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1

Municipal Solid WasteMunicipal Solid Waste Landfills In CitiesLandfills In Cities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

trench c) Liner Deployment d) Seaming Double Hot wedge Fillet Extrusion Seam properties ­ ASTM D6392 e-wise construction of landfill #12;Daily cell, cover, lift & phase of a landfill #12;Operational Points Provisions (contd) Check for compatibilities of different wastes. Divide landfill into cells. Non

Columbia University

2

Constructed wetlands for municipal solid waste landfill leachate treatment. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In 1989, the US Geological Survey and Cornell University, in cooperation with the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority and the Tompkins County Solid Waste Department, began a three-year study at a municipal solid-waste landfill near Ithaca, New York, to test the effectiveness of leachate treatment with constructed wetlands and to examine the associated treatment processes. Specific objectives of the study were to examine: treatment efficiency as function of substrate composition and grain size, degree of plant growth, and seasonal changes in evapotranspiration rates and microbial activity; effects of leachate and plant growth on the hydraulic characteristics of the substrate; and chemical, biological, and physical processes by which nutrients, metals, and organic compounds are removed from leachate as it flows through the substrate. A parallel study at a municipal solid-waste landfill near Fenton, New York was conducted by researchers at Cornell University, Ithaca College, and Hawk Engineering (Trautmann and others, 1989). Results are described.

Peverly, J.; Sanford, W.E.; Steenhuis, T.S. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Guide to implementing reclamation processes at Department of Defense municipal solid waste and construction debris landfills. Master's thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This thesis serves as a guide for implementing landfill reclamation techniques on municipal solid waste or construction debris landfills owned, operated, or used by the DoD. The research describes historical and current methods for disposing of solid waste including open dumping, sanitary landfilling, and the development of state-of-the-art sanitary landfill cell technology. The thesis also identifies the factors which have led to the need for new methods of managing municipal solid waste. The vast majority of the study is devoted to identifying actions which should be taken before, during, and after implementation of a landfill reclamation project. These actions include the development of health, safety, and contingency planning documents, the establishment of systems for characterizing and monitoring site conditions, and the identification of other procedures and processes necessary for performing successful operations. Finally, this study contains a model for analyzing under which conditions reclamation is economically feasible. The model examines economic feasibility in four separate conditions and shows that reclamation is economically feasible in a wide variety of markets. However, the model also shows that feasibility is directly associated with a continuance of normal landfilling operations. Landfill, Landfill reclamation, Landfill mining, Municipal solid waste, Recycling, Construction debris.

Tures, G.L.

1993-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

4

Municipal waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to apparatus for processing municipal waste, and more particularly to vibrating mesh screen conveyor systems for removing grit, glass, and other noncombustible materials from dry municipal waste. Municipal waste must be properly processed and disposed of so that it does not create health risks to the community. Generally, municipal waste, which may be collected in garbage trucks, dumpsters, or the like, is deposited in processing areas such as landfills. Land and environmental controls imposed on landfill operators by governmental bodies have increased in recent years, however, making landfill disposal of solid waste materials more expensive. 6 figs.

Mayberry, J.L.

1988-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

5

Effects of residues from municipal solid waste landfill on corn yield and heavy metal content  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of residues from municipal solid waste landfill, Khon Kaen Municipality, Thailand, on corn (Zea mays L.) yield and heavy metal content were studied. Field experiments with randomized complete block design with five treatments (0, 20, 40, 60 and 80% v/v of residues and soil) and four replications were carried out. Corn yield and heavy metal contents in corn grain were analyzed. Corn yield increased by 50, 72, 85 and 71% at 20, 40, 60 and 80% treatments as compared to the control, respectively. All heavy metals content, except cadmium, nickel and zinc, in corn grain were not significantly different from the control. Arsenic, cadmium and zinc in corn grain were strongly positively correlated with concentrations in soil. The heavy metal content in corn grain was within regulated limits for human consumption.

Prabpai, S. [Suphan Buri Campus Establishment Project, Kasetsart University, 50 U Floor, Administrative Building, Paholyothin Road, Jatujak, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand)], E-mail: s.prabpai@hotmail.com; Charerntanyarak, L. [Department of Epidemiology, Faculty of Public Health, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand)], E-mail: lertchai@kku.ac.th; Siri, B. [Department of Agronomy, Faculty of Agriculture, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand)], E-mail: boonmee@kku.ac.th; Moore, M.R. [The University of Queensland, The National Research Center for Environmental Toxicology, 39 Kessels Road, Coopers Plans, Brisbane, Queensland 4108 (Australia)], E-mail: m.moore@uq.edu.au; Noller, Barry N. [The University of Queensland, Centre for Mined Land Rehabilitation, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia)], E-mail: b.noller@uq.edu.au

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

6

Study of the VOC emissions from a municipal solid waste storage pilot-scale cell: Comparison with biogases from municipal waste landfill site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: > Follow-up of the emission of VOCs in a municipal waste pilot-scale cell during the acidogenesis and acetogenesis phases. > Study from the very start of waste storage leading to a better understanding of the decomposition/degradation of waste. > Comparison of the results obtained on the pilot-scale cell with those from 3 biogases coming from the same landfill site. > A methodology of characterization for the progression of the stabilization/maturation of waste is finally proposed. - Abstract: The emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from municipal solid waste stored in a pilot-scale cell containing 6.4 tonnes of waste (storage facility which is left open during the first period (40 days) and then closed with recirculation of leachates during a second period (100 days)) was followed by dynamic sampling on activated carbon and analysed by GC-MS after solvent extraction. This was done in order to know the VOC emissions before the installation of a methanogenesis process for the entire waste mass. The results, expressed in reference to toluene, were exploited during the whole study on all the analyzable VOCs: alcohols, ketones and esters, alkanes, benzenic and cyclic compounds, chlorinated compounds, terpene, and organic sulphides. The results of this study on the pilot-scale cell are then compared with those concerning three biogases from a municipal waste landfill: biogas (1) coming from waste cells being filled or recently closed, biogas (2) from all the waste storage cells on site, and biogas (3) which is a residual gas from old storage cells without aspiration of the gas. The analysis of the results obtained revealed: (i) a high emission of VOCs, principally alcohols, ketones and esters during the acidogenesis; (ii) a decrease in the alkane content and an increase in the terpene content were observed in the VOCs emitted during the production of methane; (iii) the production of heavier alkanes and an increase in the average number of carbon atoms per molecule of alkane with the progression of the stabilisation/maturation process were also observed. Previous studies have concentrated almost on the analysis of biogases from landfills. Our research aimed at gaining a more complete understanding of the decomposition/degradation of municipal solid waste by measuring the VOCs emitted from the very start of the landfill process i.e. during the acidogenesis and acetogenesis phases.

Chiriac, R., E-mail: rodica.chiriac@univ-lyon1.fr [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS, UMR 5615, Laboratoire des Multimateriaux et Interfaces, 43 boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); De Araujos Morais, J. [Universite Federal de Paraiba, Campus I Departamento de Engenharia Civil e Ambiental, Joao Pessoa, Paraiba (Brazil); Carre, J. [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS, UMR 5256, Institut de Recherche sur la Catalyse et l'Environnement, 43 boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Bayard, R. [Universite de Lyon, INSA de Lyon, Laboratoire de Genie Civil et d'Ingenierie environnementale (LGCIE), F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Chovelon, J.M. [Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, CNRS, UMR 5256, Institut de Recherche sur la Catalyse et l'Environnement, 43 boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Gourdon, R. [Universite de Lyon, INSA de Lyon, Laboratoire de Genie Civil et d'Ingenierie environnementale (LGCIE), F-69622 Villeurbanne (France)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

7

Site hydrogeologic/geotechnical characterization report for Site B new municipal solid waste landfill  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Site Hydrogeologic/Geotechnical Characterization Report (SHCR) presents the results of a comprehensive study conducted on a proposed solid waste landfill site, identified herein as Site B, at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This report is intended to satisfy all requirements of the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) with regard to landfill siting requirements and ground water and environmental protection. In addition, this report provides substantial geotechnical data pertinent to the landfill design process.

Reynolds, R.; Nowacki, P.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Two-year performance by evapotranspiration covers for municipal solid waste landfills in northwest Ohio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer All ET covers produced rates of percolation less than 32 cm yr{sup -1}, the maximum allowable rate by the Ohio EPA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dredged sediment provided sufficient water storage and promoted growth by native plant species. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Native plant mixtures attained acceptable rates of evapotranspiration throughout the growing season. - Abstract: Evapotranspiration (ET) covers have gained interest as an alternative to conventional covers for the closure of municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills because they are less costly to construct and are expected to have a longer service life. Whereas ET covers have gained acceptance in arid and semi-arid regions (defined by a precipitation (P) to potential evapotranspiration (PET) ratio less than 0.75) by meeting performance standards (e.g. rate of percolation), it remains unclear whether they are suitable for humid regions (P:PET greater than 0.75). The goal of this project is to extend their application to northwest Ohio (P:PET equals 1.29) by designing covers that produce a rate of percolation less than 32 cm yr{sup -1}, the maximum acceptable rate by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA). Test ET covers were constructed in drainage lysimeters (1.52 m diameter, 1.52 m depth) using dredged sediment amended with organic material and consisted of immature (I, plants seeded onto soil) or mature (M, plants transferred from a restored tall-grass prairie) plant mixtures. The water balance for the ET covers was monitored from June 2009 to June 2011, which included measured precipitation and percolation, and estimated soil water storage and evapotranspiration. Precipitation was applied at a rate of 94 cm yr{sup -1} in the first year and at rate of 69 cm yr{sup -1} in the second year. During the first year, covers with the M plant mixture produced noticeably less percolation (4 cm) than covers with the I plant mixture (17 cm). However, during the second year, covers with the M plant mixture produced considerably more percolation (10 cm) than covers with the I plant mixture (3 cm). This is likely due to a decrease in the aboveground biomass for the M plant mixture from year 1 (1008 g m{sup -2}) to year 2 (794 g m{sup -2}) and an increase for the I plant mixture from year 1 (644 g m{sup -2}) to year 2 (1314 g m{sup -2}). Over the 2-year period, the mean annual rates of percolation for the covers with the M and I plant mixtures were 7 and 8 cm yr{sup -1}, which are below the OEPA standard. The results suggest the application of ET covers be extended to northwest Ohio and other humid regions.

Barnswell, Kristopher D., E-mail: kristopher.barnswell2@rockets.utoledo.edu [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Toledo, Lake Erie Center, 6200 Bayshore Rd., Oregon, OH 43616 (United States); Dwyer, Daryl F., E-mail: daryl.dwyer@utoledo.edu [Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Toledo, 2801 W. Bancroft, Mail Stop 604, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

Assessment of landfill reclamation and the effects of age on the combustion of recovered municipal solid waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarized the Lancaster county Solid Waste Management Authorities`s (LCSWMA)landfill reclamation activities, ongoing since 1991. All aspects have been analyzed from the manpower and equipment requirements at the landfill to the operational impacts felt at the LCSWMA Resource Recovery Facility (RRF) where the material is delivered for processing. Characteristics of the reclaimed refuse and soil recovered from trommeling operations are discussed as are results of air monitoring performed at the landfill excavation site and the RRF. The report also discusses the energy value of the reclaimed material and compares this value with those obtained for significantly older reclaimed waste streams. The effects of waste age on the air emissions and ash residue quality at the RRF are also provided. The report concludes by summarizing the project benefits and provides recommendations for other landfill reclamation operations and areas requiring further research.

Forster, G.A. [Lancaster Environmental Foundation, PA (United States)] [Lancaster Environmental Foundation, PA (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) Industrial Solid Waste Landfill Facilities (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Utility Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency provides rules and guidelines for landfills, including those that treat waste to generate electricity. The law provides information for permitting, installing, maintaining, monitoring, and closing landfills. There are no special provisions or exemptions for landfills used to generate electricity. However, the law does apply to landfills that do

11

Best Practices for Siting Solar Photovoltaics on Municipal Solid Waste Landfills. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Agency and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory developed this best practices document to address common technical challenges for siting solar photovoltaics (PV) on municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. The purpose of this document is to promote the use of MSW landfills for solar energy systems. Closed landfills and portions of active landfills with closed cells represent thousands of acres of property that may be suitable for siting solar photovoltaics (PV). These closed landfills may be suitable for near-term construction, making these sites strong candidate to take advantage of the 30% Federal Business Energy Investment Tax Credit. It was prepared in response to the increasing interest in siting renewable energy on landfills from solar developers; landfill owners; and federal, state, and local governments. It contains examples of solar PV projects on landfills and technical considerations and best practices that were gathered from examining the implementation of several of these projects.

Kiatreungwattana, K.; Mosey, G.; Jones-Johnson, S.; Dufficy, C.; Bourg, J.; Conroy, A.; Keenan, M.; Michaud, W.; Brown, K.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Comparison of slope stability in two Brazilian municipal landfills  

SciTech Connect

The implementation of landfill gas to energy (LFGTE) projects has greatly assisted in reducing the greenhouse gases and air pollutants, leading to an improved local air quality and reduced health risks. The majority of cities in developing countries still dispose of their municipal waste in uncontrolled 'open dumps.' Municipal solid waste landfill construction practices and operating procedures in these countries pose a challenge to implementation of LFGTE projects because of concern about damage to the gas collection infrastructure (horizontal headers and vertical wells) caused by minor, relatively shallow slumps and slides within the waste mass. While major slope failures can and have occurred, such failures in most cases have been shown to involve contributory factors or triggers such as high pore pressures, weak foundation soil or failure along weak geosynthetic interfaces. Many researchers who have studied waste mechanics propose that the shear strength of municipal waste is sufficient such that major deep-seated catastrophic failures under most circumstances require such contributory factors. Obviously, evaluation of such potential major failures requires expert analysis by geotechnical specialists with detailed site-specific information regarding foundation soils, interface shearing resistances and pore pressures both within the waste and in clayey barrier layers or foundation soils. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the potential use of very simple stability analyses which can be used to study the potential for slumps and slides within the waste mass and which may represent a significant constraint on construction and development of the landfill, on reclamation and closure and on the feasibility of a LFGTE project. The stability analyses rely on site-specific but simple estimates of the unit weight of waste and the pore pressure conditions and use 'generic' published shear strength envelopes for municipal waste. Application of the slope stability analysis method is presented in a case study of two Brazilian landfill sites; the Cruz das Almas Landfill in Maceio and the Muribeca Landfill in Recife. The Muribeca site has never recorded a slope failure and is much larger and better-maintained when compared to the Maceio site at which numerous minor slumps and slides have been observed. Conventional limit-equilibrium analysis was used to calculate factors of safety for stability of the landfill side slopes. Results indicate that the Muribeca site is more stable with computed factors of safety values in the range 1.6-2.4 compared with computed values ranging from 0.9 to 1.4 for the Maceio site at which slope failures have been known to occur. The results suggest that this approach may be useful as a screening-level tool when considering the feasibility of implementing LFGTE projects.

Gharabaghi, B. [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1 (Canada)], E-mail: bgharaba@uoguelph.ca; Singh, M.K. [Department of Civil and Geological Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, S7N 5A9 (Canada); Inkratas, C. [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1 (Canada)], E-mail: cinkrata@uoguelph.ca; Fleming, I.R. [Department of Civil and Geological Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, S7N 5A9 (Canada)], E-mail: ian.fleming@usask.ca; McBean, E. [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1 (Canada)], E-mail: emcbean@uoguelph.ca

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Development of a purpose built landfill system for the control of methane emissions from municipal solid waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of landfill gas (LFG). Economic feasibility of the proposed system has been tested by comparing unit cost with gas recovery option. In the present paper, a methodology called purpose build landfill system (PBLF of the proposed system. A purpose built landfill system (PBLS) is a semi-engi- neered landfill with gas recovery

Columbia University

14

Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 9:28am Addthis Black and white photo of a bulldozer pushing a large mound of trash in a landfill. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's high-solids digester converts wastes to biogas and compost for energy production. This page provides a brief overview of municipal solid waste energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply waste to energy within the Federal sector. Overview Municipal solid waste, also known as waste to energy, generates electricity by burning solid waste as fuel. This generates renewable electricity while also incinerating landfill and other municipal waste products such as trash, yard clippings and debris, furniture, food scraps, and other

15

Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies Municipal Solid Waste Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 9:28am Addthis Black and white photo of a bulldozer pushing a large mound of trash in a landfill. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's high-solids digester converts wastes to biogas and compost for energy production. This page provides a brief overview of municipal solid waste energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply waste to energy within the Federal sector. Overview Municipal solid waste, also known as waste to energy, generates electricity by burning solid waste as fuel. This generates renewable electricity while also incinerating landfill and other municipal waste products such as trash, yard clippings and debris, furniture, food scraps, and other

16

Municipal Waste Combustion (New Mexico)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This rule establishes requirements for emissions from, and design and operation of, municipal waste combustion units. "Municipal waste" means all materials and substances discarded from residential...

17

Comprehensive Municipal Solid Waste Management, Resource Recovery...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Municipal Solid Waste Management, Resource Recovery, and Conservation Act (Texas) Comprehensive Municipal Solid Waste Management, Resource Recovery, and Conservation...

18

EA-1707: Closure of Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and Solid Waste Landfill, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of closing the Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and the Solid Waste Landfill. The Washington State Department of Ecology is a cooperating agency in preparing this EA.

19

Municipal Solid Waste | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Municipal Solid Waste Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Municipal Solid Waste Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleMunicipalSo...

20

Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration; Technology summary  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID) is to demonstrate, in contaminated sites, new technologies for clean-up of chemical and mixed waste landfills that are representative of many sites throughout the DOE Complex and the nation. When implemented, these new technologies promise to characterize and remediate the contaminated landfill sites across the country that resulted from past waste disposal practices. Characterization and remediation technologies are aimed at making clean-up less expensive, safer, and more effective than current techniques. This will be done by emphasizing in-situ technologies. Most important, MWLID`s success will be shared with other Federal, state, and local governments, and private companies that face the important task of waste site remediation. MWLID will demonstrate technologies at two existing landfills. Sandia National Laboratories` Chemical Waste Landfill received hazardous (chemical) waste from the Laboratory from 1962 to 1985, and the Mixed-Waste Landfill received hazardous and radioactive wastes (mixed wastes) over a twenty-nine year period (1959-1988) from various Sandia nuclear research programs. Both landfills are now closed. Originally, however, the sites were selected because of Albuquerque`s and climate and the thick layer of alluvial deposits that overlay groundwater approximately 480 feet below the landfills. This thick layer of ``dry`` soils, gravel, and clays promised to be a natural barrier between the landfills and groundwater.

NONE

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "municipal waste landfill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

List of Municipal Solid Waste Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste Incentives Waste Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 172 Municipal Solid Waste Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 172) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Advanced Clean Energy Project Grants (Texas) State Grant Program Texas Commercial Industrial Utility Biomass Municipal Solid Waste No Advanced Energy Fund (Ohio) Public Benefits Fund Ohio Commercial Industrial Institutional Residential Utility Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Fuel Cells Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Geothermal Electric Hydroelectric energy Landfill Gas Microturbines Municipal Solid Waste Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Water Heat Wind energy Yes Alternative Energy Law (AEL) (Iowa) Renewables Portfolio Standard Iowa Investor-Owned Utility Anaerobic Digestion

22

Municipal Solid Waste:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Methodology for Allocating Municipal Solid Waste Methodology for Allocating Municipal Solid Waste to Biogenic and Non-Biogenic Energy May 2007 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contact This report was prepared by staff of the Renewable Information Team, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewables Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels.

23

Municipal waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Municipal waste materials are processed by crushing the materials so that pieces of noncombustible material are smaller than a selected size and pieces of combustible material are larger than the selected size. The crushed materials are placed on a vibrating mesh screen conveyor belt having openings which pass the smaller, noncombustible pieces of material, but do not pass the larger, combustible pieces of material. Pieces of material which become lodged in the openings of the conveyor belt may be removed by cylindrical deraggers or pressurized air. The crushed materials may be fed onto the conveyor belt by a vibrating feed plate which shakes the materials so that they tend to lie flat.

Mayberry, J.L.

1987-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

Municipal waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Municipal waste materials are processed by crushing the materials so that pieces of noncombustible material are smaller than a selected size and pieces of combustible material are larger than the selected size. The crushed materials are placed on a vibrating mesh screen conveyor belt having openings which pass the smaller, noncombustible pieces of material, but do not pass the larger, combustible pieces of material. Pieces of material which become lodged in the openings of the conveyor belt may be removed by cylindrical deraggers or pressurized air. The crushed materials may be fed onto the conveyor belt by a vibrating feed plate which shakes the materials so that they tend to lie flat.

Mayberry, John L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Municipal waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Municipal waste materials are processed by crushing the materials so that pieces of noncombustible material are smaller than a selected size and pieces of combustible material are larger than the selected size. The crushed materials are placed on a vibrating mesh screen conveyor belt having openings which pass the smaller, noncombustible pieces of material, but do not pass the larger, combustible pieces of material. Consecutive conveyors may be connected by an intermediate vibratory plate. An air knife can be used to further separate materials based on weight.

Mayberry, John L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Municipal solid-waste management in Istanbul  

SciTech Connect

Istanbul, with a population of around 13 million people, is located between Europe and Asia and is the biggest city in Turkey. Metropolitan Istanbul produces about 14,000 tons of solid waste per day. The aim of this study was to assess the situation of municipal solid-waste (MSW) management in Istanbul. This was achieved by reviewing the quantity and composition of waste produced in Istanbul. Current requirements and challenges in relation to the optimization of Istanbul's MSW collection and management system are also discussed, and several suggestions for solving the problems identified are presented. The recovery of solid waste from the landfills, as well as the amounts of landfill-generated biogas and electricity, were evaluated. In recent years, MSW management in Istanbul has improved because of strong governance and institutional involvement. However, efforts directed toward applied research are still required to enable better waste management. These efforts will greatly support decision making on the part of municipal authorities. There remains a great need to reduce the volume of MSW in Istanbul.

Kanat, Gurdal, E-mail: gkanat@gmail.co [Yildiz Teknik Universitesi Cevre Muh Bolumu, 34220 Davutpasa-Esenler, Istanbul (Turkey)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

27

Evaluation of methane emissions from Palermo municipal landfill: Comparison between field measurements and models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methane (CH{sub 4}) diffuse emissions from Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfills represent one of the most important anthropogenic sources of greenhouse gas. CH{sub 4} is produced by anaerobic biodegradation of organic matter in landfilled MSW and constitutes a major component of landfill gas (LFG). Gas recovery is a suitable method to effectively control CH{sub 4} emissions from landfill sites and the quantification of CH{sub 4} emissions represents a good tool to evaluate the effectiveness of a gas recovery system in reducing LFG emissions. In particular, LFG emissions can indirectly be evaluated from mass balance equations between LFG production, recovery and oxidation in the landfill, as well as by a direct approach based on LFG emission measurements from the landfill surface. However, up to now few direct measurements of landfill CH{sub 4} diffuse emissions have been reported in the technical literature. In the present study, both modeling and direct emission measuring methodologies have been applied to the case study of Bellolampo landfill located in Palermo, Italy. The main aim of the present study was to evaluate CH{sub 4} diffuse emissions, based on direct measurements carried out with the flux accumulation chamber (static, non-stationary) method, as well as to obtain the CH{sub 4} contoured flux map of the landfill. Such emissions were compared with the estimate achieved by means of CH{sub 4} mass balance equations. The results showed that the emissions obtained by applying the flux chamber method are in good agreement with the ones derived by the application of the mass balance equation, and that the evaluated contoured flux maps represent a reliable tool to locate areas with abnormal emissions in order to optimize the gas recovery system efficiency.

Di Bella, Gaetano, E-mail: dibella@idra.unipa.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale e Aerospaziale, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Di Trapani, Daniele, E-mail: ditrapani@idra.unipa.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale e Aerospaziale, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Viviani, Gaspare, E-mail: gviv@idra.unipa.it [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale e Aerospaziale, Universita di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, 90128 Palermo (Italy)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This appendix contains the alphabetically indexed bibliography for the complete group of reports on municipal waste management alternatives. The references are listed for each of the following topics: mass burn technologies, RDF technologies, fluidized-bed combustion, pyrolysis and gasification of MSW, materials recovery- recycling technologies, sanitary landfills, composting, and anaerobic digestion of MSW.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Turning waste into energy beats landfilling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Turning waste into energy beats landfilling By Christopher Hume The Hamilton Spectator (Nov 16 it in Europe, "waste-to-energy," this is a technology that is needed. Objections to it are based on information lots, perhaps $300 million. But what Miller and others fail to understand is that energy-to-waste

Columbia University

30

Mathematical Models in Municipal Solid Waste Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two mathematical models developed as tools for solid waste planners in decisions concerning the overall management of solid waste in a municipality are described. The models have respectively been formulated as integer and mixed integer linear programming problems. The choice between the two models from the practical point of view depends on the user and the technology used. One user may prefer to measure the transportation costs in terms of costs per trip made from the waste source, in which case the first model is more appropriate. In this case we replace the coefficients of the decision variables in the objective function with the total cost per trip from the waste collection point. At the same time, instead of measuring the amount of waste using the number of trucks used multiplied by their capacities, continuous variables can be introduced to measure directly the amount of waste that goes to the plants and landfills. The integer linear problem is then transformed into a mixed integer problem that gives better total cost estimates and more precise waste amount measurements, but measuring transportation costs in terms of costs per trip. For instance, at the moment the first model is more relevant to the Ugandan situation, where the technology to measure waste as it is carried away from the waste sources is not available. Another user may prefer to measure the transportation costs in terms of costs per unit mass of

Michael K. Nganda

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark Shows Success Cleaning Up River Corridor Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark Shows Success...

32

The environmental comparison of landfilling vs. incineration of MSW accounting for waste diversion  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Residential waste diversion initiatives are more successful with organic waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using a incineration to manage part of the waste is better environmentally. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incineration leads to more power plant emission offsets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Landfilling all of the waste would be preferred financially. - Abstract: This study evaluates the environmental performance and discounted costs of the incineration and landfilling of municipal solid waste that is ready for the final disposal while accounting for existing waste diversion initiatives, using the life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology. Parameters such as changing waste generation quantities, diversion rates and waste composition were also considered. Two scenarios were assessed in this study on how to treat the waste that remains after diversion. The first scenario is the status quo, where the entire residual waste was landfilled whereas in the second scenario approximately 50% of the residual waste was incinerated while the remainder is landfilled. Electricity was produced in each scenario. Data from the City of Toronto was used to undertake this study. Results showed that the waste diversion initiatives were more effective in reducing the organic portion of the waste, in turn, reducing the net electricity production of the landfill while increasing the net electricity production of the incinerator. Therefore, the scenario that incorporated incineration performed better environmentally and contributed overall to a significant reduction in greenhouse gas emissions because of the displacement of power plant emissions; however, at a noticeably higher cost. Although landfilling proves to be the better financial option, it is for the shorter term. The landfill option would require the need of a replacement landfill much sooner. The financial and environmental effects of this expenditure have yet to be considered.

Assamoi, Bernadette [Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, University of Toronto, 200 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3E5 (Canada); Lawryshyn, Yuri, E-mail: yuri.lawryshyn@utoronto.ca [Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, University of Toronto, 200 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3E5 (Canada)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

Municipal solid waste management in Beijing City  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of municipal solid waste (MSW) management in Beijing City. Beijing, the capital of China, has a land area of approximately 1368.32 km{sup 2} with an urban population of about 13.33 million in 2006. Over the past three decades, MSW generation in Beijing City has increased tremendously from 1.04 million tons in 1978 to 4.134 million tons in 2006. The average generation rate of MSW in 2006 was 0.85 kg/capita/day. Food waste comprised 63.39%, followed by paper (11.07%), plastics (12.7%) and dust (5.78%). While all other wastes including tiles, textiles, glass, metals and wood accounted for less than 3%. Currently, 90% of MSW generated in Beijing is landfilled, 8% is incinerated and 2% is composted. Source separation collection, as a waste reduction method, has been carried out in a total of 2255 demonstration residential and commercial areas (covering about 4.7 million people) up to the end of 2007. Demonstration districts should be promoted over a wider range instead of demonstration communities. The capacity of transfer stations and treatment plants is an urgent problem as these sites are seriously overloaded. These problems should first be solved by constructing more sites and converting to new treatment technologies. Improvements in legislation, public education and the management of waste pickers are problematic issues which need to be addressed.

Li Zhenshan [Department of Environmental Engineering, Peking University, Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences, Ministry of Education, No. 5, Yi Heyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100871 (China); Key Laboratory for Environmental and Urban Sciences, Shenzhen Graduate School, Peking University, Shenzhen 518055 (China)], E-mail: lizhenshan@pku.edu.cn; Yang Lei [Department of Environmental Engineering, Peking University, Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences, Ministry of Education, No. 5, Yi Heyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100871 (China); Qu XiaoYan [Key Laboratory for Environmental and Urban Sciences, Shenzhen Graduate School, Peking University, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Sui Yumei [Department of Environmental Engineering, Peking University, Key Laboratory of Water and Sediment Sciences, Ministry of Education, No. 5, Yi Heyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100871 (China)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

Characteristics Of Fresh Municipal Solid Waste.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hossain, Sahadat The characteristics of fresh municipal solid waste (MSW) are critical in planning, designing, operating or upgrading solid waste management systems. Physical composition, moisture… (more)

Taufiq, Tashfeena

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

I 95 Municipal Landfill Phase I Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Municipal Landfill Phase I Biomass Facility Municipal Landfill Phase I Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name I 95 Municipal Landfill Phase I Biomass Facility Facility I 95 Municipal Landfill Phase I Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Fairfax County, Virginia Coordinates 38.9085472°, -77.2405153° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.9085472,"lon":-77.2405153,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

36

A study of tritium in municipal solid waste leachate and gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has become increasingly clear in the last few years that the vast majority of municipal solid waste landfills produce leachate that contains elevated levels of tritium. The authors recently conducted a study of landfills in New York and New Jersey and found that the mean concentration of tritium in the leachate from ten municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills was 33,800 pCi/L with a peak value of 192,000 pCi/L. A 2003 study in California reported a mean tritium concentration of 99,000 pCi/L with a peak value of 304,000 pCi/L. Studies in Pennsylvania and the UK produced similar results. The USEPA MCL for tritium is 20,000 pCi/L. Tritium is also manifesting itself as landfill gas and landfill gas condensate. Landfill gas condensate samples from landfills in the UK and California were found to have tritium concentrations as high as 54,400 and 513,000 pCi/L, respectively. The tritium found in MSW leachate is believed to derive principally from gaseous tritium lighting devices used in some emergency exit signs, compasses, watches, and even novelty items, such as 'glow stick' key chains. This study reports the findings of recent surveys of leachate from a number of municipal solid waste landfills, both open and closed, from throughout the United States and Europe. The study evaluates the human health and ecological risks posed by elevated tritium levels in municipal solid waste leachate and landfill gas and the implications to their safe management. We also assess the potential risks posed to solid waste management facility workers exposed to tritium-containing waste materials in transfer stations and other solid waste management facilities. (authors)

Mutch Jr, R. D. [HydroQual, Inc., 1200 MacArthur Blvd., Mahwah, NJ 07430 (United States); Manhattan College, Riverdale, NY (United States); Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Mahony, J. D. [HydroQual, Inc., 1200 MacArthur Blvd., Mahwah, NJ 07430 (United States); Manhattan College, Riverdale, NY (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

EA-1707: Closure of Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and Solid Waste  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

07: Closure of Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and 07: Closure of Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and Solid Waste Landfill, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington EA-1707: Closure of Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and Solid Waste Landfill, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Summary This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of closing the Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and the Solid Waste Landfill. The Washington State Department of Ecology is a cooperating agency in preparing this EA. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download August 26, 2011 EA-1707: Revised Draft Environmental Assessment Closure of Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and Solid Waste Landfill, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington May 13, 2010 EA-1707: Draft Environmental Assessment

38

Municipal Solid Waste in The United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005 Facts and Figures Municipal Solid Waste in The United States #12;United States Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste (5306P) EPA530-R-06-011 October 2006 www.epa.gov #12;MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE IN THE UNITED STATES: 2005 FACTS AND FIGURES Table of Contents Chapter Page EXECUTIVE

Barlaz, Morton A.

39

Life-cycle assessment of municipal solid wastes: Development of the WASTED model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the development of the Waste Analysis Software Tool for Environmental Decisions (WASTED) model. This model provides a comprehensive view of the environmental impacts of municipal solid waste management systems. The model consists of a number of separate submodels that describe a typical waste management process: waste collection, material recovery, composting, energy recovery from waste and landfilling. These submodels are combined to represent a complete waste management system. WASTED uses compensatory systems to account for the avoided environmental impacts derived from energy recovery and material recycling. The model is designed to provide solid waste decision-makers and environmental researchers with a tool to evaluate waste management plans and to improve the environmental performance of solid waste management strategies. The model is user-friendly and compares favourably with other earlier models.

Diaz, R. [Civil Engineering Department, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ont., M5B 2K3 (Canada); Warith, M. [Civil Engineering Department, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ont., M5B 2K3 (Canada)]. E-mail: mwarith@ryerson.ca

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Sandia National Laboratories: No More Green Waste in the Landfill  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

No More Green Waste in the Landfill No More Green Waste in the Landfill June 09, 2011 Dump Truck Image On the heels of Sandia National Laboratories' successful food waste composting program, Pollution Prevention (P2) has teamed with the Facilities' Grounds and Roads team and the Solid Waste Transfer Facility to implement green waste composting. Previously, branches and logs were being diverted and mulched by Kirtland Air Force Base at their Construction & Demolition Landfill that is on base and utilized under contract by Sandia. The mulch is available to the Air Force and Sandia for landscaping uses. However, grass clippings, leaves, and other green waste were being disposed in the landfill. In an initiative to save time and trips by small trucks with trailers to the landfill carrying organic debris, two 30 cubic yard rolloffs were

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "municipal waste landfill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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41

Greenhouse gases emission from municipal waste management: The role of separate collection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The municipal solid waste management significantly contributes to the emission in the atmosphere of greenhouse gases (e.g. CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O) and therefore the management process from collection to treatment and disposal has to be optimized in order to reduce these emissions. In this paper, starting from the average composition of undifferentiated municipal solid waste in Italy, the effect of separate collection on greenhouse gases emissions from municipal waste management has been assessed. Different combinations of separate collection scenarios and disposal options (i.e. landfilling and incineration) have been considered. The effect of energy recovery from waste both in landfills and incinerators has also been addressed. The results outline how a separate collection approach can have a significant effect on the emission of greenhouse gases and how wise municipal solid waste management, implying the adoption of Best Available Technologies (i.e. biogas recovery and exploitation system in landfills and energy recovery system in Waste to Energy plants), can not only significantly reduce greenhouse gases emissions but, in certain cases, can also make the overall process a carbon sink. Moreover it has been shown that separate collection of plastic is a major issue when dealing with global warming relevant emissions from municipal solid waste management.

Calabro, Paolo S. [Dipartimento di Meccanica e Materiali, Universita degli Studi Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria, via Graziella - loc. Feo di Vito, 89122 Reggio Calabria (Italy)], E-mail: paolo.calabro@unirc.it

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

WASTE SEPARATION-DOES IT INFLUENCE MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTOR EMISSIONS?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WASTE SEPARATION- DOES IT INFLUENCE MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTOR EMISSIONS? A. John Chandler A a commendable job in proving that trace emissions from a modem waste to energy plant have little to do with the trace compounds in individual components of municipal solid waste. Ogden, the leader in designing

Columbia University

43

Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations

44

Environmental evaluation of municipal waste prevention  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: > Influence of prevention on waste management systems, excluding avoided production, is relatively minor. > Influence of prevention on overall supply chain, including avoided production is very significant. > Higher relative benefits of prevention are observed in waste management systems relying mainly on landfills. - Abstract: Waste prevention has been addressed in the literature in terms of the social and behavioural aspects, but very little quantitative assessment exists of the environmental benefits. Our study evaluates the environmental consequences of waste prevention on waste management systems and on the wider society, using life-cycle thinking. The partial prevention of unsolicited mail, beverage packaging and food waste is tested for a 'High-tech' waste management system relying on high energy and material recovery and for a 'Low-tech' waste management system with less recycling and relying on landfilling. Prevention of 13% of the waste mass entering the waste management system generates a reduction of loads and savings in the waste management system for the different impacts categories; 45% net reduction for nutrient enrichment and 12% reduction for global warming potential. When expanding our system and including avoided production incurred by the prevention measures, large savings are observed (15-fold improvement for nutrient enrichment and 2-fold for global warming potential). Prevention of food waste has the highest environmental impact saving. Prevention generates relatively higher overall relative benefit for 'Low-tech' systems depending on landfilling. The paper provides clear evidence of the environmental benefits of waste prevention and has specific relevance in climate change mitigation.

Gentil, Emmanuel C.; Gallo, Daniele [Department of Environmental Engineering, Building 115, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H., E-mail: thho@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Building 115, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

45

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides data for use in evaluating the proven technologies and combinations of technologies that might be considered for managing municipal solid waste (MSW). It covers five major methods for MSW management in common use today: Landfilling; Mass combustion for energy recovery; Production of refuse-derived fuel (RDF); Collection/separation of recyclables; and Composting. It also provides information on three MSW management technologies that are not widely used at present: Anaerobic digestion; Cofiring of MSW with coal; and Gasification/pyrolysis. To the extent possible with available reliable data, the report presents information for each proven MSW technology on: Net energy balances; Environmental releases; and Economics. In addition to data about individual operations, the report presents net energy balances and inventories of environmental releases from selected combined MSW management strategies that use two or more separate operations. The scope of the report extends from the waste's origin (defined as the point at which the waste is set out for collection), through transportation and processing operations, to its final disposition (e.g., recycling and remanufacturing, combustion, or landfilling operations). Data for all operations are presented on a consistent basis: one (1) ton of municipal (i.e., residential, commercial, and institutional) waste at the collection point. Selection of an MSW management plan may be influenced by many factors, in addition to the technical performance and economics of each option.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Renewable Energy 32 (2007) 12431257 Methane generation in landfills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2006 Abstract Methane gas is a by-product of landfilling municipal solid wastes (MSW). Most tonnes of methane annually, 70% of which is used to generate heat and/or electricity. The landfill gas. All rights reserved. Keywords: Landfill gas; Renewable energy; Municipal solid waste; Biogas; Methane

Columbia University

47

Municipal solid waste management in India: From waste disposal to recovery of resources?  

SciTech Connect

Unlike that of western countries, the solid waste of Asian cities is often comprised of 70-80% organic matter, dirt and dust. Composting is considered to be the best option to deal with the waste generated. Composting helps reduce the waste transported to and disposed of in landfills. During the course of the research, the author learned that several developing countries established large-scale composting plants that eventually failed for various reasons. The main flaw that led to the unsuccessful establishment of the plants was the lack of application of simple scientific methods to select the material to be composted. Landfills have also been widely unsuccessful in countries like India because the landfill sites have a very limited time frame of usage. The population of the developing countries is another factor that detrimentally impacts the function of landfill sites. As the population keeps increasing, the garbage quantity also increases, which, in turn, exhausts the landfill sites. Landfills are also becoming increasingly expensive because of the rising costs of construction and operation. Incineration, which can greatly reduce the amount of incoming municipal solid waste, is the second most common method for disposal in developed countries. However, incinerator ash may contain hazardous materials including heavy metals and organic compounds such as dioxins, etc. Recycling plays a large role in solid waste management, especially in cities in developing countries. None of the three methods mentioned here are free from problems. The aim of this study is thus to compare the three methods, keeping in mind the costs that would be incurred by the respective governments, and identify the most economical and best option possible to combat the waste disposal problem.

Narayana, Tapan [Hidayatullah National Law University, HNLU Bhawan, Civil Lines, Raipur 492001, Chhattisgarh (India)], E-mail: tapan.narayana@gmail.com

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 11, Alphabetically indexed bibliography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This appendix contains the alphabetically indexed bibliography for the complete group of reports on municipal waste management alternatives. The references are listed for each of the following topics: mass burn technologies, RDF technologies, fluidized-bed combustion, pyrolysis and gasification of MSW, materials recovery- recycling technologies, sanitary landfills, composting, and anaerobic digestion of MSW.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Aerobic landfill bioreactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention includes a system of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

Hudgins, Mark P (Aiken, SC); Bessette, Bernard J (Aiken, SC); March, John C (Winterville, GA); McComb, Scott T. (Andersonville, SC)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Aerobic landfill bioreactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention includes a method of decomposing municipal solid waste (MSW) within a landfill by converting the landfill to aerobic degradation in the following manner: (1) injecting air via the landfill leachate collection system (2) injecting air via vertical air injection wells installed within the waste mass; (3) applying leachate to the waste mass using a pressurized drip irrigation system; (4) allowing landfill gases to vent; and (5) adjusting air injection and recirculated leachate to achieve a 40% to 60% moisture level and a temperature between 120.degree. F. and 140.degree. F. in steady state.

Hudgins, Mark P (Aiken, SC); Bessette, Bernard J (Aiken, SC); March, John (Winterville, GA); McComb, Scott T. (Andersonville, SC)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Emission assessment at the Burj Hammoud inactive municipal landfill: Viability of landfill gas recovery under the clean development mechanism  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LFG emissions are measured at an abandoned landfill with highly organic waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mean headspace and vent emissions are 0.240 and 0.074 l CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} hr, respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At sites with high food waste content, LFG generation drops rapidly after site closure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The viability of LFG recovery for CDMs in developing countries is doubtful. - Abstract: This paper examines landfill gas (LFG) emissions at a large inactive waste disposal site to evaluate the viability of investment in LFG recovery through the clean development mechanism (CDM) initiative. For this purpose, field measurements of LFG emissions were conducted and the data were processed by geospatial interpolation to estimate an equivalent site emission rate which was used to calibrate and apply two LFG prediction models to forecast LFG emissions at the site. The mean CH{sub 4} flux values calculated through tessellation, inverse distance weighing and kriging were 0.188 {+-} 0.014, 0.224 {+-} 0.012 and 0.237 {+-} 0.008 l CH{sub 4}/m{sup 2} hr, respectively, compared to an arithmetic mean of 0.24 l/m{sup 2} hr. The flux values are within the reported range for closed landfills (0.06-0.89 l/m{sup 2} hr), and lower than the reported range for active landfills (0.42-2.46 l/m{sup 2} hr). Simulation results matched field measurements for low methane generation potential (L{sub 0}) values in the range of 19.8-102.6 m{sup 3}/ton of waste. LFG generation dropped rapidly to half its peak level only 4 yrs after landfill closure limiting the sustainability of LFG recovery systems in similar contexts and raising into doubt promoted CDM initiatives for similar waste.

