanari; P. Mosteiro; V. Muratova; L. Oberauer; M. Obolensky; F. Ortica; K. Otis; M. Pallavicini; L. Papp; L. Perasso; S. Perasso; A. Pocar; R. S. Raghavan; G. Ranucci; A. Razeto; A. Re; A. Romani; A. Sabelnikov; R. Saldanha; C. Salvo; S. Schönert; H. Simgen; M. Skorokhvatov; O. Smirnov; A. Sotnikov; S. Sukhotin; Y. Suvorov; R. Tartaglia; G. Testera; D. Vignaud; R. B. Vogelaar; J. Winter; M. Wojcik; A. Wright; M. Wurm; J. Xu; O. Zaimidoroga; S. Zavatarelli; G. Zuzel

    2012-11-22

    We have measured the muon flux at the underground Gran Sasso National Laboratory (3800 m w.e.) to be (3.41 \\pm 0.01) \\times 10-4m-2s-1 using four years of Borexino data. A modulation of this signal is observed with a period of (366\\pm3) days and a relative amplitude of (1.29 \\pm 0.07)%. The measured phase is (179 \\pm 6) days, corresponding to a maximum on the 28th of June. Using the most complete atmospheric data models available, muon rate fluctuations are shown to be positively correlated with atmospheric temperature, with an effective coefficient {\\alpha}T = 0.93 \\pm 0.04. This result represents the most precise study of the muon flux modulation for this site and is in good agreement with expectations.

  14. Assessing the Feasibility of Interrogating Nuclear Waste Storage Silos using Cosmic-ray Muons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ambrosino, F; Cimmino, L; D'Alessandro, R; Ireland, D G; Kaiser, R; Mahon, D F; Mori, N; Noli, P; Saracino, G; Shearer, C; Viliani, L; Yang, G

    2014-01-01

    Muon radiography is a fast growing field in applied scientific research. In recent years, many detector technologies and imaging techniques using the Coulomb scattering and absorption properties of cosmic-ray muons have been developed for the non-destructive assay of various structures across a wide range of applications. This work presents the first results that assess the feasibility of using muons to interrogate waste silos within the UK Nuclear Industry. Two such approaches, using different techniques that exploit each of these properties, have previously been published, and show promising results from both simulation and experimental data for the detection of shielded high-Z materials and density variations from volcanic assay. Both detector systems are based on scintillator and photomultiplier technologies. Results from dedicated simulation studies using both these technologies and image reconstruction techniques are presented for an intermediate-sized nuclear waste storage facility filled with concrete...

  15. Magnetic Fusion Energy Plasma Interactive and High Heat Flux Components: Volume 5, Technical assessment of critical issues in the steady state operation of fusion confinement devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Critical issues for the steady state operation of plasma confinement devices exist in both the physics and technology fields of fusion research. Due to the wide range and number of these issues, this technical assessment has focused on the crucial issues associated with the plasma physics and the plasma interactive components. The document provides information on the problem areas that affect the design and operation of a steady state ETR or ITER type confinement device. It discusses both tokamaks and alternative concepts, and provides a survey of existing and planned confinement machines and laboratory facilities that can address the identified issues. A universal definition of steady state operation is difficult to obtain. From a physics point of view, steady state is generally achieved when the time derivatives approach zero and the operation time greatly exceeds the characteristic time constants of the device. Steady state operation for materials depends on whether thermal stress, creep, fatigue, radiation damage, or power removal are being discussed. For erosion issues, the fluence and availability of the machine for continuous operation are important, assuming that transient events such as disruptions do not limit the component lifetimes. The panel suggests, in general terms, that steady state requires plasma operation from 100 to 1000 seconds and an availability of more than a few percent, which is similar to the expectations for an ETR type device. The assessment of critical issues for steady state operation is divided into four sections: physics issues; technology issues; issues in alternative concepts; and devices and laboratory facilities that can address these problems.

  16. Simulation of the Ionization Cooling of Muons in Linear RF Systems G. Penn, J.S. Wurtele, Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    Simulation of the Ionization Cooling of Muons in Linear RF Systems G. Penn, J.S. Wurtele National Labs, Berkeley, CA 94720 Abstract Ionization cooling of muon beams is a crucial component of the proposed muon collider and neutrino factory. Cur- rent studies of cooling channels predominantly use simula

  17. AVLIS Criticality risk assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brereton, S.J., LLNL

    1998-04-29

    Evaluation of criticality safety has become an important task in preparing for the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) uranium enrichment runs that will take place during the Integrated Process Demonstration (IPD) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This integrated operation of AVLIS systems under plant-like conditions will be used to verify the performance of process equipment and to demonstrate the sustained integrated enrichment performance of these systems using operating parameters that are similar to production plant specifications. Because of the potential criticality concerns associated with enriched uranium, substantial effort has been aimed towards understanding the potential system failures of interest from a criticality standpoint, and evaluating them in detail. The AVLIS process is based on selective photoionization of uranium atoms of atomic weight 235 (U-235) in a vapor stream, followed by electrostatic extraction. The process is illustrated in Figure 1. Two major subsystems are involved: the uranium separator and the laser system. In the separator, metallic uranium is fed into a crucible where it is heated and vaporized by an electron beam. The atomic U-235/U-238 vapor stream moves away from the molten uranium and is illuminated by precisely tuned beams of dye laser light. Upon absorption of the tuned dye laser light, the U-235 atoms become excited and eject electrons (become photoionized), giving them a net positive charge. The ions of U-235 are moved preferentially by an electrostatic field to condense on the product collector, forming the enriched uranium product. The remaining vapor, which is depleted in U-235 (tails), passes unaffected through the photoionization/extractor zone and accumulates on collectors in the top of the separator. Tails and product collector surfaces operate at elevated temperatures so that deposited materials flow as segregated liquid streams. The separated uranium condensates (uranium enriched in U-235 and uranium depleted in U-235) are cooled and accumulated in solid metallic form in canisters. The collected product and tails material is weighed and transferred into certified, critically safe, shipping containers (DOT specification 6M with 2R containment vessel). These will be temporarily stored, and then shipped offsite either for use by a fuel fabricator, or for disposal. Tails material will be packaged for disposal. A criticality risk assessment was performed for AVLIS IPD runs. In this analysis, the likelihood of occurrence of a criticality was examined. For the AVLIS process, there are a number of areas that have been specifically examined to assess whether or not the frequency of occurrence of a criticality is credible (frequency of occurrence > 10-6/yr). In this paper, we discuss only two of the areas: the separator and canister operations.

  18. A study of muon neutrino disappearance with the MINOS detectors and the NuMI neutrino beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, John Stuart; /Cambridge U.

    2008-06-01

    This thesis presents the results of an analysis of {nu}{sub {mu}} disappearance with the MINOS experiment, which studies the neutrino beam produced by the NuMI facility at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The rates and energy spectra of charged current {nu}{sub {mu}} interactions are measured in two similar detectors, located at distances of 1 km and 735 km along the NuMI beamline. The Near Detector provides accurate measurements of the initial beam composition and energy, while the Far Detector is sensitive to the effects of neutrino oscillations. The analysis uses data collected between May 2005 and March 2007, corresponding to an exposure of 2.5 x 10{sup 20} protons on target. As part of the analysis, sophisticated software was developed to identify muon tracks in the detectors and to reconstruct muon kinematics. Events with reconstructed tracks were then analyzed using a multivariate technique to efficiently isolate a pure sample of charged current {nu}{sub {mu}} events. An extrapolation method was also developed, which produces accurate predictions of the Far Detector neutrino energy spectrum, based on data collected at the Near Detector. Finally, several techniques to improve the sensitivity of an oscillation measurement were implemented, and a full study of the systematic uncertainties was performed. Extrapolating from observations at the Near Detector, 733 {+-} 29 Far Detector events were expected in the absence of oscillations, but only 563 events were observed. This deficit in event rate corresponds to a significance of 4.3 standard deviations. The deficit is energy dependent and clear distortion of the Far Detector energy spectrum is observed. A maximum likelihood analysis, which fully accounts for systematic uncertainties, is used to determine the allowed regions for the oscillation parameters and identifies the best fit values as {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2} = 2.29{sub -0.14}{sup +0.14} x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 23} > 0.953 (68% confidence level). The models of neutrino decoherence and decay are disfavored at the 5.0{sigma} and 3.2{sigma} levels respectively, while the no oscillation model is excluded at the 9.4{sigma} level.

  19. Status of Studies of Achromat-based 6D Ionization Cooling Rings for Muons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, X.; Kirk, H.; Cline, D.; Garren, A.A.; Berg, J.S.

    2011-09-04

    Six dimensional ionization cooling of muons is needed to achieve the necessary luminosity for a muon collider. If that cooling could occur over multiple turns in a closed ring, there would be significant cost savings over a single-pass cooling channel. We report on the status of a cooling ring with achromatic arcs. The achromatic design permits the design to easily switch between a closed ring and a snaking geometry on injection or extraction from the ring. The ring is designed with sufficient space in each superperiod for injection and extraction magnets. We describe the ring's lattice design, performance, and injection/extraction requirements.

  20. Data acquisition system for the MuLan muon lifetime experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Tishchenko; S. Battu; S. Cheekatmalla; D. B. Chitwood; S. Dhamija; T. P. Gorringe; F. Gray; K. R. Lynch; I. Logashenko; S. Rath; D. M. Webber

    2008-02-07

    We describe the data acquisition system for the MuLan muon lifetime experiment at Paul Scherrer Institute. The system was designed to record muon decays at rates up to 1 MHz and acquire data at rates up to 60 MB/sec. The system employed a parallel network of dual-processor machines and repeating acquisition cycles of deadtime-free time segments in order to reach the design goals. The system incorporated a versatile scheme for control and diagnostics and a custom web interface for monitoring experimental conditions.

  1. Hadronic light-by-light scattering contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blum, Thomas [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Chowdhury, Saumitra [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Hayakawa, Masashi [Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Izubuchi, Taku [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The form factor that yields the light-by-light scattering contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment is computed in lattice QCD+QED and QED. A non-perturbative treatment of QED is used and is checked against perturbation theory. The hadronic contribution is calculated for unphysical quark and muon masses, and only the diagram with a single quark loop is computed. Statistically significant signals are obtained. Initial results appear promising, and the prospect for a complete calculation with physical masses and controlled errors is discussed.

