National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for muon anomalous magnetic

  1. The Muon Anomalous Magnetic Moment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc Knecht

    2014-12-03

    The calculations entering the prediction of the standard model value for the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon $a_\\mu$ are reviewed, and compared to the very accurate experimental measurement. The situation for the electron is discussed in parallel.

  2. Anomalous magnetic moment of the muon in a dispersive approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladyslav Pauk; Marc Vanderhaeghen

    2014-09-03

    We present a new general dispersive formalism for evaluating the hadronic light-by-light scattering contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon. In the suggested approach, this correction is related to the imaginary part of the muon's electromagnetic vertex function. The latter may be directly related to measurable hadronic processes by means of unitarity and analyticity. As a test we apply the introduced formalism to the case of meson pole exchanges and find agreement with the direct two-loop calculation.

  3. Hadronic contributions to the muon anomalous magnetic moment Workshop. $(g-2)_?$: Quo vadis? Workshop. Mini proceedings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurice Benayoun; Johan Bijnens; Tom Blum; Irinel Caprini; Gilberto Colangelo; Henryk Czy?; Achim Denig; Cesareo A. Dominguez; Simon Eidelman; Christian S. Fischer; Paolo Gauzzi; Yuping Guo; Andreas Hafner; Masashi Hayakawa; Gregorio Herdoiza; Martin Hoferichter; Guangshun Huang; Karl Jansen; Fred Jegerlehner; Benedikt Kloss; Bastian Kubis; Zhiqing Liu; William Marciano; Pere Masjuan; Harvey B. Meyer; Tsutomu Mibe; Andreas Nyffeler; Vladimir Pascalutsa; Vladyslav Pauk; Michael R. Pennington; Santiago Peris; Christoph F. Redmer; Pablo Sanchez-Puertas; Boris Shwartz; Evgeny Solodov; Dominik Stoeckinger; Thomas Teubner; Marc Unverzagt; Marc Vanderhaeghen; Magnus Wolke

    2014-07-21

    We present the mini-proceedings of the workshops Hadronic contributions to the muon anomalous magnetic moment: strategies for improvements of the accuracy of the theoretical prediction and $(g-2)_{\\mu}$: Quo vadis?, both held in Mainz from April 1$^{\\rm rst}$ to 5$^{\\rm th}$ and from April 7$^{\\rm th}$ to 10$^{\\rm th}$, 2014, respectively.

  4. Hadronic light-by-light scattering contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blum, Thomas [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Chowdhury, Saumitra [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Hayakawa, Masashi [Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Izubuchi, Taku [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The form factor that yields the light-by-light scattering contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment is computed in lattice QCD+QED and QED. A non-perturbative treatment of QED is used and is checked against perturbation theory. The hadronic contribution is calculated for unphysical quark and muon masses, and only the diagram with a single quark loop is computed. Statistically significant signals are obtained. Initial results appear promising, and the prospect for a complete calculation with physical masses and controlled errors is discussed.

  5. Hadronic light-by-light scattering contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment from lattice QCD

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Blum, Thomas; Chowdhury, Saumitra; Hayakawa, Masashi; Izubuchi, Taku

    2015-01-07

    The form factor that yields the light-by-light scattering contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment is computed in lattice QCD+QED and QED. A non-perturbative treatment of QED is used and is checked against perturbation theory. The hadronic contribution is calculated for unphysical quark and muon masses, and only the diagram with a single quark loop is computed. Statistically significant signals are obtained. Initial results appear promising, and the prospect for a complete calculation with physical masses and controlled errors is discussed.

  6. Leptophilic dark matter and the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Agrawal, Prateek; Chacko, Zackaria; Verhaaren, Christopher B.

    2014-08-26

    We consider renormalizable theories such that the scattering of dark matter off leptons arises at tree level, but scattering off nuclei only arises at loop. In this framework, the various dark matter candidates can be classified by their spins and by the forms of their interactions with leptons. In this study, we determine the corrections to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon that arise from its interactions with dark matter. We then consider the implications of these results for a set of simplified models of leptophilic dark matter. When a dark matter candidate reduces the existing tension between themore »standard model prediction of the anomalous magnetic moment and the experimental measurement, the region of parameter space favored to completely remove the discrepancy is highlighted. Conversely, when agreement is worsened, we place limits on the parameters of the corresponding simplified model. These bounds and favored regions are compared against the experimental constraints on the simplified model from direct detection and from collider searches. Although these constraints are severe, we find there do exist limited regions of parameter space in these simple theories that can explain the observed anomaly in the muon magnetic moment while remaining consistent with all experimental bounds.« less

  7. Yukawa coupling and anomalous magnetic moment of the muon: An update for the LHC era

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crivellin, Andreas; Girrbach, Jennifer; Nierste, Ulrich

    2011-03-01

    We study the interplay between a soft muon Yukawa coupling generated radiatively with the trilinear A-terms of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) and the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon. In the absence of a tree-level muon Yukawa coupling the lightest smuon mass is predicted to be in the range between 600 GeV and 2200 GeV at 2{sigma}, if the bino mass M{sub 1} is below 1 TeV. Therefore, a detection of a smuon (in conjunction with a sub-TeV bino) at the LHC would directly imply a nonzero muon Yukawa coupling in the MSSM superpotential. Inclusion of slepton flavor mixing could in principle lower the mass of one smuonlike slepton below 600 GeV. However, the experimental bounds on radiative lepton decays instead strengthen the lower mass bound, with larger effects for smaller M{sub 1}, We also extend the analysis to the electron case and find that a light selectron close to the current experimental search limit may prove the MSSM electron Yukawa coupling to be nonzero.

  8. Muon anomalous magnetic moment in a $SU(4) \\otimes U(1)_N$ model without exotic electric charges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Cogollo

    2014-11-11

    We study an electroweak gauge extension of the standard model, so called 3-4-1 model, which does not contain exotic electric charges and it is anomaly free. We discuss phenomenological constraints of the model and compute all the corrections to the muon magnetic moment. Mainly, we discuss different mass regimes and their impact on this correction, deriving for the first time direct limits on the masses of the neutral fermions and charged vector bosons. Interestingly, the model could address the reported muon anomalous magnetic moment excess, however it would demands a rather low scale of symmetry breaking, far below the current electroweak constraints on the model. Thus, if this excess is confirmed in the foreseeable future by the g-2 experiment at FERMILAB, this 3-4-1 model can be decisively ruled out since the model cannot reproduce a sizeable and positive contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment consistent with current electroweak limits.

  9. Four-flavour leading-order hadronic contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burger, Florian; Feng, Xu; Hotzel, Grit; Jansen, Karl; Univ. of Cyprus, Nicosia; Petschlies, Marcus; Renner, Dru B.

    2014-02-24

    We present a four-flavour lattice calculation of the leading-order hadronic vacuum polarisation contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, a?hvp, arising from quark-connected Feynman graphs. It is based on ensembles featuring Nf=2+1+1 dynamical twisted mass fermions generated by the European Twisted Mass Collaboration (ETMC). Several light quark masses are used in order to yield a controlled extrapolation to the physical pion mass. We employ three lattice spacings to examine lattice artefacts and several different volumes to check for finite-size effects. Including the complete first two generations of quarks allows for a direct comparison with phenomenological determinations of amore »?hvp. The final result involving an estimate of the systematic uncertainty a?hvp=6.74 (21)(18) 10-8 shows a good overall agreement with these computations.« less

  10. The muon anomalous magnetic moment in the supersymmetric economical 3-3-1 model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. T. Binh; D. T. Huong; H. N. Long

    2015-04-14

    We investigate the muon anomalous magnetic moment in the context of the supersymmetric version of the economical 3-3-1 model. We compute the 1-loop contribution of super-partner particles. We show that contribution of superparticle loop becomes significant when \\tan \\gamma is large. We investigate for both small and large values of $\\tan \\gamma$. We find the region of the parameter space where the slepton masses are of a few hundreds GeV is favour by the muon g-2 for small \\tan \\gamma (\\tan \\gamma \\sim 5 ). Numerical estimation gives the mass of supersymmetric particle, the mass of gauginos m_G \\sim 700 GeV and light slepton mass m_{\\tilde{L}} is of order O (100) GeV. When \\tan{\\gamma} is large (\\tan{\\gamma} \\sim 60), the mass of charged slepton m_{\\tilde{L}} and the mass of gauginos m_G\\sim O(1) TeV while the mass of sneutrino \\sim 450 GeV is in the reach of LHC.

  11. The muon anomalous magnetic moment in the supersymmetric economical 3-3-1 model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Binh, D T; Long, H N

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the muon anomalous magnetic moment in the context of the supersymmetric version of the economical 3-3-1 model. We compute the 1-loop contribution of super-partner particles. We show that contribution of superparticle loop becomes significant when \\tan \\gamma is large. We investigate for both small and large values of $\\tan \\gamma$. We find the region of the parameter space where the slepton masses are of a few hundreds GeV is favour by the muon g-2 for small \\tan \\gamma (\\tan \\gamma \\sim 5 ). Numerical estimation gives the mass of supersymmetric particle, the mass of gauginos m_G \\sim 700 GeV and light slepton mass m_{\\tilde{L}} is of order O (100) GeV. When \\tan{\\gamma} is large (\\tan{\\gamma} \\sim 60), the mass of charged slepton m_{\\tilde{L}} and the mass of gauginos m_G\\sim O(1) TeV while the mass of sneutrino \\sim 450 GeV is in the reach of LHC.

  12. The muon anomalous magnetic moment in the supersymmetric economical 3-3-1 model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. T. Binh; D. T. Huong; H. N. Long

    2015-11-06

    We investigate the muon anomalous magnetic moment in the context of the supersymmetric version of the economical 3-3-1 model. We compute the 1-loop contribution of super-partner particles. We show that contribution of superparticle loop becomes significant when \\tan \\gamma is large. We investigate for both small and large values of $\\tan \\gamma$. We find the region of the parameter space where the slepton masses are of a few hundreds GeV is favour by the muon g-2 for small \\tan \\gamma (\\tan \\gamma \\sim 5 ). Numerical estimation gives the mass of supersymmetric particle, the mass of gauginos m_G \\sim 700 GeV and light slepton mass m_{\\tilde{L}} is of order O (100) GeV. When \\tan{\\gamma} is large (\\tan{\\gamma} \\sim 60), the mass of charged slepton m_{\\tilde{L}} and the mass of gauginos m_G\\sim O(1) TeV while the mass of sneutrino \\sim 450 GeV is in the reach of LHC.

  13. Leading-order hadronic contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon from N_f=2+1+1 twisted mass fermions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, Florian [Humboldt U. Berlin; Feng, Xu [KEK; Hotzel, Grit [Humboldt U. Berlin; Jansen, Karl [DESY; Petschlies, Marcus [The Cyprus Institute; Renner, Dru B. [JLAB

    2013-11-01

    We present results for the leading order QCD correction to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon including the first two generations of quarks as dynamical degrees of freedom. Several light quark masses are examined in order to yield a controlled extrapolation to the physical pion mass. We analyse ensembles for three different lattice spacings and several volumes in order to investigate lattice artefacts and finite-size effects, respectively. We also provide preliminary results for this quantity for two flavours of mass-degenerate quarks at the physical value of the pion mass.

  14. Magnets for Muon 6D Cooling Channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Rolland; Flanagan, Gene

    2014-09-10

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC), an innovative technique for six-dimensional (6D) cooling of muon beams using a continuous absorber inside superconducting magnets, has shown considerable promise based on analytic and simulation studies. The implementation of this revolutionary method of muon cooling requires high field superconducting magnets that provide superimposed solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole fields. Novel magnet design concepts are required to provide HCC magnet systems with the desired fields for 6D muon beam cooling. New designs feature simple coil configurations that produce these complex fields with the required characteristics, where new high field conductor materials are particularly advantageous. The object of the program was to develop designs and construction methods for HCC magnets and design a magnet system for a 6D muon beam cooling channel. If successful the program would develop the magnet technologies needed to create bright muon beams for many applications ranging from scientific accelerators and storage rings to beams to study material properties and new sources of energy. Examples of these applications include energy frontier muon colliders, Higgs and neutrino factories, stopping muon beams for studies of rare fundamental interactions and muon catalyzed fusion, and muon sources for cargo screening for homeland security.

  15. A Pionic Hadron Explains the Muon Magnetic Moment Anomaly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainer W. Schiel; John P. Ralston

    2007-10-01

    A significant discrepancy exists between experiment and calculations of the muon's magnetic moment. We find that standard formulas for the hadronic vacuum polarization term have overlooked pionic states known to exist. Coulomb binding alone guarantees $\\pi^+ \\pi^-$ states that quantum mechanically mix with the $\\rho$ meson. A simple 2-state mixing model explains the magnetic moment discrepancy for a mixing angle of order $\\alpha \\sim 10^{-2}$. The relevant physical state is predicted to give a tiny observable bump in the ratio R(s) of $e^+ e^-$ annihilation at a low energy not previously searched. The burden of proof is reversed for claims that conventional physics cannot explain the muon's anomalous moment.

  16. Toroidal magnetic detector for high resolution measurement of muon momenta

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonanos, P.

    1992-01-07

    A muon detector system including central and end air-core superconducting toroids and muon detectors enclosing a central calorimeter/detector. Muon detectors are positioned outside of toroids and all muon trajectory measurements are made in a nonmagnetic environment. Internal support for each magnet structure is provided by sheets, located at frequent and regularly spaced azimuthal planes, which interconnect the structural walls of the toroidal magnets. In a preferred embodiment, the shape of the toroidal magnet volume is adjusted to provide constant resolution over a wide range of rapidity. 4 figs.

  17. Superconducting magnets for muon capture and phase rotation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    of Various Cases for Superconducti ng Magnets Inside andTransactions on Applied Superconductivity 7, No 2. P 642 (LBNL-43998 SC-MAG-683 SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS FOR MUON

  18. Design and commissioning of a high magnetic field muon spin relaxation spectrometer at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lord, J. S.; McKenzie, I.; Baker, P. J.; Cottrell, S. P.; Giblin, S. R.; Hillier, A. D.; Holsman, B. H.; King, P. J. C.; Nightingale, J. B.; Pratt, F. L.; Rhodes, N. J.; Blundell, S. J.; Lancaster, T.; Good, J.; Mitchell, R.; Owczarkowski, M.; Poli, S.; Scheuermann, R.; Salman, Z.

    2011-07-15

    The high magnetic field (HiFi) muon instrument at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source is a state-of-the-art spectrometer designed to provide applied magnetic fields up to 5 T for muon studies of condensed matter and molecular systems. The spectrometer is optimised for time-differential muon spin relaxation studies at a pulsed muon source. We describe the challenges involved in its design and construction, detailing, in particular, the magnet and detector performance. Commissioning experiments have been conducted and the results are presented to demonstrate the scientific capabilities of the new instrument.

  19. A New Measurement of the Muon Magnetic Anomaly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Jungmann; :; g-2 collaboration

    2000-02-08

    The muon magnetic anomaly may contain contributions from physics beyond the standard model. At the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) a precision experiment aims for a measurement of the muon magnetic anomaly $a_{\\mu}$ to 0.35 ppm, where conclusions about various theoretical approaches beyond standard theory can be expected. The difference between the spin precession and cyclotron frequencies is measured in a magnetic storage ring with highly homogeneous field. Data taking is in progress and part of all recorded data has been analyzed. Combining all experimental results to date yields preliminarily $a_{\\mu}(expt)=1~165~921(5) \\cdot 10^{-9}$ (4 ppm) in agreement with standard theory.

  20. Theory of the Anomalous Magnetic Moment of the Electron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. L. Koschmieder

    2013-01-18

    It is shown that it follows from our model of the electron that its magnetic moment has an anomalous part if the magnetic field energy is taken into account. That means that the magnetic moment of our model of the electron is 1.0000565 times larger than the measured magnetic moment of the electron.

  1. Search for anomalous production of prompt like-sign muon pairs and constraints on physics beyond the standard model with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    An inclusive search for anomalous production of two prompt, isolated muons with the same electric charge is presented. The search is performed in a data sample corresponding to 1.6??fb[superscript -1] of integrated luminosity ...

  2. Superconducting Magnets for a Muon Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    IEEE Transactions on Applied Superconductivity 3, No. 1,pMAG-544 LBL-38398 UC-414 Superconducting Magnets for a Muonsections, the nominal superconductor plus matrix current

  3. E821, A NEW MEASUREMENT OF THE MUON ANOMALOUS MAGNETIC MOMENT AT C. Timmermans a ,R.M. Carey 1 , W. Earle 1 , E. Efstathiadis 1 , M. Hare 1 , E.S. Hazen 1 , F. Krienen 1 , J.P. Miller 1 , O.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory - Experiment 821

    Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305­0801, Japan a Department of Physics agreement with the world average. We expect to increase the knowledge of the anomalous magnetic moment to 1 of running will be given, as well as the results of the 1997 run and an outlook to the 1998 and 1999 runs. 2

  4. Anomalous magnetic behavior at the graphene/Co interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandal, Sumit; Saha, Shyamal K., E-mail: cnssks@iacs.res.in [Department of Materials Science, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2014-07-14

    An intensive theoretical study on the interaction between graphene and transition metal atom has been carried out; however, its experimental verification is still lacking. To explore the theoretical prediction of antiferromagnetic coupling due to charge transfer between graphene and cobalt, epitaxial layer of cobalt is grown on graphene surface. Predicted antiferromagnetic interaction with Neel temperature (T{sub N}???32?K) which anomalously shifts to higher temperature (34?K) and becomes more prominent under application of magnetic field of 1 T is reported. Lowering of magnetoresistance as a consequence of this antiferromagnetic coupling at the interface is also observed.

  5. MAGNETISM AND SUPERCONDUCTIVITY OF ANOMALOUS RARE-EARTH METALS AND ALLOYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    MAGNETISM AND SUPERCONDUCTIVITY OF ANOMALOUS RARE-EARTH METALS AND ALLOYS B. COQBLIN Laboratoire de impurities. 1. Introduction. -The rare-earth metals can be divided in two groups : - The (( normal )) rare-earths lantha- num are (( anomalous )) rare-earths metals. The same duality exists in alloys with rareearth

  6. Anomalous delta-type electric and magnetic two-nucleon interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolae Bogdan Mandache

    2009-04-07

    Anomalous delta-type interactions, of both electric and magnetic nature, are introduced between the overlapping peripheral structures of the nucleons, which may explain the spin-triplet deuteron state and the absence of other nucleon-nucleon bound states.

  7. MULTIPASS MUON RLA RETURN ARCS BASED ON LINEAR COMBINED-FUNCTION MAGNETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasiliy Morozov, Alex Bogacz, Yves Roblin, Kevin Beard

    2011-09-01

    Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA) are an efficient way of accelerating short-lived muons to the multi-GeV energies required for Neutrino Factories and TeV energies required for Muon Colliders. In this paper we present a design of a two-pass RLA return arc based on linear combined function magnets, in which both charge muons with momenta different by a factor of two are transported through the same string of magnets. The arc is composed of 60{sup o}-bending symmetric super cells allowing for a simple arc geometry closing. By adjusting the dipole and quadrupole components of the combined-function magnets, each super cell is designed to be achromatic and to have zero initial and final periodic orbit offsets for both muon momenta. Such a design provides a greater compactness than, for instance, an FFAG lattice with its regular alternating bends and is expected to possess a large dynamic aperture characteristic of linear-field lattices.

  8. Magnetic Topological Insulator and Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kou, Xufeng

    2015-01-01

    magnetic field and a high mobility material with a good 2D confinement [magnetic TI system, the competition between the FM exchange field and the quantum confinement-

  9. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 91, 045116 (2015) Magnetic ordering at anomalously high temperatures in Dy at extreme pressures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schilling, James

    2015-01-01

    transports Dy into an unconventional magnetic state with an anomalously high magnetic ordering temperature, until finally only a structureless Thomas-Fermi gas remains [1]. Although such astronomic pressures

  10. Hybrid Rings of Fixed 8T Superconducting Magnets and Iron Magnets Rapidly Cycling between -2T and +2T for a Muon Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. J. Summers

    2001-08-01

    Two 2200m radius hybrid rings of fixed superconducting magnets and iron magnets ramping at 200 Hz and 330 Hz are used to accelerate muons. Muons are given 25 GeV of RF energy per orbit. Acceleration is from 250 GeV/c to 2400 GeV/c and requires a total of 86 orbits in both rings; 82% of the muons survive. The total power consumption of the iron dipoles is 4 megawatts. Stranded copper conductors and thin Metglas laminations are used to reduce power losses.

  11. Hybrid Rings of Fixed 8T Superconducting Magnets and Iron Magnets Rapidly Cycling between -2T and +2T for a Muon Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Summers, D J

    2001-01-01

    Two 2200m radius hybrid rings of fixed superconducting magnets and iron magnets ramping at 200 Hz and 330 Hz are used to accelerate muons. Muons are given 25 GeV of RF energy per orbit. Acceleration is from 250 GeV/c to 2400 GeV/c and requires a total of 86 orbits in both rings; 82% of the muons survive. The total power consumption of the iron dipoles is 4 megawatts. Stranded copper conductors and thin Metglas laminations are used to reduce power losses.

  12. The investigation of anomalous magnetization in the Raft River...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    magnetization in the Raft River valley, Idaho Abstract Cassia County Idaho; clastic sediments; economic geology; exploration; geophysical methods; geophysical surveys; geothermal...

  13. Spin ice: magnetic excitations without monopole signatures using muon spin rotation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunsiger, Sarah [Technical University, Munich, Germany; Aczel, Adam A. [McMaster University; Arguello, Carlos [Columbia University; Dabkowska, H. A. [McMaster University; Dabkowski, A [McMaster University; Du, Mao-Hua [ORNL; Goko, Tatsuo [Columbia University; Javanparast, B [University of Waterloo, Canada; Lin, T [University of Waterloo, Canada; Ning, F. L. [McMaster University; Noad, H. M. [McMaster University; Singh, David J [ORNL; Williams, T.J. [McMaster University; Uemura, Yasutomo J. [Columbia University; Gingras, M.P.J. [University of Waterloo, Canada; Luke, Graeme M. [McMaster University

    2011-01-01

    Theory predicts the low temperature magnetic excitations in spin ices consist of deconfined magnetic charges, or monopoles. A recent transverse-field (TF) muon spin rotation ({mu}SR) experiment [S.T. Bramwell et al., Nature (London) 461 956 (2009)] reports results claiming to be consistent with the temperature and magnetic field dependence anticipated for monopole nucleation - the so-called second Wien effect. We demonstrate via a new series of {mu}SR experiments in Dy{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} that such an effect is not observable in a TF {mu}SR experiment. Rather, as found in many highly frustrated magnetic materials, we observe spin fluctuations which become temperature independent at low temperatures, behavior which dominates over any possible signature of thermally nucleated monopole excitations.

  14. Muon (g-2) Technical Design Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Grange; V. Guarino; P. Winter; K. Wood; H. Zhao; R. M. Carey; D. Gastler; E. Hazen; N. Kinnaird; J. P. Miller; J. Mott; B. L. Roberts; J. Benante; J. Crnkovic; W. M. Morse; H. Sayed; V. Tishchenko; V. P. Druzhinin; B. I. Khazin; I. A. Koop; I. Logashenko; Y. M. Shatunov; E. Solodov; M. Korostelev; D. Newton; A. Wolski; R. Bjorkquist; N. Eggert; A. Frankenthal; L. Gibbons; S. Kim; A. Mikhailichenko; Y. Orlov; D. Rubin; D. Sweigart; D. Allspach; G. Annala; E. Barzi; K. Bourland; G. Brown; B. C. K. Casey; S. Chappa; M. E. Convery; B. Drendel; H. Friedsam; T. Gadfort; K. Hardin; S. Hawke; S. Hayes; W. Jaskierny; C. Johnstone; J. Johnstone; V. Kashikhin; C. Kendziora; B. Kiburg; A. Klebaner; I. Kourbanis; J. Kyle; N. Larson; A. Leveling; A. L. Lyon; D. Markley; D. McArthur; K. W. Merritt; N. Mokhov; J. P. Morgan; H. Nguyen; J-F. Ostiguy; A. Para; C. C. Polly M. Popovic; E. Ramberg; M. Rominsky; D. Schoo; R. Schultz; D. Still; A. K. Soha; S. Strigonov; G. Tassotto; D. Turrioni; E. Villegas; E. Voirin; G. Velev; D. Wolff; C. Worel; J-Y. Wu; R. Zifko; K. Jungmann; C. J. G. Onderwater; P. T. Debevec; S. Ganguly; M. Kasten; S. Leo; K. Pitts; C. Schlesier; M. Gaisser; S. Haciomeroglu; Y-I. Kim; S. Lee; M-J Lee; Y. K. Semertzidis; K. Giovanetti; V. A. Baranov; V. N. Duginov; N. V. Khomutov; V. A. Krylov; N. A. Kuchinskiy; V. P. Volnykh; C. Crawford; R. Fatemi; W. P. Gohn; T. P. Gorringe; W. Korsch; B. Plaster; A. Anastasi; D. Babusci; S. Dabagov; C. Ferrari; A. Fioretti; C. Gabbanini; D. Hampai; A. Palladino; G. Venanzoni; T. Bowcock; J. Carroll; B. King; S. Maxfield; K. McCormick; A. Smith; T. Teubner; M. Whitley; M. Wormald; R. Chislett; S. Kilani; M. Lancaster; E. Motuk; T. Stuttard; M. Warren; D. Flay; D. Kawall; Z. Meadows; T. Chupp; R. Raymond; A. Tewlsey-Booth; M. J. Syphers; D. Tarazona; C. Ankenbrandt; M. A. Cummings; R. P. Johnson; C. Yoshikawa; S. Catalonotti; R. Di Stefano; M. Iacovacci; S. Mastroianni; S. Chattopadhyay; M. Eads; M. Fortner; D. Hedin; N. Pohlman; A. de Gouvea; H. Schellman; L. Welty-Rieger; T. Itahashi; Y. Kuno; K. Yai; F. Azfar; S. Henry; G. D. Alkhazov; V. L. Golovtsov; P. V. Neustroev; L. N. Uvarov; A. A. Vasilyev; A. A. Vorobyov; M. B. Zhalov; L. Cerrito; F. Gray; G. Di Sciascio; D. Moricciani; C. Fu; X. Ji; L. Li; H. Yang; D. Stöckinger; G. Cantatore; D. Cauz; M. Karuza; G. Pauletta; L. Santi; S. Bae\\ssler; M. Bychkov; E. Frlez; D. Pocanic; L. P. Alonzi; M. Fertl; A. Fienberg; N. Froemming; A. Garcia; D. W. Hertzog J. Kaspar; P. Kammel; R. Osofsky; M. Smith; E. Swanson; T. van Wechel; K. Lynch

    2015-01-27

    The Muon (g-2) Experiment, E989 at Fermilab, will measure the muon anomalous magnetic moment a factor-of-four more precisely than was done in E821 at the Brookhaven National Laboratory AGS. The E821 result appears to be greater than the Standard-Model prediction by more than three standard deviations. When combined with expected improvement in the Standard-Model hadronic contributions, E989 should be able to determine definitively whether or not the E821 result is evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model. After a review of the physics motivation and the basic technique, which will use the muon storage ring built at BNL and now relocated to Fermilab, the design of the new experiment is presented. This document was created in partial fulfillment of the requirements necessary to obtain DOE CD-2/3 approval.

  15. Spin-fluctuation mechanism of anomalous temperature dependence of magnetocrystalline anisotropy in itinerant magnets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhuravlev, I. A.; Antropov, V. P.; Belashchenko, K. D.

    2015-11-16

    The origins of the anomalous temperature dependence of magnetocrystalline anisotropy in (Fe1–xCox)2B alloys are elucidated using first-principles calculations within the disordered local moment model. Excellent agreement with experimental data is obtained. The anomalies are associated with the changes in band occupations due to Stoner-like band shifts and with the selective suppression of spin-orbit “hot spots” by thermal spin fluctuations. Under certain conditions, the anisotropy can increase, rather than decrease, with decreasing magnetization. This peculiar electronic mechanisms is in stark contrast to the assumptions of the existing models.

  16. Lowest Order Hadronic Contribution to the Muon g-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher Aubin; Tom Blum

    2005-09-20

    We present the most recent lattice results for the lowest-order hadronic contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment using 2+1 flavor improved staggered fermions. A precise fit to the low-q^2 region of the vacuum polarization is necessary to accurately extract the muon g-2. To obtain this fit, we use staggered chiral perturbation theory with the inclusion of the vector particles as resonances, to evaluate the vacuum polarization. We discuss the preliminary fit results and attendant systematic uncertainties, paying particular attention to the relative contributions of the pions and vector mesons.

  17. Functional integral over velocities for a spinning particle with and without anomalous magnetic moment in a constant electromagnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wellington da Cruz

    1997-10-16

    The technique of functional integration over velocities is applied to the calculation of the propagator of a spinning particle with and without anomalous magnetic moment. A representation for the spin factor is obtained in this context for the particle in a constant electromagnetic field. As a by-product, we also obtain a Schwinger representation for the first case.

  18. IDS120j WITHOUT RESISTIVE MAGNETS PION AND MUON STUDIES WITHIN TAPER REGIONPION AND MUON STUDIES WITHIN TAPER REGION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    RESISTIVE MAGNETS AND FILLING UPPER HALF OF Hg POOL WITH SHIELDING. GENERAL OVERVIEW (LEFT), POOL REGION UPSTREAM TO THE POOL SH#1A Hg POOL Hg POOL CRYO#4CRYO#3 2 cm THICK STST BEAM PIPE WAY UPSTREAM TO THE POOL RIGHT FLANGE Hg POOL STARTS ~ 85 cm AND EXTENDS ALL THE WAY TO THE END OF THE FIRSTALL THE WAY

  19. On anomalous plasma transport in the edge of magnetic confinement devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angus, Justin Ray

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic confinement devices use strong magnetic fields tomagnetic fields. This is known as magnetic confinement. One

  20. Muon Muon Collider: Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallardo, J.C.; Palmer, R.B.; Tollestrup, A.V.; Sessler, A.M.; Skrinsky, A.N.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Geer, S.; Griffin, J.; Johnstone, C.; Lebrun, P.; McInturff, A.; Mills, Frederick E.; Mokhov, N.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Ng, K.Y.; Noble, R.; Novitski, I.; Popovic, M.; Qian, C.; Van Ginneken, A. ,

    2012-04-05

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice - we believe - to allow us to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring wich has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design. Muons because of their large mass compared to an electron, do not produce significant synchrotron radiation. As a result there is negligible beamstrahlung and high energy collisions are not limited by this phenomena. In addition, muons can be accelerated in circular devices which will be considerably smaller than two full-energy linacs as required in an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider. A hadron collider would require a CM energy 5 to 10 times higher than 4 TeV to have an equivalent energy reach. Since the accelerator size is limited by the strength of bending magnets, the hadron collider for the same physics reach would have to be much larger than the muon collider. In addition, muon collisions should be cleaner than hadron collisions. There are many detailed particle reactions which are open to a muon collider and the physics of such reactions - what one learns and the necessary luminosity to see interesting events - are described in detail. Most of the physics accesible to an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider could be studied in a muon collider. In addition the production of Higgs bosons in the s-channel will allow the measurement of Higgs masses and total widths to high precision; likewise, t{bar t} and W{sup +}W{sup -} threshold studies would yield m{sub t} and m{sub w} to great accuracy. These reactions are at low center of mass energy (if the MSSM is correct) and the luminosity and {Delta}p/p of the beams required for these measurements is detailed in the Physics Chapter. On the other hand, at 2 + 2 TeV, a luminosity of L {approx} 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} is desirable for studies such as, the scattering of longitudinal W bosons or the production of heavy scalar particles. Not explored in this work, but worth noting, are the opportunities for muon-proton and muon-heavy ion collisions as well as the enormous richness of such a facility for fixed target physics provided by the intense beams of neutrinos, muons, pions, kaons, antiprotons and spallation neutrons. To see all the interesting physics described herein requires a careful study of the operation of a detector in the very large background. Three sources of background have been identified. The first is from any halo accompanying the muon beams in the collider ring. Very carefully prepared beams will have to be injected and maintained. The second is due to the fact that on average 35% of the muon energy appears in its decay electron. The energy of the electron subsequently is converted into EM showers either from the synchrotron radiation they emit in the collider magnetic field or from direct collision with the surrounding material. The decays that occur as the beams traverse the low beta insert are of particular concern for detector backgrounds. A third source of background is e{sup +} - e{sup -} pair creation from {mu}{sup +} - {mu}{sup -} interaction. Studies of

  1. Magnetic Domains in Magnetar Matter as an Engine for Soft Gamma-ray Repeaters and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In-Saeng Suh; Grant J. Mathews

    2010-05-12

    Magnetars have been suggested as the most promising site for the origin of observed soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) and anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs). In this work we investigate the possibility that SGRs and AXPs might be observational evidence for a magnetic phase separation in magnetars. We study magnetic domain formation as a new mechanism for SGRs and AXPs in which magnetar-matter separates into two phases containing different flux densities. We identify the parameter space in matter density and magnetic field strength at which there is an instability for magnetic domain formation. We conclude that such instabilities will likely occur in the deep outer crust for the magnetic Baym, Pethick, and Sutherland (BPS) model and in the inner crust and core for magnetars described in relativistic Hartree theory. Moreover, we estimate that the energy released by the onset of this instability is comparable with the energy emitted by SGRs.

  2. Local magnetism in the molecule-based metamagnet [Ru2(O2CMe)4]3[Cr(CN)6] probed with implanted muons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lancaster, T.; Pratt, F. L.; Blundell, S. J.; Steele, Andrew J.; Baker, Peter J.; Wright, Jack D.; Fishman, Randy Scott; Miller, Joel S.

    2011-01-01

    We present a muon-spin relaxation study of local magnetism in the molecule-based metamagnet [Ru2(O2CMe)4]3[Cr(CN)6]. We observe magnetic order with TN = 33 K, although above 25 K the sublattice spins become less rigid and a degree of static magnetic disorder is observed. The comparison of measurements in applied magnetic field with simulations allows us to understand the origin of the muon response across the metamagnetic transition and to map out the phase diagram of the material. Applied hydrostatic pressures of up to 6 kbar lead to an increase in the local magnetic field along with a complex change in the internal magnetic field distribution.

  3. Anomalous magnetic behavior in nanocomposite materials of reduced graphene oxide-Ni/NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kollu, Pratap E-mail: anirmalagrace@vit.ac.in; Prathapani, Sateesh; Varaprasadarao, Eswara K.; Mallick, Sudhanshu; Bahadur, D. E-mail: anirmalagrace@vit.ac.in; Santosh, Chella; Grace, Andrews Nirmala E-mail: anirmalagrace@vit.ac.in

    2014-08-04

    Magnetic Reduced Graphene Oxide-Nickel/NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (RGO-Ni/NF) nanocomposite has been synthesized by one pot solvothermal method. Respective phase formations and their purities in the composite are confirmed by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope and X Ray Diffraction, respectively. For the RGO-Ni/NF composite material finite-size effects lead to the anomalous magnetic behavior, which is corroborated in temperature and field dependent magnetization curves. Here, we are reporting the behavior of higher magnetization values for Zero Field Cooled condition to that of Field Cooled for the RGO-Ni/NF nanocomposite. Also, the observed negative and positive moments in Hysteresis loops at relatively smaller applied fields (100?Oe and 200?Oe) are explained on the basis of surface spin disorder.

  4. On anomalous plasma transport in the edge of magnetic confinement devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angus, Justin Ray

    2012-01-01

    promising magnetic confinement devices for a fusion reactorthermonuclear fusion in magnetic confinement devices.what is fusion energy, how do magnetic confinement devices

  5. Discrete Symmetries on the Light Front and a General Relation connecting Nucleon Electric Dipole and Anomalous Magnetic Moments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC; Gardner, Susan; /Kentucky U.; Hwang, Dae Sung; /Sejong U.

    2006-01-11

    We consider the electric dipole form factor, F{sub 3}(q{sup 2}), as well as the Dirac and Pauli form factors, F{sub 1}(q{sup 2}) and F{sub 2}(q{sup 2}), of the nucleon in the light-front formalism. We derive an exact formula for F{sub 3}(q{sup 2}) to complement those known for F{sub 1}(q{sup 2}) and F{sub 2}(q{sup 2}). We derive the light-front representation of the discrete symmetry transformations and show that time-reversal- and parity-odd effects are captured by phases in the light-front wave functions. We thus determine that the contributions to F{sub 2}(q{sup 2}) and F{sub 3}(q{sup 2}), Fock-state by Fock-state, are related, independent of the fundamental mechanism through which CP violation is generated. Our relation is not specific to the nucleon, but, rather, is true of spin-1/2 systems in general, be they lepton or baryon. The empirical values of the anomalous magnetic moments, in concert with empirical bounds on the associated electric dipole moments, can better constrain theories of CP violation. In particular, we find that the neutron and proton electric dipole moments echo the isospin structure of the anomalous magnetic moments, {kappa}{sup n} {approx} -{kappa}{sup p}.

  6. Discrete symmetries on the light front and a general relation connecting the nucleon electric dipole and anomalous magnetic moments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, Stanley J. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94309 (United States); Gardner, Susan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0055 (United States); Hwang, Dae Sung [Department of Physics, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-02-01

    We consider the electric dipole form factor, F{sub 3}(q{sup 2}), as well as the Dirac and Pauli form factors, F{sub 1}(q{sup 2}) and F{sub 2}(q{sup 2}), of the nucleon in the light-front formalism. We derive an exact formula for F{sub 3}(q{sup 2}) to complement those known for F{sub 1}(q{sup 2}) and F{sub 2}(q{sup 2}). We derive the light-front representation of the discrete symmetry transformations and show that time-reversal- and parity-odd effects are captured by phases in the light-front wave functions. We thus determine that the contributions to F{sub 2}(q{sup 2}) and F{sub 3}(q{sup 2}), Fock state by Fock state, are related, independent of the fundamental mechanism through which CP violation is generated. Our relation is not specific to the nucleon, but, rather, is true of spin-1/2 systems in general, be they lepton or baryon. The empirical values of the anomalous magnetic moments, in concert with empirical bounds on the associated electric dipole moments, can better constrain theories of CP violation. In particular, we find that the neutron and proton electric dipole moments echo the isospin structure of the anomalous magnetic moments, {kappa}{sup n}{approx}-{kappa}{sup p}.

  7. Discrete Symmetries on the Light Front and a General Relation Connecting Nucleon Electric Dipole and Anomalous Magnetic Moments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. J. Brodsky; S. Gardner; D. S. Hwang

    2006-02-27

    We consider the electric dipole form factor, F_3(q^2), as well as the Dirac and Pauli form factors, F_1(q^2) and F_2(q^2), of the nucleon in the light-front formalism. We derive an exact formula for F_3(q^2) to complement those known for F_1(q^2) and F_2(q^2). We derive the light-front representation of the discrete symmetry transformations and show that time-reversal- and parity-odd effects are captured by phases in the light-front wave functions. We thus determine that the contributions to F_2(q^2) and F_3(q^2), Fock state by Fock state, are related, independent of the fundamental mechanism through which CP violation is generated. Our relation is not specific to the nucleon, but, rather, is true of spin-1/2 systems in general, be they lepton or baryon. The empirical values of the anomalous magnetic moments, in concert with empirical bounds on the associated electric dipole moments, can better constrain theories of CP violation. In particular, we find that the neutron and proton electric dipole moments echo the isospin structure of the anomalous magnetic moments, kappa^n ~ - kappa^p.

  8. Effect of Field Errors in Muon Collider IR Magnets on Beam Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexahin, Y.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Kapin, V.V.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    In order to achieve peak luminosity of a Muon Collider (MC) in the 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} range very small values of beta-function at the interaction point (IP) are necessary ({beta}* {le} 1 cm) while the distance from IP to the first quadrupole can not be made shorter than {approx}6 m as dictated by the necessity of detector protection from backgrounds. In the result the beta-function at the final focus quadrupoles can reach 100 km making beam dynamics very sensitive to all kind of errors. In the present report we consider the effects on momentum acceptance and dynamic aperture of multipole field errors in the body of IR dipoles as well as of fringe-fields in both dipoles and quadrupoles in the ase of 1.5 TeV (c.o.m.) MC. Analysis shows these effects to be strong but correctable with dedicated multipole correctors.

  9. Extending theories on muon-specific interactions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Carlson, Carl E.; Freid, Michael C.

    2015-11-23

    The proton radius puzzle, the discrepancy between the proton radius measured in muonic hydrogen and electronic hydrogen, has yet to be resolved. There are suggestions that beyond the standard model (BSM) physics could resolve both this puzzle and the muon anomalous magnetic moment discrepancy. Karshenboim et al. point out that simple, nonrenormalizable, models in this direction involving new vector bosons have serious problems when confronting high energy data. The prime example is radiative corrections to W to ?? decay which exceed experimental bounds. We show how embedding the model in a larger and arguably renormalizable theory restores gauge invariance ofmore »the vector particle interactions and controls the high energy behavior of decay and scattering amplitudes. Thus BSM explanations of the proton radius puzzle can still be viable.« less

  10. IDS120j WITH AND WITHOUT RESISTIVE MAGNETS PION AND MUON STUDIES WITHIN TAPER REGION, III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    RESISTIVE MAGNETS AND FILLING UPPER HALF OF Hg POOL WITH SHIELDING. GENERAL OVERVIEW (LEFT), POOL REGION DETAILS (RIGHT). [20 cm GAPS] SH#1 SH#1 SH#1A SH#2 SH#1A Hg POOL SH#4 SH#3 Hg POOL SH#1 2 cm THICK STST TO THE POOL SH#1 10 cm THICK STST RIGHT FLANGE Hg POOL STARTS ~ 85 cm AND EXTENDS ALL THE WAY TO THE END

  11. IDS120j WITH AND WITHOUT RESISTIVE MAGNETS PION AND MUON STUDIES WITHIN TAPER REGION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    ;IDS120j: REPLACING RESISTIVE MAGNETS AND FILLING UPPER HALF OF Hg POOL WITH SHIELDING. GENERAL OVERVIEW (LEFT), POOL REGION DETAILS (RIGHT). [20 cm GAPS] SH#1 SH#1 SH#1A SH#2 SH#1A Hg POOL SH#4 SH#3 Hg POOL SH#1 2 cm THICK STST OUTER TUBE CRYO#1 CRYO#4CRYO#3 CRYO#2 2 cm THICK STST BEAM PIPE BEAM PIPE

  12. Anomalous pressure dependence of magnetic ordering temperature in Tb revealed by resistivity measurements to 141 GPa. Comparison with Gd and Dy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lim, J.; Fabbris, G.; Haskel, D.; Schilling, J. S.

    2015-05-26

    In previous studies the pressure dependence of the magnetic ordering temperature To of Dy was found to exhibit a sharp increase above its volume collapse pressure of 73 GPa, appearing to reach temperatures well above ambient at 157 GPa. In a search for a second such lanthanide, electrical resistivity measurements were carried out on neighboring Tb to 141 GPa over the temperature range 3.8 - 295 K. Below Tb’s volume collapse pressure of 53 GPa, the pressure dependence To(P) mirrors that of both Dy and Gd. However, at higher pressures To(P) for Tb becomes highly anomalous. This result, together withmore »the very strong suppression of superconductivity by dilute Tb ions in Y, suggests that extreme pressure transports Tb into an unconventional magnetic state with an anomalously high magnetic ordering temperature.« less

  13. Efficiency enhancement of anomalous-Doppler electron cyclotron masers with tapered magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Chao-Ran; Hou, Zhi-Ling [Beijing Key Laboratory of Harmful Chemicals Analysis and School of Science, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)] [Beijing Key Laboratory of Harmful Chemicals Analysis and School of Science, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Kong, Ling-Bao, E-mail: konglingbao@gmail.com, E-mail: pkliu@pku.edu.cn [School of Electronics Engineering and Computer Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) [School of Electronics Engineering and Computer Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Harmful Chemicals Analysis and School of Science, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Liu, Pu-Kun, E-mail: konglingbao@gmail.com, E-mail: pkliu@pku.edu.cn; Du, Chao-Hai [School of Electronics Engineering and Computer Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [School of Electronics Engineering and Computer Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Jin, Hai-Bo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2014-02-15

    The efficiency of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers (ECM) is usually low, thus limiting the practical applications. Here, a method of tapered magnetic field is introduced for the efficiency enhancement of the slow-wave ECM. The numerical calculations show that the tapered magnetic-field method can enhance the efficiency of slow-wave ECM significantly. The effect of beam electron velocity spread on the efficiency has also been studied. Although the velocity spread reduces the efficiency, a great enhancement of efficiency can still be obtained by the tapered magnetic field method.

  14. Anomalous diffusion of field lines and charged particles in Arnold-Beltrami-Childress force-free magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ram, Abhay K. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Dasgupta, Brahmananda [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35805 (United States); Krishnamurthy, V. [Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia 22030 (United States); Mitra, Dhrubaditya [Nordita, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-07-15

    The cosmic magnetic fields in regions of low plasma pressure and large currents, such as in interstellar space and gaseous nebulae, are force-free in the sense that the Lorentz force vanishes. The three-dimensional Arnold-Beltrami-Childress (ABC) field is an example of a force-free, helical magnetic field. In fluid dynamics, ABC flows are steady state solutions of the Euler equation. The ABC magnetic field lines exhibit a complex and varied structure that is a mix of regular and chaotic trajectories in phase space. The characteristic features of field line trajectories are illustrated through the phase space distribution of finite-distance and asymptotic-distance Lyapunov exponents. In regions of chaotic trajectories, an ensemble-averaged variance of the distance between field lines reveals anomalous diffusion—in fact, superdiffusion—of the field lines. The motion of charged particles in the force-free ABC magnetic fields is different from the flow of passive scalars in ABC flows. The particles do not necessarily follow the field lines and display a variety of dynamical behavior depending on their energy, and their initial pitch-angle. There is an overlap, in space, of the regions in which the field lines and the particle orbits are chaotic. The time evolution of an ensemble of particles, in such regions, can be divided into three categories. For short times, the motion of the particles is essentially ballistic; the ensemble-averaged, mean square displacement is approximately proportional to t{sup 2}, where t is the time of evolution. The intermediate time region is defined by a decay of the velocity autocorrelation function—this being a measure of the time after which the collective dynamics is independent of the initial conditions. For longer times, the particles undergo superdiffusion—the mean square displacement is proportional to t{sup ?}, where ??>?1, and is weakly dependent on the energy of the particles. These super-diffusive characteristics, both of magnetic field lines and of particles moving in these fields, strongly suggest that theories of transport in three-dimensional chaotic magnetic fields need a shift from the usual paradigm of quasilinear diffusion.

  15. Discrete Symmetries on the Light Front and a General Relation Connecting Nucleon Electric Dipole and Anomalous Magnetic Moments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brodsky, S J; Hwang, D S

    2006-01-01

    We consider the electric dipole form factor, F_3(q^2), as well as the Dirac and Pauli form factors, F_1(q^2) and F_2(q^2), of the nucleon in the light-front formalism. We derive an exact formula for F_3(q^2) to complement those known for F_1(q^2) and F_2(q^2). We derive the light-front representation of the discrete symmetry transformations and show that time-reversal- and parity-odd effects are captured by phases in the light-front wave functions. We thus determine that the contributions to F_2(q^2) and F_3(q^2), Fock-state by Fock-state, are related, independent of the fundamental mechanism through which CP violation is generated. Our relation is not specific to the nucleon, but, rather, is true of spin-1/2 systems in general, be they lepton or baryon. The empirical values of the anomalous magnetic moments, in concert with empirical bounds on the associated electric dipole moments, can better constrain theories of CP violation. In particular, we find that the neutron and proton electric dipole moments echo ...

  16. Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, R.

    2009-10-19

    Parameters are given of muon colliders with center of mass energies of 1.5 and 3 TeV. Pion production is from protons on a mercury target. Capture, decay, and phase rotation yields bunch trains of both muon signs. Six dimensional cooling reduces the emittances until the trains are merged into single bunches, one of each sign. Further cooling in 6 dimensions is then applied, followed by final transverse cooling in 50 T solenoids. After acceleration the muons enter the collider ring. Ongoing R&D is discussed.

  17. Anomalous Dynamical Line Shapes in a Quantum Magnet at Finite Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tennant D. A.; James A.; Lake, B.; Essler, F.H.L.; Notbohm, S.; Mikeska, H.-J.; Fielden, J.; Kogerler,, P.; Canfield, P.C.; Telling, M.T.F.

    2012-01-04

    The effect of thermal fluctuations on the dynamics of a gapped quantum magnet is studied using inelastic neutron scattering on copper nitrate, a model material for the spin-1/2, one-dimensional (1D) bond alternating Heisenberg chain. A large, highly deuterated, single-crystal sample of copper nitrate is produced using a solution growth method and measurements are made using the high-resolution backscattering spectrometer OSIRIS at the ISIS Facility. Theoretical calculations and numerical analysis are combined to interpret the physical origin of the thermal effects observed in the magnetic spectra. The primary observations are (1) a thermally induced central peak due to intraband scattering, which is similar to Villain scattering familiar from soliton systems in 1D, and (2) the one-magnon quasiparticle pole is seen to develop with temperature into an asymmetric continuum of scattering. We relate this asymmetric line broadening to a thermal strongly correlated state caused by hard-core constraints and quasiparticle interactions. These findings are a counter example to recent assertions of the universality of line broadening in 1D systems and are applicable to a broad range of quantum systems.

  18. Anomalous magnetic structure and spin dynamics in magnetoelectric LiFePO4

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Toft-Petersen, Rasmus; Reehuis, Manfred; Jensen, Thomas B. S.; Andersen, Niels H.; Li, Jiying; Le, Manh Duc; Laver, Mark; Niedermayer, Christof; Klemke, Bastian; Lefmann, Kim; et al

    2015-07-06

    We report significant details of the magnetic structure and spin dynamics of LiFePO4 obtained by single-crystal neutron scattering. Our results confirm a previously reported collinear rotation of the spins away from the principal b axis, and they determine that the rotation is toward the a axis. In addition, we find a significant spin-canting component along c. Furthermore, the possible causes of these components are discussed, and their significance for the magnetoelectric effect is analyzed. Inelastic neutron scattering along the three principal directions reveals a highly anisotropic hard plane consistent with earlier susceptibility measurements. While using a spin Hamiltonian, we showmore »that the spin dimensionality is intermediate between XY- and Ising-like, with an easy b axis and a hard c axis. It is shown that both next-nearest neighbor exchange couplings in the bc plane are in competition with the strongest nearest neighbor coupling.« less

  19. Anomalous-viscosity current drive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stix, T.H.; Ono, M.

    1986-04-25

    The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for maintaining a steady-state current for magnetically confining the plasma in a toroidal magnetic confinement device using anomalous viscosity current drive. A second aspect of this invention relates to an apparatus and method for the start-up of a magnetically confined toroidal plasma.