El-Fadel, Mutasem, E-mail: mfadel@aub.edu.lb [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, American University of Beirut (Lebanon); Abi-Esber, Layale; Salhab, Samer [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, American University of Beirut (Lebanon)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

52

Energy potential of municipal solid waste is limited  

SciTech Connect

Energy recovery from municipal solid waste has the potential for making only a limited contribution to the nation`s overall energy production. Although the current contribution of waste-derived energy production is less than one-half of 1 percent of the nation`s total energy Supply, DOE has set a goal for energy from waste at 2 percent of the total supply by 2010. The industry`s estimates show a smaller role for waste as an energy source in the future. The energy potential from waste is limited not only by the volume and energy content of the waste itself, but also by the factors affecting the use of waste disposal options, including public opposition and the availability of financing. Energy production from waste combustors and from landfill gases generates pollutants, although these are reduced through current regulations that require the use of emissions control technology and define operational criteria for the facilities. Although DOE estimates that one-third of the energy available from waste is available in the form of energy savings through the recycling of materials, the Department`s research in this area is ongoing.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

An overview of the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID) focuses on ``in-situ`` characterization, monitoring, remediation, and containment of landfills in and environments that contain hazardous and mixed waste. The MWLID mission is to assess, demonstrate, and transfer technologies and systems that lead to faster, better, cheaper, and safer cleanup. Most important, the demonstrated technologies will be evaluated against the baseline of conventional technologies. Key goals of the MWLID are routine use of these technologies by Environmental Restoration Groups throughout the DOE complex and commercialization of these technologies to the private sector. The MWLID is demonstrating technologies at hazardous waste landfills located at Sandia National Laboratories and on Kirtland Air Force Base. These landfills have been selected because they are representative of many sites throughout the Southwest and in other and climates.

Williams, C.V.; Burford, T.D.; Betsill, J.D.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

UTILIZATION OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE COMPOST IN HORTICULTURE.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Composting of municipal solid waste (MSW) has long been considered an attractive waste management tool for effective reduction of waste volume and beneficial utilization of… (more)

Lu, Wenliang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Sardinia 2007, Eleventh International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium Potential for Reducing Global Methane Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

landfills, we developed reference projections of waste generation, recycling and landfill-gas captureSardinia 2007, Eleventh International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium 1 Potential for Reducing Global Methane Emissions From Landfills, 2000-2030 E. MATTHEWS1 , N. J. THEMELIS2 1 NASA Goddard

Columbia University

56

Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark Shows Success Cleaning Up River Corridor Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark Shows Success Cleaning Up River Corridor July 9, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE, (509) 376-5365 Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov Mark McKenna, WCH, (509) 372-9032 media@wch-rcc.com RICHLAND, Wash. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors have disposed of 15 million tons of contaminated material at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) since the facility began operations in 1996. Removing contaminated material and providing for its safe disposal prevents contaminants from reaching the groundwater and the Columbia River. ERDF receives contaminated soil, demolition debris, and solid waste from

57

Environmental impact on municipal solid waste management system in Chaiyaphum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continually increasing amount of municipal solid waste (MSW) and the limited capacity of the existing waste management system are serious problems that Chaiyaphum municipality must deal with. The optimal waste management system should be adopted. Explicit ... Keywords: decision making, environmental evaluation, life cycle assessment, municipal solid waste

S. Piyaphant; K. Prayong

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Energy implications of the thermal recovery of biodegradable municipal waste materials in the United Kingdom  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: > Energy balances were calculated for the thermal treatment of biodegradable wastes. > For wood and RDF, combustion in dedicated facilities was the best option. > For paper, garden and food wastes and mixed waste incineration was the best option. > For low moisture paper, gasification provided the optimum solution. - Abstract: Waste management policies and legislation in many developed countries call for a reduction in the quantity of biodegradable waste landfilled. Anaerobic digestion, combustion and gasification are options for managing biodegradable waste while generating renewable energy. However, very little research has been carried to establish the overall energy balance of the collection, preparation and energy recovery processes for different types of wastes. Without this information, it is impossible to determine the optimum method for managing a particular waste to recover renewable energy. In this study, energy balances were carried out for the thermal processing of food waste, garden waste, wood, waste paper and the non-recyclable fraction of municipal waste. For all of these wastes, combustion in dedicated facilities or incineration with the municipal waste stream was the most energy-advantageous option. However, we identified a lack of reliable information on the energy consumed in collecting individual wastes and preparing the wastes for thermal processing. There was also little reliable information on the performance and efficiency of anaerobic digestion and gasification facilities for waste.

Burnley, Stephen, E-mail: s.j.burnley@open.ac.uk [Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Phillips, Rhiannon, E-mail: rhiannon.jones@environment-agency.gov.uk [Strategy Unit, Welsh Assembly Government, Ty Cambria, 29 Newport Road, Cardiff CF24 0TP (United Kingdom); Coleman, Terry, E-mail: terry.coleman@erm.com [Environmental Resources Management Ltd, Eaton House, Wallbrook Court, North Hinksey Lane, Oxford OX2 0QS (United Kingdom); Rampling, Terence, E-mail: twa.rampling@hotmail.com [7 Thurlow Close, Old Town Stevenage, Herts SG1 4SD (United Kingdom)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on February 13, 2013. EZFeed Policy Place Pennsylvania Name Municipal Waste Planning, Recycling and Waste Reduction Act (Pennsylvania) Policy Category Other Policy Policy Type Environmental Regulations Affected Technologies Biomass/Biogas, Coal with CCS, Concentrating Solar Power, Energy Storage, Fuel Cells, Geothermal Electric, Hydroelectric, Hydroelectric (Small), Natural Gas, Nuclear, Solar Photovoltaics, Wind energy Active Policy Yes Implementing Sector State/Province Program Administrator Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection

60

Municipal solid waste generation in municipalities: Quantifying impacts of household structure, commercial waste and domestic fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste management planning requires reliable data concerning waste generation, influencing factors on waste generation and forecasts of waste quantities based on facts. This paper aims at identifying and quantifying differences between different municipalities' municipal solid waste (MSW) collection quantities based on data from waste management and on socio-economic indicators. A large set of 116 indicators from 542 municipalities in the Province of Styria was investigated. The resulting regression model included municipal tax revenue per capita, household size and the percentage of buildings with solid fuel heating systems. The model explains 74.3% of the MSW variation and the model assumptions are met. Other factors such as tourism, home composting or age distribution of the population did not significantly improve the model. According to the model, 21% of MSW collected in Styria was commercial waste and 18% of the generated MSW was burned in domestic heating systems. While the percentage of commercial waste is consistent with literature data, practically no literature data are available for the quantity of MSW burned, which seems to be overestimated by the model. The resulting regression model was used as basis for a waste prognosis model (Beigl and Lebersorger, in preparation).

Lebersorger, S. [Institute of Waste Management, Department of Water, Atmosphere and Environment, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Muthgasse 107, A-1190 Wien (Austria); Beigl, P., E-mail: peter.beigl@boku.ac.at [Institute of Waste Management, Department of Water, Atmosphere and Environment, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Muthgasse 107, A-1190 Wien (Austria)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "municipal waste landfill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

An Environment Friendly Energy Recovery Technology: Municipal Solid Waste Gasification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy from waste, is a perspective source to replace fossil fuels in the future, municipal solid waste (MSW) gasification is a new technique for waste treatment. MSW can be combusted directly to generate heat and electricity, and by means of gasification ... Keywords: municipal solid waste, gasification, incineration

Lei Ma; Chuanhua Liao; Yuezhao Zhu; Haijun Chen; Yanghuiqin Ding

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Energy utilization: municipal waste incineration. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An assessment is made of the technical and economical feasibility of converting municipal waste into useful and useable energy. The concept presented involves retrofitting an existing municipal incinerator with the systems and equipment necessary to produce process steam and electric power. The concept is economically attractive since the cost of necessary waste heat recovery equipment is usually a comparatively small percentage of the cost of the original incinerator installation. Technical data obtained from presently operating incinerators designed specifically for generating energy, documents the technical feasibility and stipulates certain design constraints. The investigation includes a cost summary; description of process and facilities; conceptual design; economic analysis; derivation of costs; itemized estimated costs; design and construction schedule; and some drawings.

LaBeck, M.F.

1981-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

63

An environmental assessment of recovering methane from municipal solid waste by anaerobic digestion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of an experimental process which produces synthetic natural gas (SNG) or biogas by anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste (MSW) is evaluated. This technology, if implemented, would be utilized in lieu of incineration or directly landfilling waste. An environmental assessment describing the principal impacts associated with operating the MSW anaerobic digestion process is presented. Variations in process configurations provide for SNG or electricity production and digester residue incineration, composting, or landfilling. Four process configuration are compared to the conventional solid waste disposal alternative of mass burn incineration and landfilling. Emissions are characterized, effluents quantified, and landfill areas predicted. The quantity of SNG and electricity recovered, and aluminum and ferrous metals recycled is predicted along with the emissions and effluents avoided by recovering energy and recycling metals. Air emissions are the primary on-site concern with the anaerobic digestion process. However, when compared to mass burn incineration, the projected particulate emissions for the anaerobic digestion process range from 2.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} to 2.6 {times} {sup 10{minus}5} pounds per ton of waste vs. 3.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} pounds per ton for mass burn. SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and PCCD emissions have a similar relationship.

O'Leary, P.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Prospects for pyrolysis technologies in managing municipal, industrial, and DOE cleanup wastes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pyrolysis converts portions of municipal solid wastes, hazardous wastes, and special wastes such as tires, medical wastes, and even old landfills into solid carbon and a liquid or gaseous hydrocarbon stream. Pyrolysis heats a carbonaceous waste stream typically to 290--900 C in the absence of oxygen, and reduces the volume of waste by 90% and its weight by 75%. The solid carbon char has existing markets as an ingredient in many manufactured goods, and as an adsorbent or filter to sequester certain hazardous wastes. Pyrolytic gases may be burned as fuel by utilities, or liquefied for use as chemical feedstocks, or low-pollution motor vehicle fuels and fuel additives. This report analyzes the potential applications of pyrolysis in the Long Island region and evaluates for the four most promising pyrolytic systems their technological and commercial readiness, their applicability to regional waste management needs, and their conformity with DOE requirements for environmental restoration and waste management. This summary characterizes their engineering performance, environmental effects, costs, product applications, and markets. Because it can effectively treat those wastes that are inadequately addressed by current systems, pyrolysis can play an important complementing role in the region`s existing waste management strategy. Its role could be even more significant if the region moves away from existing commitments to incineration and MSW composting. Either way, Long Island could become the center for a pyrolysis-based recovery services industry serving global markets in municipal solid waste treatment and hazardous waste cleanup. 162 refs.

Reaven, S.J. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Municipal solid waste management in Kolkata, India - A review  

SciTech Connect

Kolkata is one of four metropolitan cities in India. With an area of 187.33 sq km and a population of about 8 million, it generates around 3,000 t d{sup -1} of municipal solid waste (MSW) at a rate of 450-500 g per capita per day. With rapid urbanization as a result of planned and unplanned growth and industrialization, the problems associated with handling MSW have increased at an alarming rate over the past few years. No source segregation arrangement exists; there is only limited (60%) house-to-house collection; and 50-55% open vats are used in the present collection system. The operational efficiency of the Kolkata Municipal Corporation (KMC) transport system is about 50%, with a fleet composed of about 30-35% old vehicles. The majority (80%) of these, particularly the hired vehicles, are more than 20 years old. The newly added areas covered by KMC have even lower collection efficiencies, and only an informal recycling system exists. The waste collected has a low energy value (3,350-4,200 kJ kg{sup -1}) with high moisture and inert content. A 700 t d{sup -1} compost plant set up in 2000 has not been functioning effectively since 2003. Open dumping (without liners and without a leachate management facility) and the threat of groundwater pollution, as well as saturation of an existing landfill site (Dhapa) are the most pressing problems for the city today. KMC spends 70-75% of its total expenditures on collection of solid waste, 25-30% on transportation, and less than 5% on final disposal arrangements. The Kolkata Environmental Improvement Project, funded by the Asian Development Bank, is seen as only a partial solution to the problem. A detailed plan should emphasize segregation at the source, investment in disposal arrangements (including the use of liners and leachate collection), and an optimized transport arrangement, among improvements.

Chattopadhyay, Subhasish [Solid Waste Management Department, KMC, Department of Civil Engineering, Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India)], E-mail: subharpita@rediffmail.com; Dutta, Amit [Department of Civil Engineering, Bengal Engineering and Science University, P.O. Botanic Garden, Shibpur, Howrah 711 103 (India)], E-mail: amit@civil.becs.ac.in; Ray, Subhabrata [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)], E-mail: sray@che.iitkhp.ernet.in

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

Integration of the informal sector into municipal solid waste management in the Philippines - What does it need?  

SciTech Connect

The integration of the informal sector into municipal solid waste management is a challenge many developing countries face. In Iloilo City, Philippines around 220 tons of municipal solid waste are collected every day and disposed at a 10 ha large dumpsite. In order to improve the local waste management system the Local Government decided to develop a new Waste Management Center with integrated landfill. However, the proposed area is adjacent to the presently used dumpsite where more than 300 waste pickers dwell and depend on waste picking as their source of livelihood. The Local Government recognized the hidden threat imposed by the waste picker's presence for this development project and proposed various measures to integrate the informal sector into the municipal solid waste management (MSWM) program. As a key intervention a Waste Workers Association, called USWAG Calahunan Livelihood Association Inc. (UCLA) was initiated and registered as a formal business enterprise in May 2009. Up to date, UCLA counts 240 members who commit to follow certain rules and to work within a team that jointly recovers wasted materials. As a cooperative they are empowered to explore new livelihood options such as the recovery of Alternative Fuels for commercial (cement industry) and household use, production of compost and making of handicrafts out of used packages. These activities do not only provide alternative livelihood for them but also lessen the generation of leachate and Greenhouse Gases (GHG) emissions from waste disposal, whereby the life time of the proposed new sanitary landfill can be extended likewise.

Paul, Johannes G., E-mail: jp.aht.p3@gmail.com [GIZ-AHT Project Office SWM4LGUs, c/o DENR, Iloilo City (Philippines); Arce-Jaque, Joan [GIZ-AHT Project Office SWM4LGUs, c/o DENR, Iloilo City (Philippines); Ravena, Neil; Villamor, Salome P. [General Service Office, City Government, Iloilo City (Philippines)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

Federal Energy Management Program: Municipal Solid Waste Resources...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's high-solids digester converts wastes to biogas and compost for energy production. This page provides a brief overview of municipal...

68

Landfill gas emission prediction using Voronoi diagrams and importance sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills are among the nation's largest emitters of methane, a key greenhouse gas, and there is considerable interest in quantifying the surficial methane emissions from landfills. There are limitations in obtaining accurate ... Keywords: Air dispersion modeling, Delaunay tessellation, Kriging, Least squares, MSW landfill, Voronoi diagram

K. R. Mackie; C. D. Cooper

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Data summary of municipal solid waste management alternatives. Volume 1, Report text  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides data for use in evaluating the proven technologies and combinations of technologies that might be considered for managing municipal solid waste (MSW). It covers five major methods for MSW management in common use today: Landfilling; Mass combustion for energy recovery; Production of refuse-derived fuel (RDF); Collection/separation of recyclables; and Composting. It also provides information on three MSW management technologies that are not widely used at present: Anaerobic digestion; Cofiring of MSW with coal; and Gasification/pyrolysis. To the extent possible with available reliable data, the report presents information for each proven MSW technology on: Net energy balances; Environmental releases; and Economics. In addition to data about individual operations, the report presents net energy balances and inventories of environmental releases from selected combined MSW management strategies that use two or more separate operations. The scope of the report extends from the waste`s origin (defined as the point at which the waste is set out for collection), through transportation and processing operations, to its final disposition (e.g., recycling and remanufacturing, combustion, or landfilling operations). Data for all operations are presented on a consistent basis: one (1) ton of municipal (i.e., residential, commercial, and institutional) waste at the collection point. Selection of an MSW management plan may be influenced by many factors, in addition to the technical performance and economics of each option.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Modelling of environmental impacts of solid waste landfilling within the life-cycle analysis program EASEWASTE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new computer-based life-cycle assessment model (EASEWASTE) has been developed to evaluate resource and environmental consequences of solid waste management systems. This paper describes the landfilling sub-model used in the life-cycle assessment program EASEWASTE, and examines some of the implications of this sub-model. All quantities and concentrations of leachate and landfill gas can be modified by the user in order to bring them in agreement with the actual landfill that is assessed by the model. All emissions, except the generation of landfill gas, are process specific. The landfill gas generation is calculated on the basis of organic matter in the landfilled waste. A landfill assessment example is provided. For this example, the normalised environmental effects of landfill gas on global warming and photochemical smog are much greater than the environmental effects for landfill leachate or for landfill construction. A sensitivity analysis for this example indicates that the overall environmental impact is sensitive to the gas collection efficiency and the use of the gas, but not to the amount of leachate generated, or the amount of soil or liner material used in construction. The landfill model can be used for evaluating different technologies with different liners, gas and leachate collection efficiencies, and to compare the environmental consequences of landfilling with alternative waste treatment options such as incineration or anaerobic digestion.

Kirkeby, Janus T.; Birgisdottir, Harpa [Environment and Resources, Technical University of Denmark, DTU, Building 113, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Bhander, Gurbakash Singh; Hauschild, Michael [Department of Manufacturing Engineering and Management, Technical University of Denmark, Building 424, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H. [Environment and Resources, Technical University of Denmark, DTU, Building 113, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)], E-mail: thc@er.dtu.dk

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Process and technological aspects of municipal solid waste gasification. A review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Critical assessment of the main commercially available MSW gasifiers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Detailed discussion of the basic features of gasification process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Description of configurations of gasification-based waste-to-energy units. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmental performance analysis, on the basis of independent sources data. - Abstract: The paper proposes a critical assessment of municipal solid waste gasification today, starting from basic aspects of the process (process types and steps, operating and performance parameters) and arriving to a comparative analysis of the reactors (fixed bed, fluidized bed, entrained bed, vertical shaft, moving grate furnace, rotary kiln, plasma reactor) as well as of the possible plant configurations (heat gasifier and power gasifier) and the environmental performances of the main commercially available gasifiers for municipal solid wastes. The analysis indicates that gasification is a technically viable option for the solid waste conversion, including residual waste from separate collection of municipal solid waste. It is able to meet existing emission limits and can have a remarkable effect on reduction of landfill disposal option.

Arena, Umberto, E-mail: umberto.arena@unina2.it [Department of Environmental Sciences, Second University of Naples, Via A. Vivaldi, 43, 81100 Caserta (Italy)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

Treatment of municipal landfill leachate using a combined anaerobic digester and activated sludge system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of treating sanitary landfill leachate using a combined anaerobic and activated sludge system. A high-strength leachate from Shiraz municipal landfill site was treated using this system. A two-stage laboratory-scale anaerobic digester under mesophilic conditions and an activated sludge unit were used. Landfill leachate composition and characteristics varied considerably during 8 months experiment (COD concentrations of 48,552-62,150 mg/L). It was found that the system could reduce the COD of the leachate by 94% at a loading rate of 2.25 g COD/L/d and 93% at loading rate of 3.37 g COD/L/d. The anaerobic digester treatment was quite effective in removing Fe, Cu, Mn, and Ni. However, in the case of Zn, removal efficiency was about 50%. For the rest of the HMs the removal efficiencies were in the range 88.8-99.9%. Ammonia reduction did not occur in anaerobic digesters. Anaerobic reactors increased alkalinity about 3.2-4.8% in the 1st digester and 1.8-7.9% in the 2nd digester. In activated sludge unit, alkalinity and ammonia removal efficiency were 49-60% and 48.6-64.7%, respectively. Methane production rate was in the range of 0.02-0.04, 0.04-0.07, and 0.02-0.04 L/g COD{sub rem} for the 1st digester, the 2nd digester, and combination of both digesters, respectively; the methane content of the biogas varied between 60% and 63%.

Kheradmand, S. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Shiraz, Shiraz 7134851156 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karimi-Jashni, A., E-mail: akarimi@shirazu.ac.i [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Shiraz, Shiraz 7134851156 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sartaj, M. [Department of Civil Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 841568311 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

Landfill Methane Project Development Handbook | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Methane Project Development Handbook Landfill Methane Project Development Handbook Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Landfill Methane Project Development Handbook Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Biomass, - Landfill Gas Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Get Feedback Resource Type: Guide/manual User Interface: Website Website: www.epa.gov/lmop/publications-tools/handbook.html Cost: Free References: Project Development Handbook[1] The handbook describes the process of implementing a waste-to-energy landfill gas project. Overview "Approximately 250 million tons of solid waste was generated in the United States in 2008 with 54 percent deposited in municipal solid waste (MSW)

74

Integrated municipal solid waste treatment using a grate furnace incinerator: The Indaver case  

SciTech Connect

An integrated installation for treatment of municipal solid waste and comparable waste from industrial origin is described. It consists of three grate furnace lines with flue gas treatment by half-wet scrubbing followed by wet scrubbing, and an installation for wet treatment of bottom ash. It is demonstrated that this integrated installation combines high recovery of energy (40.8% net) with high materials recovery. The following fractions were obtained after wet treatment of the bottom ash: ferrous metals, non-ferrous metals, three granulate fractions with different particle sizes, and sludge. The ferrous and non-ferrous metal fractions can both be recycled as high quality raw materials; the two larger particle size particle fractions can be applied as secondary raw materials in building applications; the sand fraction can be used for applications on a landfill; and the sludge is landfilled. For all components of interest, emissions to air are below the limit values. The integrated grate furnace installation is characterised by zero wastewater discharge and high occupational safety. Moreover, with the considered installation, major pollutants, such as PCDD/PCDF, Hg and iodine-136 are to a large extent removed from the environment and concentrated in a small residual waste stream (flue gas cleaning residue), which can be landfilled after stabilisation.

Vandecasteele, C. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, De Croylaan 46, 3001 Leuven (Belgium)], E-mail: carlo.vandecasteele@cit.kuleuven.be; Wauters, G. [Indaver, Dijle 17a, 2800 Mechelen (Belgium); Arickx, S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, De Croylaan 46, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Jaspers, M. [Indaver, Dijle 17a, 2800 Mechelen (Belgium); Van Gerven, T. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, De Croylaan 46, 3001 Leuven (Belgium)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Flow analysis of metals in a municipal solid waste management system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study aimed to identify the metal flow in a municipal solid waste (MSW) management system. Outputs of a resource recovery facility, refuse derived fuel (RDF) production facility, carbonization facility, plastics liquefaction facility, composting facility, and bio-gasification facility were analyzed for metal content and leaching concentration. In terms of metal content, bulky and incombustible waste had the highest values. Char from a carbonization facility, which treats household waste, had a higher metal content than MSW incinerator bottom ash. A leaching test revealed that Cd and Pb in char and Pb in RDF production residue exceeded the Japanese regulatory criteria for landfilling, so special attention should be paid to final disposal of these substances. By multiplying metal content and the generation rate of outputs, the metal content of input waste to each facility was estimated. For most metals except Cr, the total contribution ratio of paper/textile/plastics, bulky waste, and incombustible waste was over 80%. Approximately 30% of Cr originated from plastic packaging. Finally, several MSW management scenarios showed that most metals are transferred to landfills and the leaching potential of metals to the environment is quite small.

Jung, C.H. [Laboratory of Solid Waste Disposal Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Matsuto, T. [Laboratory of Solid Waste Disposal Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)]. E-mail: matsuto@eng.hokudai.ac.jp; Tanaka, N. [Laboratory of Solid Waste Disposal Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Hydrogen production from municipal solid waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have modified a Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) hydrothermal pretreatment pilot plant for batch operation and blowdown of the treated batch to low pressure. We have also assembled a slurry shearing pilot plant for particle size reduction. Waste paper and a mixture of waste paper/polyethylene plastic have been run in the pilot plant with a treatment temperature of 275{degrees}C. The pilot-plant products have been used for laboratory studies at LLNL. The hydrothermal/shearing pilot plants have produced acceptable slurries for gasification tests from a waste paper feedstock. Work is currently underway with combined paper/plastic feedstocks. When the assembly of the Research Gasification Unit at Texaco (feed capacity approximately 3/4-ton/day) is complete (4th quarter of FY96), gasification test runs will commence. Laboratory work on slurry samples during FY96 has provided correlations between slurry viscosity and hydrothermal treatment temperature, degree of shearing, and the presence of surfactants and admixed plastics. To date, pumpable slurries obtained from an MSW surrogate mixture of treated paper and plastic have shown heating values in the range 13-15 MJ/kg. Our process modeling has quantified the relationship between slurry heating value and hydrogen yield. LLNL has also performed a preliminary cost analysis of the process with the slurry heating value and the MSW tipping fee as parameters. This analysis has shown that the overall process with a 15 MJ/kg slurry gasifier feed can compete with coal-derived hydrogen with the assumption that the tipping fee is of the order $50/ton.

Wallman, P.H.; Richardson, J.H.; Thorsness, C.B. [and others

1996-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

77

Life cycle assessment of four municipal solid waste management scenarios in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A life cycle assessment was carried out to estimate the environmental impact of municipal solid waste. Four scenarios mostly used in China were compared to assess the influence of various technologies on environment: (1) landfill, (2) incineration, (3) composting plus landfill, and (4) composting plus incineration. In all scenarios, the technologies significantly contribute to global warming and increase the adverse impact of non-carcinogens on the environment. The technologies played only a small role in the impact of carcinogens, respiratory inorganics, terrestrial ecotoxicity, and non-renewable energy. Similarly, the influence of the technologies on the way other elements affect the environment was ignorable. Specifically, the direct emissions from the operation processes involved played an important role in most scenarios except for incineration, while potential impact generated from transport, infrastructure and energy consumption were quite small. In addition, in the global warming category, highest potential impact was observed in landfill because of the direct methane gas emissions. Electricity recovery from methane gas was the key factor for reducing the potential impact of global warming. Therefore, increasing the use of methane gas to recover electricity is highly recommended to reduce the adverse impact of landfills on the environment.

Hong Jinglan, E-mail: hongjing@sdu.edu.c [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Li Xiangzhi [Department of Pathology, University of Michigan, 1301 Catherine, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Zhaojie Cui [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

78

Energy conservation: policy issues and end-use scenarios of savings potential. Part 2. Tradeoffs of municipal solid-waste-processing alternatives  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to assess the comparative performance and advantages of the various garbage-processing or disposal (landfill) techniques, and to address the issue of large-scale recycling of waste material. Five general methods are discussed: close-in landfill, remote landfill, refuse-derived solid fuel (RDSF), pyrolysis, and incineration. The major issue at this time concerning municipal solid waste disposal is whether to continue with landfill as the primary method or to use some combination of source separation, resource recovery, and energy generation. The constraints surrounding this issue are capital and labor costs, technical feasibility, environmental impacts--especially air pollution--marketability of the derived energy and recycled resources, and public cooperation. (MCW)

Codina, R.; Langlois, C.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Waste management health risk assessment: A case study of a solid waste landfill in South Italy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated risk assessment study has been performed in an area within 5 km from a landfill that accepts non hazardous waste. The risk assessment was based on measured emissions and maximum chronic population exposure, for both children and adults, to contaminated air, some foods and soil. The toxic effects assessed were limited to the main known carcinogenic compounds emitted from landfills coming both from landfill gas torch combustion (e.g., dioxins, furans and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs) and from diffusive emissions (vinyl chloride monomer, VCM). Risk assessment has been performed both for carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic effects. Results indicate that cancer and non-cancer effects risk (hazard index, HI) are largely below the values accepted from the main international agencies (e.g., WHO, US EPA) and national legislation ( and ).

Davoli, E., E-mail: enrico.davoli@marionegri.i [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Environmental Health Sciences Department, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milano (Italy); Fattore, E.; Paiano, V.; Colombo, A.; Palmiotto, M. [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Environmental Health Sciences Department, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milano (Italy); Rossi, A.N.; Il Grande, M. [Progress S.r.l., Via Nicola A. Porpora 147, 20131 Milano (Italy); Fanelli, R. [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Environmental Health Sciences Department, Via Giuseppe La Masa 19, 20156 Milano (Italy)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

EA-0767: Construction and Experiment of an Industrial Solid Waste Landfill  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

767: Construction and Experiment of an Industrial Solid Waste 767: Construction and Experiment of an Industrial Solid Waste Landfill at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio EA-0767: Construction and Experiment of an Industrial Solid Waste Landfill at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a solid waste landfill within the boundary at the U.S. Department of Energy's Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion plant in Piketon, Ohio. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD October 25, 1995 EA-0767: Finding of No Significant Impact Construction and Experiment of an Industrial Solid Waste Landfill at Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant October 25, 1995 EA-0767: Final Environmental Assessment

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "municipal waste landfill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A summary of the report on prospects for pyrolysis technologies in managing municipal, industrial, and Department of Energy cleanup wastes  

SciTech Connect

Pyrolysis converts portions of municipal solid wastes, hazardous wastes and special wastes such as tires, medical wastes and even old landfills into solid carbon and a liquid or gaseous hydrocarbon stream. In the past twenty years, advances in the engineering of pyrolysis systems and in sorting and feeding technologies for solid waste industries have ensured consistent feedstocks and system performance. Some vendors now offer complete pyrolysis systems with performance warranties. This report analyzes the potential applications of pyrolysis in the Long Island region and evaluates the four most promising pyrolytic systems for their readiness, applicability to regional waste management needs and conformity with DOE environmental restoration and waste management requirements. This summary characterizes the engineering performance, environmental effects, costs, product applications and markets for these pyrolysis systems.

Reaven, S.J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Wasting Time : a leisure infrastructure for mega-landfill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Landfills are consolidating into fewer, taller, and more massive singular objects in the exurban landscape.This thesis looks at one instance in Virginia, the first regional landfill in the state to accept trash from New ...

Nguyen, Elizabeth M. (Elizabeth Margaret)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Comprehensive Municipal Solid Waste Management, Resource Recovery, and Conservation Act (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act encourages the establishment of regional waste management facilities and the cooperation of local waste management entities in order to streamline the management of municipal solid waste...

84

Conversion of municipal solid waste to hydrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

LLNL and Texaco are cooperatively developing a physical and chemical treatment method for the conversion of municipal solid waste (MSW) to hydrogen via the steps of hydrothermal pretreatment, gasification and purification. LLNL`s focus has been on hydrothermal pretreatment of MSW in order to prepare a slurry of suitable viscosity and heating value to allow efficient and economical gasification and hydrogen production. The project has evolved along 3 parallel paths: laboratory scale experiments, pilot scale processing, and process modeling. Initial laboratory-scale MSW treatment results (e.g., viscosity, slurry solids content) over a range of temperatures and times with newspaper and plastics will be presented. Viscosity measurements have been correlated with results obtained at MRL. A hydrothermal treatment pilot facility has been rented from Texaco and is being reconfigured at LLNL; the status of that facility and plans for initial runs will be described. Several different operational scenarios have been modeled. Steady state processes have been modeled with ASPEN PLUS; consideration of steam injection in a batch mode was handled using continuous process modules. A transient model derived from a general purpose packed bed model is being developed which can examine the aspects of steam heating inside the hydrothermal reactor vessel. These models have been applied to pilot and commercial scale scenarios as a function of MSW input parameters and have been used to outline initial overall economic trends. Part of the modeling, an overview of the MSW gasification process and the modeling of the MSW as a process material, was completed by a DOE SERS (Science and Engineering Research Semester) student. The ultimate programmatic goal is the technical demonstration of the gasification of MSW to hydrogen at the laboratory and pilot scale and the economic analysis of the commercial feasibility of such a process.

Richardson, J.H.; Rogers, R.S.; Thorsness, C.B. [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Stochastic modelling of landfill leachate and biogas production incorporating waste heterogeneity. Model formulation and uncertainty analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mathematical model simulating the hydrological and biochemical processes occurring in landfilled waste is presented and demonstrated. The model combines biochemical and hydrological models into an integrated representation of the landfill environment. Waste decomposition is modelled using traditional biochemical waste decomposition pathways combined with a simplified methodology for representing the rate of decomposition. Water flow through the waste is represented using a statistical velocity model capable of representing the effects of waste heterogeneity on leachate flow through the waste. Given the limitations in data capture from landfill sites, significant emphasis is placed on improving parameter identification and reducing parameter requirements. A sensitivity analysis is performed, highlighting the model's response to changes in input variables. A model test run is also presented, demonstrating the model capabilities. A parameter perturbation model sensitivity analysis was also performed. This has been able to show that although the model is sensitive to certain key parameters, its overall intuitive response provides a good basis for making reasonable predictions of the future state of the landfill system. Finally, due to the high uncertainty associated with landfill data, a tool for handling input data uncertainty is incorporated in the model's structure. It is concluded that the model can be used as a reasonable tool for modelling landfill processes and that further work should be undertaken to assess the model's performance.

Zacharof, A.I.; Butler, A.P

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Phytostabilization of a landfill containing coal combustion waste.  

SciTech Connect

The establishment of a vegetative cover to enhance evapotranspiration and control runoff and drainage was examined as a method for stabilizing a landfill containing coal combustion waste. Suitable plant species and pretreatment techniques in the form of amendments, tilling, and chemical stabilization were evaluated. A randomized plot design consisting of three subsurface treatments (blocks) and five surface amendments (treatments) was implemented. The three blocks included (1) ripping and compost amended, (2) ripping only, and (3) control. Surface treatments included (1) topsoil, (2) fly ash, (3) compost, (4) apatite, and (5) control. Inoculated loblolly (Pinus taeda) and Virginia (Pinus virginiana) pine trees were planted on each plot. After three growing seasons, certain treatments were shown to be favorable for the establishment of vegetation on the basin. Seedlings located on block A developed a rooting system that penetrated into the basin media without significant adverse effects to the plant. However, seedlings on blocks B and C displayed poor rooting conditions and high mortality, regardless of surface treatment. Pore-water samples from lysimeters in block C were characterized by high acidity, Fe, Mn, Al, sulfate, and traceelement concentrations. Water-quality characteristics of the topsoil plots in block A, however, conformed to regulatory protocols. A decrease in soil-moisture content was observed in the rooting zone of plots that were successfully revegetated, which suggests that the trees, in combination with the surface treatments, influenced the water balance by facilitating water loss through transpiration and thereby reducing the likelihood of unwanted surface runoff and/or drainage effluent.

Barton, Christopher; Marx, Donald; Adriano, Domy; Koo, Bon Jun; Newman, Lee; Czapka, Stephen; Blake, John

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Sustainable recycling of municipal solid waste in developing countries  

SciTech Connect

This research focuses on recycling in developing countries as one form of sustainable municipal solid waste management (MSWM). Twenty-three case studies provided municipal solid waste (MSW) generation and recovery rates and composition for compilation and assessment. The average MSW generation rate was 0.77 kg/person/day, with recovery rates from 5-40%. The waste streams of 19 of these case studies consisted of 0-70% recyclables and 17-80% organics. Qualitative analysis of all 23 case studies identified barriers or incentives to recycling, which resulted in the development of factors influencing recycling of MSW in developing countries. The factors are government policy, government finances, waste characterization, waste collection and segregation, household education, household economics, MSWM (municipal solid waste management) administration, MSWM personnel education, MSWM plan, local recycled-material market, technological and human resources, and land availability. Necessary and beneficial relationships drawn among these factors revealed the collaborative nature of sustainable MSWM. The functionality of the factor relationships greatly influenced the success of sustainable MSWM. A correlation existed between stakeholder involvement and the three dimensions of sustainability: environment, society, and economy. The only factors driven by all three dimensions (waste collection and segregation, MSWM plan, and local recycled-material market) were those requiring the greatest collaboration with other factors.

Troschinetz, Alexis M. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Sustainable Futures Institute, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Dr., Houghton, MI 49931 (United States)], E-mail: alexis_troschinetz@yahoo.com; Mihelcic, James R. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Sustainable Futures Institute, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Dr., Houghton, MI 49931 (United States)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

88

Public health assessment for Seattle Municipal Landfill/Kent Highlands, Kent, King County, Washington, Region 10. Cerclis No. WAD980639462. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Seattle Municipal Landfill, better known as the Kent Highlands Landfill, is located in the City of Kent, approximately 14 miles south of the City of Seattle, Washington, at 23076 Military Road South. Surface water settling ponds, a leachate collection system, and gas collection system have been constructed. Only one completed pathway exists, which is the use of Midway Creek by recreationists. However, worst case scenarios were evaluated and there did not appear to be a human health threat. Two potential pathways were analyzed, for landfill gas and ground water. Again the worst case scenarios did not reveal any imminent human health threat.

1994-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

89

Landfill Gas Sequestration in Kansas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Road Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26505-0880 304-285-4132 Heino.beckert@netl.doe.gov David newell Principal Investigator Kansas Geological Survey 1930 Constant Avenue Lawrence, KS 66045 785-864-2183 dnewall@kgs.uk.edu LandfiLL Gas sequestration in Kansas Background Municipal solid waste landfills are the largest source of anthropogenic methane emissions in the United States, accounting for about 34 percent of these emissions in 2004. Most methane (CH 4 ) generated in landfills and open dumps by anaerobic decomposition of the organic material in solid-waste-disposal landfills is either vented to the atmosphere or converted to carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) by flaring. The gas consists of about 50 percent methane (CH 4 ), the primary component of natural gas, about 50 percent carbon dioxide (CO

90

Revaluing waste in New York City : planning for small-scale compost; Planning for small-scale compost.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??One-third of the municipal solid waste stream is organic material that, when processed in landfills, produces methane, a highly potent greenhouse gas. Composting is a… (more)

Neilson, Sarah (Sarah Jane)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Co-gasification of municipal solid waste and material recovery in a large-scale gasification and melting system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study evaluates the effects of co-gasification of MSW with MSW bottom ash. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No significant difference between MSW treatment with and without MSW bottom ash. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCDD/DFs yields are significantly low because of the high carbon conversion ratio. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Slag quality is significantly stable and slag contains few hazardous heavy metals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The final landfill amount is reduced and materials are recovered by DMS process. - Abstract: This study evaluates the effects of co-gasification of municipal solid waste with and without the municipal solid waste bottom ash using two large-scale commercial operation plants. From the viewpoint of operation data, there is no significant difference between municipal solid waste treatment with and without the bottom ash. The carbon conversion ratios are as high as 91.7% and 95.3%, respectively and this leads to significantly low PCDD/DFs yields via complete syngas combustion. The gross power generation efficiencies are 18.9% with the bottom ash and 23.0% without municipal solid waste bottom ash, respectively. The effects of the equivalence ratio are also evaluated. With the equivalence ratio increasing, carbon monoxide concentration is decreased, and carbon dioxide and the syngas temperature (top gas temperature) are increased. The carbon conversion ratio is also increased. These tendencies are seen in both modes. Co-gasification using the gasification and melting system (Direct Melting System) has a possibility to recover materials effectively. More than 90% of chlorine is distributed in fly ash. Low-boiling-point heavy metals, such as lead and zinc, are distributed in fly ash at rates of 95.2% and 92.0%, respectively. Most of high-boiling-point heavy metals, such as iron and copper, are distributed in metal. It is also clarified that slag is stable and contains few harmful heavy metals such as lead. Compared with the conventional waste management framework, 85% of the final landfill amount reduction is achieved by co-gasification of municipal solid waste with bottom ash and incombustible residues. These results indicate that the combined production of slag with co-gasification of municipal solid waste with the bottom ash constitutes an ideal approach to environmental conservation and resource recycling.

Tanigaki, Nobuhiro, E-mail: tanigaki.nobuhiro@nsc-eng.co.jp [Nippon Steel Engineering Co., Ltd. (Head Office), Osaki Center Building 1-5-1, Osaki, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 141-8604 (Japan); Manako, Kazutaka [Nippon Steel Engineering Co., Ltd., 46-59, Nakabaru, Tobata-ku, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 804-8505 (Japan); Osada, Morihiro [Nippon Steel Engineering Co., Ltd. (Head Office), Osaki Center Building 1-5-1, Osaki, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 141-8604 (Japan)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

A comparison of municipal solid waste management in Berlin and Singapore  

SciTech Connect

A comparative analysis of municipal solid waste management (MSWM) in Singapore and Berlin was carried out in order to identify its current status, and highlight the prevailing conditions of MSWM. An overview of the various aspects of MSWM in these two cities is provided, with emphasis on comparing the legal, technical, and managerial aspects of MSW. Collection systems and recycling practiced with respect to the involvement of the government and the private sector, are also presented. Over last two decades, the city of Berlin has made impressive progress with respect to its waste management. The amounts of waste have declined significantly, and at the same time the proportion that could be recovered and recycled has increased. In contrast, although Singapore's recycling rate has been increasing over the past few years, rapid economic and population growth as well as change in consumption patterns in this city-state has caused waste generation to continue to increase. Landfilling of MSW plays minor role in both cities, one due to geography (Singapore) and the other due to legislative prohibition (Berlin). Consequently, both in Singapore and Berlin, waste is increasingly being used as a valuable resource and great efforts have been made for the development of incineration technology and energy recovery, as well as climate protection.

Zhang Dongqing, E-mail: dqzhang@ntu.edu.s [DHI-NTU Centre, Nanyang Environment and Water Research Institute, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Keat, Tan Soon [Maritime Research Centre, School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Gersberg, Richard M. [Graduate School of Public Health, San Diego State University, Hardy Tower 119, 5500 Campanile, San Diego CA 92182-4162 (United States)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

Combustion of municipal solid wastes with oil shale in a circulating fluidized bed. Quarterly report, quarter ending December 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate that cocombustion of municipal solid waste and oil shale can reduce emissions of gaseous pollutants (SO{sub 2} and HCl) to acceptable levels. Tests in 6- and 15-inch units showed that the oil shale absorbs acid gas pollutants and produces an ash which could be, at the least, disposed of in a normal landfill. Further analysis of the results are underway to estimate scale-up to commercial size. Additional work will be done to evaluate the cementitious properties of oil shale ash.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Municipal solid waste to electricity in Bangkok, Thailand (prefeasibility study)  

SciTech Connect

Recognizing the problem of municipal waste disposal in Bangkok and the potential for energy recovery, the Royal Government of Thailand requested the US Trade and Development Program (TDP) to provide assistance in conducting an initial assessment of the potential options for managing Bangkok's waste disposal problem. Before undertaking a detailed feasibility study of a relatively attractive option for municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal in Bangkok, the Thai government wanted to determine whether a project for waste disposal and energy recovery could be developed with the involvement of the private sector such that over time the project could be totally owned and operated in the private domain. In response to the request made by the National Energy Administration (NEA) and Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (BMA), TDP asked Engineering and Economics Research Inc. (EER) to send a team of consultants to conduct a definitional study to make a preliminary assessment of a municipal waste solid disposal system which recovers energy in conjunction with the treatment/disposal of waste in an environmentally safe manner. The consultants visited Thailand for a period of 3 weeks and worked with officials from NEA and BMA.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Municipal solid waste management in Malaysia: Practices and challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rapid economic development and population growth, inadequate infrastructure and expertise, and land scarcity make the management of municipal solid waste become one of Malaysia's most critical environmental issues. The study is aimed at evaluating the generation, characteristics, and management of solid waste in Malaysia based on published information. In general, the per capita generation rate is about 0.5-0.8 kg/person/day in which domestic waste is the primary source. Currently, solid waste is managed by the Ministry of Housing and Local Government, with the participation of the private sector. A new institutional and legislation framework has been structured with the objectives to establish a holistic, integrated, and cost-effective solid waste management system, with an emphasis on environmental protection and public health. Therefore, the hierarchy of solid waste management has given the highest priority to source reduction through 3R, intermediate treatment and final disposal.