  2. Hadronic light-by-light scattering contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment from lattice QCD

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Blum, Thomas; Chowdhury, Saumitra; Hayakawa, Masashi; Izubuchi, Taku

    2015-01-07

    The form factor that yields the light-by-light scattering contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment is computed in lattice QCD+QED and QED. A non-perturbative treatment of QED is used and is checked against perturbation theory. The hadronic contribution is calculated for unphysical quark and muon masses, and only the diagram with a single quark loop is computed. Statistically significant signals are obtained. Initial results appear promising, and the prospect for a complete calculation with physical masses and controlled errors is discussed.

  3. Measurement of Neutron and Muon Fluxes 100~m Underground with the SciBath Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, Lance

    2014-01-01

    The SciBath detector is an 80 liter liquid scintillator detector read out by a three dimensional grid of 768 wavelength-shifting fibers. Initially conceived as a fine-grained charged particle detector for neutrino studies that could image charged particle tracks in all directions, it is also sensitive to fast neutrons (15-200 MeV). In fall of 2011 the apparatus performed a three month run to measure cosmic-induced muons and neutrons 100~meters underground in the FNAL MINOS near-detector area. Data from this run has been analyzed and resulted in measurements of the cosmic muon flux as \

  4. Construction and test of MDT chambers for the ATLAS muon spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, F; Dietl, H; Kroha, H; Lagouri, T; Manz, A; Ostapchuk, A Ya; Richter, R; Schael, S; Chouridou, S; Deile, M; Kortner, O; Staude, A; Ströhmer, R; Trefzger, T M

    2001-01-01

    The Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers for the muon spectrometer of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) consist of 3-4 layers of pressurized drift tubes on either side ofa space frame carrying an optical monitoring system to correct fordeformations. The full-scale prototype of a large MDT chamber has been constructed with methods suitable for large-scale production. X-ray measurements at CERN showed a positioning accuracy of the sense wires in the chamber of better than the required 20 micrometers (rms). The performance of the chamber was studied in a muon beam at CERN. Chamber production for ATLAS now has started.

  5. Energy Spectrum of Local Multiparticle Configurations and Mechanism of Anomalously Slow Relaxation of the System of Strongly Interacting Liquid Clusters in a Disordered Nanoporous Medium According to the Self-Organized Criticality Scenario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. D. Borman; V. N. Tronin; V. A. Byrkin

    2015-07-22

    It has been shown that changes in the energy of a system of nonwetting-liquid clusters confined in a random nanoporous medium in the process of relaxation can be written in the quasiparticle approximation in the form of the sum of the energies of local (metastable) configurations of liquid clusters interacting with clusters in the connected nearest pores. The energy spectrum and density of states of the local configuration have been calculated. It has been shown that the relaxation of the state of the system occurs through the scenario of self-organized criticality (SOC). The process is characterized by the expectation of a fluctuation necessary for overcoming a local energy barrier of the metastable state with the subsequent rapid hydrodynamic extrusion of the liquid under the action of the surface buoyancy forces of the nonwetting framework. In this case, the dependence of the interaction between local configurations on the number of filled pores belonging to the infinite percolation cluster of filled pores serves as an internal feedback initiating the SOC process. The calculations give a power-law time dependence of the relative volume of the confined liquid. The developed model of the relaxation of the porous medium with the nonwetting liquid demonstrates possible mechanisms and scenarios of SOC for disordered atomic systems.

  6. Energy and Direction Estimation of Neutrinos in muonless events at ICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ajmi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study events without identifiable muon tracks in the Iron Calorimeter detector at the India-based Neutrino Observatory. Such events are dominated by high energy (E$_\

  7. Energy and Direction Estimation of Neutrinos in muonless events at ICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali Ajmi; S. Uma Sankar

    2015-05-27

    In this paper, we study events without identifiable muon tracks in the Iron Calorimeter detector at the India-based Neutrino Observatory. Such events are dominated by high energy (E$_\

  8. Four Critical Needs to Change the Hydrate Energy Paradigm from Assessment to Production: The 2007 Report to Congress by the U.S. Federal methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahajan,D.; Sloan, D.; Brewer, P.; Dutta, N.; Johnson, A.; Jones, E.; Juenger, K.; Kastner, M.; Masutani, S.; Swenson, R.; Whelan, J.; Wilson, s.; Woolsey, R.

    2009-03-11

    This work summarizes a two-year study by the U.S. Federal Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee recommending the future needs for federally-supported hydrate research. The Report was submitted to the US Congress on August 14, 2007 and includes four recommendations regarding (a) permafrost hydrate production testing, (b) marine hydrate viability assessment (c) climate effect of hydrates, and (d) international cooperation. A secure supply of natural gas is a vital goal of the U.S. national energy policy because natural gas is the cleanest and most widely used of all fossil fuels. The inherent cleanliness of natural gas, with the lowest CO2 emission per unit of heat energy of any fossil fuel, means substituting gas for coal and fuel oil will reduce emissions that can exacerbate the greenhouse effect. Both a fuel and a feedstock, a secure and reasonably priced supply of natural gas is important to industry, electric power generators, large and small commercial enterprises, and homeowners. Because each volume of solid gas hydrate contains as much as 164 standard volumes of methane, hydrates can be viewed as a concentrated form of natural gas equivalent to compressed gas but less concentrated than liquefied natural gas (LNG). Natural hydrate accumulations worldwide are estimated to contain 700,000 TCF of natural gas, of which 200,000 TCF are located within the United States. Compared with the current national annual consumption of 22 TCF, this estimate of in-place gas in enormous. Clearly, if only a fraction of the hydrated methane is recoverable, hydrates could constitute a substantial component of the future energy portfolio of the Nation (Figure 1). However, recovery poses a major technical and commercial challenge. Such numbers have sparked interest in natural gas hydrates as a potential, long-term source of energy, as well as concerns about any potential impact the release of methane from hydrates might have on the environment. Energy-hungry countries such as India and Japan are outspending the United States on hydrate science and engineering R&D by a factor of 10, and may bring this resource to market as much as a decade before the United States.

  9. On the Rejection of Fake Muons in AMANDA using Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiebusch, Christopher

    On the Rejection of Fake Muons in AMANDA using Neural Networks Alexander Biron, Sabine Schilling This report describes the use of an artificial neural network in the final quality analysis for AMANDA. Aim the reconstructed tracks and are fed as inputs into the neural network. We use a simple feedforward architecture

  10. Study of the performance of the MicroMegas chambers for the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer Upgrade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanadia, Marco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Micromegas (MICRO MEsh GAseous Structure) chambers are Micro-Pattern Gaseous Detectors designed to provide a high spatial resolution in highly irradiated environments. In 2007 an ambitious long-term R&D activity was started in the context of the ATLAS experiment, at CERN: the Muon ATLAS Micromegas Activity (MAMMA). After years of tests on prototypes and technology breakthroughs, Micromegas chambers were chosen as tracking detectors for an upgrade of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer. These novel detectors will be installed in 2018 and 2019 during the second long shutdown of the Large Hadron Collider, and will serve as precision detectors in the innermost part of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer. Eight layers of Micromegas modules of unprecedented size, up to 3 $\\rm{{m^2}}$, will cover a surface of 150 $\\rm{{m^2}}$ for a total active area of about 1200 $\\rm{{m^2}}$. This upgrade will be crucial to ensure high quality performance for the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer in view of the third run of the Large Hadron Collider and...

  11. Spallation Backgrounds in Super-Kamiokande Are Made in Muon-Induced Showers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Shirley Weishi

    2015-01-01

    Crucial questions about solar and supernova neutrinos remain unanswered. Super-Kamiokande has the exposure needed for progress, but detector backgrounds are a limiting factor. A leading component is the beta decays of isotopes produced by cosmic-ray muons and their secondaries, which initiate nuclear spallation reactions. Cuts of events after and surrounding muon tracks reduce this spallation decay background by $\\simeq 90\\%$ (at a cost of $\\simeq 20\\%$ deadtime), but its rate at 6 -- 18 MeV is still dominant. A better way to cut this background was suggested in a Super-Kamiokande paper [Bays {\\it et al.}, Phys.~Rev.~D {\\bf 85}, 052007 (2012)] on a search for the diffuse supernova neutrino background. They found that spallation decays above 16 MeV were preceded near the same location by a peak in the apparent Cherenkov light profile from the muon; a more aggressive cut was applied to a limited section of the muon track, leading to decreased background without increased deadtime. We put their empirical discove...