  20. Nanodomain induced anomalous magnetic and electronic transport properties of LaBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5.5+?} highly epitaxial thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruiz-Zepeda, F.; Ma, C.; Bahena Uribe, D.; Cantu-Valle, J.; Wang, H.; Xu, Xing; Yacaman, M. J.; Ponce, A., E-mail: arturo.ponce@utsa.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas 78249 (United States); Chen, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas 78249 (United States); The Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Lorenz, B.; Jacobson, A. J.; Chu, P. C. W. [The Texas Center for Superconductivity, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States)

    2014-01-14

    A giant magnetoresistance effect (?46% at 20?K under 7?T) and anomalous magnetic properties were found in a highly epitaxial double perovskite LaBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5.5+?} (LBCO) thin film on (001) MgO. Aberration-corrected Electron Microscopy and related analytical techniques were employed to understand the nature of these unusual physical properties. The as-grown film is epitaxial with the c-axis of the LBCO structure lying in the film plane and with an interface relationship given by (100){sub LBCO} || (001){sub MgO} and [001]{sub LBCO} || [100]{sub MgO} or [010]{sub MgO}. Orderly oxygen vacancies were observed by line profile electron energy loss spectroscopy and by atomic resolution imaging. Especially, oxygen vacancy and nanodomain structures were found to have a crucial effect on the electronic transport and magnetic properties.

  1. DYNAMICS OF DECAY ELECTRONS AND SYNCHROTRON RADIATION IN A TEV MUON COLLIDER*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McIntyre, Peter

    ) in a TeV muon col- lider present major challenges as heat loads to the super- conducting magnetsDYNAMICS OF DECAY ELECTRONS AND SYNCHROTRON RADIATION IN A TEV MUON COLLIDER* P. McIntyre and A problems are mitigated. 1 MUON DECAY IN A MUON COLLIDER Ankenbrandt et al. [1] summarize the design

  2. Dynamical quark loop light-by-light contribution to muon g-2 within the nonlocal chiral quark model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. E. Dorokhov; A. E. Radzhabov; A. S. Zhevlakov

    2015-07-24

    The hadronic corrections to the muon anomalous magnetic moment a_mu, due to the gauge-invariant set of diagrams with dynamical quark loop light-by-light scattering insertions, are calculated in the framework of the nonlocal chiral quark model. These results complete calculations of all hadronic light-by-light scattering contributions to a_mu in the leading order in the 1/Nc expansion. The result for the quark loop contribution is a_mu^{HLbL,Loop}=(11.0+-0.9)*10^(-10), and the total result is a_mu^{HLbL,NxQM}=(16.8+-1.2)*10^(-10).

  3. Muons, gravity and time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis J. M. Farley

    2015-08-14

    In the muon storage rings the muons are subject to a very large radial acceleration. The equivalence principle implies a large gravity force. It has no effect on the muon lifetime.

  4. Design Issues for the Superconducting Magnet that Goes Around the Liquid Hydrogen Absorber for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01

    THAT GOES AROUND THE LIQUID HYDROGEN ABSORBER FOR THE MUONthat goes around a liquid hydrogen absorber for the Muonand magnet quench on the liquid hydrogen absorber is also

  5. Muon Anomaly and Dark Parity Violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hooman Davoudiasl; Hye-Sung Lee; William J. Marciano

    2012-07-06

    The muon anomalous magnetic moment exhibits a 3.6 \\sigma discrepancy between experiment and theory. One explanation requires the existence of a light vector boson, Z_d (the dark Z), with mass 10 - 500 MeV that couples weakly to the electromagnetic current through kinetic mixing. Support for such a solution also comes from astrophysics conjectures regarding the utility of a U(1)_d gauge symmetry in the dark matter sector. In that scenario, we show that mass mixing between the Z_d and ordinary Z boson introduces a new source of "dark" parity violation which is potentially observable in atomic and polarized electron scattering experiments. Restrictive bounds on the mixing (m_{Z_d} / m_Z) \\delta are found from existing atomic parity violation results, \\delta^2 < 2 x 10^{-5}. Combined with future planned and proposed polarized electron scattering experiments, a sensitivity of \\delta^2 ~ 10^{-6} is expected to be reached, thereby complementing direct searches for the Z_d boson.

  6. Long-range ordering of reduced magnetic moments in the spin-gap compound CeOs{sub 2}Al{sub 10} as seen via muon spin relaxation and neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adroja, D. T.; Hillier, A. D.; Kockelmann, W. A.; Anand, V. K.; Stewart, J. R.; Taylor, J. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Deen, P. P. [Institute Laue-Langevin, BP 156, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38042 Grenoble Cedex (France); Strydom, A. M. [Physics Department, University of Johannesburg, P.O. Box 524, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa); Muro, Y.; Kajino, J.; Takabatake, T. [Department of Quantum Matter, ADSM, and IAMR, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan)

    2010-09-01

    We have carried out neutron diffraction, muon spin relaxation ({mu}SR), and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) investigations on a polycrystalline sample of CeOs{sub 2}Al{sub 10} to investigate the nature of the phase transition observed near 29 K in the resistivity and heat capacity. Our {mu}SR data clearly reveal coherent frequency oscillations below 28 K, indicating the presence of an internal field at the muon site, which confirms the long-range magnetic ordering of the Ce moment below 28 K. Upon cooling the sample below 15 K, unusual behavior of the temperature-dependent {mu}SR frequencies may indicate either a change in the muon site, consistent with the observation of superstructure reflections in electron diffraction, or a change in the ordered magnetic structure. Neutron diffraction data do not reveal any clear sign of either magnetic Bragg peaks or superlattice reflections. Furthermore, INS measurements clearly reveal the presence of a sharp inelastic excitation near 11 meV between 5 and 26 K, due to opening of a gap in the spin-excitation spectrum, which transforms into a broad response at and above 30 K. The magnitude of the spin gap (11 meV) as derived from the INS peak position agrees very well with the gap value as estimated from the bulk properties.

  7. First-principles study on the relationship between magnetic anisotropy and anomalous Hall effect of bct-Fe{sub 50}Co{sub 50}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyodo, Kazushige Sakuma, Akimasa; Kota, Yohei

    2014-05-07

    We studied quantitative relationship between the intrinsic anomalous Hall conductivity (?{sub xy}) and the uniaxial magnetic anisotropy constant (K{sub u}) of bct-Fe{sub 50}Co{sub 50} using first-principles calculation because these quantities originate from spin-orbit interaction. We found that the obtained ?{sub xy} and K{sub u} with changing the axial ratio c/a (1?c/a??(2)) exhibit similar behavior mainly arising from the common band mixing of the minority-spin d{sub xy} and d{sub x{sup 2}?y{sup 2}} states near the Fermi level which is sensitive to c/a.

  8. Spin rotation and depolarization of high-energy particles in crystals at Hadron Collider (LHC) and Future Circular Collider (FCC) energies and the possibility to measure the anomalous magnetic moments of short-lived particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baryshevsky, V G

    2015-01-01

    We study the phenomena of spin rotation and depolarization of high-energy particles in crystals in the range of high energies that will be available at Hadron Collider (LHC) and Future Circular Collider (FCC). It is shown that these phenomena can be used to measure the anomalous magnetic moments of short-lived particles in this range of energies. We also demonstrate that the phenomenon of particle spin depolarization in crystals provides a unique possibility of measuring the anomalous magnetic moment of negatively-charged particles (e.g., beauty baryons), for which the channeling effect is hampered due to far more rapid dechanneling as compared to that for positively-charged particles. Channeling of particles in either straight or bent crystals with polarized nuclei could be used for polarization and the analysis thereof of high-energy particles.

  9. Spin rotation and depolarization of high-energy particles in crystals at Hadron Collider (LHC) and Future Circular Collider (FCC) energies and the possibility to measure the anomalous magnetic moments of short-lived particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. G. Baryshevsky

    2015-04-25

    We study the phenomena of spin rotation and depolarization of high-energy particles in crystals in the range of high energies that will be available at Hadron Collider (LHC) and Future Circular Collider (FCC). It is shown that these phenomena can be used to measure the anomalous magnetic moments of short-lived particles in this range of energies. We also demonstrate that the phenomenon of particle spin depolarization in crystals provides a unique possibility of measuring the anomalous magnetic moment of negatively-charged particles (e.g., beauty baryons), for which the channeling effect is hampered due to far more rapid dechanneling as compared to that for positively-charged particles. Channeling of particles in either straight or bent crystals with polarized nuclei could be used for polarization and the analysis thereof of high-energy particles.

  10. Adler function and hadronic contribution to the muon g-2 in a nonlocal chiral quark model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorokhov, Alexander E.

    2004-11-01

    The behavior of the vector Adler function at spacelike momenta is studied in the framework of a covariant chiral quark model with instantonlike quark-quark interaction. This function describes the transition between the high-energy asymptotically free region of almost massless current quarks to the low-energy hadronized regime with massive constituent quarks. The model reproduces the Adler function and V-A correlator extracted from the ALEPH and OPAL data on hadronic {tau} lepton decays, transformed into the Euclidean domain via dispersion relations. The leading order contribution from the hadronic part of the photon vacuum polarization to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, a{sub {mu}}{sup hvp(1)}, is estimated.

  11. Chapter 12. The Muon Kicker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory - Experiment 821

    per fill with direct muon injection, compared to pion injection. The disadvantage of direct muonChapter 12. The Muon Kicker Revised September 1994 12.1. Introduction and Overview Direct muon injection into the storage ring is accomplished by giving the muon beam a 10 milliradian kick at a quarter

  12. Detector Background at Muon Colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mokhov, N.V.; Striganov, S.I.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Physics goals of a Muon Collider (MC) can only be reached with appropriate design of the ring, interaction region (IR), high-field superconducting magnets, machine-detector interface (MDI) and detector. Results of the most recent realistic simulation studies are presented for a 1.5-TeV MC. It is shown that appropriately designed IR and MDI with sophisticated shielding in the detector have a potential to substantially suppress the background rates in the MC detector. The main characteristics of backgrounds are studied.

  13. The charmonium dissociation in an "anomalous wind"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrey V. Sadofyev; Yi Yin

    2015-10-22

    We study the charmonium dissociation in a strongly coupled chiral plasma in the presence of magnetic field and axial charge imbalance. This type of plasma carries ``anomalous flow" induced by the chiral anomaly and exhibits novel transport phenomena such as chiral magnetic effect. We found that the ``anomalous flow" would modify the charmonium color screening length by using the gauge/gravity correspondence. We derive an analytical expression quantifying the ``anomalous flow" experienced by a charmonium for a large class of chiral plasma with a gravity dual. We elaborate on the similarity and {\\it qualitative} difference between anomalous effects on the charmonium color screening length which are {\\it model-dependent} and those on the heavy quark drag force which are fixed by the second law of thermodynamics. We speculate on the possible charmonium dissociation induced by chiral anomaly in heavy ion collisions.

  14. The charmonium dissociation in an "anomalous wind"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadofyev, Andrey V

    2015-01-01

    We study the charmonium dissociation in a strongly coupled chiral plasma in the presence of magnetic field and axial charge imbalance. This type of plasma carries ``anomalous flow" induced by the chiral anomaly and exhibits novel transport phenomena such as chiral magnetic effect. We found that the ``anomalous flow" would modify the charmonium color screening length by using the gauge/gravity correspondence. We derive an analytical expression quantifying the ``anomalous flow" experienced by a charmonium for a large class of chiral plasma with a gravity dual. We elaborate on the similarity and {\\it qualitative} difference between anomalous effects on the charmonium color screening length which are {\\it model-dependent} and those on the heavy quark drag force which are fixed by the second law of thermodynamics. We speculate on the possible charmonium dissociation induced by chiral anomaly in heavy ion collisions.

  15. Muons and Neutrinos 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser

    2008-01-29

    This paper is the written version of the rapporteur talk on Section HE-2, muons and neutrinos, presented at the 30th International Cosmic Ray Conference, Merida, Yucatan, July 11, 2007. Topics include atmospheric muons and neutrinos, solar neutrinos and astrophysical neutrinos as well as calculations and instrumentation related to these topics.

  16. Muon Acceleration with RLA and Non-scaling FFAG Arcs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasiliy Morozov,Alex Bogacz,Dejan Trbojevic

    2010-05-01

    Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA) are the most likely means to achieve the rapid acceleration of shortlived muons to multi-GeV energies required for Neutrino Factories and TeV energies required for Muon Colliders. In this paper, we present a novel return-arc optics design based on a Non Scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (NS-FFAG) lattice that allows 5 and 9 GeV/c muons of both charges to be transported in the same string of magnets. The return arcs are made up of super cells with each super cell consisting of three triplets. By employing combined function magnets with dipole, quadrupole, sextupole and octupole magnetic field components, each super cell is designed to be achromatic and to have zero initial and final periodic orbit offsets for both 5 and 9 GeV/c muon momenta. This solution would reduce the number of arcs by a factor of 2, simplifying the overall design.

  17. Muon acceleration with RLA and non-scaling FFAG ARCS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morozov, V.S.; Trbojevic, D.; Bogacz, A.

    2010-05-23

    Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA) are the most likely means to achieve the rapid acceleration of short-lived muons to multi-GeV energies required for Neutrino Factories and TeV energies required for Muon Colliders. In this paper, we present a novel return-arc optics design based on a Non Scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (NS-FFAG) lattice that allows 5 and 9 GeV/c muons of both charges to be transported in the same string of magnets. The return arcs are made up of super cells with each super cell consisting of three triplets. By employing combined function magnets with dipole, quadrupole, sextupole and octupole magnetic field components, each super cell is designed to be achromatic and to have zero initial and final periodic orbit offsets for both 5 and 9 GeV/c muon momenta. This solution would reduce the number of arcs by a factor of 2, simplifying the overall design.

  18. The Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zisman, Michael S

    2010-05-17

    We describe the scientific motivation for a new type of accelerator, the muon collider. This accelerator would permit an energy-frontier scientific program and yet would fit on the site of an existing laboratory. Such a device is quite challenging, and requires a substantial R&D program. After describing the ingredients of the facility, the ongoing R&D activities of the Muon Accelerator Program are discussed. A possible U.S. scenario that could lead to a muon collider at Fermilab is briefly mentioned.

  19. The Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2011-01-05

    We describe the scientific motivation for a new type of accelerator, the muon collider. This accelerator would permit an energy-frontier scientific program and yet would fit on the site of an existing laboratory. Such a device is quite challenging, and requires a substantial R&D program. After describing the ingredients of the facility, the ongoing R&D activities of the Muon Accelerator Program are discussed. A possible U.S. scenario that could lead to a muon collider at Fermilab is briefly mentioned.

  20. Muon-proton Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Borie

    2013-02-05

    A recent proposal to measure the proton form factor by means of muon-proton scattering will use muons which are not ultrarelativistic (and also not nonrelativistic). The usual equations describing the scattering cross section use the approximation that the scattered lepton (usually an electron) is ultrarelativistic, with v/c approximately equal to 1. Here the cross section is calculated for all values of the energy. It agrees with the standard result in the appropriate limit.

  1. Muon Beam Helical Cooling Channel Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Rolland; Ankenbrandt, Charles; Flanagan, G.; Kazakevich, G.M.; Marhauser, Frank; Neubauer, Michael; Roberts, T.; Yoshikawa, C.; Derbenev, Yaroslav; Morozov, Vasiliy; Kashikhin, V.S.; Lopes, Mattlock; Tollestrup, A.; Yonehara, Katsuya; Zloblin, A.

    2013-06-01

    The Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) achieves effective ionization cooling of the six-dimensional (6d) phase space of a muon beam by means of a series of 21st century inventions. In the HCC, hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities enable high RF gradients in strong external magnetic fields. The theory of the HCC, which requires a magnetic field with solenoid, helical dipole, and helical quadrupole components, demonstrates that dispersion in the gaseous hydrogen energy absorber provides effective emittance exchange to enable longitudinal ionization cooling. The 10-year development of a practical implementation of a muon-beam cooling device has involved a series of technical innovations and experiments that imply that an HCC of less than 300 m length can cool the 6d emittance of a muon beam by six orders of magnitude. We describe the design and construction plans for a prototype HCC module based on oxygen-doped hydrogen-pressurized RF cavities that are loaded with dielectric, fed by magnetrons, and operate in a superconducting helical solenoid magnet.

  2. Stochastic Cooling in Muon Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barletta, W.A.

    2008-01-01

    Research Division Stochastic Cooling in Muon Colliders W.A.AC03-76SFOOO98. STOCHASTIC COOLING IN MUON COLLIDERS Williamcan consider the stochastic cooling option as more than a

  3. Anomalous Hall effect in a two-dimensional electron gas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nunner, Tamara S.; Sinitsyn, N. A.; Borunda, Mario F.; Dugaev, V. K.; Kovalev, A. A.; Abanov, Artem; Timm, Carsten; Jungwirth, T.; Inoue, Jun-ichiro; MacDonald, A. H.; Sinova, Jairo.

    2007-01-01

    The anomalous Hall effect in a magnetic two-dimensional electron gas with Rashba spin-orbit coupling is studied within the Kubo-Streda formalism in the presence of pointlike potential impurities. We find that all contributions ...

  4. Muon Cooling Channels Eberhard Keil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keil, Eberhard

    Muon Cooling Channels Eberhard Keil Katharinenstr. 17, DE-10711 Berlin, Germany Abstract Parameters of muon cooling channels are discussed that achieve cooling of a muon beam from initial to final emittances in all three degrees of freedom in a given length. Published theories of ionisation cooling yield

  5. A new muon-pion collection and transport system design using superconducting solenoids based on CSNS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Ran; Xu, Wenzhen; Ni, Xiaojie; Pan, Ziwen; Ye, Bangjiao

    2015-01-01

    A new muon and pion capture system was proposed at the under-conduction China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS). Using about 4 % of the pulsed proton beam (1.6 GeV, 4 kW and 1 Hz) of CSNS to bombard a cylindrical graphite target inside a superconducting solenoid both surface muons and pions can be acquired. The acceptance of this novel capture system - a graphite target wrapped up by a superconducting solenoid - is larger than the normal muon beam lines using quadrupoles at one side of the separated muon target. The muon and pion production at different capture magnetic fields was calculated by Geant4, the bending angle of the capture solenoid with respect to the proton beam was also optimized in simulation to achieve more muons and pions and to reduce proton dosages to following beam elements. According to the layout of the muon experimental area reserved at the CSNS project, a preliminary muon beam line was designed with multi-propose muon spin rotation areas(surface, decay and low-energy muons). Finally, hi...

  6. The Atmospheric Muon Charge Ratio at the MINOS Near Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Jong, J.K.; /IIT, Chicago /Oxford U.

    2011-11-01

    The magnetized MINOS near detector can accurately determine the charge sign of atmospheric muons, this facilitates a measurement of the atmospheric muon charge ratio. To reduce the systematic error associated with geometric bias and acceptance we have combined equal periods of data obtained with opposite magnetic field polarities. We report a charge ratio of 1.2666 {+-} 0.0015(stat.){sub -0.0088}{sup +0.0096}(syst.) at a mean E{sub {mu},0{sup cos}}({theta}) = 63 GeV. This measurement is consistent with the world average but significantly lower than the earlier observation at the MINOS far detector. This increase is shown to be consistent with the hypothesis that a greater fraction of the observed muons arise from kaon decay within the cosmic ray shower.

  7. Muon Cooling and Future Muon Facilities: The Coming Decade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel M. Kaplan

    2009-10-21

    Muon colliders and neutrino factories are attractive options for future facilities aimed at achieving the highest lepton-antilepton collision energies and precision measurements of parameters of the neutrino mixing matrix. The performance and cost of these depend sensitively on how well a beam of muons can be cooled. Recent progress in muon cooling design studies and prototype tests nourishes the hope that such facilities can be built in the decade to come.

  8. The US Muon Accelerator Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torun, Y.; Kirk, H.; Bross, A.; Geer, Steve; Shiltsev, Vladimir; Zisman, M.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2010-05-01

    An accelerator complex that can produce ultra-intense beams of muons presents many opportunities to explore new physics. A facility of this type is unique in that, in a relatively straightforward way, it can present a physics program that can be staged and thus move forward incrementally, addressing exciting new physics at each step. At the request of the US Department of Energy's Office of High Energy Physics, the Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (NFMCC) and the Fermilab Muon Collider Task Force (MCTF) have recently submitted a proposal to create a Muon Accelerator Program that will have, as a primary goal, to deliver a Design Feasibility Study for an energy-frontier Muon Collider by the end of a 7 year R&D program. This paper presents a description of a Muon Collider facility and gives an overview of the proposal.

  9. Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geer, Steve; /Fermilab

    2009-11-01

    Over the past decade, there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture, and accelerate {Omicron}(10{sup 21}) muons per year. These developments have paved the way for a new type of neutrino source (neutrino factory) and a new type of very high energy lepton-antilepton collider (muon collider). This article reviews the motivation, design, and research and development for future neutrino factories and muon colliders.

  10. Muon colliders and neutrino factories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geer, S.; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture and accelerate {Omicron}(10{sup 21}) muons/year. This development prepares the way for a new type of neutrino source (Neutrino Factory) and a new type of very high energy lepton-antilepton collider (Muon Collider). This article reviews the motivation, design and R&D for Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders.

  11. High field solenoids for muon cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Field Solenoids for Muon Cooling M. A. Green a , Y. EyssaField Solenoids for Muon Cooling · M. A. Green a, Y. EyssaABSTRA CT The proposed cooling system for the muon collider

  12. Muons for a Neutrino Factory and a Muon Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    @princeton.edu Fact'99, Lyon, France July 6, 1999 Muon Collider main page: http://www.cap.bnl.gov/mumu/mu home page the proton requirements. · Goal: 0.1/p delivered for physics use. 2 #12;The Muon Source · Pion production beam pulse shock heating of target. ­ Resulting pressure wave may disperse liquid (or crack solid

  13. Electron-Muon Ranger: performance in the MICE Muon Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Adams; A. Alekou; M. Apollonio; R. Asfandiyarov; G. Barber; P. Barclay; A. de Bari; R. Bayes; V. Bayliss; P. Bene; R. Bertoni; V. J. Blackmore; A. Blondel; S. Blot; M. Bogomilov; M. Bonesini; C. N. Booth; D. Bowring; S. Boyd; T. W. Bradshaw; U. Bravar; A. D. Bross; F. Cadoux; M. Capponi; T. Carlisle; G. Cecchet; C. Charnley; F. Chignoli; D. Cline; J. H. Cobb; G. Colling; N. Collomb; L. Coney; P. Cooke; M. Courthold; L. M. Cremaldi; S. Debieux; A. DeMello; A. Dick; A. Dobbs; P. Dornan; F. Drielsma; F. Filthaut; T. Fitzpatrick; P. Franchini; V. Francis; L. Fry; A. Gallagher; R. Gamet; R. Gardener; S. Gourlay; A. Grant; J. S. Graulich; J. Greis; S. Griffiths; P. Hanlet; O. M. Hansen; G. G. Hanson; T. L. Hart; T. Hartnett; T. Hayler; C. Heidt; M. Hills; P. Hodgson; C. Hunt; C. Husi; A. Iaciofano; S. Ishimoto; G. Kafka; D. M. Kaplan; Y. Karadzhov; Y. K. Kim; Y. Kuno; P. Kyberd; J-B Lagrange; J. Langlands; W. Lau; M. Leonova; D. Li; A. Lintern; M. Littlefield; K. Long; T. Luo; C. Macwaters; B. Martlew; J. Martyniak; F. Masciocchi; R. Mazza; S. Middleton; A. Moretti; A. Moss; A. Muir; I. Mullacrane; J. J. Nebrensky; D. Neuffer; A. Nichols; R. Nicholson; L. Nicola; E. Noah Messomo; J. C. Nugent; A. Oates; Y. Onel; D. Orestano; E. Overton; P. Owens; V. Palladino; J. Pasternak; F. Pastore; C. Pidcott; M. Popovic; R. Preece; S. Prestemon; D. Rajaram; S. Ramberger; M. A. Rayner; S. Ricciardi; T. J. Roberts; M. Robinson; C. Rogers; K. Ronald; K. Rothenfusser; P. Rubinov; P. Rucinski; H. Sakamato; D. A. Sanders; R. Sandstrom; E. Santos; T. Savidge; P. J. Smith; P. Snopok; F. J. P. Soler; D. Speirs; T. Stanley; G. Stokes; D. J. Summers; J. Tarrant; I. Taylor; L. Tortora; Y. Torun; R. Tsenov; C. D. Tunnell; M. A. Uchida; G. Vankova-Kirilova; S. Virostek; M. Vretenar; P. Warburton; S. Watson; C. White; C. G. Whyte; A. Wilson; H. Wisting; X. Yang; A. Young; M. Zisman

    2015-11-03

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a detailed study of ionization cooling to evaluate the feasibility of the technique. To carry out this program, MICE requires an efficient particle-identification (PID) system to identify muons. The Electron-Muon Ranger (EMR) is a fully-active tracking-calorimeter that forms part of the PID system and tags muons that traverse the cooling channel without decaying. The detector is capable of identifying electrons with an efficiency of 98.6%, providing a purity for the MICE beam that exceeds 99.8%. The EMR also proved to be a powerful tool for the reconstruction of muon momenta in the range 100-280 MeV/$c$.

  14. Electron-Muon Ranger: performance in the MICE Muon Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, D; Apollonio, M; Asfandiyarov, R; Barber, G; Barclay, P; de Bari, A; Bayes, R; Bayliss, V; Bene, P; Bertoni, R; Blackmore, V J; Blondel, A; Blot, S; Bogomilov, M; Bonesini, M; Booth, C N; Bowring, D; Boyd, S; Brashaw, T W; Bravar, U; Bross, A D; Cadoux, F; Capponi, M; Carlisle, T; Cecchet, G; Charnley, C; Chignoli, F; Cline, D; Cobb, J H; Colling, G; Collomb, N; Coney, L; Cooke, P; Courthold, M; Cremaldi, L M; Debieux, S; DeMello, A; Dick, A; Dobbs, A; Dornan, P; Drielsma, F; Filthaut, F; Fitzpatrick, T; Franchini, P; Francis, V; Freemire, B; Fry, L; Gallagher, A; Gamet, R; Gardener, R; Gourlay, S; Grant, A; Graulich, J S; Greis, J; Griffiths, S; Hanlet, P; Hansen, O M; Hanson, G G; Hart, T L; Hartnett, T; Hayler, T; Heidt, C; Hills, M; Hodgson, P; Hunt, C; Husi, C; Iaciofano, A; Ishimoto, S; Kafka, G; Kaplan, D M; Karadzhov, Y; Kim, Y K; Kuno, Y; Kyberd, P; Lagrange, J-B; Langlands, J; Lau, W; Leonova, M; Li, D; Lintern, A; Littlefield, M; Long, K; Luo, T; Macwaters, C; Martlew, B; Martyniak, J; Masciocchi, F; Mazza, R; Middleton, S; Moretti, A; Moss, A; Muir, A; Mullacrane, I; Nebrensky, J J; Neuffer, D; Nichols, A; Nicholson, R; Nicola, L; Messomo, E Noah; Nugent, J C; Oates, A; Onel, Y; Orestano, D; Overton, E; Owens, P; Palladino, V; Pasternak, J; Pastore, F; Pidcott, C; Popovic, M; Preece, R; Prestemon, S; Rajaram, D; Ramberger, S; Rayner, M A; Ricciardi, S; Roberts, T J; Robinson, M; Rogers, C; Ronald, K; Rothenfusser, K; Rubinov, P; Rucinski, P; Sakamato, H; Sanders, D A; Sandstrom, R; Santos, E; Savidge, T; Smith, P J; Snopok, P; Soler, F J P; Speirs, D; Stanley, T; Stokes, G; Summers, D J; Tarrant, J; Taylor, I; Tortora, L; Torun, Y; Tsenov, R; Tunnell, C D; Uchida, M A; Vankova-Kirilova, G; Virostek, S; Vretenar, M; Warburton, P; Watson, S; White, C; Whyte, C G; Wilson, A; Wisting, H; Yang, X; Young, A; Zisman, M

    2015-01-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a detailed study of ionization cooling to evaluate the feasibility of the technique. To carry out this program, MICE requires an efficient particle-identification (PID) system to identify muons. The Electron-Muon Ranger (EMR) is a fully-active tracking-calorimeter that forms part of the PID system and tags muons that traverse the cooling channel without decaying. The detector is capable of identifying electrons with an efficiency of 98.6%, providing a purity for the MICE beam that exceeds 99.8%. The EMR also proved to be a powerful tool for the reconstruction of muon momenta in the range 100-280 MeV/$c$.

  15. Anomalous Transport in Holographic Chiral Superfluids via Kubo Formulae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amadeo Jimenez-Alba; Luis Melgar

    2014-11-06

    We study anomalous conductivities in Chiral Superfluids in the framework of two different holographic models, by means of Kubo formulae. In addition, we point out the existence of an anomalous transport phenomenon that consists in the presence of a charge density when the superfluid velocity is aligned with a magnetic field. It has been pointed out recently that certain chiral conductivities in holographic superfluids exhibit universal behavior at zero temperature. We show that anomalous conductivities always stabilize at low temperatures in our setup. Even though the particular value they acquire is model-dependent, it seems to be robust and determined solely by the interplay between the broken symmetries and the anomalies.

  16. The no-drag frame for anomalous chiral fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephanov, Mikhail A

    2015-01-01

    We show that for an anomalous fluid carrying dissipationless chiral magnetic and/or vortical currents there is a frame in which a stationary obstacle experiences no drag, but energy and charge currents do not vanish, resembling superfluidity. However, unlike ordinary superfluid flow, the anomalous chiral currents do transport entropy in this frame. We show that the second law of thermodynamics completely determines the amounts of these anomalous non-dissipative currents in the "no-drag frame" as polynomials in temperature and chemical potential with known anomaly coefficients. These general results are illustrated and confirmed by a calculation in the chiral kinetic theory and quark-gluon plasma at high temperature.

  17. COSMIC RAY MUONS Anthony Tatum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    Production and Path Effects in The Atmosphere Using Muons to Test Beam Profile Monitor Conclusion #12 Nuclei (Protons) Remaining 11% includes Helium, Carbon and Oxygen among other less abundant elements #12 are the decay product of Pions and Kaons + + #12; The mean energy of muons at the site of production (~15 km

  18. Intense Muon Beams for Experiments at Project X

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.M. Ankenbrandt, R.P. Johnson, C. Y. Yoshikawa, V.S. Kashikhin, D.V. Neuffer, J. Miller, R.A. Rimmer

    2011-03-01

    A coherent approach for providing muon beams to several experiments for the intensity-frontier program at Project X is described. Concepts developed for the front end of a muon collider/neutrino factory facility, such as phase rotation and ionization cooling, are applied, but with significant differences. High-intensity experiments typically require high-duty-factor beams pulsed at a time interval commensurate with the muon lifetime. It is challenging to provide large RF voltages at high duty factor, especially in the presence of intense radiation and strong magnetic fields, which may preclude the use of superconducting RF cavities. As an alternative, cavities made of materials such as ultra-pure Al and Be, which become very good –but not super– conductors at cryogenic temperatures, can be used.

  19. BEAM-POWER DEPOSITION IN A 4-MW TARGET STATION FOR A MUON COLLIDER OR A NEUTRINO FACTORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    BEAM-POWER DEPOSITION IN A 4-MW TARGET STATION FOR A MUON COLLIDER OR A NEUTRINO FACTORY (IPAC11 with shielding out to 1.2 m radius. W-C shielding likely needed beyond the target station, where ~ 800 kW power-carbide + water shielding of superconducting magnets for the target station at a Muon Collider or Neutrino Factory

  20. Muon Simulation at the Daya Bay SIte

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mengyun, Guan; Jun, Cao; Changgen, Yang; Yaxuan, Sun; Luk, Kam-Biu

    2006-05-23

    With a pretty good-resolution mountain profile, we simulated the underground muon background at the Daya Bay site. To get the sea-level muon flux parameterization, a modification to the standard Gaisser's formula was introduced according to the world muon data. MUSIC code was used to transport muon through the mountain rock. To deploy the simulation, first we generate a statistic sample of sea-level muon events according to the sea-level muon flux distribution formula; then calculate the slant depth of muon passing through the mountain using an interpolation method based on the digitized data of the mountain; finally transport muons through rock to get underground muon sample, from which we can get results of muon flux, mean energy, energy distribution and angular distribution.

  1. Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel M. Kaplan; for the MAP; MICE Collaborations

    2014-12-10

    Muon colliders and neutrino factories are attractive options for future facilities aimed at achieving the highest lepton-antilepton collision energies and precision measurements of Higgs boson and neutrino mixing matrix parameters. The facility performance and cost depend on how well a beam of muons can be cooled. Recent progress in muon cooling design studies and prototype tests nourishes the hope that such facilities could be built starting in the coming decade. The status of the key technologies and their various demonstration experiments is summarized. Prospects "post-P5" are also discussed.

  2. JEMMRLA - Electron Model of a Muon RLA with Multi-pass Arcs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogacz, Slawomir Alex; Krafft, Geoffrey A.; Morozov, Vasiliy S.; Roblin, Yves R.

    2013-06-01

    We propose a demonstration experiment for a new concept of a 'dogbone' RLA with multi-pass return arcs -- JEMMRLA (Jlab Electron Model of Muon RLA). Such an RLA with linear-field multi-pass arcs was introduced for rapid acceleration of muons for the next generation of Muon Facilities. It allows for efficient use of expensive RF while the multi-pass arc design based on linear combined-function magnets exhibits a number of advantages over separate-arc or pulsed-arc designs. Here we describe a test of this concept by scaling a GeV scale muon design for electrons. Scaling muon momenta by the muon-to-electron mass ratio leads to a scheme, in which a 4.5 MeV electron beam is injected in the middle of a 3 MeV/pass linac with two double-pass return arcs and is accelerated to 18 MeV in 4.5 passes. All spatial dimensions including the orbit distortion are scaled by a factor of 7.5, which arises from scaling the 200 MHz muon RF to a readily available 1.5 GHz. The hardware requirements are not very demanding making it straightforward to implement. Such an RLA may have applications going beyond muon acceleration: in medical isotope production, radiation cancer therapy and homeland security.

  3. Search for Two-Particle Muon Decay to Positron and Goldstone Massless Boson (FAMILON)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreev, V A; Demidova, E V; Duginov, V N; Elkin, Y V; Gordeev, V A; Gritsai, K I; Gustov, S A; Ivochkin, V G; Karasev, E M; Khlopov, M Ya; Komarov, E N; Kosianenko, S V; Krivshich, A G; Levchenko, M P; Mamedov, T N; Mirokhin, I V; Olshevsky, V G; Scheglov, Y; Scherbakov, G V; Schkurenko, Y P; Sokolov, A Yu; Stoykov, A V; Vorobyev, S I; Zhdanov, A A; Zhukov, V A; Elkin, Yu.V.; Scheglov, Yu.A.; Schkurenko, Yu.P.

    2006-01-01

    The experimental test of possible expansion for the Higgs sector is proposed. The lepton family violation will be studied. To reach this goal we are going to carry out the search for the scalar Goldstone boson in the neutrinoless muon decay mu+ to e+ and alpha. The asymmetry of the muon decay near the high energy edge of Michel spectrum is to be measured. To examine previous TRIUMF data the experiment FAMILON is prepared at the surface muon beam of JINR (Dubna) accelerator. The setup consist of the precision magnetic spectrometer and the device for muSR - analysis.

  4. Search for Two-Particle Muon Decay to Positron and Goldstone Massless Boson (FAMILON)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Andreev; V. S. Demidov; E. V. Demidova; V. N. Duginov; Yu. V. Elkin; V. A. Gordeev; K. I. Gritsai; S. A. Gustov; V. G. Ivochkin; E. M. Karasev; M. Yu. Khlopov; E. N. Komarov; S. V. Kosianenko; A. G. Krivshich; M. P. Levchenko; T. N. Mamedov; I. V. Mirokhin; V. G. Olshevsky; Yu. A. Scheglov; G. V. Scherbakov; A. Yu. Sokolov; Yu. P. Schkurenko; A. V. Stoykov; S. I. Vorobyev; A. A. Zhdanov; V. A. Zhukov

    2006-12-28

    The experimental test of possible expansion for the Higgs sector is proposed. The lepton family violation will be studied. To reach this goal we are going to carry out the search for the scalar Goldstone boson in the neutrinoless muon decay mu+ to e+ and alpha. The asymmetry of the muon decay near the high energy edge of Michel spectrum is to be measured. To examine previous TRIUMF data the experiment FAMILON is prepared at the surface muon beam of JINR (Dubna) accelerator. The setup consist of the precision magnetic spectrometer and the device for muSR - analysis.

  5. Muon Colliders: The Next Frontier

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Tourun, Yagmur [Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois, United States

    2010-01-08

    Muon Colliders provide a path to the energy frontier in particle physics but have been regarded to be "at least 20 years away" for 20 years. I will review recent progress in design studies and hardware R&D and show that a Muon Collider can be established as a real option for the post-LHC era if the current vigorous R&D effort revitalized by the Muon Collider Task Force at Fermilab can be supported to its conclusion. All critical technologies are being addressed and no show-stoppers have emerged. Detector backgrounds have been studied in detail and appear to be manageable and the physics can be done with existing detector technology. A muon facility can be built through a staged scenario starting from a low-energy muon source with unprecedented intensity for exquisite reach for rare processes, followed by a Neutrino Factory with ultrapure neutrino beams with unparalleled sensitivity for disentangling neutrino mixing, leading to an energy frontier Muon Collider with excellent energy resolution.

  6. Low-energy muons via frictional cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu Bao; Allen Caldwell; Daniel Greenwald; Guoxing Xia

    2010-01-18

    Low-energy muon beams are useful for a range of physics experiments. We consider the production of low-energy muon beams with small energy spreads using frictional cooling. As the input beam, we take a surface muon source such as that at the Paul Scherrer Institute. Simulations show that the efficiency of low energy muon production can potentially be raised to 1%, which is significantly higher than that of current schemes.

  7. MICE: the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment. Step I: First Measurement of Emittance with Particle Physics Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U. Bravar; M. Bogomilov; Y. Karadzhov; D. Kolev; I. Russinov; R. Tsenov; L. Wang; F. Y. Xu; S. X. Zheng; R. Bertoni; M. Bonesini; R. Mazza; V. Palladino; G. Cecchet; A. de Bari; M. Capponi; A. Iaciofano; D. Orestano; F. Pastore; L. Tortora; S. Ishimoto; S. Suzuki; K. Yoshimura; Y. Mori; Y. Kuno; H. Sakamoto; A. Sato; T. Yano; M. Yoshida; F. Filthaut; M. Vretenar; S. Ramberger; A. Blondel; F. Cadoux; F. Masciocchi; J. S. Graulich; V. Verguilov; H. Wisting; C. Petitjean; R. Seviour; M. Ellis; P. Kyberd; M. Littlefield; J. J. Nebrensky; D. Forrest; F. J. P. Soler; K. Walaron; P. Cooke; R. Gamet; A. Alecou; M. Apollonio; G. Barber; A. Dobbs; P. Dornan; A. Fish; R. Hare; A. Jamdagni; V. Kasey; M. Khaleeq; K. Long; J. Pasternak; H. Sakamoto; T. Sashalmi; V. Blackmore; J. Cobb; W. Lau; M. Rayner; C. D. Tunnell; H. Witte; S. Yang; J. Alexander; G. Charnley; S. Griffiths; B. Martlew; A. Moss; I. Mullacrane; A. Oats; S. York; R. Apsimon; R. J. Alexander; P. Barclay; D. E. Baynham; T. W. Bradshaw; M. Courthold; R. Edgecock T. Hayler; M. Hills; T. Jones; N. McCubbin; W. J. Murray; C. Nelson; A. Nicholls; P. R. Norton; C. Prior; J. H. Rochford; C. Rogers; W. Spensley; K. Tilley; C. N. Booth; P. Hodgson; R. Nicholson; E. Overton; M. Robinson; P. Smith; D. Adey; J. Back; S. Boyd; P. Harrison; J. Norem; A. D. Bross; S. Geer; A. Moretti; D. Neuffer; M. Popovic; Z. Qian; R. Raja; R. Stefanski; M. A. C. Cummings; T. J. Roberts; A. DeMello; M. A. Green; D. Li; A. M. Sessler; S. Virostek; M. S. Zisman; B. Freemire; P. Hanlet; D. Huang; G. Kafka; D. M. Kaplan; P. Snopok; Y. Torun; Y. Onel; D. Cline; K. Lee; Y. Fukui; X. Yang; R. A. Rimmer; L. M. Cremaldi; T. L. Hart; D. J. Summers; L. Coney; R. Fletcher; G. G. Hanson; C. Heidt; J. Gallardo; S. Kahn; H. Kirk; R. B. Palmer

    2013-07-30

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a strategic R&D project intended to demonstrate the only practical solution to providing high brilliance beams necessary for a neutrino factory or muon collider. MICE is under development at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the United Kingdom. It comprises a dedicated beamline to generate a range of input muon emittances and momenta, with time-of-flight and Cherenkov detectors to ensure a pure muon beam. The emittance of the incoming beam will be measured in the upstream magnetic spectrometer with a scintillating fiber tracker. A cooling cell will then follow, alternating energy loss in Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) absorbers to RF cavity acceleration. A second spectrometer, identical to the first, and a second muon identification system will measure the outgoing emittance. In the 2010 run at RAL the muon beamline and most detectors were fully commissioned and a first measurement of the emittance of the muon beam with particle physics (time-of-flight) detectors was performed. The analysis of these data was recently completed and is discussed in this paper. Future steps for MICE, where beam emittance and emittance reduction (cooling) are to be measured with greater accuracy, are also presented.

  8. Anomalous expansion and negative specific heat in quasi-2D plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Chjan C.

    Anomalous expansion and negative specific heat in quasi-2D plasmas Timothy D. Andersen and Chjan C. Lim May 23, 2010 #12;Magnetic Nuclear Fusion Magnetic nuclear fusion is one of the most promising confining the plasma. #12;Magnetic Nuclear Fusion continued 2 1D +3 1 T 4 2 He +1 0 n + 17.6MeV. (1) Plasma

  9. MICE: The International Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment: Phase Space Cooling Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, T. L.

    2010-03-30

    MICE is an experimental demonstration of muon ionization cooling using a section of an ionization cooling channel and a muon beam. The muons are produced by the decay of pions from a target dipping into the ISIS proton beam at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL). The channel includes liquid-hydrogen absorbers providing transverse and longitudinal momentum loss and high-gradient radiofrequency (RF) cavities for longitudinal reacceleration, all packed into a solenoidal magnetic channel. MICE will reduce the beam transverse emittance by about 10% for muon momenta between 140 and 240 MeV/c. Time-of-flight (TOF) counters, threshold Cherenkov counters, and a calorimeter will identify background electrons and pions. Spectrometers before and after the cooling section will measure the beam transmission and input and output emittances with an absolute precision of 0.1%.

  10. Renewal-anomalous-heterogeneous files

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ophir Flomenbom

    2010-08-13

    Renewal-anomalous-heterogeneous files are solved. A simple file is made of Brownian hard spheres that diffuse stochastically in an effective 1D channel. Generally, Brownian files are heterogeneous: the spheres' diffusion coefficients are distributed and the initial spheres' density is non-uniform. In renewal-anomalous files, the distribution of waiting times for individual jumps is exponential as in Brownian files, yet obeys: {\\psi}_{\\alpha} (t)~t^(-1-{\\alpha}), 0renewal as all the particles attempt to jump at the same time. It is shown that the mean square displacement (MSD) in a renewal-anomalous-heterogeneous file, , obeys, ~[_{nrml}]^{\\alpha}, where _{nrml} is the MSD in the corresponding Brownian file. This scaling is an outcome of an exact relation (derived here) connecting probability density functions of Brownian files and renewal-anomalous files. It is also shown that non-renewal-anomalous files are slower than the corresponding renewal ones.

  11. Anomalous energy transport across topological insulator superconductor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Anomalous energy transport across topological insulator superconductor junctions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Anomalous energy transport across topological insulator...

  12. Anomalous specific heat in ultradegenerate QED and QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Gerhold; A. Ipp; A. Rebhan

    2004-08-31

    We discuss the origin of the anomalous $T\\ln T^{-1}$ behavior of the low-temperature entropy and specific heat in ultradegenerate QED and QCD and report on a recent calculation which is complete to leading order in the coupling and which contains an infinite series of anomalous terms involving also fractional powers in $T$. This result involves dynamical hard-dense-loop resummation and interpolates between Debye screening effects at larger temperatures and non-Fermi-liquid behavior from only dynamically screened magnetic fields at low temperature.

  13. PULSED-FOCUSING RECIRCULATING LINACS FOR MUON ACCELERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Rolland PAUL

    2014-12-31

    Since the muon has a short lifetime, fast acceleration is essential for high-energy applications such as muon colliders, Higgs factories, or neutrino factories. The best one can do is to make a linear accelerator with the highest possible accelerating gradient to make the accelerating time as short as possible. However, the cost of such a single linear accelerator is prohibitively large due to expensive power sources, cavities, tunnels, and related infrastructure. As was demonstrated in the Thomas Jefferson Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), an elegant solution to reduce cost is to use magnetic return arcs to recirculate the beam through the accelerating RF cavities many times, where they gain energy on each pass. In such a Recirculating Linear Accelerator (RLA), the magnetic focusing strength diminishes as the beam energy increases in a conventional linac that has constant strength quadrupoles. After some number of passes the focusing strength is insufficient to keep the beam from going unstable and being lost. In this project, the use of fast pulsed quadrupoles in the linac sections was considered for stronger focusing as a function of time to allow more successive passes of a muon beam in a recirculating linear accelerator. In one simulation, it was shown that the number of passes could be increased from 8 to 12 using pulsed magnet designs that have been developed and tested. This could reduce the cost of linac sections of a muon RLA by 8/12, where more improvement is still possible. The expense of a greater number of passes and corresponding number of return arcs was also addressed in this project by exploring the use of ramped or FFAG-style magnets in the return arcs. A better solution, invented in this project, is to use combined-function dipole-quadrupole magnets to simultaneously transport two beams of different energies through one magnet string to reduce costs of return arcs by almost a factor of two. A patent application was filed for this invention and a detailed report published in Physical Review Special Topics. A scaled model using an electron beam was developed and proposed to test the concept of a dog bone RLA with combined-function return arcs. The efforts supported by this grant were reported in a series of contributions to particle accelerator conferences that are reproduced in the appendices and summarized in the body of this report.

  14. Progress on muon{sup +}muon{sup {minus}} colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, R.B.

    1997-05-01

    Advantages and disadvantages of muon colliders are discussed. Recent results of calculations of the radiation hazard from muon decay neutrinos are presented. This is a significant problem for machines with center of mass energy of 4 TeV, but of no consequence for lower energies. Plans are outlined for future theoretical and experimental studies. Besides continued work on the parameters of a 4 TeV collider, studies are now starting on a machine near 100 GeV that could be a factory for the s-channel production of Higgs particles. Proposals are also presented for a demonstration of ionization cooling and of the required targeting, pion capture, and phase rotation rf.

  15. Pion contamination in the MICE muon beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Adams; A. Alekou; M. Apollonio; R. Asfandiyarov; G. Barber; P. Barclay; A. de Bari; R. Bayes; V. Bayliss; R. Bertoni; V. J. Blackmore; A. Blondel; S. Blot; M. Bogomilov; M. Bonesini; C. N. Booth; D. Bowring; S. Boyd; T. W. Bradshaw; U. Bravar; A. D. Bross; M. Capponi; T. Carlisle; G. Cecchet; C. Charnley; F. Chignoli; D. Cline; J. H. Cobb; G. Colling; N. Collomb; L. Coney; P. Cooke; M. Courthold; L. M. Cremaldi; A. DeMello; A. Dick; A. Dobbs; P. Dornan; M. Drews; F. Drielsma; F. Filthaut; T. Fitzpatrick; P. Franchini; V. Francis; L. Fry; A. Gallagher; R. Gamet; R. Gardener; S. Gourlay; A. Grant; J. R. Greis; S. Griffiths; P. Hanlet; O. M. Hansen; G. G. Hanson; T. L. Hart; T. Hartnett; T. Hayler; C. Heidt; M. Hills; P. Hodgson; C. Hunt; A. Iaciofano; S. Ishimoto; G. Kafka; D. M. Kaplan; Y. Karadzhov; Y. K. Kim; Y. Kuno; P. Kyberd; J-B Lagrange; J. Langlands; W. Lau; M. Leonova; D. Li; A. Lintern; M. Littlefield; K. Long; T. Luo; C. Macwaters; B. Martlew; J. Martyniak; R. Mazza; S. Middleton; A. Moretti; A. Moss; A. Muir; I. Mullacrane; J. J. Nebrensky; D. Neuffer; A. Nichols; R. Nicholson; J. C. Nugent; A. Oates; Y. Onel; D. Orestano; E. Overton; P. Owens; V. Palladino; J. Pasternak; F. Pastore; C. Pidcott; M. Popovic; R. Preece; S. Prestemon; D. Rajaram; S. Ramberger; M. A. Rayner; S. Ricciardi; T. J. Roberts; M. Robinson; C. Rogers; K. Ronald; P. Rubinov; P. Rucinski; H. Sakamato; D. A. Sanders; E. Santos; T. Savidge; P. J. Smith; P. Snopok; F. J. P. Soler; D. Speirs; T. Stanley; G. Stokes; D. J. Summers; J. Tarrant; I. Taylor; L. Tortora; Y. Torun; R. Tsenov; C. D. Tunnell; M. A. Uchida; G. Vankova-Kirilova; S. Virostek; M. Vretenar; P. Warburton; S. Watson; C. White; C. G. Whyte; A. Wilson; M. Winter; X. Yang; A. Young; M. Zisman

    2015-11-03

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a systematic investigation of ionization cooling with muon beams of momentum between 140 and 240\\,MeV/c at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS facility. The measurement of ionization cooling in MICE relies on the selection of a pure sample of muons that traverse the experiment. To make this selection, the MICE Muon Beam is designed to deliver a beam of muons with less than $\\sim$1\\% contamination. To make the final muon selection, MICE employs a particle-identification (PID) system upstream and downstream of the cooling cell. The PID system includes time-of-flight hodoscopes, threshold-Cherenkov counters and calorimetry. The upper limit for the pion contamination measured in this paper is $f_\\pi contamination requirements of the study of ionization cooling.