Manaf, Latifah Abd [Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Environmental Studies, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)], E-mail: latifah@env.upm.my; Samah, Mohd Armi Abu; Zukki, Nur Ilyana Mohd [Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Environmental Studies, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

Landfill Gas-to-Electricity Demonstration Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Medium Btu methane gas is a naturally occurring byproduct of anaerobic digestion of landfilled municipal solid waste. The energy potential of landfill gas in New York State is estimated to be 61 trillion Btu's per year or the equivalent of 10% of the natural gas used annually in the state. The 18-month Landfill Gas-to-Electricity Demonstration Project conducted at the Fresh Kills Landfill in Staten Island, New York conclusively demonstrated that landfill gas is an acceptable fuel for producing electricity using an internal combustion engine/generator set. Landfill gas proved to be a reliable and consistent fuel source during a six-month field test program. Engine exhaust emissions were determined to be comparable to that of natural gas and no unusually high corrosion rates on standard pipeline material were found.

Not Available

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

The impact of municipal solid waste treatment methods on greenhouse gas emissions in Lahore, Pakistan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The contribution of existing municipal solid waste management to emission of greenhouse gases and the alternative scenarios to reduce emissions were analyzed for Data Ganj Bukhsh Town (DGBT) in Lahore, Pakistan using the life cycle assessment methodology. DGBT has a population of 1,624,169 people living in 232,024 dwellings. Total waste generated is 500,000 tons per year with an average per capita rate of 0.84 kg per day. Alternative scenarios were developed and evaluated according to the environmental, economic, and social atmosphere of the study area. Solid waste management options considered include the collection and transportation of waste, collection of recyclables with single and mixed material bank container systems (SMBCS, MMBCS), material recovery facilities (MRF), composting, biogasification and landfilling. A life cycle inventory (LCI) of the six scenarios along with the baseline scenario was completed; this helped to quantify the CO{sub 2} equivalents, emitted and avoided, for energy consumption, production, fuel consumption, and methane (CH{sub 4}) emissions. LCI results showed that the contribution of the baseline scenario to the global warming potential as CO{sub 2} equivalents was a maximum of 838,116 tons. The sixth scenario had a maximum reduction of GHG emissions in terms of CO{sub 2} equivalents of -33,773 tons, but the most workable scenario for the current situation in the study area is scenario 5. It saves 25% in CO{sub 2} equivalents compared to the baseline scenario.

Batool, Syeda Adila [Department of Space Science, Punjab University, Lahore 54600 (Pakistan)], E-mail: aadila_batool@yahoo.com; Chuadhry, Muhammad Nawaz [College of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of the Punjab, Lahore (Pakistan)], E-mail: muhammadnawazchaudhry@yahoo.com

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

Toxicity characteristic leaching procedure fails to extract oxoanion-forming elements that are extracted by municipal solid waste leachates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

US EPA and state regulatory agencies rely on standard extraction tests to identify wastes that have the potential to contaminate surface water or groundwater. To evaluate the predictive abilities of these extraction tests, the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), the Waste Extraction Test (WET), and the Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure (SPLP) were compared with actual municipal solid waste leachates (MSWLs) for their ability to extract regulated elements from a variety of industrial solid wastes in short- and long-term extractions. Short-term extractions used MSWLs from a variety of California landfills. Long-term sequential extractions simulated longer term leaching, as might occur in MSW landfills. For most regulated elements, the TCLP roughly predicted the maximum concentrations extracted by the MSWLs. For regulated elements that form oxoanions (e.g., Sb, As, Mo, Se, V), however the TCLP underpredicted the levels extracted by the MSWL. None of the standard tests adequately predicted these levels. The results emphasize the need for better standardized techniques to identify wastes that have the potential to contaminate groundwater with oxoanion-forming elements, particularly arsenic.

Hooper, K.; Iskander, M.; Sivia, G. [California Dept. of Toxic Substances Control, Berkeley, CA (United States). Hazardous Materials Lab.] [and others

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

CCA-Treated wood disposed in landfills and life-cycle trade-offs with waste-to-energy and MSW landfill disposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) regulations, it produces energy and does not emit fossil carbonCCA-Treated wood disposed in landfills and life-cycle trade-offs with waste-to-energy and MSW in waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities. In other countries, the predominant disposal option for wood

Florida, University of

100

Fuzzy multicriteria disposal method and site selection for municipal solid waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of fuzzy multiple criteria analysis (MCA) in solid waste management has the advantage of rendering subjective and implicit decision making more objective and analytical, with its ability to accommodate both quantitative and qualitative data. In this paper a modified fuzzy TOPSIS methodology is proposed for the selection of appropriate disposal method and site for municipal solid waste (MSW). Our method is superior to existing methods since it has capability of representing vague qualitative data and presenting all possible results with different degrees of membership. In the first stage of the proposed methodology, a set of criteria of cost, reliability, feasibility, pollution and emission levels, waste and energy recovery is optimized to determine the best MSW disposal method. Landfilling, composting, conventional incineration, and refuse-derived fuel (RDF) combustion are the alternatives considered. The weights of the selection criteria are determined by fuzzy pairwise comparison matrices of Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP). It is found that RDF combustion is the best disposal method alternative for Istanbul. In the second stage, the same methodology is used to determine the optimum RDF combustion plant location using adjacent land use, climate, road access and cost as the criteria. The results of this study illustrate the importance of the weights on the various factors in deciding the optimized location, with the best site located in Catalca. A sensitivity analysis is also conducted to monitor how sensitive our model is to changes in the various criteria weights.

Ekmekcioglu, Mehmet, E-mail: meceng3584@yahoo.co [Istanbul Technical University, Department of Management Engineering, 34367 Macka, Istanbul (Turkey); Kaya, Tolga [Istanbul Technical University, Department of Management Engineering, 34367 Macka, Istanbul (Turkey); Kahraman, Cengiz [Istanbul Technical University, Department of Industrial Engineering, 34367 Macka, Istanbul (Turkey)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "municipal waste landfill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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101

Mixed waste landfill cell construction at energy solutions LLC: a regulator's perspective  

SciTech Connect

A small percentage of the property that EnergySolutions' (formerly Envirocare) operates at Clive, Utah is permitted by the State of Utah as a treatment, storage and disposal facility for mixed waste. Mixed Waste is defined as a hazardous waste (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 261.3) that also has a radioactive component. Typically, the waste EnergySolutions receives at its mixed waste facility is contaminated with heavy metals and organic compounds while also contaminated with radioactivity. For EnergySolutions, the largest generator of mixed waste is the United States Department of Energy. However, EnergySolutions also accepts a wide variety of mixed waste from other generators. For many wastes, EnergySolutions goes through the process of characterization and acceptance (if appropriate) of the waste, treating the waste (if necessary), confirmation that the waste meets Land Disposal Restriction, and disposal of the waste in its mixed waste landfill cell (MWLC). EnergySolutions originally received its State-issued Part B (RCRA) permit in 1990. The Permit allows a mixed waste landfill cell footprint that covers roughly 10 hectares and includes 20 individual 'sumps'. EnergySolutions chose to build small segments of the landfill cell as waste receipts dictated. Nearly 16 years later, EnergySolutions has just completed its Phase V construction project. 18 of the 20 sumps in the original design have been constructed. The last two sumps are anticipated to be its Phase VI construction project. Further expansion of its mixed waste disposal landfill capacity beyond the current design would require a permit modification request and approval by the Executive Secretary of the Utah Solid and Hazardous Waste Control Board. Construction of the landfill cell is governed by the Construction Quality Assurance/Quality Control manual of its State-issued Permit. The construction of each sump is made up of (from the bottom up): a foundation; three feet of engineered clay; primary and secondary geo-synthetics (60 mil HDPE, geo-fabric and geo-textile); a two foot soil protective cover; tertiary geo-synthetics (80 mil HDPE, geo-fabric and geo-textile); and a final two foot soil protective cover. The Utah Department of Environmental Quality Division of Solid and Hazardous Waste (UDEQ/DSHW) oversees the construction process and reviews the documentation after the construction is complete. If all aspects of the construction process are met, the Executive Secretary of the Utah Solid and Hazardous Waste Control Board approves the landfill cell for disposal. It is the role of the regulator to ensure to the stakeholders that the landfill cell has been constructed in accordance with the State-issued permit and that the cell is protective of human health and the environment. A final determination may require conflict resolution between the agency and the facility. (authors)

Lukes, G.C.; Willoughby, O.H. [Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Div. of Solid and Hazardous Waste (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Co-firing coal and municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this study was to experimentally investigate how different the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) or municipal solid waste (MSW) utilizing strategies affects the gas emission in simple fluidized bed combustion (FBC) of biomass. In this study, ground OFMSW and pulverized coal (PC) were used for co-firing tests. The tests were carried out in a bench-scale bubbling FBC. Coal and bio-waste fuels are quite different in composition. Ash composition of the bio-waste fuels is fundamentally different from ash composition of the coal. Chlorine (Cl) in the MSW may affect operation by corrosion. Ash deposits reduce heat transfer and also may result in severe corrosion at high temperatures. Nitrogen (N) and carbon ) assessments can play an important role in a strategy to control carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions while raising revenue. Regulations such as subsidies for oil, liquid petroleum gas (LPG) for natural gas powered vehicles, and renewables, especially biomass lines, to reduce emissions may be more cost-effective than assessments. Research and development (RD) resources are driven by energy policy goals and can change the competitiveness of renewables, especially solid waste. The future supply of co-firing depends on energy prices and technical progress, both of which are driven by energy policy priorities.

Demirbas, A. [Sila Science, Trabzon (Turkey)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Municipal solid waste combustion: Fuel testing and characterization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to screen and characterize potential biomass fuels from waste streams. This will be accomplished by determining the types of pollutants produced while burning selected municipal waste, i.e., commercial mixed waste paper residential (curbside) mixed waste paper, and refuse derived fuel. These materials will be fired alone and in combination with wood, equal parts by weight. The data from these experiments could be utilized to size pollution control equipment required to meet emission standards. This document provides detailed descriptions of the testing methods and evaluation procedures used in the combustion testing and characterization project. The fuel samples will be examined thoroughly from the raw form to the exhaust emissions produced during the combustion test of a densified sample.

Bushnell, D.J.; Canova, J.H.; Dadkhah-Nikoo, A.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Evaluating the efficiency of municipalities in collecting and processing municipal solid waste: A shared input DEA-model  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Complexity in local waste management calls for more in depth efficiency analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Shared-input Data Envelopment Analysis can provide solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Considerable room for the Flemish municipalities to improve their cost efficiency. - Abstract: This paper proposed an adjusted 'shared-input' version of the popular efficiency measurement technique Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) that enables evaluating municipality waste collection and processing performances in settings in which one input (waste costs) is shared among treatment efforts of multiple municipal solid waste fractions. The main advantage of this version of DEA is that it not only provides an estimate of the municipalities overall cost efficiency but also estimates of the municipalities' cost efficiency in the treatment of the different fractions of municipal solid waste (MSW). To illustrate the practical usefulness of the shared input DEA-model, we apply the model to data on 293 municipalities in Flanders, Belgium, for the year 2008.

Rogge, Nicky, E-mail: Nicky.Rogge@hubrussel.be [Hogeschool-Universiteit Brussel (HUBrussel), Center for Business Management Research (CBMR), Warmoesberg 26, 1000 Brussels (Belgium); Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (KULeuven), Faculty of Business and Economics, Naamsestraat 69, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); De Jaeger, Simon [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (KULeuven), Faculty of Business and Economics, Naamsestraat 69, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Hogeschool-Universiteit Brussel (HUBrussel), Center for Economics and Corporate Sustainability (CEDON), Warmoesberg 26, 1000 Brussels (Belgium)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

105

Recovery Act: Johnston Rhode Island Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill in Johnston, Rhode Island. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives. 1) Meet environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas. 2) Utilize proven and reliable technology and equipment. 3) Maximize electrical efficiency. 4) Maximize electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill. 5) Maximize equipment uptime. 6) Minimize water consumption. 7) Minimize post-combustion emissions. To achieve the Project Objective the project consisted of several components. 1) The landfill gas collection system was modified and upgraded. 2) A State-of-the Art gas clean up and compression facility was constructed. 3) A high pressure pipeline was constructed to convey cleaned landfill gas from the clean-up and compression facility to the power plant. 4) A combined cycle electric generating facility was constructed consisting of combustion turbine generator sets, heat recovery steam generators and a steam turbine. 5) The voltage of the electricity produced was increased at a newly constructed transformer/substation and the electricity was delivered to the local transmission system. The Project produced a myriad of beneficial impacts. 1) The Project created 453 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 25 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. 2) By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). 3) The Project will annually produce 365,292 MWh?s of clean energy. 4) By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO{sub 2} equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 28.3 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Galowitz, Stephen

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

106

Quantification of greenhouse gas emissions from waste management processes for municipalities - A comparative review focusing on Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The amount of greenhouse gases (GHG) emitted due to waste management in the cities of developing countries is predicted to rise considerably in the near future; however, these countries have a series of problems in accounting and reporting these gases. Some of these problems are related to the status quo of waste management in the developing world and some to the lack of a coherent framework for accounting and reporting of greenhouse gases from waste at municipal level. This review summarizes and compares GHG emissions from individual waste management processes which make up a municipal waste management system, with an emphasis on developing countries and, in particular, Africa. It should be seen as a first step towards developing a more holistic GHG accounting model for municipalities. The comparison between these emissions from developed and developing countries at process level, reveals that there is agreement on the magnitude of the emissions expected from each process (generation of waste, collection and transport, disposal and recycling). The highest GHG savings are achieved through recycling, and these savings would be even higher in developing countries which rely on coal for energy production (e.g. South Africa, India and China) and where non-motorized collection and transport is used. The highest emissions are due to the methane released by dumpsites and landfills, and these emissions are predicted to increase significantly, unless more of the methane is captured and either flared or used for energy generation. The clean development mechanism (CDM) projects implemented in the developing world have made some progress in this field; however, African countries lag behind.

Friedrich, Elena, E-mail: Friedriche@ukzn.ac.za [CRECHE Centre for Research in Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, School of Civil Engineering, Surveying and Construction, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Howard College Campus, Durban (South Africa); Trois, Cristina [CRECHE Centre for Research in Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, School of Civil Engineering, Surveying and Construction, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Howard College Campus, Durban (South Africa)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

Methodology for Allocating Municipal Solid Waste to Biogenic and Non-Biogenic Energy  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report summarizes the methodology used to split the heat content of municipal solid waste (MSW) into its biogenic and non-biogenic shares.

Marie LaRiviere

2007-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

108

Monitoring Data from the Chemical Waste Landfill, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico (2003 - 2006)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL) was a 1.9 acre site used from 1962 until 1985 for disposal of chemical wastes. The wastes were generated by research at Sandia's laboratories. The excavation of the CWL and the removal of 2000 intact chemical containers was completed safely and successfully. Contaminated soils were also removed for treatment or disposal. An "in-site" chemiresistor sensor was developed for the project that provided continuous monitoring of volatile organic compounds in the air, soil, and water. The monitoring data, collected from March, 2003 through April, 2006 is summarized and presented at this website.

Ho, Cliff (Sandia National Laboratories)

109

LCA comparison of container systems in municipal solid waste management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The planning and design of integrated municipal solid waste management (MSWM) systems requires accurate environmental impact evaluation of the systems and their components. This research assessed, quantified and compared the environmental impact of the first stage of the most used MSW container systems. The comparison was based on factors such as the volume of the containers, from small bins of 60-80 l to containers of 2400 l, and on the manufactured materials, steel and high-density polyethylene (HDPE). Also, some parameters such as frequency of collections, waste generation, filling percentage and waste container contents, were established to obtain comparable systems. The methodological framework of the analysis was the life cycle assessment (LCA), and the impact assessment method was based on CML 2 baseline 2000. Results indicated that, for the same volume, the collection systems that use HDPE waste containers had more of an impact than those using steel waste containers, in terms of abiotic depletion, global warming, ozone layer depletion, acidification, eutrophication, photochemical oxidation, human toxicity and terrestrial ecotoxicity. Besides, the collection systems using small HDPE bins (60 l or 80 l) had most impact while systems using big steel containers (2400 l) had less impact. Subsequent sensitivity analysis about the parameters established demonstrated that they could change the ultimate environmental impact of each waste container collection system, but that the comparative relationship between systems was similar.

Rives, Jesus, E-mail: Jesus.Rives@uab.ca [SosteniPrA (UAB-IRTA), Institute of Environmental Science and Technology (ICTA), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona - UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Rieradevall, Joan; Gabarrell, Xavier [SosteniPrA (UAB-IRTA), Institute of Environmental Science and Technology (ICTA), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona - UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Department of Chemical Engineering, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona - UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

Modelling integrated waste management system of the Czech Republic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper is devoted to environmental modelling, particularly modelling of Integrated Municipal Solid Waste Management Systems at the Czech Republic (IMSWMS). There are considered input macroeconomic variables (landfills fees, price of electricity, tax ... Keywords: environmental modelling, integrated waste management system, municipal solid waste, waste management modelling

Jiri Hrebicek; Jana Soukopova

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

RD & D priorities for energy production and resource conservation from municipal solid waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report identifies research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) needs and priorities associated with municipal solid waste (MSW) management technologies that conserve or produce energy or resources. The changing character of MSW waste management and the public`s heightened awareness of its real and perceived benefits and costs creates opportunities for RD&D in MSW technologies. Increased recycling, for example, creates new opportunities for energy, chemicals, and materials recovery. New technologies to control and monitor emissions from MSW combustion facilities are available for further improvement or application. Furthermore, emerging waste-to-energy technologies may offer environmental, economic, and other advantages. Given these developments, DOE identified a need to assess the RD&D needs and pdodties and carefully target RD&D efforts to help solve the carbon`s waste management problem and further the National Energy Strategy. This report presents such an assessment. It identifies and Documents RD&D needs and priorities in the broad area of MSW resource . recovery, focusing on efforts to make MSW management technologies commercially viable or to improve their commercial deployment over a 5 to l0 year period. Panels of technical experts identifies 279 RD&D needs in 12 technology areas, ranking about one-fifth of these needs as priorities. A ``Peer Review Group`` identified mass-burn combustion, ``systems studies,`` landfill gas, and ash utilization and disposal as high priority areas for RD&D based on cost and the impacts of further RD&D. The results of this assessment are intended to provide guidance to DOE concerning possible future RD&D projects.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Municipal waste water as a source of cooling water for California electric power plants. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses sources of municipal waste water for potential use as cooling water in California power plants. It notes the major factors which affect this practice. Municipal treatment facilities in California with discharge volumes deemed adequate to supply new power plants are identified. Also included is a summary of the experiences of several utilities in California and other western states with existing or planned applications of municipal waste water in power plant cooling towers.

MacDonald, T.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Health assessment for 19th Avenue Landfill National Priorities List (NPL) Site, Phoenix, Maricopa County, Arizona, Region 9. CERCLIS No. AZD980496780. Preliminary report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 19th Avenue Landfill is an National Priorities List site located in Maricopa County, Phoenix, Arizona. The site was operated as a sanitary landfill between 1957 and 1979. Most of the waste disposed of at the landfill was from municipal sources; however, old gasoline storage tanks, radioactive waste, hospital waste, industrial waste, and old transformers were also landfilled. The site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of exposure to hazardous substances via ingestion, dermal contact, or inhalation of contaminants in subsurface soil and refuse, soil-gas, and air.

Not Available

1989-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

114

Study examining a DOE proposal to dispose of mixed low level waste at the Nevada test site using an alternative landfill design.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Department of Energy has set forth a proposal to use an Alternative Landfill Design (ALD) for the Mixed Low Level Waste disposal facility, in… (more)

Hart, Deborah

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Revaluing waste in New York City : planning for small-scale compost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One-third of the municipal solid waste stream is organic material that, when processed in landfills, produces methane, a highly potent greenhouse gas. Composting is a proven strategy for organic waste management, which ...

Neilson, Sarah (Sarah Jane)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Municipal waste incineration; An environmentally benign energy source for district heating  

SciTech Connect

Municipal solid waste should be regarded as a good fuel. Emissions from solid waste incineration can be kept within any reasonable limit. Compared with fossil fuels, waste can be regarded as a renewable source of energy that does not contribute to the greenhouse effect. Finally, waste incineration for district heating can be very economical.

Astrand, L.E. (Uppsala Energi AB, Uppsala (SE))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Process modeling of hydrogen production from municipal solid waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ASPEN PLUS commercial simulation software has been used to develop a process model for a conceptual process to convert municipal solid waste (MSW) to hydrogen. The process consists of hydrothermal treatment of the MSW in water to create a slurry suitable as feedstock for an oxygen blown Texaco gasifier. A method of reducing the complicated MSW feed material to a manageable set of components is outlined along with a framework for modeling the stoichiometric changes associated with the hydrothermal treatment process. Model results indicate that 0.672 kmol/s of hydrogen can be produced from the processing of 30 kg/s (2600 tonne/day) of raw MSW. A number of variations on the basic processing parameters are explored and indicate that there is a clear incentive to reduce the inert fraction in the processed slurry feed and that cofeeding a low value heavy oil may be economically attractive.

Thorsness, C.B.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Use of thermal analysis techniques (TG-DSC) for the characterization of diverse organic municipal waste streams to predict biological stability prior to land application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal analysis was used to assess stability and composition of organic matter in three diverse municipal waste streams. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results were compared with C mineralization during 90-day incubation, FTIR and {sup 13}C NMR. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal analysis reflected the differences between the organic wastes before and after the incubation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The calculated energy density showed a strong correlation with cumulative respiration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conventional and thermal methods provide complimentary means of characterizing organic wastes. - Abstract: The use of organic municipal wastes as soil amendments is an increasing practice that can divert significant amounts of waste from landfill, and provides a potential source of nutrients and organic matter to ameliorate degraded soils. Due to the high heterogeneity of organic municipal waste streams, it is difficult to rapidly and cost-effectively establish their suitability as soil amendments using a single method. Thermal analysis has been proposed as an evolving technique to assess the stability and composition of the organic matter present in these wastes. In this study, three different organic municipal waste streams (i.e., a municipal waste compost (MC), a composted sewage sludge (CS) and a thermally dried sewage sludge (TS)) were characterized using conventional and thermal methods. The conventional methods used to test organic matter stability included laboratory incubation with measurement of respired C, and spectroscopic methods to characterize chemical composition. Carbon mineralization was measured during a 90-day incubation, and samples before and after incubation were analyzed by chemical (elemental analysis) and spectroscopic (infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance) methods. Results were compared with those obtained by thermogravimetry (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques. Total amounts of CO{sub 2} respired indicated that the organic matter in the TS was the least stable, while that in the CS was the most stable. This was confirmed by changes detected with the spectroscopic methods in the composition of the organic wastes due to C mineralization. Differences were especially pronounced for TS, which showed a remarkable loss of aliphatic and proteinaceous compounds during the incubation process. TG, and especially DSC analysis, clearly reflected these differences between the three organic wastes before and after the incubation. Furthermore, the calculated energy density, which represents the energy available per unit of organic matter, showed a strong correlation with cumulative respiration. Results obtained support the hypothesis of a potential link between the thermal and biological stability of the studied organic materials, and consequently the ability of thermal analysis to characterize the maturity of municipal organic wastes and composts.

Fernandez, Jose M., E-mail: joseman@sas.upenn.edu [Department of Earth and Environmental Science, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6316 (United States); Plaza, Cesar; Polo, Alfredo [Instituto de Ciencias Agrarias, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 115 dpdo., 28006 Madrid (Spain); Plante, Alain F. [Department of Earth and Environmental Science, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6316 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

Use of ash from municipal solid waste combustion. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details the results of efforts to integrate municipal solid waste combustion ash into a high strength portland cement concrete matrix comprised of multiple waste materials. The material developed by this research was to be used to construct a large underground storage vault to house the Friendly Mobile Barrier, a safety barrier system for use at highway crossings for the high speed rail system. The subcontractor, Environmental Solutions, Inc., of Richmond, Virginia, worked with researchers at Pennsylvania State University and the State University of New York--Stony Brook to develop and test the material. The result of this work is a portland cement concrete matrix which utilizes 80.01% recycled materials, and a field-applicable method for incorporating MSW ash as a component at volumes up to 9.78%. Twenty-eight day strengths of over 4000 psi were achieved, with 315 day strengths of 6500 psi. All structural, chemical and environmental testing showed the material to be competitive with conventional concrete.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Solute transport under steady and transient conditions in biodegraded municipal solid waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The transport of a conservative tracer (lithium) in a large (3.5 m3) undisturbed municipal solid waste sample has been investigated under steady and fully transient conditions using a simple model. The model comprises a kinematic wave approximation for water movement, presented in a previous paper, and a strict convective solute flux law. The waste medium is conceptualized as a three-domain system consisting of a mobile domain (channels), an immobile fast domain, and an immobile slow domain. The mobile domain constitutes only a minor fraction of the medium, and the access to the major part of medium is constrained by diffusive transport. Thus the system is in a state of physical nonequilibrium. The fast immobile domain is the part of the matrix which surrounds the channels and forms the boundary between the channels and the matrix. Owing to its exposure to mobile water, which enhances the biodegradation process, this domain is assumed to be more porous and loose in its structure and therefore to respond faster to a change in solute concentration in the mobile domain compared to the regions deep inside the matrix. The diffusive mass exchange between the domains is modeled with two first-order mass transfer expressions coupled in series. Under transient conditions the system will also be in a state of hydraulic nonequilibrium. Hydraulic gradients build up between the channel domain and the matrix in response to the water input events. The gradients will govern a reversible flow and convective transport between the domains, here represented as a source/sink term in the governing equation. The model has been used to interpret and compare the results from a steady state experiment and an unsteady state experiment. By solely adjusting the size of the fraction of the immobile fast domain that is active in transferring solute, the model is capable of accurately reproducing the measured outflow breakthrough curves for both the steady and unsteady state experiments. During transient conditions the fraction of the immobile fast domain that is active in transferring solute is found to be about 65% larger than that under steady state conditions. It is therefore concluded that the water input pattern governs the size of the fraction of the immobile fast domain which, in turn, governs the solute residence time in the solid waste. It can be concluded that the contaminant transport process in landfills is likely to be in a state of both physical, hydraulic, and chemical nonequilibrium. The transport process for a conservative solute is here shown to be dominated by convective transport in the channels and a fast diffusive mass exchange with the surrounding matrix. This may imply that the observed leachate quality from landfills mainly reflects the biochemical conditions in these regions. The water input pattern is of great importance for the transport process since it governs the size of the fraction of the immobile fast domain which is active in transferring solute. This may be the reason for leachate quality to be seasonally or water flux dependent, which has been observed in several investigations. The result also has a significant practical implication for efforts to enhance the biodegradation process in landfills by recycling of the leachate.

Bendz, David; Singh, Vijay P.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "municipal waste landfill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Evaluation of mixing systems for biogasification of municipal solid waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two specially selected mixing systems were tested and evaluated to determine how effectively they could prevent the formation of fibrous mats and stringers during the anaerobic digestion of a slurried mixture of preprocessed municipal solid waste and sewage sludge to produce methane gas. The tests were conducted in a modified 10.7-m (35-ft) diameter, nominal 378,000-liter (100,000-gal) capacity concrete vessel in the Franklin, Ohio, environmental complex. Between August 1977 and September 1978, nine tests were conducted with 3:1 and 9:1 solid waste/sewage sludge ratios and with 4, 7, and 10 percent total solids in the feedstock. Though the microbial culture was healthy in most tests, the mixing systems were not effective in preventing excessive fibrous mat and stringer formations. These formations occurred because of the high cellulosic content of the feedstock. The test with the best energy recovery had a gas production of 805 liters/kg of volatile solids destroyed. However, the energy recovered was only 50 percent of the energy available in the solid waste, and only four times greater than the mixing energy expended for that test. The solids accumulations were generally the same for the two mixing systems when they had common test conditions. In all tests, the percent solids for the top level were higher than those for the middle and bottom levels. As the feed ratio and the percent solids in the feedstock were increased, this differential became progressively more pronounced. Moreover, the percent of volatile solids (in a given amount of total solids) for the top level became disproportionately higher than those for the other two levels.

Swartzbaugh, J T; Smith, R B

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

ETC/RWM working paper 2008/1 Municipal waste management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.............................................................................. 19 6. Modelling greenhouse gas emissions............................................................. 21 6.1. Greenhouse gas emissions as environmental indicatorETC/RWM working paper 2008/1 Municipal waste management and greenhouse gases Prepared by: Mette

123

COMPACTING BIOMASS AND MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTES TO FORM AND UPGRADED FUEL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass waste materials exist in large quantity in every city and in numerous industrial plants such as wood processing plants and waste paper collection centers. Through minimum processing, such waste materials can be turned into a solid fuel for combustion at existing coal-fired power plants. Use of such biomass fuel reduces the amount of coal used, and hence reduces the greenhouse effect and global warming, while at the same time it reduces the use of land for landfill and the associated problems. The carbon-dioxide resulting from burning biomass fuel is recycled through plant growth and hence does not contribute to global warming. Biomass fuel also contains little sulfur and hence does not contribute to acid rain problems. Notwithstanding the environmental desirability of using biomass waste materials, not much of them are used currently due to the need to densify the waste materials and the high cost of conventional methods of densification such as pelletizing and briquetting. The purpose of this project was to test a unique new method of biomass densification developed from recent research in coal log pipeline (CLP). The new method can produce large agglomerates of biomass materials called ''biomass logs'' which are more than 100 times larger and 30% denser than conventional ''pellets'' or ''briquettes''. The Phase I project was to perform extensive laboratory tests and an economic analysis to determine the technical and economic feasibility of the biomass log fuel (BLF). A variety of biomass waste materials, including wood processing residues such as sawdust, mulch and chips of various types of wood, combustibles that are found in municipal solid waste stream such as paper, plastics and textiles, energy crops including willows and switch grass, and yard waste including tree trimmings, fallen leaves, and lawn grass, were tested by using this new compaction technology developed at Capsule Pipeline Research Center (CPRC), University of Missouri-Columbia (MU). The compaction conditions, including compaction pressure, pressure holding time, back pressure, moisture content, particle size and shape, piston and mold geometry and roughness, and binder for the materials were studied and optimized. The properties of the compacted products--biomass logs--were evaluated in terms of physical, mechanical, and combustion characteristics. An economic analysis of this technology for anticipated future commercial operations was performed. It was found that the compaction pressure and the moisture content of the biomass materials are critical for producing high-quality biomass logs. For most biomass materials, dense and strong logs can be produced under room temperature without binder and at a pressure of 70 MPa (10,000 psi), approximately. A few types of the materials tested such as sawdust and grass need a minimum pressure of 100 MPa (15,000 psi) in order to produce good logs. The appropriate moisture range for compacting waste paper into good logs is 5-20%, and the optimum moisture is in the neighborhood of 13%. For the woody materials and yard waste, the appropriate moisture range is narrower: 5-13%, and the optimum is 8-9%. The compacted logs have a dry density of 0.8 to 1.0 g/cm{sup 3}, corresponding to a wet density of 0.9 to 1.1 g/cm{sup 3}, approximately. The logs have high strength and high resistance to impact and abrasion, but are feeble to water and hence need to be protected from water or rain. They also have good long-term performance under normal environmental conditions, and can be stored for a long time without significant deterioration. Such high-density and high-strength logs not only facilitate handling, transportation, and storage, but also increase the energy content of biomass per unit volume. After being transported to power plants and crushed, the biomass logs can be co-fired with coal to generate electricity.

Henry Liu; Yadong Li

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Materials and Energy Recovery from the Dry Stream of New York City's Municipal Solid Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from waste and significant reductions of material that must be sent to a landfill. 4.1.5 Co-Firing, another advantage of co-firing emerges. The addition of CS to coal in a power plant may lower some. Several plants in the United States have tried this combination with varying degrees of success. The co-firing

Columbia University

125

Hydrogen production by gasification of municipal solid waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As fossil fuel reserves run lower and lower, and as their continued widespread use leads toward numerous environmental problems, the need for clean and sustainable energy alternatives becomes ever clearer. Hydrogen fuel holds promise as such as energy source, as it burns cleanly and can be extracted from a number of renewable materials such as municipal solid waste (MSW), which can be considered largely renewable because of its high content of paper and biomass-derived products. A computer model is being developed using ASPEN Plus flow sheeting software to simulate a process which produces hydrogen gas from MSW; the model will later be used in studying the economics of this process and is based on an actual Texaco coal gasification plant design. This paper gives an overview of the complete MSW gasification process, and describes in detail the way in which MSW is modeled by the computer as a process material. In addition, details of the gasifier unit model are described; in this unit modified MSW reacts under pressure with oxygen and steam to form a mixture of gases which include hydrogen.

Rogers, R. III

1994-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

126

Biogas generation by two-phase anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The organic fraction of municipal solid waste can be a significant energy source for renewable energy generation. The total production of municipal solid waste in Turkey was 25?×?106 tones per year. Anaerobic digestion (AD) process may be a solution to the problems of energy demand and waste management since it provides biomethanation along with waste stabilization. AD can be operated in single or two phase configurations. Two-phase processes have some advantages over one phase systems in terms of selection of microorganisms

Eylem Dogan; Göksel N. Demirer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

LCA of local strategies for energy recovery from waste in England, applied to a large municipal flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An intense waste management (WM) planning activity is currently undergoing in England to build the infrastructure necessary to treat residual wastes, increase recycling levels and the recovery of energy from waste. From the analyses of local WM strategic and planning documents we have identified the emerging of three different energy recovery strategies: established combustion of residual waste; pre-treatment of residual waste and energy recovery from Solid Recovered Fuel in a dedicated plant, usually assumed to be a gasifier; pre-treatment of residual waste and reliance on the market to accept the 'fuel from waste' so produced. Each energy recovery strategy will result in a different solution in terms of the technology selected; moreover, on the basis of the favoured solution, the total number, scale and location of thermal treatment plants built in England will dramatically change. To support the evaluation and comparison of these three WM strategy in terms of global environmental impacts, energy recovery possibilities and performance with respect to changing 'fuel from waste' market conditions, the LCA comparison of eight alternative WM scenarios for a real case study dealing with a large flow of municipal wastes was performed with the modelling tool WRATE. The large flow of waste modelled allowed to formulate and assess realistic alternative WM scenarios and to design infrastructural systems which are likely to correspond to those submitted for approval to the local authorities. The results show that all alternative scenarios contribute to saving abiotic resources and reducing global warming potential. Particularly relevant to the current English debate, the performance of a scenario was shown to depend not from the thermal treatment technology but from a combination of parameters, among which most relevant are the efficiency of energy recovery processes (both electricity and heat) and the calorific value of residual waste and pre-treated material. The contribution and relative importance of recycling and treatment/recovery processes change with the impact category. The lack of reprocessing plants in the area of the case study has shown the relevance of transport distances for recyclate material in reducing the efficiency of a WM system. Highly relevant to the current English WM infrastructural debate, these results for the first time highlight the risk of a significant reduction in the energy that could be recovered by local WM strategies relying only on the market to dispose of the 'fuel from waste' in a non dedicated plant in the case that the SRF had to be sent to landfill for lack of treatment capacity.

Tunesi, Simonetta, E-mail: s.tunesi@ucl.ac.uk [Environment Institute, University College London, Pearson Building, Gower Street, WC1E 6BT London (United Kingdom)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

128

Integrating multi-criteria decision analysis for a GIS-based hazardous waste landfill sitting in Kurdistan Province, western Iran  

SciTech Connect

The evaluation of a hazardous waste disposal site is a complicated process because it requires data from diverse social and environmental fields. These data often involve processing of a significant amount of spatial information which can be used by GIS as an important tool for land use suitability analysis. This paper presents a multi-criteria decision analysis alongside with a geospatial analysis for the selection of hazardous waste landfill sites in Kurdistan Province, western Iran. The study employs a two-stage analysis to provide a spatial decision support system for hazardous waste management in a typically under developed region. The purpose of GIS was to perform an initial screening process to eliminate unsuitable land followed by utilization of a multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) to identify the most suitable sites using the information provided by the regional experts with reference to new chosen criteria. Using 21 exclusionary criteria, as input layers, masked maps were prepared. Creating various intermediate or analysis map layers a final overlay map was obtained representing areas for hazardous waste landfill sites. In order to evaluate different landfill sites produced by the overlaying a landfill suitability index system was developed representing cumulative effects of relative importance (weights) and suitability values of 14 non-exclusionary criteria including several criteria resulting from field observation. Using this suitability index 15 different sites were visited and based on the numerical evaluation provided by MCDA most suitable sites were determined.

Sharifi, Mozafar [Razi University Center for Environmental Studies, Faculty of Science, Baghabrisham 67149, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: sharifimozafar@gmail.com; Hadidi, Mosslem [Academic Center for Education, Culture and Research, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: hadidi_moslem@yahoo.com; Vessali, Elahe [Paradise Ave, Azad University, School of Agriculture, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: elahe_vesali@yahoo.com; Mosstafakhani, Parasto [Razi University Centre for Environmental Studies, Faculty of Science, Baghabrisham 67149, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: mostafakhany2003@yahoo.com; Taheri, Kamal [Regional office of Water Resource Management, Zan Boulevard, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: taheri.kamal@gmail.com; Shahoie, Saber [Department of Soil Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Kurdistan University, University Boulevard, Sanandadj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: shahoei@yahoo.com; Khodamoradpour, Mehran [Regional office of Climatology, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: mehrankhodamorad@yahoo.com

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

129

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

uniformity. Shredding of mixed waste to about 10 centimetersand untreated mixed municipal waste. GTZ/Holcim (2006) givesCEMBUREAU 2009). Mixed municipal waste must be pre-processed

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Waste in a land of plenty -Solid waste generation and management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste in a land of plenty - Solid waste generation and management in the US The US generates the highest amount of waste per person in the world and continues to rely on landfilling at the expense of recycling and waste-to- energy, according to the latest in an annual series of national surveys on municipal

Columbia University

131

Coal combustion waste management at landfills and surface impoundments 1994-2004.  

SciTech Connect

On May 22, 2000, as required by Congress in its 1980 Amendments to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a Regulatory Determination on Wastes from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels. On the basis of information contained in its 1999 Report to Congress: Wastes from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels, the EPA concluded that coal combustion wastes (CCWs), also known as coal combustion by-products (CCBs), did not warrant regulation under Subtitle C of RCRA, and it retained the existing hazardous waste exemption for these materials under RCRA Section 3001(b)(3)(C). However, the EPA also determined that national regulations under Subtitle D of RCRA were warranted for CCWs that are disposed of in landfills or surface impoundments. The EPA made this determination in part on the basis of its findings that 'present disposal practices are such that, in 1995, these wastes were being managed in 40 percent to 70 percent of landfills and surface impoundments without reasonable controls in place, particularly in the area of groundwater monitoring; and while there have been substantive improvements in state regulatory programs, we have also identified gaps in State oversight' (EPA 2000). The 1999 Report to Congress (RTC), however, may not have reflected the changes in CCW disposal practices that occurred since the cutoff date (1995) of its database and subsequent developments. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the EPA discussed this issue and decided to conduct a joint DOE/EPA study to collect new information on the recent CCW management practices by the power industry. It was agreed that such information would provide a perspective on the chronological adoption of control measures in CCW units based on State regulations. A team of experts from the EPA, industry, and DOE (with support from Argonne National Laboratory) was established to develop a mutually acceptable approach for collecting and analyzing data on CCW disposal practices and State regulatory requirements at landfills and surface impoundments that were permitted, built, or laterally expanded between January 1, 1994, and December 31, 2004. The scope of the study excluded waste units that manage CCWs in active or abandoned coal mines. The EPA identified the following three areas of interest: (1) Recent and current CCW industry surface disposal management practices, (2) State regulatory requirements for CCW management, and (3) Implementation of State requirements (i.e., the extent to which States grant or deny operator requests to waive or vary regulatory requirements and the rationales for doing so). DOE and the EPA obtained data on recent and current disposal practices from a questionnaire that the Utility Solid Waste Activities Group (USWAG) distributed to its members that own or operate coal-fired power plants. USWAG, formed in 1978, is responsible for addressing solid and hazardous waste issues on behalf of the utility industry. It is an informal consortium of approximately 80 utility operating companies, the Edison Electric Institute (EEI), the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA), the American Public Power Association (APPA), and the American Gas Association (AGA). EEI is the principal national association of investor-owned electric power and light companies. NRECA is the national association of rural electric cooperatives. APPA is the national association of publicly owned electric utilities. AGA is the national association of natural gas utilities. Together, USWAG member companies and trade associations represent more than 85% of the total electric generating capacity of the United States and service more than 95% of the nation's consumers of electricity. To verify the survey findings, the EPA also asked State regulators from nine selected States that are leading consumers of coal for electricity generation for information on disposal units that may not have been covered in the USWAG survey. The selected States were Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Missouri, North Carolina, North Da

Elcock, D.; Ranek, N. L.; Environmental Science Division

2006-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

132

THE BURNING ISSUES OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL WHAT WORKS AND WHAT DOESN'T  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 THE BURNING ISSUES OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL ­ WHAT WORKS AND WHAT DOESN'T By: Jack D devil burns and the Lord recycles." Perhaps these negative references to waste burning come from, the Valley of Hinnom south of ancient Jerusalem. This was the site of a foul, smoking, open burning garbage

Columbia University

133

The importance of climatological variability and the rate at which waste is added to modeling water budget of landfills  

SciTech Connect

A transient one-dimensional wetting front model was developed to predict water budgets for landfills. The model simulates the moisture profile by a series of blocks, each of which has a uniform soil moisture content. The model can simulate the continual stacking of waste by adding blocks, which represent new waste layers. The model can be programmed to build up a landfill at a given rate and to cap the landfill with a liner once a specific height has been reached. The wetting front model has been compared with models that solve the Richards Equation directly. In past studies the results between the two types of models compared well,but the wetting front model solved problems with a fraction of the computer time. Because of its efficient algorithms, the wetting front model is well suited for Monte Carlo simulation of different meteorological conditions in order to produce probability density functions for runoff, evapotranspiration, and leachate generation. In order to simulate different meteorological conditions, the TVA developed RGEN, which generates hourly rainfall, and EGEN which generates daily potential evaporation rates. The results of the numerous runs with the wetting front model were used to determine the potential importance of climatological variability and the effects of the rate at which new waste is added on the water budget of dry-stack fly ash landfills. 13 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

Young, S.C.; Clapp, R.B.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Interim site characterization report and ground-water monitoring program for the Hanford site solid waste landfill  

SciTech Connect

Federal and state regulations governing the operation of landfills require utilization of ground-water monitoring systems to determine whether or not landfill operations impact ground water at the point of compliance (ground water beneath the perimeter of the facility). A detection-level ground-water monitoring system was designed, installed, and initiated at the Hanford Site Solid Waste Landfill (SWL). Chlorinated hydrocarbons were detected at the beginning of the ground-water monitoring program and continue to be detected more than 1 year later. The most probable source of the chlorinated hydrocarbons is washwater discharged to the SWL between 1985 and 1987. This is an interim report and includes data from the characterization work that was performed during well installation in 1987, such as field observations, sediment studies, and geophysical logging results, and data from analyses of ground-water samples collected in 1987 and 1988, such as field parameter measurements and chemical analyses. 38 refs., 27 figs., 8 tabs.