  12. SHIELDING STUDIES FOR THE MUON COLLIDER TARGET (From STUDY II to IDS120f Geometries)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    COLLECTING TANK (BEAM DUMP) AND REMOVAL SYSTEM. 8. SHIELDING CONFIGURATIONS (WC BEADS+H2O). 2 #12;TARGETSHIELDING STUDIES FOR THE MUON COLLIDER TARGET (From STUDY II to IDS120f Geometries) NICHOLAS. RADIATION DAMAGE. STRUCTURAL/MECHANICAL LIMITS FOR SUPERCONDUCTING COILS. SHIELDING MATERIAL. RESULTS

  13. Design and optimization of a particle selection system for muon based applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    are generated that deposit heat in superconducting materials and activate the machine. In this study we describe ·Scanned chicane length and angle · Defined performance in terms of ­ Muon transmission from 80 to 260 Me the point with best transmission and fitted results to a mathematical expression (yellow line) Summary ·We

  14. The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration The R&D Program for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    , May 26, 2001 http://puhep1.princeton.edu/mumu/target/ Kirk T. McDonald May 26, 2001 1 #12 target is feasible for beam power of 4 MW (and more). Kirk T. McDonald May 26, 2001 2 #12; The Neutrino Target system support facility. Kirk T. McDonald May 26, 2001 3 #12; The Neutrino Factory and Muon

  15. Simulation of High-Power Mercury Jet Targets for Neutrino Factory and Muon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Simulation of High-Power Mercury Jet Targets for Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider R. Samulyak,1 interacting with proton pulses in 15-20T magnetic field is a key element of high-power target systems · Proof rarefaction waves · Cavities can form on inter-particle size scales · Present work focuses of pure hydro

  16. SHIELDING OF SUPERCONDUCTING COILS FOR A 4-MW MUON-COLLIDER TARGET SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    SHIELDING OF SUPERCONDUCTING COILS FOR A 4-MW MUON-COLLIDER TARGET SYSTEM R.J. Weggel , N. Souchlas intercoil gaps to 40% of the O.D. of the flanking coils. Longitudinal sag of the tungsten shielding vessels an aggregate cross section of 0.1 m2 ; the cryogenic heat leakage may be large. The innermost shielding vessel

  17. Hadronic contributions to the muon anomalous magnetic moment Workshop. $(g-2)_?$: Quo vadis? Workshop. Mini proceedings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurice Benayoun; Johan Bijnens; Tom Blum; Irinel Caprini; Gilberto Colangelo; Henryk Czy?; Achim Denig; Cesareo A. Dominguez; Simon Eidelman; Christian S. Fischer; Paolo Gauzzi; Yuping Guo; Andreas Hafner; Masashi Hayakawa; Gregorio Herdoiza; Martin Hoferichter; Guangshun Huang; Karl Jansen; Fred Jegerlehner; Benedikt Kloss; Bastian Kubis; Zhiqing Liu; William Marciano; Pere Masjuan; Harvey B. Meyer; Tsutomu Mibe; Andreas Nyffeler; Vladimir Pascalutsa; Vladyslav Pauk; Michael R. Pennington; Santiago Peris; Christoph F. Redmer; Pablo Sanchez-Puertas; Boris Shwartz; Evgeny Solodov; Dominik Stoeckinger; Thomas Teubner; Marc Unverzagt; Marc Vanderhaeghen; Magnus Wolke

    2014-07-21

    We present the mini-proceedings of the workshops Hadronic contributions to the muon anomalous magnetic moment: strategies for improvements of the accuracy of the theoretical prediction and $(g-2)_{\\mu}$: Quo vadis?, both held in Mainz from April 1$^{\\rm rst}$ to 5$^{\\rm th}$ and from April 7$^{\\rm th}$ to 10$^{\\rm th}$, 2014, respectively.

  18. Yukawa coupling and anomalous magnetic moment of the muon: An update for the LHC era

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crivellin, Andreas; Girrbach, Jennifer; Nierste, Ulrich

    2011-03-01

    We study the interplay between a soft muon Yukawa coupling generated radiatively with the trilinear A-terms of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) and the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon. In the absence of a tree-level muon Yukawa coupling the lightest smuon mass is predicted to be in the range between 600 GeV and 2200 GeV at 2{sigma}, if the bino mass M{sub 1} is below 1 TeV. Therefore, a detection of a smuon (in conjunction with a sub-TeV bino) at the LHC would directly imply a nonzero muon Yukawa coupling in the MSSM superpotential. Inclusion of slepton flavor mixing could in principle lower the mass of one smuonlike slepton below 600 GeV. However, the experimental bounds on radiative lepton decays instead strengthen the lower mass bound, with larger effects for smaller M{sub 1}, We also extend the analysis to the electron case and find that a light selectron close to the current experimental search limit may prove the MSSM electron Yukawa coupling to be nonzero.

  19. X(5) Critical-Point Structure in a Finite System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Leviatan

    2005-09-01

    X(5) is a paradigm for the structure at the critical point of a particular first-order phase transition for which the intrinsic energy surface has two degenerate minima separated by a low barrier. For a finite system, we show that the dynamics at such a critical point can be described by an effective deformation determined by minimizing the energy surface after projection onto angular momentum zero, and combined with two-level mixing. Wave functions of a particular analytic form are used to derive estimates for energies and quadrupole rates at the critical point.

  20. Proceedings of the Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety Project Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, R.G. [comp.

    1994-01-01

    This report is the proceedings of the annual Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety Project (NCTSP) Workshop held in Monterey, California, on April 16--28, 1993. The NCTSP was sponsored by the Department of Energy and organized by the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility. The report is divided into six sections reflecting the sessions outlined on the workshop agenda.

  1. Dynamic trapping near a quantum critical point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Kolodrubetz; Emanuel Katz; Anatoli Polkovnikov

    2015-03-02

    The study of dynamics in closed quantum systems has recently been revitalized by the emergence of experimental systems that are well-isolated from their environment. In this paper, we consider the closed-system dynamics of an archetypal model: spins near a second order quantum critical point, which are traditionally described by the Kibble-Zurek mechanism. Imbuing the driving field with Newtonian dynamics, we find that the full closed system exhibits a robust new phenomenon -- dynamic critical trapping -- in which the system is self-trapped near the critical point due to efficient absorption of field kinetic energy by heating the quantum spins. We quantify limits in which this phenomenon can be observed and generalize these results by developing a Kibble-Zurek scaling theory that incorporates the dynamic field. Our findings can potentially be interesting in the context of early universe physics, where the role of the driving field is played by the inflaton or a modulus.

  2. Critical Issues Geologic mapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    , and productive cooperation with many other organizations all combine to enhance the IGS-bed methane, and geothermal energy. The IGS's important sources of information--geologic maps, rock and core technologies of energy production, such as integrated gasification combined cycle systems and underground coal

  3. PROTON BEAM REQUIREMENTS FOR A NEUTRINO FACTORY AND MUON COLLIDER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Table 1 summarizes the NF proton driver parameters obtainedboth facilities. Table 1. Proton driver requirements for arepetition frequency (Hz) Proton energy (GeV) Proton rms

  4. COVARIANCE PLASTICITY AND REGULATED CRITICALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, Daniel

    COVARIANCE PLASTICITY AND REGULATED CRITICALITY Elie Bienenstock Division of Applied Mathematics plasticity may cause the brain to operate near criticality. We analyze the effect of such a regulation of Hebbian covariance plasticity. Such a regulation may bring the system near criticality. We suggest

  5. Safety-Critical Universit at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peleska, Jan - Fachbereich 3

    . Hazard Analysis and Risk Assessment 5. Design Criteria for Safety-Critical Systems 6. Validation, Veri#12. Hazard Analysis and Risk Assessment 5. Design Criteria for Safety-Critical Systems 6. Validation, Veri#12Safety-Critical Systems Prof. Dr. Jan Peleska Universit at Bremen | TZI Dr. Ing. Cornelia Zahlten

  6. Design and Analysis of Muon Beam Stop Support Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okafor, Udenna

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this thesis is to design and analyze support structures to be used in the installation, test and final positioning of the MBS throughout the life of the Mu2e experiment. There several requirements for the MBS imposed by both the scope of the experiment and, other components within the DS bore. The functions of the MBS are: 1. To limit the induced rates in the Tracker, the Calorimeter and the Cosmic Ray Veto due to backsplash-and-secondary interactions, and 2. To reduce radiation levels external to the Detector solenoid. The structures used in supporting the MBS will also adhere to requirements imposed by its functions. These requirements are critical to the support structures and affect design decisions. Other requirements critical to the design are imposed by the weight, positional tolerance and assembly procedure of the MBS, and also, the magnetic field and vacuum dose rate of the DS bore. A detailed breakdown of how each requirement affects the structural design can be found in chapter 2. Chapter 3 describes the design of each support structure and its attachment to the MBS while chapter 4 describes the results from structural analysis of the support structures. Chapter 5 describes evaluation for the design through testing and calculations while the conclusion in chapter 6 reports the current status at the time of this thesis submission with a plan for future work to be completed until final design and installation.

  7. Critical heat flux maxima during boiling crisis on textured surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhillon, Navdeep Singh

    Enhancing the critical heat flux (CHF) of industrial boilers by surface texturing can lead to substantial energy savings and global reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, but fundamentally this phenomenon is not well ...

  8. EERE Announces Up to $4 Million for Critical Materials Recovery...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    mining projects. The United States imports many critical materials we need to expand our clean energy economy. Some of them may be found in the fluids produced by geothermal power...

  9. State Policies Provide Critical Support for Renewable Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbose, Galen

    2009-01-01

    it can compete against other renewable resource options.Critical Support for Renewable Electricity Galen Barbose,July 15, 2008 Growth in renewable energy in the U.S. over

  10. ANNUAL TRILATERAL U.S. - EU - JAPAN CONFERENCE ON CRITICAL MATERIALS...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    TRILATERAL U.S. - EU - JAPAN CONFERENCE ON CRITICAL MATERIALS FOR A CLEAN ENERGY FUTURE, SEPTEMBER 8-9, 2014 ANNUAL TRILATERAL U.S. - EU - JAPAN CONFERENCE ON CRITICAL...

  11. A Web-Based Nuclear Criticality Safety Bibliographic Database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koponen, B L; Huang, S

    2007-02-22

    A bibliographic criticality safety database of over 13,000 records is available on the Internet as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) website. This database is easy to access via the Internet and gets substantial daily usage. This database and other criticality safety resources are available at ncsp.llnl.gov. The web database has evolved from more than thirty years of effort at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), beginning with compilations of critical experiment reports and American Nuclear Society Transactions.

  12. Electrostatic interactions in critical solvents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Bier; Andrea Gambassi; Martin Oettel; S. Dietrich

    2011-04-29

    The subtle interplay between critical phenomena and electrostatics is investigated by considering the effective force acting on two parallel walls confining a near-critical binary liquid mixture with added salt. The ion-solvent coupling can turn a non-critical repulsive electrostatic force into an attractive one upon approaching the critical point. However, the effective force is eventually dominated by the critical Casimir effect, the universal properties of which are not altered by the presence of salt. This observation allows a consistent interpretation of recent experimental data.