  16. Pion contamination in the MICE muon beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, D; Apollonio, M; Asfandiyarov, R; Barber, G; Barclay, P; de Bari, A; Bayes, R; Bayliss, V; Bertoni, R; Blackmore, V J; Blondel, A; Blot, S; Bogomilov, M; Bonesini, M; Booth, C N; Bowring, D; Boyd, S; Bradshaw, T W; Bravar, U; Bross, A D; Capponi, M; Carlisle, T; Cecchet, G; Charnley, C; Chignoli, F; Cline, D; Cobb, J H; Colling, G; Collomb, N; Coney, L; Cooke, P; Courthold, M; Cremaldi, L M; DeMello, A; Dick, A; Dobbs, A; Dornan, P; Drews, M; Drielsma, F; Filthaut, F; Fitzpatrick, T; Franchini, P; Francis, V; Fry, L; Gallagher, A; Gamet, R; Gardener, R; Gourlay, S; Grant, A; Greis, J R; Griffiths, S; Hanlet, P; Hansen, O M; Hanson, G G; Hart, T L; Hartnett, T; Hayler, T; Heidt, C; Hills, M; Hodgson, P; Hunt, C; Iaciofano, A; Ishimoto, S; Kafka, G; Kaplan, D M; Karadzhov, Y; Kim, Y K; Kuno, Y; Kyberd, P; Lagrange, J-B; Langlands, J; Lau, W; Leonova, M; Li, D; Lintern, A; Littlefield, M; Long, K; Luo, T; Macwaters, C; Martlew, B; Martyniak, J; Mazza, R; Middleton, S; Moretti, A; Moss, A; Muir, A; Mullacrane, I; Nebrensky, J J; Neuffer, D; Nichols, A; Nicholson, R; Nugent, J C; Oates, A; Onel, Y; Orestano, D; Overton, E; Owens, P; Palladino, V; Pasternak, J; Pastore, F; Pidcott, C; Popovic, M; Preece, R; Prestemon, S; Rajaram, D; Ramberger, S; Rayner, M A; Ricciardi, S; Roberts, T J; Robinson, M; Rogers, C; Ronald, K; Rubinov, P; Rucinski, P; Sakamato, H; Sanders, D A; Santos, E; Savidge, T; Smith, P J; Snopok, P; Soler, F J P; Speirs, D; Stanley, T; Stokes, G; Summers, D J; Tarrant, J; Taylor, I; Tortora, L; Torun, Y; Tsenov, R; Tunnell, C D; Uchida, M A; Vankova-Kirilova, G; Virostek, S; Vretenar, M; Warburton, P; Watson, S; White, C; Whyte, C G; Wilson, A; Winter, M; Yang, X; Young, A; Zisman, M

    2015-01-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will perform a systematic investigation of ionization cooling with muon beams of momentum between 140 and 240\\,MeV/c at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory ISIS facility. The measurement of ionization cooling in MICE relies on the selection of a pure sample of muons that traverse the experiment. To make this selection, the MICE Muon Beam is designed to deliver a beam of muons with less than $\\sim$1\\% contamination. To make the final muon selection, MICE employs a particle-identification (PID) system upstream and downstream of the cooling cell. The PID system includes time-of-flight hodoscopes, threshold-Cherenkov counters and calorimetry. The upper limit for the pion contamination measured in this paper is $f_\\pi contamination requirements of the study of ionization cooling.

  17. Precision Muon Reconstruction in Double Chooz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Double Chooz collaboration; Y. Abe; J. C. dos Anjos; J. C. Barriere; E. Baussan; I. Bekman; M. Bergevin; T. J. C. Bezerra; L. Bezrukov; E. Blucher; C. Buck; J. Busenitz; A. Cabrera; E. Caden; L. Camilleri; R. Carr; M. Cerrada; P. -J. Chang; E. Chauveau; P. Chimenti; A. P. Collin; E. Conover; J. M. Conrad; J. I. Crespo-Anadón; K. Crum; A. Cucoanes; E. Damon; J. V. Dawson; D. Dietrich; Z. Djurcic; M. Dracos; M. Elnimr; A. Etenko; M. Fallot; F. von Feilitzsch; J. Felde; S. M. Fernandes; V. Fischer; D. Franco; M. Franke; H. Furuta; I. Gil-Botella; L. Giot; M. Göger-Neff; L. F. G. Gonzalez; L. Goodenough; M. C. Goodman; C. Grant; N. Haag; T. Hara; J. Haser; M. Hofmann; G. A. Horton-Smith; A. Hourlier; M. Ishitsuka; J. Jochum; C. Jollet; F. Kaether; L. N. Kalousis; Y. Kamyshkov; D. M. Kaplan; T. Kawasaki; E. Kemp; H. de Kerret; D. Kryn; M. Kuze; T. Lachenmaier; C. E. Lane; T. Lasserre; A. Letourneau; D. Lhuillier; H. P. Lima Jr; M. Lindner; J. M. López-Casta no; J. M. LoSecco; B. Lubsandorzhiev; S. Lucht; J. Maeda; C. Mariani; J. Maricic; J. Martino; T. Matsubara; G. Mention; A. Meregaglia; T. Miletic; R. Milincic; A. Minotti; Y. Nagasaka; Y. Nikitenko; P. Novella; M. Obolensky; L. Oberauer; A. Onillon; A. Osborn; C. Palomares; I. M. Pepe; S. Perasso; P. Pfahler; A. Porta; G. Pronost; J. Reichenbacher; B. Reinhold; M. Röhling; R. Roncin; S. Roth; B. Rybolt; Y. Sakamoto; R. Santorelli; A. C. Schilithz; S. Schönert; S. Schoppmann; M. H. Shaevitz; R. Sharankova; S. Shimojima; V. Sibille; V. Sinev; M. Skorokhvatov; E. Smith; J. Spitz; A. Stahl; I. Stancu; L. F. F. Stokes; M. Strait; A. Stüken; F. Suekane; S. Sukhotin; T. Sumiyoshi; Y. Sun; R. Svoboda; K. Terao; A. Tonazzo; H. H. Trinh Thi; G. Valdiviesso; N. Vassilopoulos; C. Veyssiere; M. Vivier; S. Wagner; H. Watanabe; C. Wiebusch; L. Winslow; M. Wurm; G. Yang; F. Yermia; V. Zimmer

    2014-08-15

    We describe a muon track reconstruction algorithm for the reactor anti-neutrino experiment Double Chooz. The Double Chooz detector consists of two optically isolated volumes of liquid scintillator viewed by PMTs, and an Outer Veto above these made of crossed scintillator strips. Muons are reconstructed by their Outer Veto hit positions along with timing information from the other two detector volumes. All muons are fit under the hypothesis that they are through-going and ultrarelativistic. If the energy depositions suggest that the muon may have stopped, the reconstruction fits also for this hypothesis and chooses between the two via the relative goodness-of-fit. In the ideal case of a through-going muon intersecting the center of the detector, the resolution is ~40 mm in each transverse dimension. High quality muon reconstruction is an important tool for reducing the impact of the cosmogenic isotope background in Double Chooz.

  18. Magnetic and Electric Dipole Constraints on Extra Dimensions and Magnetic Fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaron J. Roy; Myron Bander

    2008-05-10

    The propagation of charged particles and gauge fields in a compact extra dimension contributes to $g-2$ of the charged particles. In addition, a magnetic flux threading this extra dimension generates an electric dipole moment for these particles. We present constraints on the compactification size and on the possible magnetic flux imposed by the comparison of data and theory of the magnetic moment of the muon and from limits on the electric dipole moments of the muon, neutron and electron.

  19. The US Muon Accelerator Program (MAP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bross, Alan D.; /Fermilab

    2010-12-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of High Energy Physics has recently approved a Muon Accelerator Program (MAP). The primary goal of this effort is to deliver a Design Feasibility Study for a Muon Collider after a 7 year R&D program. This paper presents a brief physics motivation for, and the description of, a Muon Collider facility and then gives an overview of the program. I will then describe in some detail the primary components of the effort.

  20. The US Muon Accelerator Program (MAP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bross, Alan D.

    2011-10-06

    The US Department of Energy Office of High Energy Physics has recently approved a Muon Accelerator Program (MAP). The primary goal of this effort is to deliver a Design Feasibility Study for a Muon Collider after a 7 year R and D program. This paper presents a brief physics motivation for, and the description of, a Muon Collider facility and then gives an overview of the program. I will then describe in some detail the primary components of the effort.

  1. SCALED ELECTRON MODEL OF A DOGBONE MUON RLA WITH MULTI-PASS ARCS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin Beard, Rolland Johnson, Vasiliy Morozov, Yves Roblin, Andrew Hutton, Geoffrey Krafft, Slawomir Bogacz

    2012-07-01

    The design of a dogbone RLA with linear-field multi-pass arcs was earlier developed for accelerating muons in a Neutrino Factory and a Muon Collider. It allows for efficient use of expensive RF while the multi-pass arc design based on linear combined-function magnets exhibits a number of advantages over separate-arc or pulsed-arc designs. Such an RLA may have applications going beyond muon acceleration. This paper describes a possible straightforward test of this concept by scaling a GeV scale muon design for electrons. Scaling muon momenta by the muon-to-electron mass ratio leads to a scheme, in which a 4.5 MeV electron beam is injected at the middle of a 3 MeV/pass linac with two double-pass return arcs and is accelerated to 18 MeV in 4.5 passes. All spatial dimensions including the orbit distortion are scaled by a factor of 7.5, which arises from scaling the 200 MHz muon RF to a readily available at CEBAF 1.5 GHz. The footprint of a complete RLA fits in an area of 25 by 7 m. The scheme utilizes only fixed magnetic fields including injection and extraction. The hardware requirements are not very demanding, making it straightforward to implement. In this report, we have shown first of all that measuring the energy spectrum of the fast neutrons in the liquid scintillators allows one to distinguish the two chemical forms of plutonium. In addition, combining this information with the Feynman 2-neutron and 3-neutron correlations allows one to extract the {alpha}-ratio without explicitly knowing the multiplication. Given the {alpha}-ratio one can then extract the multiplication as well as the {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu masses directly from the moment equations.

  2. Simulation of High-Power Mercury Jet Targets for Neutrino Factory and Muon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Simulation of High-Power Mercury Jet Targets for Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider R. Samulyak,1 interacting with proton pulses in 15-20T magnetic field is a key element of high-power target systems · Proof rarefaction waves · Cavities can form on inter-particle size scales · Present work focuses of pure hydro

  3. Hydrodynamic Waves in an Anomalous Charged Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbasi, Navid; Rezaei, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    We study the collective excitations in a relativistic fluid with an anomalous conserved charge. In $3+1$ dimensions, in addition to two ordinary sound modes we find two propagating modes in presence of an external magnetic field: one with a velocity proportional to the coefficient of gauge-gravitational anomaly coefficient and the other with a velocity which depends on both chiral anomaly and the gauge gravitational anomaly coefficients. While the former is the Chiral Alfv\\'en wave recently found in arXiv:1505.05444, the latter is a new type of collective excitations originated from the density fluctuations. We refer to these modes as the Type-M and Type-D chiral Alfv\\'en waves respectively. We show that the Type-M Chiral Alfv\\'en mode is split into two chiral Alfv\\'en modes when taking into account the effect of dissipation processes in the fluid. In 1+1 dimensions we find only one propagating mode associated with the anomalous effects. We explicitly compute the velocity of this wave and show that in contras...

  4. Zero-Field Dissipationless Chiral Edge Transport and the Nature of Dissipation in the Quantum Anomalous Hall State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Weiwei

    The quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect is predicted to possess, at a zero magnetic field, chiral edge channels that conduct a spin polarized current without dissipation. While edge channels have been observed in previous ...

  5. Accessing interior magnetic field vector components in neutron electric dipole moment experiments via exterior measurements, I. Boundary-value techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Plaster

    2013-09-22

    We propose a new concept for determining the interior magnetic field vector components in neutron electric dipole moment experiments. If a closed three-dimensional boundary surface surrounding the fiducial volume of an experiment can be defined such that its interior encloses no currents or sources of magnetization, each of the interior vector field components and the magnetic scalar potential will satisfy a Laplace equation. Therefore, if either the vector field components or the normal derivative of the scalar potential can be measured on the surface of this boundary, thus defining a Dirichlet or Neumann boundary-value problem, respectively, the interior vector field components or the scalar potential (and, thus, the field components via the gradient of the potential) can be uniquely determined via solution of the Laplace equation. We discuss the applicability of this technique to the determination of the interior magnetic field components during the operating phase of neutron electric dipole moment experiments when it is not, in general, feasible to perform direct in situ measurements of the interior field components. We also study the specifications that a vector field probe must satisfy in order to determine the interior vector field components to a certain precision. The technique we propose here may also be applicable to experiments requiring monitoring of the vector magnetic field components within some closed boundary surface, such as searches for neutron-antineutron oscillations along a flight path or measurements in storage rings of the muon anomalous magnetic moment $g-2$ and the proton electric dipole moment.

  6. Measurement of the nucleon structure function using high energy muons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyers, P.D.

    1983-12-01

    We have measured the inclusive deep inelastic scattering of muons on nucleons in iron using beams of 93 and 215 GeV muons. To perform this measurement, we have built and operated the Multimuon Spectrometer (MMS) in the muon beam at Fermilab. The MMS is a magnetized iron target/spectrometer/calorimeter which provides 5.61 kg/cm/sup 2/ of target, 9% momentum resolution on scattered muons, and a direct measure of total hadronic energy with resolution sigma/sub nu/ = 1.4..sqrt..nu(GeV). In the distributed target, the average beam energies at the interaction are 88.0 and 209 GeV. Using the known form of the radiatively-corrected electromagnetic cross section, we extract the structure function F/sub 2/(x,Q/sup 2/) with a typical precision of 2% over the range 5 < Q/sup 2/ < 200 GeV/sup 2//c/sup 2/. We compare our measurements to the predictions of lowest order quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and find a best fit value of the QCD scale parameter ..lambda../sub LO/ = 230 +- 40/sup stat/ +- 80/sup syst/ MeV/c, assuming R = 0 and without applying Fermi motion corrections. Comparing the cross sections at the two beam energies, we measure R = -0.06 +- 0.06/sup stat/ +- 0.11/sup syst/. Our measurements show qualitative agreement with QCD, but quantitative comparison is hampered by phenomenological uncertainties. The experimental situation is quite good, with substantial agreement between our measurements and those of others. 86 references.

  7. Status of Studies of Achromat-based 6D Ionization Cooling Rings for Muons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, X.; Kirk, H.; Cline, D.; Garren, A.A.; Berg, J.S.

    2011-09-04

    Six dimensional ionization cooling of muons is needed to achieve the necessary luminosity for a muon collider. If that cooling could occur over multiple turns in a closed ring, there would be significant cost savings over a single-pass cooling channel. We report on the status of a cooling ring with achromatic arcs. The achromatic design permits the design to easily switch between a closed ring and a snaking geometry on injection or extraction from the ring. The ring is designed with sufficient space in each superperiod for injection and extraction magnets. We describe the ring's lattice design, performance, and injection/extraction requirements.

  8. Muon Cooling via Ionization Andrea Kay Forget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    1 Muon Cooling via Ionization Andrea Kay Forget Department of Physics, Wayne State University decay, as a result of their short lives many of the known cooling techniques (electron, stochastic, and laser cooling) cannot be used to properly cool muons that are being used in proposed accelerators

  9. Muon Flux at the Geographical South Pole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. Bai; T. K. Gaisser; A. Karle; K. Rawlins; G. M. Spiczak; Todor Stanev

    2006-02-17

    The muon flux at the South-Pole was measured for five zenith angles, $0^{\\circ}$, $15^{\\circ}$, $35^{\\circ}$, $82.13^{\\circ}$ and $85.15^{\\circ}$ with a scintillator muon telescope incorporating ice Cherenkov tank detectors as the absorber. We compare the measurements with other data and with calculations.

  10. Fermilab | Science | Particle Physics | Muons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you not find whatGasEnergyfeature photo featureParticleDarkMuons photo

  11. Search for Anomalous Production of Events with Two Photons and Additional Energetic Objects at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /Padua U. /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U. /Kosice, IEF; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2009-10-01

    The authors present results of a search for anomalous production of two photons together with an electron, muon, {tau} lepton, missing transverse energy, or jets using p{bar p} collision data from 1.1-2.0 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). The event yields and kinematic distributions are examined for signs for new physics without favoring a specific model of new physics. The results are consistent with the standard model expectations. The search employs several new analysis techniques that significantly reduce instrumental backgrounds in channels with an electron and missing transverse energy.

  12. Measurement of the anomalous like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry with 9 fb?ą of pp? collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; et al

    2011-09-16

    We present an updated measurement of the anomalous like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry Absl for semileptonic b-hadron decays in 9.0 fb?ą of pp? collisions recorded with the D0 detector at a center-of-mass energy of ?s=1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We obtain Absl=(-0.787±0.172(stat)±0.093(syst))%. This result differs by 3.9 standard deviations from the prediction of the standard model and provides evidence for anomalously large CP violation in semileptonic neutral B decay. The dependence of the asymmetry on the muon impact parameter is consistent with the hypothesis that it originates from semileptonic b-hadron decays.

  13. Injection/Extraction Studies for the Muon FFAG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasternak, J.; Berg, J. Scott; Kelliher, D. J.; Machida, S.

    2010-03-30

    The non-scaling fixed field alternating gradient (NS-FFAG) ring is a candidate muon accelerator in the Neutrino Factory complex according to the present baseline, which is currently being addressed by the International Design Study (IDS-NF). In order to achieve small orbit excursion, motivated by magnet cost reduction, and small time of flight variation, dictated by the need to use high RF frequency, lattices with a very compact cell structure and short straight sections are required. The resulting geometry dictates very difficult constraints on the injection/extraction systems. Beam dynamics in the non-scaling FFAG is studied using codes capable of correctly tracking with large transverse amplitude and momentum spread. The feasibility of injection/extraction is studied and various implementations focusing on minimization of kicker/septum strength are presented. Finally the parameters of the resulting kicker magnets are estimated.

  14. Mercury Handling for the Target System for a Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graves, Van B [ORNL; Mcdonald, K [Princeton University; Kirk, H. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Weggel, Robert [Particle Beam Laser, Inc.; Souchlas, Nicholas [Particle Beam Laser, Inc.; Sayed, H [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Ding, X [University of California, Los Angeles

    2012-01-01

    The baseline target concept for a Muon Collider or Neutrino Factory is a free-stream mercury jet being impacted by an 8-GeV proton beam. The target is located within a 20-T magnetic field, which captures the generated pions that are conducted to a downstream decay channel. Both the mercury and the proton beam are introduced at slight downward angles to the magnetic axis. A pool of mercury serves as a receiving reservoir for the mercury and a dump for the unexpended proton beam. The impact energy of the remaining beam and jet are substantial, and it is required that splashes and waves be controlled in order to minimize the potential for interference of pion production at the target. Design issues discussed in this paper include the nozzle, splash mitigation in the mercury pool, the mercury containment vessel, and the mercury recirculation system.

  15. Superconducting solenoids for muon-cooling in the neutrino factory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, M.A.; Miller, J.R.; Prestemon, S.

    2001-05-12

    The cooling channel for a neutrino factory consists of a series of alternating field solenoidal cells. The first section of the bunching cooling channel consists of 41 cells that are 2.75-m long. The second section of the cooling channel consists of 44 cells that are 1.65-m long. Each cell consists of a single large solenoid with an average diameter of 1.5 m and a pair of flux reversal solenoids that have an average diameter of 0.7 to 0.9 meters. The magnetic induction on axis reaches a peak value of about 5 T at the end of the second section of the cooling channel. The peak on axis field gradients in flux reversal section approaches 33 T/m. This report describes the two types of superconducting solenoid magnet sections for the muon-cooling channel of the proposed neutrino factory.

  16. Cosmic Muon Detector Using Proportional Chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dezs? Varga; Zoltán Gál; Gerg? Hamar; Janka Sára Molnár; Éva Oláh; Péter Pázmándi

    2015-07-28

    A set of classical multi-wire proportional chambers were designed and constructed with the main purpose of efficient cosmic muon detection. These detectors are relatively simple to construct, and at the same time are low cost, making them ideal for educational purposes. The detector layers have efficiencies above 99% for minimum ionizing cosmic muons, and their position resolution is about 1 cm, that is, particle trajectories are clearly observable. Visualization of straight tracks is possible using an LED array, with the discriminated and latched signal driving the display. Due to the exceptional operating stability of the chambers, the design can also be used for cosmic muon telescopes.

  17. Imaging Fukushima Daiichi reactors with muons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyadera, Haruo; Borozdin, Konstantin N.; Greene, Steve J.; Milner, Edward C.; Morris, Christopher L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Lukic, Zarija [Computational Cosmology Center, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Masuda, Koji [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Perry, John O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2013-05-15

    A study of imaging the Fukushima Daiichi reactors with cosmic-ray muons to assess the damage to the reactors is presented. Muon scattering imaging has high sensitivity for detecting uranium fuel and debris even through thick concrete walls and a reactor pressure vessel. Technical demonstrations using a reactor mockup, detector radiation test at Fukushima Daiichi, and simulation studies have been carried out. These studies establish feasibility for the reactor imaging. A few months of measurement will reveal the spatial distribution of the reactor fuel. The muon scattering technique would be the best and probably the only way for Fukushima Daiichi to make this determination in the near future.

  18. Anomalous transport effects and possible environmental symmetry "violation" in heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jinfeng Liao

    2015-02-27

    The heavy ion collision provides a unique many-body environment where local domains of strongly interacting chiral medium may occur and in a sense allow environmental symmetry "violation" phenomena. For example certain anomalous transport processes, forbidden in usual medium, become possible in such domains. We briefly review recent progress in both the theoretical understanding and experimental search of various anomalous transport effects (such as the Chiral Magnetic Effect, Chiral Separation Effect, Chiral Electric Separation Effect, Chiral Electric/Magnetic Waves, etc) in the hot QCD fluid created by such collisions.

  19. Muons for a Muon-Collider Kirk T. McDonald

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    ://www.cap.bnl.gov/mumu/mu home page.html Muon Collider R&D Status Report: http://www.cap.bnl.gov/mumu/status report.html Muon � 10-10 (mm)3 . · Initial pulse length only 1-2 ns. The Source · The muons come from the decay of soft pulse shock heating of target. ­ Resulting pressure wave may disperse liquid (or crack solid). ­ Damage

  20. Muon Cooling Progress and Prospects for an S-channel Muon Collider Higgs Factory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummings, Mary Anne

    2015-01-01

    Muon-based accelerators have the potential to enable facilities at both the Intensity and the Energy Frontiers. Muon storage rings can serve as high precision neutrino sources, and a muon collider is an ideal technology for a TeV or multi-TeV collider. Progress in muon accelerator designs has advanced steadily in recent years. In regard to 6D muon cooling, detailed and realistic designs now exist that provide more than 5 order-of-magnitude emittance reduction. Furthermore, detector performance studies indicate that with suitable pixelation and timing resolution, backgrounds in the collider detectors can be significantly reduced thus enabling high quality physics results. Thanks to these and other advances in design and simulation of muon systems, technology development, and systems demonstrations, muon storage-ring-based neutrino sources and a muon collider appear more feasible than ever before. A muon collider is now arguably among the most compelling approaches to a multi-TeV lepton collider and an S-Channe...

  1. W and Anomalous Single Top Production at HERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Rizvi; for the H1 Collabortion

    2008-07-22

    The analysis of $W$ production and the search for anomalous single top production is performed with the H1 detector at HERA with an integrated luminosity of 0.5 fb$^{-1}$, consisting of the complete high energy data from the HERA programme. Production cross section measurements of single $W$ production, as well as $W$ polarisation fractions in events containing isolated leptons and missing transverse momentum are also presented. In the context of a search for single top production an upper limit on the top production cross section $\\sigma_{ep\\to etX} < 0.16$ pb is established at the 95% confidence level, corresponding to an upper bound on the anomalous magnetic coupling $\\kappa_{tu\\gamma} < 0.14$.

  2. The Cosmic Ray Muon Flux at WIPP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esch, E I; Hime, A; Pichlmaier, A; Reifarth, R; Wollnik, H

    2005-01-01

    In this work a measurement of the muon intensity at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM, USA is presented. WIPP is a salt mine with a depth of 655 m. The vertical muon flux was measured with a two panels scintillator coincidence setup to Phi_{vert}=3.10(+0.05/-0.07)*10^(-7)s^(-1)cm^(-2)sr^(-1).

  3. The Cosmic Ray Muon Flux at WIPP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. -I. Esch; T. J. Bowles; A. Hime; A. Pichlmaier; R. Reifarth; H. Wollnik

    2004-08-25

    In this work a measurement of the muon intensity at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM, USA is presented. WIPP is a salt mine with a depth of 655 m. The vertical muon flux was measured with a two panels scintillator coincidence setup to Phi_{vert}=3.10(+0.05/-0.07)*10^(-7)s^(-1)cm^(-2)sr^(-1).

  4. Progress on Superconducting Magnets for the MICE Cooling Channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Michael A; Virostek, Steve P.; Li, Derun; Zisman, Michael S.; Wang, Li; Pan, Heng; Wu, Hong; Guo, XingLong; Xu, FengYu; Liu, X. K.; Zheng, S. X.; Bradshaw, Thomas; Baynham, Elwyn; Cobb, John; Lau, Wing; Lau, Peter; Yang, Stephanie Q.

    2009-09-09

    The muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) consists of a target, a beam line, a pion decay channel, the MICE cooling channel. Superconducting magnets are used in the pion decay channel and the MICE cooling channel. This report describes the MICE cooling channel magnets and the progress in the design and fabrication of these magnets. The MICE cooling channel consists of three types of superconducting solenoids; the spectrometer solenoids, the coupling solenoids and the focusing solenoids. The three types of magnets are being fabricated in he United States, China, and the United Kingdom respectively. The spectrometer magnets are used to analyze the muon beam before and after muon cooling. The coupling magnets couple the focusing sections and keep the muon beam contained within the iris of the RF cavities that re used to recover the muon momentum lost during ionization cooling. The focusing magnets focus the muon beam in the center of a liquid hydrogen absorber. The first of the cooling channel magnets will be operational in MICE in the spring of 2010.

  5. 44th Annual Anomalous Absorption Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beg, Farhat

    2014-03-03

    Conference Grant Report July 14, 2015 Submitted to the U. S. Department of Energy Attn: Dr. Sean Finnegan By the University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, California 92093 On behalf of the 44th Annual Anomalous Absorption Conference 8-13 June 2014, in Estes Park, Colorado Support Requested: $10,100 Amount expended: $3,216.14 Performance Period: 1 March 20 14 to 28 February 20 15 Principal Investigator Dr. Farhat Beg Center for Energy Research University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, California 92093-0417 858-822-1266 (telephone) 858-534-4543 (fax) fbeg@ucsd.edu Administrative Point of Contact: Brandi Pate, 858-534-0851, blpate®ucsd.edu I. Background The forty-fourth Anomalous Absorption Conference was held in Estes Park, Colorado from June 5-8, 2014 (aac2014.ucsd.edu). The first Anomalous Absorption Conference was held in 1971 to assemble experts in the poorly understood area of laser-plasma absorption. The goal of that conference was to address the anomalously large laser absorption seen in plasma experiments with respect to the laser absorption predicted by linear plasma theory. Great progress in this research area has been made in the decades since that first meeting, due in part to the scientific interactions that have occurred annually at this conference. Specifically, this includes the development of nonlinear laser-plasma theory and the simulation of laser interactions with plasmas. Each summer since that first meeting, this week-long conference has been held at unique locations in North America as a scientific forum for intense scientific exchanges relevant to the interaction of laser radiation with plasmas. Responsibility for organizing the conference has traditional rotated each year between the major Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) laboratories and universities including LANL, LLNL, LLE, UCLA UC Davis and NRL. As the conference has matured over the past four decades, its technical footprint has expanded beyond ICF-related laser-plasma interactions to encompass closely related technical areas including laser particle acceleration, high-intensity laser effects, short­ pulse laser interactions, PIC and Vlasov/rad-hydro modeling, inertial and magnetic fusion plasmas, advanced plasma diagnostics, alternate ignition schemes, EOS/transport/opacity, and this year, x­ ray free-electron lasers and their applications. The conference continues to be a showcase for the presentation and discussion of the latest developments in these areas. II. Meeting Report The conference was extremely successful with more than one hundred participants. There were ninety-nine (99) abstracts submitted. There were forty-four (44) presentations including eleven (11) invited talks. The following topics were covered: a) Radiation Hydrodynamics b) Implosion Plasma Kinetic Effects c) Alternate Ignition Schemes d) Astrophysical Phenomena e) Opacity/Transport/EOS f) High Power Lasers and Facilities g) High-Intensity Laser-Matter Interactions h) Hydrodynamics and Hydro-instabilities i) Hot Dense Plasma Atomic Processes j) High Energy Density Physics k) Laser Particle Acceleration Physics l) Advanced Plasma Diagnostics m) Advanced light sources and applications Despite significant advertising, there were two students who applied for the travel grants: Charlie Jarrott and Joohwan Kim. The total funds expended were $3,216.14.

  6. The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration Physics Opportunities with Muon Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    (s). ­ Can store muons in rings. ­ Lower cost of acceleration. · But muons decay. ­ Secondary neutrino experiments based on innovative particle sources. · A full range of new phenomena can be investigated accelerators with a more cost-effective technology, that is capable of extension to 10's of TeV of constituent

  7. Proceedings of the International Workshop on Low Energy Muon Science: LEMS`93

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leon, M. [comp.

    1994-01-01

    This report contains papers on research with low energy muons. Topics cover fundamental electroweak physics; muonic atoms and molecules, and muon catalyzed fusion; muon spin research; and muon facilities. These papers have been indexed and cataloged separately.

  8. Study of high pressure gas filled RF cavities for muon collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yonehara, Katsuya

    2015-01-01

    Muon collider is a considerable candidate of the next-generation high-energy lepton collider machine. Operating an RF cavity in a multi-Tesla magnet is a critical requirement in a muon accelerator and a cooling channel. However, the maximum RF gradient in a vacuum RF cavity is strongly limited by an external magnetic field. Dense hydrogen gas filled RF cavity has been proposed since it is functional of generating a high RF accelerating gradient in a strong magnetic field and making an ionization cooling process at the same time. A critical issue of the cavity is a beam- induced plasma that consumes a considerable amount of RF power. The gas filled RF test cell was made and measured the RF loading due to a beam-induced plasma by using an intense proton beam at Fermilab. By doping an electronegative gas in dense hydrogen, the plasma loading effect is significantly mitigated. The result shows that the cavity is functional with a muon collider beam. Recent progress is shown in this presentation.

  9. Magnetic and Cryogenic Design of the MICE Coupling Solenoid Magnet System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Li; Xu, FengYu; Wu, Hong; Liu, XiaoKum; Li, LanKai; Guo, XingLong; Chen, AnBin; Green, Michael A; Li, D.R.; Virostek, Steve; Pan, H.

    2008-08-02

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) will demonstrate ionization cooling in a short section of a realistic cooling channel using a muon beam at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK. The coupling magnet is a superconducting solenoid mounted around four 201MHz RF cavities, which produces magnetic field up to 2.6 T on the magnet centerline to keep muons within the iris of RF cavities windows. The coupling coil with inner radius of 750mm, length of 285mm and thickness of 102.5mm will be cooled by a pair of 1.5 W at 4.2 K small coolers. This paper will introduce the updated engineering design of the coupling magnet made by ICST in China. The detailed analyses on magnetic fields, stresses induced during the processes of winding, cool down and charging, and cold mass support assembly are presented as well.

  10. Electrons from Muon Decay in Bound State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rashid M. Djilkibaev; Rostislav V. Konoplich

    2009-02-12

    We present results of a study of the muon decay in orbit (DIO) contribution to the signal region of muon - electron conversion. Electrons from DIO are the dominant source of background for muon - electron conversion experiments because the endpoint of DIO electrons is the same as the energy of electrons from elastic muon - electron conversion. The probability of DIO contribution to the signal region was considered for a tracker with Gaussian resolution function and with a realistic resolution function obtained in the application of pattern recognition and momentum reconstruction Kalman filter based procedure to GEANT simulated DIO events. It is found that the existence of non Gaussian tails in the realistic resolution function does not lead to a significant increase in DIO contribution to the signal region. The probability of DIO contribution to the calorimeter signal was studied in dependence on the resolution, assuming a Gaussian resolution function of calorimeter. In this study the geometrical acceptance played an important role, suppressing DIO contribution of the intermediate range electrons from muon decay in orbit.

  11. Exploring Geometries of SRF Cavities for a Future Muon Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geng, Rong-Li

    application of super- conducting RF cavities in a future muon collider. Such RF cavities are expected to workExploring Geometries of SRF Cavities for a Future Muon Collider Rong-Li Geng LEPP, Cornell

  12. DESIGN OF HIGH INTENSITY MUON SOURCES HISHAM KAMAL SAYED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    /19/15 OUTLINE Goal : Op0mize number of useful muons Involved systems: - Carbon parameters: Carbon target length, radius, and 0lt angle to solenoid axis 2 momentum spread Challenges with muon beams: - Short life0me ~ 2

  13. Use of dielectric material in muon accelerator RF cavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    French, Katheryn Decker

    2011-01-01

    The building of a muon collider is motivated by the desire to collide point-like particles while reducing the limitations imposed by synchrotron radiation. The many challenges unique to muon accelerators are derived from ...

  14. Anomalous

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TAPropaneandAn319 125Annualregulatoryimpurity ion

  15. Measurement of the atmospheric muon charge ratio at TeV energies with MINOS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamson, P.; Andreopoulos, C.; Arms, K.E.; Armstrong, R.; Auty, D.J.; Avvakumov, S.; Ayres, D.S.; Baller, B.; Barish, B.; Barnes, P.D., Jr.; Barr, G.; /Fermilab /University Coll. London /Rutherford /Minnesota U. /Indiana U. /Sussex U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Argonne /Caltech /LLNL, Livermore /Oxford U.

    2007-05-01

    The 5.4 kton MINOS far detector has been taking charge-separated cosmic ray muon data since the beginning of August, 2003 at a depth of 2070 m.w.e. in the Soudan Underground Laboratory, Minnesota, USA. The data with both forward and reversed magnetic field running configurations were combined to minimize systematic errors in the determination of the underground muon charge ratio. When averaged, two independent analyses find the charge ratio underground to be N{sub {mu}}+/N{sub {mu}}-=1.374{+-}0.004(stat)-0.010{sup +0.012}(sys). Using the map of the Soudan rock overburden, the muon momenta as measured underground were projected to the corresponding values at the surface in the energy range 1-7 TeV. Within this range of energies at the surface, the MINOS data are consistent with the charge ratio being energy independent at the 2 standard deviation level. When the MINOS results are compared with measurements at lower energies, a clear rise in the charge ratio in the energy range 0.3-1.0 TeV is apparent. A qualitative model shows that the rise is consistent with an increasing contribution of kaon decays to the muon charge ratio.

  16. Neutrinos from Decaying Muons, Pions, Kaons and Neutrons in Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reetanjali Moharana; Nayantara Gupta

    2012-05-27

    In the internal shock model of gamma ray bursts ultrahigh energy muons, pions, neutrons and kaons are likely to be produced in the interactions of shock accelerated relativistic protons with low energy photons (KeV-MeV). These particles subsequently decay to high energy neutrinos/antineutrinos and other secondaries. In the high internal magnetic fields of gamma ray bursts, the ultrahigh energy charged particles ($\\mu^+$, $\\pi^+$, $K^+$) lose energy significantly due to synchrotron radiations before decaying into secondary high energy neutrinos and antineutrinos. The relativistic neutrons decay to high energy antineutrinos, protons and electrons. We have calculated the total neutrino flux (neutrino and antineutrino) considering the decay channels of ultrahigh energy muons, pions, neutrons and kaons. We have shown that the total neutrino flux generated in neutron decay can be higher than that produced in $\\mu^+$ and $\\pi^+$ decay. The charged kaons being heavier than pions, lose energy slowly and their secondary total neutrino flux is more than that from muons and pions at very high energy. Our detailed calculations on secondary particle production in $p\\gamma$ interactions give the total neutrino fluxes and their flavour ratios expected on earth. Depending on the values of the parameters (luminosity, Lorentz factor, variability time, spectral indices and break energy in the photon spectrum) of a gamma ray burst the contributions to the total neutrino flux from the decay of different particles (muon, pion, neutron and kaon) may vary and they would also be reflected on the neutrino flavour ratios.

  17. Test of a 1.8 Tesla, 400 Hz Dipole for a Muon Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Summers, D.J.; Cremaldi, L.M.; Hart, T.L.; Perera, L.P.; Reep, M.; /Mississippi U.; Witte, H.; /Brookhaven; Hansen, S.; Lopes, M.L.; /Fermilab; Reidy Jr., J.; /Oxford High School

    2012-05-01

    A 1.8 T dipole magnet using thin grain oriented silicon steel laminations has been constructed as a prototype for a muon synchrotron ramping at 400 Hz. Following the practice in large 3 phase transformers and our own Opera-2d simulations, joints are mitred to take advantage of the magnetic properties of the steel which are much better in the direction in which the steel was rolled. Measurements with a Hysteresigraph 5500 and Epstein frame show a high magnetic permeability which minimizes stored energy in the yoke allowing the magnet to ramp quickly with modest voltage. Coercivity is low which minimizes hysteresis losses. A power supply with a fast Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) switch and a capacitor was constructed. Coils are wound with 12 gauge copper wire. Thin wire and laminations minimize eddy current losses. The magnetic field was measured with a peak sensing Hall probe.

  18. Test of a 1.8 Tesla, 400 Hz Dipole for a Muon Synchrotron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. J. Summers; L. M. Cremaldi; T. L. Hart; L. P. Perera; M. Reep; H. Witte; S. Hansen; M. L. Lopes; J. Reidy, Jr.

    2012-07-28

    A 1.8 T dipole magnet using thin grain oriented silicon steel laminations has been constructed as a prototype for a muon synchrotron ramping at 400 Hz. Following the practice in large 3 phase transformers and our own Opera-2d simulations, joints are mitred to take advantage of the magnetic properties of the steel which are much better in the direction in which the steel was rolled. Measurements with a Hysteresigraph 5500 and Epstein frame show a high magnetic permeability which minimizes stored energy in the yoke allowing the magnet to ramp quickly with modest voltage. Coercivity is low which minimizes hysteresis losses. A power supply with a fast Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) switch and a capacitor was constructed. Coils are wound with 12 gauge copper wire. Thin wire and laminations minimize eddy current losses. The magnetic field was measured with a peak sensing Hall probe.

  19. High Intensity Muon Beams in Osaka -MuSIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    High Intensity Muon Beams in Osaka - MuSIC Yoshitaka Kuno Osaka Unviersity, Osaka, Japan ! THB2014 ·Muon Transport ·COMET ·MuSIC facility at Osaka University ·MuSIC stage-I for µSR ·PRISM demonstration at MuSIC ·Phase Rotation at FFAG ·Summary #12;Muon Beam Sources #12;ISIS EM, RIKEN-RAL J-PARC, MUSE

  20. Pion/Muon Beam and Monitoring Revised February 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory - Experiment 821

    injection scheme used in the CERN experiment, [1] a pion beam was formed and directed parallel to, but just. This technique of direct muon injection has two benefits: i) the number of stored muons per fill is increased, and produced the ``flash'' following injection which presented such a challenge to the muon decay electron

  1. Characterisation of the muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, D.; et al.,

    2013-10-01

    A novel single-particle technique to measure emittance has been developed and used to characterise seventeen different muon beams for the Muon Ionisation Cooling Experiment (MICE). The muon beams, whose mean momenta vary from 171 to 281 MeV/c, have emittances of approximately 1.5--2.3 \\pi mm-rad horizontally and 0.6--1.0 \\pi mm-rad vertically, a horizontal dispersion of 90--190 mm and momentum spreads of about 25 MeV/c. There is reasonable agreement between the measured parameters of the beams and the results of simulations. The beams are found to meet the requirements of MICE.

  2. Constraints on muon-specific dark forces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savely G. Karshenboim; David McKeen; Maxim Pospelov

    2014-01-23

    The recent measurement of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen allows for the most precise extraction of the charge radius of the proton which is currently in conflict with other determinations based on $e-p$ scattering and hydrogen spectroscopy. This discrepancy could be the result of some new muon-specific force with O(1-100) MeV force carrier---in this paper we concentrate on vector mediators. Such an explanation faces challenges from the constraints imposed by the $g-2$ of the muon and electron as well as precision spectroscopy of muonic atoms. In this work we complement the family of constraints by calculating the contribution of hypothetical forces to the muonium hyperfine structure. We also compute the two-loop contribution to the electron parity violating amplitude due to a muon loop, which is sensitive to the muon axial-vector coupling. Overall, we find that the combination of low-energy constraints favors the mass of the mediator to be below 10 MeV, and that a certain degree of tuning is required between vector and axial-vector couplings of new vector particles to muons in order to satisfy constraints from muon $g-2$. However, we also observe that in the absence of a consistent standard model embedding, high energy weak-charged processes accompanied by the emission of new vector particles are strongly enhanced by $(E/m_V)^2$, with $E$ a characteristic energy scale and $m_V$ the mass of the mediator. In particular, leptonic $W$ decays impose the strongest constraints on such models completely disfavoring the remainder of the parameter space.

  3. Microscopic theory of quantum anomalous Hall effect in graphene...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Microscopic theory of quantum anomalous Hall effect in graphene Prev Next Title: Microscopic theory of quantum anomalous Hall effect in graphene Authors: Qiao, Zhenhua ;...

  4. Electromagnetic fields and anomalous transports in heavy-ion collisions --- A pedagogical review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Xu-Guang

    2015-01-01

    The hot and dense matter generated in heavy-ion collisions may contain domains in which the P and CP symmetries of QCD are violated. Moreover, heavy-ion collisions can generate extremely strong magnetic fields as well as electric fields. The interplay among the electromagnetic field, triangle anomaly, and the P and CP violation of QCD leads to a number of macroscopic quantum phenomena known as the anomalous transports. The purpose of the article is to give a pedagogical review of various properties of the electromagnetic fields, the anomalous transports phenomena, and their experimental signatures in heavy-ion collisions.

  5. Electromagnetic fields and anomalous transports in heavy-ion collisions --- A pedagogical review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu-Guang Huang

    2015-09-14

    The hot and dense matter generated in heavy-ion collisions may contain domains in which the P and CP symmetries of QCD are violated. Moreover, heavy-ion collisions can generate extremely strong magnetic fields as well as electric fields. The interplay among the electromagnetic field, triangle anomaly, and the P and CP violation of QCD leads to a number of macroscopic quantum phenomena known as the anomalous transports. The purpose of the article is to give a pedagogical review of various properties of the electromagnetic fields, the anomalous transports phenomena, and their experimental signatures in heavy-ion collisions.

  6. Simulations Study of Muon Response in the Peripheral Regions of the Iron Calorimeter Detector at the India-based Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanishka, R; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Indumathi, D; Sinha, Nita

    2015-01-01

    The magnetized Iron CALorimeter detector (ICAL) which is proposed to be built in the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) laboratory, aims to study atmospheric neutrino oscillations primarily through charged current interactions of muon neutrinos and anti-neutrinos with the detector. The response of muons and charge identification efficiency, angle and energy resolution as a function of muon momentum and direction are studied from GEANT4-based simulations in the peripheral regions of the detector. This completes the characterisation of ICAL with respect to muons over the entire detector and has implications for the sensitivity of ICAL to the oscillation parameters and mass hierarchy compared to the studies where only the resolutions and efficiencies of the central region of ICAL were assumed for the entire detector. Selection criteria for track reconstruction in the peripheral region of the detector were determined from the detector response. On applying these, for the 1--20 GeV energy region of interest fo...

  7. Alpha-muon sticking and chaos in muon-catalysed "in flight" d-t fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sachie Kimura; Aldo Bonasera

    2006-07-31

    We discuss the alpha-muon sticking coefficient in the muon-catalysed ``in flight" d-t fusion in the framework of the Constrained Molecular Dynamics model. Especially the influence of muonic chaotic dynamics on the sticking coefficient is brought into focus. The chaotic motion of the muon affects not only the fusion cross section but also the $\\mu-\\alpha$ sticking coefficient. Chaotic systems lead to larger enhancements with respect to regular systems because of the reduction of the tunneling region. Moreover they give smaller sticking probabilities than those of regular events. By utilizing a characteristic of the chaotic dynamics one can avoid losing the muon in the $\\mu$CF cycle. We propose the application of the so-called ``microwave ionization of a Rydberg atom" to the present case which could lead to the enhancement of the reactivation process by using X-rays.

  8. Anomalous Emission from HII regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Dickinson

    2008-08-04

    Spinning dust appears to be the best explanation for the anomalous emission that has been observed at $\\sim 10-60$ GHz. One of the best examples of spinning dust comes from a HII region in the Perseus molecular cloud. Observations of other HII regions also show tentative evidence for excess emission at frequencies $\\sim 30$ GHz, although at lower emissivity levels. A new detection of excess emission at 31 GHz in the HII region RCW175 has been made. The most plausible explanation again comes from spinning dust. HII regions are a good place to look for spinning dust as long as accurate radio data spanning the $\\sim 5-100$ GHz range is available.

  9. Muons for a MuonCollider Kirk T. McDonald

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    ://www.cap.bnl.gov/mumu/mu home page.html Muon Collider R&D Status Report: http://www.cap.bnl.gov/mumu/status report.html Muon­D emittance of 2 \\Theta 10 \\Gamma10 (�mm) 3 . ffl Initial pulse length only 1­2 ns. The Source ffl). 3 #12; Targetry Issues ffl Is a liquid jet target viable? -- 1­ns beam pulse ) shock heating

  10. Precision Measurements at a Muon Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Dawson

    1995-12-08

    We discuss the potential for making precision measurements of $M_W$ and $M_T$ at a muon collider and the motivations for each measurement. A comparison is made with the precision measurements expected at other facilities. The measurement of the top quark decay width is also discussed.

  11. Thermal Conductivity of Electrons and Muons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gnedin, Oleg Y.

    Thermal Conductivity of Electrons and Muons in Neutron Star Cores O.Y. Gnedin and D.G. Yakovlev A thermal conductivity of dense matter (ae ? ¸ 10 14 g cm \\Gamma3 ) in neutron star cores with various expressions valid for a wide class of models of dense matter. 1 #12; 1 Introduction Thermal conductivity

  12. Muon Collider Physics at Very High Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Berger

    2000-01-03

    Muon colliders might greatly extend the energy frontier of collider physics. One can contemplate circular colliders with center-of-mass energies in excess of 10 TeV. Some physics issues that might be relevant at such a machine are discussed.

  13. Electromagnetic Design of RF Cavities for Accelerating Low-Energy Muons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurennoy, Sergey S.

    2012-05-14

    A high-gradient linear accelerator for accelerating low-energy muons and pions in a strong solenoidal magnetic field has been proposed for homeland defense and industrial applications. The acceleration starts immediately after collection of pions from a target in a solenoidal magnetic field and brings decay muons, which initially have kinetic energies mostly around 15-20 MeV, to 200 MeV over a distance of {approx}10 m. At this energy, both ionization cooling and further, more conventional acceleration of the muon beam become feasible. A normal-conducting linac with external-solenoid focusing can provide the required large beam acceptances. The linac consists of independently fed zero-mode (TM{sub 010}) RF cavities with wide beam apertures closed by thin conducting edge-cooled windows. Electromagnetic design of the cavity, including its RF coupler, tuning and vacuum elements, and field probes, has been developed with the CST MicroWave Studio, and is presented.

  14. Matched Optics of Muon RLA and Non-Scaling FFAG ARCS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V.S. Morozov, S.A. Bogacz, Y. Roblin, K.B. Beard, D. Trbojevic

    2011-03-01

    Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA) are an efficient way of accelerating short-lived muons to multi-GeV energies required for Neutrino Factories and TeV energies required for Muon Colliders. To reduce the number of required return arcs, we employ a Non-Scaling Fixed-Field Alternating-Gradient (NS-FFAG) arc lattice design. We present a complete linear optics design of a muon RLA with two-pass linear NS-FFAG droplet return arcs. The arcs are composed of symmetric cells with each cell designed using combined function magnets with dipole and quadrupole magnetic field components so that the cell is achromatic and has zero initial and final periodic orbit offsets for both passes’ energies. Matching to the linac is accomplished by adjusting linac quadrupole strengths so that the linac optics on each pass is matched to the arc optics. We adjust the difference of the path lengths and therefore of the times of flight of the two momenta in each arc to ensure proper synchronization with the linac. We investigate the dynamic aperture and momentum acceptance of the arcs.

  15. The superconducting solenoid magnets for MICE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Michael A.

    2002-12-22

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a channel of superconducting solenoid magnets. The magnets in MICE are around the RF cavities, absorbers (liquid or solid) and the primary particle detectors [1], [2]. The MICE superconducting solenoid system consists of eighteen coils that are grouped in three types of magnet assemblies. The cooling channel consists of two complete cell of an SFOFO cooling channel. Each cell consists of a focusing coil pair around an absorber and a coupling coil around a RF cavity that re-accelerates the muons to their original momentum. At the ends of the experiment are uniform field solenoids for the particle detectors and a set of matching coils used to match the muon beam to the cooling cells. Three absorbers are used instead of two in order to shield the detectors from dark currents generated by the RF cavities at high operating acceleration gradients.