Fruland, R.M.; Hagan, R.A.; Cline, C.S.; Bates, D.J.; Evans, J.C.; Aaberg, R.L.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Landfill Disamenities And Better Utilization of Waste Resources Presented to the Wisconsin Governor's Task Force on Waste Materials Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions. I recently saw an exhibit of a landfill gas carbon adsorber designed to remove siloxanes and air toxics from landfill gas prior to engine burning, to reduce wear on the engine. They later stripped this is a common practice. Most landfill gas energy combustion systems are uncontrolled. In 1998, a New York State

Columbia University

136

Municipal solid waste management: A bibliography of US Department of Energy contractor report through 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

U.S. Department of Energy contractors continue to conduct research targeting the productive and responsible use of the more than 516,000 metric tons (567,000 tons) of municipal solid waste (MSW) that is generated each day in the United States. It is becoming more and more prudent to improve current methods of MSW management and to continue to search for additional cost-effective, energy-efficient means to manage our MSW resource. This bibliography provides information about technical reports on energy from municipal waste that were prepared under grants or contracts from the US DOE. The reports listed focus on energy from municipal waste technologies and energy conservation in wastewater treatment.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Municipal waste water as a source of cooling water for California electric power plants  

SciTech Connect

The results of an investigation of sources of municipal waste water for potential use as cooling water in California power plants and the major factors which affect this practice are presented. Municipal treatment facilities in California with discharge volumes deemed adequate to supply new power plants are identified. Also included is a summary of the experiences of several utilities in California and other western states with existing or planned applications of municipal waste water in power plant cooling towers. Due to limited supplies of high-quality water, municipal waste water is increasingly viewed as an alternative source of supply for a variety of water uses, including electric power plant evaporative cooling. In California, enough municipal effluent is discharged to the ocean to conceivably supply the total projected cooling water needs of new power plants for the next 20 years or more. A number of existing applications of such waste water for power plant cooling, including several California cases, demonstrate the technical feasibility of its use for this purpose. However, a combination of economic, environmental, and geographic factors reduce the likelihood of widespread use of this alternative for meeting anticipated large increases in power plant water requirements in the state. The most important factors are: the long distances involved; the public health concerns; added costs and environmental effects; and unreliability of supply quality.

McDonald, T.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Risk assessment of the health liabilities from exposure to toxic metals found in the composted material of Air Force municipal solid waste. Master's thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This thesis assesses the risk of the health liabilities from exposure to toxic metals found in the composted material of Air Force municipal solid waste (MSW). The goal is to determine the probability that the composted MSW could be a health hazard if it were used as a soil amendment. The research limited the assessment of the exposure risk to heavy metals found in raw MSW and its resulting compost. The thesis uses reviews of present literature to examine the food and soil ingestion exposure pathways. These pathways are assessed using the heavy metal concentrations found in MSW compost and the soil-plant partition coefficients of vegetables grown in soil mixed with sewage sludge or soil irrigated with sewage sludge or soil irrigated with sewage sludge leachate. The recommendation resulting from this research is that the Air Force should not use MSW composting as part of its future solid waste management plan. This alternative to landfilling contains a chronic health risk that is greater than the Environmental Protection Agency's guideline. If the Air Force would use MSW composting in the future, it may endanger Air Force personnel and others who use the compost created from Air Force MSW. Risk assessment, Heavy metals, Recycling municipal solid waste, Pollution, Composting.

Merrymon, T.L.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Syn-Gas Production from Catalytic Steam Gasification of Municipal Solid Wastes in a Combined Fixed Bed Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The catalytic steam gasi?cation of municipal solid wastes (MSW) for syn-gas production was experimentally investigated in a combined fixed bed reactor using the newly developed tri-metallic catalyst. A series of experiments have been performed to explore ... Keywords: Biomass gasification, municipal solid wastes, catalyst, hydrogen production, energy recovery

Jianfen Li; Jianjun Liu; Shiyan Liao; Xiaorong Zhou; Rong Yan

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Developing a holistic strategy for integrated waste management within municipal planning: Challenges, policies, solutions and perspectives for Hellenic municipalities in the zero-waste, low-cost direction  

SciTech Connect

The present position paper addresses contemporary waste management options, weaknesses and opportunities faced by Hellenic local authorities. It focuses on state-of-the-art, tested as well as innovative, environmental management tools on a municipal scale and identifies a range of different collaboration schemes between local authorities and related service providers. Currently, a policy implementation gap is still experienced among Hellenic local authorities; it appears that administration at the local level is inadequate to manage and implement many of the general policies proposed; identify, collect, monitor and assess relevant data; and safeguard efficient and effective implementation of MSWM practices in the framework of integrated environmental management as well. This shortfall is partly due to the decentralisation of waste management issues to local authorities without a parallel substantial budgetary and capacity support, thus resulting in local activity remaining often disoriented and isolated from national strategies, therefore yielding significant planning and implementation problems and delays against pressing issues at hand as well as loss or poor use of available funds. This paper develops a systemic approach for MSWM at both the household and the non-household level, summarizes state-of-the-art available tools and compiles a set of guidelines for developing waste management master plans at the municipal level. It aims to provide a framework in the MSWM field for municipalities in Greece as well as other countries facing similar problems under often comparable socioeconomic settings.

Zotos, G. [Division of Business Studies, Dept. of Economics, Aristotle University, GR-54124, Thessaloniki (Greece); Karagiannidis, A. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University, GR-54124, Thessaloniki (Greece); Zampetoglou, S. [Municipal Development Company of Kalamaria, GR-55132 (Greece); Malamakis, A. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University, GR-54124, Thessaloniki (Greece)], E-mail: amalama@aix.meng.auth.gr; Antonopoulos, I.-S.; Kontogianni, S. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University, GR-54124, Thessaloniki (Greece); Tchobanoglous, G. [Department of civil and environmental Engineering, University of California, Davis (United States)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "municipal waste landfill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Eco-efficiency for greenhouse gas emissions mitigation of municipal solid waste management: A case study of Tianjin, China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The issue of municipal solid waste (MSW) management has been highlighted in China due to the continually increasing MSW volumes being generated and the limited capacity of waste treatment facilities. This article presents a quantitative eco-efficiency (E/E) analysis on MSW management in terms of greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation. A methodology for E/E analysis has been proposed, with an emphasis on the consistent integration of life cycle assessment (LCA) and life cycle costing (LCC). The environmental and economic impacts derived from LCA and LCC have been normalized and defined as a quantitative E/E indicator. The proposed method was applied in a case study of Tianjin, China. The study assessed the current MSW management system, as well as a set of alternative scenarios, to investigate trade-offs between economy and GHG emissions mitigation. Additionally, contribution analysis was conducted on both LCA and LCC to identify key issues driving environmental and economic impacts. The results show that the current Tianjin's MSW management system emits the highest GHG and costs the least, whereas the situation reverses in the integrated scenario. The key issues identified by the contribution analysis show no linear relationship between the global warming impact and the cost impact in MSW management system. The landfill gas utilization scenario is indicated as a potential optimum scenario by the proposed E/E analysis, given the characteristics of MSW, technology levels, and chosen methodologies. The E/E analysis provides an attractive direction towards sustainable waste management, though some questions with respect to uncertainty need to be discussed further.

Zhao Wei, E-mail: zhaowei.tju@gmail.com [College of Civil Engineering and Architecture, Liaoning University of Technology, 121000 Jinzhou (China); Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, P.O. Box 9518, 2300RA Leiden (Netherlands); Huppes, Gjalt, E-mail: huppes@cml.leidenuniv.nl [Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, P.O. Box 9518, 2300RA Leiden (Netherlands); Voet, Ester van der, E-mail: Voet@cml.leidenuniv.nl [Institute of Environmental Sciences (CML), Leiden University, P.O. Box 9518, 2300RA Leiden (Netherlands)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

Environmental assessment of garden waste management in the Municipality of Aarhus, Denmark  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An environmental assessment of six scenarios for handling of garden waste in the Municipality of Aarhus (Denmark) was performed from a life cycle perspective by means of the LCA-model EASEWASTE. In the first (baseline) scenario, the current garden waste management system based on windrow composting was assessed, while in the other five scenarios alternative solutions including incineration and home composting of fractions of the garden waste were evaluated. The environmental profile (normalised to Person Equivalent, PE) of the current garden waste management in Aarhus is in the order of -6 to 8 mPE Mg{sup -1} ww for the non-toxic categories and up to 100 mPE Mg{sup -1} ww for the toxic categories. The potential impacts on non-toxic categories are much smaller than what is found for other fractions of municipal solid waste. Incineration (up to 35% of the garden waste) and home composting (up to 18% of the garden waste) seem from an environmental point of view suitable for diverting waste away from the composting facility in order to increase its capacity. In particular the incineration of woody parts of the garden waste improved the environmental profile of the garden waste management significantly.

Boldrin, Alessio, E-mail: aleb@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Andersen, Jacob K.; Christensen, Thomas H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

Feasibility study on the management of the disposal of Bangkok municipal waste. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In January, 1985, the Government of Thailand sought assistance from the United States Trade and Development Program (USTDP) to undertake a feasibility study to review and update the solid waste management master plan, with particular emphasis to be placed on waste disposal methods. In April, 1985, the USTDP engaged the firm of Engineering and Economic Research, Inc. to carry out a definitional/prefeasibility study to assess the potential of a project for solid waste management and energy production using municipal solid waste as fuel.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Understanding landfill gas generation and migration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Landfill gas research in the US Department of Energy (DOE) from Municipal Waste (EMW) Program is focusing on two major areas of investigation: (1) Landfill gas migration processes; and (2) Landfill gas generation. With regard to gas migration, a field investigation is examining bidirectional gas movement through landfill cover materials by processes of pressure and diffusional flow. The overall purpose of the study is to quantify gas loss from the landfill reservoir by natural venting and air influx due to pumping on recovery wells. Two field sites--a humid site with clay cover and a semiarid site with sand cover--have been instrumented to examine vertical gas movement through cover materials. Results from the humid site indicate that: (1) concentrations of methane, carbon dioxide, oxygen and nitrogen in soil gas vary seasonally with soil moisture; (2) based on average methane gradients in soil gas and a simple diffusion model, up to 10E5 g methane m/sup /minus /2/ yr/sup /minus/1/ are vented through the cover materials at the humid site (area of 17 ht); and (3) during prolonged wet weather, pressure gradients of more than 2 kPa may develop between the cover materials and top of refuse, indicating that pressure flow is periodically an important mechanism for gas transport. The second project is addressing landfill gas generation. The major goal is to develop simple assay techniques to examine the gas production potential of landfilled refuse. Refuse samples extracted from various depths in a landfill are being leached by three different methods to separate microbial mass and substrate. The leachates are being subjected to Biochemical Methane Production (BMP) assays with periodic qualitative examination of microbial populations using fluorescence microscopy of live cultures and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

Bogner, J.; Rose, C.; Vogt, M.; Gartman, D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Mining the Midden: Dynamic Waste Harvesting at the Cedar Hills Regional Landfill.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mining the Midden intends to re-frame the sanitary landfill as a new typology of public land containing an embodied energy of cultural and material value.… (more)

Allan, Aaron Marshall

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Prototype demonstration of dual sorbent injection for acid gas control on municipal solid waste combustion units  

SciTech Connect

This report gathered and evaluated emissions and operations data associated with furnace injection of dry hydrated lime and duct injection of dry sodium bicarbonate at a commercial, 1500 ton per day, waste-to-energy facility. The information compiled during the project sheds light on these sorbents to affect acid gas emissions from municipal solid waste combustors. The information assesses the capability of these systems to meet the 1990 Clean Air Act and 1991 EPA Emission Guidelines.

None

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

High temperature behavior of electrostatic precipitator ash from municipal solid waste combustors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

combustion may cause the oxidation of mercury, and chloride mercury #12;13 13 species may be the major form combustion and gasification flue gases, Environ. Sci. Technol. 30 (1996) 2421-2426. [23] S.B. Ghorishi, C Ms. Ref. No.: HAZMAT-D-07-00176 Accepted manuscript #12;2 2 Abstract Municipal solid waste (MSW) flue

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

148

Municipal solid waste management: A bibliography of US Department of Energy contractor reports through 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

US Department of Energy contractors continue to conduct research targeting the productive and responsible use of the more than 536,000 tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) that is generated each day in the United States. It is becoming more and more prudent to improve current methods of MSW management and to continue to search for additional cost-effective, energy-efficient means to manage our MSW resource. This bibliography is an updated version of Municipal Waste to Energy: An Annotated Bibliography of US Department of Energy Contractor Reports, by Caroline Brooks, published in 1987. Like its predecessor, this bibliography provides information about technical reports on energy from municipal waste that were prepared under grants or contracts from the US Department of Energy. The reports listed focus on energy from municipal waste technologies and energy conservation in wastewater treatment. The bibliography contains three indexes -- an author index, a subject index, and a title index. The reports are listed alphabetically in the subject areas and may appear under more than one subject. All of the reports cited in the original MSW bibliography are also included in this update. The number of copies of each report originally published varied according to anticipated public demand. However, all reports are available in either microfiche or hard copy form and may be ordered from the National Technical Information Service (NTIS), US Department of Commerce, Springfield, VA 22161. Explicit information on ordering reports is included in Appendix A.

Shepherd, P.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

DISTRICT ENERGY SYSTEMS POWERED THROUGH THE COMBUSTION OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.assure.org Biography: Mr. Tomberlin has 21 years of experience in the design of power generation facilities having & Brad Moorman Barlow Projects, Inc. 2000 Vermont Drive, Fort Collins, CO 80525 (970) 226-8557 info municipal solid waste (MSW) by 90%-95% creating energy in the form of steam and/or electricity

Columbia University

150

Cultural Resources Review for Closure of the nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill and Solid Waste Landfill in the 600 Area, Hanford Site, Benton County, Washington, HCRC# 2010-600-018R  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office is proposing to close the Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill (NRDWL) and Solid Waste Landfill (SWL) located in the 600 Area of the Hanford Site. The closure of the NRDWL/SWL entails the construction of an evapotranspiration cover over the landfill. This cover would consist of a 3-foot (1-meter) engineered layer of fine-grained soil, modified with 15 percent by weight pea gravel to form an erosion-resistant topsoil that will sustain native vegetation. The area targeted for silt-loam borrow soil sits in Area C, located in the northern central portion of the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve Unit. The pea gravel used for the mixture will be obtained from both off-site commercial sources and an active gravel pit (Pit #6) located just west of the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. Materials for the cover will be transported along Army Loop Road, which runs from Beloit Avenue (near the Rattlesnake Barricade) east-northeast to the NRDWL/SWL, ending at State Route 4. Upgrades to Army Loop Road are necessary to facilitate safe bidirectional hauling traffic. This report documents a cultural resources review of the proposed activity, conducted according to Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

Gutzeit, Jennifer L.; Kennedy, Ellen P.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Sharpe, James J.; DeMaris, Ranae; Venno, M.; Christensen, James R.

2011-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

151

Combustion of municipal solid wastes with oil shale in a circulating fluidized bed. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The problem addressed by our invention is that of municipal solid waste utilization. The dimensions of the problem can be visualized by the common comparison that the average individual in America creates in five years time an amount of solid waste equivalent in weight to the Statue of Liberty. The combustible portion of the more than 11 billion tons of solid waste (including municipal solid waste) produced in the United States each year, if converted into useful energy, could provide 32 quads per year of badly needed domestic energy, or more than one-third of our annual energy consumption. Conversion efficiency and many other factors make such a production level unrealistic, but it is clear that we are dealing with a very significant potential resource. This report describes research pertaining to the co-combustion of oil shale with solid municipal wastes in a circulating fluidized bed. The oil shale adds significant fuel content and also constituents that can possible produce a useful cementitious ash.

NONE

1996-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

152

Waste collection systems for recyclables: An environmental and economic assessment for the municipality of Aarhus (Denmark)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recycling of paper and glass from household waste is an integrated part of waste management in Denmark, however, increased recycling is a legislative target. The questions are: how much more can the recycling rate be increased through improvements of collection schemes when organisational and technical limitations are respected, and what will the environmental and economic consequences be? This was investigated in a case study of a municipal waste management system. Five scenarios with alternative collection systems for recyclables (paper, glass, metal and plastic packaging) were assessed by means of a life cycle assessment and an assessment of the municipality's costs. Kerbside collection would provide the highest recycling rate, 31% compared to 25% in the baseline scenario, but bring schemes with drop-off containers would also be a reasonable solution. Collection of recyclables at recycling centres was not recommendable because the recycling rate would decrease to 20%. In general, the results showed that enhancing recycling and avoiding incineration was recommendable because the environmental performance was improved in several impact categories. The municipal costs for collection and treatment of waste were reduced with increasing recycling, mainly because the high cost for incineration was avoided. However, solutions for mitigation of air pollution caused by increased collection and transport should be sought.

Larsen, A.W., E-mail: awl@env.dtu.d [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Merrild, H.; Moller, J.; Christensen, T.H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Anaerobic co-digestion of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste with FOG waste from a sewage treatment plant: Recovering a wasted methane potential and enhancing the biogas yield  

SciTech Connect

Anaerobic digestion is applied widely to treat the source collected organic fraction of municipal solid wastes (SC-OFMSW). Lipid-rich wastes are a valuable substrate for anaerobic digestion due to their high theoretical methane potential. Nevertheless, although fat, oil and grease waste from sewage treatment plants (STP-FOGW) are commonly disposed of in landfill, European legislation is aimed at encouraging more effective forms of treatment. Co-digestion of the above wastes may enhance valorisation of STP-FOGW and lead to a higher biogas yield throughout the anaerobic digestion process. In the present study, STP-FOGW was evaluated as a co-substrate in wet anaerobic digestion of SC-OFMSW under mesophilic conditions (37 {sup o}C). Batch experiments carried out at different co-digestion ratios showed an improvement in methane production related to STP-FOGW addition. A 1:7 (VS/VS) STP-FOGW:SC-OFMSW feed ratio was selected for use in performing further lab-scale studies in a 5 L continuous reactor. Biogas yield increased from 0.38 {+-} 0.02 L g VS{sub feed}{sup -1} to 0.55 {+-} 0.05 L g VS{sub feed}{sup -1} as a result of adding STP-FOGW to reactor feed. Both VS reduction values and biogas methane content were maintained and inhibition produced by long chain fatty acid (LCFA) accumulation was not observed. Recovery of a currently wasted methane potential from STP-FOGW was achieved in a co-digestion process with SC-OFMSW.

Martin-Gonzalez, L., E-mail: lucia.martin@uab.ca [Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Colturato, L.F. [Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Font, X.; Vicent, T. [Departament d'Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Institut de Ciencia i Tecnologia Ambiental (ICTA) Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

Thermal conversion of municipal solid waste via hydrothermal carbonization: Comparison of carbonization products to products from current waste management techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a novel thermal conversion process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HTC converts wastes into value-added resources. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbonization integrates majority of carbon into solid-phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbonization results in a hydrochar with high energy density. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using hydrochar as an energy source may be beneficial. - Abstract: Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a novel thermal conversion process that may be a viable means for managing solid waste streams while minimizing greenhouse gas production and producing residual material with intrinsic value. HTC is a wet, relatively low temperature (180-350 Degree-Sign C) thermal conversion process that has been shown to convert biomass to a carbonaceous residue referred to as hydrochar. Results from batch experiments indicate HTC of representative waste materials is feasible, and results in the majority of carbon (45-75% of the initially present carbon) remaining within the hydrochar. Gas production during the batch experiments suggests that longer reaction periods may be desirable to maximize the production of energy-favorable products. If using the hydrochar for applications in which the carbon will remain stored, results suggest that the gaseous products from HTC result in fewer g CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions than the gases associated with landfilling, composting, and incineration. When considering the use of hydrochar as a solid fuel, more energy can be derived from the hydrochar than from the gases resulting from waste degradation during landfilling and anaerobic digestion, and from incineration of food waste. Carbon emissions resulting from the use of the hydrochar as a fuel source are smaller than those associated with incineration, suggesting HTC may serve as an environmentally beneficial alternative to incineration. The type and extent of environmental benefits derived from HTC will be dependent on hydrochar use/the purpose for HTC (e.g., energy generation or carbon storage).

Lu Xiaowei; Jordan, Beth [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of South Carolina, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Berge, Nicole D., E-mail: berge@cec.sc.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of South Carolina, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Municipal solid waste management in Lahore City District, Pakistan  

SciTech Connect

This study deals with generation, composition, collection, transportation, and disposal, as well as the present cost of the waste management on the basis of 60% collection of the total waste and the cost of proposed improved system of management on the basis of 100% waste collection using the IWM-2 LCI model. A GIS map of Data Ganj Bakhsh Town (DGBT) of Lahore City District showing communal storage facilities is also provided. DGBT has a population of 1,624,169 living in 232,024 dwellings. The total waste generated per year is 500,000 tons, or 0.84/kg/cap/day. Presently 60% of the MSW is collected and disposed in open dumps, while 40% is not collected and lies along roadsides, streets railway lines, depressions, vacant plots, drains, storm drains and open sewers. In DGBT, 129 containers of 5-m{sup 3} capacity, 120 containers of 10-m{sup 3} capacity and 380 skips of 2.5-m{sup 3} capacity are placed for waste collection. The overall collection and disposal cost of the MSW of DGBT is $3,177,900/yr, which is $10.29/ton. Modeling was conducted using the IWM-2 model for improved collection and disposal on the basis of 100% service, compared to the current 60% service. The modelled cost is $8.3/per ton, which is 20% less than the present cost, but the overall cost of 100% collection and disposal increases to $4,155,737/yr.

Batool, Syeda Adila [Department of Space Science, Punjab University, Lahore (Pakistan)], E-mail: aadila_batool@yahoo.com; Muhammad Nawaz Ch [College of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of the Punjab, Lahore (Pakistan)], E-mail: muhammadnawazchaudhry@yahoo.com

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

A study of the metal content of municipal solid waste. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Knowledge of the content of toxic components, so called pollutant precursors, in the municipal solid waste (MSW) stream is essential to development of the strategies for source reduction and reuse, recycling, composting and disposal. Data are scarce; trends in composition for any locality even more so. In a previous study the total and water soluble chlorine content of the components of municipal solid waste were determined from sampling studies at two sites, Baltimore County, MD, and Brooklyn, NY, each for a five day period. The total sulfur content of the combined combustible components was also determined. Because of the scarcity of data and synergistic effects, it seemed appropriate to determine the heavy metal content of the preceding material prior to its disposal. The metals chosen were the so-called priority pollutant metals (PPM): antimony, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, nickel, selenium, silver, thallium, and zinc.

Churney, K.L.; Domalski, E.S.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Recovery and recycling practices in municipal solid waste management in Lagos, Nigeria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The population of Lagos, the largest city in Nigeria, increased seven times from 1950 to 1980 with a current population of over 10 million inhabitants. The majority of the city's residents are poor. The residents make a heavy demand on resources and, at the same time, generate large quantities of solid waste. Approximately 4 million tonnes of municipal solid waste (MSW) is generated annually in the city, including approximately 0.5 million of untreated industrial waste. This is approximately 1.1 kg/cap/day. Efforts by the various waste management agencies set up by the state government to keep its streets and neighborhoods clean have achieved only minimal success. This is because more than half of these wastes are left uncollected from the streets and the various locations due to the inadequacy and inefficiency of the waste management system. Whilst the benefits of proper solid waste management (SWM), such as increased revenues for municipal bodies, higher productivity rate, improved sanitation standards and better health conditions, cannot be overemphasized, it is important that there is a reduction in the quantity of recoverable materials in residential and commercial waste streams to minimize the problem of MSW disposal. This paper examines the status of recovery and recycling in current waste management practice in Lagos, Nigeria. Existing recovery and recycling patterns, recovery and recycling technologies, approaches to materials recycling, and the types of materials recovered from MSW are reviewed. Based on these, strategies for improving recovery and recycling practices in the management of MSW in Lagos, Nigeria are suggested.

Kofoworola, O.F. [Environment Division, Joint Graduate School of Energy and Environment, King Mongkuts University of Technology Thonburi, 91 Prachauthit Road, Bangmod, Tungkru, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)], E-mail: sholafemi28@yahoo.com

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume 1: Availability of Feedstock and Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report investigated the potential of using municipal solid waste (MSW) to make synthesis gas (syngas) suitable for production of liquid fuels. Issues examined include: • MSW physical and chemical properties affecting its suitability as a gasifier feedstock and for liquid fuels synthesis • expected process scale required for favorable economics • the availability of MSW in quantities sufficient to meet process scale requirements • the state-of-the-art of MSW gasification technology.

Valkenburg, Corinne; Walton, Christie W.; Thompson, Becky L.; Gerber, Mark A.; Jones, Susanne B.; Stevens, Don J.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

National survey of industrial markets for steam produced from burning municipal solid waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the methodology and findings of an analysis to determine the maximum size of the industrial market for steam produced from municipal solid waste in the United States. The data used in the analysis were developed from the 1980 census report and the US Chamber of Commerce's 1979 Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) listing. The process used to match potential steam users with populations large enough to generate suitable quantities of waste is presented. No attempt was made to rank the markets or analyze the market economics.

Pearson, C.V.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR REMOVAL ACTIONS AT THE TECHNICAL AREA III CLASSIFIED WASTE LANDFILL, SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES, NEW MEXICO - DOE/EA-1729  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR REMOVAL FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR REMOVAL ACTIONS AT THE TECHNICAL AREA III CLASSIFIED WASTE LANDFILL, SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES, NEW MEXICO DOE/EA-1729 August 2010 National Nuclear Security Administration Sandia Site Office P.O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-5400 DOE/EA-1729: Environmental Assessment for Removal Actions at the Technical Area III August 2010 Classified Waste Landfill, Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico i TABLE OF CONTENTS Section 1.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR AGENCY ACTION .................................................................... Page 1 1.1 Background .................................................................................................................................. 1

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161

Improved methodology to assess modification and completion of landfill gas management in the aftercare period  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Performance-based evaluation of landfill gas control system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analytical framework to evaluate transition from active to passive gas control. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Focus on cover oxidation as an alternative means of passive gas control. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrates research on long-term landfill behavior with practical guidance. - Abstract: Municipal solid waste landfills represent the dominant option for waste disposal in many parts of the world. While some countries have greatly reduced their reliance on landfills, there remain thousands of landfills that require aftercare. The development of cost-effective strategies for landfill aftercare is in society's interest to protect human health and the environment and to prevent the emergence of landfills with exhausted aftercare funding. The Evaluation of Post-Closure Care (EPCC) methodology is a performance-based approach in which landfill performance is assessed in four modules including leachate, gas, groundwater, and final cover. In the methodology, the objective is to evaluate landfill performance to determine when aftercare monitoring and maintenance can be reduced or possibly eliminated. This study presents an improved gas module for the methodology. While the original version of the module focused narrowly on regulatory requirements for control of methane migration, the improved gas module also considers best available control technology for landfill gas in terms of greenhouse gas emissions, air quality, and emissions of odoriferous compounds. The improved module emphasizes the reduction or elimination of fugitive methane by considering the methane oxidation capacity of the cover system. The module also allows for the installation of biologically active covers or other features designed to enhance methane oxidation. A methane emissions model, CALMIM, was used to assist with an assessment of the methane oxidation capacity of landfill covers.

Morris, Jeremy W.F., E-mail: jmorris@geosyntec.com [Geosyntec Consultants, 10220 Old Columbia Road, Suite A, Columbia, MD 21046 (United States); Crest, Marion, E-mail: marion.crest@suez-env.com [Suez Environnement, 38 rue du President Wilson, 78230 Le Pecq (France); Barlaz, Morton A., E-mail: barlaz@ncsu.edu [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, Campus Box 7908, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7908 (United States); Spokas, Kurt A., E-mail: kurt.spokas@ars.usda.gov [United States Department of Agriculture - Agricultural Research Service, 1991 Upper Buford Circle, 439 Borlaug Hall, St. Paul, MN 55108 (United States); Akerman, Anna, E-mail: anna.akerman@sita.fr [SITA France, Tour CB 21, 16 Place de l'Iris, 92040 Paris La Defense Cedex (France); Yuan, Lei, E-mail: lyuan@geosyntec.com [Geosyntec Consultants, 10220 Old Columbia Road, Suite A, Columbia, MD 21046 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

Municipal solid waste management in Africa: Strategies and livelihoods in Yaounde, Cameroon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of the state of municipal solid waste (MSW) management in the capital of Cameroon, Yaounde, and suggests some possible solutions for its improvement. The institutional, financial, and physical aspects of MSW management, as well as the livelihoods of the population, were analyzed. Our study revealed that distances and lack of infrastructure have a major impact on waste collection. Garbage bins are systematically mentioned as the primary infrastructure needed by the population in all quarters, whether it be a high or low standard community. The construction of transfer stations and the installation of garbage bins are suggested as a solution to reduce distances between households and garbage bins, thus improving waste collection vehicle accessibility. Transfer stations and garbage bins would enable the official waste collection company to expand its range of services and significantly improve waste collection rates. Several transfer stations have already been set up by non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and community-based organizations (CBOs), but they require technical, institutional and funding support. Research is needed on the quality and safety of community-made compost, as well as on soil fertility in urban and peri-urban areas. Most of the stakeholders, municipalities, the official waste collection company and households acknowledge the need for better monitoring and regulation of MSW management. The urban community of Yaounde also needs to maintain its support of MSW management and promote the sustainability of NGOs and CBOs operating in underserved areas not yet covered by adequate infrastructures. A major opportunity for implementation of such waste policy is the heavily indebted poor countries (HIPC) program dedicated to urban planning and good governance.

Parrot, Laurent [Centre de Cooperation Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Developpement (CIRAD), Montpellier 34398 Cedex 5 (France)], E-mail: laurent.parrot@cirad.fr; Sotamenou, Joel; Dia, Bernadette Kamgnia [University of Yaounde II - Soa, Faculty of Economics and Management, P.O. Box 1365, Yaounde (Cameroon)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume 2: A Techno-economic Evaluation of the Production of Mixed Alcohols  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass is a renewable energy resource that can be converted into liquid fuel suitable for transportation applications and thus help meet the Energy Independence and Security Act renewable energy goals (U.S. Congress 2007). However, biomass is not always available in sufficient quantity at a price compatible with fuels production. Municipal solid waste (MSW) on the other hand is readily available in large quantities in some communities and is considered a partially renewable feedstock. Furthermore, MSW may be available for little or no cost. This report provides a techno-economic analysis of the production of mixed alcohols from MSW and compares it to the costs for a wood based plant. In this analysis, MSW is processed into refuse derived fuel (RDF) and then gasified in a plant co-located with a landfill. The resulting syngas is then catalytically converted to mixed alcohols. At a scale of 2000 metric tons per day of RDF, and using current technology, the minimum ethanol selling price at a 10% rate of return is approximately $1.85/gallon ethanol (early 2008 $). However, favorable economics are dependent upon the toxicity characteristics of the waste streams and that a market exists for the by-product scrap metal recovered from the RDF process.

Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua; Valkenburg, Corinne

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

South Carolina Municipalities - Green Power Purchasing | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

South Carolina Municipalities - Green Power Purchasing South Carolina Municipalities - Green Power Purchasing South Carolina Municipalities - Green Power Purchasing < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Bioenergy Solar Buying & Making Electricity Wind Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Green Power Purchasing Provider Santee Cooper Santee Cooper's Green Power Program was launched in September of 2001. All of the state's 20 electric cooperatives and the City of Georgetown participate in the Green Power Program, which is Green-e accredited. The renewable resources sold under the Green Power Program are comprised of 99% landfill gas (methane) and less than 1% solar energy. Santee Cooper is currently using landfill gas (methane) to produce electricity at six facilities in South Carolina: Horry Solid Waste

165

Municipal solid waste source-separated collection in China: A comparative analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pilot program focusing on municipal solid waste (MSW) source-separated collection was launched in eight major cities throughout China in 2000. Detailed investigations were carried out and a comprehensive system was constructed to evaluate the effects of the eight-year implementation in those cities. This paper provides an overview of different methods of collection, transportation, and treatment of MSW in the eight cities; as well as making a comparative analysis of MSW source-separated collection in China. Information about the quantity and composition of MSW shows that the characteristics of MSW are similar, which are low calorific value, high moisture content and high proportion of organisms. Differences which exist among the eight cities in municipal solid waste management (MSWM) are presented in this paper. Only Beijing and Shanghai demonstrated a relatively effective result in the implementation of MSW source-separated collection. While the six remaining cities result in poor performance. Considering the current status of MSWM, source-separated collection should be a key priority. Thus, a wider range of cities should participate in this program instead of merely the eight pilot cities. It is evident that an integrated MSWM system is urgently needed. Kitchen waste and recyclables are encouraged to be separated at the source. Stakeholders involved play an important role in MSWM, thus their responsibilities should be clearly identified. Improvement in legislation, coordination mechanisms and public education are problematic issues that need to be addressed.

Tai Jun [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Urbanization and Ecological Restoration, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Shanghai Environmental Engineering Design Research Institute, Shanghai 200232 (China); Zhang Weiqian [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Urbanization and Ecological Restoration, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Che Yue, E-mail: yche@des.ecnu.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Urbanization and Ecological Restoration, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Feng Di [Shanghai Environmental Engineering Design Research Institute, Shanghai 200232 (China)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

166

Performance evaluation of an anaerobic/aerobic landfill-based digester using yard waste for energy and compost production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biochemical methane potential decreased by 83% during the two-stage operation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Net energy produced was 84.3 MWh or 46 kWh per million metric tons (Mg). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The average removal efficiency of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was 96-99%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The average removal efficiency of non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) was 68-99%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The two-stage batch digester proved to be simple to operate and cost-effective. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to evaluate a new alternative for yard waste management by constructing, operating and monitoring a landfill-based two-stage batch digester (anaerobic/aerobic) with the recovery of energy and compost. The system was initially operated under anaerobic conditions for 366 days, after which the yard waste was aerated for an additional 191 days. Off gas generated from the aerobic stage was treated by biofilters. Net energy recovery was 84.3 MWh, or 46 kWh per million metric tons of wet waste (as received), and the biochemical methane potential of the treated waste decreased by 83% during the two-stage operation. The average removal efficiencies of volatile organic compounds and non-methane organic compounds in the biofilters were 96-99% and 68-99%, respectively.

Yazdani, Ramin, E-mail: ryazdani@sbcglobal.net [Yolo County Planning and Public Works Department, Division of Integrated Waste Management, Woodland, CA 95776 (United States); Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Ghausi Hall, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Barlaz, Morton A., E-mail: barlaz@eos.ncsu.edu [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Augenstein, Don, E-mail: iemdon@aol.com [Institute for Environmental Management, Inc., Palo Alto, CA 94306 (United States); Kayhanian, Masoud, E-mail: mdkayhanian@ucdavis.edu [Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Ghausi Hall, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Tchobanoglous, George, E-mail: gtchobanoglous@ucdavis.edu [Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Ghausi Hall, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

Assessment of municipal solid waste for energy production in the western United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Municipal solid waste (MSW) represents both a significant problem and an abundant resource for the production of energy. The residential, institutional, and industrial sectors of this country generate about 250 million tons of MSW each year. In this report, the authors have compiled data on the status of MSW in the 13-state western region, including economic and environmental issues. The report is designed to assist the members of the Western Regional Biomass Energy Program Ad Hoc Resource Committee in determining the potential for using MSW to produce energy in the region. 51 refs., 7 figs., 18 tabs.

Goodman, B.J.; Texeira, R.H.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Evaluation of Energy Recovery from Municipal Solid Waste in Oil-Fired Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Five methods of energy recovery from municipal solid waste (MSW) in oil-fired power plants are evaluated: preparation and supplemental firing of refuse-derived fuel (RDF) with oil in a utility boiler originally designed for coal firing; 100% firing of either RDF or MSW in a dedicated water-wall incinerator and use of the steam to drive a dedicated turbine generator unit; and 100% firing of RDF or MSW in a dedicated water-wall incinerator and integration of the steam into the power plant steam cycle.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Energy recovery from municipal solid waste, an environmental and safety mini-overview survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The environmental and safety aspects of processing municipal solid wastes to recover energy and materials are reviewed in some detail. The state of the art in energy recovery, energy potential for the near and long-term, and constraints to commercialization are discussed. Under the environmental and safety aspects the state of the art, need for research and development, and need for coordination among federal agencies and private industry are considered. Eleven principal types of refuse-to-energy processes are described and a projected energy balance is derived for each process. (JSR)

Johnson, R.L.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Municipal spotlight: Working together in Northern Virginia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Northern Virginia region is one of the nation`s liveliest centers of commerce as measured by job creation, new business formation, residential and commercial construction, and retail sales. The region also has one of the most advanced integrated waste management programs. In 1994, more than 1.6 million tons of municipal solid (MSW) were generated in the Northern Virginia region. Of that amount, 1 million tons were recovered as energy and more than 500,000 tons were landfilled. Additionally, more than 500,000 tons were recycled. The jurisdictions in this region have built an extensive network of solid waste management programs that are handled on the local government level, through cooperative programs, and through implementation of unique interjurisdictional agreements. These programs are arranged in the following hierarchy: source reduction, composting, recycling, energy recovery, and landfilling. This article provides a description of how this hierarchy is implemented in the region.

Arner, R.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Municipal solid waste management challenges in developing countries - Kenyan case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of the state of municipal solid waste management (MSWM) by local authorities in Kenya as a case study of a low-income developing country. Approaches of possible solutions that can be undertaken to improve municipal solid waste (MSW) services are discussed. Poor economic growth (1.1% in 1993) has resulted in an increase in the poverty level which presently stands at 56%. Migration from the rural areas to the urban areas has resulted in unplanned settlements in suburban areas accommodating about 60% of the urban population on only 5% urban land area. Political interference also hampers smooth running of local authorities. Vulnerability of pollution of surface and groundwater is high because local authorities rarely considered environmental impact in siting MSW disposal sites. Illegal dumping of MSW on the river banks or on the roadside poses environmental and economic threats on nearby properties. Poor servicing of MSW collection vehicles, poor state of infrastructure and the lack of adequate funding militate against optimization of MSW disposal service. The rural economy needs to be improved if rural-urban migration is to be managed. Involvement of stakeholders is important to achieve any meaningful and sustainable MSWM. The role of the informal sector through community-based organizations (CBOs), Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) and the private sector in offering solutions towards improvement of MSWM also is explored.

Henry, Rotich K. [College of Environment and Resources, Jilin University, Changchun 130026 (China); Zhao Yongsheng [College of Environment and Resources, Jilin University, Changchun 130026 (China)]. E-mail: zhaoyongsheng@jlu.edu.cn; Dong Jun [College of Environment and Resources, Jilin University, Changchun 130026 (China)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Micro-scale anaerobic digestion of point source components of organic fraction of municipal solid waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fermentation characteristics of six specific types of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) were examined, with an emphasis on properties that are needed when designing plug-flow type anaerobic bioreactors. More specifically, the decomposition patterns of a vegetable (cabbage), fruits (banana and citrus peels), fresh leaf litter of bamboo and teak leaves, and paper (newsprint) waste streams as feedstocks were studied. Individual OFMSW components were placed into nylon mesh bags and subjected to various fermentation periods (solids retention time, SRT) within the inlet of a functioning plug-flow biogas fermentor. These were removed at periodic intervals, and their composition was analyzed to monitor decomposition rates and changes in chemical composition. Components like cabbage waste, banana peels, and orange peels fermented rapidly both in a plug-flow biogas reactor (PFBR) as well as under a biological methane potential (BMP) assay, while other OFMSW components (leaf litter from bamboo and teak leaves and newsprint) fermented slowly with poor process stability and moderate biodegradation. For fruit and vegetable wastes (FVW), a rapid and efficient removal of pectins is the main cause of rapid disintegration of these feedstocks, which left behind very little compost forming residues (2-5%). Teak and bamboo leaves and newsprint decomposed only to 25-50% in 30 d. These results confirm the potential for volatile fatty acids accumulation in a PFBR's inlet and suggest a modification of the inlet zone or operation of a PFBR with the above feedstocks.

Chanakya, H.N. [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, (formerly ASTRA), Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)], E-mail: chanakya@astra.iisc.ernet.in; Sharma, Isha [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, (formerly ASTRA), Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Ramachandra, T.V. [Centre for Sustainable Technologies, (formerly ASTRA), Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Centre for Ecological Sciences, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

Estimation of landfill emission lifespan using process oriented modeling  

SciTech Connect

Depending on the particular pollutants emitted, landfills may require service activities lasting from hundreds to thousands of years. Flexible tools allowing long-term predictions of emissions are of key importance to determine the nature and expected duration of maintenance and post-closure activities. A highly capable option represents predictions based on models and verified by experiments that are fast, flexible and allow for the comparison of various possible operation scenarios in order to find the most appropriate one. The intention of the presented work was to develop a experimentally verified multi-dimensional predictive model capable of quantifying and estimating processes taking place in landfill sites where coupled process description allows precise time and space resolution. This constitutive 2-dimensional model is based on the macromechanical theory of porous media (TPM) for a saturated thermo-elastic porous body. The model was used to simulate simultaneously occurring processes: organic phase transition, gas emissions, heat transport, and settlement behavior on a long time scale for municipal solid waste deposited in a landfill. The relationships between the properties (composition, pore structure) of a landfill and the conversion and multi-phase transport phenomena inside it were experimentally determined. In this paper, we present both the theoretical background of the model and the results of the simulations at one single point as well as in a vertical landfill cross section.

Ustohalova, Veronika [Institute of Waste Management, University of Duisburg-Essen, Universitaetsstrasse 15, 45141 Essen (Germany)]. E-mail: veronika.ustohalova@uni-essen.de; Ricken, Tim [Institute of Mechanics, University of Duisburg-Essen, Universitaetsstrasse 15, 45141 Essen (Germany); Widmann, Renatus [Institute of Waste Management, University of Duisburg-Essen, Universitaetsstrasse 15, 45141 Essen (Germany)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

The multiple market-exposure of waste management companies: A case study of two Swedish municipally owned companies  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Swedish municipally owned waste management companies are active on political, material, technical, and commercial markets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These markets differ in kind and their demands follow different logics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These markets affect the public service, processing, and marketing of Swedish waste management. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Articulating these markets is a strategic challenge for Swedish municipally owned waste management. - Abstract: This paper describes how the business model of two leading Swedish municipally owned solid waste management companies exposes them to four different but related markets: a political market in which their legitimacy as an organization is determined; a waste-as-material market that determines their access to waste as a process input; a technical market in which these companies choose what waste processing technique to use; and a commercial market in which they market their products. Each of these markets has a logic of its own. Managing these logics and articulating the interrelationships between these markets is a key strategic challenge for these companies.