  13. Teaching Critical Thinking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmes, N G; Bonn, D A

    2015-01-01

    The ability to make decisions based on data, with its inherent uncertainties and variability, is a complex and vital skill in the modern world. The need for such quantitative critical thinking occurs in many different contexts, and while it is an important goal of education, that goal is seldom being achieved. We argue that the key element for developing this ability is repeated practice in making decisions based on data, with feedback on those decisions. We demonstrate a structure for providing suitable practice that can be applied in any instructional setting that involves the acquisition of data and relating that data to scientific models. This study reports the results of applying that structure in an introductory physics lab course. Students in an experimental condition were repeatedly instructed to make and act on quantitative comparisons between datasets, and between data and models, an approach that is common to all science disciplines. These instructions were slowly faded across the course. After the...

  14. The critical temperature of superconductor and its electronic specific heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. V. Vasiliev

    2010-08-09

    It is shown that the critical temperature of the superconductor is related to the Sommerfeld constant, i.e. it is determined by the Fermi energy for I-type superconductors. The estimation of properties of II-type superconductors reveals a somewhat different relation of critical temperature and Fermi energy. Among the high-temperature superconducting ceramics there are the both - I and II - types superconductors.

  15. Inclusive b-hadron production cross section with muons in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2011-03-01

    A measurement of the b-hadron production cross section in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV is presented. The dataset, corresponding to 85 inverse nanobarns, was recorded with the CMS experiment at the LHC using a low-threshold single-muon trigger. Events are selected by the presence of a muon with transverse momentum greater than 6 GeV with respect to the beam direction and pseudorapidity less than 2.1. The transverse momentum of the muon with respect to the closest jet discriminates events containing b hadrons from background. The inclusive b-hadron production cross section is presented as a function of muon transverse momentum and pseudorapidity. The measured total cross section in the kinematic acceptance is sigma(pp to b+X to mu + X') =1.32 +/- 0.01 (stat) +/- 0.30 (syst) +/- 0.15 (lumi) microbarns.

  16. Measurement of the top quark mass using the invariant mass of lepton pairs in soft muon b-tagged events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Gerry P.

    We present the first measurement of the mass of the top quark in a sample of tt? ???? bb? qq? events (where ?=e,?) selected by identifying jets containing a muon candidate from the semileptonic decay of heavy-flavor hadrons ...

  17. Before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Subject: Critical Materials By: Dr. David Daneilson, Assistant Secretary Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  18. Americas' Energy Leaders Take Action to Realize Energy and Climate...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    renewable energy, cleaner fossil fuels, critical infrastructure, and energy poverty alleviation. DOE's Assistant Secretary for Policy and International Affairs David...

  19. Superallowed 0+ --> 0+ nuclear beta decays: 2014 critical survey, with precise results for Vud and CKM unitarity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. C. Hardy; I. S. Towner

    2014-11-21

    A new critical survey is presented of all half-life, decay-energy and branching-ratio measurements related to 20 superallowed 0+ --> 0+ beta decays. Included are 222 individual measurements of comparable precision obtained from 177 published references. Compared with our last review in 2008, we have added results from 24 new publications and eliminated 9 references, the results from which having been superseded by much more precise modern data. We obtain world-average ft-values for each of the eighteen transitions that have a complete set of data, then apply radiative and isospin-symmetry-breaking corrections to extract corrected Ft values. Fourteen of these Ft values now have a precision of order 0.1% or better. In the process of obtaining these results we carefully evaluate the available calculations of the isospin-symmetry-breaking corrections by testing the extent to which they lead to Ft values consistent with conservation of the vector current (CVC). Only one set of calculations satisfactorily meets this condition. The resultant average Ft value, when combined with the muon liftime, yields the up-down quark-mixing element of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix, Vud = 0.97417 +/- 0.00021. The unitarity test on the top row of the matrix becomes |Vud|^2 + |Vus|^2 + |Vub|^2 = 0.99978 +/- 0.00055 if the Particle Data Group recommended value for Vus is used. However, recent lattice QCD calculations, not included yet in the PDG evaluation, have introduced some inconsistency into kaon-decay measurements of Vus and Vus/Vud. We examine the impact of these new results on the unitarity test and conclude that there is no evidence of any statistically significant violation of unitarity. Finally, from the Ft-value data we also set limits on the possible existence of scalar interactions.

  20. Monitoring temporal opacity fluctuations of large structures with muon tomography : a calibration experiment using a water tower tank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kevin Jourde; Dominique Gibert; Jacques Marteau; Jean de Bremond d'Ars; Serge Gardien; Claude Girerd; Jean-Christophe Ianigro

    2015-04-09

    The idea of using secondary cosmic muons to scan the internal structure of a given body has known significant developments since the first archaeological application by Alvarez and collaborators on the Gizah pyramids. Recent applications cover the fields of volcanology, hydrology, civil engineering, mining, archaeology etc. Muon radiography features are essentially identical to those of medical X-ray imaging techniques. It is a contrast densitometry method using the screening effect of the body under study on the natural flux of cosmic muons. This technique is non-invasive and complements the standard geophysical techniques, e.g. electrical tomography or gravimetry. It may be applied to a large variety of geological targets, among which the domes of active volcanoes. In this context muon tomography presents the noticeable advantage to perform measurements of large volumes, with a large aperture, from a distant point, far from the potentially dangerous zones. The same conclusions apply regarding the monitoring of the volcano's activity since muon tomography provides continuous data taking, provided the muon detectors are sufficiently well designed and autonomous. Recent measurements on La Soufri\\`ere of Guadeloupe (Lesser Antilles, France) show, over a one year period, large modulations of the crossing muon flux, correlated with an increase of the activity in the dome. In order to firmly establish the sensitivity of the method and of our detectors and to disentangle the effects on the muon flux modulations induced by the volcano's hydrothermal system from those induced by other sources, e.g. atmospheric temperature and pressure, we perform a dedicated calibration experiment inside a water tower tank. We show how the method is fully capable of dynamically following fast variations in the density.

  1. R&D Towards a Muon Collider H. Guler (undergraduate student), C. Lu, K.T. McDonald,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    ://www.cap.bnl.gov/mumu/mu home page.html Princeton muon collider page: http://www.hep.princeton.edu/�mcdonald/mumu 1 #12; Options (?). . Muon collider: # $1B for source/cooler + $100k/m for rings Well­defined leptonic initial state. m µ /m; Targetry Issues . 1­ns beam pulse # shock heating of target. -- Resulting pressure wave may disperse liquid

  2. R&D Towards a Muon Collider H. Guler (undergraduate student), C. Lu, K.T. McDonald,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    ://www.cap.bnl.gov/mumu/mu home page.html Princeton muon collider page: http://www.hep.princeton.edu/~mcdonald/mumu 1 #12;Options collider: $1B for source/cooler + $100k/m for rings Well-defined leptonic initial state. m/me 200 Little of the muon bunch). 7 #12;Targetry Issues · 1-ns beam pulse shock heating of target. ­ Resulting pressure

  3. Chiral effective field theory predictions for muon capture on...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    studied with nuclear strong-interaction potentials and charge-changing weak currents, derived in chiral effective field theory. The low-energy constants (LEC's) csub D and csub...

  4. Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartmentEnergyEvery Thanksgiving,is designed as a practicalAlex

  5. Critical Materials Strategy Summary

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartmentEnergyEvery Thanksgiving,is designed as a

  6. The cosmic ray muon tomography facility based on large scale MRPC detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xuewu Wang; Ming Zeng; Zhi Zeng; Yi Wang; Ziran Zhao; Xiaoguang Yue; Zhifei Luo; Hengguan Yi; Baihui Yu; Jianping Cheng

    2015-04-18

    Cosmic ray muon tomography is a novel technology to detect high-Z material. A prototype of TUMUTY with 73.6 cm x 73.6 cm large scale position sensitive MRPC detectors has been developed and is introduced in this paper. Three test kits have been tested and image is reconstructed using MAP algorithm. The reconstruction results show that the prototype is working well and the objects with complex structure and small size (20 mm) can be imaged on it, while the high-Z material is distinguishable from the low-Z one. This prototype provides a good platform for our further studies of the physical characteristics and the performances of cosmic ray muon tomography.

  7. Reconcile muon g-2 anomaly with LHC data in SUGRA with generalized gravity mediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fei Wang; Wenyu Wang; Jin Min Yang

    2015-05-29

    From generalized gravity mediation we build a SUGRA scenario in which the gluino is much heavier than the electroweak gauginos at the GUT scale. We find that such a non-universal gaugino scenario with very heavy gluino at the GUT scale can be naturally obtained with proper high dimensional operators in the framework of SU(5) GUT. Then, due to the effects of heavy gluino, at the weak scale all colored sparticles are heavy while the uncolored sparticles are light, which can explain the Brookhaven muon g-2 measurement while satisfying the collider constraints (both the 125 GeV Higgs mass and the direct search limits of sparticles) and dark matter requirements. We also find that, in order to explain the muon g-2 measurement, the neutralino dark matter is lighter than 200 GeV in our scenario, which can be mostly covered by the future Xenon1T experiment.

  8. A Decisive Disappearance Search at High-$\\Delta m^2$ with Monoenergetic Muon Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Axani, S; Conrad, JM; Shaevitz, MH; Spitz, J; Wongjirad, T

    2015-01-01

    "KPipe" is a proposed experiment which will study muon neutrino disappearance for a sensitive test of the $\\Delta m^2\\sim1 \\mathrm{eV}^2$ anomalies, possibly indicative of one or more sterile neutrinos. The experiment is to be located at the J-PARC Materials and Life Science Facility's spallation neutron source, which represents the world's most intense source of charged kaon decay-at-rest monoenergetic (236 MeV) muon neutrinos. The detector vessel, designed to measure the charged current interactions of these neutrinos, will be 3 m in diameter and 120 m long, extending radially at a distance of 32 m to 152 m from the source. This design allows a sensitive search for $\

  9. A Decisive Disappearance Search at High-$?m^2$ with Monoenergetic Muon Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S Axani; G Collin; JM Conrad; MH Shaevitz; J Spitz; T Wongjirad

    2015-06-18

    "KPipe" is a proposed experiment which will study muon neutrino disappearance for a sensitive test of the $\\Delta m^2\\sim1 \\mathrm{eV}^2$ anomalies, possibly indicative of one or more sterile neutrinos. The experiment is to be located at the J-PARC Materials and Life Science Facility's spallation neutron source, which represents the world's most intense source of charged kaon decay-at-rest monoenergetic (236 MeV) muon neutrinos. The detector vessel, designed to measure the charged current interactions of these neutrinos, will be 3 m in diameter and 120 m long, extending radially at a distance of 32 m to 152 m from the source. This design allows a sensitive search for $\

  10. Test of candidate light distributors for the muon (g$-$2) laser calibration system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Anastasi; D. Babusci; F. Baffigi; G. Cantatore; D. Cauz; G. Corradi; S. Dabagov; G. Di Sciascio; R. Di Stefano; C. Ferrari; A. T. Fienberg; A. Fioretti; L. Fulgentini; C. Gabbanini; L. A. Gizzi; D. Hampai; D. W. Hertzog; M. Iacovacci; M. Karuza; J. Kaspar; P. Koester; L. Labate; S. Mastroianni; D. Moricciani; G. Pauletta; L. Santi; G. Venanzoni

    2015-04-01

    The new muon (g-2) experiment E989 at Fermilab will be equipped with a laser calibration system for all the 1296 channels of the calorimeters. An integrating sphere and an alternative system based on an engineered diffuser have been considered as possible light distributors for the experiment. We present here a detailed comparison of the two based on temporal response, spatial uniformity, transmittance and time stability.