  16. MICE Spectrometer Magnet System Progress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Michael A.; Virostek, Steve P.

    2007-08-27

    The first magnets for the muon ionization cooling experimentwill be the tracker solenoids that form the ends of the MICE coolingchannel. The primary purpose of the tracker solenoids is to provide auniform 4 T field (to better than +-0.3 percent over a volume that is 1meter long and 0.3 meters in diameter) spectrometer magnet field for thescintillating fiber detectors that are used to analyze the muons in thechannel before and after ionization cooling. A secondary purpose for thetracker magnet is the matching of the muon beam between the rest of theMICE cooling channel and the uniform field spectrometer magnet. Thetracker solenoid is powered by three 300 amp power supplies. Additionaltuning of the spectrometer is provided by a pair of 50 amp power suppliesacross the spectrometer magnet end coils. The tracker magnet will becooled using a pair of 4 K pulse tube coolers that each provide 1.5 W ofcooling at 4.2 K. Final design and construction of the tracker solenoidsbegan during the summer of 2006. This report describes the progress madeon the construction of the tracker solenoids.

  17. Anomalous transport through porous and fractured media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Peter Kyungchul

    2014-01-01

    Anomalous transport, understood as the nonlinear scaling with time of the mean square displacement of transported particles, is observed in many physical processes, including contaminant transport through porous and fractured ...

  18. Search for anomalous production of multiple leptons in association with $W$ and $Z$ bosons at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents a search for anomalous production of multiple low-energy leptons in association with a W or Z boson using events collected at the CDF experiment corresponding to 5.1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. This search is sensitive to a wide range of topologies with low-momentum leptons, including those with the leptons near one another. The observed rates of production of additional electrons and muons are compared with the standard model predictions. No indications of phenomena beyond the standard model are found. A 95% confidence level limit is presented on the production cross section for a benchmark model of supersymmetric hidden-valley Higgs production. Particle identification efficiencies are also provided to enable the calculation of limits on additional models.

  19. MERIT Magnet Testing Status Neutrino Factory Muon Collider Collaboration Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    tap of the transformers (to support 700 v operation) will be done this week Bus Bar connections, and the bolt strength, which limits the pressure capability of the vessel, increases with lower temperatures pressure. The vessel can be de-rated further if needed for qualification at CERN. · The strength of bolting

  20. LIMIT ON THE MUON NEUTRINO MAGNETIC MOMENT AND A MEASUREMENT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp Graduate student Subtask22 LANSCE TopicalElectricity &LIMIT

  1. Muon acceleration in cosmic-ray sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, Spencer R.; Mikkelsen, Rune E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Becker Tjus, Julia [Fakultät für Physik and Astronomie, Theoretische Physik I, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2013-12-20

    Many models of ultra-high energy cosmic-ray production involve acceleration in linear accelerators located in gamma-ray bursts, magnetars, or other sources. These transient sources have short lifetimes, which necessitate very high accelerating gradients, up to 10{sup 13} keV cm{sup –1}. At gradients above 1.6 keV cm{sup –1}, muons produced by hadronic interactions undergo significant acceleration before they decay. This muon acceleration hardens the neutrino energy spectrum and greatly increases the high-energy neutrino flux. Using the IceCube high-energy diffuse neutrino flux limits, we set two-dimensional limits on the source opacity and matter density, as a function of accelerating gradient. These limits put strong constraints on different models of particle acceleration, particularly those based on plasma wake-field acceleration, and limit models for sources like gamma-ray bursts and magnetars.

  2. Solenoid Magnet System for the Fermilab Mu2e Experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lamm, M. J.; Andreev, N.; Ambrosio, G.; Brandt, J.; Coleman, R.; Evbota, D.; Kashikhin, V. V.; Lopes, M.; Miller, J.; Nicol, T.; et al

    2011-12-14

    The Fermilab Mu2e experiment seeks to measure the rare process of direct muon to electron conversion in the field of a nucleus. Key to the design of the experiment is a system of three superconducting solenoids; a muon production solenoid (PS) which is a 1.8 m aperture axially graded solenoid with a peak field of 5 T used to focus secondary pions and muons from a production target located in the solenoid aperture; an 'S shaped' transport solenoid (TS) which selects and transports the subsequent muons towards a stopping target; a detector solenoid (DS) which is an axially graded solenoidmore »at the upstream end to focus transported muons to a stopping target, and a spectrometer solenoid at the downstream end to accurately measure the momentum of the outgoing conversion elections. The magnetic field requirements, the significant magnetic coupling between the solenoids, the curved muon transport geometry and the large beam induced energy deposition into the superconducting coils pose significant challenges to the magnetic, mechanical, and thermal design of this system. In this paper a conceptual design for the magnetic system which meets the Mu2e experiment requirements is presented.« less

  3. First Measurement of Muon Neutrino Charged Current Quasielastic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Charged Current Quasielastic (CCQE) Double Differential Cross Section Using a high statistics sample of muon neutrino charged current quasielastic (CCQE) events, we report...

  4. Measurement of Neutral Particle Contamination in the MICE Muon Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rob Roy Fletcher; Linda Coney; Gail Hanson

    2011-05-03

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is being built at the ISIS proton synchrotron at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) to measure ionization cooling of a muon beam. During recent data-taking, it was determined that there is a significant background contamination of neutral particles populating the MICE muon beam. This contamination creates unwanted triggers in MICE, thus reducing the percentage of useful data taken during running. This paper describes the analysis done with time-of-flight detectors, used to measure and identify the source of the contamination in both positive and negative muon beams.

  5. Measurements of integral muon intensity at large zenith angles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. N. Dmitrieva; D. V. Chernov; R. P. Kokoulin; K. G. Kompaniets; G. Mannocchi; A. A. Petrukhin; O. Saavedra; V. V. Shutenko; D. A. Timashkov; G. Trinchero; I. I. Yashin

    2006-11-28

    High-statistics data on near-horizontal muons collected with Russian-Italian coordinate detector DECOR are analyzed. Precise measurements of muon angular distributions in zenith angle interval from 60 to 90 degrees have been performed. In total, more than 20 million muons are selected. Dependences of the absolute integral muon intensity on zenith angle for several threshold energies ranging from 1.7 GeV to 7.2 GeV are derived. Results for this region of zenith angles and threshold energies have been obtained for the first time. The dependence of integral intensity on zenith angle and threshold energy is well fitted by a simple analytical formula.

  6. Pion and muon decays beyond the standard model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herczeg, P.

    1988-01-01

    We review and discuss the information provided by charged pion and muon decays on physics beyond the minimal standard model. 109 refs., 3 tabs.

  7. The performance of the MICE muon beam line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayner, Mark Alastair

    2011-10-06

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment is one lattice cell of a cooling channel suitable for conditioning the muon beam at the front end of a Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider. The beam line designed to transport muons into MICE has been installed, and data was collected in 2010. In this paper the method of reconstructing longitudinal momentum and transverse trace space using two timing detectors is discussed, and a preliminary simulation of the performance of a measured beam in the cooling channel is presented.

  8. Muon Figures: 2001/04/19 Chris Waltham

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Learned, John

    TO SAVE SPACE. Figure 6: Muon event: PMT hit times in ns. OMITTED TO SAVE SPACE. A B C W E N S Figure 7

  9. SIMULATION STUDY OF BACKGROUND PARTICLES IN THE MUON TELESCOPE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SIMULATION STUDY OF BACKGROUND PARTICLES IN THE MUON TELESCOPE DETECTOR AT THE STAR EXPERIMENT Matthew Breen Thanks to Dr. Mioduszewski and Yanfang Liu Overview Background ...

  10. Measurement of Cosmic-ray Muons and Muon-induced Neutrons in the Aberdeen Tunnel Underground Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blyth, S C; Chen, X C; Chu, M C; Cui, K X; Hahn, R L; Ho, T H; Hsiung, Y B; Hu, B Z; Kwan, K K; Kwok, M W; Kwok, T; Lau, Y P; Leung, J K C; Leung, K Y; Lin, G L; Lin, Y C; Luk, K B; Luk, W H; Ngai, H Y; Ngan, S Y; Pun, C S J; Shih, K; Tam, Y H; Tsang, R H M; Wang, C H; Wong, C M; Wong, H L; Wong, K K; Yeh, M; Zhang, B J

    2015-01-01

    We measured the muon flux and the production rate of muon-induced neutrons at a depth of 611 meters water equivalent. Our apparatus comprises of three layers of crossed plastic scintillator hodoscopes for tracking the incident cosmic-ray muons, and 760 L of gadolinium-doped liquid scintillator for both neutron production and detection targets. The vertical muon intensity was measured to be $I_{\\mu}$ = (5.7 $\\pm$ 0.6) $\\times$ 10$^{-6}$ cm$^{-2}$ s$^{-1}$ sr$^{-1}$. The muon-induced neutron yield in the liquid scintillator was determined to be $Y_{n}$ = (1.19 $\\pm$ 0.08(stat.) $\\pm$ 0.21(syst.)) $\\times$ 10$^{-4}$ neutrons / ($\\mu$ g cm$^{-2}$). A fitting to recently measured neutron yields at different depths gave a muon energy dependence of $\\left\\langle E_{\\mu} \\right\\rangle^{0.76 \\pm 0.03}$ for scintillator targets.

  11. Analyzing the anomalous dipole moment type couplings of heavy quarks with FCNC interactions at the CLIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. T. Tasci; A. Senol; C. Verep

    2014-04-10

    In this study we examine both anomalous magnetic and dipole moment type couplings of a heavy quark via its single production with subsequent dominant Standard Model decay modes at the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). The signal and background cross sections are analyzed for heavy quark masses 600 and 700 GeV. We make the analysis to delimitate these couplings as well as to find the attainable integrated luminosities or 3$\\sigma$ observation limit.

  12. Parametric probability distributions for anomalous change detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theiler, James P; Foy, Bernard R; Wohlberg, Brendt E; Scovel, James C

    2010-01-01

    The problem of anomalous change detection arises when two (or possibly more) images are taken of the same scene, but at different times. The aim is to discount the 'pervasive differences' that occur thoughout the imagery, due to the inevitably different conditions under which the images were taken (caused, for instance, by differences in illumination, atmospheric conditions, sensor calibration, or misregistration), and to focus instead on the 'anomalous changes' that actually take place in the scene. In general, anomalous change detection algorithms attempt to model these normal or pervasive differences, based on data taken directly from the imagery, and then identify as anomalous those pixels for which the model does not hold. For many algorithms, these models are expressed in terms of probability distributions, and there is a class of such algorithms that assume the distributions are Gaussian. By considering a broader class of distributions, however, a new class of anomalous change detection algorithms can be developed. We consider several parametric families of such distributions, derive the associated change detection algorithms, and compare the performance with standard algorithms that are based on Gaussian distributions. We find that it is often possible to significantly outperform these standard algorithms, even using relatively simple non-Gaussian models.

  13. Subsurface conductive isolation of refraction correlative magnetic signals (SCIRCMS) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erck, Eric Stephenson

    2004-11-15

    . This is an independently-derived sequence of anomalous values derived from Global Positioning System (GPS) refracted ranges. Detailed application of the Biot-Savart law provides independent anomaly signals to which the magnetic anomalies correlations show great...

  14. Progress on a Cavity with Beryllium Walls for Muon Ionization Cooling Channel R&D.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowring, D.L.; DeMello, A.J.; Lambert, A.R.; Li, D.; Virostek,, S.; Zisman, M.; Kaplan, D.; Palmer, R.B.

    2012-05-20

    The Muon Accelerator Program (MAP) collaboration is working to develop an ionization cooling channel for muon beams. An ionization cooling channel requires the operation of high-gradient, normal-conducting RF cavities in multi-Tesla solenoidal magnetic fields. However, experiments conducted at Fermilab?s MuCool Test Area (MTA) show that increasing the solenoidal field strength reduces the maximum achievable cavity gradient. This gradient limit is characterized by an RF breakdown process that has caused significant damage to copper cavity interiors. The damage may be caused by field-emitted electrons, focused by the solenoidal magnetic field onto small areas of the inner cavity surface. Local heating may then induce material fatigue and surface damage. Fabricating a cavity with beryllium walls would mitigate this damage due to beryllium?s low density, low thermal expansion, and high electrical and thermal conductivity. We address the design and fabrication of a pillbox RF cavity with beryllium walls, in order to evaluate the performance of high-gradient cavities in strong magnetic fields.

  15. Detailed Report of the MuLan Measurement of the Positive Muon Lifetime and Determination of the Fermi Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Tishchenko; S. Battu; R. M. Carey; D. B. Chitwood; J. Crnkovic; P. T. Debevec; S. Dhamija; W. Earle; A. Gafarov; K. Giovanetti; T. P. Gorringe; F. E. Gray; Z. Hartwig; D. W. Hertzog; B. Johnson; P. Kammel; B. Kiburg; S. Kizilgul; J. Kunkle; B. Lauss; I. Logashenko; K. R. Lynch; R. McNabb; J. P. Miller; F. Mulhauser; C. J. G. Onderwater; Q. Peng; J. Phillips; S. Rath; B. L. Roberts; D. M. Webber; P. Winter; B. Wolfe

    2012-11-05

    We present a detailed report of the method, setup, analysis and results of a precision measurement of the positive muon lifetime. The experiment was conducted at the Paul Scherrer Institute using a time-structured, nearly 100%-polarized, surface muon beam and a segmented, fast-timing, plastic scintillator array. The measurement employed two target arrangements; a magnetized ferromagnetic target with a ~4 kG internal magnetic field and a crystal quartz target in a 130 G external magnetic field. Approximately 1.6 x 10^{12} positrons were accumulated and together the data yield a muon lifetime of tau_{mu}(MuLan) = 2196980.3(2.2) ps (1.0 ppm), thirty times more precise than previous generations of lifetime experiments. The lifetime measurement yields the most accurate value of the Fermi constant G_F (MuLan) = 1.1663787(6) x 10^{-5} GeV^{-2} (0.5 ppm). It also enables new precision studies of weak interactions via lifetime measurements of muonic atoms.

  16. Investigating Unitarity in Presence of Anomalous Couplings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mamta Dahiya; Sukanta Dutta; Rashidul Islam

    2015-06-20

    We study the high energy behaviour of the helicity amplitudes in the $2\\to2$ scattering processes involving Higgs and gauge bosons. This model-independent analysis is performed for a SM-like Higgs in the presence of anomalous $WWV$, $WWVV$, $VVH$, $VVHH$, $HHHH$ and $HHH$ interactions ($V\\equiv Z,\\gamma$ and $W^\\pm$.) among gauge and highs bosons. We constrain these anomalous couplings by requiring the non-violation of the perturbative unitarity. Further, assuming all anomalous couplings to have arisen only from dimension-six operators, we show that unitarity violation can be evaded up to $\\sim$ 9 TeV corresponding to the best fit values of $f_{WW}/\\Lambda^2$ and $f_{BB}/\\Lambda^2$ from the combined analysis of Tevatron and LHC data.

  17. Anomalous Soft Photons in Hadron Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheuk-Yin Wong

    2010-05-17

    Anomalous soft photons in excess of what is expected from electromagnetic bremsstrahlung have been observed in association with the production of hadrons, mostly mesons, in high-energy (K+)p, (pi+)p, (pi-)p, pp, and (e+)(e-) collisions. We propose a model for the simultaneous production of anomalous soft photons and mesons in quantum field theory, in which the meson production arises from the oscillation of color charge densities of the quarks of the underlying vacuum in the flux tube. As a quark carries both a color charge and an electric charge, the oscillation of the color charge densities will be accompanied by the oscillation of electric charge densities, which will in turn lead to the simultaneous production of soft photons during the meson production process. How the production of these soft photons may explain the anomalous soft photon data will be discussed. Further experimental measurements to test the model will be proposed.

  18. The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration Physics Opportunities with Muon Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    . -- ) Enhanced coupling to Higgs boson(s). -- ) Can store muons in rings. -- ) Lower cost of acceleration. ffl experiments based on innovative particle sources. ffl A full range of new phenomena can be investigated For this we need accelerators with a more cost­effective technology, that is capable of extension to 10's

  19. The Muon g2 Experiment at Gerry Bunce for the Muon g2 Collaboration 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory - Experiment 821

    )=2. a is approximately 0.001 for the muon (and electron). Standard Model contributions come from electromagnetic be obtained from measurements of e + e \\Gamma !hadrons, measured now very accurately at lower center of mass energies in the VEPP2M machine at Novosibirsk. [2] The present theoretical error on g­2 is \\Sigma0:7 ppm

  20. Anomalous magnetization reversal in exchange biased thin films and nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhi-Pan

    2006-01-01

    eld. Sent to Mike for neutron scattering. IZ072606 MgF 2 (2.5 nm) Prepared for neutron scattering. Bibliography [1] W.to Mike Fitzsimmons for neutron scattering. IZ051606 MgF 2 (

  1. Anomalous magnetic moments of free and bound leptons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pachucki, Krzysztof

    ]. An almost simultaneous calculation by Schwinger [2] showed how the electron self-interaction explains. Jentschura. Max­Planck­Institut f¨ur Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg, Germany. e-mail: Ulrich.Jentschura@mpi-hd.mpg to know this part with the maximum possible accuracy. Schwinger's calculation included a single virtual

  2. Magnetic Topological Insulator and Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kou, Xufeng

    2015-01-01

    M. L. Roukes, et al. , Spintronics: A spin-based electronicsand D. M. Treger, Spintronics - A retrospective andand A. Chtchelkanova, Spintronics: The future of data

  3. The investigation of anomalous magnetization in the Raft River valley,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJ AutomationTexas/Wind ResourcesProgramSulFeroxOpenVote

  4. Precise parametrizations of muon energy losses in water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. I. Klimushin; E. V. Bugaev; I. A. Sokalski

    2001-06-01

    The description of muon propagation through large depths of matter, based on a concept of the correction factor, is proposed. The results of Monte-Carlo calculations of this correction factor are presented. The parametrizations for continuous energy loss coefficients, valid in the broad interval of muon energies, and for the correction factor are given. The concrete calculations for pure water are presented.

  5. GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION FOR THE NEW MUON COLLIDER HISHAM SAYED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION FOR THE NEW MUON COLLIDER FRONT END HISHAM SAYED BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY FRONT END MEETING 01-28-2014 #12;GLOBALLY OPTIMIZING MUON TARGET & FRONT END 325 Sayed BNL #12;INTRODUCTION & LAYOUT Ă? High performance Optimization Tools on NERSC Ă? Target

  6. SHIELDING STUDIES FOR THE MUON COLLIDER TARGET NICHOLAS SOUCHLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    SHIELDING STUDIES FOR THE MUON COLLIDER TARGET NICHOLAS SOUCHLAS BNL Nov 30, 2010 1 #12;MUON). 6. CRYOGENIC COOLING FOR THE SC SOLENOIDS. 7. MERCURY COLLECTING TANK AND REMOVAL SYSTEM. 8. SHIELDING CONFIGURATIONS (WC BEADS+H2O). 2 #12;REQUIREMENTS/LIMITATIONS PROTON BEAM AND MERCURY JET

  7. The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration Considerations on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Plenary Meeting, KEK Jan 24, 2006 http://puhep1.princeton.edu/mumu/target/ (Presented by M. Zisman) Kirk T.) Kirk T. McDonald ISS Plenary Meeting, KEK, Jan 24, 2006 2 #12;The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider". Kirk T. McDonald ISS Plenary Meeting, KEK, Jan 24, 2006 3 #12;The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider

  8. Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in Hg_1-yMn_yTe Quantum Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Chao-Xing; /Tsinghua U., Beijing /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Qi, Xiao-Liang; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; /Beijing, Inst. Phys.; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-19

    The quantum Hall effect is usually observed when the two-dimensional electron gas is subjected to an external magnetic field, so that their quantum states form Landau levels. In this work we predict that a new phenomenon, the quantum anomalous Hall effect, can be realized in Hg{sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}Te quantum wells, without the external magnetic field and the associated Landau levels. This effect arises purely from the spin polarization of the Mn atoms, and the quantized Hall conductance is predicted for a range of quantum well thickness and the concentration of the Mn atoms. This effect enables dissipationless charge current in spintronics devices.

  9. Search for anomalous production of events with a high energy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ThesisDissertation: Search for anomalous production of events with a high energy lepton and photon at the Tevatron Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Search for anomalous...

  10. CMS TECHNICAL DESIGN REPORT FOR THE MUON ENDCAP GEM UPGRADE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colaleo, A; Sharma, A; Tytgat, M

    2015-01-01

    This report describes both the technical design and the expected performance of the Phase-II upgrade, using Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors, of the first endcap station of the CMS muon system. The upgrade is targeted for the second long shutdown of the CERN LHC and is designed to improve the muon trigger and tracking performance at high luminosity. The GEM detectors will add redundancy to the muon system in the 1.6 technology to operate in the high radiation environment present in that region. The first muon endcap station will be instrumented with a double layer of triple-GEM chambers in the 1.6 < |?| < 2.2 region. The detector front-end electronics uses the custom designed VFAT3 chip to provide both fast input for the level-1 muon trigger ...

  11. Development of anomalous diffusion among crowding proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Margaret R. Horton; Felix Höfling; Joachim O. Rädler; Thomas Franosch

    2010-03-19

    In cell membranes, proteins and lipids diffuse in a highly crowded and heterogeneous landscape, where aggregates and dense domains of proteins or lipids obstruct the path of diffusing molecules. In general, hindered motion gives rise to anomalous transport, though the nature of the onset of this behavior is still under debate and difficult to investigate experimentally. Here, we present a systematic study where proteins bound to supported lipid membranes diffuse freely in two dimensions, but are increasingly hindered by the presence of other like proteins. In our model system, the surface coverage of the protein avidin on the lipid bilayer is well controlled by varying the concentration of biotinylated lipid anchors. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), we measure the time correlation function over long times and convert it to the mean-square displacement of the diffusing proteins. Our approach allows for high precision data and a clear distinction between anomalous and normal diffusion. It enables us to investigate the onset of anomalous diffusion, which takes place when the area coverage of membrane proteins increases beyond approximately 5%. This transition region exhibits pronounced spatial heterogeneities. Increasing the packing fraction further, transport becomes more and more anomalous, manifested in a decrease of the exponent of subdiffusion.

  12. EXPERIMENT E951 POWER SUPPLY TO PULSE A 14.5 TESLA SOLENOID MAGNET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    EXPERIMENT E951 POWER SUPPLY TO PULSE A 14.5 TESLA SOLENOID MAGNET IOANNIS MARNERIS BOOSTER and 3 we will have four 540KVA in series/parallel to generate 7200A, +/300 V (Cases 2-3). The 540KVA T magnet): - + MUON EXPERIMENT POWER SUPPLY FOR PULSING A 5 TESLA MAGNET 3600 A, +/ - 150 V . MOD. 1 3600 A

  13. Muon simulations for Super-Kamiokande, KamLAND, and CHOOZ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Alfred; Horton-Smith, Glenn; Kudryavtsev, Vitaly A.; Tonazzo, Alessandra

    2006-09-01

    Muon backgrounds at Super-Kamiokande, KamLAND, and CHOOZ are calculated using MUSIC. A modified version of the Gaisser sea-level muon distribution and a well-tested Monte Carlo integration method are introduced. Average muon energy, flux, and rate are tabulated. Plots of average energy and angular distributions are given. Implications for muon tracker design in future experiments are discussed.

  14. Construccion, calibracion evaluacion del sistema link de alineamiento del espectrometro de muones del experimento CMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calderon A T

    Construccion, calibracion evaluacion del sistema link de alineamiento del espectrometro de muones del experimento CMS

  15. The muon system of the Daya Bay Reactor antineutrino experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daya Bay Collaboration

    2014-11-28

    The Daya Bay experiment consists of functionally identical antineutrino detectors immersed in pools of ultrapure water in three well-separated underground experimental halls near two nuclear reactor complexes. These pools serve both as shields against natural, low-energy radiation, and as water Cherenkov detectors that efficiently detect cosmic muons using arrays of photomultiplier tubes. Each pool is covered by a plane of resistive plate chambers as an additional means of detecting muons. Design, construction, operation, and performance of these muon detectors are described.

  16. The Muon System of the Daya Bay Reactor Antineutrino Experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    An, F. P.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Brown, R. E.; Chasman, C.; Dale, E.; Diwan, M. V.; Gill, R.; Hans, S.; Isvan, Z.; Jaffe, D. E.; Kettell, S. H.; Littenberg, L.; Pearson, C. E.; Qian, X.; Theman, H.; Viren, B.; Worcester, E.; Yeh, M.; Zhang, C.

    2015-02-01

    The Daya Bay experiment consists of functionally identical antineutrino detectors immersed in pools of ultrapure water in three well-separated underground experimental halls near two nuclear reactor complexes. These pools serve both as shields against natural, low-energy radiation, and as water Cherenkov detectors that efficiently detect cosmic muons using arrays of photomultiplier tubes. Each pool is covered by a plane of resistive plate chambers as an additional means of detecting muons. Design, construction, operation, and performance of these muon detectors are described. (auth)

  17. The Muon System of the Daya Bay Reactor Antineutrino Experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    An, F. P.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Brown, R. E.; Chasman, C.; Dale, E.; Diwan, M. V.; Gill, R.; Hans, S.; Isvan, Z.; Jaffe, D. E.; et al

    2014-10-05

    The Daya Bay experiment consists of functionally identical antineutrino detectors immersed in pools of ultrapure water in three well-separated underground experimental halls near two nuclear reactor complexes. These pools serve both as shields against natural, low-energy radiation, and as water Cherenkov detectors that efficiently detect cosmic muons using arrays of photomultiplier tubes. Each pool is covered by a plane of resistive plate chambers as an additional means of detecting muons. Design, construction, operation, and performance of these muon detectors are described. (auth)

  18. The MICE Muon Beam on ISIS and the beam-line instrumentation of the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICE Collaboration

    2012-03-23

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), which is under construction at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), will demonstrate the principle of ionization cooling as a technique for the reduction of the phase-space volume occupied by a muon beam. Ionization cooling channels are required for the Neutrino Factory and the Muon Collider. MICE will evaluate in detail the performance of a single lattice cell of the Feasibility Study 2 cooling channel. The MICE Muon Beam has been constructed at the ISIS synchrotron at RAL, and in MICE Step I, it has been characterized using the MICE beam-instrumentation system. In this paper, the MICE Muon Beam and beam-line instrumentation are described. The muon rate is presented as a function of the beam loss generated by the MICE target dipping into the ISIS proton beam. For a 1 V signal from the ISIS beam-loss monitors downstream of our target we obtain a 30 KHz instantaneous muon rate, with a neglible pion contamination in the beam.

  19. The MICE Muon Beam on ISIS and the beam-line instrumentation of the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogomilov, M.; et al.

    2012-05-01

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), which is under construction at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), will demonstrate the principle of ionization cooling as a technique for the reduction of the phase-space volume occupied by a muon beam. Ionization cooling channels are required for the Neutrino Factory and the Muon Collider. MICE will evaluate in detail the performance of a single lattice cell of the Feasibility Study 2 cooling channel. The MICE Muon Beam has been constructed at the ISIS synchrotron at RAL, and in MICE Step I, it has been characterized using the MICE beam-instrumentation system. In this paper, the MICE Muon Beam and beam-line instrumentation are described. The muon rate is presented as a function of the beam loss generated by the MICE target dipping into the ISIS proton beam. For a 1 V signal from the ISIS beam-loss monitors downstream of our target we obtain a 30 KHz instantaneous muon rate, with a neglible pion contamination in the beam.

  20. First direct observation of muon antineutrino disappearance

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamson, P.

    2011-07-05

    This letter reports the first direct observation of muon antineutrino disappearance. The MINOS experiment has taken data with an accelerator beam optimized for ??? production, accumulating an exposure of 1.71 x 1020 protons on target. In the Far Detector, 97 charged current ??? events are observed. The no-oscillation hypothesis predicts 156 events and is excluded at 6.3?. The best fit to oscillation yields |?m?2| = (3.36-0.40 +0.46(stat.) ± 0.06(syst.)) x 10-3 eV2, sin2(2 ??) = 0.86-0.12+0.11 (stat.) ± 0.01(syst.). The MINOS ?? and ??? measurements are consistent at the 2.0% confidence level, assuming identical underlying oscillation parameters.

  1. Anomalous Topological Pumps and Fractional Josephson Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan Zhang; C. L. Kane

    2013-10-20

    We discover novel topological pumps in the Josephson effects for superconductors. The phase difference, which is odd under the chiral symmetry defined by the product of time-reversal and particle-hole symmetries, acts as an anomalous adiabatic parameter. These pumping cycles are different from those in the "periodic table", and are characterized by $Z\\times Z$ or $Z_2\\times Z_2$ strong invariants. We determine the general classifications in class AIII, and those in class DIII with a single anomalous parameter. For the $Z_2\\times Z_2$ topological pump in class DIII, one $Z_2$ invariant describes the coincidence of fermion parity and spin pumps whereas the other one reflects the non-Abelian statistics of Majorana Kramers pairs, leading to three distinct fractional Josephson effects.

  2. Balancing particle absorption with structural support of the muon beam stop in muons-to-electrons experimental chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majewski, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is seeking a full conversion from muon to electron. The design for Mu2e is based off MECO, another proposed experiment that sought a full conversion from muon to electron at Brookhaven National Laboratory in the 1990s. Mu2e will provide sensitivity that is four times the sensitivity of the previous experiment, SINDRUM II. Discovering muon to electron conversions could help explain physics beyond the standard model of the particle physics.

  3. Detecting Special Nuclear Material Using Muon-Induced Neutron Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Guardincerri; J. D. Bacon; K. Borodzin; J. M. Durham; J. M. Fabritius II; A. Hecht; E. C. Milner; H. Miyadera; C. L. Morris; J. O. Perry; D. Poulson

    2015-03-25

    The penetrating ability of cosmic ray muons makes them an attractive probe for imaging dense materials. Here, we describe experimental results from a new technique that uses neutrons generated by cosmic-ray muons to identify the presence of special nuclear material (SNM). Neutrons emitted from SNM are used to tag muon-induced fission events in actinides and laminography is used to form images of the stopping material. This technique allows the imaging of SNM-bearing objects tagged using muon tracking detectors located above or to the side of the objects, and may have potential applications in warhead verification scenarios. During the experiment described here we did not attempt to distinguish the type or grade of the SNM.

  4. Fermilab | Newsroom | Press Releases | May 8, 2013: Muon g-2...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High Res Crews work to attach the red stabilizing apparatus to the Muon g-2 rings at Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York in preparation for moving them over land and sea to...

  5. Measurement of muon plus proton final states in $\

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walton, T; Aliaga, L; Altinok, O; Bodek, A; Bravar, A; Budd, H; Bustamante, M J; Butkevich, A; Caicedo, D A Martinez; Carneiro, M F; Castromonte, C M; Christy, M E; Chvojka, J; da Motta, H; Datta, M; Devan, J; Dytman, S A; Díaz, G A; Eberly, B; Felix, J; Fields, L; Fine, R; Fiorentini, G A; Gago, A M; Gallagher, H; Gran, R; Harris, D A; Higuera, A; Hurtado, K; Kleykamp, J; Kordosky, M; Kulagin, S A; Le, T; Maher, E; Manly, S; Mann, W A; Marshall, C M; Mari, C Martin; McFarland, K S; McGivern, C L; McGowan, A M; Messerly, B; Miller, J; Mislivec, A; Morfín, J G; Mousseau, J; Muhlbeier, T; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Norrick, A; Osta, J; Paolone, V; Park, J; Patrick, C E; Perdue, G N; Rakotondravohitra, L; Ransome, R D; Ray, H; Ren, L; Rodrigues, P A; Schellman, H; Schmitz, D W; Simon, C; Snider, F D; Sobczyk, J T; Salinas, C J Solano; Tagg, N; Tice, B G; Valencia, E; Wolcott, J; Wospakrik, M; Zavala, G; Zhang, D; Ziemer, B P

    2014-01-01

    A study of charged-current muon neutrino scattering on hydrocarbon in which the final state includes a muon and a proton and no pions is presented. Although this signature has the topology of neutrino quasielastic scattering from neutrons, the event sample contains contributions from both quasielastic and inelastic processes where pions are absorbed in the nucleus. The analysis accepts events with muon production angles up to 70$^{\\circ}$ and proton kinetic energies greater than 110~MeV. The extracted cross section, when based completely on hadronic kinematics, is well-described by a simple relativistic Fermi gas nuclear model including the neutrino event generator modeling for inelastic processes and particle transportation through the nucleus. This is in contrast to the quasielastic cross section based on muon kinematics, which is best described by an extended model that incorporates multi-nucleon correlations. This measurement guides the formulation of a complete description of neutrino-nucleus interaction...

  6. Measurement of the Positive Muon Lifetime and Determination of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    measured. The experiment used a time-structured, low-energy muon beam and a segmented plastic scintillator array to record more than 2x10sup 12 decays. Two different stopping...

  7. CROSS SECTION MEASUREMENTS FOR CHARM PRODUCTION BY MUONS AND PHOTONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, A.R.

    2013-01-01

    Production by Muons and Photons A.Rc Clark, K.J, Johnson,section for 178(100)-GeV photons is 750 _ ) nb, too small tohigh-energy rise in the photon-nucleon total cross sectiono

  8. Muon Pair Production in ep Collisions at HERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aktas, A; Anthonis, T; Asmone, A; Babaev, A; Backovic, S; Bähr, J; Baranov, P; Barrelet, E; Bartel, Wulfrin; Baumgartner, S; Becker, J; Beckingham, M; Behnke, O; Behrendt, O; Belousov, A; Berger, C; Berger, N; Berndt, T; Bizot, J C; Böhme, J; Boenig, M O; Boudry, V; Bracinik, J; Braunschweig, W; Brisson, V; Broker, H B; Brown, D P; Bruncko, Dusan; Büsser, F W; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Caron, S; Cassol-Brunner, F; Cerny, K; Chekelian, V; Collard, Caroline; Contreras, J G; Coppens, Y R; Coughlan, J A; Cousinou, M C; Cox, B E; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Dau, W D; Daum, K; Delcourt, B; Delerue, N; Demirchyan, R; de Roeck, A; Desch, Klaus; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dingfelder, J; Dodonov, V; Dowell, John D; Dubak, A; Duprel, C; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eichler, R; Eisele, F; Ellerbrock, M; Elsen, E; Erdmann, M; Erdmann, W; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Ferencei, J; Fleischer, M; Fleischmann, P; Fleming, Y H; Flucke, G; Flügge, G; Fomenko, A; Foresti, I; Formánek, J; Franke, G; Frising, G; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gabathuler, K; Garvey, J; Gassner, J; Gayler, J; Gerhards, R; Gerlich, C; Ghazaryan, S; Görlich, L; Gogitidze, N; Gorbounov, S; Grab, C; Grabskii, V; Grässler, Herbert; Greenshaw, T; Gregori, M; Grindhammer, G; Haidt, Dieter; Hajduk, L; Haller, J; Heinzelmann, G; Henderson, R C W; Henschel, H; Henshaw, O; Heremans, R; Herrera-Corral, G; Herynek, I; Heuer, R D; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hladky, J; Hoting, P; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R P; Hovhannisyan, A; Ibbotson, M; Ismail, M; Jacquet, M; Janauschek, L; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jönsson, L B; Johnson, C; Johnson, D P; Jung, H; Kant, D; Kapichine, M; Karlsson, M; Katzy, J; Keller, N; Kennedy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, T; Knies, G; Knutsson, A; Koblitz, B; Kolya, S D; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Koutouev, R; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kroseberg, J; Kuckens, J; Kuhr, T; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastoviicka, T; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Leiner, B; Lemrani, R; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; List, B; Lobodzinska, E; Loktionova, N A; López-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Lüders, H; Lüders, S; Lüke, D; Lux, T; Lytkin, L; Makankine, A; Malden, N; Malinovskii, E I; Mangano, S; Marage, P; Marks, J; Marshall, R; Martisikova, M; Martyn, H U; Martyniak, J; Maxfield, S J; Meer, D; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Michine, S; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz, I; Milstead, D; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morozov, I; Morris, J V; Mozer, M; Müller, K; Murn, P; Nagovizin, V; Naroska, Beate; Naumann, J; Naumann, T; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C B; Nikitin, D K; Nowak, G; Nozicka, M; Olivier, B; Olsson, J E; Ossoskov, G; Ozerov, D; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Peez, M; Pérez, E; Perieanu, A; Petrukhin, A; Pitzl, D; Pöschl, R; Portheault, B; Povh, B; Raicevic, N; Rauschenberger, J; Reimer, P; Reisert, B; Risler, C; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A A; Rurikova, Z; Rusakov, S V; Rybicki, K; Sankey, D P C; Sauvan, E; Schatzel, S; Scheins, J; Schilling, F P; Schleper, P; Schmidt, S; Schmitt, S; Schneider, M; Schoeffel, L; Schöning, A; Schröder, V; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schwanenberger, C; Sedlak, K; Sefkow, F; Shevyakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Sirois, Y; Sloan, T; Smirnov, P; Soloviev, Yu; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, A; Spitzer, H; Stamen, R; Stella, B; Stiewe, J; Strauch, I; Straumann, U; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Tomasz, F; Traynor, D; Truöl, P; Tsipolitis, G; Tsurin, I; Turnau, J; Tzamariudaki, E; Uraev, A; Urban, M; Usik, A; Valkár, S; Valkárová, A; Vallée, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vargas-Trevino, A; Vasilev, S; Vazdik, Ya A; Veelken, C; Vest, A; Vichnevski, A; Vinokurova, S; Volchinski, V; Wacker, K; Wagner, J; Waugh, B; Weber, G; Weber, R; Wegener, D; Werner, C; Werner, N; Wessels, M; Wessling, B; Winde, M; Winter, G G; Wissing, C; Woerling, E E; Wünsch, E; Yan, W; Zaicek, J; Zaleisak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhokin, A; Zohrabyan, H G; Zomer, F

    2003-01-01

    Cross sections for the production of two isolated muons up to high di-muon masses are measured in ep collisions at HERA with the H1 detector in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 71 pb^-1 at a centre of mass energy of sqrt{s} = 319 GeV. The results are in good agreement with Standard Model predictions, the dominant process being photon-photon interactions. Additional muons or electrons are searched for in events with two high transverse momentum muons using the full data sample corresponding to 114 pb^-1, where data at sqrt{s} = 301 GeV and sqrt{s} = 319 GeV are combined. Both the di-lepton sample and the tri-lepton sample agree well with the predictions.

  9. Vacuum self-magnetization?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perez Rojas, H.; Rodriguez Querts, E. [Instituto de Cibernetica, Matematica y Fisica, Calle E No. 309, esq. a 15 Vedado, C. Havana (Cuba)

    2006-06-19

    We study vacuum properties in a strong magnetic field as the zero temperature and zero density limit of quantum statistics. For charged vector bosons (W bosons) the vacuum energy density diverges for B > B{sub c} = m{sub w}{sup 2}/e, leading to vacuum instability. A logarithmic divergence of vacuum magnetization is found for B = Bc, which suggests that if the magnetic field is large enough, it is self-consistently maintained, and this mechanism actually prevents B from reaching the critical value Bc. For virtual neutral vector bosons bearing an anomalous magnetic moment, the instability of the ground state for B > B{sub c}{sup '} = m{sub n}{sup 2}/q also leads to the vacuum energy density divergence for fields B > B{sub c}{sup '} and to the magnetization divergence for B B{sub c}{sup '}. The possibility of virtual electron-positron pairs bosonization in strong magnetic field and the applicability of the neutral bosons model to describe the virtual positronium behavior in a magnetic field are discussed. We conjecture that this could lead to vacuum self-magnetization in QED.

  10. Phase-space jets drive transport and anomalous resistivity (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    transport and anomalous resistivity In the presence of wave dissipation, phase-space structures spontaneously emerge in nonlinear Vlasov dynamics. These structures include not only...

  11. Anomalous Zeeman response of the coexisting superconducting and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Anomalous Zeeman response of the coexisting superconducting and spin-density-wave phases as a probe of extended s -wave pairing in ferropnictide superconductors Prev Next ...

  12. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 84, 224402 (2011) Anomalous magneto-optical Kerr hysteresis loops in Fe0.25TaS2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kono, Junichiro

    2011-01-01

    in a number of these materials,9 while long-range magnetic order can occur when TX2 is intercalated with 3d structures of these layered materials provide a natural quasi-two-dimensional platform for the fundamentalPHYSICAL REVIEW B 84, 224402 (2011) Anomalous magneto-optical Kerr hysteresis loops in Fe0.25TaS2

  13. New bounds on neutrino electric millicharge from GEMMA experiment on neutrino magnetic moment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor B. Brudanin; Dmitry V. Medvedev; Alexander S. Starostin; Alexander I. Studenikin

    2014-11-09

    Using the new limit on the neutrino anomalous magnetic moment recently obtained by GEMMA experiment we get an order-of-magnitude estimation for possible new direct upper bound on the neutrino electric millicharge $\\mid q_{\

  14. Magnetic measurements on ??CS{sub 2}U{sub 4}O{sub 12}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanrar, Buddhadev Misra, N. L.; Sastry, P. U.; Dube, V.; Ravikumar, G.

    2014-04-24

    Magnetic and XRD measurements on ??CS{sub 2}U{sub 4}O{sub 12} having uranium in mixed valent states of U (V) and U (VI) have been made. The study reveals that the compound undergoes an antiferromagnetic transition below 25K and an anomalous magnetic behavior was seen around 75K. This anomalous behavior indicates towards a structural phase transition. However, the low temperature XRD could not confirm this observation.

  15. Nernst Effect in Magnetized Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joglekar, Archis S; Ridgers, Christopher P; Kingham, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    We present nanosecond timescale Vlasov-Fokker-Planck-Maxwell modeling of magnetized plasma transport and dynamics in a hohlraum with an applied external magnetic field, under conditions similar to recent experiments. Self-consistent modeling of the kinetic electron momentum equation allows for a complete treatment of the heat flow equation and Ohm's Law, including Nernst advection of magnetic fields. In addition to showing the prevalence of non-local behavior, we demonstrate that effects such as anomalous heat flow are induced by inverse bremsstrahlung heating. We show magnetic field amplification up to a factor of 3 from Nernst compression into the hohlraum wall. The magnetic field is also expelled towards the hohlraum axis due to Nernst advection faster than frozen-in-flux would suggest. Non-locality contributes to the heat flow towards the hohlraum axis and results in an augmented Nernst advection mechanism that is included self-consistently through kinetic modeling.

  16. Top polarisation measurement and anomalous $Wtb$ coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arun Prasath; Rohini M. Godbole; Saurabh D. Rindani

    2014-12-09

    Kinematical distributions of the decay products of the top quark carry information on the polarisation of the top as well as on any possible new physics in the decay of the top quark. We construct observables in the form of asymmetries in the kinematical distributions to probe their effects. Charged-lepton angular distributions in the decay are insensitive to anomalous couplings and are a sensitive measure of top polarisation. However, these are difficult to measure in the case of highly boosted top quarks as compared to energy distributions of decay products. These are then sensitive, in general, to both top polarisation and top anomalous couplings. We compare various asymmetries for their sensitivities to the polarisation of the top quark as well as to possible new physics in the $Wtb$ vertex, paying special attention to the case of highly boosted top quarks. We perform a $\\chi ^2$- analysis to determine the regions in the polarisation of the top quark and the couplings of the $Wtb$ vertex constrained by different combinations of the asymmetries.

  17. Elliptic flow of muons from heavy-flavour hadron decays at forward...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Elliptic flow of muons from heavy-flavour hadron decays at forward rapidity in Pb-Pb collisions at sNN2.76 TeV Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Elliptic flow of muons...

  18. A New ATLAS Muon CSC Readout System with System on Chip Technology...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A New ATLAS Muon CSC Readout System with System on Chip Technology on ATCA Platform Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A New ATLAS Muon CSC Readout System with System on...

  19. Search for Sterile Neutrinos in the Muon Neutrino Disappearance Mode at FNAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anokhina, A; Benettoni, M; Bernardini, P; Brugnera, R; Calabrese, M; Cecchetti, A; Cecchini, S; Chernyavskiy, M; Corso, F Dal; Dalkarov, O; Del Prete, A; De Robertis, G; De Serio, M; Di Ferdinando, D; Dusini, S; Dzhatdoev, T; Fini, R A; Fiore, G; Garfagnini, A; Guerzoni, M; Klicek, B; Kose, U; Jakovcic, K; Laurenti, G; Lippi, I; Loddo, F; Longhin, A; Malenica, M; Mancarella, G; Mandrioli, G; Margiotta, A; Marsell, G; Mauri, N; Medinaceli, E; Mingazheva, R; Morgunova, O; Muciaccia, M T; Nessi, M; Orecchini, D; Paoloni, A; Papadia, G; Paparella, L; Pasqualini, L; Pastore, A; Patrizii, L; Polukhina, N; Pozzato, M; Roda, M; Roganova, T; Rosa, G; Sahnoun, Z; Shchedrina, T; Simone, S; Sirignano, C; Sirri, G; Spurio, M; Stanco, L; Starkov, N; Stipcevic, M; Surdo, A; Tenti, M; Togo, V; Vladymyrov, M

    2015-01-01

    The NESSiE Collaboration has been setup to undertake a conclusive experiment to clarify the {\\em muon--neutrino disappearance} measurements at short baselines in order to put severe constraints to models with more than the three--standard neutrinos, or even to robustly establish the presence of a new kind of neutrino oscillation for the first time. To this aim the use of the current FNAL--Booster neutrino beam for a Short--Baseline experiment was carefully evaluated by considering the use of magnetic spectrometers at two sites, near and far ones. The detector locations were extensively studied, together with the achievable performances of two OPERA--like spectrometers. The study was constrained by the availability of existing hardware and a time--schedule compatible with the undergoing project of multi--site Liquid--Argon detectors at FNAL. \

  20. Multi-purpose 805 MHz Pillbox RF Cavity for Muon Acceleration Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurennoy, Sergey S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chan, Kwok-Chi Dominic [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jason, Andrew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miyadera, Haruo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turchi, Peter J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-01

    An 805 MHz RF pillbox cavity has been designed and constructed to investigate potential muon beam acceleration and cooling techniques. The cavity can operate at vacuum or under pressure to 100 atmospheres, at room temperature or in a liquid nitrogen bath at 77 K. The cavity is designed for easy assembly and disassembly with bolted construction using aluminum seals. The surfaces of the end walls of the cavity can be replaced with different materials such as copper, aluminum, beryllium, or molybdenum, and with different geometries such as shaped windows or grid structures. Different surface treatments such as electro polished, high-pressure water cleaned, and atomic layer deposition are being considered for testing. The cavity has been designed to fit inside the 5-Tesla solenoid in the MuCool Test Area at Fermilab. Current status of the cavity prepared for initial conditioning and operation in the external magnetic field is discussed.

  1. Anomalous expansion of the copper-apical-oxygen distance in supercondu...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Anomalous expansion of the copper-apical-oxygen distance in superconducting cuprate bilayers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Anomalous expansion of the...

  2. Nuclear Waste Imaging and Spent Fuel Verification by Muon Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonkmans, G; Jewett, C; Thompson, M

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the use of cosmic ray muons to image the contents of shielded containers and detect high-Z special nuclear materials inside them. Cosmic ray muons are a naturally occurring form of radiation, are highly penetrating and exhibit large scattering angles on high Z materials. Specifically, we investigated how radiographic and tomographic techniques can be effective for non-invasive nuclear waste characterization and for nuclear material accountancy of spent fuel inside dry storage containers. We show that the tracking of individual muons, as they enter and exit a structure, can potentially improve the accuracy and availability of data on nuclear waste and the contents of Dry Storage Containers (DSC) used for spent fuel storage at CANDU plants. This could be achieved in near real time, with the potential for unattended and remotely monitored operations. We show that the expected sensitivity, in the case of the DSC, exceeds the IAEA detection target for nuclear material accountancy.

  3. A parameterisation of single and multiple muons in the deep water or ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annarita Margiotta

    2006-02-01

    A new parameterisation of atmospheric muons deep underwater (or ice) is presented. It takes into account the simultaneous arrival of muons in bundle giving the multiplicity of the events and the muon energy spectrum as a function of their lateral distribution in a shower.

  4. Alternative muon frontend for the International Design Study (IDS) A. Alekou, Imperial College, London, UK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Alternative muon front­end for the International Design Study (IDS) A. Alekou, Imperial College discuss alternative designs of the muon capture front end of the Neutrino Factory International Design measurements of neutrino oscillation parame­ ters. The present paper discusses alternative muon capture

  5. Muon-Induced Background Study for Underground Laboratories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. -M. Mei; A. Hime

    2005-12-06

    We provide a comprehensive study of the cosmic-ray muon flux and induced activity as a function of overburden along with a convenient parameterization of the salient fluxes and differential distributions for a suite of underground laboratories ranging in depth from $\\sim$1 to 8 km.w.e.. Particular attention is given to the muon-induced fast neutron activity for the underground sites and we develop a Depth-Sensitivity-Relation to characterize the effect of such background in experiments searching for WIMP dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay.

  6. Muon g-2 Anomaly and Dark Leptonic Gauge Boson

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Hye-Sung [W& M

    2014-11-01

    One of the major motivations to search for a dark gauge boson of MeV-GeV scale is the long-standing muon g-2 anomaly. Because of active searches such as fixed target experiments and rare meson decays, the muon g-2 favored parameter region has been rapidly reduced. With the most recent data, it is practically excluded now in the popular dark photon model. We overview the issue and investigate a potentially alternative model based on the gauged lepton number or U(1)_L, which is under different experimental constraints.