Corvellec, Herve, E-mail: herve.corvellec@ism.lu.se [Department of Service Management, Lund University, Campus Helsingborg, PO Box 882, SE-251 08 Helsingborg (Sweden); Bramryd, Torleif [Department of Environmental Strategy, Lund University, Campus Helsingborg, PO Box 882, SE-251 08 Helsingborg (Sweden)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

Solid Waste Management (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solid Waste Management (Indiana) Solid Waste Management (Indiana) Solid Waste Management (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Utility Program Info State Indiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Association of Indiana Solid Wastes Districts Inc. The state supports the implementation of source reduction, recycling, and other alternative solid waste management practices over incineration and land disposal. The Indiana Department of Environmental Management and the Indiana Solid Waste Management Board are tasked with planning and adopting rules and regulations governing solid waste management practices. Provisions pertaining to landfill management and expansion, permitting,

176

Review of composting and anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste and a methodological proposal for a mid-size city  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review of composting and anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste and a methodological proposal and processes on composting and anaerobic digestion are compiled, showing the versatility and multivariable of the compost. In addition, anaerobic decomposition followed by vermicomposting is pointed as one of the best

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

177

Reducing Mercury Emissions from Municipal Solid Waste Combustion (Results of Investigations and Testing at the Camden Resource Recovery Facility)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technologies for mercury control for flue gases of Municipal Waste Combustors (MWCs) not only ecological hydrochloric acid (HCl) and elemental mercury (Hg") under oxidizing conditions of the off-gases downstream to the decreasing gas temperature, the elemental mercury is able to react with other flue gas components. The main

Columbia University

178

Metropolitan Landfill Abatement Act (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A fee is imposed on operators of mixed municipal solid waste disposal facilities corresponding to the amount of waste taken in. Waste residue from recycling facilities or resource recovery...

179

Heating and cooling of municipal buildings with waste heat from ground water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The feasibility of using waste heat from municipal water wells to replace natural gas for heating of the City Hall, Fire Station, and Community Hall in Wilmer, Texas was studied. At present, the 120/sup 0/F well water is cooled by dissipating the excess heat through evaporative cooling towers before entering the distribution system. The objective of the study was to determine the pumping cycle of the well and determine the amount of available heat from the water for a specified period. This data were correlated with the heating and cooling demand of the City's buildings, and a conceptual heat recovery system will be prepared. The system will use part or all of the excess heat from the water to heat the buildings, thereby eliminating the use of natural gas. The proposed geothermal retrofit of the existing natural gas heating system is not economical because the savings in natural gas does not offset the capital cost of the new equipment and the annual operating and maintenance costs. The fuel savings and power costs are a virtual trade-off over the 25-year period. The installation and operation of the system was estimated to cost $105,000 for 25 years which is an unamortized expense. In conclusion, retrofitting the City of Wilmer's municipal buildings is not feasible based on the economic analysis and fiscal projections as presented.

Morgan, D.S.; Hochgraf, J.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

On-line early fault detection and diagnosis of municipal solid waste incinerators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fault detection and diagnosis framework is proposed in this paper for early fault detection and diagnosis (FDD) of municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWIs) in order to improve the safety and continuity of production. In this framework, principal component analysis (PCA), one of the multivariate statistical technologies, is used for detecting abnormal events, while rule-based reasoning performs the fault diagnosis and consequence prediction, and also generates recommendations for fault mitigation once an abnormal event is detected. A software package, SWIFT, is developed based on the proposed framework, and has been applied in an actual industrial MSWI. The application shows that automated real-time abnormal situation management (ASM) of the MSWI can be achieved by using SWIFT, resulting in an industrially acceptable low rate of wrong diagnosis, which has resulted in improved process continuity and environmental performance of the MSWI.

Zhao Jinsong [College of Information Science and Technology, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)], E-mail: jinsongzhao@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn; Huang Jianchao [College of Information Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 10086 (China); Sun Wei [College of Chemical Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "municipal waste landfill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Methanogenic Population Dynamics during Start-Up of Anaerobic Digesters Treating Municipal Solid Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: An aggressive start-up strategy was used to initiate codigestion in two anaerobic, continuously mixed bench-top reactors at mesophilic (37°C) and thermophilic (55°C) conditions. The digesters were inoculated with mesophilic anaerobic sewage sludge and cattle manure and were fed a mixture of simulated municipal solid waste and biosolids in proportions that reflect U.S. production rates. The design organic loading rate was 3.1 kg volatile solids/m 3 /day and the retention time was 20 days. Ribosomal RNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes were used to determine the methanogenic community structure in the inocula and the digesters. Chemical analyses were performed to evaluate digester performance. The aggressive start-up strategy was successful for the thermophilic reactor, despite the use of a

Biosolids; Matt E. Griffin; Katherine D. Mcmahon; Roderick I. Mackie; Lutgarde Raskin

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

An analytic network process model for municipal solid waste disposal options  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this paper is to present an evaluation method that can aid decision makers in a local civic body to prioritize and select appropriate municipal solid waste disposal methods. We introduce a hierarchical network (hiernet) decision structure and apply the analytic network process (ANP) super-matrix approach to measure the relative desirability of disposal alternatives using value judgments as the input of the various stakeholders. ANP is a flexible analytical program that enables decision makers to find the best possible solution to complex problems by breaking down a problem into a systematic network of inter-relationships among the various levels and attributes. This method therefore may not only aid in selecting the best alternative but also helps decision makers to understand why an alternative is preferred over the other options.

Khan, Sheeba [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Youngstown State University, OH 44555, United States of America (United States)], E-mail: sheebanishat@yahoo.com; Faisal, Mohd Nishat [Department of Management Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110 016 (India)], E-mail: nishat786@yahoo.com

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Evaluation of gasification and novel thermal processes for the treatment of municipal solid waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report identifies seven developers whose gasification technologies can be used to treat the organic constituents of municipal solid waste: Energy Products of Idaho; TPS Termiska Processor AB; Proler International Corporation; Thermoselect Inc.; Battelle; Pedco Incorporated; and ThermoChem, Incorporated. Their processes recover heat directly, produce a fuel product, or produce a feedstock for chemical processes. The technologies are on the brink of commercial availability. This report evaluates, for each technology, several kinds of issues. Technical considerations were material balance, energy balance, plant thermal efficiency, and effect of feedstock contaminants. Environmental considerations were the regulatory context, and such things as composition, mass rate, and treatability of pollutants. Business issues were related to likelihood of commercialization. Finally, cost and economic issues such as capital and operating costs, and the refuse-derived fuel preparation and energy conversion costs, were considered. The final section of the report reviews and summarizes the information gathered during the study.

Niessen, W.R.; Marks, C.H.; Sommerlad, R.E. [Camp Dresser and McKee, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)] [Camp Dresser and McKee, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Anaerobic digestion of pressed off leachate from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A highly polluted liquid ('press water') was obtained from the pressing facility for the organic fraction of municipal solid waste in a composting plant. Methane productivity of the squeezed-off leachate was investigated in batch assays. To assess the technical feasibility of 'press water' as a substrate for anaerobic digestion, a laboratory-scale glass column reactor was operated semi-continuously at 37 {sup o}C. A high methane productivity of 270 m{sup -3} CH{sub 4} ton{sup -1} COD{sub added} or 490 m{sup -3} CH{sub 4} ton{sup -1} VS{sub added} was achieved in the batch experiment. The semi-continuously run laboratory-scale reactor was initially operated at an organic loading rate of 10.7 kg COD m{sup -3} d{sup -1}. The loading was increased to finally 27.7 kg COD m{sup -3} d{sup -1}, corresponding to a reduction of the hydraulic retention time from initially 20 to finally 7.7 days. During the digestion, a stable elimination of organic material (measured as COD elimination) of approximately 60% was achieved. Linearly with the increment of the OLR, the volumetric methane production of the reactor increased from 2.6 m{sup 3} m{sub reactor}{sup -3} d{sup -1} to 7.1 m{sup 3} m{sub reactor}{sup -3} d{sup -1}. The results indicated that 'press water' from the organic fraction of municipal solid waste was a suitable substrate for anaerobic digestion which gave a high biogas yield even at very high loading rates.

Nayono, Satoto E. [Department of Civil Engineering, Yogyakarta State University, Campus UNY Karangmalang Yogyakarta 55281 (Indonesia); Institute of Biology for Engineers and Biotechnology of Wastewater, University of Karlsruhe, Am Fasanengarten, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Winter, Josef, E-mail: josef.winter@iba.uka.d [Institute of Biology for Engineers and Biotechnology of Wastewater, University of Karlsruhe, Am Fasanengarten, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Gallert, Claudia [Institute of Biology for Engineers and Biotechnology of Wastewater, University of Karlsruhe, Am Fasanengarten, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

185

Development of a Segregated Municipal Solid Waste Gasification System for Electrical Power Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gasification technologies are expected to play a key role in the future of solid waste management since the conversion of municipal and industrial solid wastes to a gaseous fuel significantly increases its value. Municipal solid waste (MSW) gasification for electrical power generation was conducted in a fluidized bed gasifier and the feasibility of using a control system was evaluated to facilitate its management and operation. The performance of an engine using the gas produced was evaluated. A procedure was also tested to upgrade the quality of the gas and optimize its production. The devices installed and automated control system developed was able to achieve and maintain the set conditions for optimum gasification. The most important parameters of reaction temperature and equivalence ratio were fully controlled. Gas production went at a rate of 4.00 kg min-1 with a yield of 2.78 m3 kg-1 of fuel and a heating value (HV) of 7.94 MJ Nm-3. Within the set limits of the tests, the highest production of synthesis gas and the net heating value of 8.97 MJ Nm-3 resulted from gasification at 725°C and ER of 0.25 which was very close to the predicted value of 7.47 MJ Nm-3. This was not affected by temperature but significantly affected by the equivalence ratio. The overall engine-generator efficiency at 7.5 kW electrical power load was lower at 19.81% for gasoline fueled engine compared to 35.27% for synthesis gas. The pressure swing adsorption (PSA) system increased the net heating value of the product gas by an average of 38% gas over that of inlet gas. There were no traces of carbon dioxide in the product gas indicating that it had been completely adsorbed by the system. MSW showed relatively lower fouling and slagging tendencies than cotton gin trash (CGT) and dairy manure (DM). This was further supported by the compressive strength measurements of the ash of MSW, CGT and DM and the EDS elemental analysis of the MSW ash.

Maglinao, Amado Latayan

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Hazardous Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 6   General refractory disposal options...D landfill (b) Characterized hazardous waste by TCLP

187

An Economic Assessment of Market-Based Approaches to Regulating the Municipal Solid Waste Stream  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in id. ). The number of mixed waste processing facilitiesWaste separation occurs at mixed waste processing facilitiesban disposal of yard waste in mixed refuse. Variable Rate

Menell, Peter S.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Dry-thermophilic anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste: Methane production modeling  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Methane generation may be modeled by means of modified product generation model of Romero Garcia (1991). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Organic matter content and particle size influence the kinetic parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Higher organic matter content and lower particle size enhance the biomethanization. - Abstract: The influence of particle size and organic matter content of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) in the overall kinetics of dry (30% total solids) thermophilic (55 Degree-Sign C) anaerobic digestion have been studied in a semi-continuous stirred tank reactor (SSTR). Two types of wastes were used: synthetic OFMSW (average particle size of 1 mm; 0.71 g Volatile Solids/g waste), and OFMSW coming from a composting full scale plant (average particle size of 30 mm; 0.16 g Volatile Solids/g waste). A modification of a widely-validated product-generation kinetic model has been proposed. Results obtained from the modified-model parameterization at steady-state (that include new kinetic parameters as K, Y{sub pMAX} and {theta}{sub MIN}) indicate that the features of the feedstock strongly influence the kinetics of the process. The overall specific growth rate of microorganisms ({mu}{sub max}) with synthetic OFMSW is 43% higher compared to OFMSW coming from a composting full scale plant: 0.238 d{sup -1} (K = 1.391 d{sup -1}; Y{sub pMAX} = 1.167 L CH{sub 4}/gDOC{sub c}; {theta}{sub MIN} = 7.924 days) vs. 0.135 d{sup -1} (K = 1.282 d{sup -1}; Y{sub pMAX} = 1.150 L CH{sub 4}/gDOC{sub c}; {theta}{sub MIN} = 9.997 days) respectively. Finally, it could be emphasized that the validation of proposed modified-model has been performed successfully by means of the simulation of non-steady state data for the different SRTs tested with each waste.

Fdez-Gueelfo, L.A., E-mail: alberto.fdezguelfo@uca.es [Department of Chemical Engineering and Food Technology, Faculty of Science, University of Cadiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Alvarez-Gallego, C. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Food Technology, Faculty of Science, University of Cadiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Sales, D. [Department of Environmental Technologies, Faculty of Marine and Environmental Sciences, University of Cadiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Romero Garcia, L.I. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Food Technology, Faculty of Science, University of Cadiz, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

Nitrogen management in landfill leachate: Application of SHARON, ANAMMOX and combined SHARON-ANAMMOX process  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significant research on ammonia removal from leachate by SHARON and ANAMMOX process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Operational parameters, microbiology, biochemistry and application of the process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SHARON-ANAMMOX process for leachate a new research and this paper gives wide facts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cost-effective process, alternative to existing technologies for leachate treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Address the issues and operational conditions for application in leachate treatment. - Abstract: In today's context of waste management, landfilling of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) is considered to be one of the standard practices worldwide. Leachate generated from municipal landfills has become a great threat to the surroundings as it contains high concentration of organics, ammonia and other toxic pollutants. Emphasis has to be placed on the removal of ammonia nitrogen in particular, derived from the nitrogen content of the MSW and it is a long term pollution problem in landfills which determines when the landfill can be considered stable. Several biological processes are available for the removal of ammonia but novel processes such as the Single Reactor System for High Activity Ammonia Removal over Nitrite (SHARON) and Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation (ANAMMOX) process have great potential and several advantages over conventional processes. The combined SHARON-ANAMMOX process for municipal landfill leachate treatment is a new, innovative and significant approach that requires more research to identify and solve critical issues. This review addresses the operational parameters, microbiology, biochemistry and application of both the processes to remove ammonia from leachate.

Sri Shalini, S., E-mail: srishalini10@gmail.com [Centre for Environmental Studies, Anna University, Chennai (India); Joseph, Kurian, E-mail: kuttiani@gmail.com [Centre for Environmental Studies, Anna University, Chennai (India)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

190

Combustion of municipal solid wastes with oil shale in a circulating fluidized bed. Quarterly report ending March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

This document contains a progress report for the Project Description of Grant No. DE-FG01-94CE15612, {open_quotes}Develop a Combustion of Municipal Solid Waste with Oil Shale in Circulating Fluidized Bed{close_quotes}, dated September 2, 1994. The Project Description lists and describes six tasks, four of which are complete, and two others nearing completion. A summary of progress on each task is presented in this report.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Atmospheric fluidized bed combustion of municipal solid waste: test program results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Air classified municipal solid waste (MSW) was fired in an atmospheric fluidized bed combustor at low excess air to simulate boiler conditions. The 7 ft/sup 2/ combustor at Combustion Power Company's energy laboratory in Menlo Park, CA, incorporates water tubes for heat extraction and recycles elutriated particles to the bed. System operation was stable while firing processed MSW for the duration of a 300-h test. Low excess air, low exhaust gas emissions, and constant bed temperature demonstrated feasibility of steam generation from fluidized bed combustion of MSW. During the 300-h test, combustion efficiency averaged 99%. Excess air was typically 44% while an average bed temperature of 1400/sup 0/F and an average superficial gas velocity of 4.6 fps were maintained. Typical exhaust emission levels were 30 ppM SO/sub 2/, 160 ppM NO/sub x/, 200 ppM CO, and 25 ppM hydrocarbons. No agglomeration of bed material or detrimental change in fluidization properties was experienced. A conceptual design study of a full scale plant to be located at Stanford University was based on process conditions from the 300-h test. The plant would produce 250,000 lb/hr steam at the maximum firing rate of 1000 tons per day (TPD) processed MSW. The average 800 TPD firing rate would utilize approximately 1200 TPD raw MSW from surrounding communities. The Stanford Solid Waste energy Program was aimed at development of a MSW-fired fluidized bed boiler and cogeneration plant to supply most of the energy needs of Stanford University.

Preuit, L C; Wilson, K B

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Emissions of PCDD/Fs from municipal solid waste incinerators in China Yuwen Ni, Haijun Zhang, Su Fan, Xueping Zhang, Qing Zhang, Jiping Chen *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s t r a c t Gas emission of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD.5% of the total production of the world (Zhang and Zhu, 2006). The lack of landfill sites for the wastes has operated in China (Yan et al., 2006). However, until now there was a lack of detailed information

Columbia University

193

Leachability of heavy metals from growth media containing source-separated municipal solid waste compost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The leaching of heavy metals in source-separated municipal solid waste (MSW) compost was determined by irrigation leaching of growth medium, admixed with varying amounts of compost, used for container grown plants. Perennial flowers (black-eyed Susan, Rudbeckia hirta L.) were grown in 2-L containers filled with the growth medium for a 10-wk period. Rainfall was supplemented with overhead irrigation to supply 2 cm of water per day. Leachates collected over each 2-wk period were analyzed for Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn using atomic spectrometry. Concentrations of the heavy metals in the leachates increased with increasing proportions of MSW compost in the growth medium, but decreased with time of leaching. Leaching of the metals occurred at relatively high concentrations initially, followed by continued leaching at low concentrations. The initial leaching of heavy metals is attributed to their soluble or exchangeable forms and the subsequent slow leaching to the solid compounds. The concentrations of the heavy metals remained below the current drinking water standards in all treatments throughout the leaching period. The results thus suggest that contamination of groundwater with heavy metals from source-separated MSW compost applied as a soil amendment should be negligible, as the low concentrations in the leachates leaving the surface soil would be further attenuated by the subsoil. 29 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Sawhney, B.L.; Bugbee, G.J.; Stilwell, D.E. [Connecticut Agricultural Experimental Station, New Haven, CT (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash: Characterization and kinetic studies of organic matter  

SciTech Connect

Bottom ash is the main solid residue which is produced by municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) facilities. To be reused in public works, it has to be stored previously a few months. This material is composed primarily of a mineral matrix but also contains unburnt organic matter. The mineral content and its change in the course of aging are relatively well-known, in contrast with the organic content. So in order to detect the phenomena responsible for changes in organic matter and their effects during aging, the concentrations of the main organic compounds previously characterized, the number of microorganisms, and the release of carbon dioxide were followed kinetically in model laboratory conditions. The results showed that the aging process led to the natural biodegradation of the organic matter available in bottom ash, composed essentially of carboxylic acids and n-alkanes (steroids and PAH`s to a lesser extent), and consequently that it would improve the bottom ash quality. Furthermore these results were confirmed by the study of aging conducted in conditions used in the industrial scale.

Dugenest, S.; Casabianca, H.; Grenier-Loustalot, M.F. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Vernaison (France). Service central d`Analyse; Combrisson, J. [Univ. Claude Bernard-Lyon I, Villeurbanne (France). Lab. d`Ecologie Microbienne du Sol

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Oxygen respirometry to assess stability and maturity of composted municipal solid waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The stability and maturity of compost prepared from municipal solid waste (MSW) at a full-scale composting plant was assessed through chemical, physical, and biological assays. Respiration bioassays used to determine stability (O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} respirometry) were sensitive to process control problems at the composting plant and indicated increasing stability with time. Radish (Raphanus sativus L.) and ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) growth bioassays revealed that immature compost samples inhibited growth. Growth of ryegrass in potting mix prepared with cured compost not amended with fertilizer was enhanced as compared to a pest control. Garden cress (Lepidium sativum L.) seed germination, used as an indicator of phytotoxicity, revealed inhibition of germination at all compost maturity levels. The phytotoxicity was though to be salt-related. Spearman rank-order correlations demonstrated that O{sub 2} respirometry, water-soluble organic C, and the water extract organic C to organic N ratio, significantly correlated with compost age and best indicated an acceptable level of stability. Oxygen respirometry also best predicted the potential for ryegrass growth, and an acceptable level of compost maturity. 31 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

Iannotti, D.A.; Grebus, M.E.; Toth, B.L.; Madden, L.V.; Hoitink, A.J. [Ohio State Univ./Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, Wooster, OH (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Municipal Solid Waste Combustion : Fuel Testing and Characterization : Task 1 Report, May 30, 1990-October 1, 1990.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to screen and characterize potential biomass fuels from waste streams. This will be accomplished by determining the types of pollutants produced while burning selected municipal waste, i.e., commercial mixed waste paper residential (curbside) mixed waste paper, and refuse derived fuel. These materials will be fired alone and in combination with wood, equal parts by weight. The data from these experiments could be utilized to size pollution control equipment required to meet emission standards. This document provides detailed descriptions of the testing methods and evaluation procedures used in the combustion testing and characterization project. The fuel samples will be examined thoroughly from the raw form to the exhaust emissions produced during the combustion test of a densified sample.

Bushnell, Dwight J.; Canova, Joseph H.; Dadkhah-Nikoo, Abbas.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

woody and grass waste, cardboard, mixed paper and otherwastes Woody wastes Cardboard Mixed paper Digestibilitycontent, 44.9 (grass wastes) – 128.3 (mixed paper) gallon of

Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

An Economic Assessment of Market-Based Approaches to Regulating the Municipal Solid Waste Stream  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation of biofuel waste energy and increases the rate ofthe design and siting of waste to energy incinerators. Theregion is burned in waste-to-energy incineration facilities.

Menell, Peter S.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Aerobic attached growth biofilter using tire chips and mixed broken glass as media for landfill leachate treatment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ontario regulations can necessitate expensive leachate treatment plants in large landfills. Lower-cost technologies may suit rural landfills due to lower waste toxicity and less proximity… (more)

Smith, Daniel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Aerobic Attached Growth Biofilter Using Tire Chips And Mixed Broken Glass As Media For Landfill Leachate Treatment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ontario regulations can necessitate expensive leachate treatment plants in large landfills. Lower-cost technologies may suit rural landfills due to lower waste toxicity and less proximity… (more)

Smith, Daniel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "municipal waste landfill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Nitrogen availability and leaching from soil amended with municipal solid waste compost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Beneficial use of municipal solid waste compost depends on identifying a management strategy that supports crop production and protects water quality. Effects of compost and N fertilizer management strategies on corn (Zea mays L.) yield and NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N leaching were evaluated in a 3-yr study on a Hubbard loamy sand soil. Two composts were each applied at either 90 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} yr{sup {minus}1} from 1993 to 1995, or at 270 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} in one application in 1993. The compost and non-amended plots were side dressed annually with N fertilizer as urea at 0, 125, and 250 kg ha{sup {minus}1}. Biochemical properties of the compost as well as compost management strongly affected crop response and fate of N. Compost increased grain yield with no significant yield response to N fertilizer with the single compost application in Year 1 and the annual compost application in Year 3. Plant N uptake increased with N fertilizer rate, except in the 270 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} compost treatments in Year 1. Over the 3-yr period, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N leaching with the 270 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} compost application was 1.8 times greater compared to that with the annual application. The estimated N mineralization ranged from 0 to 12% and 3 to 6% in the annual and single compost addition, respectively. Under the conditions of this study, annual compost application with reduced supplemental N fertilizer was the best management strategy to reach optimum crop yield while minimizing NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N leaching losses.

Mamo, M.; Rosen, C.J.; Halbach, T.R.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Toxicity mitigation and solidification of municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash using alkaline activated coal ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Incinerator fly ash (IFA) is added to an alkali activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Means of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in construction applications. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was chemically characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Environmentally friendly solution to IFA disposal by reducing its toxicity levels. - Abstract: Municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration is a common and effective practice to reduce the volume of solid waste in urban areas. However, the byproduct of this process is a fly ash (IFA), which contains large quantities of toxic contaminants. The purpose of this research study was to analyze the chemical, physical and mechanical behaviors resulting from the gradual introduction of IFA to an alkaline activated coal fly ash (CFA) matrix, as a mean of stabilizing the incinerator ash for use in industrial construction applications, where human exposure potential is limited. IFA and CFA were analyzed via X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Inductive coupled plasma (ICP) to obtain a full chemical analysis of the samples, its crystallographic characteristics and a detailed count of the eight heavy metals contemplated in US Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR). The particle size distribution of IFA and CFA was also recorded. EPA's Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) was followed to monitor the leachability of the contaminants before and after the activation. Also images obtained via Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), before and after the activation, are presented. Concrete made from IFA, CFA and IFA-CFA mixes was subjected to a full mechanical characterization; tests include compressive strength, flexural strength, elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio and setting time. The leachable heavy metal contents (except for Se) were below the maximum allowable limits and in many cases even below the reporting limit. The leachable Chromium was reduced from 0.153 down to 0.0045 mg/L, Arsenic from 0.256 down to 0.132 mg/L, Selenium from 1.05 down to 0.29 mg/L, Silver from 0.011 down to .001 mg/L, Barium from 2.06 down to 0.314 mg/L and Mercury from 0.007 down to 0.001 mg/L. Although the leachable Cd exhibited an increase from 0.49 up to 0.805 mg/L and Pd from 0.002 up to 0.029 mg/L, these were well below the maximum limits of 1.00 and 5.00 mg/L, respectively.

Ivan Diaz-Loya, E. [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Allouche, Erez N., E-mail: allouche@latech.edu [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Eklund, Sven; Joshi, Anupam R. [Department of Chemistry, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States); Kupwade-Patil, Kunal [Alternative Cementitious Binders Laboratory (ACBL), Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

Life-cycle assessment of municipal solid waste management alternatives with consideration of uncertainty: SIWMS development and application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the development and application of the Stochastic Integrated Waste Management Simulator (SIWMS) model. SIWMS provides a detailed view of the environmental impacts and associated costs of municipal solid waste (MSW) management alternatives under conditions of uncertainty. The model follows a life-cycle inventory approach extended with compensatory systems to provide more equitable bases for comparing different alternatives. Economic performance is measured by the net present value. The model is verified against four publicly available models under deterministic conditions and then used to study the impact of uncertainty on Sydney's MSW management 'best practices'. Uncertainty has a significant effect on all impact categories. The greatest effect is observed in the global warming category where a reversal of impact direction is predicted. The reliability of the system is most sensitive to uncertainties in the waste processing and disposal. The results highlight the importance of incorporating uncertainty at all stages to better understand the behaviour of the MSW system.

El Hanandeh, Ali, E-mail: alel5804@uni.sydney.edu.a [School of Civil Engineering, Building J05, University of Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia); El-Zein, Abbas [School of Civil Engineering, Building J05, University of Sydney NSW 2006 (Australia)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 9:27am Addthis Photo of a bulldozer on top of a large trash mound in a landfill with a cloudy sky in the backdrop. Methane and other gases produced from landfill decomposition can be leveraged for energy. This page provides a brief overview of landfill gas energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply landfill gas energy within the Federal sector. Overview Landfill gases are a viable energy resource created during waste decomposition. Landfills are present in most communities. These resources can be tapped to generate heat and electricity. As organic waste decomposes, bio-gas is produced made up of roughly half methane, half carbon dioxide, and small amounts of non-methane organic

205

Resource recovery potential from secondary components of segregated municipal solid wastes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for decentralized biogas plants to be operated in the vicinity. We characterized the fermen- tation potential of six differently for each of the feedstocks to obtain a higher gas recovery. Bagasse produced the largest fraction-systems. The existing centralized collection and open landfill systems are gradually becoming expensive and will need

Columbia University

206

Utilization of biocatalysts in cellulose waste minimization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cellulose, a polymer of glucose, is the principal component of biomass and, therefore, a major source of waste that is either buried or burned. Examples of biomass waste include agricultural crop residues, forestry products, and municipal wastes. Recycling of this waste is important for energy conservation as well as waste minimization and there is some probability that in the future biomass could become a major energy source and replace fossil fuels that are currently used for fuels and chemicals production. It has been estimated that in the United States, between 100-450 million dry tons of agricultural waste are produced annually, approximately 6 million dry tons of animal waste, and of the 190 million tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) generated annually, approximately two-thirds is cellulosic in nature and over one-third is paper waste. Interestingly, more than 70% of MSW is landfilled or burned, however landfill space is becoming increasingly scarce. On a smaller scale, important cellulosic products such as cellulose acetate also present waste problems; an estimated 43 thousand tons of cellulose ester waste are generated annually in the United States. Biocatalysts could be used in cellulose waste minimization and this chapter describes their characteristics and potential in bioconversion and bioremediation processes.

Woodward, J.; Evans, B.R.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Passive drainage and biofiltration of landfill gas: Australian field trial  

SciTech Connect

In Australia a significant number of landfill waste disposal sites do not incorporate measures for the collection and treatment of landfill gas. This includes many old/former landfill sites, rural landfill sites, non-putrescible solid waste and inert waste landfill sites, where landfill gas generation is low and it is not commercially viable to extract and beneficially utilize the landfill gas. Previous research has demonstrated that biofiltration has the potential to degrade methane in landfill gas, however, the microbial processes can be affected by many local conditions and factors including moisture content, temperature, nutrient supply, including the availability of oxygen and methane, and the movement of gas (oxygen and methane) to/from the micro-organisms. A field scale trial is being undertaken at a landfill site in Sydney, Australia, to investigate passive drainage and biofiltration of landfill gas as a means of managing landfill gas emissions at low to moderate gas generation landfill sites. The design and construction of the trial is described and the experimental results will provide in-depth knowledge on the application of passive gas drainage and landfill gas biofiltration under Sydney (Australian) conditions, including the performance of recycled materials for the management of landfill gas emissions.

Dever, S.A. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia) and GHD Pty. Ltd., 10 Bond Street, Sydney, NSW 2000 (Australia)]. E-mail: stuart_dever@ghd.com.au; Swarbrick, G.E. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)]. E-mail: g.swarbrick@unsw.edu.au; Stuetz, R.M. [School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)]. E-mail: r.stuetz@unsw.edu.au

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

T2LBM Version 1.0: Landfill bioreactor model for TOUGH2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The need to control gas and leachate production and minimize refuse volume in landfills has motivated the development of landfill simulation models that can be used by operators to predict and design optimal treatment processes. T2LBM is a module for the TOUGH2 simulator that implements a Landfill Bioreactor Model to provide simulation capability for the processes of aerobic or anaerobic biodegradation of municipal solid waste and the associated flow and transport of gas and liquid through the refuse mass. T2LBM incorporates a Monod kinetic rate law for the biodegradation of acetic acid in the aqueous phase by either aerobic or anaerobic microbes as controlled by the local oxygen concentration. Acetic acid is considered a proxy for all biodegradable substrates in the refuse. Aerobic and anaerobic microbes are assumed to be immobile and not limited by nutrients in their growth. Methane and carbon dioxide generation due to biodegradation with corresponding thermal effects are modeled. The numerous parameters needed to specify biodegradation are input by the user in the SELEC block of the TOUGH2 input file. Test problems show that good matches to laboratory experiments of biodegradation can be obtained. A landfill test problem demonstrates the capabilities of T2LBM for a hypothetical two-dimensional landfill scenario with permeability heterogeneity and compaction.

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2001-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

209

The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as agricultural wastes and energy crops, also raisesacid hydrolysis. Energy Biomass Wastes 13:1281- 16. Green M,fraction. Energy from Biomass and Wastes 15:725-43. 2. Aden

Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Micro-scale anaerobic digestion of point source components of organic fraction of municipal solid waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Micro-scale anaerobic digestion of point source components of organic fraction of municipal solid that are needed when designing plug-flow type anaerobic bioreactors. More specifically, the decomposition patterns

Columbia University

211

An Economic Assessment of Market-Based Approaches to Regulating the Municipal Solid Waste Stream  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total (lbs) Total recycle compost Community Characteristicsdiscards percent diverted compost Waste/HH/Day after PAYTof recycled waste streams, compost, and possibly from energy

Menell, Peter S.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Solid Waste Policies (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policies (Iowa) Policies (Iowa) Solid Waste Policies (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fuel Distributor Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Department of Natural Resources This statute establishes the support of the state for alternative waste management practices that reduce the reliance upon land disposal and incorporate resource recovery. Cities and counties are required to establish and operate a comprehensive solid waste reduction program. These regulations discuss land application of processed wastes as well as requirements for sanitary landfills and for groundwater monitoring near land disposal sites

213

Multiphase Modeling of Flow, Transport, and Biodegradation in a Mesoscale Landfill Bioreactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The need to control gas and leachate production and minimize refuse volume in municipal solid waste landfills has motivated the development of landfill simulation models to predict and design optimal treatment processes. We have developed a multiphase and multicomponent nonisothermal module called T2LBM for the three-dimensional TOUGH2 flow and transport simulator. T2LBM can be used to simulate aerobic or anaerobic biodegradation of municipal solid waste and the associated flow and transport of gas and liquid through the refuse mass. Acetic acid is used as a proxy for all biodegradable substrates in the refuse. T2LBM incorporates a Monod kinetic rate law for the biodegradation of acetic acid by either aerobic or anaerobic microbes as controlled by the local oxygen concentration. We have verified the model against published data, and applied it to our own mesoscale laboratory aerobic landfill bioreactor experiments. We observe spatial variability of flow and biodegradation consistent with permeability heterogeneity and the geometry of the radial grid. The model is capable of matching results of a shut-in test where the respiration of the system is measured over time.

Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Borglin, Sharon E.; Hazen, Terry C.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Recovery of solid fuel from municipal solid waste by hydrothermal treatment using subcritical water  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrothermal treatment using subcritical water was studied to recover solid fuel from MSW. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer More than 75% of carbon in MSW was recovered as char. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heating value of char was comparable to that of brown coal and lignite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polyvinyl chloride was decomposed at 295 Degree-Sign C and 8 MPa and was removed by washing. - Abstract: Hydrothermal treatments using subcritical water (HTSW) such as that at 234 Degree-Sign C and 3 MPa (LT condition) and 295 Degree-Sign C and 8 MPa (HT condition) were investigated to recover solid fuel from municipal solid waste (MSW). Printing paper, dog food (DF), wooden chopsticks, and mixed plastic film and sheets of polyethylene, polypropylene, and polystyrene were prepared as model MSW components, in which polyvinylchloride (PVC) powder and sodium chloride were used to simulate Cl sources. While more than 75% of carbon in paper, DF, and wood was recovered as char under both LT and HT conditions, plastics did not degrade under either LT or HT conditions. The heating value (HV) of obtained char was 13,886-27,544 kJ/kg and was comparable to that of brown coal and lignite. Higher formation of fixed carbon and greater oxygen dissociation during HTSW were thought to improve the HV of char. Cl atoms added as PVC powder and sodium chloride to raw material remained in char after HTSW. However, most Cl originating from PVC was found to converse into soluble Cl compounds during HTSW under the HT condition and could be removed by washing. From these results, the merit of HTSW as a method of recovering solid fuel from MSW is considered to produce char with minimal carbon loss without a drying process prior to HTSW. In addition, Cl originating from PVC decomposes into soluble Cl compound under the HT condition. The combination of HTSW under the HT condition and char washing might improve the quality of char as alternative fuel.

Hwang, In-Hee, E-mail: hwang@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Solid Waste Disposal Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060 8628 (Japan); Aoyama, Hiroya; Matsuto, Toshihiko; Nakagishi, Tatsuhiro; Matsuo, Takayuki [Laboratory of Solid Waste Disposal Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060 8628 (Japan)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

Assessing recycling versus incineration of key materials in municipal waste: The importance of efficient energy recovery and transport distances  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model the environmental impact of recycling and incineration of household waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recycling of paper, glass, steel and aluminium is better than incineration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recycling and incineration of cardboard and plastic can be equally good alternatives. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recyclables can be transported long distances and still have environmental benefits. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Paper has a higher environmental benefit than recyclables found in smaller amounts. - Abstract: Recycling of materials from municipal solid waste is commonly considered to be superior to any other waste treatment alternative. For the material fractions with a significant energy content this might not be the case if the treatment alternative is a waste-to-energy plant with high energy recovery rates. The environmental impacts from recycling and from incineration of six material fractions in household waste have been compared through life cycle assessment assuming high-performance technologies for material recycling as well as for waste incineration. The results showed that there are environmental benefits when recycling paper, glass, steel and aluminium instead of incinerating it. For cardboard and plastic the results were more unclear, depending on the level of energy recovery at the incineration plant, the system boundaries chosen and which impact category was in focus. Further, the environmental impact potentials from collection, pre-treatment and transport was compared to the environmental benefit from recycling and this showed that with the right means of transport, recyclables can in most cases be transported long distances. However, the results also showed that recycling of some of the material fractions can only contribute marginally in improving the overall waste management system taking into consideration their limited content in average Danish household waste.

Merrild, Hanna [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Larsen, Anna W., E-mail: awla@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Christensen, Thomas H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Miljoevej, Building 113, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

216

The estimation of N{sub 2}O emissions from municipal solid waste incineration facilities: The Korea case  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The greenhouse gases (GHGs) generated in municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration are carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4}), and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O). In South Korea case, the total of GHGs from the waste incineration facilities has been increasing at an annual rate 10%. In these view, waste incineration facilities should consider to reduce GHG emissions. This study is designed to estimate the N{sub 2}O emission factors from MSW incineration plants, and calculate the N{sub 2}O emissions based on these factors. The three MSW incinerators examined in this study were either stoker or both stoker and rotary kiln facilities. The N{sub 2}O concentrations from the MSW incinerators were measured using gas chromatography-electron capture detection (GC-ECD) equipment. The average of the N{sub 2}O emission factors for the M01 plant, M02 plant, and M03 plant are 71, 75, and 153 g-N{sub 2}O/ton-waste, respectively. These results showed a significant difference from the default values of the intergovernmental panel on climate change (IPCC), while approaching those values derived in Japan and Germany. Furthermore, comparing the results of this study to the Korea Energy Economics Institute (KEEI) (2007) data on waste incineration, N{sub 2}O emissions from MSW incineration comprised 19% of the total N{sub 2}O emissions.

Park, Sangwon; Choi, Jun-Ho [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Yonsei University, 262 Seongsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jinwon, E-mail: jwpark@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Yonsei University, 262 Seongsanno, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

The Potential of Cellulosic Ethanol Production from Municipal Solid Waste: A Technical and Economic Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

process streams. Handb. Bioethanol:395-415. 10. Ehrman T.solid waste used as bioethanol sources and its relatedof cellulosic biomass into bioethanol as an alternative

Shi, Jian; Ebrik, Mirvat; Yang, Bin; Wyman, Charles E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Combustion of municipal solid wastes with oil shale in a circulating fluidized bed. Quarterly report, quarter ending 31 December 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The test plan is designed to demonstrate that oil shale co-combusted with municipal solid waste (MSW) can reduce gaseous pollutants (SO{sub 2}, CO) to acceptable levels (90%+ reduction) and produce a cementitious ash which will, at a minimum, be acceptable in normal land fills. The small-scale combustion testing will be accomplished in a 6-in. circulating fluid bed combustor (CFBC) at Hazen Research Laboratories. This work will be patterned after the study the authors conducted in 1988 when coal and oil shale were co-combusted in a program sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute. The specific purpose of the test program will be to: determine the required ratio of oil shale to MSW by determining the ratio of absorbent to pollutant (A/P); determine the effect of temperature and resident time in the reactor; and determine if kinetic model developed for coal/oil shale mixture is applicable.

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Environmental & economical optimization for municipal solid waste collection problems, a modeling and algorithmic approach case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing environmental concerns and interests in material and energy conservation have lead to increasing advancement in the management of solid waste over the past two decades. The field of modeling of waste management system, as opposed to the modeling ... Keywords: CO2 emission, MSW collection and routing, MSW costs analysis, network design

F. Rhoma; Z. Zhang; Y. Luo; B. Noche

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Waste2Energy Holdings | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Holdings Holdings Jump to: navigation, search Name Waste2Energy Holdings Place Greenville, South Carolina Zip 29609 Sector Biomass, Renewable Energy Product The Waste2Energy Holdings is a supplier of proprietary gasification technology designed to convert municipal solid waste, biomass and other solid waste streams traditionally destined for landfill into clean renewable energy. References Waste2Energy Holdings[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Waste2Energy Holdings is a company located in Greenville, South Carolina . References ↑ "Waste2Energy Holdings" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Waste2Energy_Holdings&oldid=352938

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221

Landfill stabilization focus area: Technology summary  

SciTech Connect

Landfills within the DOE Complex as of 1990 are estimated to contain 3 million cubic meters of buried waste. The DOE facilities where the waste is predominantly located are at Hanford, the Savannah River Site (SRS), the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP). Landfills include buried waste, whether on pads or in trenches, sumps, ponds, pits, cribs, heaps and piles, auger holes, caissons, and sanitary landfills. Approximately half of all DOE buried waste was disposed of before 1970. Disposal regulations at that time permitted the commingling of various types of waste (i.e., transuranic, low-level radioactive, hazardous). As a result, much of the buried waste throughout the DOE Complex is presently believed to be contaminated with both hazardous and radioactive materials. DOE buried waste typically includes transuranic-contaminated radioactive waste (TRU), low-level radioactive waste (LLW), hazardous waste per 40 CFR 26 1, greater-than-class-C waste per CFR 61 55 (GTCC), mixed TRU waste, and mixed LLW. The mission of the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area is to develop, demonstrate, and deliver safer,more cost-effective and efficient technologies which satisfy DOE site needs for the remediation and management of landfills. The LSFA is structured into five technology areas to meet the landfill remediation and management needs across the DOE complex. These technology areas are: assessment, retrieval, treatment, containment, and stabilization. Technical tasks in each of these areas are reviewed.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Comments of the Integrated Waste Services Association Florida PSC Renewable Portfolio Standard Workshop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The following comments are submitted by the Integrated Waste Services Association (IWSA). IWSA is the national trade association representing the nation’s waste-to-energy industry and municipalities. Waste-to-energy facilities produce clean, renewable energy through the combustion of municipal solid waste in specially designed power plants equipped with the most modern pollution control equipment to clean emissions. Trash volume is reduced by 90 % and the remaining residue is safely reused or disposed in landfills. There are 87 waste-to-energy plants operating in 25 states managing about 13 percent of America’s trash, or about 95,000 tons each day. Waste-toenergy generates about 2,700 megawatts of electricity to meet the power needs of nearly 2.3 million homes while serving the trash disposal needs of more than 36 million people. In Florida, 11 WTE plants process over 18,000 tons per day of municipal solid waste, and 514 megawatts of electricity. Waste to Energy benefits in relation to Greenhouse Gases: In response to recent discussions regarding greenhouse gases at the workshop, IWSA would like to point out that a number of studies have shown that waste-to-energy is better than “carbon neutral.” Use of waste-to-energy avoids emissions from fossil fuel-fired electric generation, fugitive methane emissions from decomposing trash in landfills and avoidance of emissions from production of new

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL  

SciTech Connect

''Conventional'' waste landfills emit methane, a potent greenhouse gas, in quantities such that landfill methane is a major factor in global climate change. Controlled landfilling is a novel approach to manage landfills for rapid completion of total gas generation, maximizing gas capture and minimizing emissions of methane to the atmosphere. With controlled landfilling, methane generation is accelerated and brought to much earlier completion by improving conditions for biological processes (principally moisture levels) in the landfill. Gas recovery efficiency approaches 100% through use of surface membrane cover over porous gas recovery layers operated at slight vacuum. A field demonstration project's results at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California are, to date, highly encouraging. Two major controlled landfilling benefits would be the reduction of landfill methane emissions to minuscule levels, and the recovery of greater amounts of landfill methane energy in much shorter times than with conventional landfill practice. With the large amount of US landfill methane generated, and greenhouse potency of methane, better landfill methane control can play a substantial role in reduction of US greenhouse gas emissions.