  11. The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration The R&D Program for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    , May 26, 2001 http://puhep1.princeton.edu/mumu/target/ Kirk T. McDonald May 26, 2001 1 #12;The Neutrino is feasible for beam power of 4 MW (and more). Kirk T. McDonald May 26, 2001 2 #12;The Neutrino Factory facility. Kirk T. McDonald May 26, 2001 3 #12;The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration Pion

  12. The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration The Target System and Support Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    , May 4, 2001 http://puhep1.princeton.edu/mumu/target/ Kirk T. McDonald May 4, 2001 1 #12; The Neutrino target is feasible for beam power of 4 MW (and more). Kirk T. McDonald May 4, 2001 2 #12; The Neutrino Target system support facility. Kirk T. McDonald May 4, 2001 3 #12; The Neutrino Factory and Muon

  13. Production of radioactive isotopes through cosmic muon spallation in KamLAND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abe, S.; Furuno, K.; Gando, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Kibe, Y.; Kishimoto, Y.; Minekawa, Y.; Mitsui, T.; Nakajima, K.; Nakajima, K.; Nakamura, M.; Shimizu, I.; Shimizu, Y.; Shirai, J.; Suekane, F.; Suzuki, A.; Takemoto, Y.; Tamae, K.; Terashima, A.; Watanabe, H.

    2010-02-15

    Radioactive isotopes produced through cosmic muon spallation are a background for rare-event detection in nu detectors, double-beta-decay experiments, and dark-matter searches. Understanding the nature of cosmogenic backgrounds is particularly important for future experiments aiming to determine the pep and CNO solar neutrino fluxes, for which the background is dominated by the spallation production of {sup 11}C. Data from the Kamioka liquid-scintillator antineutrino detector (KamLAND) provides valuable information for better understanding these backgrounds, especially in liquid scintillators, and for checking estimates from current simulations based upon MUSIC, FLUKA, and GEANT4. Using the time correlation between detected muons and neutron captures, the neutron production yield in the KamLAND liquid scintillator is measured to be Y{sub n}=(2.8+-0.3)x10{sup -4} mu{sup -1} g{sup -1} cm{sup 2}. For other isotopes, the production yield is determined from the observed time correlation related to known isotope lifetimes. We find some yields are inconsistent with extrapolations based on an accelerator muon beam experiment.

  14. Study of the Production of Radioactive Isotopes through Cosmic Muon Spallation in KamLAND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KamLAND Collaboration; Abe, S.; Enomoto, S.; Furuno, K.; Gando, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Kibe, Y.; Kishimoto, Y.; Koga, M.; Minekawa, Y.; Mitsui, T.; Nakajima, K.; Nakajima, K.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, M.; Shimizu, I.; Shimizu, Y.; Shirai, J.; Suekane, F.; Suzuki, A.; Takemoto, Y.; Tamae, K.; Terashima, A.; Watanabe, H.; Yonezawa, E.; Yoshida, S.; Kozlov, A.; Murayama, H.; Busenitz, J.; Classen, T.; Grant, C.; Keefer, G.; Leonard, D. S.; McKee, D.; Piepke, A.; Banks, T. I.; Bloxham, T.; Detwiler, J. A.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Gray, F.; Guardincerri, E.; Hsu, L.; Ichimura, K.; Kadel, R.; Lendvai, C.; Luk, K.-B.; O'Donnell, T.; Steiner, H. M.; Winslow, L. A.; Dwyer, D. A.; Jillings, C.; Mauger, C.; McKeown, R. D.; Vogel, P.; Zhang, C.; Berger, B. E.; Lane, C. E.; Maricic, J.; Miletic, T.; Batygov, M.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Pakvasa, S.; Foster, J.; Horton-Smith, G. A.; Tang, A.; Dazeley, S.; Downum, K. E.; Gratta, G.; Tolich, K.; Bugg, W.; Efremenko, Y.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Perevozchikov, O.; Karwowski, H. J.; Markoff, D. M.; Tornow, W.; Heeger, K. M.; Piquemal, F.; Ricol, J.-S.; Decowski, M. P.

    2009-06-30

    Radioactive isotopes produced through cosmic muon spallation are a background for rare event detection in {nu} detectors, double-beta-decay experiments, and dark-matter searches. Understanding the nature of cosmogenic backgrounds is particularly important for future experiments aiming to determine the pep and CNO solar neutrino fluxes, for which the background is dominated by the spallation production of {sup 11}C. Data from the Kamioka Liquid scintillator Anti-Neutrino Detector (KamLAND) provides valuable information for better understanding these backgrounds, especially in liquid scintillator, and for checking estimates from current simulations based upon MUSIC, FLUKA, and Geant4. Using the time correlation between detected muons and neutron captures, the neutron production yield in the KamLAND liquid scintillator is measured to be (2.8 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -4} n/({mu} {center_dot} (g/cm{sup 2})). For other isotopes, the production yield is determined from the observed time correlation related to known isotope lifetimes. We find some yields are inconsistent with extrapolations based on an accelerator muon beam experiment.

  15. Design of the Muon Lifetime Experiment By Steve Kliewer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    , solar flares · Mostly made up of protons (some electrons and helium, C, O, & Fe nuclei) · Energies from is a Hamamatsu 931A photomultiplier tube with an HC123-01 low voltage base. Power to the bases is provided by a custom designed power supply that allows adjustment of a separate control voltage to each tube

  16. Status of Muon Collider Research and Development and Future Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    , Oxford, MS 38677 13 Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 14 KEK High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1­1 Oho, Tsukuba 305, Japan 15 Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 16. Wurtele 28 , Yongxiang Zhao 13 , Max Zolotorev 9 1 Fermi National Laboratory, P. O. Box 500, Batavia, IL

  17. SILENE Benchmark Critical Experiments for Criticality Accident Alarm Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Thomas Martin; Reynolds, Kevin H.

    2011-01-01

    In October 2010 a series of benchmark experiments was conducted at the Commissariat a Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA) Valduc SILENE [1] facility. These experiments were a joint effort between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the French CEA. The purpose of these experiments was to create three benchmarks for the verification and validation of radiation transport codes and evaluated nuclear data used in the analysis of criticality accident alarm systems (CAASs). This presentation will discuss the geometric configuration of these experiments and the quantities that were measured and will present some preliminary comparisons between the measured data and calculations. This series consisted of three single-pulsed experiments with the SILENE reactor. During the first experiment the reactor was bare (unshielded), but during the second and third experiments it was shielded by lead and polyethylene, respectively. During each experiment several neutron activation foils and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed around the reactor, and some of these detectors were themselves shielded from the reactor by high-density magnetite and barite concrete, standard concrete, and/or BoroBond. All the concrete was provided by CEA Saclay, and the BoroBond was provided by Y-12 National Security Complex. Figure 1 is a picture of the SILENE reactor cell configured for pulse 1. Also included in these experiments were measurements of the neutron and photon spectra with two BICRON BC-501A liquid scintillators. These two detectors were provided and operated by CEA Valduc. They were set up just outside the SILENE reactor cell with additional lead shielding to prevent the detectors from being saturated. The final detectors involved in the experiments were two different types of CAAS detectors. The Babcock International Group provided three CIDAS CAAS detectors, which measured photon dose and dose rate with a Geiger-Mueller tube. CIDAS detectors are currently in use at Y-12 in the newly constructed Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility. The second CAAS detector used a {sup 6}LiF TLD to absorb neutrons and a silicon detector to count the charge particles released by these absorption events. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory provided four of these detectors, which had formerly been used at the Rocky Flats facility in the United States.

  18. Critical Materials For Sustainable Energy Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ..................................................22 Case Study: Solar/Photovoltaics ......................................24 Materials Reduction

  19. 2010 Critical Materials Strategy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12 Beta-3 Racetracks Y-12

  20. Evidence for Neutrino Oscillations from Muon Decay at Rest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Athanassopoulos; L. B. Auerbach; R. L. Burman; I. Cohen; D. O. Caldwell; B. D. Dieterle; J. B. Donahue; A. M. Eisner; A. Fazely; F. J. Federspiel; G. T. Garvey; M. Gray; R. M. Gunasingha; R. Imlay; K. Johnston; H. J. Kim; W. C. Louis; R. Majkic; J. Margulies; K. McIlhany; W. Metcalf; G. B. Mills; R. A. Reeder; V. Sandberg; D. Smith; I. Stancu; W. Strossman; R. Tayloe; G. J. VanDalen; W. Vernon; N. Wadia; J. Waltz; Y-X. Wang; D. H. White; D. Works; Y. Xiao; S. Yellin The LSND Collaboration

    1996-05-01

    A search for nu_bar_mu to nu_bar_e oscillations has been conducted at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility using nu_bar_mu from mu+ decay at rest. The nu_bar_e are detected via the reaction (nu_bar_e,p) -> (e+,n), correlated with the 2.2 MeV gamma from (n,p) -> (d,gamma). The use of tight cuts to identify e+ events with correlated gamma rays yields 22 events with e+ energy between 36 and 60 MeV and only 4.6 (+/- 0.6) background events. The probability that this excess is due entirely to a statistical fluctuation is 4.1E-08. A chi^2 fit to the entire e+ sample results in a total excess of 51.8 (+18.7) (-16.9) (+/- 8.0) events with e+ energy between 20 and 60 MeV. If attributed to nu_bar_mu -> nu_bar_e oscillations, this corresponds to an oscillation probability (averaged over the experimental energy and spatial acceptance) of 0.0031 (+0.0011) (-0.0010) (+/- 0.0005).