  7. Powder diffraction studies using anomalous dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, D.E. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Wilkinson, A.P. [California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials

    1993-05-01

    With the increasing availability and accessibility of high resolution powder diffractometers at many synchrotron radiation sources throughout the world, there is rapidly-growing interest in the exploitation of anomalous dispersion techniques for structural studies of polycrystalline materials. In conjunction with the Rietveld profile method for structure refinement, such studies are especially useful for the determination of the site distributions of two or more atoms which are near neighbors in the periodic table, or atoms which are distributed among partially occupied sites. Additionally, it is possible to (1) determine the mean-square displacements associated with different kinds of atoms distributed over a single set of sites, (2) distinguish between different oxidation states and coordination geometries of a particular atom in a compound and (3) to determine f` for a wide range of atomic species as a function of energy in the vicinity of an absorption edge. Experimental methods for making anomalous dispersion measurements are described in some detail, including data collection strategies, data analysis and correlation problems, possible systematic errors, and the accuracy of the results. Recent work in the field is reviewed, including cation site-distribution studies (e.g. doped high {Tc} superconductors, ternary alloys, FeCo{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}, FeNi{sub 2}BO{sub 5}), oxidation-state contrast (e.g. YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x}, Eu{sub 3}O{sub 4}, GaCl{sub 2}, Fe{sub 2}PO{sub 5}), and the effect of coordination geometry (e.g. Y{sub 3}Ga{sub 5}O{sub l2}).

  8. Powder diffraction studies using anomalous dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, D.E. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Wilkinson, A.P. (California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials)

    1993-01-01

    With the increasing availability and accessibility of high resolution powder diffractometers at many synchrotron radiation sources throughout the world, there is rapidly-growing interest in the exploitation of anomalous dispersion techniques for structural studies of polycrystalline materials. In conjunction with the Rietveld profile method for structure refinement, such studies are especially useful for the determination of the site distributions of two or more atoms which are near neighbors in the periodic table, or atoms which are distributed among partially occupied sites. Additionally, it is possible to (1) determine the mean-square displacements associated with different kinds of atoms distributed over a single set of sites, (2) distinguish between different oxidation states and coordination geometries of a particular atom in a compound and (3) to determine f' for a wide range of atomic species as a function of energy in the vicinity of an absorption edge. Experimental methods for making anomalous dispersion measurements are described in some detail, including data collection strategies, data analysis and correlation problems, possible systematic errors, and the accuracy of the results. Recent work in the field is reviewed, including cation site-distribution studies (e.g. doped high [Tc] superconductors, ternary alloys, FeCo[sub 2](PO[sub 4])[sub 3], FeNi[sub 2]BO[sub 5]), oxidation-state contrast (e.g. YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 6+x], Eu[sub 3]O[sub 4], GaCl[sub 2], Fe[sub 2]PO[sub 5]), and the effect of coordination geometry (e.g. Y[sub 3]Ga[sub 5]O[sub l2]).

  9. Performance of the ATLAS muon trigger in pp collisions at ?s = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-03-13

    The performance of the ATLAS muon trigger system is evaluated with proton–proton collision data collected in 2012 at the Large Hadron Collider at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. It is primarily evaluated using events containing a pair of muons from the decay of Z bosons. The efficiency of the single-muon trigger is measured for muons with transverse momentum 25 T more »top quarks. The muon trigger shows highly uniform and stable performance. Thus, the performance is compared to the prediction of a detailed simulation.« less

  10. Production of Charged Hadrons in Muon Deep Inelastic Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammed Sultan Al-Buriahi; Mohammed Tarek Hussein; Mohammed Tawfik Ghoneim

    2015-08-06

    The production of charged hadrons, in muon Deep inelastic scattering (DIS), at light and heavy target is presented. The particles produced by the interaction with Xenon (Xe) is compared with that produced by the interaction with Deuteron (D), to obtain information on cascading process, forward-backward productions, and the rapidity distribution in different bins of the invariant mass of the interacting system W.

  11. A MUON STORAGE RING FOR NEUTRINO OSCILLATIONS EXPERIMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    856 A MUON STORAGE RING FOR NEUTRINO OSCILLATIONS EXPERIMENTS David Cline University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wl 53706 David Neuffer Fermilab,* Batavia, IL 60510 ABSTRACT · + decay in a ~- Storage Ring can as a possible first ~ storage ring. INTRODUCTION Recent experimental reports 1'2 of a non-zero ~ mass and of e

  12. Neutrinos from Stored Muons nuSTORM: Expression of Interest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adey, D; Ankenbrandt, C M; Asfandiyarov, R; Back, J J; Barker, G; Baussan, E; Bayes, R; Bhadra, S; Blackmore, V; Blondel, A; Bogacz, S A; Booth, C; Boyd, S B; Bravar, A; Brice, S J; Bross, A D; Cadoux, F; Cease, H; Cervera, A; Cobb, J; Colling, D; Coney, L; Dobbs, A; Dobson, J; Donini, A; Dornan, P J; Dracos, M; Dufour, F; Edgecock, R; Evans, J; Geelhoed, M; George, M A; Ghosh, T; de Gouvea, A; Gomez-Cadenas, J J; Haesler, A; Hanson, G; Harrison, P F; Hartz, M; Hernandez, P; Hernando-Morata, J A; Hodgson, P J; Huber, P; Izmaylov, A; Karadhzov, Y; Kobilarcik, T; Kopp, J; Kormos, L; Korzenev, A; Kurup, A; Kuno, Y; Kyberd, P; Lagrange, J P; Laing, A M; Link, J; Liu, A; Long, K R; McCauley, N; McDonald, K T; Mahn, K; Martin, C; Martin, J; Mena, O; Mishra, S R; Mokhov, N; Morfin, J; Mori, Y; Murray, W; Neuffer, D; Nichol, R; Noah, E; Palmer, M A; Parke, S; Pascoli, S; Pasternak, J; Popovic, M; Ratoff, P; Ravonel, M; Rayner, M; Ricciardi, S; Rogers, C; Rubinov, P; Santos, E; Sato, A; Scantamburlo, E; Sedgbeer, J K; Smith, D R; Smith, P J; Sobczyk, J T; Soldner-Rembold, S; Soler, F J P; Sorel, M; Stahl, A; Stanco, L; Stamoulis, P; Striganov, S; Tanaka, H; Taylor, I J; Touramanis, C; Tunnell, C D; Uchida, Y; Vassilopoulos, N; Wascko, M O; Wilking, M J; Weber, A; Wildner, E; Winter, W; Yang, U K

    2013-01-01

    The nuSTORM facility has been designed to deliver beams of electron and muon neutrinos from the decay of a stored muon beam with a central momentum of 3.8 GeV/c and a momentum spread of 10%. The facility is unique in that it will: serve the future long- and short-baseline neutrino-oscillation programmes by providing definitive measurements of electron-neutrino- and muon-neutrino-nucleus cross sections with percent-level precision; allow searches for sterile neutrinos of exquisite sensitivity to be carried out; and constitute the essential first step in the incremental development of muon accelerators as a powerful new technique for particle physics. Of the world's proton-accelerator laboratories, only CERN and FNAL have the infrastructure required to mount nuSTORM. Since no siting decision has yet been taken, the purpose of this Expression of Interest (EoI) is to request the resources required to: investigate in detail how nuSTORM could be implemented at CERN; and develop options for decisive European contrib...

  13. Muon and Tau Neutrinos Spectra from Solar Flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Fargion; F. Moscato

    2004-05-03

    Solar neutrino flares and mixing are considered. Most power-full solar flare as the ones occurred on 23th February 1956, September 29th 1989, 28th October and on 2nd-4th November 2003 are sources of cosmic rays, X, gamma and neutrino bursts. These flares took place both on front or in the edge and in the hidden solar disk. The observed and estimated total flare energy should be a source of a prompt secondary neutrino burst originated, by proton-proton-pion production on the sun itself; a more delayed and spread neutrino flux signal arise by the solar charged flare particles reaching the terrestrial atmosphere. Our first estimates of neutrino signals in largest underground detectors hint for few events in correlation with, gamma,radio onser. Our approximated spectra for muons and taus from these rare solar eruption are shown over the most common background. The muon and tau signature is very peculiar and characteristic over electron and anti-electron neutrino fluxes. The rise of muon neutrinos will be detectable above the minimal muon threshold of 113 MeV. The rarest tau appearence will be possible only for hardest solar neutrino energies above 3.471 GeV

  14. The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration Large Underground Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Kirk T. McDonald Princeton University June 26, 2001 Meeting with Brierley Associates Ithaca, NY http://puhep1.princeton.edu/~mcdonald/nufact/ Kirk T. McDonald June 26, 2001 1 #12; The Neutrino Factory for neutrino detectors. Kirk T. McDonald June 26, 2001 2 #12; The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider

  15. Fermilab Muon Campus g-2 Cryogenic Distribution Remote Control System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pei, L; Klebaner, A; Soyars, W; Bossert, R

    2015-01-01

    The Muon Campus (MC) is able to measure Muon g-2 with high precision and comparing its value to the theoretical prediction. The MC has four 300 KW screw compressors and four liquid helium refrigerators. The centerpiece of the Muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab is a large, 50-foot-diameter superconducting muon storage ring. This one-of-a-kind ring, made of steel, aluminum and superconducting wire, was built for the previous g-2 experiment at Brookhaven. Due to each subsystem has to be far away from each other and be placed in the distant location, therefore, Siemens Process Control System PCS7-400, Automation Direct DL205 & DL05 PLC, Synoptic and Fermilab ACNET HMI are the ideal choices as the MC g-2 cryogenic distribution real-time and on-Line remote control system. This paper presents a method which has been successfully used by many Fermilab distribution cryogenic real-time and On-Line remote control systems.

  16. Shielded RF Lattice for the Muon Front End Chris Rogers,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Shielded RF Lattice for the Muon Front End Chris Rogers, Accelerator Science and Technology Centre (ASTeC), Rutherford Appleton Laboratory #12; Shielded RF Lattice I wanted to remind folks a lot of slides apologies I've tried to break it up a bit #12; Part 1 Shielded Lattice Baseline

  17. Simulation of neutrons produced by high-energy muons underground

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Lindote; H. M. Araujo; V. A. Kudryavtsev; M. Robinson

    2009-02-12

    This article describes the Monte Carlo simulation used to interpret the measurement of the muon-induced neutron flux in the Boulby Underground Laboratory (North Yorkshire, UK), recently performed using a large scintillator veto deployed around the ZEPLIN-II WIMP detector. Version 8.2 of the GEANT4 toolkit was used after relevant benchmarking and validation of neutron production models. In the direct comparison between Monte Carlo and experimental data, we find that the simulation produces a 1.8 times higher neutron rate, which we interpret as over-production in lead by GEANT4. The dominance of this material in neutron production allows us to estimate the absolute neutron yield in lead as (1.31 +/- 0.06) x 10^(-3) neutrons/muon/(g/cm^2) for a mean muon energy of 260 GeV. Simulated nuclear recoils due to muon-induced neutrons in the ZEPLIN-II target volume (~1 year exposure) showed that, although a small rate of events is expected from this source of background in the energy range of interest for dark matter searches, no event survives an anti-coincidence cut with the veto.

  18. PION PRODUCTION FOR NEUTRINO FACTORIES AND MUON COLLIDERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    PION PRODUCTION FOR NEUTRINO FACTORIES AND MUON COLLIDERS Workshop on Applications of High production for nufact/mu-collider - N.V. Mokhov Outline · Pion Production and Collection · Event Generators-independent analysis of HARP data 2 #12;AHIPA Workshop, Fermilab, October 19-21, 2009 Pion production for nufact

  19. Neutrinos from Stored Muons nuSTORM: Expression of Interest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Adey; S. K. Agarwalla; C. M. Ankenbrandt; R. Asfandiyarov; J. J. Back; G. Barker; E. Baussan; R. Bayes; S. Bhadra; V. Blackmore; A. Blondel; S. A. Bogacz; C. Booth; S. B. Boyd; A. Bravar; S. J. Brice; A. D. Bross; F. Cadoux; H. Cease; A. Cervera; J. Cobb; D. Colling; L. Coney; A. Dobbs; J. Dobson; A. Donini; P. J. Dornan; M. Dracos; F. Dufour; R. Edgecock; J. Evans; M. A. George; T. Ghosh; A. deGouvea; J. J. Gomez-Cadenas; A. Haesler; G. Hanson; M. Geelhoed; P. F. Harrison; M. Hartz; P. Hernandez; J. A. Hernando-Morata; P. J. Hodgson; P. Huber; A. Izmaylov; Y. Karadhzov; T. Kobilarcik; J. Kopp; L. Kormos; A. Korzenev; A. Kurup; Y. Kuno; P. Kyberd; J. P. Lagrange; A. M. Laing; J. Link; A. Liu; K. R. Long; N. McCauley; K. T. McDonald; K. Mahn; C. Martin; J. Martin; O. Mena; S. R. Mishra; N. Mokhov; J. Morfin; Y. Mori; W. Murray; D. Neuffer; R. Nichol; E. Noah; M. A. Palmer; S. Parke; S. Pascoli; J. Pasternak; M. Popovic; P. Ratoff; M. Ravonel; M. Rayner; S. Ricciardi; C. Rogers; P. Rubinov; E. Santos; A. Sato; E. Scantamburlo; J. K. Sedgbeer; D. R. Smith; P. J. Smith; J. T. Sobczyk; S. Soldner-Rembold; F. J. P. Soler; M. Sorel; A. Stahl; L. Stanco; P. Stamoulis; S. Striganov; H. Tanaka; I. J. Taylor; C. Touramanis; C. D. Tunnel; Y. Uchida; N. Vassilopoulos; M. O. Wascko; A. Weber; E. Wildner; M. J. Wilking; W. Winter; U. K. Yang

    2013-05-07

    The nuSTORM facility has been designed to deliver beams of electron and muon neutrinos from the decay of a stored muon beam with a central momentum of 3.8 GeV/c and a momentum spread of 10%. The facility is unique in that it will: serve the future long- and short-baseline neutrino-oscillation programmes by providing definitive measurements of electron-neutrino- and muon-neutrino-nucleus cross sections with percent-level precision; allow searches for sterile neutrinos of exquisite sensitivity to be carried out; and constitute the essential first step in the incremental development of muon accelerators as a powerful new technique for particle physics. Of the world's proton-accelerator laboratories, only CERN and FNAL have the infrastructure required to mount nuSTORM. Since no siting decision has yet been taken, the purpose of this Expression of Interest (EoI) is to request the resources required to: investigate in detail how nuSTORM could be implemented at CERN; and develop options for decisive European contributions to the nuSTORM facility and experimental programme wherever the facility is sited. The EoI defines a two-year programme culminating in the delivery of a Technical Design Report.

  20. Sampling and Characterization of 618-2 Anomalous Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.E. Zacharias

    2006-04-27

    Excavation of the 618-2 Burial Ground has produced many items of anomalous waste. Prior to temporary packaging and/or storage, these items have been characterized in the field to identify radiological and industrial safety conditions.

  1. Quantum transport, anomalous dephasing, and spin-orbit coupling...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantum transport, anomalous dephasing, and spin-orbit coupling in an open ballistic bismuth nanocavity Home Author: B. Hackens, J. P. Minet, S. Faniel, G. Farhi, C. Gustin, J. P....

  2. Apparatus for responding to an anomalous change in downhole pressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe; Wilde, Tyson; Barlow, Jonathan S.

    2010-04-13

    A method of responding to an anomalous change in downhole pressure in a bore hole comprises detecting the anomalous change in downhole pressure, sending a signal along the segmented electromagnetic transmission path, receiving the signal, and performing a automated response. The anomalous change in downhole pressure is detected at a first location along a segmented electromagnetic transmission path, and the segmented electromagnetic transmission path is integrated into the tool string. The signal is received by at least one receiver in communication with the segmented electromagnetic transmission path. The automated response is performed along the tool string. Disclosed is an apparatus for responding to an anomalous change in downhole pressure in a downhole tool string, comprising a segmented electromagnetic transmission path connecting one or more receivers and at least one pressure sensor.

  3. NLO BFKL and anomalous dimensions of light-ray operators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balitsky, Ian

    2013-05-01

    This presentation covers: Regge limit in the coordinate space; “BFKL” representation of 4-point correlation function in N = 4 SYM; light-ray operators; “DGLAP” representation of 4-point correlation function; and anomalous dimensions from DGAP vs BFKL representations.

  4. Searching for the fourth family quarks through anomalous decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahin, M.; Sultansoy, S.; Turkoz, S. [TOBB University of Economics and Technology, Physics Division, Ankara (Turkey); TOBB University of Economics and Technology, Physics Division, Ankara, Turkey and Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences, Baku (Azerbaijan); Ankara University, Department of Physics, Ankara (Turkey)

    2010-09-01

    The flavor democracy hypothesis predicts the existence of the fourth standard model family. Because of the high masses of the fourth family quarks, their anomalous decays could be dominant if certain criteria are met. This will drastically change the search strategy at hadron colliders. We show that the fourth standard model family down quarks with masses up to 400-450 GeV can be observed (or excluded) via anomalous decays by Tevatron.

  5. Simulation framework for spatio-spectral anomalous change detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theiler, James P; Harvey, Neal R; Porter, Reid B; Wohlberg, Brendt E

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe the development of a simulation framework for anomalous change detection that considers both the spatial and spectral aspects of the imagery. A purely spectral framework has previously been introduced, but the extension to spatio-spectral requires attention to a variety of new issues, and requires more careful modeling of the anomalous changes. Using this extended framework, they evaluate the utility of spatial image processing operators to enhance change detection sensitivity in (simulated) remote sensing imagery.

  6. Method for processing seismic data to identify anomalous absorption zones

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taner, M. Turhan

    2006-01-03

    A method is disclosed for identifying zones anomalously absorptive of seismic energy. The method includes jointly time-frequency decomposing seismic traces, low frequency bandpass filtering the decomposed traces to determine a general trend of mean frequency and bandwidth of the seismic traces, and high frequency bandpass filtering the decomposed traces to determine local variations in the mean frequency and bandwidth of the seismic traces. Anomalous zones are determined where there is difference between the general trend and the local variations.

  7. Measurement of the Z? production cross section in pp collisions at 8 TeV and search for anomalous triple gauge boson couplings

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-04-29

    The cross section for the production of Z? in proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV is measured based on data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb?ą. Events with an oppositely-charged pair of muons or electrons together with an isolated photon are selected. The differential cross section as a function of the photon transverse momentum is measured inclusively and exclusively, where the exclusive selection applies a veto on central jets. The observed cross sections are compatible with the expectations of next-to-next-to-leading-order quantum chromodynamics. Limits on anomalous triple gauge couplings of ZZ? andmore »Z?? are set that improve on previous experimental results obtained with the charged lepton decay modes of the Z boson.« less

  8. Diagnosing Anomalous Network Performance with Confidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Settlemyer, Bradley W; Hodson, Stephen W; Kuehn, Jeffery A; Poole, Stephen W

    2011-04-01

    Variability in network performance is a major obstacle in effectively analyzing the throughput of modern high performance computer systems. High performance interconnec- tion networks offer excellent best-case network latencies; how- ever, highly parallel applications running on parallel machines typically require consistently high levels of performance to adequately leverage the massive amounts of available computing power. Performance analysts have usually quantified network performance using traditional summary statistics that assume the observational data is sampled from a normal distribution. In our examinations of network performance, we have found this method of analysis often provides too little data to under- stand anomalous network performance. Our tool, Confidence, instead uses an empirically derived probability distribution to characterize network performance. In this paper we describe several instances where the Confidence toolkit allowed us to understand and diagnose network performance anomalies that we could not adequately explore with the simple summary statis- tics provided by traditional measurement tools. In particular, we examine a multi-modal performance scenario encountered with an Infiniband interconnection network and we explore the performance repeatability on the custom Cray SeaStar2 interconnection network after a set of software and driver updates.

  9. The scattering of muons in low Z materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MuScat Collaboration; D. Attwood; P. Bell; S. Bull; T. McMahon; J. Wilson; R. Fernow; P. Gruber; A. Jamdagni; K. Long; E. McKigney; P. Savage; M. Curtis-Rouse; T. R. Edgecock; M. Ellis; J. Lidbury; W. J. Murray; P. Norton; K. Peach; K. Ishida; Y. Matsuda; K. Nagamine; S. Nakamura; G. M. Marshall; S. Benveniste; D. Cline; Y. Fukui; K. Lee; Y. Pischalnikov; S. Holmes; A. Bogacz

    2005-12-02

    This paper presents the measurement of the scattering of 172 MeV/c muons in assorted materials, including liquid hydrogen, motivated by the need to understand ionisation cooling for muon acceleration. Data are compared with predictions from the Geant 4 simulation code and this simulation is used to deconvolute detector effects. The scattering distributions obtained are compared with the Moliere theory of multiple scattering and, in the case of liquid hydrogen, with ELMS. With the exception of ELMS, none of the models are found to provide a good description of the data. The results suggest that ionisation cooling will work better than would be predicted by Geant 4.7.0p01.

  10. RECENT PROGRESS TOWARD A MUON RECIRCULATING LINEAR ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slawomir Bogacz, Vasiliy Morozov, Yves Roblin, Kevin Beard

    2012-07-01

    Both Neutrino Factories (NF) and Muon Colliders (MC) require very rapid acceleration due to the short lifetime of muons. After a capture and bunching section, a linac raises the energy to about 900 MeV, and is followed by one or more Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA), possibly followed by a Rapid Cycling Synchnotron (RCS) or Fixed-Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) ring. A RLA reuses the expensive RF linac section for a number of passes at the price of having to deal with different energies within the same linac. Various techniques including pulsed focusing quadruopoles, beta frequency beating, and multipass arcs have been investigated via simulations to improve the performance and reduce the cost of such RLAs.

  11. Analysis of ordinary and radiative muon capture in liquid hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shung-ichi Ando; Fred Myhrer; Kuniharu Kubodera

    2001-10-04

    A simultaneous analysis is made of the measured rates of ordinary muon capture (OMC) and radiative muon capture (RMC) in liquid hydrogen, using theoretical estimates for the relevant atomic capture rates that have been obtained in chiral perturbation theory with the use of the most recent values of the coupling constants. We reexamine the basic formulas for relating the atomic OMC and RMC rates to the liquid-hydrogen OMC and RMC rates, respectively. Although the analysis is significantly influenced by ambiguity in the molecular state population, we can demonstrate that, while the OMC data can be reproduced, the RMC data can be explained only with unrealistic values of the coupling constants; the degree of difficulty becomes even more severe when we try to explain the OMC and RMC data simultaneously.

  12. Discussion - Next Step for Fukushima Daiichi Muon Tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyadera, Haruo

    2012-08-13

    Specification of Fukushima Daiichi Muon Tomography (FMT): (1) 18-feet (5.5-m) drift tube, 2-inch (5-cm) diameter; (2) 108 tubes per layer; (3) Unit layer = 2 layer (detection efficiency: 0.96 x 0.96 = 92%); (4) 12 or 16 layer per module; (5) 16 layers allows momentum analysis at 30% level; (6) 2 module per super module (5.5 x 11 m{sup 2}); and (7) FMT = 2 super module. By deploying MMT next to a research reactor, we will be able to measure the impact of low level radiation fields on muon tomography and reconstruction processes. Radiation level during reactor operation is {approx}50 {micro}Sv/h which provides similar radiation environment of inside the FMT radiation shield at Fukushima Daiichi. We will implement coincidence algorithm on the FPGA board.

  13. FEASIBILITY STUDY II OF A MUON BASED NEUTRINO SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GALLARDO,J.C.; OZAKI,S.; PALMER,R.B.; ZISMAN,M.

    2001-06-30

    The concept of using a muon storage ring to provide a well characterized beam of muon and electron neutrinos (a Neutrino Factory) has been under study for a number of years now at various laboratories throughout the world. The physics program of a Neutrino Factoryis focused on the relatively unexplored neutrino sector. In conjunction with a detector located a suitable distance from the neutrino source, the facility would make valuable contributions to the study of neutrino masses and lepton mixing. A Neutrino Factory is expected to improve the measurement accuracy of sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 23}) and {Delta}m{sup 2}{sub 32} and provide measurements of sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 13}) and the sign of {Delta}m{sup 2}{sub 32}. It may also be able to measure CP violation in the lepton sector.

  14. The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration Tests of Targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    .edu/mumu/target/ Kirk T. McDonald December 15, 2000 1 #12; The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration The Need collection efficiency. Solution: a moving target, such as a liquid metal jet. Kirk T. McDonald December 15 0.16 858 0.35 80 y 2.9 Bismuth 83 9.7 271 1610 0.12 857 0.079 120 1.3 y liquid Kirk T. Mc

  15. Lateral Distribution for Aligned Events in Muon Groups Deep Underground

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. L. Tsyabuk; R. A. Mukhamedshin; Yu. V. Stenkin

    2007-01-09

    The paper concerns the so-called aligned events observed in cosmic rays. The phenomenon of the alignment of the most energetic subcores of gamma-ray--hadron ($\\gamma-h$) families (particles of the highest energies in the central EAS core) was firstly found in the "Pamir" emulsion chamber experiment and related to a coplanar particle production at $E_0>10^{16}$ eV. Here a separation distribution (distances between pairs of muons) for aligned events has been analyzed throughout muon groups measured by Baksan Underground Scintillation Telescope (BUST) for threshold energies $0.85 \\div 3.2$ TeV during a period of 7.7 years. Only muon groups of multiplicity $m\\geq 4$ with inclined trajectories for an interval of zenith angles $50^\\circ - 60^\\circ$ were selected for the analysis. The analysis has revealed that the distribution complies with the exponential law. Meanwhile the distributions become steeper with the increase of threshold energy. There has been no difference between the lateral distribution of all the groups and the distribution of the aligned groups.

  16. ATLAS Muon Spectrometer Upgrades for the High Luminosity LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valderanis, Chrysostomos; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS Muon Spectrometer Upgrades for the High Luminosity LHC The luminosity of the LHC will increase up to 2x10^34 cm-2s-1 after the long shutdown in 2019 (phase-1 upgrade) and up to 7x10^34 cm-2s-1 after the long shutdown in 2025 (phase-2 upgrade). In order to cope with the increased particle fluxes, upgrades are envisioned for the ATLAS muon spectrometer. At phase-1, the current innermost stations of the ATLAS muon endcap tracking system (the Small Wheels) will be upgraded with 2x4-layer modules of Micromega detectors, sandwiched by two 4 layer modules of small strip Thin Gap Chambers on either side. Each 4-layer module of the so-called New Small Wheels covers a surface area of approximately 2 to 3 m2 for a total active area of 1200 m2 each for the two technologies. On such large area detectors, the mechanical precision (30 \\mu m along the precision coordinate and 80 \\mu m along the beam) is a key point and must be controlled and monitored along the process of construction and integration. The design and re...

  17. Our Next Two Steps for Fukushima Daiichi Muon Tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyadera, Haruo

    2012-04-11

    After the vast disasters caused by the great earthquake and tsunami in eastern Japan, we proposed applying our Muon Tomography (MT) technique to help and improve the emergency situation at Fukushima Daiichi using cosmic-ray muons. A reactor-tomography team was formed at LANL which was supported by the Laboratory as a response to a request by the former Japanese Prime Minister, Naoto Kan. Our goal is to help the Japanese people and support remediation of the reactors. At LANL, we have carried out a proof-of-principle technical demonstration and simulation studies that established the feasibility of MT to image a reactor core. This proposal covers the next two critical steps for Fukushima Daiichi Muon Imaging: (1) undertake case study mock-up experiments of Fukushima Daiichi, and (2) system optimization. We requested funding to the US and Japanese government to assess damage of reactors at Fukushima Daiichi. The two steps will bring our project to the 'ready-to-go' level.

  18. Spontaneous Muon Emission during Fission, a New Nuclear Radioactivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. B. Ion; M. L. D. Ion; Reveica Ion-Mihai

    2011-01-24

    In this paper the essential theoretical predictions for the nuclear muonic radioactivity are presented by using a special fission-like model similar with that used in description of the pionic emission during fission. Hence, a fission-like model for the muonic radioactivity takes into account the essential degree of freedom of the system: muon-fissility, muon-fission barrier height, etc. Using this model it was shown that most of the SHE-nuclei lie in the region where the muonic fissility parameters attain their limiting value X=1. Hence, the SHE-region is characterized by the absence of a classical barrier toward spontaneous muon and pion emissions. Numerical estimations on the yields for the natural muonic radioactivities of the transuranium elements as well numerical values for barrier heights are given only for even-even parent nuclei. Some experimental results from LCP-identification emission spectrum are reviewed. Also, the experimental results obtained by Khryachkov et al, using new spectrometer for investigation of ternary nuclear fission, are presented. The OPERA-experiment proposed to perform search for muonic radioactivity from lead nuclei, in the low background conditions offered by the Gran Sasso underground Laboratory (LNGS), is discussed.

  19. NuFact03, June 04 -11, New York Funneling pions and muons.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    9/9/2004 NuFact03, June 04 -11, New York Funneling pions and muons. 1 Funneling 's and µ's Bruno, New York Funneling pions and muons. 2 Proton Beam Parameters 4Beam power [MW] 50Repetition frequency bunch 140Number of bunches #12;9/9/2004 NuFact03, June 04 -11, New York Funneling pions and muons. 3 Why

  20. Anomalous spectral laws in differential models of turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon Thalabard; Sergey Nazarenko; Sebastien Galtier; Sergey Medvedev

    2015-05-27

    Differential models for hydrodynamic, passive-scalar and wave turbulence given by nonlinear first- and second-order evolution equations for the energy spectrum in the $k$-space were analysed. Both types of models predict formation an anomalous transient power-law spectra. The second-order models were analysed in terms of self-similar solutions of the second kind, and a phenomenological formula for the anomalous spectrum exponent was constructed using numerics for a broad range of parameters covering all known physical examples. The first-order models were examined analytically, including finding an analytical prediction for the anomalous exponent of the transient spectrum and description of formation of the Kolmogorov-type spectrum as a reflection wave from the dissipative scale back into the inertial range. The latter behaviour was linked to pre-shock/shock singularities similar to the ones arising in the Burgers equation. Existence of the transient anomalous scaling and the reflection-wave scenario are argued to be a robust feature common to the finite-capacity turbulence systems. The anomalous exponent is independent of the initial conditions but varies for for different models of the same physical system.

  1. Project X ICD-2 and its upgrades for Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebedev, Valeri; Nagaitsev, Sergei; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    This paper reviews the Initial Configuration Document for Fermilab's Project X and considers its possible upgrades for neutrino factory or muon collider.

  2. Muon Radiography at LANL | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Muon Radiography at LANL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science Applications of Nuclear Science...

  3. Progress on a Cavity with Beryllium Walls for Muon Ionization Cooling Channel R&D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowring, D.L.

    2014-01-01

    ON A CAVITY WITH BERYLLIUM WALLS FOR MUON IONIZATION COOLINGFabricating a cavity with beryllium walls would mitigatepillbox RF cavity with beryllium walls, in order to evaluate

  4. A Case Against Spinning PAHs as the Source of the Anomalous Microwave Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hensley, Brandon S

    2015-01-01

    We employ the all-sky map of the anomalous microwave emission (AME) produced by component separation of the microwave sky to study correlations between the AME and Galactic dust properties. We find that while the AME is highly correlated with all tracers of dust emission, fluctuations in the AME intensity per dust optical depth are uncorrelated with fluctuations in the emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), casting doubt on the association between AME and PAHs. Further, we find that the best predictor of the AME strength is the dust radiance and that the AME intensity increases with increasing radiation field strength, at variance with predictions from the spinning dust hypothesis. A reconsideration of other emission mechanisms, such as magnetic dipole emission, is warranted.

  5. Anomalous specific heat in high-density QED and QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Ipp; A. Gerhold; A. Rebhan

    2003-09-22

    Long-range quasi-static gauge-boson interactions lead to anomalous (non-Fermi-liquid) behavior of the specific heat in the low-temperature limit of an electron or quark gas with a leading $T\\ln T^{-1}$ term. We obtain perturbative results beyond the leading log approximation and find that dynamical screening gives rise to a low-temperature series involving also anomalous fractional powers $T^{(3+2n)/3}$. We determine their coefficients in perturbation theory up to and including order $T^{7/3}$ and compare with exact numerical results obtained in the large-$N_f$ limit of QED and QCD.

  6. Universal anomalous dimensions at large spin and large twist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apratim Kaviraj; Kallol Sen; Aninda Sinha

    2015-06-09

    In this paper we consider anomalous dimensions of double trace operators at large spin ($\\ell$) and large twist ($\\tau$) in CFTs in arbitrary dimensions ($d\\geq 3$). Using analytic conformal bootstrap methods, we show that the anomalous dimensions are universal in the limit $\\ell\\gg \\tau\\gg 1$. In the course of the derivation, we extract an approximate closed form expression for the conformal blocks arising in the four point function of identical scalars in any dimension. We compare our results with two different calculations in holography and find perfect agreement.

  7. Superconducting Magnet with the Reduced Barrel Yoke for the Hadron Future Circular Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klyukhin, V I; Berriaud, C; Curé, B; Dudarev, A; Gaddi, A; Gerwig, H; Hervé, A; Mentink, M; Rolando, G; Da Silva, H F Pais; Wagner, U; Kate, H H J ten

    2015-01-01

    The conceptual design study of a hadron Future Circular Collider (FCC-hh) with a center-of-mass energy of the order of 100 TeV in a new tunnel of 80-100 km circumference assumes the determination of the basic requirements for its detectors. A superconducting solenoid magnet of 12 m diameter inner bore with the central magnetic flux density of 6 T is proposed for a FCC-hh experimental setup. The coil of 24.518 m long has seven 3.5 m long modules included into one cryostat. The steel yoke with a mass of 21 kt consists of two barrel layers of 0.5 m radial thickness, and 0.7 m thick nose disk, four 0.6 m thick end-cap disks, and three 0.8 m thick muon toroid disks each side. The outer diameter of the yoke is 17.7 m; the length without the forward muon toroids is 33 m. The air gaps between the end-cap disks provide the installation of the muon chambers up to the pseudorapidity of \\pm 3.5. The conventional forward muon spectrometer provides the measuring of the muon momenta in the pseudorapidity region from \\pm 2.7...

  8. Cosmic magnetism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seymour, P.

    1986-01-01

    This book deals with the cosmic magnetism in a non-mathematical way. It uses Faraday's very powerful and highly pictorial concept of lines of magnetic force and their associated physical properties to explain the structure and behavior of magnetic fields in extraterrestrial objects. Contents include: forces of nature; magnetic field of earth; solar and interplanetary magnetic fields; magnetic fields in the solar system; stars and pulsars; and magnetic fields of the milky way and other galaxies.

  9. Atmospheric Neutrino Induced Muons in the MINOS Far Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahman, Dipu; /Minnesota U.

    2007-02-01

    The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. The MINOS Far Detector, located in the Soudan Underground Laboratory in Soudan MN, has been collecting data since August 2003. The scope of this dissertation involves identifying the atmospheric neutrino induced muons that are created by the neutrinos interacting with the rock surrounding the detector cavern, performing a neutrino oscillation search by measuring the oscillation parameter values of {Delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 23}, and searching for CPT violation by measuring the charge ratio for the atmospheric neutrino induced muons. A series of selection cuts are applied to the data set in order to extract the neutrino induced muons. As a result, a total of 148 candidate events are selected. The oscillation search is performed by measuring the low to high muon momentum ratio in the data sample and comparing it to the same ratio in the Monte Carlo simulation in the absence of neutrino oscillation. The measured double ratios for the ''all events'' (A) and high resolution (HR) samples are R{sub A} = R{sub low/high}{sup data}/R{sub low/high}{sup MC} = 0.60{sub -0.10}{sup +0.11}(stat) {+-} 0.08(syst) and R{sub HR} = R{sub low/high}{sup data}/R{sub low/high}{sup MC} = 0.58{sub -0.11}{sup +0.14}(stat) {+-} 0.05(syst), respectively. Both event samples show a significant deviation from unity giving a strong indication of neutrino oscillation. A combined momentum and zenith angle oscillation fit is performed using the method of maximum log-likelihood with a grid search in the parameter space of {Delta}m{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}. The best fit point for both event samples occurs at {Delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2} = 1.3 x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}, and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 23} = 1. This result is compatible with previous measurements from the Super Kamiokande experiment and Soudan 2 experiments. The MINOS Far Detector is the first underground neutrino detector to be able to distinguish the charge of the muons. The measured charge is used to test the rate of the neutrino to the anti-neutrino oscillations by measuring the neutrino induced muon charge ratio. Using the high resolution sample, the {mu}{sup +} to {mu}{sup -} double charge ratio has been determined to be R{sub CPT} = R{sub {mu}{sup -}/{mu}{sup +}}{sup data}/R{sub {mu}{sup -}/{mu}{sup +}}{sup MC} = 0.90{sub -0.18}{sup +0.24}(stat) {+-} 0.09(syst). With the uncertainties added in quadrature, the CPT double ratio is consistent with unity showing no indication for CPT violation.

  10. An investigation of the spin structure of the proton in deep inelastic scattering of polarised muons on polarised protons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashman, John Gavin; Baum, G; Beaufays, J; Bee, C P; Benchouk, C; Bird, I G; Brown, S C; Caputo, M C; Cheung, H W K; Chima, J S; Cibarowski, J; Clifft, R W; Coignet, G; Combley, F; Court, G R; D'Agostini, Giulio; Drees, J; Düren, M; Dyce, N; Edwards, A W; Edwards, M; Ernst, T; Ferrero, M I; Francis, D; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gamet, R; Gibson, V; Gillies, James D; Grafström, P; Hamacher, K; Von Harrach, D; Hayman, P J; Holt, J R; Hughes, V W; Jacholkowska, A; Jones, T; Kabuss, E M; Korzen, B; Krüner, U; Kullander, Sven; Landgraf, U; Lanske, D; Lattenstrom, F; Lindqvist, T; Loken, J G; Matthews, N; Mizuno, Y; Mönig, K; Montanet, François; Nagy, E; Nassalski, J P; Niinikoski, T O; Norton, P R; Oakham, F G; Oppenheim, R F; Osborne, A M; Papavassiliou, V; Pavel, N; Peroni, C; Peschel, H; Piegaia, R; Pietrzyk, B; Pietrzyk, U; Povh, B; Renton, P B; Rieubland, Jean Michel; Rijllart, A; Rith, K; Rondio, Ewa; Ropelewski, Leszek; Salmon, D P; Sandacz, A; Schröder, T B; Schüler, K P; Schultze, K; Shibata, T A; Sloan, Terence; Staiano, A; Stier, H E; Stock, J T; Taylor, G N; Thompson, J C; Walcher, T; Tóth, J; Urbŕn, L; Wallucks, W; Wheeler, S; Williams, D A; Williams, W S C; Wimpenny, S J; Windmolders, R; Womersley, W J; Ziemons, K

    1989-01-01

    An investigation of the spin structure of the proton in deep inelastic scattering of polarised muons on polarised protons

  11. GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION OF THE MUON COLLIDER/NEUTRINO FACTORY FRONT END

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION OF THE MUON COLLIDER/NEUTRINO FACTORY FRONT END HISHAM SAYED BROOKHAVEN MEETING 10 September 2013 #12;GLOBALLY OPTIMIZING MUON TARGET & FRONT END 9/10/13 2 in bunches #12;INTRODUCTION & LAYOUT Ă? High performance Optimization Tools on NERSC Ă? Target: Ă?

  12. Possible explanation for the low flux of high energy astrophysical muon neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pakvasa, Sandip

    2013-05-23

    I consider the possibility that some exotic neutrino property is responsible for reducing the muon neutrino flux at high energies from distant sources; specifically, (i) neutrino decay and (ii) neutrinos being pseudo-Dirac particles. This would provide a mechanism for the lack of high energy muon events in the Icecube detector.

  13. Flux of upward high-energy muons at the multi-component primary energy spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. Ter-Antonyan; P. L. Biermann

    2001-06-07

    The atmospheric neutrino-induced upward muon flux are calculated by using the multi-component primary energy spectrum, CORSIKA EAS simulation code for the reproduction of the atmospheric neutrino spectra and improved parton model for charged-current cross sections. The results are obtained at 0.1-1000 TeV muon energy range and 0-89 degrees zenith angular range.

  14. Semi-analytic approximations for production of atmospheric muons and neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser

    2001-04-19

    Simple approximations for fluxes of atmospheric muons and muon neutrinos are developed which display explicitly how the fluxes depend on primary cosmic ray energy and on features of pion production. For energies of approximately 10 GeV and above the results are sufficiently accurate to calculate response functions and to use for estimates of systematic uncertainties.

  15. The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration The R&D Program for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Subpanel on Long­Range Plans for US HEP http://puhep1.princeton.edu/mumu/target/ Kirk T. McDonald April 19 intense proton pulses. Kirk T. McDonald April 19, 2001 2 #12; The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider. Kirk T. McDonald April 19, 2001 3 #12; The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration 2. Long

  16. Neutron production by cosmic-ray muons at shallow depth J. Busenitz,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piepke, Andreas G.

    Neutron production by cosmic-ray muons at shallow depth F. Boehm,3 J. Busenitz,1 B. Cook,3 G Received 23 June 2000; published 12 October 2000 The yield of neutrons produced by cosmic ray muons of one and two neutron captures was determined. Modeling the neutron capture efficiency allowed us

  17. Lithium Lens ANSYS Mechanical Simula3on for Muon g-2 R. Schultz, P. Hurh (FNAL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Lithium Lens ANSYS Mechanical Simula3on for Muon g-2 R. Schultz, P. Hurh (FNAL) § The Lithium Collec;on Lens was used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider, is roughly 1e6 pulses per month § Muon g-2 intends to use the Lithium Collec

  18. Performance studies of resistive Micromegas chambers for the upgrade of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ntekas, Konstantinos; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration at LHC has endorsed the resistive Micromegas technology (MM), along with the small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC), for the high luminosity upgrade of the first muon station in the high-rapidity region, the so called New Small Wheel (NSW) project. The NSW requires fully efficient MM chambers, up to a particle rate of $\\sim15\\,\\mathrm{kHz/cm^2}$, with spatial resolution better than $100\\,\\mu\\mathrm{m}$ independent of the track incidence angle and the magnetic field ($B \\leq 0.3\\,\\mathrm{T}$). Along with the precise tracking the MM should be able to provide a trigger signal, complementary to the sTGC, thus a decent timing resolution is required. Several tests have been performed on small ($10\\times10\\,\\mathrm{cm^2}$) MM chambers using medium ($10\\,\\mathrm{GeV/c}$, PS) and high ($150\\,\\mathrm{GeV/c}$, SPS) momentum hadron beams at CERN. Results on the efficiency and position resolution measured during these tests are presented demonstrating the excellent characteristics of the MM that fulf...

  19. PHYSICAL REVIEW D VOLUME 53, NUMBER 1 1 JANUARY 1996 Measurement of the negative muon spectrum between 0.3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morselli, Aldo

    Particle Astrophysics Labor&y, New Mexico State University, Las Cmes, New Mexico 88003 M. P. De Pascale, A is momentum dependent; the low energy muon flux peaks around 150 g/cm' and higher energy muons penetrate calculations has created a renewed interest in the muon spectra as a function of the atmospheric depth (e

  20. Anomalous emissions of 103mRh biphoton transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao Cheng; Bing Xia

    2009-08-06

    In this report, the anomalous emissions, centered on the one half transition energy 39.76/2 keV, are observed from the long-lived Mossbauer state of 103mRh excited by bremsstrahlung exposure. Strong coupling with identical nuclei in Rh crystals opens cascade channels for biphoton transitions.

  1. Anomalous loss in blue-green wavelength discrimination with very

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foster, David H.

    Anomalous loss in blue-green wavelength discrimination with very brief monochromatic stimuli to yield non-uniform increases in discrimination thresholds in the blue-green region of the spectrum that the effect was not attributable to the reduced energy of the short flash. One of the most significant

  2. Quantum origin of an anomalous isotope effect in ozone formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Scott A.

    Quantum origin of an anomalous isotope effect in ozone formation D. Babikov *, B.K. Kendrick, R mechanical calculations of the đJ Ľ 0Ţ energies and lifetimes of the metastable states of ozone on a new effect in the reaction that forms ozone because of their role in the energy transfer mechanism, in which

  3. Weak chaos, infinite ergodic theory, and anomalous dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainer Klages

    2015-07-15

    This book chapter introduces to the concept of weak chaos, aspects of its ergodic theory description, and properties of the anomalous dynamics associated with it. In the first half of the chapter we study simple one-dimensional deterministic maps, in the second half basic stochastic models and eventually an experiment. We start by reminding the reader of fundamental chaos quantities and their relation to each other, exemplified by the paradigmatic Bernoulli shift. Using the intermittent Pomeau-Manneville map the problem of weak chaos and infinite ergodic theory is outlined, defining a very recent mathematical field of research. Considering a spatially extended version of the Pomeau-Manneville map leads us to the phenomenon of anomalous diffusion. This problem will be discussed by applying stochastic continuous time random walk theory and by deriving a fractional diffusion equation. Another important topic within modern nonequilibrium statistical physics are fluctuation relations, which we investigate for anomalous dynamics. The chapter concludes by showing the importance of anomalous dynamics for understanding experimental results on biological cell migration.

  4. Anomalous Transformation in Supersymmetric Yang-Mills Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Itoyama; B. Razzaghe-Ashrafi

    1992-04-03

    An ``anomalous'' supersymmetry transformation of the gaugino axial current is given in supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. The contact term is computed to one-loop order by a gauge-invariant point-splitting procedure. We reexamine the supercurrent anomaly in this method.

  5. The rest masses of the electron and muon and of the stable mesons and baryons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. L. Koschmieder

    2007-07-30

    The rest masses of the electron, the muon and of the stable mesons and baryons can be explained, within 1% accuracy, with the standing wave model, which uses only photons, neutrinos, charge and the weak nuclear force. We do not need hypothetical particles for the explanation of the masses of the electron, muon, mesons and baryons. We can also explain the charge of the electron, the spin of the electron, of the muon and of the stable baryons, without any additional assumption. We also have determined the rest masses of the electron-, muon- and tau neutrinos and found that the mass of the electron neutrino is equal to the fine structure constant times the mass of the muon neutrino.

  6. Recherche De Correlations Temporelles Des Muons Cosmiques Avec Macro Et Perte D'Energie Des Nuclearites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moussa, A

    2009-01-01

    The first parts of the thesis recalls the main features of the large MACRO experiment at the underground Gran Sasso Laboratory. It then describes the atmospheric muons measured by the experiment and the selection criteria to obtain and analyze a large sample of cosmic muons. The time series of MACRO muons was analyzed with two complementary approaches: search for the occurrence of bursts of muon events and search for periodicities in the muon time distribution. The Scan Statistics method was used in the first case and the Lomb-Scargle spectral analysis in the second case. The two techniques complete early analyses performed with "folding" methods. It is confirmed that the seasonal variation is the dominant periodic variation, and one also confirms the solar diurnal and sidereal modulations. A separate study concerns the analysis of the energy losses of the hypothetical Nuclearites in different materials and detectors; their importance for the searches performed by the MACRO and the SLIM experiments is discuss...

  7. nuSTORM and A Path to a Muon Collider

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adey, David; Bayes, Ryan; Bross, Alan; Snopok, Pavel

    2015-05-20

    Our article reviews the current status of the nuSTORM facility and shows how it can be utilized to perform the next step on the path toward the realization of a ?+?- collider. This review includes the physics motivation behind nuSTORM, a detailed description of the facility and the neutrino beams it can produce, and a summary of the short-baseline neutrino oscillation physics program that can be carried out at the facility. The idea for nuSTORM (the production of neutrino beams from the decay of muons in a racetrack-like decay ring) was discussed in the literature more than 30 years agomore »in the context of searching for noninteracting (sterile) neutrinos. However, only in the past 5 years has the concept been fully developed, motivated in large part by the facility's unmatched reach in addressing the evolving data on oscillations involving sterile neutrinos. Finally, this article reviews the basics of the ?+?-collider concept and describes how nuSTORM provides a platform to test advanced concepts for six-dimensional muon ionization cooling.« less

  8. Precise mapping of the magnetic field in the CMS barrel yoke using cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, S.; et al.,

    2010-03-01

    The CMS detector is designed around a large 4 T superconducting solenoid, enclosed in a 12000-tonne steel return yoke. A detailed map of the magnetic field is required for the accurate simulation and reconstruction of physics events in the CMS detector, not only in the inner tracking region inside the solenoid but also in the large and complex structure of the steel yoke, which is instrumented with muon chambers. Using a large sample of cosmic muon events collected by CMS in 2008, the field in the steel of the barrel yoke has been determined with a precision of 3 to 8% depending on the location.

  9. On The Anomalous Fast Ion Energy Diffusion in Toroidal Plasmas Due to Cavity Modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N.N. Gorelenkov, N.J. Fisch and E. Fredrickson

    2010-03-09

    An enormous wave-particle diffusion coefficient along paths suitable for alpha channeling had been deduced in mode converted ion Bernstein wave experiments on Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) the only plausible explanation advanced for such a large diffusion coefficient was the excitation of internal cavity modes which induce particle diffusion along identical diffusion paths, but at much higher rates. Although such a mode was conjectured, it was never observed. However, recent detailed observations of high frequency compressional Alfven eigenmodes (CAEs) on the National Spherical torus Experiment (NSTX) indirectly support the existence of the related conjectured modes on TFTR. The eigenmodes responsible for the high frequency magnetic activity can be identified as CAEs through the polarization of the observed magnetic field oscillations in NSTX and through a comparison with the theoretically derived freuency dispersion relation. Here, we show how these recent observations of high frequency CAEs lend support to this explanation of the long-standing puzzle of anomalous fast ion energy diffusion on TFTR. The support of the conjecure that these internal modes could have caused the remarkable ion energy diffusion on TFTR carries significant and favorable implications for the possibilities in achieving the alpha channeling effect with small injected power in a tokamak reactor.

  10. A parameterisation of the flux and energy spectrum of single and multiple muons in deep water/ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bazzotti; S. Biagi; G. Carminati; S. Cecchini; T. Chiarusi; G. Giacomelli; A. Margiotta; M. Sioli; M. Spurio

    2009-10-22

    In this paper parametric formulas are presented to evaluate the flux of atmospheric muons in the range of vertical depth between 1.5 to 5 km of water equivalent (km w.e.) and up to 85^o for the zenith angle. We take into account their arrival in bundles with different muon multiplicities. The energy of muons inside bundles is then computed considering the muon distance from the bundle axis. This parameterisation relies on a full Monte Carlo simulation of primary Cosmic Ray (CR) interactions, shower propagation in the atmosphere and muon transport in deep water [1]. The primary CR flux and interaction models, in the range in which they can produce muons which may reach 1.5 km w.e., suffer from large experimental uncertainties. We used a primary CR flux and an interaction model able to correctly reproduce the flux, the multiplicity distribution, the spatial distance between muons as measured by the underground MACRO experiment.