Don Augenstein

1999-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

224

Examining the effectiveness of municipal solid waste management systems: An integrated cost-benefit analysis perspective with a financial cost modeling in Taiwan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to develop a sound material-cycle society, cost-effective municipal solid waste (MSW) management systems are required for the municipalities in the context of the integrated accounting system for MSW management. Firstly, this paper attempts to establish an integrated cost-benefit analysis (CBA) framework for evaluating the effectiveness of MSW management systems. In this paper, detailed cost/benefit items due to waste problems are particularly clarified. The stakeholders of MSW management systems, including the decision-makers of the municipalities and the citizens, are expected to reconsider the waste problems in depth and thus take wise actions with the aid of the proposed CBA framework. Secondly, focusing on the financial cost, this study develops a generalized methodology to evaluate the financial cost-effectiveness of MSW management systems, simultaneously considering the treatment technological levels and policy effects. The impacts of the influencing factors on the annual total and average financial MSW operation and maintenance (O and M) costs are analyzed in the Taiwanese case study with a demonstrative short-term future projection of the financial costs under scenario analysis. The established methodology would contribute to the evaluation of the current policy measures and to the modification of the policy design for the municipalities.

Weng, Yu-Chi, E-mail: clyde.weng@gmail.com [Solid Waste Management Research Center, Okayama University, Okayama (Japan); Fujiwara, Takeshi [Solid Waste Management Research Center, Okayama University, Okayama (Japan)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

Agencies plan continued DOE landfill remediation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agencies plan continued DOE landfill remediation Agencies plan continued DOE landfill remediation The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Idaho Department of Environmental Quality and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency have released a planning document that specifies how DOE will continue to remediate a landfill containing hazardous and transuranic waste at DOE's Idaho Site located in eastern Idaho. The Phase 1 Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan for Operable Unit 7-13/14 document was issued after the September 2008 Record of Decision (ROD) and implements the retrieval of targeted waste at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) within the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). The SDA began receiving waste in 1952 and contains radioactive and chemical waste in approximately 35 acres of disposal pits, trenches and soil vaults.

226

Pilot-scale anaerobic co-digestion of municipal biomass waste and waste activated sludge in China: Effect of organic loading rate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co-digestion of municipal biomass waste (MBW) and waste activated sludge (WAS) was examined on a pilot-scale reactor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer System performance and stability under OLR of 1.2, 2.4, 3.6, 4.8, 6.0 and 8.0 kg VS (m{sup 3} d){sup -1} were analyzed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A maximum methane production rate of 2.94 m{sup 3} (m{sup 3} d){sup -1} was achieved at OLR of 8.0 kg VS (m{sup 3} d){sup -1} and HRT of 15d. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer With the increasing OLRs, pH values, VS removal rate and methane concentration decreased and VFA increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The changing of biogas production rate can be a practical approach to monitor and control anaerobic digestion system. - Abstract: The effects of organic loading rate on the performance and stability of anaerobic co-digestion of municipal biomass waste (MBW) and waste activated sludge (WAS) were investigated on a pilot-scale reactor. The results showed that stable operation was achieved with organic loading rates (OLR) of 1.2-8.0 kg volatile solid (VS) (m{sup 3} d){sup -1}, with VS reduction rates of 61.7-69.9%, and volumetric biogas production of 0.89-5.28 m{sup 3} (m{sup 3} d){sup -1}. A maximum methane production rate of 2.94 m{sup 3} (m{sup 3} d){sup -1} was achieved at OLR of 8.0 kg VS (m{sup 3} d){sup -1} and hydraulic retention time of 15 days. With increasing OLRs, the anaerobic reactor showed a decrease in VS removal rate, average pH value and methane concentration, and a increase of volatile fatty acid concentration. By monitoring the biogas production rate (BPR), the anaerobic digestion system has a higher acidification risk under an OLR of 8.0 kg VS (m{sup 3} d){sup -1}. This result remarks the possibility of relating bioreactor performance with BPR in order to better understand and monitor anaerobic digestion process.

Liu Xiao, E-mail: liuxiao07@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn [School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wang Wei; Shi Yunchun; Zheng Lei [School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Gao Xingbao [Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Qiao Wei [State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, China University of Petroleum, Beijing 102249 (China); Zhou Yingjun [Department of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Katsura, Nisikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

Methane Gas Utilization Project from Landfill at Ellery (NY)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Landfill Gas to Electric Energy Generation and Transmission at Chautauqua County Landfill, Town of Ellery, New York. The goal of this project was to create a practical method with which the energy, of the landfill gas produced by the decomposing waste at the Chautauqua County Landfill, could be utilized. This goal was accomplished with the construction of a landfill gas to electric energy plant (originally 6.4MW and now 9.6MW) and the construction of an inter-connection power-line, from the power-plant to the nearest (5.5 miles) power-grid point.

Pantelis K. Panteli

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

228

Sustainable use of California biomass resources can help meet state and national bioenergy targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as mixed municipal solid wastes, thereby accruing addi-Landfilled mixed paper Landfilled wood and green waste with

Jenkins, Bryan M; Williams, Robert B; Gildart, Martha C; Kaffka, Stephen R.; Hartsough, Bruce; Dempster, Peter G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Guide to Clean Development Mechanism Projects Related to Municipal Solid  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Guide to Clean Development Mechanism Projects Related to Municipal Solid Guide to Clean Development Mechanism Projects Related to Municipal Solid Waste Management Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: A Guide to Clean Development Mechanism Projects Related to Municipal Solid Waste Management Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: - Landfill Gas, - Waste to Energy Topics: Implementation, Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.unescap.org/esd/environment/publications/cdm/Guide.pdf UN Region: Central Asia, Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, "Pacific" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

230

Bioreactor Landfill Research and Demonstration Project Northern Oaks Landfill, Harrison, MI  

SciTech Connect

A bioreactor landfill cell with 1.2-acre footprint was constructed, filled, operated, and monitored at Northern Oaks Recycling and Disposal Facility (NORDF) at Harrison, MI. With a filled volume of 74,239 cubic yards, the cell contained approximately 35,317 tons of municipal solid waste (MSW) and 20,777 tons of cover soil. It was laid on the slope of an existing cell but separated by a geosynthetic membrane liner. After the cell reached a design height of 60 feet, it was covered with a geosynthetic membrane cap. A three-dimensional monitoring system to collect data at 48 different locations was designed and installed during the construction phase of the bioreactor cell. Each location had a cluster of monitoring devices consisting of a probe to monitor moisture and temperature, a leachate collection basin, and a gas sampling port. An increase in moisture content of the MSW in the bioreactor cell was achieved by pumping leachate collected on-site from various other cells, as well as recirculation of leachate from the bioreactor landfill cell itself. Three types of leachate injection systems were evaluated in this bioreactor cell for their efficacy to distribute pumped leachate uniformly: a leachate injection pipe buried in a 6-ft wide horizontal stone mound, a 15-ft wide geocomposite drainage layer, and a 60-ft wide geocomposite drainage layer. All leachate injection systems were installed on top of the compacted waste surface. The distribution of water and resulting MSW moisture content throughout the bioreactor cell was found to be similar for the three designs. Water coming into and leaving the cell (leachate pumped in, precipitation, snow, evaporation, and collected leachate) was monitored in order to carry out a water balance. Using a leachate injection rate of 26 – 30 gal/yard3, the average moisture content increased from 25% to 35% (wet based) over the period of this study. One of the key aspects of this bioreactor landfill study was to evaluate bioreactor start up and performance in locations with colder climate. For lifts filled during the summer months, methane generation started within three months after completion of the lift. For lifts filled in winter months, very little methane production occurred even eight months after filling. The temperature data indicated that subzero or slightly above zero (oC) temperatures persisted for unusually long periods (more than six months) in the lifts filled during winter months. This was likely due to the high thermal insulation capability of the MSW and the low level of biological activity during start up. This observation indicates that bioreactor landfills located in cold climate and filled during winter months may require mechanisms to increase temperature and initiate biodegradation. Thus, besides moisture, temperature may be the next important factor controlling the biological decomposition in anaerobic bioreactor landfills. Spatial and temporal characterization of leachate samples indicated the presence of low levels of commonly used volatile organic compounds (including acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone, and toluene) and metals (including arsenic, chromium, and zinc). Changes and leachate and gaseous sample characteristics correlated with enhanced biological activity and increase in temperature. Continued monitoring of this bioreactor landfill cell is expected to yield critical data needed for start up, design, and operation of this emerging process.

Zhao, Xiando; Voice, Thomas; and Hashsham, Syed A.

2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

231

Combustion of municipal solid wastes with oil shale in a circulating fluidized bed. Second quarterly report ending March 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Project Description lists and describes six tasks, three of which are virtually complete, with three others underway. A summary of progress on each task follows. Task 1: Development of a Detailed Test Plan. This task is complete. Task 2: Preparation of Test Equipment. This task is complete. Two test units (a six-inch internal diameter and a fifteen-inch internal diameter unit) were prepared and used as described under Task 4. Task 3: Obtain test materials. The required amounts of oil shale and pelletized municipal solid waste have been obtained, tested, and found to be suitable. We have obtained an adequate quantity of a pelletized ``standard`` MSW from BEPR/BFI, Eden Prairie, MN. For test purposes, we synthesized the desired ``worst probable case`` of MSW by the addition of sulfur and chlorine to reach the sulfur and chlorine levels characteristic of such waste. Task 4: Execute Feasibility Demonstration Program. The fluidized bed tests associated with the program have been completed. Analysis of the results is continuing. Testing of the waste stream material generated from these runs will begin about 6 April to evaluate its possible use as cement for specific applications. Information on the technical feasibility of the invention as indicated by the fluid bed test program is included as Attachment A. The results demonstrate that the process is technically feasible. Task 5: Data Analysis. This task is beginning. Task 6: Project Management, Reporting, and Necessary Liaison Activities. Those portions of this task associated with work done on Tasks 1 through 4 have been completed. This task will continue throughout the period of the study. In summary, work is proceeding within budget. No serious problems in the next scheduled tasks are foreseen.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Development of Energy Balances for the State of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

geothermal, wind, solar, landfill gas and municipal solidgeothermal, wind, solar, landfill gas and municipal solidsolid wasted, and landfill gas is also shown in this

Murtishaw, Scott; Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Masanet, Eric; Worrell, Ernst; Sahtaye, Jayant

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Landfill Gas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Gas Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Landfill Gas Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleLandfillGas&oldid267173"...

234

Biowaste and vegetable waste compost application to agriculture.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The landfilling of biodegradable waste is proven to contribute to environmental degradation. Compost use in agriculture is increasing as both an alternative to landfilling for… (more)

Kokkora, Maria I.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Sustainable sanitary landfills for neglected small cities in developing countries: The semi-mechanized trench method from Villanueva, Honduras  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Open dumping is the most common form of waste disposal in neglected small cities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Semi-mechanized landfills can be a sustainable option for small cities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present the theory of design and operation of semi-mechanized landfills. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Villanueva, Honduras has operated its semi-mechanized landfill for 15 years. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The cost of operation is US$4.60/ton with a land requirement of 0.2m{sup 2}/person-year. - Abstract: Open dumping is the most common practice for the disposal of urban solid wastes in the least developed regions of Africa, Asia and Latin America. Sanitary landfill design and operation has traditionally focused on large cities, but cities with fewer than 50,000 in population can comprise from 6% to 45% of a given country's total population. These thousands of small cities cannot afford to operate a sanitary landfill in the way it is proposed for large cities, where heavy equipment is used to spread and compact the waste in daily cells, and then to excavate, transport and apply daily cover, and leachate is managed with collection and treatment systems. This paper presents an alternative approach for small cities, known as the semi-mechanized trench method, which was developed in Villanueva, Honduras. In the semi-mechanized trench method a hydraulic excavator is used for 1-3 days to dig a trench that will last at least a month before it is filled with waste. Trucks can easily unload their wastes into the trench, and the wastes compact naturally due to semi-aerobic biodegradation, after which the trenches are refilled and covered. The exposed surface area is minimal since only the top surface of the wastes is exposed, the remainder being covered by the sides and bottom of the trench. The surplus material from trench excavation can be valorized for use as engineering fill onsite or off. The landfill in Villanueva has operated for 15 years, using a total land area of approximately 11 ha for a population that grew from 23,000 to 48,000, with a land requirement of 0.2 m{sup 2}/person year, a cover to waste ratio of 0.2, and an estimated soil surplus of 298,000 m{sup 3} that is valorized and used onsite. The landfill has been operated solely by the municipality with an operational cost in 2010 estimated at US$4.60 per ton. A modified water balance analysis at Villanueva shows negligible leachate generation from covered trenches and 700 m{sup 3}/yr (60 m{sup 3}/ha yr) from the two open trenches required for daily operation. If the site were an open dump, however, leachate generation is estimated to be 3900 m{sup 3}/ha yr and contaminated runoff 5000 m{sup 3}/ha yr. A simple model used to estimate dilution of generated leachate based on groundwater flow data and aquifer stratigraphy suggests that the leachate will be diluted by a factor of 0.01 in the aquifer. Leachate contaminants will not accumulate because the aquifer discharges to the Ulua River 2 km south of the landfill. While not suitable for all sites, the Villanueva method nevertheless serves as an excellent example of how a small city landfill with natural compaction of waste and attenuation of leachate can be sustainably operated.

Oakley, Stewart M., E-mail: soakley@csuchico.edu [Department of Civil Engineering, Chico State University, California State University, Chico, CA 95929 (United States); Jimenez, Ramon, E-mail: rjimenez1958@yahoo.com [Public Works, Municipality of Villanueva, Cortes (Honduras)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

Planning document for the Advanced Landfill Cover Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy and Department of Defense are faced with the closure of thousands of decommissioned radioactive, hazardous, and mixed waste landfills as a part of ongoing Environmental Restoration activities. Regulations on the closure of hazardous and radioactive waste landfills require the construction of a ``low-permeability`` cover over the unit to limit the migration of liquids into the underlying waste. These landfills must be maintained and monitored for 30 years to ensure that hazardous materials are not migrating from the landfill. This test plan is intended as an initial road map for planning, designing, constructing, evaluating, and documenting the Advanced Landfill Cover Demonstration (ALCD). It describes the goals/ objectives, scope, tasks, responsibilities, technical approach, and deliverables for the demonstration.

Hakonson, T.E. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Center for Ecological Risk Assessment & Management; Bostick, K.V. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Environmental Science Group

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Processing high solids concentration of municipal solid waste by anaerobic digester for methane production  

SciTech Connect

Cellulosic solids are pretreated by calcium hydroxide to produce salts of volatile orangic acids and other water-soluble substances. Pure cellulose, sawdust, and waste paper are used as model substances for the study of alkaline degradation. It is found that sawdust is more difficult to degrade than the other two substances. The cooking conditions for high conversion of model substances and high yeild of orangic acids are found to be 275/degree/C to 300/degree/C with the corresponding reaction time from 30 minutes to 15 minutes. The cooking liquor can be readily fermented in an anaerobic fluidized-bed digester for methane production. The cooking liquor from different reaction conditions can all be digested by the methanogens. Higher than 90% of COD can be removed under the conditions of low organic loading rate (<2.0 g COD/1/day) and low hydraulic retention time (1.5 to 2.0 days). 14 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Tsao, G.T.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Clean energy from municipal solid waste. ERIP technical progress report {number_sign}6  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ground carbonized RDF slurry from the grinding trials at IKA Works at approximately 50 wt.% solids was sealed in drums and shipped to the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER) for the dioxin/furan and trace heavy metal combustion tests. In addition, a fuel characterization and trace component analysis was completed for this final carbonized RDF slurry fuel. This final fuel was a blend of several fuels from the pilot scale slurry carbonization experiments. As can be seen from the data, the final carbonized RDF has an exceptional heating value and volatile matter content. In addition, trace components are significantly lower than the raw RDF pellets. The report summarizes results from combustion tests and air pollution monitoring of these tests. For the upcoming time period 10/96--01/97, it is anticipated that the analysis of the dioxin/furan and trace heavy metal combustion test will be completed. This analysis includes rheology and particle size distribution analysis of the carbonized RDF slurry fuel, carbon content and TCLP of the combustion ash, trace heavy metal balances around combustor, and dioxin/furan emissions. Finally, the slurry carbonization computer model and computer simulations will be completed in the next reporting period (including the waste water treatment subsystem). Based upon this computer model, initial economic estimates and optimizations of the slurry carbonization process will be completed in the next reporting period.

NONE

1996-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

239

An assessment of management practices of wood and wood-related wastes in the urban environment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Environmental Protection Agency estimates that yard waste{sup 1} accounts for approximately 16% of the municipal solid waste (MSW) stream (US EPA, 1994). Until recently, specific data and related information on this component of the (MSW) stream has been limited. The purposes of this study, phase two of the three-phase assessment of urban wood waste issues, are to assess and describe current alternatives to landfills for urban wood waste management; provide guidance on the management of urban wood waste to organizations that produce or manage wood waste; and clarify state regulatory and policy positions affecting these organizations. For this study, urban wood waste is defined as solid waste generated by tree and landscape maintenance services (public and private). Urban wood waste includes the following materials: unchipped mixed wood, unchipped logs, and unchipped tops and brush; clearing and grubbing waste; fall leaves and grass clippings; and chips and whole stumps. Construction and demolition debris and consumer-generated yard waste are not included in this study. Generators of urban wood waste include various organizations; municipal, county, and commercial tree care divisions; nurseries, orchards, and golf courses; municipal park and recreation departments; and electric and telephone utility power line maintenance, excavator and land clearance, and landscape organizations. (1) US EPA defines yard waste as ''yard trimmings'' which includes ''grass, leaves and tree brush trimmings from residential, institutional, and commercial sources.''

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Waste-to-Energy Evaluation: U.S. Virgin Islands  

SciTech Connect

This NREL technical report evaluates the environmental impact and fundamental economics of waste-to-energy (WTE) technology based on available data from commercially operating WTE facilities in the United States. In particular, it considers life-cycle impacts of WTE as compared to landfill disposal and various forms of electrical generation, as well as WTE impacts on source reduction or recycling programs. In addition, it evaluates the economics and potential environmental impact of WTE in the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) based on existing USVI waste stream characterization data, recycling challenges unique to the USVI, and the results of cost and environmental modeling of four municipal solid waste (MSW) management options, including landfill, refuse-derived fuel (RDF) production, recycling, and gassification plus RDF.

Davis, J.; Hasse, S.; Warren, A.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "municipal waste landfill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Clean energy from municipal solid waste. Technical progress report number 3  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Development of the computer models for slurry carbonization have begun and were based upon the collected data (mass balances, yield, temperatures, and pressures) from the previous pilot plant campaigns. All computer models are being developed with Aspen`s SpeedUp{trademark} software. The primary flow sheet with major alternatives has been developed and the majority of equipment descriptions and models, cost algorithms, and baseline parameters have been input to SpeedUp. The remaining modeling parameters will be input in the next reporting period and the initial flow sheet skeleton and model will be completed. The computer models will focus on optimizing capital and operating costs, and evaluating alternative waste water recycling technologies. The weaknesses of the previous pilot plant data and the data required for design of the commercial demonstration facility were identified. The identified weaknesses of the existing data included mass balance precision and accuracy, reactor residence time control (i.e. reactor level control), reactor temperature variations, and air entrainment in the feed RDF slurry. To improve mass balance precision and accuracy, an alternative carbonization gas flow meter will be designed and installed on the pilot plant. EnerTech`s carbonization gas flow meter design has been submitted to the EERC for final approval. In addition, an appropriate number of feed RDF samples will be characterized for moisture content just prior to the next pilot plant run to estimate incoming moisture variation. A pumping test also will be performed with the feed RDF slurry to determine the amount of air entrainment with the feed slurry.

Klosky, M.

1996-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

242

Information on the Fate of Mercury From Fluorescent Lamps Disposed in Landfills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mercury is contained in energy-efficient fluorescent, mercury-vapor, metal halide, and high-pressure sodium lamps. This report presents information on the potential for air and groundwater contamination when mercury lamps are disposed in municipal landfills.

1995-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

243

Renewable Hydrogen: Technology Review and Policy Recommendations for State-Level Sustainable Energy Futures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

municipal solid wastelandfill gas” and waste gases fromin Israel, a solar and landfill gas demonstration in Canada,23. Solar-Powered Landfill Gas Conversion in Saskatoon,

Lipman, Timothy; Edwards, Jennifer Lynn; Brooks, Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Application of spatial and non-spatial data analysis in determination of the factors that impact municipal solid waste generation rates in Turkey  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spatial autocorrelation exists in municipal solid waste generation rates for different provinces in Turkey. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Traditional non-spatial regression models may not provide sufficient information for better solid waste management. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unemployment rate is a global variable that significantly impacts the waste generation rates in Turkey. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significances of global parameters may diminish at local scale for some provinces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GWR model can be used to create clusters of cities for solid waste management. - Abstract: In studies focusing on the factors that impact solid waste generation habits and rates, the potential spatial dependency in solid waste generation data is not considered in relating the waste generation rates to its determinants. In this study, spatial dependency is taken into account in determination of the significant socio-economic and climatic factors that may be of importance for the municipal solid waste (MSW) generation rates in different provinces of Turkey. Simultaneous spatial autoregression (SAR) and geographically weighted regression (GWR) models are used for the spatial data analyses. Similar to ordinary least squares regression (OLSR), regression coefficients are global in SAR model. In other words, the effect of a given independent variable on a dependent variable is valid for the whole country. Unlike OLSR or SAR, GWR reveals the local impact of a given factor (or independent variable) on the waste generation rates of different provinces. Results show that provinces within closer neighborhoods have similar MSW generation rates. On the other hand, this spatial autocorrelation is not very high for the exploratory variables considered in the study. OLSR and SAR models have similar regression coefficients. GWR is useful to indicate the local determinants of MSW generation rates. GWR model can be utilized to plan waste management activities at local scale including waste minimization, collection, treatment, and disposal. At global scale, the MSW generation rates in Turkey are significantly related to unemployment rate and asphalt-paved roads ratio. Yet, significances of these variables may diminish at local scale for some provinces. At local scale, different factors may be important in affecting MSW generation rates.

Keser, Saniye [Department of Environmental Engineering, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Duzgun, Sebnem [Department of Mining Engineering, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Department of Geodetic and Geographic Information Technologies, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Aksoy, Aysegul, E-mail: aaksoy@metu.edu.tr [Department of Environmental Engineering, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

245

Anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste combining two pretreatment modalities, high temperature microwave and hydrogen peroxide  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microwave and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} pretreatment were studied to enhance anaerobic digestion of organic waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The whole waste pretreated at 115 Degree-Sign C or 145 Degree-Sign C had the highest biogas production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biogas production of the whole waste decreased at 175 Degree-Sign C due to formation of refractory compounds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pretreatment to 145 Degree-Sign C and 175 Degree-Sign C were the best when considering only the free liquid fraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} pretreatment had a lag phase and the biogas production was not higher than MW pretreated samples. - Abstract: In order to enhance anaerobic digestion (AD) of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW), pretreatment combining two modalities, microwave (MW) heating in presence or absence of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) were investigated. The main pretreatment variables affecting the characteristics of the OFMSW were temperature (T) via MW irradiation and supplemental water additions of 20% and 30% (SWA20 and SW30). Subsequently, the focus of this study was to evaluate mesophilic batch AD performance in terms of biogas production, as well as changes in the characteristics of the OFMSW post digestion. A high MW induced temperature range (115-175 Degree-Sign C) was applied, using sealed vessels and a bench scale MW unit equipped with temperature and pressure controls. Biochemical methane potential (BMP) tests were conducted on the whole OFMSW as well as the liquid fractions. The whole OFMSW pretreated at 115 Degree-Sign C and 145 Degree-Sign C showed 4-7% improvement in biogas production over untreated OFMSW (control). When pretreated at 175 Degree-Sign C, biogas production decreased due to formation of refractory compounds, inhibiting the digestion. For the liquid fraction of OFMSW, the effect of pretreatment on the cumulative biogas production (CBP) was more pronounced for SWA20 at 145 Degree-Sign C, with a 26% increase in biogas production after 8 days of digestion, compared to the control. When considering the increased substrate availability in the liquid fraction after MW pretreatment, a 78% improvement in biogas production vs. the control was achieved. Combining MW and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} modalities did not have a positive impact on OFMSW stabilization and enhanced biogas production. In general, all samples pretreated with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} displayed a long lag phase and the CBP was usually lower than MW irradiated only samples. First order rate constant was calculated.

Shahriari, Haleh, E-mail: haleh.shahriari@gmail.com [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Ottawa, 161 Louis Pasteur St., P.O. Box 450, Stn. A, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Warith, Mostafa [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Ottawa, 161 Louis Pasteur St., P.O. Box 450, Stn. A, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Hamoda, Mohamed [Department of Environmental Technology and Management, Kuwait University, P.O. Box 5969, Safat 13060 (Kuwait); Kennedy, Kevin J. [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Ottawa, 161 Louis Pasteur St., P.O. Box 450, Stn. A, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5 (Canada)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Case study: City of Industry landfill gas recovery operation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Development of civic, recreation, and conservation facilities throughout a 150-acre site which had been used for waste disposal from 1951 to 1970 is described. The history of the landfill site, the geology of the site, and a test well program to assess the feasibility of recoverying landfill gas economically from the site are discussed. Based on results of the test well program, the City of Industry authorized the design and installation of a full-scale landfill gas recovery system. Design, construction, and operation of the system are described. The landfill gas system provides fuel for use in boilers to meet space heating and hot water demands for site development (MCW)

None

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Controlled landfilling is an approach to manage solid waste landfills, so as to rapidly complete methane generation, while maximizing gas capture and minimizing the usual emissions of methane to the atmosphere. With controlled landfilling, methane generation is accelerated to more rapid and earlier completion to full potential by improving conditions (principally moisture, but also temperature) to optimize biological processes occurring within the landfill. Gas is contained through use of surface membrane cover. Gas is captured via porous layers, under the cover, operated at slight vacuum. A field demonstration project has been ongoing under NETL sponsorship for the past several years near Davis, CA. Results have been extremely encouraging. Two major benefits of the technology are reduction of landfill methane emissions to minuscule levels, and the recovery of greater amounts of landfill methane energy in much shorter times, more predictably, than with conventional landfill practice. With the large amount of US landfill methane generated, and greenhouse potency of methane, better landfill methane control can play a substantial role both in reduction of US greenhouse gas emissions and in US renewable energy. The work described in this report, to demonstrate and advance this technology, has used two demonstration-scale cells of size (8000 metric tons [tonnes]), sufficient to replicate many heat and compaction characteristics of larger ''full-scale'' landfills. An enhanced demonstration cell has received moisture supplementation to field capacity. This is the maximum moisture waste can hold while still limiting liquid drainage rate to minimal and safely manageable levels. The enhanced landfill module was compared to a parallel control landfill module receiving no moisture additions. Gas recovery has continued for a period of over 4 years. It is quite encouraging that the enhanced cell methane recovery has been close to 10-fold that experienced with conventional landfills. This is the highest methane recovery rate per unit waste, and thus progress toward stabilization, documented anywhere for such a large waste mass. This high recovery rate is attributed to moisture, and elevated temperature attained inexpensively during startup. Economic analyses performed under Phase I of this NETL contract indicate ''greenhouse cost effectiveness'' to be excellent. Other benefits include substantial waste volume loss (over 30%) which translates to extended landfill life. Other environmental benefits include rapidly improved quality and stabilization (lowered pollutant levels) in liquid leachate which drains from the waste.

Don Augenstein; Ramin Yazdani; Rick Moore; Michelle Byars; Jeff Kieffer; Professor Morton Barlaz; Rinav Mehta

2000-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

248

WIPP Doubles Solid Waste Reduction Rate in Fiscal Year 2013 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Doubles Solid Waste Reduction Rate in Fiscal Year 2013 Doubles Solid Waste Reduction Rate in Fiscal Year 2013 WIPP Doubles Solid Waste Reduction Rate in Fiscal Year 2013 December 5, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis WIPP environmental and operations personnel gather next to pallets that will be provided to the local community as part of WIPP’s wood waste diversion program. WIPP environmental and operations personnel gather next to pallets that will be provided to the local community as part of WIPP's wood waste diversion program. CARLSBAD, N.M. - EM's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) almost doubled its solid waste reduction rate from 15.5 percent in fiscal year 2012 to 33 percent in fiscal year 2013 through programs that diverted WIPP's wood waste from the municipal landfill by reusing, repurposing or recycling.

249

WIPP Doubles Solid Waste Reduction Rate in Fiscal Year 2013 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WIPP Doubles Solid Waste Reduction Rate in Fiscal Year 2013 WIPP Doubles Solid Waste Reduction Rate in Fiscal Year 2013 WIPP Doubles Solid Waste Reduction Rate in Fiscal Year 2013 December 5, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis WIPP environmental and operations personnel gather next to pallets that will be provided to the local community as part of WIPP’s wood waste diversion program. WIPP environmental and operations personnel gather next to pallets that will be provided to the local community as part of WIPP's wood waste diversion program. CARLSBAD, N.M. - EM's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) almost doubled its solid waste reduction rate from 15.5 percent in fiscal year 2012 to 33 percent in fiscal year 2013 through programs that diverted WIPP's wood waste from the municipal landfill by reusing, repurposing or recycling.

250

Reducing Waste and Harvesting Energy This Halloween | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reducing Waste and Harvesting Energy This Halloween Reducing Waste and Harvesting Energy This Halloween Reducing Waste and Harvesting Energy This Halloween October 30, 2013 - 9:57am Addthis This graphic shows how seasonal waste can be used to generate power. | Graphic by BCS for the Energy Department This graphic shows how seasonal waste can be used to generate power. | Graphic by BCS for the Energy Department Paul Grabowski Demonstration and Deployment, Bioenergy Technologies Office This Halloween, think of turning seasonal municipal solid waste (MSW) to energy as a very important "trick" that can have a positive environmental impact. Usually, these seasonal items including hay, pumpkins, candy, and leaves, are thrown away and sent to landfills. From there, the MSW decomposes and eventually turns into methane-a harmful

251

Thermodynamic estimation of minor element distribution between immiscible liquids in Fe-Cu-based metal phase generated in melting treatment of municipal solid wastes  

SciTech Connect

Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two liquids separation of metal occurs in the melting of municipal solid waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The distribution of PGMs etc. between two liquid metal phases is studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quite simple thermodynamic model is applied to predict the distribution ratio. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Au and Ag originated from WEEE are found to be concentrated into Cu-rich phase. - Abstract: Waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) has become an important target in managing material cycles from the viewpoint of not only waste management and control of environmental pollution but also resource conservation. This study investigated the distribution tendency of trace elements in municipal solid waste (MSW) or incinerator ash, including valuable non-ferrous metals (Ni, Co, Cr, Mn, Mo, Ti, V, W, Zr), precious group metals (PGMs) originated from WEEE (Ag, Au, Pd, Pt), and others (Al, B, Pb, Si), between Fe-rich and Cu-rich metal phases by means of simple thermodynamic calculations. Most of the typical alloying elements for steel (Co, Cr, Mo, Nb, Ni, Si, Ti, V, and W) and Rh were preferentially distributed into the Fe-rich phase. PGMs, such as Au, Ag, and Pd, were enriched in the Cu-rich phase, whereas Pt was almost equally distributed into both phases. Since the primary metallurgical processing of Cu is followed by an electrolysis for refining, and since PGMs in crude copper have been industrially recovered from the resulting anode slime, our results indicated that Ag, Au, and Pd could be effectively recovered from MSW if the Cu-rich phase could be selectively collected.

Lu, X. [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, The University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Nakajima, K.; Sakanakura, H. [Research Center for Material Cycles and Waste Management, National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES), 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba 305-8506 (Japan); Matsubae, K. [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-11 Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Bai, H. [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, The University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Nagasaka, T., E-mail: t-nagasaka@m.tohoku.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-11 Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

The municipal solid waste landfill as a source of Montreal Protocol-restricted halocarbons in the United States and United Kingdom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Central to the study of stratospheric ozone recovery and climate change, is the ability to predict emissions of Montreal Protocol-restricted halocarbons (MPGs) over the coming decades. The prediction of emissions has become ...

Hodson, Elke L. (Elke Lynn Ann)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Comparison of models for predicting landfill methane recovery. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Landfill methane models are tools used to project methane generation over time from a mass of landfilled waste. These models are used for sizing landfill gas (LFG) collection systems, evaluations and projections of LFG energy uses, and regulatory purposes. The objective of this project was to select various landfill methane models and to provide a comparison of model outputs to actual long-term gas recovery data from a number of well managed and suitable landfills. Another objective was to use these data to develop better estimates of confidence limits that can be assigned to model projections. This project assessed trial model forms against field data from available landfills where methane extraction was maximized, waste filling history was well-documented, and other pertinent site information was of superior quality. Data were obtained from 18 US landfills. Four landfill methane models were compared: a zero-order, a simple first order, a modified first order, and a multi-phase first order model. Models were adjusted for best fit to field data to yield parameter combinations based on the minimized residual errors between predicted and experienced methane recovery. The models were optimized in this way using two data treatments: absolute value of the differences (arithmetic error minimization) and absolute value of the natural log of the ratios (logarithmic error minimization).

Vogt, W.G. [SCS Engineers, Reston, VA (United States); Augenstein, D. [Institute for Environmental Management, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

SRS seeks RCRA Hazardous Waste Permit Renewal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ery Act (RCRA) permit be renewed. The current permit for the Mixed Waste Storage Buildings (MWSB), Mixed Waste Man- agement Facility (MWMF), and Sanitary Landfill (SLF)...

255

Measurements of particulate matter concentrations at a landfill site (Crete, Greece)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large amounts of solid waste are disposed in landfills and the potential of particulate matter (PM) emissions into the atmosphere is significant. Particulate matter emissions in landfills are the result of resuspension from the disposed waste and other activities such as mechanical recycling and composting, waste unloading and sorting, the process of coating residues and waste transport by trucks. Measurements of ambient levels of inhalable particulate matter (PM{sub 10}) were performed in a landfill site located at Chania (Crete, Greece). Elevated PM{sub 10} concentrations were measured in the landfill site during several landfill operations. It was observed that the meteorological conditions (mainly wind velocity and temperature) influence considerably the PM{sub 10} concentrations. Comparison between the PM{sub 10} concentrations at the landfill and at a PM{sub 10} background site indicates the influence of the landfill activities on local concentrations at the landfill. No correlation was observed between the measurements at the landfill and the background sites. Finally, specific preventing measures are proposed to control the PM concentrations in landfills.

Chalvatzaki, E.; Kopanakis, I. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Chania 73100, Crete (Greece); Kontaksakis, M. [Municipal Company of Solid Waste Management, Chania 73100, Crete (Greece); Glytsos, T.; Kalogerakis, N. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Chania 73100, Crete (Greece); Lazaridis, M., E-mail: lazaridi@mred.tuc.g [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Chania 73100, Crete (Greece)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

Illinois Turning Landfill Trash into Future Cash | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Turning Landfill Trash into Future Cash Turning Landfill Trash into Future Cash Illinois Turning Landfill Trash into Future Cash September 28, 2010 - 5:35pm Addthis Illinois Turning Landfill Trash into Future Cash Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist, Office of Public Affairs Will County, Illinois officials yesterday formally broke ground on a new $7 million project (that includes $1 million of Energy Efficiency Conservation Block Grant funds) to turn methane gas from the Prairie View Landfill into electricity in a partnership with Waste Management. Will County will receive revenue from the sale of the gas created from decomposing garbage which will be harnessed and converted to generate 4.8 megawatts of green electrical power and used to power up to 8,000 homes. The future revenue generated from the sale of the gas and the sale of the

257

Solid Waste Management Act (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act provides for the planning and regulation of solid waste storage, collection, transportation, processing, treatment, and disposal. It requires that municipalities submit plans for municipal...

258

Reducing volatilization of heavy metals in phosphate-pretreated municipal solid waste incineration fly ash by forming pyromorphite-like minerals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research investigated the feasibility of reducing volatilization of heavy metals (lead, zinc and cadmium) in municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash by forming pyromorphite-like minerals via phosphate pre-treatment. To evaluate the evaporation characteristics of three heavy metals from phosphate-pretreated MSWI fly ash, volatilization tests have been performed by means of a dedicated apparatus in the 100-1000 deg. C range. The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) test and BCR sequential extraction procedure were applied to assess phosphate stabilization process. The results showed that the volatilization behavior in phosphate-pretreated MSWI fly ash could be reduced effectively. Pyromorphite-like minerals formed in phosphate-pretreated MSWI fly ash were mainly responsible for the volatilization reduction of heavy metals in MSWI fly ash at higher temperature, due to their chemical fixation and thermal stabilization for heavy metals. The stabilization effects were encouraging for the potential reuse of MSWI fly ash.

Sun Ying; Zheng Jianchang [School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Zou Luquan [Shanghai Center of Solid Waste Disposal, Shanghai (China); Liu Qiang; Zhu Ping [School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Qian Guangren, E-mail: grqian@mail.shu.edu.cn [School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

259

PTC, ITC, or Cash Grant? An Analysis of the Choice Facing Renewable Power Projects in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A10. Net Value of ITC for Landfill Gas (10% Nominal Discountbiomass, geothermal, landfill gas, municipal solid waste,biomass, geothermal, and landfill gas projects. Section 4

Bolinger, Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

United States - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

a Biomass waste includes municipal solid waste from biogenic sources, landfill gas, sludge waste, agricultural byproducts, and other biomass.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "municipal waste landfill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

For Immediate release: 10/17/11 Contact: Ingrid Wright  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-diesel, landfill gas, water reuse, and municipal solid waste technologies. This year's conference focus

Ward, Karen

262

Burbank Water and Power SBX1 2 Compliance Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

impact hydroelectric generation, digester gas, municipal solid waste, landfill gas, ocean wave, ocean

263

ELIGIBILITY SECOND EDITION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, certification, digester gas, eligibility, geothermal, landfill gas, municipal solid waste, ocean wave

264

Carbon emissions reduction strategies in Africa from improved waste management: A review  

SciTech Connect

The paper summarises a literature review into waste management practices across Africa as part of a study to assess methods to reduce carbon emissions. Research shows that the average organic content for urban Municipal Solid Waste in Africa is around 56% and its degradation is a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions. The paper concludes that the most practical and economic way to manage waste in the majority of urban communities in Africa and therefore reduce carbon emissions is to separate waste at collection points to remove dry recyclables by door to door collection, compost the remaining biogenic carbon waste in windrows, using the maturated compost as a substitute fertilizer and dispose the remaining fossil carbon waste in controlled landfills.

Couth, R. [University of KwaZulu-Natal, CRECHE, School of Civil Engineering, Survey and Construction, Durban 4041 (South Africa); Trois, C., E-mail: troisc@ukzn.ac.z [University of KwaZulu-Natal, CRECHE, School of Civil Engineering, Survey and Construction, Durban 4041 (South Africa)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

265

LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The work described in this report, to demonstrate and advance this technology, has used two demonstration-scale cells of size (8000 metric tons [tonnes]), sufficient to replicate many heat and compaction characteristics of larger ''full-scale'' landfills. An enhanced demonstration cell has received moisture supplementation to field capacity. This is the maximum moisture waste can hold while still limiting liquid drainage rate to minimal and safely manageable levels. The enhanced landfill module was compared to a parallel control landfill module receiving no moisture additions. Gas recovery has continued for a period of over 4 years. It is quite encouraging that the enhanced cell methane recovery has been close to 10-fold that experienced with conventional landfills. This is the highest methane recovery rate per unit waste, and thus progress toward stabilization, documented anywhere for such a large waste mass. This high recovery rate is attributed to moisture, and elevated temperature attained inexpensively during startup. Economic analyses performed under Phase I of this NETL contract indicate ''greenhouse cost effectiveness'' to be excellent. Other benefits include substantial waste volume loss (over 30%) which translates to extended landfill life. Other environmental benefits include rapidly improved quality and stabilization (lowered pollutant levels) in liquid leachate which drains from the waste.

Don Augenstein

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This corrective action plan proposes the closure method for the area 9 unexploded Ordnance landfill, corrective action unit 453 located at the Tonopah Test Range. The area 9 UXO landfill consists of corrective action site no. 09-55-001-0952 and is comprised of three individual landfill cells designated as A9-1, A9-2, and A9-3. The three landfill cells received wastes from daily operations at area 9 and from range cleanups which were performed after weapons testing. Cell locations and contents were not well documented due to the unregulated disposal practices commonly associated with early landfill operations. However, site process knowledge indicates that the landfill cells were used for solid waste disposal, including disposal of UXO.

Bechtel Nevada

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

267

Ris DTU 09-06-08 Waste-to-energy technologies in TIMES models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-to-energy technologies in the Pan-European NEEDS- TIMES model Waste incineration for electricity and heat, landfill gas legislation on waste Directives · Waste Framework Directive, 1975 (75/442/EEC) · Directive on the landfill be accepted as recovery) Avoid · Landfill #12;Risø DTU 09-06-08 4 European waste model Econometric model

268

Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nowadays, Brazilian´s Light Emitting Diode - Liquid Crystal Display (LED-LCD) End-of-Life (EoL) disposal is traditionally landfills and incineration.

269

Community Renewable Energy Deployment: Sacramento Municipal Utility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Deployment: Sacramento Municipal Utility Deployment: Sacramento Municipal Utility District Projects Jump to: navigation, search Name Community Renewable Energy Deployment: Sacramento Municipal Utility District Projects Agency/Company /Organization US Department of Energy Focus Area Agriculture, Economic Development, Greenhouse Gas, Renewable Energy, Biomass - Anaerobic Digestion, Solar - Concentrating Solar Power, Solar, - Solar Pv, Biomass - Waste To Energy Phase Bring the Right People Together, Develop Finance and Implement Projects Resource Type Case studies/examples Availability Publicly available--Free Publication Date 2/2/2011 Website http://www1.eere.energy.gov/co Locality Sacramento Municipal Utility District, CA References Community Renewable Energy Deployment: Sacramento Municipal Utility District Projects[1]

270

Earth Engineering Center-Associates: Eileen Berenyi http://www.seas.columbia.edu/earth/Berenyi.html[8/19/2009 3:14:19 PM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and government. Author and publisher of major reference books on municipal waste combustion, landfill gas from Landfill Yearbook; Municipal Waste Combustion in the United States: Resource Recovery Yearbook Kills Landfill. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION. 1996-present. Preparation

271

Evaluation of the impact of RCRA amendments on waste-to-energy activities by using a system simulation computer code  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary methodology that is used for disposal of municipal solid waste is the use of land fills; 80--85% of the municipal solid waste (MSW) produced in the country currently is land filled. The two other disposal alternatives used are recycling and incineration. Waste-to-energy technology (WTE) which incinerates MSW to produce electricity and/or steam is attractive in other cases since it reduces landfill volume, reduces the consumption of fossil and other fuels, and produces a revenue stream from the sale of the electricity or steam. The gaseous effluents from landfills can also be used to fuel power plants. Recycling and material separation programs can have a substantial impact on the throughput and heating value of MSW collected and thus impact WTE plant economics; the magnitude of the impact will depend upon a number of factors such as what materials and what fraction are separated and recycled, the design of the WTE plant itself (its operating window); the contractual arrangements relative to maintaining throughput (ability to adjust catchment area), limitations on adjusting tipping fees, etc. Mandated increased recycling and landfill gaseous effluent control -- could alter substantially the economics and competitive position of the MSW-WTE industry. The objectives of this study are: (1) to simulate typical WTE plants fired with a national average waste stream, (2) to evaluate the parametric effects of waste component recycling on the performance of the typical WTE plants, and (3) to assess the impact of RCRA recycling amendments on the performance of the typical WTE plants and on the potential methane generation of typical landfills. The relevant technical issues, technical approach, results and conclusions are presented.