  1. CRITICAL MATERIALS MUSEUM DISPLAY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits &BradburyMay 1, 2013, 4:15pmEnergyNovemberCompute 1 04-01-2015

  2. The Rest of the Story: What Critics Aren't Telling You About...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Director, Office of Public Affairs For nearly a year, Congressional critics of the Energy Department's loan programs have demonstrated a consistent pattern of cherry-picking...

  3. CLIC Project Overview (In Conjunction with the Muon Collider Workshop)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Latina, Andrea

    2010-01-08

    The CLIC study is exploring the scheme for an electron-positron collider with a centre-of-mass energy of 3 TeV in order to make the multi-TeV range accessible for physics. The current goal of the project is to demonstrate the feasibility of the technology by the year 2010. Recently, important progress has been made concerning the high-gradient accelerating structure tests and the experiments with beam in the CLIC test facility, CTF3. On the organizational side, the CLIC international collaborations have significantly gained momentum, boosting the CLIC study.

  4. Review of Yucca Mountain Disposal Criticality Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scaglione, John M [ORNL] [ORNL; Wagner, John C [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, submitted a license application for construction authorization of a deep geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in June of 2008. The license application is currently under review by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. However,on March 3, 2010 the DOE filed a motion requesting withdrawal of the license application. With the withdrawal request and the development of the Blue Ribbon Commission to seek alternative strategies for disposing of spent fuel, the status of the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain is uncertain. What is certain is that spent nuclear fuel (SNF) will continue to be generated and some long-lived components of the SNF will eventually need a disposition path(s). Strategies for the back end of the fuel cycle will continue to be developed and need to include the insights from the experience gained during the development of the Yucca Mountain license application. Detailed studies were performed and considerable progress was made in many key areas in terms of increased understanding of relevant phenomena and issues regarding geologic disposal of SNF. This paper reviews selected technical studies performed in support of the disposal criticality analysis licensing basis and the use of burnup credit. Topics include assembly misload analysis, isotopic and criticality validation, commercial reactor critical analyses, loading curves, alternative waste package and criticality control studies, radial burnup data and effects, and implementation of a conservative application model in the criticality probabilistic evaluation as well as other information that is applicable to operations regarding spent fuel outside the reactor. This paper summarizes the work and significant accomplishments in these areas and provides a resource for future, related activities.

  5. Preservation and Dissemination of the Hardcopy Documentation Portion of the NCSP Nuclear Criticality Bibliographic Database

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koponen, B L; Heinrichs, D

    2009-05-18

    The U.S. Department of Energy supports a nuclear criticality safety bibliographic internet database that contains approximately 15,000 records. We are working to ensure that a substantial portion of the corresponding hardcopy documents are preserved, digitized, and made available to criticality safety practitioners via the Nuclear Criticality Safety Program web site.

  6. 3 LANSCE: Mission-Critical for National Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Hui

    3 LANSCE: Mission-Critical for National Security 7 Nuclear Energy for Our Challenging Future 12) and the Department of Energy (DOE). In 2011, the NNSA renewed the memorandum of understanding that affirms, and the Isotope Production Facility. A sixth facility, the Materials Test Station, is being developed. The linac

  7. SHEBA-II as a criticality safety benchmark experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaBauve, R.J.; Sapir, J.L.

    1995-07-01

    SHEBA-II (Solution High Energy Burst Assembly-II) is a critical assembly experiment currently (1995) being operated at the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility. It is a bare assembly fueled with an aqueous solution of about 5% enriched uranyl fluoride that is stored in four critically safe steel tanks. The solution is transferred to the critical assembly vessel (CAV) by applying gas pressure to the storage tanks. Reactivity is controlled by varying the solution level, and a safety rod may be inserted in a thimble along the central axis of the CAV for fast shutdown. The simple geometry provided by this cylindrical system allows for easily applied calculational methods, and thus SHEBA-II is ideally suited for use as a criticality safety benchmark experiment.

  8. Critical speed measurements in the Tevatron cold compressors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeGraff, B.; Bossert, R.; Martinez, A.; Soyars, W.M.; /Fermilab

    2006-01-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron cryogenic system utilizes high-speed centrifugal cold compressors, manufactured by Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd. (IHI), for high energy operations. Nominal operating range for these compressors is 43,000 to 85,000 rpm. Past foil bearing failures prompted investigation to determine if critical speeds for operating compressors fall within operating range. Data acquisition hardware and software settings will be discussed for measuring liftoff, first critical and second critical speeds. Several tests provided comparisons between an optical displacement probe and accelerometer measurements. Vibration data and analysis of the 20 Tevatron ring cold compressors will be presented.

  9. Universality of critical magnetic field in holographic superconductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Momeni; R. Myrzakulov

    2015-02-11

    In this letter we study aspects of the holographic superconductors analytically in the presence of a constant external magnetic field. We show that the critical temperature and critical magnetic field can be calculated at nonzero temperature. We detect the Meissner effect in such superconductors. A universal relation between black hole mass $ M$ and critical magnetic field $H_c$ is proposed as $\\frac{H_c}{M^{2/3}}\\leq 0.687365$. We discuss some aspects of phase transition in terms of black hole entropy and the Bekenstein's entropy to energy upper bound.

  10. Autoclave nuclear criticality safety analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D`Aquila, D.M. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States); Tayloe, R.W. Jr. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Steam-heated autoclaves are used in gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment plants to heat large cylinders of UF{sub 6}. Nuclear criticality safety for these autoclaves is evaluated. To enhance criticality safety, systems are incorporated into the design of autoclaves to limit the amount of water present. These safety systems also increase the likelihood that any UF{sub 6} inadvertently released from a cylinder into an autoclave is not released to the environment. Up to 140 pounds of water can be held up in large autoclaves. This mass of water is sufficient to support a nuclear criticality when optimally combined with 125 pounds of UF{sub 6} enriched to 5 percent U{sup 235}. However, water in autoclaves is widely dispersed as condensed droplets and vapor, and is extremely unlikely to form a critical configuration with released UF{sub 6}.

  11. Analysis of RE4 Construction Cosmic Muon Test Data and Comparison with 2015 Collision Calibration Run Data for the Newly Installed RPC Chambers in the 4th Muon Endcap Station of the CMS Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iqbal, Muhammad Ansar

    2015-01-01

    RPC are the heart of the muon system of CMS experiment at LHC, CERN. Recently a new endcap layer, RE4, was added to increase redundancy. These added chambers were tested during the construction period with cosmic muons in the 904 lab at Prevessin, CERN. This study analyzes the HV scan from those tests and compares them with the first 2015 collision data taken at Point-5. The analysis showed that most of the chambers were producing more than 90% efficiency and were in good agreement with the Point-5 results. Those which did not give good results were reported. Other variables like working point and maximum efficiency were also studied.

  12. Muon anomalous magnetic moment in a $SU(4) \\otimes U(1)_N$ model without exotic electric charges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Cogollo

    2014-11-11

    We study an electroweak gauge extension of the standard model, so called 3-4-1 model, which does not contain exotic electric charges and it is anomaly free. We discuss phenomenological constraints of the model and compute all the corrections to the muon magnetic moment. Mainly, we discuss different mass regimes and their impact on this correction, deriving for the first time direct limits on the masses of the neutral fermions and charged vector bosons. Interestingly, the model could address the reported muon anomalous magnetic moment excess, however it would demands a rather low scale of symmetry breaking, far below the current electroweak constraints on the model. Thus, if this excess is confirmed in the foreseeable future by the g-2 experiment at FERMILAB, this 3-4-1 model can be decisively ruled out since the model cannot reproduce a sizeable and positive contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment consistent with current electroweak limits.

  13. Thermoelectric efficiency of critical quantum junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mihail Mintchev; Luca Santoni; Paul Sorba

    2013-10-30

    We derive the efficiency at maximal power of a scale-invariant (critical) quantum junction in exact form. Both Fermi and Bose statistics are considered. We show that time-reversal invariance is spontaneously broken. For fermions we implement a new mechanism for efficiency enhancement above the Curzon-Ahlborn bound, based on a shift of the particle energy in each heat reservoir, proportional to its temperature. In this setting fermionic junctions can even reach at maximal power the Carnot efficiency. The bosonic junctions at maximal power turn out to be less efficient then the fermionic ones.

  14. Downward Muon Intensity at Surface dI 0 (E 0 ; cos )

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Learned, John

    Downward Muon Intensity at Surface dI #22;0 (E #22;0 ; cos #18;) dE #22;0 = 0:14 #1; E #22;0 #1; 0 B @ 1 1 + 1:1E #22;0 cos #18; #3; 115 GeV + 0:054 1 + 1:1E #22;0 cos #18; ? 850 GeV + R c 1 C A Ref Approx. Isotropic H.E. Primary C.R. Flux Depth of Atmosphere a( ) q -1 -0.5 0 0.5 1 cos q 10 100 1000

  15. Fabrication of the prototype 201.25 mhz cavity for a muon ionization cooling experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rimmer, R.A.; Manning, S.; Manus, R.; Phillips, L.; Stirbet, M.; Worland, K.; Wu, G.; Li, D.; MacGill, R.; Staples, J.; Virostek, S.; Zisman, M.S.; Taminger, K.; Hafley, R.; Martin, R.; Summers, D.; Reep, M.