  11. Observation of seasonal variation of atmospheric multiple-muon events in the MINOS Near and Far Detectors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamson, P.; Bishai, M.; Diwan, M. V.; Isvan, Z.; Ling, J.; Viren, B.

    2015-06-09

    We report the first observation of seasonal modulations in the rates of cosmic ray multiple-muon events at two underground sites, the MINOS Near Detector with an overburden of 225 mwe, and the MINOS Far Detector site at 2100 mwe. At the deeper site, multiple-muon events with muons separated by more than 8 m exhibit a seasonal rate that peaks during the summer, similar to that of single-muon events. Conversely, the rate of multiple-muon events with muons separated by less than 5–8 m, and the rate of multiple-muon events in the smaller, shallower Near Detector, exhibit a seasonal rate modulation thatmore »peaks in the winter.« less

  12. Physics validation studies for muon collider detector background simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, Aaron Owen; /Northern Illinois U.

    2011-07-01

    Within the broad discipline of physics, the study of the fundamental forces of nature and the most basic constituents of the universe belongs to the field of particle physics. While frequently referred to as 'high-energy physics,' or by the acronym 'HEP,' particle physics is not driven just by the quest for ever-greater energies in particle accelerators. Rather, particle physics is seen as having three distinct areas of focus: the cosmic, intensity, and energy frontiers. These three frontiers all provide different, but complementary, views of the basic building blocks of the universe. Currently, the energy frontier is the realm of hadron colliders like the Tevatron at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) or the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. While the LHC is expected to be adequate for explorations up to 14 TeV for the next decade, the long development lead time for modern colliders necessitates research and development efforts in the present for the next generation of colliders. This paper focuses on one such next-generation machine: a muon collider. Specifically, this paper focuses on Monte Carlo simulations of beam-induced backgrounds vis-a-vis detector region contamination. Initial validation studies of a few muon collider physics background processes using G4beamline have been undertaken and results presented. While these investigations have revealed a number of hurdles to getting G4beamline up to the level of more established simulation suites, such as MARS, the close communication between us, as users, and the G4beamline developer, Tom Roberts, has allowed for rapid implementation of user-desired features. The main example of user-desired feature implementation, as it applies to this project, is Bethe-Heitler muon production. Regarding the neutron interaction issues, we continue to study the specifics of how GEANT4 implements nuclear interactions. The GEANT4 collaboration has been contacted regarding the minor discrepancies in the neutron interaction cross sections for boron. While corrections to the data files themselves are simple to implement and distribute, it is quite possible, however, that coding changes may be required in G4beamline or even in GEANT4 to fully correct nuclear interactions. Regardless, these studies are ongoing and future results will be reflected in updated releases of G4beamline.

  13. Improved Measurement of the Positive Muon Lifetime and Determination of the Fermi Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MuLan Collaboration; D. B. Chitwood; T. I. Banks; M. J. Barnes; S. Battu; R. M. Carey; S. Cheekatmalla; S. M. Clayton; J. Crnkovic; K. M. Crowe; P. T. Debevec; S. Dhamija; W. Earle; A. Gafarov; K. Giovanetti; T. P. Gorringe; F. E. Gray; M. Hance; D. W. Hertzog; M. F. Hare; P. Kammel; B. Kiburg; J. Kunkle; B. Lauss; I. Logashenko; K. R. Lynch; R. McNabb; J. P. Miller; F. Mulhauser; C. J. G. Onderwater; C. S. Ozben; Q. Peng; C. C. Polly; S. Rath; B. L. Roberts; V. Tishchenko; G. D. Wait; J. Wasserman; D. M. Webber; P. Winter; P. A. Zolnierczuk

    2008-02-08

    The mean life of the positive muon has been measured to a precision of 11 ppm using a low-energy, pulsed muon beam stopped in a ferromagnetic target, which was surrounded by a scintillator detector array. The result, tau_mu = 2.197013(24) us, is in excellent agreement with the previous world average. The new world average tau_mu = 2.197019(21) us determines the Fermi constant G_F = 1.166371(6) x 10^-5 GeV^-2 (5 ppm). Additionally, the precision measurement of the positive muon lifetime is needed to determine the nucleon pseudoscalar coupling g_P.

  14. Conformal constraints for anomalous dimensions of leading twist operators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. N. Manashov; M. Strohmaier

    2015-03-16

    Leading-twist operators have a remarkable property that their divergence vanishes in a free theory. Recently it was suggested that this property can be used for an alternative technique to calculate anomalous dimensions of leading-twist operators and allows one to gain one order in perturbation theory so that, i.e., two-loop anomalous dimensions can be calculated from one-loop Feynman diagrams, etc. In this work we study feasibility of this program on a toy-model example of the $\\varphi^3$ theory in six dimensions. Our conclusion is that this approach is valid, although it does not seem to present considerable technical simplifications as compared to the standard technique. It does provide one, however, with a very nontrivial check of the calculation as the structure of the contributions is very different.

  15. Driven Anomalous Diffusion: An example from Polymer Stretching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takuya Saito; Takahiro Sakaue

    2015-04-24

    The way tension propagates along a chain is a key to govern many of anomalous dynamics in macromolecular systems. After introducing the weak and the strong force regimes of the tension propagation, we focus on the latter, in which the dynamical fluctuations of a segment in a long polymer during its stretching process is investigated. We show that the response, i.e., average drift, is anomalous, which is characterized by the nonlinear memory kernel, and its relation to the fluctuation is nontrivial. These features are discussed on the basis of the generalized Langevin equation, in which the role of the temporal change in spring constant due to the stress hardening is pinpointed. We carried out the molecular dynamics simulation, which supports our theory.

  16. Effective field theory: A modern approach to anomalous couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Degrande, Céline, E-mail: cdegrand@illinois.edu [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States) [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Centre for Particle Physics and Phenomenology (CP3), Université Catholique de Louvain, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Greiner, Nicolas [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States) [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany); Kilian, Wolfgang [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States) [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); University of Siegen, Fachbereich Physik, D-57068 Siegen (Germany); Mattelaer, Olivier [Centre for Particle Physics and Phenomenology (CP3), Université Catholique de Louvain, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)] [Centre for Particle Physics and Phenomenology (CP3), Université Catholique de Louvain, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Mebane, Harrison; Stelzer, Tim; Willenbrock, Scott [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Zhang, Cen [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States) [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Centre for Particle Physics and Phenomenology (CP3), Université Catholique de Louvain, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2013-08-15

    We advocate an effective field theory approach to anomalous couplings. The effective field theory approach is the natural way to extend the standard model such that the gauge symmetries are respected. It is general enough to capture any physics beyond the standard model, yet also provides guidance as to the most likely place to see the effects of new physics. The effective field theory approach also clarifies that one need not be concerned with the violation of unitarity in scattering processes at high energy. We apply these ideas to pair production of electroweak vector bosons. -- Highlights: •We discuss the advantages of effective field theories compared to anomalous couplings. •We show that one need not be concerned with unitarity violation at high energy. •We discuss the application of effective field theory to weak boson physics.

  17. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Garfield County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Garfield Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Garfield County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1? and 2? were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4442180.552290 m Left: 268655.053363 m Right: 359915.053363 m Bottom: 4312490.552290 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  18. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Alamosa Saguache Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4217727.601630 m Left: 394390.400264 m Right: 460179.841813 m Bottom: 4156258.036086 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  19. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Archuleta County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Archuleta Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Archuleta County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1? and 2? were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies). Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4144825.235807 m Left: 285446.256851 m Right: 350577.338852 m Bottom: 4096962.250137 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  20. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Dolores County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Dolores Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Dolores County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4186234.213315 m Left: 212558.673056 m Right: 232922.811862 m Bottom: 4176781.467043 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  1. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Routt County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Routt Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Routt County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1? and 2? were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4501071.574000 m Left: 311351.975000 m Right: 359411.975000 m Bottom: 4447521.574000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  2. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Chaffee County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Chaffee Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Chaffee County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4333432.368072 m Left: 366907.700763 m Right: 452457.816015 m Bottom: 4208271.566715 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  3. Anomalous energy transport in the FPU-beta chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jani Lukkarinen; Herbert Spohn

    2007-04-12

    We consider the energy current correlation function for the FPU-beta lattice. For small non-linearity one can rely on kinetic theory. The issue reduces then to a spectral analysis of the linearized collision operator. We prove thereby that, on the basis of kinetic theory, the energy current correlations decay in time as t^(-3/5). It follows that the thermal conductivity is anomalous, increasing as N^(2/5) with the system size N.

  4. Crossover from anomalous to normal diffusion in porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. D. A. Aarao Reis; Dung di Caprio

    2015-06-16

    Random walks (RW) of particles adsorbed in the internal walls of porous deposits produced by ballistic-type growth models are studied. The particles start at the external surface of the deposits and enter their pores, in order to simulate an external flux of a species towards a porous solid. For short times, the walker concentration decays as a stretched exponential of the depth z, but a crossover to long time normal diffusion is observed in most samples. The anomalous concentration profile remains at long times in very porous solids if the walker steps are restricted to nearest neighbors and is accompanied with subdiffusion features. These findings are correlated with a decay of the explored area with z. The study of RW of tracer particles left at the internal part of the solid rules out an interpretation by diffusion equations with position-dependent coefficients. A model of RW in a tube of decreasing cross section explains those results by showing long crossovers from an effective subdiffusion regime to an asymptotic normal diffusion. The crossover position and density are analytically calculated for a tube with area decreasing exponentially with z and show good agreement with numerical data. The anomalous decay of the concentration profile is interpreted as a templating effect of the tube shape on the total number of diffusing particles at each depth, while the volumetric concentration in the actually explored porous region may not have significant decay. These results may explain the anomalous diffusion of metal atoms in porous deposits observed in recent works. They also confirm the difficulty in interpreting experimental or computational data on anomalous transport reported in recent works, particularly if only the concentration profiles are measured.

  5. CP-safe Gravity Mediation and Muon g-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sho Iwamoto; Tsutomu T. Yanagida; Norimi Yokozaki

    2015-02-03

    We propose a CP-safe gravity mediation model, where the phases of the Higgs B parameter, scalar trilinear couplings and gaugino mass parameters are all aligned. Since all dangerous CP violating phases are suppressed, we are now safe to consider low-energy SUSY scenarios. As an application, we consider a gravity mediation model explaining the observed muon $g-2$ anomaly. The CP-safe property originates in two simple assumptions: SUSY breaking in the K\\"ahler potential and a shift symmetry of a SUSY breaking field $Z$. As a result of the shift symmetry, the imaginary part of $Z$ behaves as a QCD axion, leading to an intriguing possibility: the strong CP problem in QCD and the SUSY CP problem are solved simultaneously.

  6. Characterising encapsulated nuclear waste using cosmic-ray muon tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarkson, Anthony; Hoek, Matthias; Ireland, David G; Johnstone, John R; Kaiser, Ralf; Keri, Tibor; Lumsden, Scott; Mahon, David F; McKinnon, Bryan; Murray, Morgan; Nutbeam-Tuffs, Siân; Shearer, Craig; Yang, Guangliang; Zimmerman, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Tomographic imaging techniques using the Coulomb scattering of cosmic-ray muons have been shown previously to successfully identify and characterise low- and high-Z materials within an air matrix using a prototype scintillating-fibre tracker system. Those studies were performed as the first in a series to assess the feasibility of this technology and image reconstruction techniques in characterising the potential high-Z contents of legacy nuclear waste containers for the UK Nuclear Industry. The present work continues the feasibility study and presents the first images reconstructed from experimental data collected using this small-scale prototype system of low- and high-Z materials encapsulated within a concrete-filled stainless-steel container. Clear discrimination is observed between the thick steel casing, the concrete matrix and the sample materials assayed. These reconstructed objects are presented and discussed in detail alongside the implications for future industrial scenarios.

  7. INTERACTION OF MUON BEAM WITH PLASMA DEVELOPED DURING IONIZATION COOLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Ahmed, D. Kaplan, T. Roberts, L. Spentzouris, K. Beard

    2012-07-01

    Particle-in-cell simulations involving the interaction of muon beam (peak density 10{sup 18} m{sup 3}) with Li plasma (ionized medium) of density 10{sup 16}-10{sup 22} m{sup -3} have been performed. This study aimed to understand the effects of plasma on an incoming beam in order to explore scenario developed during the process of ionization cooling. The computer code takes into account the self-consistent electromagnetic effects of beam interacting with plasma. This study shows that the beam can pass through the plasma of densities four order of magnitude higher than its peak density. The low density plasmas are wiped out by the beam, however, the resonance is observed for densities of similar order. Study reveals the signature of plasma wakefield acceleration.

  8. Characterising encapsulated nuclear waste using cosmic-ray muon tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anthony Clarkson; David J. Hamilton; Matthias Hoek; David G. Ireland; John R. Johnstone; Ralf Kaiser; Tibor Keri; Scott Lumsden; David F. Mahon; Bryan McKinnon; Morgan Murray; Siân Nutbeam-Tuffs; Craig Shearer; Guangliang Yang; Colin Zimmerman

    2014-10-27

    Tomographic imaging techniques using the Coulomb scattering of cosmic-ray muons have been shown previously to successfully identify and characterise low- and high-Z materials within an air matrix using a prototype scintillating-fibre tracker system. Those studies were performed as the first in a series to assess the feasibility of this technology and image reconstruction techniques in characterising the potential high-Z contents of legacy nuclear waste containers for the UK Nuclear Industry. The present work continues the feasibility study and presents the first images reconstructed from experimental data collected using this small-scale prototype system of low- and high-Z materials encapsulated within a concrete-filled stainless-steel container. Clear discrimination is observed between the thick steel casing, the concrete matrix and the sample materials assayed. These reconstructed objects are presented and discussed in detail alongside the implications for future industrial scenarios.

  9. Self-consistent nonlinear kinetic simulations of the anomalous Doppler instability of suprathermal electrons in plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, W. N. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)] [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Chapman, S. C. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom) [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Tromsř, Tromsř (Norway); Dendy, R. O. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom) [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-15

    Suprathermal tails in the distributions of electron velocities parallel to the magnetic field are found in many areas of plasma physics, from magnetic confinement fusion to solar system plasmas. Parallel electron kinetic energy can be transferred into plasma waves and perpendicular gyration energy of particles through the anomalous Doppler instability (ADI), provided that energetic electrons with parallel velocities v{sub ||}?(?+?{sub ce})/k{sub ||} are present; here ?{sub ce} denotes electron cyclotron frequency, ? the wave angular frequency, and k{sub ||} the component of wavenumber parallel to the magnetic field. This phenomenon is widely observed in tokamak plasmas. Here, we present the first fully self-consistent relativistic particle-in-cell simulations of the ADI, spanning the linear and nonlinear regimes of the ADI. We test the robustness of the analytical theory in the linear regime and follow the ADI through to the steady state. By directly evaluating the parallel and perpendicular dynamical contributions to j·E in the simulations, we follow the energy transfer between the excited waves and the bulk and tail electron populations for the first time. We find that the ratio ?{sub ce}/(?{sub pe}+?{sub ce}) of energy transfer between parallel and perpendicular, obtained from linear analysis, does not apply when damping is fully included, when we find it to be ?{sub pe}/(?{sub pe}+?{sub ce}); here ?{sub pe} denotes the electron plasma frequency. We also find that the ADI can arise beyond the previously expected range of plasma parameters, in particular when ?{sub ce}>?{sub pe}. The simulations also exhibit a spectral feature which may correspond to the observations of suprathermal narrowband emission at ?{sub pe} detected from low density tokamak plasmas.

  10. Magnets & Magnet Condensed Matter Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    Sights from around the Magnet Lab in 2010. On the cover MAGNETS & MAGNET MATERIALS Engineering materials in Mesoporous Silica SBA-15 31 YBCO Pancake Wound Test Coil for 32-T Magnet Development 32 Strong Vortex Pinning from Marine Cyanobacteria 37 Heavy Petroleum Composition 2. Progression of the Boduszynski Model

  11. Magnetic Fields Boosted by Gluon Vortices in Color Superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efrain J. Ferrer; Vivian de la Incera

    2006-08-28

    We investigate the effects of an external magnetic field in the gluon dynamics of a color superconductor with three massless quark flavors. In the framework of gluon mean-field theory at asymptotic densities, we show that the long-range component $\\widetilde{H}$ of the external magnetic field that penetrates the CFL phase produces an instability when its strength becomes larger than the Meissner mass of the charged gluons. As a consequence, the magnetic field causes the formation of a vortex state characterized by the condensation of charged gluons and the creation of magnetic flux tubes. Inside the flux tubes the magnetic field is stronger than the applied one. This antiscreening effect is connected to the anomalous magnetic moment of the gluon field. We suggest how this same mechanism could serve to remove the chromomagnetic instabilities existing in gapless color superconductivity.

  12. A parameterisation of single and multiple muons in the deep water or ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Becherini; A. Margiotta; M. Sioli; M. Spurio

    2005-07-19

    Atmospheric muons play an important role in underwater/ice neutrino detectors. In this paper, a parameterisation of the flux of single and multiple muon events, their lateral distribution and of their energy spectrum is presented. The kinematics parameters were modelled starting from a full Monte Carlo simulation of the interaction of primary cosmic rays with atmospheric nuclei; secondary muons reaching the sea level were propagated in the deep water. The parametric formulas are valid for a vertical depth of 1.5-5 km w.e. and up to 85 deg for the zenith angle, and can be used as input for a fast simulation of atmospheric muons in underwater/ice detectors.

  13. Time calibration with atmospheric muon tracks in the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrián-Martínez, S; André, M; Anton, G; Ardid, M; Aubert, J -J; Baret, B; Barrios-Martí, J; Basa, S; Bertin, V; Biagi, S; Bogazzi, C; Bormuth, R; Bou-Cabo, M; Bouwhuis, M C; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Busto, J; Capone, A; Caramete, L; Carr, J; Chiarusi, T; Circella, M; Coniglione, R; Costantini, H; Coyle, P; Creusot, A; Dekeyser, I; Deschamps, A; De Bonis, G; Distefano, C; Donzaud, C; Dornic, D; Drouhin, D; Dumas, A; Eberl, T; Elsässer, D; Enzenhöfer, A; Fehn, K; Felis, I; Fermani, P; Flaminio, V; Folger, F; Fusco, L A; Galatŕ, S; Gay, P; Geißelsöder, S; Geyer, K; Giordano, V; Gleixner, A; Gracia-Ruiz, R; Gómez-González, J P; Graf, K; van Haren, H; Heijboer, A J; Hello, Y; Hernández-Rey, J J; Herrero, A; Hößl, J; Hofestädt, J; Hugon, C; James, C W; de Jong, M; Kadler, M; Kalekin, O; Katz, U; Kießling, D; Kooijman, P; Kouchner, A; Kreykenbohm, I; Kulikovskiy, V; Lahmann, R; Lambard, G; Lattuada, D; Lefčvre, D; Leonora, E; Loucatos, S; Mangano, S; Marcelin, M; Margiotta, A; Marinelli, A; Martínez-Mora, J A; Martini, S; Mathieu, A; Michael, T; Migliozzi, P; Moussa, A; Mueller, C; Neff, M; Nezri, E; P?v?la?, G E; Pellegrino, C; Perrina, C; Piattelli, P; Popa, V; Pradier, T; Racca, C; Riccobene, G; Richter, R; Roensch, K; Rostovtsev, A; Saldańa, M; Samtleben, D F E; Sánchez-Losa, A; Sanguineti, M; Sapienza, P; Schmid, J; Schnabel, J; Schulte, S; Schüssler, F; Seitz, T; Sieger, C; Spurio, M; Steijger, J J M; Stolarczyk, Th; Taiuti, M; Tamburini, C; Trovato, A; Tselengidou, M; Tönnis, C; Turpin, D; Vallage, B; Vallée, C; Van Elewyck, V; Visser, E; Vivolo, D; Wagner, S; Wilms, J; Zornoza, J D; Zúńiga, J

    2015-01-01

    The ANTARES experiment consists of an array of photomultipliers distributed along 12 lines and located deep underwater in the Mediterranean Sea. It searches for astrophysical neutrinos collecting the Cherenkov light induced by the charged particles, mainly muons, produced in neutrino interactions around the detector. Since at energies of $\\sim$10 TeV the muon and the incident neutrino are almost collinear, it is possible to use the ANTARES detector as a neutrino telescope and identify a source of neutrinos in the sky starting from a precise reconstruction of the muon trajectory. To get this result, the arrival times of the Cherenkov photons must be accurately measured. A to perform time calibrations with the precision required to have optimal performances of the instrument is described. The reconstructed tracks of the atmospheric muons in the ANTARES detector are used to determine the relative time offsets between photomultipliers. Currently, this method is used to obtain the time calibration constants for ph...

  14. Search for muon neutrinos from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the IceCube neutrino telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbasi, R.

    2010-01-01

    2009, GCN: The Gamma ray bursts Coordinates Network, http://for muon neutrinos from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the IceCubeMereghetti, S. 2004, in Gamma-ray Bursts: 30 Years of

  15. Underground muons from the direction of Cygnus X-3 during the January 1991 radio flare

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The Soudan 2 Collaboration

    1991-08-01

    Muons recorded in the Soudan 2 underground nucleon decay detector from January 1989 to February 1991 have been examined for any correlation with the radio flares of Cyguns X-3 observed during this period. On two nearby days during the radio flare of January 1991 a total of 32 muons within 2.0{degrees} of the Cyguns X-3 direction were observed when 11.4 were expected.

  16. Muon Collider/Neutrino Factory Targetry R&D 2009-2012 Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    in collection pool (beam dump) 0.4 FTE engineer effort × 1 year H. Kirk, K. McDonald (July 10, 2009) #12;Muon, Latvia) 0.2 scientist effort × 3 years Travel $20k ·Use of a Pb-Bi alloy rather than Hg (?) H. Kirk, K for high TC solenoid ·0.3 engineer effort × 2 years H. Kirk, K. McDonald (July 10, 2009) #12;Muon Collider

  17. ATLAS Muon TGCTrigger Electronics Hi-pT ASIC Extended URD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fukunaga, Chikara

    ATLAS Muon TGCTrigger Electronics Hi-pT ASIC Extended URD Version 0 June,2000 1 Hi-pT ASIC Design in every block. There may be, therefore, maximum six hi-pT tracks found by a chip if each chip find-Packard G-link protocol. #12;ATLAS Muon TGCTrigger Electronics Hi-pT ASIC Extended URD Version 0 June,2000 2

  18. Quasi-TEM electromagnetic modes of a plasma waveguide with a nonsimply connected cross section in an external magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kartashov, I. N., E-mail: igorkartashov@mail.ru; Kuzelev, M. V., E-mail: kuzelev@mail.ru [Moscow State University, Physics Department (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-15

    Electromagnetic modes of a plasma waveguide with a nonsimply connected cross section in an external magnetic field are investigated. The existence of quasi-TEM modes in a finite-strength magnetic field is demonstrated. It is shown that, in the limits of infinitely strong and zero magnetic fields, this mode transforms into a true TEM mode. The possibility of excitation of such modes by an electron beam in the regime of the anomalous Doppler effect is analyzed.

  19. Anomalous quartic boson couplings via gamma gamma --> WW and gamma gamma --> WWZ at the TESLA kinematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. B. Marfin; V. A. Mossolov; T. V. Shishkina

    2003-04-30

    The production of two and three electroweak gauge bosons in the high-energy $\\gamma\\gamma$ collisions gives the well opportunity to probe anomalous quartic gauge boson couplings. The influence of five possible anomalous couplings on the cross sections for $W^+W^-$, $W^+W^-\\gamma$, $W^+W^-Z$ productions has been investigated at the TESLA kinematics ($\\sqrt{S}\\sim 1$ TeV). There are the reasonable discriminations between various anomalous contributions.

  20. Anomalous momentum and energy transfer rates for electrostatic ion-cyclotron turbulence in downward auroral-current regions of the Earth's magnetosphere. III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jasperse, John R.; Basu, Bamandas; Lund, Eric J.; Grossbard, Neil

    2010-06-15

    Recently, a new multimoment fluid theory was developed for inhomogeneous, nonuniformly magnetized plasma in the guiding-center and gyrotropic approximation that includes the effect of electrostatic, turbulent, wave-particle interactions (see Jasperse et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 072903 (2006); ibid.13, 112902 (2006)]). In the present paper, which is intended as a sequel, it is concluded from FAST satellite data that the electrostatic ion-cyclotron turbulence that appears is due to the operation of an electron, bump-on-tail-driven ion-cyclotron instability for downward currents in the long-range potential region of the Earth's magnetosphere. Approximate closed-form expressions for the anomalous momentum and energy transfer rates for the ion-cyclotron turbulence are obtained. The turbulent, inhomogeneous, nonuniformly magnetized, multimoment fluid theory given above, in the limit of a turbulent, homogeneous, uniformly magnetized, quasisteady plasma, yields the well-known formula for the anomalous resistivity given by Gary and Paul [Phys. Rev. Lett. 26, 1097 (1971)] and Tange and Ichimaru [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 36, 1437 (1974)].

  1. Anomalous effects due to the inertial anti-gravitational potential of the sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. L. Khokhlov

    2007-10-31

    It is introduced inertial anti-gravitational potential into the theory of gravity to stop gravitational collapse at the nuclear density and thus prevent singularities. It is considered effective gravity which includes Newtonian potential and inertial anti-gravitational potential. It is investigated footprints of the effective gravity in the solar system. The inertial anti-gravitational potential of the sun allows to explain the anomalous acceleration of Pioneer 10 and 11, the anomalous increase in the lunar semi-major axis, the residuals of the seasonal variation of the proper angular velocity of the earth, the anomalous increase of the Astronomical Unit, the anomalous shift of the perihelion of mercury.

  2. Conditions for stimulated emission in anomalous gravity-superconductors interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Modanese; T. Junker

    2009-08-19

    Several authors have studied the generation of gravitational fields by condensed-matter systems in non-extreme density conditions. General Relativity and lowest-order perturbative Quantum Gravity predict in this case an extremely small emission rate, so these phenomena can become relevant only if some strong quantum effect occurs. Quantum aspects of gravity are still poorly understood. It is believed that they could play a role in systems which exhibit macroscopic quantum coherence, like superconductors and superfluids, leading to an "anomalous" coupling between matter and field. We mention here recent work in this field by Woods, Chiao, Becker, Agop et al., Ummarino, Kiefer and Weber. New results are presented concerning anomalous stimulated gravitational emission in a layered superconductor like YBCO. We model the superconductor as an array of intrinsic Josephson junctions. The superconducting parameters are defined by our preliminary measurements with melt-textured samples. We write explicitly and solve numerically the Josephson equations which give the normal and super components of the total current in the superconductor, and derive from this the total available power P=IV. Then, assuming that the coefficients A and B for spontaneous and stimulated gravitational emission are known, we apply to this case the Frantz-Nodvik equation for a laser amplifier. The equation is suitably modified in order to allow for a "continuous pumping" given by an oscillating transport current. The conclusions are relevant for the evaluation of gravitational emission from superconductors. We find that even if the A and B coefficients are anomalously large (possibly because of the Quantum Gravity effects mentioned above), the conditions for stimulated emission are quite strict and the emission rate strongly limited by the IV value.

  3. Superconducting magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This report discusses the following topics on superconducting magnets: D19B and -C: The next steps for a record-setting magnet; D20: The push beyond 10 T: Beyond D20: Speculations on the 16-T regime; other advanced magnets for accelerators; spinoff applications; APC materials development; cable and cabling-machine development; and high-{Tc} superconductor at low temperature.

  4. Measurement of the $W^+W^-$ Production Cross Section and Search for Anomalous $WW\\gamma$ and $WWZ$ Couplings in $p \\bar p$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2009-12-01

    This Letter describes the current most precise measurement of the W boson pair production cross section and most sensitive test of anomalous WW{gamma} and WWZ couplings in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The WW candidates are reconstructed from decays containing two charged leptons and two neutrinos, where the charged leptons are either electrons or muons. Using data collected by the CDF II detector from 3.6 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, a total of 654 candidate events are observed with an expected background contribution of 320 {+-} 47 events. The measured total cross section is {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} + X) = 12.1 {+-} 0.9 (stat){sub -1.4}{sup +1.6} (syst) pb, which is in good agreement with the standard model prediction. The same data sample is used to place constraints on anomalous WW{gamma} and WWZ couplings.

  5. Red Noise in Anomalous X-ray Pulsar Timing Residuals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anne M. Archibald; Rim Dib; Margaret A. Livingstone; Victoria M. Kaspi

    2007-12-20

    Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs), thought to be magnetars, exhibit poorly understood deviations from a simple spin-down called "timing noise". AXP timing noise has strong low-frequency components which pose significant challenges for quantification. We describe a procedure for extracting two quantities of interest, the intensity and power spectral index of timing noise. We apply this procedure to timing data from three sources: a monitoring campaign of five AXPs, observations of five young pulsars, and the stable rotator PSR B1937+21.

  6. Dirt Softens Soap: Anomalous Elasticity of Disordered Smectics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leo Radzihovsky; John Toner

    1997-08-01

    We show that a smectic in a disordered medium (e.g., aerogel) exhibits anomalous elasticity, with the compression modulus B(k) vanishing and the bend modulus K(k) diverging as k --> 0. In addition, the effective disorder develops long ranged correlations. These divergences are much stronger than those driven by thermal fluctuations in pure smectics, and are controlled by a zero temperature glassy fixed point, which we study in an $\\epsilon=5-d$ expansion. We discuss the experimental implications of these theoretical predictions.

  7. Origin of the Anomalous Long Lifetime of 14C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean, David Jarvis [ORNL; Nam, Hai Ah [ORNL; Maris, Pieter [Iowa State University; Vary, J. P. [Iowa State University; Navratil, Petr [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Ormand, W. Erich [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

    2011-01-01

    We report the microscopic origins of the anomalously suppressed beta decay of 14C to 14N using the ab initio no-core shell model with the Hamiltonian from the chiral effective field theory including three-nucleon force terms. The three-nucleon force induces unexpectedly large cancellations within the p shell between contributions to beta decay, which reduce the traditionally large contributions from the nucleon-nucleon interactions by an order of magnitude, leading to the long lifetime of 14C.

  8. Large anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnetic insulator-topological insulator heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alegria, L. D.; Petta, J. R.; Ji, H.; Cava, R. J.; Yao, N.; Clarke, J. J.

    2014-08-04

    We demonstrate the van der Waals epitaxy of the topological insulator compound Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} on the ferromagnetic insulator Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6}. The layers are oriented with (001)Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}||(001)Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6} and (110)Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}||(100)Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6}. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy indicates the formation of a sharp interface. At low temperatures, bilayers consisting of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} on Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6} exhibit a large anomalous Hall effect (AHE). Tilted field studies of the AHE indicate that the easy axis lies along the c-axis of the heterostructure, consistent with magnetization measurements in bulk Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6}. The 61?K Curie temperature of Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6} and the use of near-stoichiometric materials may lead to the development of spintronic devices based on the AHE.

  9. What flows in the chiral magnetic effect? -- Simulating the particle production with CP-breaking backgrounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenji Fukushima

    2015-08-23

    To address a question of whether the chiral magnetic current is a static polarization or a genuine flow of charged particles, we elucidate the numerical formulation to simulate the net production of right-handed particles and anomalous currents with CP-breaking background fields which cause an imbalance between particles and anti-particles. For a concrete demonstration we numerically impose pulsed electric and magnetic fields to confirm our answer to the question that the produced net particles flow in the dynamical chiral magnetic effect. The rate for the particle production and the chiral magnetic current generation is quantitatively consistent with the axial anomaly, while they appear with a finite response time. We emphasize the importance to quantify the response time that would suppress observable effects of the anomalous current.

  10. Investigation of ELM [edge localized mode] Dynamics with the Resonant Magnetic Perturbation Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pankin, Alexei Y.; Kritz, Arnold H.

    2011-07-19

    Topics covered are: anomalous transport and E x B flow shear effects in the H-mode pedestal; RMP (resonant magnetic perturbation) effects in NSTX discharges; development of a scaling of H-mode pedestal in tokamak plasmas with type I ELMs (edge localized modes); and divertor heat load studies.

  11. High-Energy Cosmic-Ray Muons Under Thick Layers of Matter I. a Method to Solve the Transport Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Naumov; S. I. Sinegovsky; E. V. Bugaev

    1993-01-22

    An effective analytical method for calculating energy spectra of cosmic-ray muons at large depths of homogeneous media is developed. The method allows to include an arbitrary (decreasing) muon spectrum at the medium boundary and the energy dependence of both discrete (radiative and photonuclear) and continuous (ionization) muon energy losses, with resonable requirements for the high-energy behavior of the initial spectrum and differential cross sections of the muon-matter interactions. (To be published in the Proceedings of the Second NESTOR International Workshop, 19 -- 21 October 1992, Pylos, Greece.)

  12. Transverse charge and magnetization densities in holographic QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarti, Dipankar

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of flavor structures of nucleons transverse charge and anomalous magnetization densities for both unpolarized and transversely polarized nucleons. We consider two different models for the electromagnetic form factors in holographic QCD. The flavor form factors are obtained by decomposing the Dirac and Pauli form factors for nucleons using the charge and isospin symmetry. The results are compared with two standard phenomenological parametrizations.

  13. FEA Simulations of Magnets with Grain Oriented Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witte H.

    2012-08-06

    One of the potential successors of the Large Hadron Collider is a Muon Col- lider. Muons are short-lived particles, which therefore require fast acceleration. One potential avenue is a very fast cycling cyclotron, where the bending is sup- plied by a combination of fixed-field superconducting magnets and fast ramping normal conducting iron-cored coils. Due to the high ramping rate (around 1 kHz) eddy current and hysteresis losses are a concern. One way to overcome these is by using grain-oriented soft-iron, which promises superior magnetic properties in the direction of the grains. This note summarizes efforts to include the anisotropic material properties of grain-oriented steel in finite element analysis to predict the behaviour of the dipole magnets for this accelerator. It was found that including anisotropic material properties has a detrimental effect on model convergence. During this study it was not possible to include grain oriented steel with an accuracy necessary to study the field quality of a dipole magnet.

  14. Discovering Tau and Muon Solar Neutrino Flares above backgrounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Fargion; F. Moscato

    2004-07-11

    Solar neutrino flares astronomy is at the edge of its discover. High energy flare particles (protons, alpha) whose self scattering within the solar corona is source of a rich prompt charged pions are also source of sharp solar neutrino "burst" (at tens-hundred MeV) produced by their pion-muon primary decay in flight. This brief (minute) solar neutrino "burst" at largest peak overcome by four-five order of magnitude the steady atmospheric neutrino noise at the Earth. Later on, solar flare particles hitting the terrestrial atmosphere may marginally increase the atmospheric neutrino flux without relevant consequences. Largest prompt "burst" solar neutrino flare may be detected in present or better in future largest neutrino underground neutrino detectors. Our estimate for the recent and exceptional October - November 2003 solar flares gives a number of events above or just near unity for Super-Kamiokande. The neutrino spectra may reflect in a subtle way the neutrino flavour mixing in flight. A surprising tau appearance may even occur for a hard ({E}_{nu}_{mu}--> {E}_{nu}_{tau} > 4 GeV) flare spectra. A comparison of the solar neutrino flare (at their birth place on Sun and after oscillation on the arrival on the Earth) with other neutrino foreground is here described and it offer an independent road map to disentangle the neutrino flavour puzzles and its secret flavour mixing angles .

  15. Deconfinement to quark matter in neutron stars - The influence of strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dexheimer, V.; Negreiros, R.; Schramm, S.; Hempel, M.

    2013-03-25

    We use an extended version of the hadronic SU(3) non-linear realization of the sigma model that also includes quarks to study hybrid stars. Within this approach, the degrees of freedom change naturally as the temperature/density increases. Different prescriptions of charge neutrality, local and global, are tested and the influence of strong magnetic fields and the anomalous magnetic moment on the particle population is discussed.

  16. On anomalous plasma transport in the edge of magnetic confinement devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angus, Justin Ray

    2012-01-01

    KH modes and lose their free energy source as they rotate toinstability develops, the free energy source present in theunstable due to the ”free energy” source contained in the

  17. Anomalous Magnetic Orientations of Magnetosome Chains in a Magnetotactic Bacterium: Magnetovibrio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use of Energy Research, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences Division of the U.S. Department of Energy, under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. The funders had no role in study design, data collection

  18. Long-wavelength anomalous diffusion mode in the two-dimensional XY dipole magnet 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abanov, Artem; Kashuba, A.; Pokrovsky, Valery L.

    1997-01-01

    In a two-dimensional XY ferromagnet the dipole force induces a strong interaction between spin waves in the long-wavelength limit. The major effect of this interaction is the transformation of a propagating spin wave into ...

  19. ANOMALOUS RADIO EMISSION FROM DUST IN THE HELIX1 S. Casassus,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Readhead, Anthony

    ANOMALOUS RADIO EMISSION FROM DUST IN THE HELIX1 S. Casassus,2 A. C. S. Readhead,3 T. J. Pearson,3 detection of a new component of foreground Galactic emission. The anomalous foreground at $10­30 GHz, unexplained by tradi- tional emission mechanisms, correlates with 100 m dust emission. We use planetary

  20. Formation of ozone: Metastable states and anomalous isotope effect Dmitri Babikov,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Scott A.

    Formation of ozone: Metastable states and anomalous isotope effect Dmitri Babikov,a) Brian K for an anomalous isotope effect in ozone formation is given in terms of the energy transfer mechanism, where the metastable states of ozone are formed first, and then stabilized by collisions with other atoms. Unusual

  1. Feasibility study of heavy ion beams and compound target materials for muon production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaebum Son; Ju Hahn Lee; Gi Dong Kim; Yong Kyun Kim

    2015-07-15

    We have investigated the feasibility of using compound materials as target for muon production by virtue of simulations using a GEANT4 toolkit. A graphite and two thermostable compound materials, beryllium oxide (BeO) and boron carbide (B4C) were considered as muon production targets and their muon production rates for 600-MeV proton beam were calculated and compared. For thermal analysis, total heat deposited on the targets by the proton beams and the secondary particles was calculated with a MCNPX code, and then the temperature distribution of target was derived from the calculated heat by using an ANSYS code with consideration for heat transfer mechanisms, such as thermal conduction and thermal radiation. In addition, we have investigated whether the heavy ion beams can be utilized for muon production. For various beam species such as 3He2, 4He, 7Li, 10B and 12C, their muon production rates were calculated and compared with that obtained for a proton beam.

  2. Feasibility study of heavy ion beams and compound target materials for muon production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Son, Jaebum; Kim, Gi Dong; Kim, Yong Kyun

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the feasibility of using compound materials as target for muon production by virtue of simulations using a GEANT4 toolkit. A graphite and two thermostable compound materials, beryllium oxide (BeO) and boron carbide (B4C) were considered as muon production targets and their muon production rates for 600-MeV proton beam were calculated and compared. For thermal analysis, total heat deposited on the targets by the proton beams and the secondary particles was calculated with a MCNPX code, and then the temperature distribution of target was derived from the calculated heat by using an ANSYS code with consideration for heat transfer mechanisms, such as thermal conduction and thermal radiation. In addition, we have investigated whether the heavy ion beams can be utilized for muon production. For various beam species such as 3He2, 4He, 7Li, 10B and 12C, their muon production rates were calculated and compared with that obtained for a proton beam.

  3. Progress on the Design and Fabrication of the MICE Focusing Magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Michael A; Baynham, D. Elwyn; Bradshaw, Thomas W.; Cobb, John H.; Lau, Wing W.; Yang, Stephanie Q.

    2009-10-19

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) focusing solenoid magnets focus the muon beam within the MICE cooling channel on a liquid or solid absorber that is within the warm bore of solenoid. The focusing magnet has a warm bore of 470 mm. his magnet consists of two coils 210-mm long that is separated by an aluminum mandrel that is 200 mm long. Each of the coils has its own leads. The coils may be operated in either the non-flip mode (solenoid mode with both coils at the same polarity) or the lip mode (quadrupole focusing mode where both coils are at opposite polarity). This report describes the focusing solenoid magnet design that will be built by the vendor. The progress on the construction of the first of the focusing magnets will also be discussed in this report. Ultimately three of these magnets will be built. These magnets will be cooled using a pair 1.5 W (at 4.2 K) pulse tube coolers.

  4. Magnetic shielding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

    1987-10-06

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient magnetic field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines. 3 figs.

  5. Magnetic shielding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kerns, John A. (Livermore, CA); Stone, Roger R. (Walnut Creek, CA); Fabyan, Joseph (Livermore, CA)

    1987-01-01

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient magnetic field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

  6. Compact storage ring to search for the muon electric dipole moment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Adelmann; K. Kirch; C. J. G. Onderwater; T. Schietinger

    2009-06-25

    We present the concept of a compact storage ring of less than 0.5 m orbit radius to search for the electric dipole moment of the muon ($d_\\mu$) by adapting the "frozen spin" method. At existing muon facilities a statistics limited sensitivity of $d_\\mu \\sim 5 \\times 10^{-23} \\ecm$ can be achieved within one year of data taking. Reaching this precision would demonstrate the viability of this novel technique to directly search for charged particle EDMs and already test a number of Standard Model extensions. At a future, high-power muon facility a statistical reach of $d_\\mu \\sim 5 \\times 10^{-25} \\ecm$ seems realistic with this setup.

  7. Measurement of the charge ratio of atmospheric muons with the CMS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2010-08-01

    We present a measurement of the ratio of positive to negative muon fluxes from cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere, using data collected by the CMS detector both at ground level and in the underground experimental cavern at the CERN LHC. Muons were detected in the momentum range from 5 GeV/c to 1 TeV/c. The surface flux ratio is measured to be 1.2766 \\pm 0.0032(stat.) \\pm 0.0032 (syst.), independent of the muon momentum, below 100 GeV/c. This is the most precise measurement to date. At higher momenta the data are consistent with an increase of the charge ratio, in agreement with cosmic ray shower models and compatible with previous measurements by deep-underground experiments.

  8. Cosmic-muon flux and annual modulation in Borexino at 3800 m water-equivalent depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Bellini; J. Benziger; D. Bick; G. Bonfini; D. Bravo; M. Buizza Avanzini; B. Caccianiga; L. Cadonati; F. Calaprice; C. Carraro; P. Cavalcante; A. Chavarria; A. Chepurnov; D. D'Angelo; S. Davini; A. Derbin; A. Etenko; F. von Feilitzsch; K. Fomenko; D. Franco; C. Galbiati; S. Gazzana; C. Ghiano; M. Giammarchi; M. Goeger-Neff; A. Goretti; L. Grandi; E. Guardincerri; C. Hagner; S. Hardy; Aldo Ianni; Andrea Ianni; D. Korablev; G. Korga; Y. Koshio; D. Kryn; M. Laubenstein; T. Lewke; E. Litvinovich; B. Loer; F. Lombardi; P. Lombardi; L. Ludhova; I. Machulin; S. Manecki; W. Maneschg; G. Manuzio; Q. Meindl; E. Meroni; L. Miramonti; M. Misiaszek; D. Montanari; P. Mosteiro; V. Muratova; L. Oberauer; M. Obolensky; F. Ortica; K. Otis; M. Pallavicini; L. Papp; L. Perasso; S. Perasso; A. Pocar; R. S. Raghavan; G. Ranucci; A. Razeto; A. Re; A. Romani; A. Sabelnikov; R. Saldanha; C. Salvo; S. Schönert; H. Simgen; M. Skorokhvatov; O. Smirnov; A. Sotnikov; S. Sukhotin; Y. Suvorov; R. Tartaglia; G. Testera; D. Vignaud; R. B. Vogelaar; J. Winter; M. Wojcik; A. Wright; M. Wurm; J. Xu; O. Zaimidoroga; S. Zavatarelli; G. Zuzel

    2012-11-22

    We have measured the muon flux at the underground Gran Sasso National Laboratory (3800 m w.e.) to be (3.41 \\pm 0.01) \\times 10-4m-2s-1 using four years of Borexino data. A modulation of this signal is observed with a period of (366\\pm3) days and a relative amplitude of (1.29 \\pm 0.07)%. The measured phase is (179 \\pm 6) days, corresponding to a maximum on the 28th of June. Using the most complete atmospheric data models available, muon rate fluctuations are shown to be positively correlated with atmospheric temperature, with an effective coefficient {\\alpha}T = 0.93 \\pm 0.04. This result represents the most precise study of the muon flux modulation for this site and is in good agreement with expectations.

  9. Assessing the Feasibility of Interrogating Nuclear Waste Storage Silos using Cosmic-ray Muons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ambrosino, F; Cimmino, L; D'Alessandro, R; Ireland, D G; Kaiser, R; Mahon, D F; Mori, N; Noli, P; Saracino, G; Shearer, C; Viliani, L; Yang, G

    2014-01-01

    Muon radiography is a fast growing field in applied scientific research. In recent years, many detector technologies and imaging techniques using the Coulomb scattering and absorption properties of cosmic-ray muons have been developed for the non-destructive assay of various structures across a wide range of applications. This work presents the first results that assess the feasibility of using muons to interrogate waste silos within the UK Nuclear Industry. Two such approaches, using different techniques that exploit each of these properties, have previously been published, and show promising results from both simulation and experimental data for the detection of shielded high-Z materials and density variations from volcanic assay. Both detector systems are based on scintillator and photomultiplier technologies. Results from dedicated simulation studies using both these technologies and image reconstruction techniques are presented for an intermediate-sized nuclear waste storage facility filled with concrete...

  10. Distortions of Experimental Muon Arrival Time Distributions of Extensive Air Showers by the Observation Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Haeusler; A. F. Badea; H. Rebel; I. M. Brancus; J. Oehlschlaeger

    2001-10-17

    Event-by-event measured arrival time distributions of Extensive Air Shower (EAS) muons are affected and distorted by various interrelated effects which originate from the time resolution of the timing detectors, from fluctuations of the reference time and the number (multiplicity) of detected muons spanning the arrival time distribution of the individual EAS events. The origin of these effects is discussed, and different correction procedures, which involve detailed simulations, are proposed and illustrated. The discussed distortions are relevant for relatively small observation distances (R < 200 m) from the EAS core. Their significance decreases with increasing observation distance and increasing primary energies. Local arrival time distributions which refer to the observed arrival time of the first local muon prove to be less sensitive to the mass of the primary. This feature points to the necessity of arrival time measurements with additional information on the curvature of the EAS disk.

  11. Measurement of the energy spectrum of underground muons at Gran Sasso with a transition radiation detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The MACRO Collaboration; M. Ambrosio et al

    1998-07-09

    We have measured directly the residual energy of cosmic ray muons crossing the MACRO detector at the Gran Sasso Laboratory. For this measurement we have used a transition radiation detector consisting of three identical modules, each of about 12 m^2 area, operating in the energy region from 100 GeV to 1 TeV. The results presented here were obtained with the first module collecting data for more than two years. The average single muon energy is found to be 320 +/- 4 (stat.) +/- 11 (syst.) GeV in the rock depth range 3000-6500 hg/cm^2. The results are in agreement with calculations of the energy loss of muons in the rock above the detector.

  12. Spin-glass behavior and anomalous magnetoresistance in ferromagnetic Ge{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x}Te epilayer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jindong [School of Optical and Electronic Information, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Materials Research Center, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Cheng, Xiaomin, E-mail: xmcheng@mail.hust.edu.cn; Tong, Fei; Miao, Xiangshui [School of Optical and Electronic Information, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-07-28

    We report that the Ge{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x}Te thin film exhibits spin-glass behavior when the Fe concentration increases to 0.08. A large bifurcation between the zero-field cooling and field cooling temperature-dependent magnetization was observed. The hysteresis loops after zero-field cooling and field cooling show an exchange bias effect. A time-dependent thermoremanent magnetization follows power-law decay, which confirms the existence of spin glass. The anomalous magnetotranport properties present a further evidence for spin-glass behavior and give a freezing temperature T{sub g}???5?K in the Ge{sub 0.92}Fe{sub 0.08}Te thin film.

  13. Simulation of the Ionization Cooling of Muons in Linear RF Systems G. Penn, J.S. Wurtele, Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    Simulation of the Ionization Cooling of Muons in Linear RF Systems G. Penn, J.S. Wurtele National Labs, Berkeley, CA 94720 Abstract Ionization cooling of muon beams is a crucial component of the proposed muon collider and neutrino factory. Cur- rent studies of cooling channels predominantly use simula

  14. On the Anomalous Weight Losses of High Voltage Symmetrical Capacitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elio B. Porcelli; Victo S. Filho

    2015-02-21

    In this work, we analyzed an anomalous effect verified from symmetrical capacitor devices, working in very high electric potentials. The mastery of that effect could mean in the future the possible substitution of propulsion technology based on fuels by single electrical propulsion systems. From experimental measurements, we detected small variations of the device inertia that cannot be associated with known interactions, so that the raised force apparently has not been completely elucidated by current theories. We measured such variations within an accurate range and we proposed that the experimental results can be explained by relations like Clausius-Mossotti one, in order to quantify the dipole forces that appear in the devices. The values of the weight losses in the capacitors were calculated by means of the theoretical proposal and indicated good agreement with our experimental measurements for 7kV and with many other experimental works.

  15. Modeling anomalous/non-CCM extinction using nanodiamonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rai, Rakesh K

    2012-01-01

    Modeling extinction along anomalous/non-CCM sightlines, which are characterized by a broad $217.5 nm$ bump and steep far-ultraviolet (FUV) rise, is reported. The extinction along these sightlines, viz. {HD 210121}, {HD 204827}, {HD 29647} and {HD 62542}, is difficult to reproduce using standard silicate and graphite grains. Very good match with the observed extinction is obtained by considering nanodiamond component as part of carbonaceous matter. Most of these sightlines are rich in carbon and are invariably backed by a young hot stellar object. Nanodiamond is taken as core within amorphous carbon and graphite. These core-mantle particles taken as additional components along with graphite and silicates lead to reduction in the silicate requirement. The abundance of carbonaceous matter is not affected as a very small fraction of nanodiamond is required. Extinction along sightlines that show steep FUV is also reported demonstrating the importance of nanodiamond component in all such regions.