Chang, S.L.; Petrick, M.; Stodolsky, F.; Freckmann, A.B.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

A finite element simulation of biological conversion processes in landfills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Landfills are the most common way of waste disposal worldwide. Biological processes convert the organic material into an environmentally harmful landfill gas, which has an impact on the greenhouse effect. After the depositing of waste has been stopped, current conversion processes continue and emissions last for several decades and even up to 100 years and longer. A good prediction of these processes is of high importance for landfill operators as well as for authorities, but suitable models for a realistic description of landfill processes are rather poor. In order to take the strong coupled conversion processes into account, a constitutive three-dimensional model based on the multiphase Theory of Porous Media (TPM) has been developed at the University of Duisburg-Essen. The theoretical formulations are implemented in the finite element code FEAP. With the presented calculation concept we are able to simulate the coupled processes that occur in an actual landfill. The model's theoretical background and the results of the simulations as well as the meantime successfully performed simulation of a real landfill body will be shown in the following.

Robeck, M., E-mail: markus.robeck@uni-due.de [Department of Water and Waste Management, Building Sciences, University of Duisburg-Essen, Universitaetsstrasse 15, 45141 Essen (Germany); Ricken, T. [Institute of Mechanics/Computational Mechanics, Building Sciences, University of Duisburg-Essen, Universitaetsstrasse 15, 45141 Essen (Germany); Widmann, R. [Department of Water and Waste Management, Building Sciences, University of Duisburg-Essen, Universitaetsstrasse 15, 45141 Essen (Germany)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

SPONSORED PROJECTS 1. Pending: "Feasibility Studies and Training to Support Landfill Gas Recovery in Ghana"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SPONSORED PROJECTS 1. Pending: "Feasibility Studies and Training to Support Landfill Gas Recovery: PI. 4. "An Improved Model to Predict Gas Generation from Landfills based on Waste Composition-2015, Role: Co-PI. 3. "Field Measurement of Emissions from Natural Gas Drilling, Production, and Distribution

Texas at Arlington, University of

274

DOE EM Landfill Workshop and Path Forward - July 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Teleconference: Teleconference: 2. DOE EM Landfill Workshop & Path Forward Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation US Department of Energy July 2009 Slides prepared by CRESP DOE EM Landfill Workshop 2 Objective: - Discuss findings & recommendations from ITR visits to DOE facilities - Identify technology gaps and needs to advance EM disposal practice of the future. - Obtain input from experts within and outside of DOE. Panels: Waste subsidence: prediction and impacts Waste forecasting: predicting volumes and WACs Final covers: long-term performance and monitoring Liners: role and need Workshop Approach and Structure * Objective: - Discuss each issue - Evaluate the merits of each issue - Create a prioritized list of technologies needs for Office of

275

Possible global environmental impacts of solid waste practices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pollutants resulting from the management of solid waste have been shown to affect the air, land, oceans, and waterways. In addition, solid wastes have other, more indirect impacts such as reduction in feedstocks of natural resources, because useful materials are disposed of rather than recycled. The objective of this study is to evaluate solid waste management practices that have negative implications on the global environment and develop recommendations for reducing such impacts. Recommendations identifying needed changes are identified that will reduce global impacts of solid waste practices in the future. The scope of this study includes the range of non-hazardous solid wastes produced within our society, including municipal solid waste (MSW) and industrial solid waste (ISW), as well as industry-specific wastes from activities such as construction, demolition, and landclearing. Most solid waste management decisions continue to be made and implemented at very local levels, predominantly with a short-term focus to respond to relatively immediate pressures of landfill shortages, funding problems, political considerations, and the like. In this rush to address immediate local problems, little consideration is being given to potential impacts, either short- or long-term, at the national or global level resulting from solid waste management practices. More and more, the cumulative impacts from local decisions concerning solid waste management are beginning to manifest themselves in broader, longer-term impacts than are being addressed by the decision-makers or, at the very least, are presenting a greater and greater potential for such impacts.

Davis, M.M.; Holter, G.M.; DeForest, T.J.; Stapp, D.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Dibari, J.C. [Heritage College, Toppenish, WA (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Integrated assessment of a new Waste-to-Energy facility in Central Greece in the context of regional perspectives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main aim of this study is the integrated assessment of a proposed Waste-to-Energy facility that could contribute in the Municipal Solid Waste Management system of the Region of Central Greece. In the context of this paper alternative transfer schemes for supplying the candidate facility were assessed considering local conditions and economical criteria. A mixed-integer linear programming model was applied for the determination of optimum locations of Transfer Stations for an efficient supplying chain between the waste producers and the Waste-to-Energy facility. Moreover different Regional Waste Management Scenarios were assessed against multiple criteria, via the Multi Criteria Decision Making method ELECTRE III. The chosen criteria were total cost, Biodegradable Municipal Waste diversion from landfill, energy recovery and Greenhouse Gas emissions and the analysis demonstrated that a Waste Management Scenario based on a Waste-to-Energy plant with an adjacent landfill for disposal of the residues would be the best performing option for the Region, depending however on the priorities of the decision makers. In addition the study demonstrated that efficient planning is necessary and the case of three sanitary landfills operating in parallel with the WtE plant in the study area should be avoided. Moreover alternative cases of energy recovery of the candidate Waste-to-Energy facility were evaluated against the requirements of the new European Commission Directive on waste in order for the facility to be recognized as recovery operation. The latter issue is of high significance and the decision makers in European Union countries should take it into account from now on, in order to plan and implement facilities that recover energy efficiently. Finally a sensitivity check was performed in order to evaluate the effects of increased recycling rate, on the calorific value of treated Municipal Solid Waste and the gate fee of the candidate plant and found that increased recycling efforts would not diminish the potential for incineration with energy recovery from waste and neither would have adverse impacts on the gate fee of the Waste-to-Energy plant. In general, the study highlighted the need for efficient planning in solid waste management, by taking into account multiple criteria and parameters and utilizing relevant tools and methodologies into this context.

Perkoulidis, G. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Box 483, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Papageorgiou, A., E-mail: giou6@yahoo.g [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Box 483, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Karagiannidis, A. [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Box 483, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Kalogirou, S. [Waste to Energy Research and Technology Council (Greece)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

Des Plaines Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Des Plaines Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Des Plaines Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Des Plaines Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas...

278

Rodefeld Landfill Ga Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rodefeld Landfill Ga Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Rodefeld Landfill Ga Biomass Facility Facility Rodefeld Landfill Ga Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas...

279

Waste Management and WasteWaste Management and Waste--toto--EnergyEnergy Status in SingaporeStatus in Singapore  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Management and WasteWaste Management and Waste--toto--EnergyEnergy Status in Singapore #12;Singapore's Waste Management · In 2003, 6877 tonnes/day (2.51 M tonnes/year) of MSW collected plants · 8% (non-incinerable waste) and incineration ash goes to the offshore Semakau Landfill · To reach

Columbia University

280

Synergistic Utilization of Coal Fines and Municipal Solid Waste in Coal-Fired Boilers. Phase I Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A feasibility study was performed on a novel concept: to synergistically utilize a blend of waste coal fines with so-called E-fuel for cofiring and reburning in utility and industrial boilers. The E-fuel is produced from MSW by the patented EnerTech's slurry carbonization process. The slurry carbonization technology economically converts MSW to a uniform, low-ash, low-sulfur, and essentially chlorine-free fuel with energy content of about 14,800 Btu/lb.

V. Zamansky; P. Maly; M. Klosky

1998-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "municipal waste landfill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Energy potential of modern landfills  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methane produced by refuse decomposition in a sanitary landfill can be recovered for commercial use. Landfill methane is currently under-utilized, with commercial recovery at only a small percentage of US landfills. New federal regulations mandating control of landfill gas migration and atmospheric emissions are providing impetus to methane recovery schemes as a means of recovering costs for increased environmental control. The benefits of landfill methane recovery include utilization of an inexpensive renewable energy resource, removal of explosive gas mixtures from the subsurface, and mitigation of observed historic increases in atmospheric methane. Increased commercial interest in landfill methane recovery is dependent on the final form of Clean Air Act amendments pertaining to gaseous emissions from landfills; market shifts in natural gas prices; financial incentives for development of renewable energy resources; and support for applied research and development to develop techniques for increased control of the gas generation process in situ. This paper will discuss the controls on methane generation in landfills. In addition, it will address how landfill regulations affect landfill design and site management practices which, in turn, influence decomposition rates. Finally, future trends in landfilling, and their relationship to gas production, will be examined. 19 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Bogner, J.E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Guide to Clean Development Mechanism Projects Related to Municipal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name A Guide to Clean Development Mechanism Projects Related to Municipal Solid Waste Management AgencyCompany Organization United Nations Economic and Social Commission for...

283

Delaware Solid Waste Authority (Delaware)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Delaware Solid Waste Authority (DSWA) runs three landfills, all of which recover methane and generate electricity with a total capacity of 24 MWs. The DSWA Solid Waste Plan includes goals,...

284

Solid waste integrated cost analysis model: 1991 project year report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the City of Houston's 1991 Solid Waste Integrated Cost Analysis Model (SWICAM) project was to continue the development of a computerized cost analysis model. This model is to provide solid waste managers with tool to evaluate the dollar cost of real or hypothetical solid waste management choices. Those choices have become complicated by the implementation of Subtitle D of the Resources Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the EPA's Integrated Approach to managing municipal solid waste;. that is, minimize generation, maximize recycling, reduce volume (incinerate), and then bury (landfill) only the remainder. Implementation of an integrated solid waste management system involving all or some of the options of recycling, waste to energy, composting, and landfilling is extremely complicated. Factors such as hauling distances, markets, and prices for recyclable, costs and benefits of transfer stations, and material recovery facilities must all be considered. A jurisdiction must determine the cost impacts of implementing a number of various possibilities for managing, handling, processing, and disposing of waste. SWICAM employs a single Lotus 123 spreadsheet to enable a jurisdiction to predict or assess the costs of its waste management system. It allows the user to select his own process flow for waste material and to manipulate the model to include as few or as many options as he or she chooses. The model will calculate the estimated cost for those choices selected. The user can then change the model to include or exclude waste stream components, until the mix of choices suits the user. Graphs can be produced as a visual communication aid in presenting the results of the cost analysis. SWICAM also allows future cost projections to be made.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Biological Removal of Siloxanes from Landfill and Digester Gases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

volatilize from waste at landfills and wastewater treatment plants (1). As a result, biogas produced, as well as an increase in maintenance costs (6, 7). The presence of VMSs in biogas is thus a challenge recommended by most equipment manufacturers for un- hindered use (6). Of all VMSs in biogas

286

Parameters affecting the stability of the digestate from a two-stage anaerobic process treating the organic fraction of municipal solid waste  

SciTech Connect

This paper focused on the factors affecting the respiration rate of the digestate taken from a continuous anaerobic two-stage process treating the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW). The process involved a hydrolytic reactor (HR) that produced a leachate fed to a submerged anaerobic membrane bioreactor (SAMBR). It was found that a volatile solids (VS) removal in the range 40-75% and an operating temperature in the HR between 21 and 35 {sup o}C resulted in digestates with similar respiration rates, with all digestates requiring 17 days of aeration before satisfying the British Standard Institution stability threshold of 16 mg CO{sub 2} g VS{sup -1} day{sup -1}. Sanitization of the digestate at 65 {sup o}C for 7 days allowed a mature digestate to be obtained. At 4 g VS L{sup -1} d{sup -1} and Solid Retention Times (SRT) greater than 70 days, all the digestates emitted CO{sub 2} at a rate lower than 25 mg CO{sub 2} g VS{sup -1} d{sup -1} after 3 days of aeration, while at SRT lower than 20 days all the digestates displayed a respiration rate greater than 25 mg CO{sub 2} g VS{sup -1} d{sup -1}. The compliance criteria for Class I digestate set by the European Commission (EC) and British Standard Institution (BSI) could not be met because of nickel and chromium contamination, which was probably due to attrition of the stainless steel stirrer in the HR.

Trzcinski, Antoine P., E-mail: a.trzcinski05@ic.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College of Science and Technology and Medicine, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Stuckey, David C., E-mail: d.stuckey@ic.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College of Science and Technology and Medicine, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

287

Mercury emissions from municipal solid waste combustors. An assessment of the current situation in the United States and forecast of future emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines emissions of mercury (Hg) from municipal solid waste (MSW) combustion in the United States (US). It is projected that total annual nationwide MSW combustor emissions of mercury could decrease from about 97 tonnes (1989 baseline uncontrolled emissions) to less than about 4 tonnes in the year 2000. This represents approximately a 95 percent reduction in the amount of mercury emitted from combusted MSW compared to the 1989 mercury emissions baseline. The likelihood that routinely achievable mercury emissions removal efficiencies of about 80 percent or more can be assured; it is estimated that MSW combustors in the US could prove to be a comparatively minor source of mercury emissions after about 1995. This forecast assumes that diligent measures to control mercury emissions, such as via use of supplemental control technologies (e.g., carbon adsorption), are generally employed at that time. However, no present consensus was found that such emissions control measures can be implemented industry-wide in the US within this time frame. Although the availability of technology is apparently not a limiting factor, practical implementation of necessary control technology may be limited by administrative constraints and other considerations (e.g., planning, budgeting, regulatory compliance requirements, etc.). These projections assume that: (a) about 80 percent mercury emissions reduction control efficiency is achieved with air pollution control equipment likely to be employed by that time; (b) most cylinder-shaped mercury-zinc (CSMZ) batteries used in hospital applications can be prevented from being disposed into the MSW stream or are replaced with alternative batteries that do not contain mercury; and (c) either the amount of mercury used in fluorescent lamps is decreased to an industry-wide average of about 27 milligrams of mercury per lamp or extensive diversion from the MSW stream of fluorescent lamps that contain mercury is accomplished.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Inventory of Nonutility Electric Power Plants in the United States ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

6 Includes agricultural byproducts, fish oil, liquid acetonitrile waste, landfill gas, municipal solid waste, solid waste, sludge waste, straw, tires, waste alco-

289

Landfill Gas Fueled HCCI Demonstration System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

USA ICEF2006-1578 LANDFILL GAS FUELED HCCI DEMONSTRATIONengine that runs on landfill gas. The project team led bygas and simulated landfill gas as a fuel source. This

Blizman, Brandon J.; Makel, Darby B.; Mack, John Hunter; Dibble, Robert W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

U. S. landfill gas research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper surveys US landfill gas RandD programs and presents some technical details of work being conducted at Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne, Illinois) through the support of the US Department of Energy. The two projects at Argonne include (1) a study of bidirectional gas movement through landfill cover materials and (2) development of standardized techniques to assay gas production from landfilled refuse (including qualitative microbiology of refuse assays).

Bogner, J.; Vogt, M.; Piorkowski, R.; Rose, C.; Hsu, M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

EM SSAB ITR Landfill Assessment Project Lessons Learned Presentation - July 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Teleconference: Teleconference: 1. DOE EM ITR Landfill Assessment Project: Lessons Learned Craig H. Benson, PhD, PE CRESP July 2009 1 Independent Technical Review Team * Craig H. Benson, PhD, PE - University of Wisconsin-Madison: waste containment systems, civil engineering, geotechnical engineering. * William H. Albright, PhD - Desert Research Institute, Reno, Nevada: waste containment systems, hydrology, regulatory interactions. * David P. Ray, PE - US Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha, NB: waste containment systems, civil engineering, geotechnical engineering. * John Smegal - Legin Group, Washington, DC: economics, management. 2 * Mixed-waste landfill authorized by EPA and Washington State DoE for disposal of

292

Strategic environmental assessment as an approach to assess waste management systems. Experiences from an Austrian case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste management has evolved from the simple transportation of waste to landfills to complex systems, including waste prevention and waste recycling as well as several waste treatment and landfill technologies. To assess the environmental, economical ... Keywords: Life cycle assessment, Participation, Strategic environmental assessment, Waste management

Stefan Salhofer; Gudrun Wassermann; Erwin Binner

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

n.d. “Co-Processing of Waste and Energy Efficiency By CementAnnual North American Waste-to-Energy Conference NAWTEC17,2009. Stantec, 2011. Waste to Energy: a Technical Review of

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Life cycle assessment of solid waste management options for Eskisehir, Turkey  

SciTech Connect

Life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology was used to determine the optimum municipal solid waste (MSW) management strategy for Eskisehir city. Eskisehir is one of the developing cities of Turkey where a total of approximately 750 tons/day of waste is generated. An effective MSW management system is needed in this city since the generated MSW is dumped in an unregulated dumping site that has no liner, no biogas capture, etc. Therefore, five different scenarios were developed as alternatives to the current waste management system. Collection and transportation of waste, a material recovery facility (MRF), recycling, composting, incineration and landfilling processes were considered in these scenarios. SimaPro7 libraries were used to obtain background data for the life cycle inventory. One ton of municipal solid waste of Eskisehir was selected as the functional unit. The alternative scenarios were compared through the CML 2000 method and these comparisons were carried out from the abiotic depletion, global warming, human toxicity, acidification, eutrophication and photochemical ozone depletion points of view. According to the comparisons and sensitivity analysis, composting scenario, S3, is the more environmentally preferable alternative. In this study waste management alternatives were investigated only on an environmental point of view. For that reason, it might be supported with other decision-making tools that consider the economic and social effects of solid waste management.

Banar, Mufide [Anadolu University, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Department of Environmental Engineering, Iki Eylul Campus, 26555 Eskisehir (Turkey)], E-mail: mbanar@anadolu.edu.tr; Cokaygil, Zerrin; Ozkan, Aysun [Anadolu University, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Department of Environmental Engineering, Iki Eylul Campus, 26555 Eskisehir (Turkey)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

Risk assessment of landfill disposal sites - State of the art  

SciTech Connect

A risk assessment process can assist in drawing a cost-effective compromise between economic and environmental costs, thereby assuring that the philosophy of 'sustainable development' is adhered to. Nowadays risk analysis is in wide use to effectively manage environmental issues. Risk assessment is also applied to other subjects including health and safety, food, finance, ecology and epidemiology. The literature review of environmental risk assessments in general and risk assessment approaches particularly regarding landfill disposal sites undertaken by the authors, reveals that an integrated risk assessment methodology for landfill gas, leachate or degraded waste does not exist. A range of knowledge gaps is discovered in the literature reviewed to date. From the perspective of landfill leachate, this paper identifies the extent to which various risk analysis aspects are absent in the existing approaches.

Butt, Talib E. [Sustainability Centre in Glasgow (SCG), George Moore Building, 70 Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow G4 0BA, Scotland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: t_e_butt@hotmail.com; Lockley, Elaine [Be Environmental Ltd. Suite 213, Lomeshaye Business Village, Turner Road, Nelson, Lancashire, BB9 7DR, England (United Kingdom); Oduyemi, Kehinde O.K. [Built and Natural Environment, Baxter Building, University of Abertay Dundee, Bell Street, Dundee DD1 1HG, Scotland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: k.oduyemi@abertay.ac.uk

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

future science group 133ISSN 1758-300410.4155/CMT.12.11 2012 Future Science Ltd Municipal solid waste (MSW) is a ubiquitous byprod-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- monly known as waste-to-energy (WTE). This method reduces the land requirement for waste disposal of waste-to-energy in reducing GHG emissions Munish K Chandel1 , Gabriel Kwok2 , Robert B Jackson*1 or electricity (waste-to-energy [WTE]) could reduce net GHG emissions in the USA compared with combusting methane

Jackson, Robert B.

297

World Waste Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search Name World Waste Technologies Place San Diego, California Sector Biofuels Product Technology developer that focuses on converting municipal solid waste into...

298

BEE 4760. Solid Waste Engineering Spring Semester 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chemistry, energy balance, environmental impacts & controls Sanitary Landfills: planning & operation, gas characterization and reduction; collection and transport systems; waste-to-energy combustion; sanitary landfills) management. 2. An ability to plan and design MSW disposal facilities ­ landfills and incineration. 3

Walter, M.Todd

299

BEE 476. Solid Waste Engineering Spring Semester 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chemistry, energy balance, environmental impacts & controls Sanitary Landfills: planning & operation, gas characterization and reduction; collection and transport systems; waste-to-energy combustion; sanitary landfills) management. 2. An ability to plan and design MSW disposal facilities ­ landfills and incineration. 3

Walter, M.Todd

300

BEE 476. Solid Waste Engineering Spring Semester 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chemistry, energy balance, environmental impacts & controls Sanitary Landfills: planning & operation, gas characterization and reduction; collection and transport systems; waste-to-energy combustion; sanitary landfills) management. 2. An ability to plan and design MSW disposal facilities ­ landfills and incineration. 3

Walter, M.Todd

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "municipal waste landfill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Effects of adding wash tower effluent to Ano Liossia landfill to enhance bioreaction c by Olympia Galenianou.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A theoretical study was performed on the effects of adding sulfate-rich wash tower effluent from the Athens hospital waste incinerator to the Ano Liossia landfill of Athens. The method of mass balance was used to examine ...

Galenianou, Olympia

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Comparison of municipal solid waste management systems in Canada and Ghana: A case study of the cities of London, Ontario, and Kumasi, Ghana  

SciTech Connect

Integrated waste management has been accepted as a sustainable approach to solid waste management in any region. It can be applied in both developed and developing countries. The difference is the approach taken to develop the integrated waste management system. This review looks at the integrated waste management system operating in the city of London, Ontario-Canada and how lessons can be drawn from the system's development and operation that will help implement a sustainable waste management system in the city of Kumasi, Ghana. The waste management system in London is designed such that all waste generated in the city is handled and disposed of appropriately. The responsibility of each sector handling waste is clearly defined and monitored. All major services are provided and delivered by a combination of public and private sector forces. The sustainability of the waste management in the city of London is attributed to the continuous improvement strategy framework adopted by the city based on the principles of integrated waste management. It is perceived that adopting a strategic framework based on the principles of integrated waste management with a strong political and social will, can transform the current waste management in Kumasi and other cities in developing countries in the bid for finding lasting solutions to the problems that have plagued the waste management system in these cities.

Asase, Mizpah [Department of Chemical Engineering, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi (Ghana); Yanful, Ernest K. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The University of Western Ontario London, Ontario, N6A 5B9 (Canada)], E-mail: eyanful@eng.uwo.ca; Mensah, Moses [Department of Chemical Engineering, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi (Ghana); Stanford, Jay [City of London, 300 Dufferin Ave. P.O. Box 5035, Ontario, N6A 4L9 (Canada); Amponsah, Samuel [Mathematics Department, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi (Ghana)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

Landfill Cover Revegetation at the Rocky Flats Environmental...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Landfill Cover Revegetation at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Landfill Cover Revegetation at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Landfill Cover...

304

HMDC Kingsland Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HMDC Kingsland Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name HMDC Kingsland Landfill Biomass Facility Facility HMDC Kingsland Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type...

305

Winnebago County Landfill Gas Biomass Facility | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Winnebago County Landfill Gas Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Winnebago County Landfill Gas Biomass Facility Facility Winnebago County Landfill Gas Sector Biomass...

306

Penrose Landfill Gas Conversion LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Penrose Landfill Gas Conversion LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Penrose Landfill Gas Conversion LLC Place Los Angeles, California Product Owner of landfill gas plant....

307

Corrective action investigation plan for CAU Number 453: Area 9 Landfill, Tonopah Test Range  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the environmental sample collection objectives and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at the Area 9 Landfill, Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 453/Corrective Action (CAS) 09-55-001-0952, which is located at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). The TTR, included in the Nellis Air Force Range, is approximately 255 kilometers (140 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The Area 9 Landfill is located northwest of Area 9 on the TTR. The landfill cells associated with CAU 453 were excavated to receive waste generated from the daily operations conducted at Area 9 and from range cleanup which occurred after test activities.

NONE

1997-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

308

Solid Waste Disposal Act (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality is responsible for the regulation and management of municipal solid waste and hazardous waste. A fee is applied to all solid waste disposed in the...

309

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

engineering.de/116/) Co-firing of MSW and sewage sludge indevice for solid waste fuel co-firing Solid waste fuels areand HF produced during firing. ? CO is largely unaffected. ?

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Solid waste integrated cost analysis model: 1991 project year report. Part 2  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the City of Houston`s 1991 Solid Waste Integrated Cost Analysis Model (SWICAM) project was to continue the development of a computerized cost analysis model. This model is to provide solid waste managers with tool to evaluate the dollar cost of real or hypothetical solid waste management choices. Those choices have become complicated by the implementation of Subtitle D of the Resources Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the EPA`s Integrated Approach to managing municipal solid waste;. that is, minimize generation, maximize recycling, reduce volume (incinerate), and then bury (landfill) only the remainder. Implementation of an integrated solid waste management system involving all or some of the options of recycling, waste to energy, composting, and landfilling is extremely complicated. Factors such as hauling distances, markets, and prices for recyclable, costs and benefits of transfer stations, and material recovery facilities must all be considered. A jurisdiction must determine the cost impacts of implementing a number of various possibilities for managing, handling, processing, and disposing of waste. SWICAM employs a single Lotus 123 spreadsheet to enable a jurisdiction to predict or assess the costs of its waste management system. It allows the user to select his own process flow for waste material and to manipulate the model to include as few or as many options as he or she chooses. The model will calculate the estimated cost for those choices selected. The user can then change the model to include or exclude waste stream components, until the mix of choices suits the user. Graphs can be produced as a visual communication aid in presenting the results of the cost analysis. SWICAM also allows future cost projections to be made.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

311

Sustainable use of California biomass resources can help meet state and national bioenergy targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

waste in landfills, or biogas from municipal wastewaterheat for industrial uses. Biogas potential from landfills,Bio]gas-to-liquids (GTL) Gas Biogas Biomethane Compressed

Jenkins, Bryan M; Williams, Robert B; Gildart, Martha C; Kaffka, Stephen R.; Hartsough, Bruce; Dempster, Peter G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Tri County/Elgin Landfill Site, Elgin, IL. (First remedial action), September 1992. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The 66-acre Tri County Landfill (TCL) site comprises two former landfills the Tri County Landfill and the Elgin Landfill, located near the junction of Kane, Cook and DuPage Counties, Illinois. The two disposal operations overlapped to the point where the two landfills were indistinguishable. Land use in the area is predominantly agricultural. The local residents and businesses use private wells as their drinking water supply. Prior to the 1940's, both landfills were used for gravel mining operations. From 1968 to 1976, the TCL received liquid and industrial waste. State and county inspection reports revealed that open dumping, area filling, and dumping into the abandonded gravel quarry had occurred at the site. In addition, confined dumping, inadequate daily cover, blowing litter, fires, lack of access restrictions, and leachate flows were typical problems reported. In 1981, the landfill was closed with a final cover.

Not Available

1992-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

313

Optimizing Organic Waste to Energy Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A waste-to-energy firm that recycles organic waste with energy recovery performs two environmentally beneficial functions: it diverts waste from landfills and it produces renewable energy. At the same time, the waste-to-energy firm serves and collects ... Keywords: environment, operating strategy, organic waste to energy, regulation, sustainability

Bar?? Ata; Deishin Lee; Mustafa H. Tongarlak

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Greenhouse gases accounting and reporting for waste management - A South African perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates how greenhouse gases are accounted and reported in the waste sector in South Africa. Developing countries (including South Africa) do not have binding emission reduction targets, but many of them publish different greenhouse gas emissions data which have been accounted and reported in different ways. Results show that for South Africa, inventories at national and municipal level are the most important tools in the process of accounting and reporting greenhouse gases from waste. For the development of these inventories international initiatives were important catalysts at national and municipal levels, and assisted in developing local expertise, resulting in increased output quality. However, discrepancies in the methodology used to account greenhouse gases from waste between inventories still remain a concern. This is a challenging issue for developing countries, especially African ones, since higher accuracy methods are more data intensive. Analysis of the South African inventories shows that results from the recent inventories can not be compared with older ones due to the use of different accounting methodologies. More recently the use of Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) procedures in Africa, geared towards direct measurements of greenhouse gases from landfill sites, has increased and resulted in an improvement of the quality of greenhouse gas inventories at municipal level.

Friedrich, Elena, E-mail: Friedriche@ukzn.ac.z [University of KwaZulu-Natal, CRECHE, School of Civil Engineering, Surveying and Construction, Howard College Campus, Durban (South Africa); Trois, Cristina [University of KwaZulu-Natal, CRECHE, School of Civil Engineering, Surveying and Construction, Howard College Campus, Durban (South Africa)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

Pricing landfill externalities: Emissions and disamenity costs in Cape Town, South Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: > The paper estimates landfill externalities associated with emissions, disamenities and transport. > Transport externalities vary from 24.22 to 31.42 Rands per tonne. > Costs of emissions (estimated using benefits transfer) vary from 0.07 to 28.91 Rands per tonne. > Disamenities (estimated using hedonic pricing) vary from 0.00 to 57.46 Rands per tonne. > Overall, external costs for urban landfills exceed those of a regional landfill. - Abstract: The external (environmental and social) costs of landfilling (e.g. emissions to air, soil and water; and 'disamenities' such as odours and pests) are difficult to quantify in monetary terms, and are therefore not generally reflected in waste disposal charges or taken into account in decision making regarding waste management options. This results in a bias against alternatives such as recycling, which may be more expensive than landfilling from a purely financial perspective, but preferable from an environmental and social perspective. There is therefore a need to quantify external costs in monetary terms, so that different disposal options can be compared on the basis of their overall costs to society (financial plus external costs). This study attempts to estimate the external costs of landfilling in the City of Cape Town for different scenarios, using the benefits transfer method (for emissions) and the hedonic pricing method (for disamenities). Both methods (in particular the process of transferring and adjusting estimates from one study site to another) are described in detail, allowing the procedures to be replicated elsewhere. The results show that external costs are currently R111 (in South African Rands, or approximately US$16) per tonne of waste, although these could decline under a scenario in which energy is recovered, or in which the existing urban landfills are replaced with a new regional landfill.

Nahman, Anton, E-mail: anahman@csir.co.za [Environmental and Resource Economics Group, Natural Resources and the Environment, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, P.O. Box 320, Stellenbosch 7599 (South Africa)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

Sodium Dichromate Barrel Landfill expedited response action proposal  

SciTech Connect

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) recommended that the US Department of Energy (DOE) prepare an expedited response action (ERA) for the Sodium Dichromate Barrel Landfill. The Sodium Dichromate Barrel Disposal Site was used in 1945 for disposal of crushed barrels. The site location is the sole waste site within the 100-IU-4 Operable Unit. The Waste Information Data System (WIDS 1992) assumes that the crushed barrels contained 1% residual sodium dichromate at burial time and that only buried crushed barrels are at the site. Burial depth is shallow since visual inspection finds numerous barrel debris on the surface. A non-time-critical ERA proposal includes preparation of an engineering evaluation and cost analysis (EE/CA) section. The EE/CA is a rapid, focused evaluation of available technologies using specific screening factors to assess feasibility, appropriateness, and cost. The ERA goal is to reduce the potential for any contaminant migration from the landfill to the soil column, groundwater, and Columbia River. Since the landfill is the only waste site within the operable unit, the ERA will present a final remediation of the 100-IU-4 operable unit.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Waste Not, Want Not: Analyzing the Economic and Environmental Viability of Waste-to-Energy (WTE) Technology for Site-Specific Optimization of Renewable Energy Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste-to-energy (WTE) technology burns municipal solid waste (MSW) in an environmentally safe combustion system to generate electricity, provide district heat, and reduce the need for landfill disposal. While this technology has gained acceptance in Europe, it has yet to be commonly recognized as an option in the United States. Section 1 of this report provides an overview of WTE as a renewable energy technology and describes a high-level model developed to assess the feasibility of WTE at a site. Section 2 reviews results from previous life cycle assessment (LCA) studies of WTE, and then uses an LCA inventory tool to perform a screening-level analysis of cost, net energy production, greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and conventional air pollution impacts of WTE for residual MSW in Boulder, Colorado. Section 3 of this report describes the federal regulations that govern the permitting, monitoring, and operating practices of MSW combustors and provides emissions limits for WTE projects.

Funk, K.; Milford, J.; Simpkins, T.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 - 3 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

A diminishing portion of municipal solid waste is landfilled each year as recycling and composting programs expand (Figure 6). Also, ...

319

Rhode Island Profile - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... including hydroelectric power, municipal solid waste, and landfill gas. Rhode Island has potential wind energy generation from offshore wind farms.

320

Business Energy Investment Tax Credit (ITC) (Federal) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Direct Use, Geothermal Electric, Geothermal Heat Pumps, Hydroelectric, Landfill Gas, Microturbines, Municipal Solid Waste, Ocean Thermal, Photovoltaics, Small...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "municipal waste landfill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Virginia - State Energy Profile Analysis - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural gas consumption by Virginia's electric power generators has increased sharply since 2009. ... Municipal solid waste and landfill gas also ...

322

Non-Mandated Renewable Energy Objective (Minnesota) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility Eligible Technologies Solar Thermal Electric, Photovoltaics, Landfill Gas, Wind, Biomass, Hydroelectric, Municipal Solid Waste, Hydrogen Active Incentive No Implementing...

323

Modified biochemical methane potential (BMP) assays to assess biodegradation potential of landfilled refuse  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Modified Biochemical Methane Potential (BMP) assays were used to assess biogas production potential of solid landfill samples. In landfill samples with visible soil content, moisture addition alone was generally as effective at stimulating biogas production as the addition of a comprehensive nutrient media. In a variety of samples from humid and semiarid landfills, addition of an aqueous nutrient media was the most effective stimulant for biogas production; however, moisture addition was almost as effective for most samples, suggesting that water addition would be the most cost-effective field approach. Onset of methanogenesis was slower in fresh refuse samples (even when inoculated with anaerobic digester sludge) than in landfill samples, indicating that the soil into which materials are landfilled is a major source of microorganisms. High volatile solids loading in fresh refuse and landfill assays retarded methanogenesis. A comparison of anaerobic and aerobic sample handling techniques showed no significant differences with regard to onset of methanogenesis and total gas production. The technique shows initial promise with regard to replication and reproducibility of results and could be a meaningful addition to landfill site evaluations where commercial gas recovery is anticipated. The BMP technique could also be adapted to assess anaerobic biodegradability of other solid waste materials for conventional anaerobic digestion applications. 9 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Bogner, J.E.; Rose, C.; Piorkowski, R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Exploratory Study of Waste Generation and Waste Minimization in Sweden.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The current thesis presents an exploratory study on municipal solid waste generation and minimization in Sweden, with a focus on their connection to basic… (more)

Kuslyaykina, Dina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Landfill Gas Fueled HCCI Demonstration System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

operations with natural gas: Fuel composition implications,”of Natural gas testing LANDFILL GAS COMPOSITION Tapping into

Blizman, Brandon J.; Makel, Darby B.; Mack, John Hunter; Dibble, Robert W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Landfill Gas Fueled HCCI Demonstration System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simulated Landfill Gas Intake Diagram STEADY STATE OPERATIONlandfill gas. Expanding the understanding of HCCI mode of engine operation

Blizman, Brandon J.; Makel, Darby B.; Mack, John Hunter; Dibble, Robert W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

July 17, 2012, Webinar: Landfill Gas-to-Energy Projects | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 17, 2012, Webinar: Landfill Gas-to-Energy Projects July 17, 2012, Webinar: Landfill Gas-to-Energy Projects July 17, 2012, Webinar: Landfill Gas-to-Energy Projects This webinar, held July 17, 2012, provided information on the challenges and benefits of developing successful community landfill gas-to-energy projects in Will County, Illinois, and Escambia County, Florida. Download the presentations below, watch the webinar (WMV 112 MB) or view the text version. Find more CommRE webinars. Prairie View RDF Gas to Energy Facility: A Public/Private Partnership Will County partnered with Waste Management, using a portion of the county's DOE Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) funding, to develop the Prairie View Recycling and Disposal Facility. A gas purchase agreement was executed in 2010 and the facility became operational

328

Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS Items that could cut or puncture skin or trash- can liners. This waste stream must be boxed to protect custodial staff. It goes directly to the landfill lined cardboard box. Tape seams with heavy duty tape to contain waste. Limit weight to 20 lbs. Or

Sheridan, Jennifer

329

Capture and Utilisation of Landfill Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass Capture and Utilisation of Landfill Gas What is the potential for additional utilisation of landfill gas in the USA and around the world? By Nickolas Themelis and Priscilla Ulloa, Columbia University. In his 2003 review of energy recovery from landfill gas, Willumsen1 reported that as of 2001, there were

Columbia University

330

Landfill Gas | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Gas Landfill Gas Dataset Summary Description The UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) publishes annual renewable energy generation and capacity by region (9 regions in England, plus Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland). Data available 2003 to 2009. Data is included in the DECC Energy Trends: September 2010 Report (available: http://www.decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/Statistics/publications/trends/558-tr...) Source UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) Date Released September 30th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Energy Generation Hydro Landfill Gas Other Biofuels Renewable Energy Consumption Sewage Gas wind Data application/zip icon 2 Excel files, 1 for generation, 1 for capacity (zip, 24.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

331

Annual Performance Assessment and Composite Analysis Review for the ICDF Landfill FY 2008  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses low-level waste disposal operations at the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility (ICDF) landfill from the start of operations in Fiscal Year 2003 through Fiscal Year 2008. The ICDF was authorized in the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision for disposal of waste from the Idaho National Laboratory Site CERCLA environmental restoration activities. The ICDF has been operating since 2003 in compliance with the CERCLA requirements and the waste acceptance criteria developed in the CERCLA process. In developing the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision, U.S. Department of Energy Order (DOE) 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management', was identified as a 'to be considered' requirement for the ICDF. The annual review requirement under DOE Order 435.1 was determined to be an administrative requirement and, therefore, annual reviews were not prepared on an annual basis. However, the landfill has been operating for 5 years and, since the waste forms and inventories disposed of have changed from what was originally envisioned for the ICDF landfill, the ICDF project team has decided that this annual review is necessary to document the changes and provide a basis for any updates in analyses that may be necessary to continue to meet the substantive requirements of DOE Order 435.1. For facilities regulated under DOE Order 435.1-1, U.S. DOE Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management', IV.P.(4)(c) stipulates that annual summaries of low-level waste disposal operations shall be prepared with respect to the conclusions and recommendations of the performance assessment and composite analysis. Important factors considered in this review include facility operations, waste receipts, and results from monitoring and research and development programs. There have been no significant changes in operations at the landfill in respect to the disposal geometry, the verification of waste characteristics, and the tracking of inventories against total limits that would affect the results and conclusions of the performance assessment. Waste receipts to date and projected waste receipts through Fiscal Year 2012 are both greater than the inventory assessed in the performance assessment and composite analysis. The waste forms disposed of to the landfill are different from the waste form (compacted soil) assessed in the performance assessment. The leak detection system and groundwater monitoring results indicate the landfill has not leaked. The results of the performance assessment/composite analysis are valid (i.e., there is still a reasonable expectation of meeting performance objectives) but the new information indicates less conservatism in the results than previously believed.

Karen Koslow Arthur Rood

2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

332

CEPM 4: optimization of the waste management for construction projects using simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Growth in construction activities increases the amount of construction waste generated. Recycling of construction waste is an important component of environmentally responsible construction, as it reduces the amount of waste directed to landfills. In ...

Mala Chandrakanthi; Patrick Hettiaratchi; Bolívar Prado; Janaka Y. Ruwanpura

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Report of the DOD-DOE Workshop on Converting Waste to Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

plants (WWTPs) and landfills, food waste (such as spent cooking oil from mess halls), compost heaps, plastic waste, and paper waste (office paper and cardboard). DOD may also be...

334

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"2Other Renewables includes biogenic municipal solid waste, wood, black liquor, other wood waste, landfill gas, sludge waste, agriculture byproducts, and other biomass...

335

Methane production during the anaerobic decomposition of composted and raw organic refuse in simulated landfill cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methane contributes 20% annually to increases in global warming, and is explosive at concentrations of 5-15% in air. Landfills contribute 15% to total methane emissions. This study was conducted to determine the potential decrease in methane production from landfills if organic waste is composted prior to. The quantities and rates of methane production were measured from simulated landfill cells containing composted and raw simulated refuse. The refuse was composted in an open pile and characterized by temperature, pH, ash content and C02 evolved during aerobic respiration. Assuming a 1 0% lignin content, the labile carbon fraction was reduced by an estimated 71 % during composting. Over a of six month period, simulated landfill cells filled with raw waste generated 66 M3 methane per Mg of dry refuse, while cells containing compost produced 31 M3 methane per Mg of dry compost. Per unit weight of dry raw material, composted waste placed in a landfill produced only 23% of the methane that was generated from raw refuse.

West, Margrit Evelyn

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

US Integrated Waste Services Association | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search Name US Integrated Waste Services Association Place Washington, DC Product Focussed on promoting integrated solutions to municipal solid waste management...

337

China's waste could be treasure for Kyoto scheme 01 Mar 2006 12:36:11 GMT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with equipment to stream-off greenhouse gas emissions from rotting waste in landfills and convert it into energy registered landfill sites but only 10 of them have installed gas recovery and utilisation systems," he told Penson COPENHAGEN, March 1 (Reuters) - Hundreds of rubbish landfill sites across China have vast

Columbia University

338

CEWEP -Confederation of European Waste-to-Energy Plants Boulevard Clovis 12A  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

follow at a distance, are energy from Landfill Gas (LFG) extraction, co-incineration of SRF (Solid; BEP ­ Biomass Energy Plants; LFG ­ Landfill Gas; WtE ­ Waste-to-Energy 1 Excluding agricultural policy would be even more ambitious, replacing landfilling). Both the supply of renewable electricity

339

Environmental and economic analyses of waste disposal options for traditional markets in Indonesia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste from traditional markets in Indonesia is the second largest stream of municipal solid waste after household waste. It has a higher organic fraction and may have greater potential to be managed on a business scale compared to household wastes. The attributed reason is that in general the wastes generated from traditional markets are more uniform, more concentrated and less hazardous than waste from other sources. This paper presents the results of environmental and economic assessments to compare the options available for traditional market waste disposal in Indonesia. The options compared were composting in labour intensive plants, composting in a centralised plant that utilised a simple wheel loader, centralised biogas production and landfill for electricity production. The current open dumping practice was included as the baseline case. A life cycle assessment (LCA) was used for environmental analysis. All options compared have lower environmental impacts than the current practice of open dumping. The biogas production option has the lowest environmental impacts. A cost-benefit analysis, which considered greenhouse gas savings, was used for the economic assessment. It was found that composting at a centralised plant is the most economically feasible option under the present Indonesian conditions. The approach reported in this study could be applied for 'a pre-feasibility first cut comparison' that includes environmental aspects in a decision-making framework for developing countries even though European emission factors were used.

Aye, Lu [International Technologies Centre (IDTC), Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Melbourne, Vic. 3010 (Australia)]. E-mail: lua@unimelb.edu.au; Widjaya, E.R. [International Technologies Centre (IDTC), Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Vic. 3010 (Australia)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Consumption patterns and household hazardous solid waste generation in an urban settlement in Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Mexico is currently facing a crisis in the waste management field. Some efforts have just commenced in urban and in rural settlements, e.g., conversion of open dumps into landfills, a relatively small composting culture, and implementation of source separation and plastic recycling strategies. Nonetheless, the high heterogeneity of components in the waste, many of these with hazardous properties, present the municipal collection services with serious problems, due to the risks to the health of the workers and to the impacts to the environment as a result of the inadequate disposition of these wastes. A generation study in the domestic sector was undertaken with the aim of finding out the composition and the generation rate of household hazardous waste (HHW) produced at residences. Simultaneously to the generation study, a socioeconomic survey was applied to determine the influence of income level on the production of HHW. Results from the solid waste generation analysis indicated that approximately 1.6% of the waste stream consists of HHW. Correspondingly, it was estimated that in Morelia, a total amount of 442 ton/day of domestic waste are produced, including 7.1 ton of HHW per day. Furthermore, the overall amount of HHW is not directly related to income level, although particular byproducts do correlate. However, an important difference was observed, as the brands and the presentation sizes of goods and products used in each socioeconomic stratum varied.

Delgado Otoniel, Buenrostro [Instituto De Investigaciones Agricolas y Forestales, Universidad Michoacana De San Nicolas De Hidalgo, Av. San Juanito Itzicuaro S/N, Col. San Juanito Itzicuaro, C.P. 58330, Morelia-Aeropuerto, Michoacan (Mexico)], E-mail: otonielb@zeus.umich.mx; Liliana, Marquez-Benavides; Gaona Francelia, Pinette [Instituto De Investigaciones Agricolas y Forestales, Universidad Michoacana De San Nicolas De Hidalgo, Av. San Juanito Itzicuaro S/N, Col. San Juanito Itzicuaro, C.P. 58330, Morelia-Aeropuerto, Michoacan (Mexico)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "municipal waste landfill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

The composition of the domestic waste in Timisoara  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our study aims to present and analyse the data resulted from the analysis of municipal waste composition in Timisoara, Romania, in comparison with Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany. The present article is the outcome of a laborious work of researchers from ... Keywords: biological waste, ecology, municipal waste composition, recycling, waste economy, waste management

Iulia Para; Daniela Stanciu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Evaluation of the Natick enzymatic hydrolysis process for use in the production of ethanol from municipal solid waste or from wood. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Economic evaluation of a conceptual, large-scale, commercial ethanol production facility using the enzymatic hydrolysis technology are presented. Designs and cost estimates for the mechanical processing and the ethanol fermentation and recovery are included. Production of ethanol from both wood and solid wastes is covered. (MHR)

Jones, J. L.; Fong, W. S.; Chatterjee, A. K.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

FULL SCALE BIOREACTOR LANDFILL FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND GREENHOUSE EMISSION CONTROL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works is constructing a full-scale bioreactor landfill as a part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Project XL program to develop innovative approaches for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. The overall objective is to manage landfill solid waste for rapid waste decomposition and maximum landfill gas generation and capture for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. Waste decomposition is accelerated by improving conditions for either the aerobic or anaerobic biological processes and involves circulating controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray water, etc.), and, in the aerobic process, large volumes of air. The first phase of the project entails the construction of a 12-acre module that contains a 6-acre anaerobic cell, a 3.5-acre anaerobic cell, and a 2.5-acre aerobic cell at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California. The cells are highly instrumented to monitor bioreactor performance. Construction is complete on the 3.5-acre anaerobic cell and liquid addition has commenced. Construction of the 2.5 acre aerobic cell is nearly complete with only the blower station and biofilter remaining. Waste placement and instrumentation installation is ongoing in the west-side 6-acre anaerobic cell. The current project status and preliminary monitoring results are summarized in this report.

Ramin Yazdani; Jeff Kieffer; Heather Akau

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

FULL SCALE BIOREACTOR LANDFILL FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND GREENHOUSE EMISSION CONTROL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works is constructing a full-scale bioreactor landfill as a part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Project XL program to develop innovative approaches while providing superior environmental protection. The overall objective is to manage landfill solid waste for rapid waste decomposition, maximum landfill gas generation and capture, and minimum long-term environmental consequences. Waste decomposition is accelerated by improving conditions for either the aerobic or anaerobic biological processes and involves circulating controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray water, etc.), and, in the aerobic process, large volumes of air. The first phase of the project entails the construction of a 12-acre module that contains a 6-acre anaerobic cell, a 3.5-acre anaerobic cell, and a 2.5-acre aerobic cell at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California. The cells are highly instrumented to monitor bioreactor performance. Construction is complete on the 3.5 acre anaerobic cell and liquid addition has commenced. Construction of the 2.5 acre aerobic cell is nearly complete with only the blower station and biofilter remaining. Waste placement and instrumentation installation is ongoing in the west-side 6-acre anaerobic cell. The current project status and preliminary monitoring results are summarized in this report.

Ramin Yazdani; Jeff Kieffer; Heather Akau

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

The reduction of packaging waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nationwide, packaging waste comprises approximately one third of the waste being sent to our solid waste landfills. These wastes range from product and shipping containers made from plastic, glass, wood, and corrugated cardboard to packaging fillers and wraps made from a variety of plastic materials such as shrink wrap and polystyrene peanuts. The amount of packaging waste generated is becoming an important issue for manufacturers, retailers, and consumers. Elimination of packaging not only conserves precious landfill space, it also reduces consumption of raw materials and energy, all of which result in important economic and environmental benefits. At the US Department of Energy-Richland Field Office's (DOE-RL) Hanford Site as well as other DOE sites the generation of packaging waste has added importance. By reducing the amount of packaging waste, DOE also reduces the costs and liabilities associated with waste handling, treatment, storage, and disposal.

Raney, E.A.; McCollom, M.; Hogan, J.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

The reduction of packaging waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nationwide, packaging waste comprises approximately one third of the waste being sent to our solid waste landfills. These wastes range from product and shipping containers made from plastic, glass, wood, and corrugated cardboard to packaging fillers and wraps made from a variety of plastic materials such as shrink wrap and polystyrene peanuts. The amount of packaging waste generated is becoming an important issue for manufacturers, retailers, and consumers. Elimination of packaging not only conserves precious landfill space, it also reduces consumption of raw materials and energy, all of which result in important economic and environmental benefits. At the US Department of Energy-Richland Field Office`s (DOE-RL) Hanford Site as well as other DOE sites the generation of packaging waste has added importance. By reducing the amount of packaging waste, DOE also reduces the costs and liabilities associated with waste handling, treatment, storage, and disposal.

Raney, E.A.; McCollom, M.; Hogan, J.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Municipal Utility Districts (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Municipal Utility Districts, regulated by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, may be created for the following purposes: (1) the control, storage, preservation, and distribution of its...

348

Wastes as co-fuels: the policy framework for solid recovered fuel (SRF) in Europe, with UK implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

European Union (EU) member states are adopting the mechanical-biological treatment (MBT) of municipal solid waste (MSW) to comply with EU Landfill Directive (LD) targets on landfill diversion. We review the policy framework for MSW-derived solid recovered fuel (SRF), composed of paper, plastic, and textiles, in the energy-intensive industries. A comparatively high calorific value (15-18 MJ/kg) fuel, SRF has the potential to partially replace fossil fuel in energy-intensive industries, alongside MSW in dedicated combustion facilities. Attempts by the European standards organization (CEN) to classify fuel properties consider net calorific value (CV) and chlorine and mercury content. However, the particle size, moisture content, and fuel composition also require attention and future studies must address these parameters. We critically review the implications of using SRF as a co-fuel in thermal processes. A thermodynamic analysis provides insight into the technical and environmental feasibility of co-combusting SRF in coal-fired power plants and cement kilns. Results indicate the use of SRF as co-fuel can reduce global warming and acidification potential significantly. This policy analysis is of value to waste managers, policy specialists, regulators, and the waste management research community. 63 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Anurag Garg; Richard Smith; Daryl Hill; Nigel Simms; Simon Pollard [Cranfield University, Cranfield (United Kingdom). Sustainable Systems Department, School of Applied Sciences

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

349

Investigation of Integrated Subsurface Processing of Landfill Gas and Carbon Sequestration, Johnson County, Kansas  

SciTech Connect

The Johnson County Landfill in Shawnee, KS is operated by Deffenbaugh Industries and serves much of metropolitan Kansas City. Refuse, which is dumped in large plastic-underlined trash cells covering several acres, is covered over with shale shortly after burial. The landfill waste, once it fills the cell, is then drilled by Kansas City LFG, so that the gas generated by anaerobic decomposition of the refuse can be harvested. Production of raw landfill gas from the Johnson County landfill comes from 150 wells. Daily production is approximately 2.2 to 2.5 mmcf, of which approximately 50% is methane and 50% is carbon dioxide and NMVOCs (non-methane volatile organic compounds). Heating value is approximately 550 BTU/scf. A upgrading plant, utilizing an amine process, rejects the carbon dioxide and NMVOCs, and upgrades the gas to pipeline quality (i.e., nominally a heating value >950 BTU/scf). The gas is sold to a pipeline adjacent to the landfill. With coal-bearing strata underlying the landfill, and carbon dioxide a major effluent gas derived from the upgrading process, the Johnson County Landfill is potentially an ideal setting to study the feasibility of injecting the effluent gas in the coals for both enhanced coalbed methane recovery and carbon sequestration. To these ends, coals below the landfill were cored and then were analyzed for their thickness and sorbed gas content, which ranged up to 79 scf/ton. Assuming 1 1/2 square miles of land (960 acres) at the Johnson County Landfill can be utilized for coalbed and shale gas recovery, the total amount of in-place gas calculates to 946,200 mcf, or 946.2 mmcf, or 0.95 bcf (i.e., 985.6 mcf/acre X 960 acres). Assuming that carbon dioxide can be imbibed by the coals and shales on a 2:1 ratio compared to the gas that was originally present, then 1682 to 1720 days (4.6 to 4.7 years) of landfill carbon dioxide production can be sequestered by the coals and shales immediately under the landfill. Three coal--the Bevier, Fleming, and Mulberry coals--are the major coals of sufficient thickness (nominally >1-foot) that can imbibe carbon dioxide gas with an enhanced coalbed injection. Comparison of the adsorption gas content of coals to the gas desorbed from the coals shows that the degree of saturation decreases with depth for the coals.

K. David Newell; Timothy R. Carr

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

350

Turbines produce energy from L. A. landfill  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes one of the Nation's most sophisticated resource recovery projects which began operating in February at the Puente Hills Landfill Methane Energy Station as part of the County Sanitation Districts of Los Angeles County. The project is currently generating 2.8 megawatts of power which would serve the electrical needs of approximately 5600 homes. Future plans for the landfill energy project include generating enough electricity for more than 50,000 homes. Unlike other methane recovery projects that use diesel or gasoline power reciprocating engines, the Puente Hills Landfill Methane Energy Station drives its electrical generators with gas turbines. This is a first for power generation at a landfill site.

Carry, C.W.; Stahl, J.F.; Maguin, S.R.; Friess, P.L.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Design document for landfill capping Prototype Decision Support System. Draft 1.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of the Prototype Decision Support System for shallow land burial project is to ``Develop a Decision Support System tool which incorporates simulation modeling and multi-objective decision theory for the purpose of designing and evaluating alternative trench cap designs for mixed waste landfill covers. The goal is to improve the quality of technical information used by the risk manager to select landfill cover designs while taking into account technological, economical, and regulatory factors.`` The complexity of the technical and non-technical information, and how the information varies in importance across sites, points to the need for decision analysis tools that provide a common basis for integrating, synthesizing, and valuing the decision input. Because the cost of remediating thousands of contaminated DOE sites is projected to be in the 10`s--100`s of billions of dollars, methods will be needed to establish cleanup priorities and to help in the selection and evaluation of cost effective remediation alternatives. Even at this early stage in DOE`s cleanup program, it is certain that capping technologies will be heavily relied upon to remediate the 3000+ landfills on DOE property. Capping is favored in remediating most DOE landfills because, based on preliminary baseline risk assessments, human and ecological risks are considered to be low at most of these sites and the regulatory requirements for final closure of old landfills can be met using a well designed cap to isolate the buried waste. This report describes a program plan to design, develop, and test a decision support system (DSS) for assisting the DOE risk manager in evaluating capping alternatives for radioactive and hazardous waste landfills. The DOE DSS will incorporate methods for calculating, integrating and valuing technical, regulatory, and economic criteria.

Stone, J.J.; Paige, G.; Hakonson, T.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Lane, L.J. [USDA-ARS Southwest Watershed Research Center, Tucson, AZ (United State)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Landfill Gas Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Technology Deployment Renewable Energy Federal Requirements Renewable Resources & Technologies

353

Appendix B Landfill Inspection Forms and Survey Data  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Appendix B Landfill Inspection Forms and Survey Data This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank Original Landfill January 2011 Monthly Inspection -...

354

Community Renewable Energy Success Stories: Landfill Gas-to-Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stories: Landfill Gas-to-Energy Projects Webinar (text version) Community Renewable Energy Success Stories: Landfill Gas-to-Energy Projects Webinar (text version) Below is the text...

355

Briefing: DOE EM ITR Landfill Assessment Project Lessons Learned...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ITR Landfill Assessment Project Lessons Learned Briefing: DOE EM ITR Landfill Assessment Project Lessons Learned By: Craig H. Benson, PhD, PE Where: EM SSAB Teleconference: 1...

356

DOE EM Landfill Workshop and Path Forward - July 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Teleconference: 2. DOE EM Landfill Workshop & Path Forward Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation US Department of Energy July 2009 Slides prepared by CRESP DOE EM Landfill...

357

Briefing: DOE EM Landfill Workshop & Path Forward | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Landfill Workshop & Path Forward Briefing: DOE EM Landfill Workshop & Path Forward By: Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation Where: SSAB Teleconference 2 Subject: DOE EM...

358

FULL SCALE BIOREACTOR LANDFILL FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND GREENHOUSE EMISSION CONTROL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works is constructing a full-scale bioreactor landfill as a part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Project XL program to develop innovative approaches for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. The overall objective is to manage landfill solid waste for rapid waste decomposition and maximum landfill gas generation and capture for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. Waste decomposition is accelerated by improving conditions for either the aerobic or anaerobic biological processes and involves circulating controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray water, etc.), and, in the aerobic process, large volumes of air. The first phase of the project entails the construction of a 12-acre module that contains a 6-acre anaerobic cell, a 3.5-acre anaerobic cell, and a 2.5-acre aerobic cell at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California. The cells are highly instrumented to monitor bioreactor performance. Liquid addition has commenced in the 3.5-acre anaerobic cell and the 6-acre anaerobic cell. Construction of the 2.5-acre aerobic cell is nearly complete with only the biofilter remaining and is scheduled to be complete by the end of August 2003. The current project status and preliminary monitoring results are summarized in this report.

Ramin Yazdani; Jeff Kieffer; Heather Akau

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

FULL SCALE BIOREACTOR LANDFILL FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND GREENHOUSE EMISSION CONTROL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works is constructing a full-scale bioreactor landfill as a part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Project XL program to develop innovative approaches for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. The overall objective is to manage landfill solid waste for rapid waste decomposition and maximum landfill gas generation and capture for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. Waste decomposition is accelerated by improving conditions for either the aerobic or anaerobic biological processes and involves circulating controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray water, etc.), and, in the aerobic process, large volumes of air. The first phase of the project entails the construction of a 12-acre module that contains a 6-acre anaerobic cell, a 3.5-acre anaerobic cell, and a 2.5-acre aerobic cell at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California. The cells are highly instrumented to monitor bioreactor performance. Construction is complete on the 3.5-acre anaerobic cell and liquid addition has commenced. Construction of the 2.5-acre aerobic cell is nearly complete with only the biofilter remaining and construction of the west-side 6-acre anaerobic cell is nearly complete with only the liquid addition system remaining. The current project status and preliminary monitoring results are summarized in this report.

Ramin Yazdani; Jeff Kieffer; Heather Akau

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Full Scale Bioreactor Landfill for Carbon Sequestration and Greenhouse Emission Control  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works constructed a full-scale bioreactor landfill as a part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Project XL program to develop innovative approaches for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. The overall objective was to manage landfill solid waste for rapid waste decomposition and maximum landfill gas generation and capture for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. Waste decomposition is accelerated by improving conditions for either the aerobic or anaerobic biological processes and involves circulating controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray water, etc.), and, in the aerobic process, large volumes of air. The first phase of the project entailed the construction of a 12-acre module that contained a 6-acre anaerobic cell, a 3.5-acre anaerobic cell, and a 2.5-acre aerobic cell at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California. The cells were highly instrumented to monitor bioreactor performance. Liquid addition commenced in the 3.5-acre anaerobic cell and the 6-acre anaerobic cell. Construction of the 2.5-acre aerobic cell and biofilter has been completed. The current project status and preliminary monitoring results are summarized in this report.

Ramin Yazdani; Jeff Kieffer; Kathy Sananikone; Don Augenstein

2005-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "municipal waste landfill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

FULL SCALE BIOREACTOR LANDFILL FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND GREENHOUSE EMISSION CONTROL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works is constructing a full-scale bioreactor landfill as a part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Project XL program to develop innovative approaches for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. The overall objective is to manage landfill solid waste for rapid waste decomposition and maximum landfill gas generation and capture for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. Waste decomposition is accelerated by improving conditions for either the aerobic or anaerobic biological processes and involves circulating controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray water, etc.), and, in the aerobic process, large volumes of air. The first phase of the project entails the construction of a 12-acre module that contains a 6-acre anaerobic cell, a 3.5-acre anaerobic cell, and a 2.5-acre aerobic cell at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California. The cells are highly instrumented to monitor bioreactor performance. Liquid addition has commenced in the 3.5-acre anaerobic cell and the 6-acre anaerobic cell. Construction of the 2.5-acre aerobic cell and biofilter has been completed. The remaining task to be completed is to test the biofilter prior to operation, which is currently anticipated to begin in January 2004. The current project status and preliminary monitoring results are summarized in this report.

Ramin Yazdani; Jeff Kieffer; Heather Akau

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

FULL SCALE BIOREACTOR LANDFILL FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND GREENHOUSE EMISSION CONTROL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works is constructing a full-scale bioreactor landfill as a part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Project XL program to develop innovative approaches while providing superior environmental protection. The overall objective is to manage landfill solid waste for rapid waste decomposition, maximum landfill gas generation and capture, and minimum long-term environmental consequences. Waste decomposition is accelerated by improving conditions for either the aerobic or anaerobic biological processes and involves circulating controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray water, etc.), and, in the aerobic process, large volumes of air. The first phase of the project entails the construction of a 12-acre module that contains a 6-acre anaerobic cell, a 3.5-acre anaerobic cell, and a 2.5-acre aerobic cell at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California. The cells are highly instrumented to monitor bioreactor performance. The current project status and preliminary monitoring results are summarized in this report.

Ramin Yazdani; Jeff Kieffer; Heather Akau

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

FULL SCALE BIOREACTOR LANDFILL FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND GREENHOUSE EMISSION CONTROL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works is constructing a full-scale bioreactor landfill as a part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Project XL program to develop innovative approaches while providing superior environmental protection. The overall objective is to manage landfill solid waste for rapid waste decomposition, maximum landfill gas generation and capture, and minimum long-term environmental consequences. Waste decomposition is accelerated by improving conditions for either the aerobic or anaerobic biological processes and involves circulating controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray water, etc.), and, in the aerobic process, large volumes of air. The first phase of the project entails the construction of a 12-acre module that contains a 6-acre anaerobic cell, a 3.5-acre anaerobic cell, and a 2.5-acre aerobic cell at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California. The cells are highly instrumented to monitor bioreactor performance. The current project status and preliminary monitoring results are summarized in this report.

Ramin Yazdani; Jeff Kieffer; Heather Akau

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Urban Wood Waste Resource Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study collected and analyzed data on urban wood waste resources in 30 randomly selected metropolitan areas in the United States. Three major categories wood wastes disposed with, or recovered from, the municipal solid waste stream; industrial wood wastes such as wood scraps and sawdust from pallet recycling, woodworking shops, and lumberyards; and wood in construction/demolition and land clearing debris.

Wiltsee, G.

1998-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

365

Waste Toolkit A-Z Light bulbs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Toolkit A-Z Light bulbs Can I recycle light bulbs? It depends what type of bulbs you have for the `hazardous' symbol on the packaging or on the light bulb (crossed out wheelie bin symbol). How can I recycle light bulbs? Standard filament bulbs Put in the waste bin (landfill waste) as these are not classified

Melham, Tom

366

by Caroline Jackson MEP Britain's Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Caroline Jackson MEP Britain's Waste: the lessons we can learn from Europe Conservative MEPs #12 on the EU landfill directive in 1997-9 and is now rapporteur on the draft waste framework directive and encouragement. Britain's Waste: the lessons we can learn from Europe by Caroline Jackson MEP #12;#12;B ritain

Columbia University

367

Health assessment for New Lyme Landfill, Ashtabula, Ohio, Region 5. CERCLIS No. OHD980794614. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The New Lyme Landfill is a 40-acre facility operated from 1969 until 1978 as a trench and fill landfill with majority of the waste coming from industrial and commercial sources. Leachate includes both leachate seeps at the surface of the landfill and water that is either stagnant or moving very slowly in or out of the trenches. Organic compounds detected consisted of VOCs and phenolic compounds. Concentrations of inorganic compounds were generally an order-of-magnitude or more in ground water. Chrysotile asbestos fibers were found in two leachate water samples. The primary potential exposure pathways for leachate are direct contact or inhalation of airborne asbestos fibers. Based on the nature of the contaminants and the hydrological conditions at the site, residential development of the area may not be suitable.

Not Available

1986-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

368

Westchester Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Biomass Facility Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Westchester Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Westchester Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Cook County, Illinois Coordinates 41.7376587°, -87.697554° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7376587,"lon":-87.697554,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

369

Kiefer Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kiefer Landfill Biomass Facility Kiefer Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Kiefer Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Kiefer Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Sacramento County, California Coordinates 38.47467°, -121.3541631° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.47467,"lon":-121.3541631,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

370

Milliken Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Milliken Landfill Biomass Facility Milliken Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Milliken Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Milliken Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location San Bernardino County, California Coordinates 34.9592083°, -116.419389° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.9592083,"lon":-116.419389,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

371

Colton Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colton Landfill Biomass Facility Colton Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Colton Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Colton Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location San Bernardino County, California Coordinates 34.9592083°, -116.419389° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.9592083,"lon":-116.419389,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

372

Girvin Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Girvin Landfill Biomass Facility Girvin Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Girvin Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Girvin Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Duval County, Florida Coordinates 30.3500511°, -81.6035062° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.3500511,"lon":-81.6035062,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

373

Acme Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Biomass Facility Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Acme Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Acme Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Contra Costa County, California Coordinates 37.8534093°, -121.9017954° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.8534093,"lon":-121.9017954,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

374

BKK Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BKK Landfill Biomass Facility BKK Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name BKK Landfill Biomass Facility Facility BKK Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Los Angeles County, California Coordinates 34.3871821°, -118.1122679° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.3871821,"lon":-118.1122679,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

375

Dane County Landfill | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dane County Landfill Dane County Landfill Jump to: navigation, search Name Dane County Landfill Facility Dane County Landfill #2 Rodefeld Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Dane County, Wisconsin Coordinates 43.0186073°, -89.5497632° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.0186073,"lon":-89.5497632,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

376

Comparing the greenhouse gas emissions from three alternative waste combustion concepts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significant GHG reductions are possible by efficient WtE technologies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CHP and high power-to-heat ratio provide significant GHG savings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N{sub 2}O and coal mine type are important in LCA GHG emissions of FBC co-combustion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Substituting coal and fuel oil by waste is beneficial in electricity and heat production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Substituting natural gas by waste may not be reasonable in CHP generation. - Abstract: Three alternative condensing mode power and combined heat and power (CHP) waste-to-energy concepts were compared in terms of their impacts on the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from a heat and power generation system. The concepts included (i) grate, (ii) bubbling fluidised bed (BFB) and (iii) circulating fluidised bed (CFB) combustion of waste. The BFB and CFB take advantage of advanced combustion technology which enabled them to reach electric efficiency up to 35% and 41% in condensing mode, respectively, whereas 28% (based on the lower heating value) was applied for the grate fired unit. A simple energy system model was applied in calculating the GHG emissions in different scenarios where coal or natural gas was substituted in power generation and mix of fuel oil and natural gas in heat generation by waste combustion. Landfilling and waste transportation were not considered in the model. GHG emissions were reduced significantly in all of the considered scenarios where the waste combustion concepts substituted coal based power generation. With the exception of condensing mode grate incinerator the different waste combustion scenarios resulted approximately in 1 Mton of fossil CO{sub 2}-eq. emission reduction per 1 Mton of municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerated. When natural gas based power generation was substituted by electricity from the waste combustion significant GHG emission reductions were not achieved.

Vainikka, Pasi, E-mail: pasi.vainikka@vtt.fi [VTT, Koivurannantie 1, FIN 40101 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Tsupari, Eemeli; Sipilae, Kai [VTT, Koivurannantie 1, FIN 40101 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Hupa, Mikko [Aabo Akademi Process Chemistry Centre, Piispankatu 8, FIN 20500 Turku (Finland)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

Table 8. U.S. Renewable Energy Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) U ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

heating oil. (b) Wood and wood-derived fuels. (c) Municipal solid waste from biogenic sources, landfill gas, sludge waste, agricultural byproducts, ...

378

Table 8.5b Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Anthracite, bituminous coal, subbituminous coal, lignite, waste coal, and coal synfuel. 9 Municipal solid waste from biogenic sources, landfill gas, ...

379

Forecast and Control Methods of Landfill Emission Gas to Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main component of landfill gas is CH4, its release is a potential hazard to the environment. To understand the gas law and landfill gas production are the prerequisite for effective control of landfill gas. This paper selects three kinds of typical ... Keywords: Landfill gas, German model, IPCC model, Marticorena dynamic model

Wang Qi; Yang Meihua; Wang Jie

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Capturing, Purifying, and Liquefying Landfill Gas for Transportation Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capturing, Purifying, and Liquefying Landfill Gas for Transportation Fuel TRANSPORTATION ENERGY alternative fuel, and purified landfill gas could provide a renewable domestic source of it. Landfills from landfills and use it in natural gas applications such as fueling motor vehicles. Project

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "municipal waste landfill" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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381

Treatment technology analysis for mixed waste containers and debris  

SciTech Connect

A team was assembled to develop technology needs and strategies for treatment of mixed waste debris and empty containers in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex, and to determine the advantages and disadvantages of applying the Debris and Empty Container Rules to these wastes. These rules issued by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) apply only to the hazardous component of mixed debris. Hazardous debris that is subjected to regulations under the Atomic Energy Act because of its radioactivity (i.e., mixed debris) is also subject to the debris treatment standards. The issue of treating debris per the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) at the same time or in conjunction with decontamination of the radioactive contamination was also addressed. Resolution of this issue requires policy development by DOE Headquarters of de minimis concentrations for radioactivity and release of material to Subtitle D landfills or into the commercial sector. The task team recommends that, since alternate treatment technologies (for the hazardous component) are Best Demonstrated Available Technology (BDAT): (1) funding should focus on demonstration, testing, and evaluation of BDAT on mixed debris, (2) funding should also consider verification of alternative treatments for the decontamination of radioactive debris, and (3) DOE should establish criteria for the recycle/reuse or disposal of treated and decontaminated mixed debris as municipal waste.

Gehrke, R.J. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Brown, C.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Langton, C.A.; Askew, N.M. [Savannah River Lab., Aiken, SC (United States); Kan, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Schwinkendorf, W.E. [BDM Federal, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Initial Report for PCB Disposal Authorization (40 CFR {section} 761.75[c])  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This initial report is being submitted pursuant to Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) {section} 761.75(c) to request authorization to allow the disposal of transuranic (TRU) wastes containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) which are duly regulated under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). Approval of this initial report will not affect the disposal of TRU or TRU mixed wastes that do not contain PCBs. This initial report also demonstrates how the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) meets or exceeds the technical standards for a Chemical Waste Landfill. Approval of this request will allow the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to dispose of approximately 88,000 cubic feet (ft3) (2,500 cubic meters [m3]) of TRU wastes containing PCBs subject to regulation under the TSCA. This approval will include only those PCB/TRU wastes, which the TSCA regulations allow for disposal of the PCB component in municipal solid waste facilities or chemical waste landfills (e.g., PCB remediation waste, PC B articles, and bulk PCB product waste). Disposal of TRU waste by the DOE is congressionally mandated in Public Law 102-579 (as amended by the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1997, Pub. L. 104-201, referred to as the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act [LWA]). Portions of the TRU waste inventory contain hazardous waste constituents regulated under 40 CFR Parts 260 through 279, and/or PCBs and PCB Items regulated under 40 CFR Part 761. Therefore, the DOE TRU waste program must address the disposal requirements for these hazardous waste constituents and PCBs. To facilitate the disposal of TRU wastes containing hazardous waste constituents, the owner/operators received a Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (HWFP) from the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) on October 27, 1999. The permit allows the disposal of TRU wastes subject to hazardous waste disposal requirements (TRU mixed waste). Informational copies of this permit and other referenced documents are available from the WIPP website. To facilitate the disposal of TRU wastes containing PCBs, the owner/operators are hereby submitting this initial report containing information required pursuant to the Chemical Waste Landfill Approval requirements in 40 CFR {section} 761.75(c). Although WIPP is defined as a miscellaneous unit and not a landfill by the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act, WIPP meets or exceeds all applicable technical standards for chemical waste landfills by virtue of its design and programs as indicated in the Engineering Report (Attachment B). The layout of this initial report is consistent with requirements (i.e., Sections 2.0 through 12.0 following the sequence of 40 CFR {section} 761.75[c][i] -[ix] with sections added to discuss the Contingency and Training Plans; and Attachment B of this initial report addresses the requirements of 40 CFR {section} 761.75[b][1] through [9] in this order). This initial report includes a description of three proposed changes that will be subject to ''conditional approval.'' The first will allow the disposal of remote-handled (RH) PCB/TRU waste at WIPP. The second will allow the establishment of a central confirmation facility at WIPP. The third will allow for an increase in contact-handled Working Copy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Initial Report for PCB Disposal Authorization DOE/WIPP 02-3196 (CH) waste storage capacities. These proposed changes are discussed further in Section 3.3 of this initial report. ''Conditional approval'' of these requests would allow these activities at WIPP contingent upon: - Approval of the HWFP modification (NMED) and Compliance Certification Application (CCA) change request (Environmental Protection Agency [EPA]) - Inspection of facility prior to implementing the change (if deemed necessary by the EPA) - Written approval from the EPA This initial report also includes the following three requests for waivers to the technical requirements for Chemical Waste Landfills pursuant to 40 CFR {section} 761.75(c)(4): - Hydrologic Conditions (40 CFR {section} 761.75[b][3]) - Monitoring Systems (40 CFR {sect

Westinghouse TRU Solutions

2002-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

383

Solid Waste Planning and Recycling Act (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

It is the purpose of this Act to provide incentives for decreased generation of municipal waste, to require certain counties to develop comprehensive waste management plans that place substantial...

384

A-1 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT 2000 APPENDIX A: GLOSSARY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to landfilling the municipal solid wastes (MSW) of New York City. Detailed characterization of the wastes led. The ash meets the EPA non-toxic criteria (TCLP test) and can be used as landfill cover and other

Homes, Christopher C.

385

Landfill Gas Fueled HCCI Demonstration System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power, 121:569-operations with natural gas: Fuel composition implications,”USA ICEF2006-1578 LANDFILL GAS FUELED HCCI DEMONSTRATION

Blizman, Brandon J.; Makel, Darby B.; Mack, John Hunter; Dibble, Robert W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Reducing Open Cell Landfill Methane Emissions with a Bioactive Alternative Daily  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methane and carbon dioxide are formed in landfills as wastes degrade. Molecule-for-molecule, methane is about 20 times more potent than carbon dioxide at trapping heat in the earth's atmosphere, and thus, it is the methane emissions from landfills that are scrutinized. For example, if emissions composed of 60% methane and 40% carbon dioxide were changed to a mix that was 40% methane and 60% carbon dioxide, a 30% reduction in the landfill's global warming potential would result. A 10% methane, 90% carbon dioxide ratio will result in a 75% reduction in global warming potential compared to the baseline. Gas collection from a closed landfill can reduce emissions, and it is sometimes combined with a biocover, an engineered system where methane oxidizing bacteria living in a medium such as compost, convert landfill methane to carbon dioxide and water. Although methane oxidizing bacteria merely convert one greenhouse gas (methane) to another (carbon dioxide), this conversion can offer significant reductions in the overall greenhouse gas contribution, or global warming potential, associated with the landfill. What has not been addressed to date is the fact that methane can also escape from a landfill when the active cell is being filled with waste. Federal regulations require that newly deposited solid waste to be covered daily with a 6 in layer of soil or an alternative daily cover (ADC), such as a canvas tarp. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of immobilizing methane oxidizing bacteria into a tarp-like matrix that could be used for alternative daily cover at open landfill cells to prevent methane emissions. A unique method of isolating methanotrophs from landfill cover soil was used to create a liquid culture of mixed methanotrophs. A variety of prospective immobilization techniques were used to affix the bacteria in a tarp-like matrix. Both gel encapsulation of methanotrophs and gels with liquid cores containing methanotrophs were readily made but prone to rapid desiccation. Bacterial adsorption onto foam padding, natural sponge, and geotextile was successful. The most important factor for success appeared to be water holding capacity. Prototype biotarps made with geotextiles plus adsorbed methane oxidizing bacteria were tested for their responses to temperature, intermittent starvation, and washing (to simulate rainfall). The prototypes were mesophilic, and methane oxidation activity remained strong after one cycle of starvation but then declined with repeated cycles. Many of the cells detached with vigorous washing, but at least 30% appeared resistant to sloughing. While laboratory landfill simulations showed that four-layer composite biotarps made with two different types of geotextile could remove up to 50% of influent methane introduced at a flux rate of 22 g m{sup -2} d{sup -1}, field experiments did not yield high activity levels. Tests revealed that there were high hour-to-hour flux variations in the field, which, together with frequent rainfall events, confounded the field testing. Overall, the findings suggest that a methanotroph embedded biotarp appears to be a feasible strategy to mitigate methane emission from landfill cells, although the performance of field-tested biotarps was not robust here. Tarps will likely be best suited for spring and summer use, although the methane oxidizer population may be able to shift and adapt to lower temperatures. The starvation cycling of the tarp may require the capacity for intermittent reinoculation of the cells, although it is also possible that a subpopulation will adapt to the cycling and become dominant. Rainfall is not expected to be a major factor, because a baseline biofilm will be present to repopulate the tarp. If strong performance can be achieved and documented, the biotarp concept could be extended to include interception of other compounds beyond methane, such as volatile aromatic hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents.

Helene Hilger; James Oliver; Jean Bogner; David Jones

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

387

Managing America`s solid waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents an historical overview of the federal role in municipal solid waste management from 1965 to approximately 1995. Attention is focuses on the federal role in safeguarding public health, protecting the environment, and wisely using material and energy resources. It is hoped that this report will provide important background for future municipal solid waste research and development initiatives.

Not Available

1998-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

388

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Landfills Convert Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable Natural Gas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable Natural Gas on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable Natural Gas on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable Natural Gas on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable Natural Gas on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable Natural Gas on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable Natural Gas on AddThis.com... May 25, 2013 Landfills Convert Biogas Into Renewable Natural Gas

389

Capacity-to-Act in India's Solid Waste Management and Waste-to-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Capacity-to-Act in India's Solid Waste Management and Waste-to- Energy Industries Perinaz Bhada and disposal of garbage, or municipal solid waste, compounded by increasing consumption levels. Another serious of converting waste into different forms of energy. The process of using waste as a fuel source and converting

Columbia University

390

Investigations of natural attenuation in groundwater near a landfill and implications for landfill post-closure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-closure phase. During the post-closure phase, landfill operators need to convince environmental authorities treatment of residual greenhouse gas emissions (e.g. Scheutz et al., 2009). From an operator's perspective to be a source of cost. Therefore during the post-closure phase, landfill operators need to convince

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

391

Photovoltaics on Landfills in Puerto Rico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico for a feasibility study of m0treAlables on several brownfield sites. The EPA defines a brownfield as 'a property, the expansion, redevelopment, or reuse of which may be complicated by the presence or potential presence of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant.' All of the brownfields in this study are landfill sites. Citizens of Puerto Rico, city planners, and site managers are interested in redevelopment uses for landfills in Puerto Rico, which are particularly well suited for solar photovoltaic (PV) installation. The purpose of this report is to assess the landfills with the highest potential for possible solar PV installation and estimate cost, performance, and site impacts of three different PV options: crystalline silicon (fixed-tilt), crystalline silicon (single-axis tracking), and thin film (fixed-tilt). Each option represents a standalone system that can be sized to use an entire available site area. In addition, the report outlines financing options that could assist in the implementation of a system. The feasibility of PV systems installed on landfills is highly impacted by the available area for an array, solar resource, operating status, landfill cap status, distance to transmission lines, and distance to major roads. All of the landfills in Puerto Rico were screened according to these criteria in order to determine the sites with the greatest potential. Eight landfills were chosen for site visits based on the screening criteria and location. Because of time constraints and the fact that Puerto Rico is a relatively large island, the eight landfills for this visit were all located in the eastern half of the island. The findings from this report can be applied to landfills in the western half of the island. The economics of a potential PV system on landfills in Puerto Rico depend greatly on the cost of electricity. Currently, PREPA has an average electric rate of $0.119/kWh. Based on past electric rate increases in Puerto Rico and other islands in the Caribbean, this rate could increase to $0.15/kWh or higher in a relatively short amount of time. In the coming years, increasing electrical rates and increased necessity for clean power will continue to improve the feasibility of implementing solar PV systems at these sites.

Salasovich, J.; Mosey, G.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Clean energy from municipal solid waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This progress report describes a slurry grinding trial where a carbonized refuse derived fuel was dispersed in water. The RDF slurry produced in this study is to subjected to dioxin combustion tests.

Klosky, M.

1996-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

393

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential Efficiency Smart Program (Ohio) American Municipal Power (Public Electric Utilities) - Residential Efficiency...

394

Using GIS to Identify Remediation Areas in Landfills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports the use of GIS mapping software—ArcMap and ArcInfo Workstation—by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) as a non-intrusive method of locating and characterizing radioactive waste in a 97-acre landfill to aid in planning cleanup efforts. The fine-scale techniques and methods used offer potential application for other burial sites for which hazards indicate a non-intrusive approach. By converting many boxes of paper shipping records in multiple formats into a relational database linked to spatial data, the INEEL has related the paper history to our current GIS technologies and spatial data layers. The wide breadth of GIS techniques and tools quickly display areas in need of remediation as well as evaluate methods of remediation for specific areas as the site characterization is better understood and early assumptions are refined.

Linda A.Tedrow

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Impact of different plants on the gas profile of a landfill cover  

SciTech Connect

Research highlights: > Plants influence gas profile and methane oxidation in landfill covers. > Plants regulate water content and increase the availability of oxygen for methane oxidation. > Plant species with deep roots like alfalfa showed more stimulation of methane oxidation than plants with shallow root systems like grasses. - Abstract: Methane is an important greenhouse gas emitted from landfill sites and old waste dumps. Biological methane oxidation in landfill covers can help to reduce methane emissions. To determine the influence of different plant covers on this oxidation in a compost layer, we conducted a lysimeter study. We compared the effect of four different plant covers (grass, alfalfa + grass, miscanthus and black poplar) and of bare soil on the concentration of methane, carbon dioxide and oxygen in lysimeters filled with compost. Plants were essential for a sustainable reduction in methane concentrations, whereas in bare soil, methane oxidation declined already after 6 weeks. Enhanced microbial activity - expected in lysimeters with plants that were exposed to landfill gas - was supported by the increased temperature of the gas in the substrate and the higher methane oxidation potential. At the end of the first experimental year and from mid-April of the second experimental year, the methane concentration was most strongly reduced in the lysimeters containing alfalfa + grass, followed by poplar, miscanthus and grass. The observed differences probably reflect the different root morphology of the investigated plants, which influences oxygen transport to deeper compost layers and regulates the water content.

Reichenauer, Thomas G., E-mail: thomas.reichenauer@ait.ac.at [Health and Environment Department, Environmental Resources and Technologies, AIT - Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, 2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); Watzinger, Andrea; Riesing, Johann [Health and Environment Department, Environmental Resources and Technologies, AIT - Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, 2444 Seibersdorf (Austria); Gerzabek, Martin H. [Institute of Soil Research, Department of Forest and Soil Sciences, University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Peter Jordan-Strasse 82, 1190 Vienna (Austria)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

396

Hazardous Waste Management System-General (Ohio) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

System-General (Ohio) Hazardous Waste Management System-General (Ohio) Eligibility Agricultural Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government MunicipalPublic Utility Rural...

397

DC Hazardous Waste Management (District of Columbia) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

District of Columbia Applies to Municipality District of Columbia Name DC Hazardous Waste Management (District of Columbia) Policy Type Environmental Regulations Affected...

398

Using landfill gas for energy: Projects that pay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pending Environmental Protection Agency regulations will require 500 to 700 landfills to control gas emissions resulting from decomposing garbage. Conversion of landfill gas to energy not only meets regulations, but also creates energy and revenue for local governments.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Mill Seat Landfill Bioreactor Renewable Green Power (NY)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project was implemented at the Mill Seat landfill located in the Town of Bergen, Monroe County, New York. The landfill was previously equipped with a landfill gas collection system to collect methane gas produced by the bioreactor landfill and transport it to a central location for end use. A landfill gas to energy facility was also previously constructed at the site, which utilized generator engines, designed to be powered with landfill methane gas, to produce electricity, to be utilized on site and to be sold to the utility grid. The landfill gas generation rate at the site had exceeded the capacity of the existing generators, and the excess landfill gas was therefore being burned at a candlestick flare for destruction. The funded project consisted of the procurement and installation of two (2) additional 800 KW Caterpillar 3516 generator engines, generator sets, switchgear and ancillary equipment.

Barton & Loguidice, P.C.

2010-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

400

Soil gas investigations at the Sanitary Landfill  

SciTech Connect

A soil gas survey was performed at the 740-G Sanitary Landfill of Savannah River Plant during December, 1990. The survey monitored the presence and distribution of the C[sub 1]C[sub 4] hydrocarbons; the C[sub 5]-C[sub 10] normal paraffins; the aromatic hydrocarbons, BTXE; selected chlorinated hydrocarbons; and mercury. Significant levels of several of these contaminants were found associated with the burial site. In the northern area of the Landfill, methane concentrations ranged up to 63% of the soil gas and were consistently high on the western side of the access road. To the east of the access road in the northern and southern area high concentrations of methane were encountered but were not consistently high. Methane, the species found in highest concentration in the landfill, was generated in the landfill as the result of biological oxidation of cellulose and other organics to carbon dioxide followed by reduction of the carbon dioxide to methane. Distributions of other species are the result of burials in the landfill of solvents or other materials.

Wyatt, D.E.; Pirkle, R.J.; Masdea, D.J.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z