    2005-05-20

    We describe the fabrication and assembly of the first prototype 201. 25 MHz copper cavity for the muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE). This cavity was developed by the US MUCOOL collaboration and will be tested in the new MUCOOL Test Area at Fermilab. We outline the component and subassembly fabrication steps and the various metal forming and joining methods used to produce the final cavity shape. These include spinning, brazing, TIG welding, electron beam welding, electron beam annealing and deep drawing. Some of the methods developed for this cavity are novel and offer significant cost savings over conventional methods.

  16. High-Rate Glass Resistive Plate Chambers For LHC Muon Detectors Upgrade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laktineh, I; Cauwenbergh, S; Combret, C; Crotty, I; Haddad, Y; Grenier, G; Guida, R; Kieffer, R; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Schirra, F; Seguin, N; Tytgat, M; Van der Donckt, M; Wang, Y; Zaganidis, N

    2012-01-01

    The limitation of the detection rate of standard bakelite resistive plate chambers (RPC) used as muon detector in LHC experiments is behind the absence of such detectors in the high TJ regions in both CMS and ATLAS detectors. RPCs made with low resistivity glass plates (10ID O.cm) could be an adequate solution to equip the high TJ regions extending thus both the trigger efficiency and the physics performance. Different beam tests with single and multi-gap configurations using the new glass have shown that such detectors can operate at few thousands Hzlcm2 with high efficiency( > 90%).

  17. Higgs mass 125 GeV and g-2 of the muon in Gaugino Mediation Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harigaya, Keisuke; Yokozaki, Norimi

    2015-01-01

    Gaugino mediation is very attractive since it is free from the serious flavor problem in the supersymmetric standard model. We show that the observed Higgs boson mass at around 125 GeV and the anomaly of the muon g-2 can be easily explained in gaugino mediation models. It should be noted that no dangerous CP violating phases are generated in our framework. Furthermore, there are large parameter regions which can be tested not only at the planned International Linear Collider but also at the coming 13-14 TeV Large Hadron Collider.

  18. Higgs mass 125 GeV and g-2 of the muon in Gaugino Mediation Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keisuke Harigaya; Tsutomu T. Yanagida; Norimi Yokozaki

    2015-01-29

    Gaugino mediation is very attractive since it is free from the serious flavor problem in the supersymmetric standard model. We show that the observed Higgs boson mass at around 125 GeV and the anomaly of the muon g-2 can be easily explained in gaugino mediation models. It should be noted that no dangerous CP violating phases are generated in our framework. Furthermore, there are large parameter regions which can be tested not only at the planned International Linear Collider but also at the coming 13-14 TeV Large Hadron Collider.

  19. Muon Radiography at LANL | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe23-24, 2011 HighMay AdvancedMuon Radiography at LANL Nuclear

  20. Measurement of the Positive Muon Lifetime and Determination of the Fermi

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(JournalspectroscopyReport) | SciTechelement method in the muon+jets final state

  1. Measurement of Muon Neutrino and Antineutrino Induced Single Neutral Pion Production Cross Sections

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCentermillion Measurement of Muon Neutrino and Antineutrino

  2. was a decisive one as in the studies of hyperon rare decays at FNAL (E715 and E761 experi ments), in the studies of the muon catalyzed nuclear fusion at PSI, or in the studies of exotic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Titov, Anatoly

    ­ ments), in the studies of the muon catalyzed nuclear fusion at PSI, or in the studies of exotic nuclei nuclear fusion reactions was successfully carried out in the muon channel of the SC. The muon beam is also intensity (1¯A) make this accelerator valuable even in the up­to­date nuclear studies. For example

  3. A Discrimination Procedure between Muon and Electron in Superkamiokande Experiment Based on the Angular Distribution Function Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. I. Galkin[1; A. M. Anokhina[1; E. Konishi[2; A. Misaki{3

    2007-03-29

    In the previous paper, we construct the angular distribution functions for muon and electron as well as their relative fluctuation functions to find suitable discrimination procedure between muon and electron in Superkamiokande experiment. In the present paper, we are able to discriminate muons from electrons in Fully Contained Events with a probability of error of less than several %. At the same time, our geometrical reconstruction procedure, considering only the ring-like structure of the Cherenkov image, gives an unsatisfactory resolution for 1GeV electron and muon, with a mean vertex position error, delta r, of 5-10 m and a mean directional error, delta theta, of about 6-20 degrees. In contrast, a geometrical reconstruction procedure utilizing the full image and using a detailed approximation of the event angular distribution works much better: for a 1 GeV electron, delta r is about 2 m and delta theta is about 3 degrees; for a 1GeV muon, delta r is about 3 m and delta theta is about 5 degrees. At 5 GeV, the corresponding values are about 1.4 m and about 2 degree for electron and are about 2.9m and about 4.3 degrees for muon. The numerical values depend on a single PMT contribution threshold. The values quoted above are the minima with respect to this threshold. Even the methodologically correct approach we have adopted, based on detailed simulations using closer approximations than those adopted in the SK analysis, cannot reproduce the accuracies for particle discrimination, momentum resolution, interaction vertex location, and angular resolution obtained by the SK simulations, suggesting the assumptions in these may be inadequate.

  4. An additional study of multi-muon events produced in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Fermilab

    2011-11-01

    We present one additional study of multi-muon events produced at the Fermilab Tevatron collider and recorded by the CDF II detector. We use a data set acquired with a dedicated dimuon trigger and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.9 fb{sup -1}. We investigate the distribution of the azimuthal angle between the two trigger muons in events containing at least four additional muon candidates to test the compatibility of these events with originating from known QCD processes. We find that this distribution is markedly different from what is expected from such QCD processes and this observation strongly disfavours the possibility that multi-muon events result from an underestimate of the rate of misidentified muons in ordinary QCD events.

  5. Search for Higgs boson production in trilepton and like-charge electron-muon final states with the D0 detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D0 Collaboration

    2013-02-22

    We present a search for Higgs bosons in multilepton final states in pp-bar collisions at sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV recorded with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, using the full Run II data set with integrated luminosities of up to 9.7 fb-1. The multilepton states considered are two electron plus muon, electron with two muons, muon with two hadronic tau leptons, and like-charge electron-muon pairs. These channels directly probe the HVV (V=W,Z) coupling of the Higgs boson in production and decay. The muon with two hadronic tau lepton channel is also sensitive to H to tau lepton pair decays. Upper limits at the 95% C.L on the rate of standard model Higgs boson production are derived in the mass range 100 Higgs boson model.

  6. A Proposal for the Muon Piston Calorimeter Extension (MPC-EX) to the PHENIX Experiment at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Campbell; R. Hollis; A. Iordanova; E. Kistenev; X. Jiang; Y. Kwon; J. Lajoie; J. Perry; R. Seto; A. Sukhanov; A. Timilsina; for the PHENIX Collaboration

    2013-01-07

    The PHENIX MPC-EX detector is a Si-W preshower extension to the existing PHENIX Muon Piston Calorimeters (MPC). The MPC-EX will consist of eight layers of alternating W absorber and Si mini-pad sensors and will be installed in time for RHIC Run-15. Covering a large pseudorapidity range, 3.1 energies > 80 GeV, a factor of four improvement over current capabilities. Not only will the MPC-EX strengthen PHENIX's existing forward neutral pion and jet measurements, it also provides the necessary neutral pion rejection to make a prompt photon measurement feasible in both p+A and p+p collisions. With this neutral pion rejection, prompt (direct + fragmentation) photon yields at high p_T, p_T > 3 GeV, can be statistically extracted using a double ratio method. In p+A collisions direct photons at forward rapidities are optimally sensitive to the gluon distribution because, unlike pions, direct photons are only produced by processes that are directly sensitive to the gluon distribution at leading order. A measurement of the forward prompt photon R_pA will cleanly access and greatly expand our understanding of the gluon nuclear parton distribution functions and provide important information about the initial state in heavy ion collisions. In transversely polarized p+p collisions the MPC-EX will make possible a measurement of the prompt photon single spin asymmetry A_N, and will help elucidate the correlation of valence partons in the proton with the proton spin.

  7. S. 1600, THE CRITICAL MINERALS POLICY ACT OF 2013 Statement of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    raw materials; and reliance on by-product production. In both cases, mineral availability--or more of Economics and Business Colorado School of Mines, and Deputy Director, Critical Materials Institute An Energy, as well as deputy director of the Critical Materials Institute, an energy innovation hub of the U

  8. Critical behavior in topological ensembles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Bulycheva; A. Gorsky; S. Nechaev

    2015-02-11

    We consider the relation between three physical problems: 2D directed lattice random walks, ensembles of $T_{n,n+1}$ torus knots, and instanton ensembles in 5D SQED with one compact dimension in $\\Omega$ background and with 5D Chern-Simons term at the level one. All these ensembles exhibit the critical behavior typical for the "area+length+corners" statistics of grand ensembles of 2D directed paths. Using the combinatorial description, we obtain an explicit expression of the generating function for $q$-Narayana numbers which amounts to the new critical behavior in the ensemble of $T_{n,n+1}$ torus knots and in the ensemble of instantons in 5D SQED. Depending on the number of the nontrivial fugacities, we get either the critical point, or cascade of critical lines and critical surfaces. In the 5D gauge theory the phase transition is of the 3rd order, while in the ensemble of paths and ensemble of knots it is typically of the 1st order. We also discuss the relation with the integrable models.

  9. Muon conversion to electron in nuclei in type-I seesaw models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodrigo Alonso; Mikael Dhen; Belen Gavela; Thomas Hambye

    2012-10-08

    We compute the muon to electron conversion in the type-I seesaw model, as a function of the right-handed neutrino mixings and masses. The results are compared with previous computations in the literature. We determine the definite predictions resulting for the ratios between the muon to electron conversion rate for a given nucleus and the rate of two other processes which also involve a mu-e flavour transition: mu -> e gamma and mu -> eee. For a quasi-degenerate mass spectrum of right-handed neutrino masses -which is the most natural scenario leading to observable rates- those ratios depend only on the seesaw mass scale, offering a quite interesting testing ground. In the case of sterile neutrinos heavier than the electroweak scale, these ratios vanish typically for a mass scale of order a few TeV. Furthermore, the analysis performed here is also valid down to very light masses. It turns out that planned mu -> e conversion experiments would be sensitive to masses as low as 2 MeV. Taking into account other experimental constraints, we show that future mu -> e conversion experiments will be fully relevant to detect or constrain sterile neutrino scenarios in the 2 GeV-1000 TeV mass range.