  16. Anomalous Soft Photons associated with Hadron Production in String Fragmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheuk-Yin Wong

    2010-11-29

    The bosonized QCD2+QED2 system for quarks with two flavors contains QCD2 and QED2 bound states, with an isoscalar photon at about 25 MeV and an isovector (I=1,I_3=0) photon at about 44 MeV. Consequently, when a quark and an antiquark at the two ends of a string pulls apart from each other at high energies, hadrons and soft photons will be produced simultaneously in the fragmentation of the string. The production of the QED2 soft photons in association with hadrons may explain the anomalous soft photon data in hadron-hadron collisions and e+e- annihilations at high energies.

  17. Sensor fusion and nonlinear prediction for anomalous event detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hernandez, J.V.; Moore, K.R.; Elphic, R.C.

    1995-03-07

    The authors consider the problem of using the information from various time series, each one characterizing a different physical quantity, to predict the future state of the system and, based on that information, to detect and classify anomalous events. They stress the application of principal components analysis (PCA) to analyze and combine data from different sensors. They construct both linear and nonlinear predictors. In particular, for linear prediction the authors use the least-mean-square (LMS) algorithm and for nonlinear prediction they use both backpropagation (BP) networks and fuzzy predictors (FP). As an application, they consider the prediction of gamma counts from past values of electron and gamma counts recorded by the instruments of a high altitude satellite.

  18. Spallation Backgrounds in Super-Kamiokande Are Made in Muon-Induced Showers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirley Weishi Li; John F. Beacom

    2015-04-28

    Crucial questions about solar and supernova neutrinos remain unanswered. Super-Kamiokande has the exposure needed for progress, but detector backgrounds are a limiting factor. A leading component is the beta decays of isotopes produced by cosmic-ray muons and their secondaries, which initiate nuclear spallation reactions. Cuts of events after and surrounding muon tracks reduce this spallation decay background by $\\simeq 90\\%$ (at a cost of $\\simeq 20\\%$ deadtime), but its rate at 6--18 MeV is still dominant. A better way to cut this background was suggested in a Super-Kamiokande paper [Bays {\\it et al.}, Phys.~Rev.~D {\\bf 85}, 052007 (2012)] on a search for the diffuse supernova neutrino background. They found that spallation decays above 16 MeV were preceded near the same location by a peak in the apparent Cherenkov light profile from the muon; a more aggressive cut was applied to a limited section of the muon track, leading to decreased background without increased deadtime. We put their empirical discovery on a firm theoretical foundation. We show that almost all spallation decay isotopes are produced by muon-induced showers and that these showers are rare enough and energetic enough to be identifiable. This is the first such demonstration for any detector. We detail how the physics of showers explains the peak in the muon Cherenkov light profile and other Super-K observations. Our results provide a physical basis for practical improvements in background rejection that will benefit multiple studies. For solar neutrinos, in particular, it should be possible to dramatically reduce backgrounds at energies as low as 6 MeV.

  19. Forbush decreases and solar events seen in the 10 - 20GeV energy range by the Karlsruhe Muon Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Braun; J. Engler; J. R. Hörandel; J. Milke

    2008-10-27

    Since 1993, a muon telescope located at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Karlsruhe Muon Telescope) has been recording the flux of single muons mostly originating from primary cosmic-ray protons with dominant energies in the 10 - 20 GeV range. The data are used to investigate the influence of solar effects on the flux of cosmic-rays measured at Earth. Non-periodic events like Forbush decreases and ground level enhancements are detected in the registered muon flux. A selection of recent events will be presented and compared to data from the Jungfraujoch neutron monitor. The data of the Karlsruhe Muon Telescope help to extend the knowledge about Forbush decreases and ground level enhancements to energies beyond the neutron monitor regime.

  20. MERCURY HANDLING FOR THE TARGET SYSTEM FOR A MUON COLLIDER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    angle to the magnetic axis, so as later to be collected in a mercury pool/beam dump. The replaceable target module includes the interaction region and mercury pool inside a primary containment vessel flow loop: The interaction region inside the target module: Cross section of the mercury pool: Services

  1. Data acquisition system for the MuLan muon lifetime experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Tishchenko; S. Battu; S. Cheekatmalla; D. B. Chitwood; S. Dhamija; T. P. Gorringe; F. Gray; K. R. Lynch; I. Logashenko; S. Rath; D. M. Webber

    2008-02-07

    We describe the data acquisition system for the MuLan muon lifetime experiment at Paul Scherrer Institute. The system was designed to record muon decays at rates up to 1 MHz and acquire data at rates up to 60 MB/sec. The system employed a parallel network of dual-processor machines and repeating acquisition cycles of deadtime-free time segments in order to reach the design goals. The system incorporated a versatile scheme for control and diagnostics and a custom web interface for monitoring experimental conditions.

  2. Prompt muon-induced fission: a probe for nuclear energy dissipation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volker E. Oberacker

    1999-05-04

    We solve the time-dependent Dirac equation for a muon which is initially bound to a fissioning actinide nucleus. The computations are carried out on a 3-D cartesian lattice utilizing the Basis-Spline collocation method. The muon dynamics is sensitive to the nuclear energy dissipation between the outer fission barrier and the scission point. From a comparison with experimental data we find a dissipated energy of about 10 MeV and a fission time delay due to friction of order $2 \\times 10^{-21}$ s.

  3. Analysis of muon radiography of the Toshiba nuclear critical assembly reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, C. L.; Bacon, Jeffery; Borozdin, Konstantin; Fabritius, J. M.; Perry, John; Ramsey, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Ban, Yuichiro; Izumi, Mikio; Sano, Yuji; Yoshida, Noriyuki [Toshiba Corporation, 8 Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8523 (Japan); Miyadera, Haruo [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Toshiba Corporation, 8 Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8523 (Japan); Mizokami, Shinya; Otsuka, Yasuyuki; Yamada, Daichi [Tokyo Electric Power Company, 1-1-3 Uchisaiwai-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Sugita, Tsukasa; Yoshioka, Kenichi [Toshiba Corporation, 4-1 Ukishima-cho, Kawasaki-ku, Kawasaki 210-0862 (Japan)

    2014-01-13

    A 1.2?×?1.2 m{sup 2} muon tracker was moved from Los Alamos to the Toshiba facility at Kawasaki, Japan, where it was used to take ?4 weeks of data radiographing the Toshiba Critical Assembly Reactor with cosmic ray muons. In this paper, we describe the analysis procedure, show results of this experiment, and compare the results to Monte Carlo predictions. The results validate the concept of using cosmic rays to image the damaged cores of the Fukushima Daiichi reactors.

  4. A Small Multi-Wire Telescope for High Energy Cosmic Ray Muon Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maghrabi, Abdullrahnan; Aldosari, A; Almuteri, M

    2016-01-01

    Different types of ground-based detectors have been developed and deployed around the world to monitor and study CR variations. We have designed, constructed and operated a three layer small (20x20 cm2) multiwire proportional chamber MWPC telescope for cosmic ray muon observations. In this paper, the technical aspects of this detector will be briefly discussed. The abilities of the telescope in detecting high nergy cosmic ray muons (primaries higher than 20 GeV) were established. The telescope performs well in this sense and showed comparable results with a 1 m2 scintillator detector.

  5. Measurement of Neutron and Muon Fluxes 100~m Underground with the SciBath Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, Lance

    2014-01-01

    The SciBath detector is an 80 liter liquid scintillator detector read out by a three dimensional grid of 768 wavelength-shifting fibers. Initially conceived as a fine-grained charged particle detector for neutrino studies that could image charged particle tracks in all directions, it is also sensitive to fast neutrons (15-200 MeV). In fall of 2011 the apparatus performed a three month run to measure cosmic-induced muons and neutrons 100~meters underground in the FNAL MINOS near-detector area. Data from this run has been analyzed and resulted in measurements of the cosmic muon flux as \

  6. Construction and test of MDT chambers for the ATLAS muon spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, F; Dietl, H; Kroha, H; Lagouri, T; Manz, A; Ostapchuk, A Ya; Richter, R; Schael, S; Chouridou, S; Deile, M; Kortner, O; Staude, A; Ströhmer, R; Trefzger, T M

    2001-01-01

    The Monitored Drift Tube (MDT) chambers for the muon spectrometer of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) consist of 3-4 layers of pressurized drift tubes on either side ofa space frame carrying an optical monitoring system to correct fordeformations. The full-scale prototype of a large MDT chamber has been constructed with methods suitable for large-scale production. X-ray measurements at CERN showed a positioning accuracy of the sense wires in the chamber of better than the required 20 micrometers (rms). The performance of the chamber was studied in a muon beam at CERN. Chamber production for ATLAS now has started.

  7. Progress Report on the g-2 Storage Ring Magnet System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunce, G.A.; Cullen, J.; Danby, G.; Green, M.A.; Jackson, J.; Jia, L.; Krienen, F.; Meier, R.; Meng, W.; Morse, W.; Pai, C.; Polk, I.; Prodell, A.; Shutt, R.; Snydstrup, L.; Yamamoto, A.

    1995-06-01

    The 3.1 GeV muon storage ring for the g-2 experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory has three large solenoid magnets that form a continuous 1.451 tesla storage ring dipole with an average beam bend radius of 7.1 meters. In addition to the three storage ring solenoids, there is an inflector dipole with nested dipole coils that create very little stray magnetic field. A superconducting shield on the inflector gets rid of most of the remaining stray flux. This paper reports on the progress made on the storage ring solenoid magnet system and the inflector as of June 1995. The results of cryogenic system tests are briefly reported.

  8. Magnetic shielding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

    1985-02-12

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

  9. Simulation of RF Cavity Dark Current in Presence of Helical Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romanov, Gennady; Kashikhin, Vladimir; /Unlisted

    2010-09-01

    In order to produce muon beam of high enough quality to be used for a Muon Collider, its large phase space must be cooled several orders of magnitude. This task can be accomplished by ionization cooling. Ionization cooling consists of passing a high-emittance muon beam alternately through regions of low Z material, such as liquid hydrogen, and very high accelerating RF cavities within a multi-Tesla solenoidal focusing channel. But first high power tests of RF cavity with beryllium windows in solenoidal magnetic field showed a dramatic drop in accelerating gradient due to RF breakdowns. It has been concluded that external magnetic fields parallel to RF electric field significantly modifies the performance of RF cavities. However, magnetic field in Helical Cooling Channel has a strong dipole component in addition to solenoidal one. The dipole component essentially changes electron motion in a cavity compare to pure solenoidal case, making dark current less focused at field emission sites. The simulation of dark current dynamic in HCC performed with CST Studio Suit is presented in this paper.

  10. Simulation of RF Cavity Dark Current In Presence of Helical Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romanov, Gennady; Kashikhin, Vladimir; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    In order to produce muon beam of high enough quality to be used for a Muon Collider, its large phase space must be cooled several orders of magnitude. This task can be accomplished by ionization cooling. Ionization cooling consists of passing a high-emittance muon beam alternately through regions of low Z material, such as liquid hydrogen, and very high accelerating RF cavities within a multi-Tesla solenoidal focusing channel. But first high power tests of RF cavity with beryllium windows in solenoidal magnetic field showed a dramatic drop in accelerating gradient due to RF breakdowns. It has been concluded that external magnetic fields parallel to RF electric field significantly modifies the performance of RF cavities. However, magnetic field in Helical Cooling Channel has a strong dipole component in addition to solenoidal one. The dipole component essentially changes electron motion in a cavity compare to pure solenoidal case, making dark current less focused at field emission sites. The simulation of dark current dynamic in HCC performed with CST Studio Suit is presented in this paper.

  11. Magnetic nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Matsui, Hiroshi (Glen Rock, NJ); Matsunaga, Tadashi (Tokyo, JP)

    2010-11-16

    A magnetic nanotube includes bacterial magnetic nanocrystals contacted onto a nanotube which absorbs the nanocrystals. The nanocrystals are contacted on at least one surface of the nanotube. A method of fabricating a magnetic nanotube includes synthesizing the bacterial magnetic nanocrystals, which have an outer layer of proteins. A nanotube provided is capable of absorbing the nanocrystals and contacting the nanotube with the nanocrystals. The nanotube is preferably a peptide bolaamphiphile. A nanotube solution and a nanocrystal solution including a buffer and a concentration of nanocrystals are mixed. The concentration of nanocrystals is optimized, resulting in a nanocrystal to nanotube ratio for which bacterial magnetic nanocrystals are immobilized on at least one surface of the nanotubes. The ratio controls whether the nanocrystals bind only to the interior or to the exterior surfaces of the nanotubes. Uses include cell manipulation and separation, biological assay, enzyme recovery, and biosensors.

  12. Anomalous electron-ion energy coupling in electron drift wave turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Lei

    a Century of Magnetic Confinement Fusion Research, Instituteto realize fusion are magnetic and inertial confinement. The

  13. How are Forbush decreases related with interplanetary magnetic field enhancements ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arunbabu, K P; Dugad, S R; Gupta, S K; Hayashi, Y; Kawakami, S; Mohanty, P K; Oshima, A; Subramanian, P

    2015-01-01

    Aims. Forbush decrease (FD) is a transient decrease followed by a gradual recovery in the observed galactic cosmic ray intensity. We seek to understand the relationship between the FDs and near-Earth interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) enhancements associated with solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Methods. We use muon data at cutoff rigidities ranging from 14 to 24 GV from the GRAPES-3 tracking muon telescope to identify FD events. We select those FD events that have a reasonably clean profile, and magnitude > 0.25%. We use IMF data from ACE/WIND spacecrafts. We look for correlations between the FD profile and that of the one hour averaged IMF. We ask if the diffusion of high energy protons into the large scale magnetic field is the cause of the lag observed between the FD and the IMF. Results. The enhancement of the IMF associated with FDs occurs mainly in the shock-sheath region, and the turbulence level in the magnetic field is also enhanced in this region. The observed FD profiles look remarkably simil...

  14. Matter effects on neutrino oscillations in gravitational and magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Athar; Jose F. Nieves

    2000-01-10

    When neutrinos propagate in a background, their gravitational couplings are modified by their weak interactions with the particles in the background. In a medium that contains electrons but no muons or taons, the matter-induced gravitational couplings of neutrinos are different for the various neutrino flavors, and they must be taken into account in describing the phenomena associated with the neutrino oscillations in the presence of strong gravitational fields. Here we incorporate those couplings in that description, including also the effects of a magnetic field, and consider the implications that they have for the emission of high energy neutrinos in the vicinity of Active Galactic Nuclei.

  15. Anomalous supercurrent from Majorana states in topological insulator Josephson junctions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potter, Andrew C.

    We propose a Josephson junction setup based on a topological insulator (TI) thin film to detect Majorana states that exploits the unique helical and extended nature of the TI surface state. When the magnetic flux through ...

  16. Apparatus for magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl

    2013-06-11

    An apparatus and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions ions are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  17. Apparatus for magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl

    2006-10-31

    An apparatus and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions they are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  18. Apparatus for magnetic and electrostatic confinement of plasma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rostoker, Norman; Binderbauer, Michl

    2006-04-11

    An apparatus and method for containing plasma and forming a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) magnetic topology are described in which plasma ions are contained magnetically in stable, non-adiabatic orbits in the FRC. Further, the electrons are contained electrostatically in a deep energy well, created by tuning an externally applied magnetic field. The simultaneous electrostatic confinement of electrons and magnetic confinement of ions avoids anomalous transport and facilitates classical containment of both electrons and ions. In this configuration, ions and electrons may have adequate density and temperature so that upon collisions they are fused together by nuclear force, thus releasing fusion energy. Moreover, the fusion fuel plasmas that can be used with the present confinement system and method are not limited to neutronic fuels only, but also advantageously include advanced fuels.

  19. Shielding at a distance due to anomalous resonance in superlens with eccentric core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanghyeon Yu; Mikyoung Lim

    2015-04-18

    The cylindrical plasmonic structure with concentric core exhibits the anomalous localized resonance and the resulting cloaking effect. It turns out that the plasmonic structure of eccentric core also has the anomalous resonant behavior. Differently from the concentric case, the eccentric superlens has the shielding effect as well as the cloaking effect depending on the radii of core and shell and the distance between them, where the shielding region is located at a distance from the device. In this paper, we investigate the anomalous resonance and the shielding effect in superlens with eccentric core using the m\\"{o}bius transformation which maps the eccentric annulus to an concentric annulus.

  20. Superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr?Ir?Sn??

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, P. K. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Wang, Kefeng [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Amato, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Khasanov, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Luetkens, H. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Petrovic, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Cook, R. M. [Univ. of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); Lees, M. R. [Univ. of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom); Morenzoni, E. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    2014-10-01

    Magnetization and muon spin relaxation or rotation (µSR) measurements have been performed to study the superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr?Ir?Sn??. From magnetization measurements the lower and upper critical fields of Sr?Ir?Sn?? are found to be 81(1) Oe and 14.4(2) kOe, respectively. Zero-field µSR data show no sign of any magnetic ordering or weak magnetism in Sr?Ir?Sn??. Transverse-field µSR measurements in the vortex state provided the temperature dependence of the magnetic penetration depth ?. The dependence of ??˛ with temperature is consistent with the existence of single s-wave energy gap in the superconducting state of Sr?Ir?Sn?? with a gap value of 0.82(2) meV at absolute zero temperature. The magnetic penetration depth at zero temperature ?(0) is 291(3) nm. The ratio ?(0)/kBTc = 2.1(1) indicates that Sr?Ir?Sn?? should be considered as a strong-coupling superconductor.

  1. Superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr?Ir?Sn??

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, P. K.; Wang, Kefeng; Amato, A.; Khasanov, R.; Luetkens, H.; Petrovic, C.; Cook, R. M.; Lees, M. R.; Morenzoni, E.

    2014-10-10

    Magnetization and muon spin relaxation or rotation (µSR) measurements have been performed to study the superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr?Ir?Sn??. From magnetization measurements the lower and upper critical fields of Sr?Ir?Sn?? are found to be 81(1) Oe and 14.4(2) kOe, respectively. Zero-field µSR data show no sign of any magnetic ordering or weak magnetism in Sr?Ir?Sn??. Transverse-field µSR measurements in the vortex state provided the temperature dependence of the magnetic penetration depth ?. The dependence of ??˛ with temperature is consistent with the existence of single s-wave energy gap in the superconducting state of Sr?Ir?Sn?? with a gap value of 0.82(2) meV at absolute zero temperature. The magnetic penetration depth at zero temperature ?(0) is 291(3) nm. The ratio ?(0)/kBTc = 2.1(1) indicates that Sr?Ir?Sn?? should be considered as a strong-coupling superconductor.

  2. Superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr?Ir?Sn??

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Biswas, P. K.; Wang, Kefeng; Amato, A.; Khasanov, R.; Luetkens, H.; Petrovic, C.; Cook, R. M.; Lees, M. R.; Morenzoni, E.

    2014-10-10

    Magnetization and muon spin relaxation or rotation (µSR) measurements have been performed to study the superconducting and magnetic properties of Sr?Ir?Sn??. From magnetization measurements the lower and upper critical fields of Sr?Ir?Sn?? are found to be 81(1) Oe and 14.4(2) kOe, respectively. Zero-field µSR data show no sign of any magnetic ordering or weak magnetism in Sr?Ir?Sn??. Transverse-field µSR measurements in the vortex state provided the temperature dependence of the magnetic penetration depth ?. The dependence of ??˛ with temperature is consistent with the existence of single s-wave energy gap in the superconducting state of Sr?Ir?Sn?? with a gap valuemore »of 0.82(2) meV at absolute zero temperature. The magnetic penetration depth at zero temperature ?(0) is 291(3) nm. The ratio ?(0)/kBTc = 2.1(1) indicates that Sr?Ir?Sn?? should be considered as a strong-coupling superconductor.« less

  3. Measurement of the Muon content of Extensive Air Showers with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Espadanal; for the Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2015-05-20

    Several methods developed within the Pierre Auger Collaboration for the estimation of the muonic component of the Extensive Air Showers observed in the surface Cherenkov detectors are described. The results derived from the data show a deficit of muons predicted by the current hadronic interactions models at ultra-high energies.

  4. Muon Energy Reconstruction Through the Multiple Scattering Method in the NO$\\mathrm{\

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Psihas Olmedo, Silvia Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Neutrino energy measurements are a crucial component in the experimental study of neutrino oscillations. These measurements are done through the reconstruction of neutrino interactions and energy measurements of their products. This thesis presents the development of a technique to reconstruct the energy of muons from neutrino interactions in the NO$\\mathrm{\

  5. On the Rejection of Fake Muons in AMANDA using Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiebusch, Christopher

    On the Rejection of Fake Muons in AMANDA using Neural Networks Alexander Biron, Sabine Schilling This report describes the use of an artificial neural network in the final quality analysis for AMANDA. Aim the reconstructed tracks and are fed as inputs into the neural network. We use a simple feedforward architecture

  6. Physics Opportunities at a Muon Collider Kirk T. McDonald

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    of TeV of constituent CoM energy. . That a Muon Collider is the best option to accomplish the above. 2 solenoids (to avoid buildup of angular momentum). The Energy Spread Rises due to ``Straggling'' # Must reduce energy spread by a wedge absorber at a momentum dispersion point: Absorber wedge Nominal energy

  7. Study of the performance of the MicroMegas chambers for the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer Upgrade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanadia, Marco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Micromegas (MICRO MEsh GAseous Structure) chambers are Micro-Pattern Gaseous Detectors designed to provide a high spatial resolution in highly irradiated environments. In 2007 an ambitious long-term R&D activity was started in the context of the ATLAS experiment, at CERN: the Muon ATLAS Micromegas Activity (MAMMA). After years of tests on prototypes and technology breakthroughs, Micromegas chambers were chosen as tracking detectors for an upgrade of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer. These novel detectors will be installed in 2018 and 2019 during the second long shutdown of the Large Hadron Collider, and will serve as precision detectors in the innermost part of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer. Eight layers of Micromegas modules of unprecedented size, up to 3 $\\rm{{m^2}}$, will cover a surface of 150 $\\rm{{m^2}}$ for a total active area of about 1200 $\\rm{{m^2}}$. This upgrade will be crucial to ensure high quality performance for the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer in view of the third run of the Large Hadron Collider and...

  8. Spallation Backgrounds in Super-Kamiokande Are Made in Muon-Induced Showers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Shirley Weishi

    2015-01-01

    Crucial questions about solar and supernova neutrinos remain unanswered. Super-Kamiokande has the exposure needed for progress, but detector backgrounds are a limiting factor. A leading component is the beta decays of isotopes produced by cosmic-ray muons and their secondaries, which initiate nuclear spallation reactions. Cuts of events after and surrounding muon tracks reduce this spallation decay background by $\\simeq 90\\%$ (at a cost of $\\simeq 20\\%$ deadtime), but its rate at 6 -- 18 MeV is still dominant. A better way to cut this background was suggested in a Super-Kamiokande paper [Bays {\\it et al.}, Phys.~Rev.~D {\\bf 85}, 052007 (2012)] on a search for the diffuse supernova neutrino background. They found that spallation decays above 16 MeV were preceded near the same location by a peak in the apparent Cherenkov light profile from the muon; a more aggressive cut was applied to a limited section of the muon track, leading to decreased background without increased deadtime. We put their empirical discove...

  9. SHIELDING STUDIES FOR THE MUON COLLIDER TARGET (From STUDY II to IDS120f Geometries)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    COLLECTING TANK (BEAM DUMP) AND REMOVAL SYSTEM. 8. SHIELDING CONFIGURATIONS (WC BEADS+H2O). 2 #12;TARGETSHIELDING STUDIES FOR THE MUON COLLIDER TARGET (From STUDY II to IDS120f Geometries) NICHOLAS. RADIATION DAMAGE. STRUCTURAL/MECHANICAL LIMITS FOR SUPERCONDUCTING COILS. SHIELDING MATERIAL. RESULTS

  10. Design and optimization of a particle selection system for muon based applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    are generated that deposit heat in superconducting materials and activate the machine. In this study we describe ·Scanned chicane length and angle · Defined performance in terms of ­ Muon transmission from 80 to 260 Me the point with best transmission and fitted results to a mathematical expression (yellow line) Summary ·We

  11. The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration The R&D Program for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    , May 26, 2001 http://puhep1.princeton.edu/mumu/target/ Kirk T. McDonald May 26, 2001 1 #12 target is feasible for beam power of 4 MW (and more). Kirk T. McDonald May 26, 2001 2 #12; The Neutrino Target system support facility. Kirk T. McDonald May 26, 2001 3 #12; The Neutrino Factory and Muon

  12. Neutrino Physics at a Muon Collider K.T. McDonald

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    GeV: light Higgs, calibrate on Z0. Cost: > 1$B. Could the case be strengthened by ancillary physics-energy (and ) beams exist in the early stages of a muon collider. 2 #12;Summary of Ancillary Physics than a horn. Bottom line: Present understanding of ancillary physics capabilities does not provide

  13. FFAGS FOR MUON ACCELERATION J. Scott Berg, Stephen Kahn, Robert Palmer, Dejan Trbojevic,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keil, Eberhard

    the desired energy gain. An alter- native method for muon acceleration is using a fixed field alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerator. Such an accelera- tor has a very large energy acceptance (a factor of two with time. The arc must be able to transmit a beam over a wide range of energies. The first difficulty

  14. High-energy Atmospheric Muon Flux Expected at India-Based Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukanta Panda; Sergei I. Sinegovsky

    2008-02-04

    We calculate the zenith-angle dependence of conventional and prompt high-energy muon fluxes at India-Based Neutrino Observatory (INO) depth. This study demonstrates a possibility to discriminate models of the charm hadroproduction including the low-x QCD behaviour of hadronic cross-sections relevant at very high energies.

  15. SHIELDING OF SUPERCONDUCTING COILS FOR A 4-MW MUON-COLLIDER TARGET SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    SHIELDING OF SUPERCONDUCTING COILS FOR A 4-MW MUON-COLLIDER TARGET SYSTEM R.J. Weggel , N. Souchlas intercoil gaps to 40% of the O.D. of the flanking coils. Longitudinal sag of the tungsten shielding vessels an aggregate cross section of 0.1 m2 ; the cryogenic heat leakage may be large. The innermost shielding vessel

  16. nuSTORM - Neutrinos from STORed Muons: Letter of Intent to the Fermilab Physics Advisory Committee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyberd, P.; Smith, D.R.; Coney, L.; Pascoli, S.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Brice, S.J.; Bross, A.D.; Cease, H.; Kopp, J.; Mokhov, N.; Morfin, J.; /Fermilab /Yerkes Observ. /Glasgow U. /Imperial Coll., London /Valencia U. /Jefferson Lab /Kyoto U. /Northwestern U. /Osaka U.

    2012-06-01

    The idea of using a muon storage ring to produce a high-energy ({approx_equal} 50 GeV) neutrino beam for experiments was first discussed by Koshkarev in 1974. A detailed description of a muon storage ring for neutrino oscillation experiments was first produced by Neuffer in 1980. In his paper, Neuffer studied muon decay rings with E{sub {mu}} of 8, 4.5 and 1.5 GeV. With his 4.5 GeV ring design, he achieved a figure of merit of {approx_equal} 6 x 10{sup 9} useful neutrinos per 3 x 10{sup 13} protons on target. The facility we describe here ({nu}STORM) is essentially the same facility proposed in 1980 and would utilize a 3-4 GeV/c muon storage ring to study eV-scale oscillation physics and, in addition, could add significantly to our understanding of {nu}{sub e} and {nu}{sub {mu}} cross sections. In particular the facility can: (1) address the large {Delta}m{sup 2} oscillation regime and make a major contribution to the study of sterile neutrinos, (2) make precision {nu}{sub e} and {bar {nu}}{sub e} cross-section measurements, (3) provide a technology ({mu} decay ring) test demonstration and {mu} beam diagnostics test bed, and (4) provide a precisely understood {nu} beam for detector studies. The facility is the simplest implementation of the Neutrino Factory concept. In our case, 60 GeV/c protons are used to produce pions off a conventional solid target. The pions are collected with a focusing device (horn or lithium lens) and are then transported to, and injected into, a storage ring. The pions that decay in the first straight of the ring can yield a muon that is captured in the ring. The circulating muons then subsequently decay into electrons and neutrinos. We are starting with a storage ring design that is optimized for 3.8 GeV/c muon momentum. This momentum was selected to maximize the physics reach for both oscillation and the cross section physics. See Fig. 1 for a schematic of the facility.

  17. Magnetic monopoles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fryberger, D.

    1984-12-01

    In this talk on magnetic monopoles, first the author briefly reviews some historical background; then, the author describes what several different types of monopoles might look like; and finally the author discusses the experimental situation. 81 references.

  18. Violations of Lorentz invariance in the neutrino sector: an improved analysis of anomalous threshold constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maccione, Luca; Liberati, Stefano; Mattingly, David M. E-mail: liberati@sissa.it

    2013-03-01

    Recently there has been a renewed activity in the physics of violations of Lorentz invariance in the neutrino sector. Flavor dependent Lorentz violation, which generically changes the pattern of neutrino oscillations, is extremely tightly constrained by oscillation experiments. Flavor independent Lorentz violation, which does not introduce new oscillation phenomena, is much more weakly constrained with constraints coming from time of flight and anomalous threshold analyses. We use a simplified rotationally invariant model to investigate the effects of finite baselines and energy dependent dispersion on anomalous reaction rates in long baseline experiments and show numerically that anomalous reactions do not necessarily cut off the spectrum quite as sharply as currently assumed. We also present a revised analysis of how anomalous reactions can be used to cast constraints from the observed atmospheric high energy neutrinos and the expected cosmogenic ones.

  19. Anomalously High B-Values In The South Flank Of Kilauea Volcano...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Anomalously High B-Values In The South Flank Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii- Evidence For The Distribution Of Magma Below Kilauea'S East Rift Zone Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  20. Coexistence and efficiency of normal and anomalous transport by molecular motors in living cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igor Goychuk; Vasyl O. Kharchenko; R. Metzler

    2013-09-26

    Recent experiments reveal both passive subdiffusion of various nanoparticles and anomalous active transport of such particles by molecular motors in the molecularly crowded environment of living biological cells. Passive and active microrheology reveals that the origin of this anomalous dynamics is due to the viscoelasticity of the intracellular fluid. How do molecular motors perform in such a highly viscous, dissipative environment? Can we explain the observed co-existence of the anomalous transport of relatively large particles of 100 to 500 nm in size by kinesin motors with the normal transport of smaller particles by the same molecular motors? What is the efficiency of molecular motors in the anomalous transport regime? Here we answer these seemingly conflicting questions and consistently explain experimental findings in a generalization of the well-known continuous diffusion model for molecular motors with two conformational states in which viscoelastic effects are included.

  1. Quantum anomalous Hall effect with cold atoms trapped in a square lattice 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xiong-Jun; Liu, Xin; Wu, Congjun; Sinova, Jairo

    2010-01-01

    We propose an experimental scheme to realize the quantum anomalous Hall effect in an anisotropic square optical lattice which can be generated from available experimental setups of double-well lattices with minor modifications. A periodic gauge...

  2. MRF Technical Note # 49 Can desert dust explain the anomalous greenhouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    MRF Technical Note # 49 Can desert dust explain the anomalous greenhouse effect observed over greenhouse effect observed over the Sahara during July 2003 revealed by GERB/UM intercomparisons? Jim M

  3. Anomalous $WW?$ couplings with beam polarization at the Compact Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Ar?; A. A. Billur; S. C. ?nan; M. Köksal

    2015-06-30

    We study the anomalous $WW\\gamma$ couplings at the Compact Linear Collider through the processes $e^{+}e^{-}\\to W^+W^-$, $e^{-}e^{+} \\to e^{-} \\gamma^{*} e^{+} \\to e^{+} \

  4. Anomalous Near-Field Heat Transfer between a Cylinder and a Perforated Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez-Wong, Alejandro

    We predict that the near-field radiative heat-transfer rate between a cylinder and a perforated surface depends nonmonotonically on their separation. This anomalous behavior, which arises due to evanescent-wave effects, ...

  5. Solution to the long-standing puzzle of Huygens’ “anomalous suspension”

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nauenberg, M

    2015-01-01

    SOLUTION TO THE LONG STANDING PUZZLE OF HUYGENS’ “ANOMALOUSof mercury 76 cm. in height standing inside the tube. At theSOLUTION TO THE LONG STANDING PUZZLE OF HUYGENS’ “ANOMALOUS

  6. Simulating net particle production and chiral magnetic current in a CP-odd domain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenji Fukushima

    2015-01-29

    We elucidate the numerical formulation to simulate net production of particles and anomalous currents with CP-breaking background fields which cause an imbalance between particles and anti-particles. For a concrete demonstration we numerically impose pulsed electric and magnetic fields to observe that the dynamical chiral magnetic current follows together with the net particle production. The produced particle density is quantitatively consistent with the axial anomaly, while the chiral magnetic current shows a delay before the onset, which leads to a suppression effect, and then approaches what is expected from the axial anomaly.

  7. Simulating net particle production and chiral magnetic current in a CP-odd domain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fukushima, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    We elucidate the numerical formulation to simulate net production of particles and anomalous currents with CP-breaking background fields which cause an imbalance of particles over anti-particles. For a concrete demonstration we numerically impose pulsed electric and magnetic fields to observe that the dynamical chiral magnetic current follows together with the net particle production. The produced particle density is quantitatively consistent with the axial anomaly, while the chiral magnetic current is suppressed by a delay before the the onset of the current generation.

  8. Measuring Muon-Induced Neutrons with Liquid Scintillation Detector at Soudan Mine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Zhang; D. -M. Mei

    2014-11-26

    We report a direct detection of muon-induced high energy neutrons with a 12-liter neutron detector fabricated with EJ-301 liquid scintillator operating at Soudan Mine for about two years. The detector response to energy from a few MeV up to $\\sim$ 20 MeV has been calibrated using radioactive sources and cosmic-ray muons. Subsequently, we have calculated the scintillation efficiency for nuclear recoils, up to a few hundred MeV, using Birks' law in the Monte Carlo simulation. Data from an exposure of 655.1 days were analyzed and neutron-induced recoil events were observed in the energy region from 4 MeV to 50 MeV, corresponding to fast neutrons with kinetic energy up to a few hundred MeV, depending on the scattering angle. Combining with the Monte Carlo simulation, the muon-induced fast neutron flux is determined to be $(2.3 \\pm 0.52 (sta.) \\pm 0.99 (sys.) ) \\times10^{-9}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ (E$_{n}$ $>$ 20 MeV), in a reasonable agreement with the model prediction. The muon flux is found to be ($1.65\\pm 0.02 (sta.) \\pm 0.1 (sys.) ) \\times10^{-7}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ (E$_{\\mu}$ $>$ 1 GeV), consistent with other measurements. As a result, the muon-induced high energy gamma-ray flux is simulated to be 7.08 $\\times$10$^{-7}$cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ (E$_{\\gamma}$ $>$ 1 MeV) for the depth of Soudan.

  9. Momentum conservation implies anomalous energy transport in 1d classical lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomaz Prosen; David K. Campbell

    1999-08-26

    Under quite general conditions, we prove that for classical many-body lattice Hamiltonians in one dimension (1D) total momentum conservation implies anomalous conductivity in the sense of the divergence of the Kubo expression for the coefficient of thermal conductivity, $\\kappa$. Our results provide rigorous confirmation and explanation of many of the existing ``surprising'' numerical studies of anomalous conductivity in 1D classical lattices, including the celebrated Fermi-Pasta-Ulam problem.

  10. A random walk approach to anomalous particle and energy transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Isliker

    2007-10-26

    The combined Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW) in position and momentum space is introduced, in the form of two coupled integral equations that describe the evolution of the probability distribution for finding a particle at a certain position and with a certain momentum as a function of time. The integral equations are solved numerically with a pseudospectral method that is based on the expansion of the unknown functions in terms of Chebyshev polynomials. In parallel, Monte-Carlo simulation are performed. Through the inclusion of momentum space, the combined CTRW is able to yield results on density and temperature profile evolution, on particle and heat fluxes and diffusivities, and on kinetic energy distributions. Depending on the choice of the probability distributions of the particle displacements in position and momentum space, the combined CTRW is able to model phenomena of anomalous transport in position as well as in momentum (or energy or velocity) space. An application is made to a toroidally confined plasma that undergoes off-center injection of cold plasma (off-axis fueling), using two variants of the model, the mixed model and the critical gradient model. The phenomenon of profile stiffness is addressed, both for the density and for the temperature profile, respectively, and the particle and energy confinement times are determined. The analysis of the particle and heat fluxes shows that the dynamics realized in the combined CTRW is incompatible with the classical approach of Fick's or Fourier's law for particle and heat transport, respectively.

  11. An Explanation of Dayton Miller's Anomalous "Ether Drift" Result

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas J. Roberts

    2006-10-15

    In 1933 Dayton Miller published in this journal the results of his voluminous observations using his ether drift interferometer, and proclaimed that he had determined the "absolute motion of the earth". This result is in direct conflict with the prediction of Special Relativity, and also with numerous related experiments that found no such signal or "absolute motion". This paper presents a complete explanation for his anomalous result by: a) showing that his results are not statistically significant, b) describing in detail how flaws in his analysis procedure produced a false signal with precisely the properties he expected, and c) presenting a quantitative model of his systematic drift that shows there is no real signal in his data. In short, this is every experimenter's nightmare: he was unknowingly looking at statistically insignificant patterns in his systematic drift that mimicked the appearance of a real signal. An upper limit on "absolute motion" of 6 km/sec is derived from his raw data, fully consistent with similar experimental results and the prediction of Special Relativity. The key point of this paper is the need for a comprehensive and quantitative error analysis. The concepts and techniques used in this analysis were not available in Miller's day, but are now standard. These problems also apply to the famous measurements of Michelson and Morley, and to most if not all similar experiments; appendices are provided discussing several such experiments.

  12. Anomalous transport in Charney-Hasegawa-Mima flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leoncini, Xavier; Agullo, Olivier; Benkadda, Sadruddin; Zaslavsky, George M. [PIIM, Universite, de Provence, CNRS, Centre Universitaire de Saint Jerome, F-13397 Marseilles (France); Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer Street, New York, New York 10012, USA and Department of Physics, New York University, 2-4 Washington Place, New York, New York 10003 (United States)

    2005-08-01

    The transport properties of particles evolving in a system governed by the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima equation are investigated. Transport is found to be anomalous with a nonlinear evolution of the second moments with time. The origin of this anomaly is traced back to the presence of chaotic jets within the flow. All characteristic transport exponents have a similar value around {mu}=1.75, which is also the one found for simple point vortex flows in the literature, indicating some kind of universality. Moreover, the law {gamma}={mu}+1 linking the trapping-time exponent within jets to the transport exponent is confirmed, and an accumulation toward zero of the spectrum of the finite-time Lyapunov exponent is observed. The localization of a jet is performed, and its structure is analyzed. It is clearly shown that despite a regular coarse-grained picture of the jet, the motion within the jet appears as chaotic, but that chaos is bounded on successive small scales.

  13. Electric-Magnetic Duality in Massless QED?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chris Ford

    2009-09-09

    The possibility that QED and recently developed non-Hermitian, or magnetic, versions of QED are equivalent is considered. Under this duality the Hamiltonians and anomalous axial currents of the two theories are identified. A consequence of such a duality is that particles described by QED carry magnetic as well as electric charges. The proposal requires a vanishing zero bare fermion mass in both theories; Dirac mass terms are incompatible with the conservation of magnetic charge much as Majorana masses spoil the conservation of electric charge. The physical spectrum comprises photons and massless spin-1/2 particles carrying equal or opposite electric and magnetic charges. The four particle states described by the Dirac fermion correspond to the four possible charge assignments of elementary dyons. This scale invariant spectrum indicates that the quantum field theory is finite. The Johnson Baker Willey eigenvalue equation for the fine structure constant in finite spinor QED is interpreted as a Dirac-like charge quantisation condition for dyons.

  14. Inclusive b-hadron production cross section with muons in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2011-03-01

    A measurement of the b-hadron production cross section in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV is presented. The dataset, corresponding to 85 inverse nanobarns, was recorded with the CMS experiment at the LHC using a low-threshold single-muon trigger. Events are selected by the presence of a muon with transverse momentum greater than 6 GeV with respect to the beam direction and pseudorapidity less than 2.1. The transverse momentum of the muon with respect to the closest jet discriminates events containing b hadrons from background. The inclusive b-hadron production cross section is presented as a function of muon transverse momentum and pseudorapidity. The measured total cross section in the kinematic acceptance is sigma(pp to b+X to mu + X') =1.32 +/- 0.01 (stat) +/- 0.30 (syst) +/- 0.15 (lumi) microbarns.

  15. Measurement of the top quark mass using the invariant mass of lepton pairs in soft muon b-tagged events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Gerry P.

    We present the first measurement of the mass of the top quark in a sample of tt? ???? bb? qq? events (where ?=e,?) selected by identifying jets containing a muon candidate from the semileptonic decay of heavy-flavor hadrons ...

  16. Magnet Cable Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royet, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    J. Royet, "Magnet Cable Manufacturing", oral presentation atDivision Magnet Cable Manufacturing J. Royet October 1990J I Magnet Cable Manufacturing* John Royet Accelerator &

  17. Impact of anomalous dispersion on the interferometer measurements of plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilsen, J; Johnson, W R; Iglesias, C A; Scofield, J H

    2004-12-16

    For many decades optical interferometers have been used to measure the electron density of plasmas. During the last ten years X-ray lasers in the wavelength range 14 to 47 nm have enabled researchers to use interferometers to probe even higher density plasmas. The data analysis assumes that the index of refraction is due only to the free electrons, which makes the index of refraction less than one and the electron density proportional to the number of fringe shifts. Recent experiments in Al plasmas observed plasmas with an index of refraction greater than one and made us question the validity of the usual formula for calculating the index of refraction. Recent calculations showed how the anomalous dispersion from the bound electrons can dominate the index of refraction in many types of plasma and make the index greater than one or enhance the index such that one would greatly overestimate the electron density of the plasma using interferometers. In this work we calculate the index of refraction of C, Al, Ti, and Pd plasmas for photon energies from 0 to 100 eV (12.4 nm) using a new average-atom code. The results show large variations from the free electron approximation under many different plasma conditions. We validate the average-atom code against the more detailed OPAL code for carbon and aluminum plasmas. During the next decade X-ray free electron lasers and other sources will be available to probe a wider variety of plasmas at higher densities and shorter wavelengths so understanding the index of refraction in plasmas will be even more essential.

  18. Monitoring temporal opacity fluctuations of large structures with muon tomography : a calibration experiment using a water tower tank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kevin Jourde; Dominique Gibert; Jacques Marteau; Jean de Bremond d'Ars; Serge Gardien; Claude Girerd; Jean-Christophe Ianigro

    2015-04-09

    The idea of using secondary cosmic muons to scan the internal structure of a given body has known significant developments since the first archaeological application by Alvarez and collaborators on the Gizah pyramids. Recent applications cover the fields of volcanology, hydrology, civil engineering, mining, archaeology etc. Muon radiography features are essentially identical to those of medical X-ray imaging techniques. It is a contrast densitometry method using the screening effect of the body under study on the natural flux of cosmic muons. This technique is non-invasive and complements the standard geophysical techniques, e.g. electrical tomography or gravimetry. It may be applied to a large variety of geological targets, among which the domes of active volcanoes. In this context muon tomography presents the noticeable advantage to perform measurements of large volumes, with a large aperture, from a distant point, far from the potentially dangerous zones. The same conclusions apply regarding the monitoring of the volcano's activity since muon tomography provides continuous data taking, provided the muon detectors are sufficiently well designed and autonomous. Recent measurements on La Soufri\\`ere of Guadeloupe (Lesser Antilles, France) show, over a one year period, large modulations of the crossing muon flux, correlated with an increase of the activity in the dome. In order to firmly establish the sensitivity of the method and of our detectors and to disentangle the effects on the muon flux modulations induced by the volcano's hydrothermal system from those induced by other sources, e.g. atmospheric temperature and pressure, we perform a dedicated calibration experiment inside a water tower tank. We show how the method is fully capable of dynamically following fast variations in the density.

  19. R&D Towards a Muon Collider H. Guler (undergraduate student), C. Lu, K.T. McDonald,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    ://www.cap.bnl.gov/mumu/mu home page.html Princeton muon collider page: http://www.hep.princeton.edu/�mcdonald/mumu 1 #12; Options (?). . Muon collider: # $1B for source/cooler + $100k/m for rings Well­defined leptonic initial state. m µ /m; Targetry Issues . 1­ns beam pulse # shock heating of target. -- Resulting pressure wave may disperse liquid

  20. R&D Towards a Muon Collider H. Guler (undergraduate student), C. Lu, K.T. McDonald,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    ://www.cap.bnl.gov/mumu/mu home page.html Princeton muon collider page: http://www.hep.princeton.edu/~mcdonald/mumu 1 #12;Options collider: $1B for source/cooler + $100k/m for rings Well-defined leptonic initial state. m/me 200 Little of the muon bunch). 7 #12;Targetry Issues · 1-ns beam pulse shock heating of target. ­ Resulting pressure

  1. Entangled states, Lorentz transformations, Spin-precession in magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Chakrabarti

    2009-03-07

    Two positive mass, spin $\\frac 12$ particles created in an entangled state are studied in the presence of a constant magnetic field inducing distinct precessions, depending on the respective momenta, of the two spins. The charge and anomalous magnetic moment of each particle is taken into account. Consequences for entanglement and, more generally, on correlations, are derived. We start, however, with a compact derivation of the effects of Lorentz transformations on such entangled states, though that has been studied by several authors. Our formalism displays conveniently the analogies and the differences between the two cases. Moreover, combining the two, one obtains the case of constant, orthogonal electric and magnetic fields. More general perspectives are evoked in the concluding remarks.

  2. Neutrino Oscillations, Solar Antineutrinos and the Solar Magnetic Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Dev; Sanjeev Kumar

    2003-08-05

    Even after the confirmation of the large mixing angle (LMA) solution of the solar neutrino problem, the scope for resonant spin- flavor precession (RSFP) transitions as a subdominant effect still exists. In this work,we have considered suitably suppressed RSFP transitions in addition to the dominant LMA flavor transitions and translated the bounds on the antineutrino flux into the bounds on the product of neutrino magnetic moment and solar magnetic field. The low and intermediate energy neutrinos have been included in the analysis by obtaining indirect bounds on the corresponding antineutrino fluxes for these components. It is assumed that the missing beryllium neutrinos are being converted into muon antineutrinos via RSFP transitions in the Sun.

  3. Investigation of the relative abundance of heavy versus light nuclei in primary cosmic rays using underground muon bundles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sundaralingam, N.

    1993-06-08

    We study multiple muon events (muon bundles) recorded underground at a depth of 2090 mwe. To penetrate to this depth, the muons must have energies above 0.8 TeV at the Earth`s surface; the primary cosmic ray nuclei which give rise to the observed muon bundles have energies at incidence upon the upper atmosphere of 10 to 10{sup 5}TeV. The events are detected using the Soudan 2 experiment`s fine grained tracking calorimeter which is surrounded by a 14 m {times}10 m {times} 31 m proportional tube array (the ``active shield``). Muon bundles which have at least one muon traversing the calorimeter, are reconstructed using tracks in the calorimeter together with hit patterns in the proportional tube shield. All ionization pulses are required to be coincident within 3 microseconds. A goal of this study is to investigate the relative nuclear abundances in the primary cosmic radiation around the ``knee`` region (10{sup 3} {minus} 10{sup 4} TeV) of the incident energy spectrum. Four models for the nuclear composition of cosmic rays are considered: The Linsley model, the Constant Mass Composition model (CMC), the Maryland model and the Proton-poor model. A Monte Carlo which incorporates one model at a time is used to simulate events which are then reconstructed using the same computer algorithms that are used for the data. Identical cuts and selections are applied to the data and to the simulated events.

  4. Magnetic Field and Flavor Effects on the Gamma-Ray Burst Neutrino Flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philipp Baerwald; Svenja Hümmer; Walter Winter

    2011-03-04

    We reanalyze the prompt muon neutrino flux from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), at the example of the often used reference Waxman-Bahcall GRB flux, in terms of the particle physics involved. We first reproduce this reference flux treating synchrotron energy losses of the secondary pions explicitly. Then we include additional neutrino production modes, the neutrinos from muon decays, the magnetic field effects on all secondary species, and flavor mixing with the current parameter uncertainties. We demonstrate that the combination of these effects modifies the shape of the original Waxman-Bahcall GRB flux significantly, and changes the normalization by a factor of three to four. As a consequence, the gamma-ray burst search strategy of neutrino telescopes may be based on the wrong flux shape, and the constraints derived for the GRB neutrino flux, such as the baryonic loading, may in fact be already much stronger than anticipated.

  5. Magnetic Stereoscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Wiegelmann; Bernd Inhester

    2006-12-21

    The space mission STEREO will provide images from two viewpoints. An important aim of the STEREO mission is to get a 3D view of the solar corona. We develop a program for the stereoscopic reconstruction of 3D coronal loops from images taken with the two STEREO spacecraft. A pure geometric triangulation of coronal features leads to ambiguities because the dilute plasma emissions complicates the association of features in image 1 with features in image 2. As a consequence of these problems the stereoscopic reconstruction is not unique and multiple solutions occur. We demonstrate how these ambiguities can be resolved with the help of different coronal magnetic field models (potential, linear and non-linear force-free fields). The idea is that, due to the high conductivity in the coronal plasma, the emitting plasma outlines the magnetic field lines. Consequently the 3D coronal magnetic field provides a proxy for the stereoscopy which allows to eliminate inconsistent configurations. The combination of stereoscopy and magnetic modelling is more powerful than one of these tools alone. We test our method with the help of a model active region and plan to apply it to the solar case as soon as STEREO data become available.