  10. Performance of a Drift Chamber Candidate for a Cosmic Muon Tomography System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anghel, V.; Jewett, C.; Jonkmans, G.; Thompson, M.; Armitage, J.; Botte, J.; Boudjemline, K.; Erlandson, A.; Oakham, G.; Bueno, J.; Bryman, D.; Liu, Z.; Charles, E.; Gallant, G.; Cousins, T.; Noel, S.; Drouin, P.-L.; Waller, D.; Stocki, T. J.

    2011-12-13

    In the last decade, many groups around the world have been exploring different ways to probe transport containers which may contain illicit Special Nuclear Materials such as uranium. The muon tomography technique has been proposed as a cost effective system with an acceptable accuracy. A group of Canadian institutions (see above), funded by Defence Research and Development Canada, is testing different technologies to track the cosmic muons. One candidate is the single wire Drift Chamber. With the capability of a 2D impact position measurement, two detectors will be placed above and two below the object to be probed. In order to achieve a good 3D image quality of the cargo content, a good angular resolution is required. The simulation showed that 1mrad was required implying the spatial resolution of the trackers must be in the range of 1 to 2 mm for 1 m separation. A tracking system using three prototypes has been built and tested. The spatial resolution obtained is 1.7 mm perpendicular to the wire and 3 mm along the wire.

  11. Leptophilic dark matter and the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Agrawal, Prateek; Chacko, Zackaria; Verhaaren, Christopher B.

    2014-08-26

    We consider renormalizable theories such that the scattering of dark matter off leptons arises at tree level, but scattering off nuclei only arises at loop. In this framework, the various dark matter candidates can be classified by their spins and by the forms of their interactions with leptons. In this study, we determine the corrections to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon that arise from its interactions with dark matter. We then consider the implications of these results for a set of simplified models of leptophilic dark matter. When a dark matter candidate reduces the existing tension between themore »standard model prediction of the anomalous magnetic moment and the experimental measurement, the region of parameter space favored to completely remove the discrepancy is highlighted. Conversely, when agreement is worsened, we place limits on the parameters of the corresponding simplified model. These bounds and favored regions are compared against the experimental constraints on the simplified model from direct detection and from collider searches. Although these constraints are severe, we find there do exist limited regions of parameter space in these simple theories that can explain the observed anomaly in the muon magnetic moment while remaining consistent with all experimental bounds.« less

  12. Simulation of muon radiography for monitoring CO$_2$ stored in a geological reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klinger, J; Coleman, M; Gluyas, J G; Kudryavtsev, V A; Lincoln, D L; Pal, S; Paling, S M; Spooner, N J C; Telfer, S; Thompson, L F; Woodward, D

    2015-01-01

    Current methods of monitoring subsurface CO$_2$, such as repeat seismic surveys, are episodic and require highly skilled personnel to acquire the data. Simulations based on simplified models have previously shown that muon radiography could be automated to continuously monitor CO$_2$ injection and migration, in addition to reducing the overall cost of monitoring. In this paper, we present a simulation of the monitoring of CO$_2$ plume evolution in a geological reservoir using muon radiography. The stratigraphy in the vicinity of a nominal test facility is modelled using geological data, and a numerical fluid flow model is used to describe the time evolution of the CO$_2$ plume. A planar detection region with a surface area of 1000 m$^2$ is considered, at a vertical depth of 776 m below the seabed. We find that one year of constant CO$_2$ injection leads to changes in the column density of $\\lesssim 1\\%$, and that the CO$_2$ plume is already resolvable with an exposure time of less than 50 days.

  13. The muon anomalous magnetic moment in the supersymmetric economical 3-3-1 model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. T. Binh; D. T. Huong; H. N. Long

    2015-04-14

    We investigate the muon anomalous magnetic moment in the context of the supersymmetric version of the economical 3-3-1 model. We compute the 1-loop contribution of super-partner particles. We show that contribution of superparticle loop becomes significant when \\tan \\gamma is large. We investigate for both small and large values of $\\tan \\gamma$. We find the region of the parameter space where the slepton masses are of a few hundreds GeV is favour by the muon g-2 for small \\tan \\gamma (\\tan \\gamma \\sim 5 ). Numerical estimation gives the mass of supersymmetric particle, the mass of gauginos m_G \\sim 700 GeV and light slepton mass m_{\\tilde{L}} is of order O (100) GeV. When \\tan{\\gamma} is large (\\tan{\\gamma} \\sim 60), the mass of charged slepton m_{\\tilde{L}} and the mass of gauginos m_G\\sim O(1) TeV while the mass of sneutrino \\sim 450 GeV is in the reach of LHC.

  14. Progress on a Cavity with Beryllium Walls for Muon Ionization Cooling Channel R&D.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowring, D.L.; DeMello, A.J.; Lambert, A.R.; Li, D.; Virostek,, S.; Zisman, M.; Kaplan, D.; Palmer, R.B.

    2012-05-20

    The Muon Accelerator Program (MAP) collaboration is working to develop an ionization cooling channel for muon beams. An ionization cooling channel requires the operation of high-gradient, normal-conducting RF cavities in multi-Tesla solenoidal magnetic fields. However, experiments conducted at Fermilab?s MuCool Test Area (MTA) show that increasing the solenoidal field strength reduces the maximum achievable cavity gradient. This gradient limit is characterized by an RF breakdown process that has caused significant damage to copper cavity interiors. The damage may be caused by field-emitted electrons, focused by the solenoidal magnetic field onto small areas of the inner cavity surface. Local heating may then induce material fatigue and surface damage. Fabricating a cavity with beryllium walls would mitigate this damage due to beryllium?s low density, low thermal expansion, and high electrical and thermal conductivity. We address the design and fabrication of a pillbox RF cavity with beryllium walls, in order to evaluate the performance of high-gradient cavities in strong magnetic fields.

  15. The muon anomalous magnetic moment in the supersymmetric economical 3-3-1 model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Binh, D T; Long, H N

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the muon anomalous magnetic moment in the context of the supersymmetric version of the economical 3-3-1 model. We compute the 1-loop contribution of super-partner particles. We show that contribution of superparticle loop becomes significant when \\tan \\gamma is large. We investigate for both small and large values of $\\tan \\gamma$. We find the region of the parameter space where the slepton masses are of a few hundreds GeV is favour by the muon g-2 for small \\tan \\gamma (\\tan \\gamma \\sim 5 ). Numerical estimation gives the mass of supersymmetric particle, the mass of gauginos m_G \\sim 700 GeV and light slepton mass m_{\\tilde{L}} is of order O (100) GeV. When \\tan{\\gamma} is large (\\tan{\\gamma} \\sim 60), the mass of charged slepton m_{\\tilde{L}} and the mass of gauginos m_G\\sim O(1) TeV while the mass of sneutrino \\sim 450 GeV is in the reach of LHC.

  16. The muon anomalous magnetic moment in the supersymmetric economical 3-3-1 model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. T. Binh; D. T. Huong; H. N. Long

    2015-11-06

    We investigate the muon anomalous magnetic moment in the context of the supersymmetric version of the economical 3-3-1 model. We compute the 1-loop contribution of super-partner particles. We show that contribution of superparticle loop becomes significant when \\tan \\gamma is large. We investigate for both small and large values of $\\tan \\gamma$. We find the region of the parameter space where the slepton masses are of a few hundreds GeV is favour by the muon g-2 for small \\tan \\gamma (\\tan \\gamma \\sim 5 ). Numerical estimation gives the mass of supersymmetric particle, the mass of gauginos m_G \\sim 700 GeV and light slepton mass m_{\\tilde{L}} is of order O (100) GeV. When \\tan{\\gamma} is large (\\tan{\\gamma} \\sim 60), the mass of charged slepton m_{\\tilde{L}} and the mass of gauginos m_G\\sim O(1) TeV while the mass of sneutrino \\sim 450 GeV is in the reach of LHC.

  17. Simulation of muon radiography for monitoring CO$_2$ stored in a geological reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Klinger; S. J. Clark; M. Coleman; J. G. Gluyas; V. A. Kudryavtsev; D. L. Lincoln; S. Pal; S. M. Paling; N. J. C. Spooner; S. Telfer; L. F. Thompson; D. Woodward

    2015-10-12

    Current methods of monitoring subsurface CO$_2$, such as repeat seismic surveys, are episodic and require highly skilled personnel to acquire the data. Simulations based on simplified models have previously shown that muon radiography could be automated to continuously monitor CO$_2$ injection and migration, in addition to reducing the overall cost of monitoring. In this paper, we present a simulation of the monitoring of CO$_2$ plume evolution in a geological reservoir using muon radiography. The stratigraphy in the vicinity of a nominal test facility is modelled using geological data, and a numerical fluid flow model is used to describe the time evolution of the CO$_2$ plume. A planar detection region with a surface area of 1000 m$^2$ is considered, at a vertical depth of 776 m below the seabed. We find that one year of constant CO$_2$ injection leads to changes in the column density of $\\lesssim 1\\%$, and that the CO$_2$ plume is already resolvable with an exposure time of less than 50 days.

  18. Microsoft Word - Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    White House Office of the Press Secretary For Immediate Release October 31, 2013 Presidential Proclamation -- Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience Month, 2013 CRITICAL...

  19. DOE and Critical Materials Video (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a text version of the "DOE and Critical Materials" video presented at the Critical Materials Workshop, held on April 3, 2012 in Arlington, Virginia.

  20. Nuclear criticality safety: 2-day training course

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlesser, J.A.

    1997-02-01

    This compilation of notes is presented as a source reference for the criticality safety course. At the completion of this training course, the attendee will: be able to define terms commonly used in nuclear criticality safety; be able to appreciate the fundamentals of nuclear criticality safety; be able to identify factors which affect nuclear criticality safety; be able to identify examples of criticality controls as used as Los Alamos; be able to identify examples of circumstances present during criticality accidents; have participated in conducting two critical experiments; be asked to complete a critique of the nuclear criticality safety training course.