  6. Theory of anomalous optical properties of bulk Rashba conductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shibata, Junya; Kohno, Hiroshi; Tatara, Gen

    2015-01-01

    The Rashba interaction induced when inversion symmetry is broken in solids is a key interaction connecting spin and charge for realizing novel magnetoelectric cross-correlation effects. Here, we theoretically explore the optical properties of a bulk Rashba conductor by calculating the transport coefficients at finite frequencies. It is demonstrated that the combination of direct and inverse Edelstein effects leads to a softening of the plasma frequency for the electric field perpendicular to the Rashba field, resulting in a hyperbolic electromagnetic metamaterial. In the presence of magnetization, a significant enhancement of anisotropic propagation (directional dichroism) is predicted because of interband transition edge singularity.Based on an effective Hamiltonian analysis, the dichroism is demonstrated to be driven by toroidal and quadratic moments of the magnetic Rashba system. The effective theory of the cross-correlation effects has the same mathematical structure as that of insulating multiferroics.

  7. The cosmic ray muon tomography facility based on large scale MRPC detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xuewu Wang; Ming Zeng; Zhi Zeng; Yi Wang; Ziran Zhao; Xiaoguang Yue; Zhifei Luo; Hengguan Yi; Baihui Yu; Jianping Cheng

    2015-04-18

    Cosmic ray muon tomography is a novel technology to detect high-Z material. A prototype of TUMUTY with 73.6 cm x 73.6 cm large scale position sensitive MRPC detectors has been developed and is introduced in this paper. Three test kits have been tested and image is reconstructed using MAP algorithm. The reconstruction results show that the prototype is working well and the objects with complex structure and small size (20 mm) can be imaged on it, while the high-Z material is distinguishable from the low-Z one. This prototype provides a good platform for our further studies of the physical characteristics and the performances of cosmic ray muon tomography.

  8. Reconcile muon g-2 anomaly with LHC data in SUGRA with generalized gravity mediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fei Wang; Wenyu Wang; Jin Min Yang

    2015-05-29

    From generalized gravity mediation we build a SUGRA scenario in which the gluino is much heavier than the electroweak gauginos at the GUT scale. We find that such a non-universal gaugino scenario with very heavy gluino at the GUT scale can be naturally obtained with proper high dimensional operators in the framework of SU(5) GUT. Then, due to the effects of heavy gluino, at the weak scale all colored sparticles are heavy while the uncolored sparticles are light, which can explain the Brookhaven muon g-2 measurement while satisfying the collider constraints (both the 125 GeV Higgs mass and the direct search limits of sparticles) and dark matter requirements. We also find that, in order to explain the muon g-2 measurement, the neutralino dark matter is lighter than 200 GeV in our scenario, which can be mostly covered by the future Xenon1T experiment.

  9. Parameter choices for a muon recirculating linear accelerator from 5 to 63 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, J. S.

    2014-06-19

    A recirculating linear accelerator (RLA) has been proposed to accelerate muons from 5 to 63 GeV for a muon collider. It should be usable both for a Higgs factory and as a stage for a higher energy collider. First, the constraints due to the beam loading are computed. Next, an expression for the longitudinal emittance growth to lowest order in the longitudinal emittance is worked out. After finding the longitudinal expression, a simplified model that describes the arcs and their approximate expression for the time of flight dependence on energy in those arcs is found. Finally, these results are used to estimate the parameters required for the RLA arcs and the linac phase.

  10. Prompt muon-induced fission: a sensitive probe for nuclear energy dissipation and fission dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volker E. Oberacker; A. Sait Umar; Feodor F. Karpeshin

    2004-03-30

    Following the formation of an excited muonic atom, inner shell transitions may proceed without photon emission by inverse internal conversion, i.e. the muonic excitation energy is transferred to the nucleus. In actinides, the 2p -> 1s and the 3d -> 1s muonic transitions result in excitation of the nuclear giant dipole and giant quadrupole resonances, respectively, which act as doorway states for fission. The nuclear excitation energy is typically 6.5 - 10 MeV. Because the muon lifetime is long compared to the timescale of prompt nuclear fission, the motion of the muon in the Coulomb field of the fissioning nucleus may be utilized to learn about the dynamics of fission.

  11. A Decisive Disappearance Search at High-$\\Delta m^2$ with Monoenergetic Muon Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Axani, S; Conrad, JM; Shaevitz, MH; Spitz, J; Wongjirad, T

    2015-01-01

    "KPipe" is a proposed experiment which will study muon neutrino disappearance for a sensitive test of the $\\Delta m^2\\sim1 \\mathrm{eV}^2$ anomalies, possibly indicative of one or more sterile neutrinos. The experiment is to be located at the J-PARC Materials and Life Science Facility's spallation neutron source, which represents the world's most intense source of charged kaon decay-at-rest monoenergetic (236 MeV) muon neutrinos. The detector vessel, designed to measure the charged current interactions of these neutrinos, will be 3 m in diameter and 120 m long, extending radially at a distance of 32 m to 152 m from the source. This design allows a sensitive search for $\

  12. Beam Dynamics Studies for the First Muon Linac of the Neutrino Factory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Bontoiu,M. Aslaninejad,J. Pozimski,Alex Bogacz

    2010-05-01

    Within the Neutrino Factory Project the muon acceleration process involves a complex chain of accelerators including a (single-pass) linac, two recirculating linacs and an FFAG. The linac consists of RF cavities and iron shielded solenoids for transverse focusing and has been previously designed relying on idealized field models. However, to predict accurately the transport and acceleration of a high emittance 30 cm wide beam with 10 % energy spread requires detailed knowledge of fringe field distributions. This article presents results of the front-to-end tracking of the muon beam through numerically simulated realistic field distributions for the shielded solenoids and the RF fields. Real and phase space evolution of the beam has been studied along the linac and the results are presented and discussed.

  13. Search for Light Resonances Decaying into Pairs of Muons as a Signal of New Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, S. [Yerevan Physics Institute(Armenia)

    2011-07-01

    A search for groups of collimated muons is performed using a data sample collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 35 inverse picobarns. The analysis searches for production of new low-mass states decaying into pairs of muons and is designed to achieve high sensitivity to a broad range of models predicting leptonic jet signatures. With no excess observed over the background expectation, upper limits on the production cross section times branching fraction times acceptance are set, ranging from 0.1 to 0.5 pb at the 95% CL depending on event topology. In addition, the results are interpreted in several benchmark models in the context of supersymmetry with a new light dark sector exploring previously inaccessible parameter space.

  14. Irradiation of Nuclear Track Emulsions with Thermal Neutrons, Heavy Ions, and Muons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. A. Artemenkov; V. Bradnova; A. A. Zaitsev; P. I. Zarubin; I. G. Zarubina; R. R. Kattabekov; K. Z. Mamatkulov; V. V. Rusakova

    2015-08-11

    Exposures of test samples of nuclear track emulsion were analyzed. Angular and energy correlations of products originating from the thermal-neutron-induced reaction n$_{th} + ^{10}$B $\\rightarrow ^{7}$Li $+ (\\gamma) + \\alpha$ were studied in nuclear tack emulsions enriched in boron. Nuclear track emulsions were also irradiated with $^{86}$Kr$^{+17}$ and $^{132}$Xe$^{+26}$ of energy about 1.2 MeV per nucleon. Measurements of ranges of heavy ions in nuclear track emulsions made it possible to determine their energies on the basis of the SRIM model. The formation of high-multiplicity nuclear stars was observed upon irradiating nuclear track emulsions with ultrarelativistic muons. Kinematical features studied in this exposure of nuclear track emulsions for events of the muon-induced splitting of carbon nuclei to three alpha particles are indicative of the nuclear-diffraction interaction mechanism.

  15. A Decisive Disappearance Search at High-$?m^2$ with Monoenergetic Muon Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S Axani; G Collin; JM Conrad; MH Shaevitz; J Spitz; T Wongjirad

    2015-06-18

    "KPipe" is a proposed experiment which will study muon neutrino disappearance for a sensitive test of the $\\Delta m^2\\sim1 \\mathrm{eV}^2$ anomalies, possibly indicative of one or more sterile neutrinos. The experiment is to be located at the J-PARC Materials and Life Science Facility's spallation neutron source, which represents the world's most intense source of charged kaon decay-at-rest monoenergetic (236 MeV) muon neutrinos. The detector vessel, designed to measure the charged current interactions of these neutrinos, will be 3 m in diameter and 120 m long, extending radially at a distance of 32 m to 152 m from the source. This design allows a sensitive search for $\

  16. Magnetic Fields in Quantum Degenerate Systems and in Vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Perez Rojas; E. Rodriguez Querts

    2006-12-28

    We consider self-magnetization of charged and neutral vector bosons bearing a magnetic moment in a gas and in vacuum. For charged vector bosons (W bosons) a divergence of the magnetization in both the medium and the electroweak vacuum occurs for the critical field B=B_{wc}=m_{w}^{2}/e. For B>B_{wc} the system is unstable. This behavior suggests the occurrence of a phase transition at B=B_{c}, where the field is self-consistently maintained. This mechanism actually prevents $B$ from reaching the critical value B_{c}. For virtual neutral vector bosons bearing an anomalous magnetic moment, the ground state has a similar behavior for B=B_{nbc}=m_{nb}^{2}/q . The magnetization in the medium is associated to a Bose-Einstein condensate and we conjecture a similar condensate occurs also in the case of vacuum. The model is applied to virtual electron-positron pairs bosonization in a magnetic field B \\sim B_{pc}\\lesssim 2m_{e}^{2}/e, where m_e is the electron mass. This would lead also to vacuum self-magnetization in QED, where in both cases the symmetry breaking is due to a condensate of quasi-massless particles.

  17. Test of candidate light distributors for the muon (g$-$2) laser calibration system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Anastasi; D. Babusci; F. Baffigi; G. Cantatore; D. Cauz; G. Corradi; S. Dabagov; G. Di Sciascio; R. Di Stefano; C. Ferrari; A. T. Fienberg; A. Fioretti; L. Fulgentini; C. Gabbanini; L. A. Gizzi; D. Hampai; D. W. Hertzog; M. Iacovacci; M. Karuza; J. Kaspar; P. Koester; L. Labate; S. Mastroianni; D. Moricciani; G. Pauletta; L. Santi; G. Venanzoni

    2015-04-01

    The new muon (g-2) experiment E989 at Fermilab will be equipped with a laser calibration system for all the 1296 channels of the calorimeters. An integrating sphere and an alternative system based on an engineered diffuser have been considered as possible light distributors for the experiment. We present here a detailed comparison of the two based on temporal response, spatial uniformity, transmittance and time stability.

  18. The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration The R&D Program for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    , May 26, 2001 http://puhep1.princeton.edu/mumu/target/ Kirk T. McDonald May 26, 2001 1 #12;The Neutrino is feasible for beam power of 4 MW (and more). Kirk T. McDonald May 26, 2001 2 #12;The Neutrino Factory facility. Kirk T. McDonald May 26, 2001 3 #12;The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration Pion

  19. The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration The Target System and Support Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    , May 4, 2001 http://puhep1.princeton.edu/mumu/target/ Kirk T. McDonald May 4, 2001 1 #12; The Neutrino target is feasible for beam power of 4 MW (and more). Kirk T. McDonald May 4, 2001 2 #12; The Neutrino Target system support facility. Kirk T. McDonald May 4, 2001 3 #12; The Neutrino Factory and Muon

  20. The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration The R&D Program for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    , BNL http://puhep1.princeton.edu/mumu/target/ Kirk T. McDonald June 15, 2000 1 #12; The Neutrino with phase­rotation via rf (to compress the bunch energy). Kirk T. McDonald June 15, 2000 2 #12; The Neutrino For 1.5 MW beam Kirk T. McDonald June 15, 2000 3 #12; The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider

  1. The three-loop cusp anomalous dimension in QCD and its supersymmetric extensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrey Grozin; Johannes M. Henn; Gregory P. Korchemsky; Peter Marquard

    2015-11-27

    We present the details of the analytic calculation of the three-loop angle-dependent cusp anomalous dimension in QCD and its supersymmetric extensions, including the maximally supersymmetric $\\mathcal{N}=4$ super Yang-Mills theory. The three-loop result in the latter theory is new and confirms a conjecture made in our previous paper. We study various physical limits of the cusp anomalous dimension and discuss its relation to the quark-antiquark potential including the effects of broken conformal symmetry in QCD. We find that the cusp anomalous dimension viewed as a function of the cusp angle and the new effective coupling given by light-like cusp anomalous dimension reveals a remarkable universality property -- it takes the same form in QCD and its supersymmetric extensions, to three loops at least. We exploit this universality property and make use of the known result for the three-loop quark-antiquark potential to predict the special class of nonplanar corrections to the cusp anomalous dimensions at four loops. Finally, we also discuss in detail the computation of all necessary Wilson line integrals up to three loops using the method of leading singularities and differential equations.

  2. Precise determination of muon and electromagnetic shower contents from shower universality property

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Yushkov; M. Ambrosio; C. Aramo; F. Guarino; D. D'Urso; L. Valore

    2010-04-21

    We consider two new aspects of Extensive Air Shower development universality allowing to make accurate estimation of muon and electromagnetic (EM) shower contents in two independent ways. In the first case, to get muon (or EM) signal in water Cherenkov tanks or in scintillator detectors it is enough to know the vertical depth of shower maximum and the total signal in the ground detector. In the second case, the EM signal can be calculated from the primary particle energy and the zenith angle. In both cases the parametrizations of muon and EM signals are almost independent on primary particle nature, energy and zenith angle. Implications of the considered properties for mass composition and hadronic interaction studies are briefly discussed. The present study is performed on 28000 of proton, oxygen and iron showers, generated with CORSIKA 6.735 for $E^{-1}$ spectrum in the energy range log(E/eV)=18.5-20.0 and uniformly distributed in cos^2(theta) in zenith angle interval theta=0-65 degrees for QGSJET II/Fluka interaction models.

  3. Performance of the ATLAS Muon Trigger in Run I and Upgrades for Run II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobayashi, Dai; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has taken data at a centre-of-mass energy between 900 GeV and 8 TeV during Run I (2009-2013). The LHC delivered an integrated luminosity of about 20fb-1 in 2012, which required dedicated strategies to guard the highest possible physics output while reducing effectively the event rate. The Muon High Level Trigger has successfully adapted to the changing environment of a low luminosity in 2010 to the luminosities encountered in 2012. The selection strategy has been optimized for the various physics analyses involving muons in the final state. We will present the excellent performance achieved during Run I. In preparation for the next data taking period (Run II) several hardware and software upgrades to the ATLAS Muon Trigger have been performed to deal with the increased trigger rate expected at higher center of mass energy and increased instantaneous luminosity. We will highlight the development of novel algorithms that have been developed to maintain a h...

  4. Performance of the ATLAS Muon Trigger in Run I and Upgrades for Run II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobayashi, Dai; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has taken data at a centre-of-mass energy between 900 GeV and 8 TeV during Run I (2009-2013). The LHC delivered an integrated luminosity of about 20 fb?1 in 2012, which required dedicated strategies to guard the highest possible physics output while reducing effectively the event rate. The Muon High Level Trigger has successfully adapted to the changing environment of a low luminosity in 2010 to the luminosities encountered in 2012. The selection strategy has been optimized for the various physics analyses involving muons in the final state. We will present the excellent performance achieved during Run I. In preparation for the next data taking period (Run II) several hardware and software upgrades to the ATLAS Muon Trigger have been performed to deal with the increased trigger rate expected at higher center of mass energy and increased instantaneous luminosity. We will highlight the development of novel algorithms that have been developed to maintain ...

  5. Production of radioactive isotopes through cosmic muon spallation in KamLAND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abe, S.; Furuno, K.; Gando, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Kibe, Y.; Kishimoto, Y.; Minekawa, Y.; Mitsui, T.; Nakajima, K.; Nakajima, K.; Nakamura, M.; Shimizu, I.; Shimizu, Y.; Shirai, J.; Suekane, F.; Suzuki, A.; Takemoto, Y.; Tamae, K.; Terashima, A.; Watanabe, H.

    2010-02-15

    Radioactive isotopes produced through cosmic muon spallation are a background for rare-event detection in nu detectors, double-beta-decay experiments, and dark-matter searches. Understanding the nature of cosmogenic backgrounds is particularly important for future experiments aiming to determine the pep and CNO solar neutrino fluxes, for which the background is dominated by the spallation production of {sup 11}C. Data from the Kamioka liquid-scintillator antineutrino detector (KamLAND) provides valuable information for better understanding these backgrounds, especially in liquid scintillators, and for checking estimates from current simulations based upon MUSIC, FLUKA, and GEANT4. Using the time correlation between detected muons and neutron captures, the neutron production yield in the KamLAND liquid scintillator is measured to be Y{sub n}=(2.8+-0.3)x10{sup -4} mu{sup -1} g{sup -1} cm{sup 2}. For other isotopes, the production yield is determined from the observed time correlation related to known isotope lifetimes. We find some yields are inconsistent with extrapolations based on an accelerator muon beam experiment.

  6. Study of the Production of Radioactive Isotopes through Cosmic Muon Spallation in KamLAND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KamLAND Collaboration; Abe, S.; Enomoto, S.; Furuno, K.; Gando, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Kibe, Y.; Kishimoto, Y.; Koga, M.; Minekawa, Y.; Mitsui, T.; Nakajima, K.; Nakajima, K.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, M.; Shimizu, I.; Shimizu, Y.; Shirai, J.; Suekane, F.; Suzuki, A.; Takemoto, Y.; Tamae, K.; Terashima, A.; Watanabe, H.; Yonezawa, E.; Yoshida, S.; Kozlov, A.; Murayama, H.; Busenitz, J.; Classen, T.; Grant, C.; Keefer, G.; Leonard, D. S.; McKee, D.; Piepke, A.; Banks, T. I.; Bloxham, T.; Detwiler, J. A.; Freedman, S. J.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Gray, F.; Guardincerri, E.; Hsu, L.; Ichimura, K.; Kadel, R.; Lendvai, C.; Luk, K.-B.; O'Donnell, T.; Steiner, H. M.; Winslow, L. A.; Dwyer, D. A.; Jillings, C.; Mauger, C.; McKeown, R. D.; Vogel, P.; Zhang, C.; Berger, B. E.; Lane, C. E.; Maricic, J.; Miletic, T.; Batygov, M.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Pakvasa, S.; Foster, J.; Horton-Smith, G. A.; Tang, A.; Dazeley, S.; Downum, K. E.; Gratta, G.; Tolich, K.; Bugg, W.; Efremenko, Y.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Perevozchikov, O.; Karwowski, H. J.; Markoff, D. M.; Tornow, W.; Heeger, K. M.; Piquemal, F.; Ricol, J.-S.; Decowski, M. P.

    2009-06-30

    Radioactive isotopes produced through cosmic muon spallation are a background for rare event detection in {nu} detectors, double-beta-decay experiments, and dark-matter searches. Understanding the nature of cosmogenic backgrounds is particularly important for future experiments aiming to determine the pep and CNO solar neutrino fluxes, for which the background is dominated by the spallation production of {sup 11}C. Data from the Kamioka Liquid scintillator Anti-Neutrino Detector (KamLAND) provides valuable information for better understanding these backgrounds, especially in liquid scintillator, and for checking estimates from current simulations based upon MUSIC, FLUKA, and Geant4. Using the time correlation between detected muons and neutron captures, the neutron production yield in the KamLAND liquid scintillator is measured to be (2.8 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -4} n/({mu} {center_dot} (g/cm{sup 2})). For other isotopes, the production yield is determined from the observed time correlation related to known isotope lifetimes. We find some yields are inconsistent with extrapolations based on an accelerator muon beam experiment.

  7. Design and Construction of Large Size Micromegas Chambers for the Upgrade of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lösel, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Large area Micromegas detectors will be employed for the first time in high-energy physics experiments. A total surface of about $\\mathbf{150~m^2}$ of the forward regions of the Muon Spectrometer of the ATLAS detector at LHC will be equipped with 8-layer Micromegas modules. Each layer covers more than $\\mathbf{2~m^2}$ for a total active area of $\\mathbf{1200~m^2}$. Together with the small strip Thin Gap Chambers they will compose the two New Small Wheels, which will replace the innermost stations of the ATLAS endcap muon tracking system in the 2018/19 shutdown. In order to achieve a 15$\\mathbf{\\%}$ transverse momentum resolution for $\\mathbf{1~TeV}$ muons, in addition to an excellent intrinsic resolution, the mechanical precision of each plane of the assembled module must be as good as $\\mathbf{30~\\mu m}$ along the precision coordinate and $\\mathbf{80~\\mu m}$ perpendicular to the chamber. The design and construction procedure of the Micromegas modules will be presented, as well as the design for the assembly ...

  8. The ALICE muon spectrometer: trigger detectors and quarkonia detection in p-p collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gagliardi, Martino

    This work was carried out in the context of the optimisation of the performances of the muon spectrometer of the forthcoming ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC, CERN). The aim of ALICE is the study of nuclear matter at the highest energy densities ever accessed experimentally. More in detail, the focus is on the expected phase transition to a deconfined phase of matter where the degrees of freedom are those of quarks and gluons: the Quark-Gluon Plasma. The conditions for QGP formation are expected to be achieved in highly relativistic heavy ion collisions. The energy in the centre of mass of Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC will be 5.5 TeV per nucleon pair. The ALICE physics program also includes data-taking in p-p collisions at the centre-of-mass-energy of 14 TeV. The ALICE muon spectrometer has been designed for the detection of heavy quarkonia through their muon decay: both theoretical predictions and experimental data obtained at SPS and RHIC indicate that the production of these resonances sho...

  9. Muon content of ultra-high-energy air showers: Yakutsk data versus simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Glushkov; I. T. Makarov; M. I. Pravdin; I. E. Sleptsov; D. S. Gorbunov; G. I. Rubtsov; S. V. Troitsky

    2008-02-18

    We analyse a sample of 33 extensive air showers (EAS) with estimated primary energies above 2\\cdot 10^{19} eV and high-quality muon data recorded by the Yakutsk EAS array. We compare, event-by-event, the observed muon density to that expected from CORSIKA simulations for primary protons and iron, using SIBYLL and EPOS hadronic interaction models. The study suggests the presence of two distinct hadronic components, ``light'' and ``heavy''. Simulations with EPOS are in a good agreement with the expected composition in which the light component corresponds to protons and the heavy component to iron-like nuclei. With SYBILL, simulated muon densities for iron primaries are a factor of \\sim 1.5 less than those observed for the heavy component, for the same electromagnetic signal. Assuming two-component proton-iron composition and the EPOS model, the fraction of protons with energies E>10^{19} eV is 0.52^{+0.19}_{-0.20} at 95% confidence level.

  10. Isolated electrons and muons in events with missing transverse momentum at HERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreev, V; Anthonis, T; Astvatsatourov, A; Babaev, A; Bähr, J; Baranov, P S; Barrelet, E; Bartel, Wulfrin; Baumgartner, S; Becker, J; Beckingham, M; Beglarian, A; Behnke, O; Belousov, A; Berger, C; Berndt, T; Bizot, J C; Böhme, J; Boudry, V; Bracinik, J; Braunschweig, W; Brisson, V; Broker, H B; Brown, D P; Bruncko, Dusan; Büsser, F W; Bunyatyan, A; Burrage, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Caron, S; Cassol-Brunner, F; Chekelian, V; Clarke, D; Collard, Caroline; Contreras, J G; Coppens, Y R; Coughlan, J A; Cousinou, M C; Cox, B E; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Dau, W D; Daum, K; Davidsson, M; Delcourt, B; Delerue, N; Demirchyan, R A; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C A; Dingfelder, J; Dixon, P; Dodonov, V; Dowell, John D; Dubak, A; Duprel, C; Eckerlin, G; Eckstein, D; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eichler, R; Eisele, Franz; Ellerbrock, M; Elsen, E; Erdmann, M; Erdmann, W; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Ferencei, J; Ferron, S; Fleischer, M; Fleischmann, P; Fleming, Y H; Flucke, G; Flügge, G; Fomenko, A; Foresti, I; Formánek, J; Franke, G; Frising, G; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gabathuler, K; Garvey, J; Gassner, J; Gayler, J; Gerhards, R; Gerlich, C; Ghazaryan, S; Görlich, L; Gogitidze, N; Gorbounov, S; Grab, C; Grabskii, V; Grässler, Herbert; Greenshaw, T; Grindhammer, G; Haidt, Dieter; Hajduk, L; Haller, J; Heinemann, B; Heinzelmann, G; Henderson, R C W; Henschel, H; Henshaw, O; Heremans, R; Herrera-Corral, G; Herynek, I; Hildebrandt, M; Hilgers, M; Hiller, K H; Hladky, J; Hoting, P; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R P; Hovhannisyan, A V; Ibbotson, M; Issever, C; Jacquet, M; Jaffré, M; Janauschek, L; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jönsson, L B; Johnson, C; Johnson, D P; Jones, M A S; Jung, H; Kant, D; Kapichine, M; Karlsson, M; Karschnick, O; Katzy, J; Keil, F; Keller, N; Kennedy, J; Kenyon, Ian Richard; Kiesling, C; Kjellberg, P; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, T; Knies, G; Koblitz, B; Kolya, S D; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Koutouev, R; Koutov, A; Kroseberg, J; Krüger, K; Kueckens, J; Kuhr, T; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastoviicka, T; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Leiner, B; Lemrani, R; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; List, B; Lobodzinska, E; Lobodzinski, B; Loktionova, N A; Lubimov, V; Lüders, S; Lüke, D; Lytkin, L; Malden, N; Malinovskii, E I; Mangano, S; Marage, P; Marks, J; Marshall, R; Martyn, H U; Martyniak, J; Maxfield, S J; Meer, D; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Michine, S; Mikocki, S; Milstead, D; Mohrdieck, S; Mondragón, M N; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Müller, K; Murn, P; Nagovizin, V; Naroska, Beate; Naumann, J; Naumann, T; Newman, P R; Niebergall, F; Niebuhr, C B; Nowak, G; Nozicka, M; Olivier, B; Olsson, J E; Ozerov, D; Panassik, V; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Peez, M; Pérez, E; Petrukhin, A; Phillips, J P; Pitzl, D; Pöschl, R; Potachnikova, I; Povh, B; Rauschenberger, J; Reimer, P; Reisert, B; Risler, C; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A A; Rusakov, S V; Rybicki, K; Sankey, D P C; Sauvan, E; Schatzel, S; Scheins, J; Schilling, F P; Schleper, P; Schmidt, D; Schmidt, S; Schmitt, S; Schneider, M; Schoeffel, L; Schöning, A; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, V; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schwanenberger, C; Sedlak, K; Sefkow, F; Shevyakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Sirois, Y; Sloan, Terence; Smirnov, P; Soloviev, Yu; South, D; Spaskov, V N; Specka, A E; Spitzer, H; Stamen, R; Stella, B; Stiewe, J; Strauch, I; Straumann, U; Chechelnitskii, S; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Tomasz, F; Traynor, D; Truöl, P; Tsipolitis, G; Tsurin, I; Turnau, J; Turney, J E; Tzamariudaki, E; Uraev, A; Urban, M; Usik, A; Valkár, S; Valkárová, A; Vallée, C; Van Mechelen, P; Vargas-Trevino, A; Vasilev, S; Vazdik, Ya A; Veelken, C; Vest, A; Vichnevski, A; Volchinski, V; Wacker, K; Wagner, J; Wallny, R; Waugh, B; Weber, G; Weber, R; Wegener, D; Werner, C; Werner, N; Wessels, M; Wessling, B; Winde, M; Winter, G G; Wissing, C; Woerling, E E; Wünsch, E; Wyatt, A C; Zácek, J; Zaleisak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhokin, A; Zomer, F; Zur Nedden, M

    2003-01-01

    A search for events with a high energy isolated electron or muon and missing transverse momentum has been performed at the electron-proton collider HERA using an integrated luminosity of 13.6 pb-1 in e-p scattering and 104.7 pb-1 in e+p scattering. Within the Standard Model such events are expected to be mainly due to W boson production with subsequent leptonic decay. In e-p interactions one event is observed in the electron channel and none in the muon channel, consistent with the expectation of the Standard Model. In the e+p data a total of 18 events are seen in the electron and muon channels compared to an expectation of 12.4 \\pm 1.7 dominated by W production (9.4 \\pm 1.6). Whilst the overall observed number of events is broadly in agreement with the number predicted by the Standard Model, there is an excess of events with transverse momentum of the hadronic system greater than 25 GeV with 10 events found compared to 2.9 \\pm 0.5 expected. The results are used to determine the cross section for events with ...

  11. Design and Analysis of Muon Beam Stop Support Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okafor, Udenna

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this thesis is to design and analyze support structures to be used in the installation, test and final positioning of the MBS throughout the life of the Mu2e experiment. There several requirements for the MBS imposed by both the scope of the experiment and, other components within the DS bore. The functions of the MBS are: 1. To limit the induced rates in the Tracker, the Calorimeter and the Cosmic Ray Veto due to backsplash-and-secondary interactions, and 2. To reduce radiation levels external to the Detector solenoid. The structures used in supporting the MBS will also adhere to requirements imposed by its functions. These requirements are critical to the support structures and affect design decisions. Other requirements critical to the design are imposed by the weight, positional tolerance and assembly procedure of the MBS, and also, the magnetic field and vacuum dose rate of the DS bore. A detailed breakdown of how each requirement affects the structural design can be found in chapter 2. Chapter 3 describes the design of each support structure and its attachment to the MBS while chapter 4 describes the results from structural analysis of the support structures. Chapter 5 describes evaluation for the design through testing and calculations while the conclusion in chapter 6 reports the current status at the time of this thesis submission with a plan for future work to be completed until final design and installation.

  12. Anomalous small angle x-ray scattering studies of amorphous metal-germanium alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, M.

    1993-12-01

    This dissertation addresses the issue of composition modulation in sputtered amorphous metal-germanium thin films with the aim of understanding the intermediate range structure of these films as a function of composition. The investigative tool used in this work is anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering (ASAXS). The primary focus of this investigation is the amorphous iron-germanium (a-Fe{sub x}Ge{sub 100-x}) system with particular emphasis on the semiconductor-rich regime. Brief excursions are made into the amorphous tungsten-germanium (a-W{sub x}Ge{sub 100-x}) and the amorphous molybdenum-germanium (a-Mo{sub x}Ge{sub 100-x}) systems. All three systems exhibit an amorphous structure over a broad composition range extending from pure amorphous germanium to approximately 70 atomic percent metal when prepared as sputtered films. Across this composition range the structures change from the open, covalently bonded, tetrahedral network of pure a-Ge to densely packed metals. The structural changes are accompanied by a semiconductor-metal transition in all three systems as well as a ferromagnetic transition in the a-Fe{sub x}Ge{sub 100-x} system and a superconducting transition in the a-Mo{sub x}Ge{sub 100-x} system. A long standing question, particularly in the a-Fe{sub x}Ge{sub 100-x} and the a-Mo{sub x}Ge{sub 100-x} systems, has been whether the structural changes (and therefore the accompanying electrical and magnetic transitions) are accomplished by homogeneous alloy formation or phase separation. The application of ASAXS to this problem proves unambiguously that fine scale composition modulations, as distinct from the simple density fluctuations that arise from cracks and voids, are present in the a-Fe{sub x}Ge{sub 100-x}, a-W{sub x}Ge{sub 100-x}, and a-Mo{sub x}Ge{sub 100-x} systems in the semiconductor-metal transition region. Furthermore, ASAXS shows that germanium is distributed uniformly throughout each sample in the x<25 regime of all three systems.

  13. Design and Construction of a Prototype Solenoid Coil for MICE Coupling Magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Li; Pan, Heng; Guo, XingLong; Xu, FengYu; Liu, XiaoKun; Wu, Hong; Zheng, ShiXian; Green, Michael A; Li, Derun; Virostek, Steve; Zisman, Michael

    2010-06-28

    A superconducting coupling solenoid mounted around four conventional RF cavities, which produces up to 2.6 T central magnetic field to keep the muons within the cavities, is to be used for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). The coupling coil made from copper matrix NbTi conductors is the largest of three types of magnets in MICE both in terms of 1.5 m inner diameter and about 13MJ stored magnetic energy at full operation current of 210A. The stress induced inside the coil assembly during cool down and magnet charging is relatively high. In order to validate the design method and develop the coil winding technique with inside-wound SC splices required for the coupling coil, a prototype coil made from the same conductor and with the same diameter and thickness but only one-fourth long as the coupling coil was designed and fabricated by ICST. The prototype coil was designed to be charged to strain conditions that are equivalent or greater than would be encountered in the coupling coil. This paper presents detailed design of the prototype coil as well as developed coil winding skills. The analyses on stress in the coil assembly and quench process were carried out.

  14. Inhomogeneous All-Dielectric Magnetic Metamaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Jingbo; Zhou, Ji; Kudyshev, Zhaxylyk; Litchinitser, Natalia M

    2015-01-01

    Anomalous field enhancement accompanied by resonant absorption phenomenon was originally discussed in the context of plasma physics and in applications related to radio-communications between the ground and spacecraft returning to Earth. Indeed, there is a critical period of time when all communications are lost due to the reflection/absorption of electromagnetic waves by the sheath of plasma created by a high speed vehicle re-entering the atmosphere. While detailed experimental studies of these phenomena in space are challenging, the emergence of electromagnetic metamaterials enables researchers exceptional flexibility to study them in the laboratory environment. Here, we experimentally demonstrated the localized field enhancement of the electromagnetic wave obliquely incident on a Mie-resonance-based inhomogeneous metamaterials with magnetic permeability gradually changing from positive to negative values.

  15. Magnetic Reconnection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masaaki Yamada, Russell Kulsrud and Hantao Ji

    2009-09-17

    We review the fundamental physics of magnetic reconnection in laboratory and space plasmas, by discussing results from theory, numerical simulations, observations from space satellites, and the recent results from laboratory plasma experiments. After a brief review of the well-known early work, we discuss representative recent experimental and theoretical work and attempt to interpret the essence of significant modern findings. In the area of local reconnection physics, many significant findings have been made with regard to two- uid physics and are related to the cause of fast reconnection. Profiles of the neutral sheet, Hall currents, and the effects of guide field, collisions, and micro-turbulence are discussed to understand the fundamental processes in a local reconnection layer both in space and laboratory plasmas. While the understanding of the global reconnection dynamics is less developed, notable findings have been made on this issue through detailed documentation of magnetic self-organization phenomena in fusion plasmas. Application of magnetic reconnection physics to astrophysical plasmas is also brie y discussed.

  16. Patterned Magnetic Nanostructures and Quantized Magnetic Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -increasing demands in data storage and to new applications of magnetic devices in the field of sensors. NewPatterned Magnetic Nanostructures and Quantized Magnetic Disks STEPHEN Y. CHOU Invited Paper, opens up new opportunities for engineering innovative magnetic materials and devices, developing ultra

  17. Enhanced anomalous photo-absorption from TiO{sub 2} nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solanki, Vanaraj; Majumder, Subrata; Mishra, Indrani; Varma, Shikha; Dash, P.; Singh, C.; Kanjilal, D.

    2014-03-28

    Two dimensional nanostructures have been created on the rutile TiO{sub 2} (110) surfaces via ion irradiation technique. Enhanced anomalous photo- absorption response is displayed, where nanostructures of 15?nm diameter with 0.5?nm height, and not the smaller nanostructures with larger surface area, delineate highest absorbance. Comprehensive investigations of oxygen vacancy states, on ion- irradiated surfaces, display a remarkable result that the number of vacancies saturates for higher fluences. A competition between the number of vacancy sites on the nanostructure in conjunction with its size is responsible for the observed anomalous photo-absorption.

  18. Measuring Anomalous Couplings in H->WW* Decays at the International Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yosuke Takubo; Robert N. Hodgkinson; Katsumasa Ikematsu; Keisuke Fujii; Nobuchika Okada; Hitoshi Yamamoto

    2013-05-17

    Measurement of the Higgs coupling to W-bosons is an important test of our understanding of the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism. We study the sensitivity of the International Linear Collider (ILC) to the presence of anomalous HW+W- couplings using ZH -> nu nu WW* -> nu nu 4j events. Using an effective Lagrangian approach, we calculate the differential decay rates of the Higgs boson including the effects of new dimension-5 operators. We present a Monte Carlo simulation of events at the ILC, using a full detector simulation based on geant4 and a real event reconstruction chain. Expected constraints on the anomalous couplings are given.

  19. Searching for Single Production of Charged Heavy Leptons via Anomalous Interactions at CLIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. T. Tasci; A. Senol

    2013-01-07

    We consider the possible discovery potential for single production of charged heavy leptons via anomalous interactions at the envisaged Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) by taking into account initial state radiation (ISR) and beamstrahlung effects. We calculate the production cross sections and decay widths of charged heavy leptons in the context of anomalous interactions at center of mass energies $\\sqrt{s}=1$ and 3 TeV. The signal and corresponding backgrounds are studied in detail for the mass range 300-1900 GeV.

  20. 718 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 34, NO. 3, JUNE 2006 Nonlinear Effects and Anomalous Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Francis F.

    -frequency plasmas: anomalous skin depth in inductively coupled plasmas, transport by fluctuations in helicon plasmas. II. ANOMALOUS SKIN DEPTH IN ICPS Inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) are plasma sources ex- cited. The first is a spiral coil shaped like a stove-top heating element and placed on the dielectric top cover

  1. Marine and Petroleum Geology 23 (2006) 745765 Origin of anomalous subsidence along the Northern South China Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Dietmar

    2006-01-01

    Marine and Petroleum Geology 23 (2006) 745­765 Origin of anomalous subsidence along the Northern China Sea margin to assess all mechanisms contributing to Late Tertiary tectonic subsidence in this area-rift anomalous subsidence is computed as the discrepancy between observed and predicted post-rift subsidence

  2. Anomalous Near-Field Heat Transfer between a Cylinder and a Perforated Surface Alejandro W. Rodriguez,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anomalous Near-Field Heat Transfer between a Cylinder and a Perforated Surface Alejandro W between a cylinder and a perforated surface depends nonmonotonically on their separation. This anomalous between a cylinder (or elongated object) and a perforated surface (e.g., a ring) can vary nonmonotonically

  3. Determining the exchange parameters of spin-1 metal-organic molecular magnets in pulsed magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcdonald, Ross D; Singleton, John; Lancaster, Tom; Goddard, Paul; Manson, Jamie

    2011-01-14

    We nave measured the high-field magnetization of a number of Ni-based metal-organic molecular magnets. These materials are self-assembly coordination polymers formed from transition metal ions and organic ligands. The chemistry of the compounds is versatile allowing many structures with different magnetic properties to be formed. These studies follow on from previous measurements of the Cu-based analogues in which we showed it was possible to extract the exchange parameters of low-dimensional magnets using pulsed magnetic fields. In our recent experiments we have investigated the compound (Ni(HF{sub 2})(pyz){sub 2})PF{sub 6}, where pyz = pyrazine, and the Ni-ions are linked in a quasi-two-dimensional (Q2D) square lattice via the pyrazine molecules, with the layers held together by HF{sub 2} ligands. We also investigated Ni(NCS){sub 2}(pyzdo){sub 2}, where pyzdo = pyrazine dioxide. The samples are grown at Eastern Washington University using techniques described elsewhere. Measurements are performed at the pulsed magnetic field laboratory in Los Alamos. The magnetization of powdered samples is determined using a compensated coil magnetometer in a 65 T short pulse magnet. Temperatures as low as 500 mK are achievable using a {sup 3}He cryostat. The main figure shows the magnetization of the spin-1 [Ni(HF{sub 2})(pyz){sub 2}]PF{sub 6} compound at 1.43 K. The magnetization rises slowly at first, achieving a rounded saturation whose midpoint is around 19 T. A small anomaly is also seen in the susceptibility at low fields ({approx}3 T), which might be attributed to a spin-flop transition. In contrast, the spin-1/2 [Cu(HF{sub 2})(pyz){sub 2}]PF{sub 6} measured previously has a saturation magnetization of 35.5 T and a strongly concave form of M(B) below this field. This latter compound was shown to be a good example of a Q2D Heisenberg antiferromagnet with the strong exchange coupling (J{sub 2D} = 12.4 K, J{sub {perpendicular}}/J{sub 2D} {approx} 10{sup -2}) directed along the Cu-pyz-Cu directions. The structure of the two compounds is similar, but in the case of the Cu-compound the Cu-Cu pathways are linear, whereas in the Ni-compound they are kinked. The pulsed-field data combined with information from temperature-dependent susceptibility, muon-spin rotation, electron-spin resonance and ligand-field calculations suggest that, far from being magnetically Q2D, the Ni-compound is fairly one-dimensional with the dominant exchange (J{sub 1D} = 3.1 K and J{sub {perpendicular}}/J{sub 1D} = 0.63) directed along the Ni-FHF-Ni direction. Ni(NCS){sub 2}(pyzdo){sub 2} was also investigated. Previous ultra-high field measurements using the 100 T magnet have shown that this compound has a saturation field close to 80 T. The purpose of the present studies is to map out the phase diagram of this material at mid-range fields. The data are shown in the inset to the figure. This continuing project probes the ability of organic ligands to mediate magnetic exchange, the link between structure, dimensionality and bulk magnetic properties, as well as the role of spin number in quantum magnets. Ultimately the investigations aim to determine to what extent it is possible to produce self-assembly molecular materials with tailor-made magnetic characteristics.

  4. Using analytic continuation for the hadronic vacuum polarization computation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Xu; Hashimoto, Shoji; Hotzel, Grit; Jansen, Karl; Petschlies, Marcus; Renner Dru B

    2014-11-01

    We present two examples of applications of the analytic continuation method for computing the hadronic vacuum polarization function in space- and time-like momentum regions. These examples are the Adler function and the leading order hadronic contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment. We comment on the feasibility of the analytic continuation method and provide an outlook for possible further applications.

  5. Towards the physical point hadronic vacuum polarisation from Moebius DWF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marinkovic, Marina; Del Debbio, Luigi; Juettner, Andreas; Maltman, Kim; Portelli, Antonin

    2015-01-01

    We present steps towards the computation of the leading-order hadronic contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment on RBC/UKQCD physical point DWF ensembles. We discuss several methods for controlling and reducing uncertainties associated to the determination of the HVP form factor.

  6. Towards the physical point hadronic vacuum polarisation from Moebius DWF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marina Marinkovic; Peter Boyle; Luigi Del Debbio; Andreas Juettner; Kim Maltman; Antonin Portelli

    2015-02-18

    We present steps towards the computation of the leading-order hadronic contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment on RBC/UKQCD physical point DWF ensembles. We discuss several methods for controlling and reducing uncertainties associated to the determination of the HVP form factor.

  7. Large scale magnetic fields and coherent structures in nonuniform unmagnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jucker, Martin; Andrushchenko, Zhanna N.; Pavlenko, Vladimir P.

    2006-07-15

    The properties of streamers and zonal magnetic structures in magnetic electron drift mode turbulence are investigated. The stability of such large scale structures is investigated in the kinetic and the hydrodynamic regime, for which an instability criterion similar to the Lighthill criterion for modulational instability is found. Furthermore, these large scale flows can undergo further nonlinear evolution after initial linear growth, which can lead to the formation of long-lived coherent structures consisting of self-bound wave packets between the surfaces of two different flow velocities with an expected modification of the anomalous electron transport properties.

  8. Magnetic and transport properties of Mn{sub 2}CoAl oriented films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamer, Michelle E.; Assaf, Badih A.; Devakul, Trithep; Heiman, Don

    2013-09-30

    The structure, magnetic, and transport properties of thin films of the Heusler ferrimagnet Mn{sub 2}CoAl have been investigated for properties related to spin gapless semiconductors. Oriented films were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on GaAs substrates and the structure was found to transform from tetragonal to cubic for increasing annealing temperature. The anomalous Hall resistivity is found to be proportional to the square of the longitudinal resistivity and magnetization expected for a topological Berry curvature origin. A delicate balance of the spin-polarized carrier type when coupled with voltage gate-tuning could significantly impact advanced electronic devices.

  9. Size-dependent magnetic ordering and spin-dynamics in DyPO4 and GdPO4 nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evangelisti, Marco; Sorop, Tibi G; Bakharev, Oleg N; Visser, Dirk; Hillier, Adrian D.; Alonso, Juan; Haase, Markus; Boatner, Lynn A; De Jongh, L. Jos

    2011-01-01

    Low-temperature magnetic susceptibility and heat capacity measurements on nanoparticles (d 2.6 nm) of the antiferromagnetic compounds DyPO4 (TN = 3:4 K) and GdPO4 (TN = 0:77 K) provide clear demonstrations of finite-size effects, which limit the divergence of the magnetic correlation lengths, thereby suppressing the bulk long-range magnetic ordering transitions. Instead, the incomplete antiferromagnetic order inside the particles leads to the formation of net magnetic moments on the particles. For the nanoparticles of Ising-type DyPO4 superparamagnetic blocking is found in the ac-susceptibility at 1 K, those of the XY-type GdPO4 analogue show a dipolar spin-glass transition at 0:2 K. Monte Carlo simulations for the magnetic heat capacities of both bulk and nanoparticle samples are in agreement with the experimental data. Strong size effects are also apparent in the Dy3+ and Gd3+ spin-dynamics, which were studied by zero-field SR relaxation and high-field 31P-NMR nuclear relaxation measurements. The freezing transitions observed in the ac-susceptibility of the nanoparticles also appear as peaks in the temperature dependence of the zero-field SR rates, but at slightly higher temperatures - as to be expected from the higher frequency of the muon probe. For both bulk and nanoparticles of GdPO4, the muon and 31P-NMR rates are for T 5 K dominated by exchange-narrowed hyperfine broadening arising from the electron spin-spin interactions inside the particles. The dipolar hyperfine interactions acting on the muons and the 31P are, however, much reduced in the nanoparticles. For the DyPO4 analogues the high-temperature rates appear to be fully determined by electron spin-lattice relaxation processes.

  10. Superconducting Magnet Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Ramesh

    Superconducting Magnet Division Permanent Magnet Designs with Large Variations in Field Strength the residual field of the magnetized bricks by concentrating flux lines at the iron pole. Low Field Design Medium Field Design Superconducting Magnet Division Dipole and Quadrupole Magnets for RHIC e

  11. Superconducting magnet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Satti, John A. (Naperville, IL)

    1980-01-01

    A superconducting magnet designed to produce magnetic flux densities of the order of 4 to 5 Webers per square meter is constructed by first forming a cable of a plurality of matrixed superconductor wires with each wire of the plurality insulated from each other one. The cable is shaped into a rectangular cross-section and is wound with tape in an open spiral to create cooling channels. Coils are wound in a calculated pattern in saddle shapes to produce desired fields, such as dipoles, quadrupoles, and the like. Wedges are inserted between adjacent cables as needed to maintain substantially radial placement of the long dimensions of cross sections of the cables. After winding, individual strands in each of the cables are brought out to terminals and are interconnected to place all of the strands in series and to maximize the propagation of a quench by alternating conduction from an inner layer to an outer layer and from top half to bottom half as often as possible. Individual layers are separated from others by spiraled aluminum spacers to facilitate cooling. The wound coil is wrapped with an epoxy tape that is cured by heat and then machined to an interference fit with an outer aluminum pipe which is then affixed securely to the assembled coil by heating it to make a shrink fit. In an alternate embodiment, one wire of the cable is made of copper or the like to be heated externally to propagate a quench.

  12. A Characterization of the Set of Species Trees that Produce Anomalous Ranked Gene Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Noah

    A Characterization of the Set of Species Trees that Produce Anomalous Ranked Gene Trees James H characterize the set of unranked species tree topologies that give rise to ARGTs, showing that this set generalizes beyond the specific five-taxon case. Here, we perform a complete characterization of the set

  13. ANOMALOUS DISPERSION OF SLOW NEUTRONS IN CRYSTALS By H. G. SMITH and S. W. PETERSON (1),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Studies of anomalous scattering of neutrons from CdI2 single crystals were conti- nued over an energy neutron scattering by nuclei and crystals has been fairly well understood for many years. An incident, and depends on the neutron-nucleus interactions. In general, the scattering amplitude can be expressed

  14. Oil and Gas CDT Anomalous compaction and lithification during early burial in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Oil and Gas CDT Anomalous compaction and lithification during early burial in sedimentary basins training in a range of skills will mean opportunities for academic, government or Oil and Gas sector (e geoscience for oil and gas). References & Further Reading Neagu, R.C. Cartwright, J., Davies R.J. & Jensen L

  15. Anomalous Tectonic Subsidence of the Southern Australian Passive Margin: Response to Cretaceous Dynamic Topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Dietmar

    Anomalous Tectonic Subsidence of the Southern Australian Passive Margin: Response to Cretaceous that formed over and orthogonal to a Mesozoic subducted slab in the mantle. The tectonic subsidence pattern, enhancing initial subsidence. Subsequent lithospheric rebound coincides with post-rift thermal subsidence

  16. Detecting Anomalous Sensor Events in Smart Home Data for Enhancing the Living Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Diane J.

    Detecting Anomalous Sensor Events in Smart Home Data for Enhancing the Living Experience is on the rise and the place for smart home solutions is growing. One of the major concerns for smart home data captured from a smart home testbed. Introduction Smart homes are built by adding intelligent

  17. Dynamic topography and anomalously negative residual depth of the Argentine Basin G.E. Shephard a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Lijun

    GR letter Dynamic topography and anomalously negative residual depth of the Argentine Basin G Handling Editor: A. Aitken Keywords: Dynamic topography Residual basement depth Geodynamic modeling Argentine Basin Subduction Plate tectonics A substantial portion of Earth's topography is known to be caused

  18. Dynamic topography and anomalously negative residual depth of the Argentine Basin G.E. Shephard a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Dietmar

    GR letter Dynamic topography and anomalously negative residual depth of the Argentine Basin G: A. Aitken Keywords: Dynamic topography Residual basement depth Geodynamic modeling Argentine Basin Subduction Plate tectonics A substantial portion of Earth's topography is known to be caused by the viscous

  19. Search for anomalous production of multilepton events in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Gerry P.

    A search for anomalous production of events with three or more isolated leptons in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV is presented. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.98 fb[superscript ?1], were collected ...

  20. TENSILE PROPERTIES OF PLA AND PHBV BLENDS: ANOMALOUS ELONGATION AND AGING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    TENSILE PROPERTIES OF PLA AND PHBV BLENDS: ANOMALOUS ELONGATION AND AGING T. Gérard, T. Noto and T-based polymers, they still have some disadvantages such as poor (fragile) mechanical properties. Blending the drawbacks of the pure components. In this work, PLA and poly(hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV