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1

Subtask 4.27 - Evaluation of the Multielement Sorbent Trap (MEST) Method at an Illinois Coal-Fired Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Owners of fossil fuel-fired power plants face the challenge of measuring stack emissions of trace metals and acid gases at much lower levels than in the past as a result of increasingly stringent regulations. In the United States, the current reference methods for trace metals and halogens are wet-chemistry methods, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Methods 29 and 26 or 26A, respectively. As a possible alternative to the EPA methods, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has developed a novel multielement sorbent trap (MEST) method to be used to sample for trace elements and/or halogens. Sorbent traps offer a potentially advantageous alternative to the existing sampling methods, as they are simpler to use and do not require expensive, breakable glassware or handling and shipping of hazardous reagents. Field tests comparing two sorbent trap applications (MEST-H for hydrochloric acid and MEST-M for trace metals) with the reference methods were conducted at two power plant units fueled by Illinois Basin bituminous coal. For hydrochloric acid, MEST measured concentrations comparable to EPA Method 26A at two power plant units, one with and one without a wet flue gas desulfurization scrubber. MEST-H provided lower detection limits for hydrochloric acid than the reference method. Results from a dry stack unit had better comparability between methods than results from a wet stack unit. This result was attributed to the very low emissions in the latter unit, as well as the difficulty of sampling in a saturated flue gas. Based on these results, the MEST-H sorbent traps appear to be a good candidate to serve as an alternative to Method 26A (or 26). For metals, the MEST trap gave lower detection limits compared to EPA Method 29 and produced comparable data for antimony, arsenic, beryllium, cobalt, manganese, selenium, and mercury for most test runs. However, the sorbent material produced elevated blanks for cadmium, nickel, lead, and chromium at levels that would interfere with accurate measurement at U.S. hazardous air pollutant emission limits for existing coal-fired power plant units. Longer sampling times employed during this test program did appear to improve comparative results for these metals. Although the sorbent contribution to the sample was reduced through improved trap design, additional research is still needed to explore lower-background materials before the MEST-M application can be considered as a potential alternative method for all of the trace metals. This subtask was funded through the EERC–U.S. Department of Energy Joint Program on Research and Development for Fossil Energy-Related Resources Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-08NT43291. Nonfederal funding was provided by the Electric Power Research Institute, the Illinois Clean Coal Institute, Southern Illinois Power Company, and the Center for Air Toxic Metals Affiliates Program.

Pavlish, John; Thompson, Jeffrey; Dunham, Grant

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

2

Sorbent selection and design considerations for uranium trapping. [H-151 alumina, XF-100 alumina, F-1 alumina, sodium fluoride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The efficient removal of UF/sub 6/ from effluent streams can be accomplished through the selection of the best solid sorbent and the implementation of good design principles. Pressure losses, sorbent capacity, reaction kinetics, sorbent regeneration/uranium recovery requirements and the effects of other system components are the performance factors which are summarized. The commonly used uranium trapping materials highlighted are sodium fluoride, H-151 alumina, XF-100 alumina, and F-1 alumina. Sorbent selection and trap design have to be made on a case-by-case basis but the theoretical modeling studies and the evaluation of the performance factors presented can be used as a guide for other chemical trap applications.

Schultz, R.M.; Hobbs, W.E.; Norton, J.L.; Stephenson, M.J.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Desulfurization sorbent regeneration  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A spent solid sorbent resulting from the removal of hydrogen sulfide from a fuel gas flow is regenerated with a steam-air mixture. The mixture of steam and air may also include additional nitrogen or carbon dioxide. The gas mixture contacts the spent sorbent containing metal sulfide at a temperature above 500/sup 0/C to regenerate the sulfide to metal oxide or carbonate. Various metal species including the period four transition metals and the lanthanides are suitable sorbents that may be regenerated by this method. In addition, the introduction of carbon dioxide gas permits carbonates such as those of strontium, barium and calcium to be regenerated. The steam permits regeneration of spent sorbent without formation of metal sulfate. Moreover, the regeneration will proceed with low oxygen concentrations and will occur without the increase in temperature to minimize the risk of sintering and densification of the sorbent. This method may be used for high-temperature fuel cells.

Jalan, V.M.; Frost, D.G.

1982-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

4

Modified clay sorbents  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A novel modified clay sorbent and method of treating industrial effluents to remove trace pollutants, such as dioxins, biphenyls, and polyaromatics such as benzo(a)pyrene and pentachlorophenol. The novel clay sorbent has a composite structure in which the interlayer space of an expandable clay, such as smectite, is filled with polyvalent or multivalent inorganic cations which forces weaker surfactant cations to locate on the surface of the clay in such an orientation that the resulting composite is hydrophilic in nature. A specific example is cetylpyridinium-hydroxy aluminum-montmorillonite. In certain embodiments, a non-expanding clay, such as kaolinite, is used and surfactant cations are necessarily located on an external surface of the clay. A specific example is cetylpyridinium-kaolinite.

Fogler, H. Scott (Ann Arbor, MI); Srinivasan, Keeran R. (Livonia, MI)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

High Capacity Immobilized Amine Sorbents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capacity Immobilized Amine Sorbents Capacity Immobilized Amine Sorbents Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,288,136 entitled "High Capacity Immobilized Amine Sorbents." Disclosed in this patent is the invention of a method that facilitates the production of low-cost carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) sorbents for use in large-scale gas-solid processes. This method treats an amine to increase the number of secondary amine groups and impregnates the amine in a porous solid support. As a result of this improvement, the method increases CO 2 capture capacity and decreases the cost of using an amine-enriched solid sorbent in CO 2 capture systems. Overview The U.S. Department of Energy has placed a high priority on the separation

6

High capacity immobilized amine sorbents  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is provided for making low-cost CO.sub.2 sorbents that can be used in large-scale gas-solid processes. The improved method entails treating an amine to increase the number of secondary amine groups and impregnating the amine in a porous solid support. The method increases the CO.sub.2 capture capacity and decreases the cost of utilizing an amine-enriched solid sorbent in CO.sub.2 capture systems.

Gray, McMahan L. (Pittsburgh, PA); Champagne, Kenneth J. (Fredericktown, PA); Soong, Yee (Monroeville, PA); Filburn, Thomas (Granby, CT)

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

7

sorbent-rti | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Novel Solid Sorbents for Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0007707 RTI International is developing and demonstrating an advanced, solid sorbent-based CO2 capture...

8

Sorbent characterization for FBC application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluidized-bed boilers operating at both atmospheric and elevated pressures have received considerable attention from utilities and independent power producers because of their ability to remove SO{sub 2} from the flue gas during combustion and to minimize NO{sub x} production. The technology has advanced rapidly in the 1980s because of its adaptability to a range of fuel types, boiler capacities, and operating conditions without seriously compromising efficiency or performance. A sorbent, typically limestone or dolostone, is used in the fluidized-bed boiler to capture the combustion-generated SO{sub 2}. Many CFBC boiler operators are now realizing that optimizing sorbent usage is important for economical and environmentally acceptable operation of their plants. It is reported (mostly based on studies using a few sorbents) that particle size, porosity and pore size distribution, extent of sulfation, combustor temperature, pressure and CaCO{sub 3} content affect extent of sulfation.

Pisupati, S.V.; Scaroni, A.W. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

9

Photopatternable sorbent and functionalized films  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composition containing a polymer, a crosslinker and a photo-activatable catalyst is placed on a substrate. The composition is exposed to a predetermined pattern of light, leaving an unexposed region. The light causes the polymer to become crosslinked by hydrosilylation. A solvent is used to remove the unexposed composition from the substrate, leaving the exposed pattern to become a sorbent polymer film that will absorb a predetermined chemical species when exposed to such chemical species.

Grate, Jay W. (West Richland, WA); Nelson, David A. (Richland, WA)

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

10

Method for Regeneration of Immobilized Amine Sorbents for Use...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Method for Regeneration of Immobilized Amine Sorbents for Use in CO 2 Capture Opportunity Research is currently active on the patent-pending technology "Regenerable Sorbent...

11

Method for Regeneration of Immobilized Amine Sorbents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Regeneration of Immobilized Amine Sorbents Regeneration of Immobilized Amine Sorbents for Use in CO 2 Capture Opportunity Research is currently active on the patent-pending technology "Regenerable Sorbent Technique for Capturing CO 2 Using Immobilized Amine Sorbents." The technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview Carbon sequestration entails a multi-step process in which anthropogenic CO 2 emissions are captured from CO 2 -laden process gas streams and perma- nently stored. Carbon capture is a critical step in the process and accounts for a considerable portion of the overall cost. Newly developed, high-capacity amine-based sorbents offer many advantages over existing technology

12

Sorption of petroleum products by carbon sorbents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comparative study of the adsorption of petroleum products by micro- and macroporous carbon sorbents was performed. For this purpose, four carbon sorbent samples prepared from various raw materials by various processing techniques were used. The following raw materials were used: (1) fuel mill from the Mezinoskoe deposit; (2) wood waste, shaving and sawdust in ratio (%) of 50:50; and (3) low-caking gas coal of the 2G group from the mine im.Kirova in the Kuznetsk Basin. The pore structures and adsorption capacities of these sorbents for petroleum products were studied. It was found that the adsorption of petroleum products on porous and nonporous carbon sorbents occurred in different manners. In this case, macroporous sorbents with a weakly developed structure of sorbing micro- and mesopores exhibited a maximum capacity for petroleum products.

M.A. Perederii; Y.I. Kurakov; I.N. Malikov; S.V. Molchanov [Institute for Fossil Fuels, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Sorbents for the oxidation and removal of mercury  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A promoted activated carbon sorbent is described that is highly effective for the removal of mercury from flue gas streams. The sorbent comprises a new modified carbon form containing reactive forms of halogen and halides. Optional components may be added to increase reactivity and mercury capacity. These may be added directly with the sorbent, or to the flue gas to enhance sorbent performance and/or mercury capture. Mercury removal efficiencies obtained exceed conventional methods. The sorbent can be regenerated and reused. Sorbent treatment and preparation methods are also described. New methods for in-flight preparation, introduction, and control of the active sorbent into the mercury contaminated gas stream are described.

Olson, Edwin S. (Grand Forks, ND); Holmes, Michael J. (Thompson, ND); Pavlish, John H. (East Grand Forks, MN)

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

14

Sorbents for the oxidation and removal of mercury  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A promoted activated carbon sorbent is described that is highly effective for the removal of mercury from flue gas streams. The sorbent comprises a new modified carbon form containing reactive forms of halogen and halides. Optional components may be added to increase reactivity and mercury capacity. These may be added directly with the sorbent, or to the flue gas to enhance sorbent performance and/or mercury capture. Mercury removal efficiencies obtained exceed conventional methods. The sorbent can be regenerated and reused. Sorbent treatment and preparation methods are also described. New methods for in-flight preparation, introduction, and control of the active sorbent into the mercury contaminated gas stream are described.

Olson, Edwin S.; Holmes, Michael J.; Pavlish, John Henry

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

15

New, high-capacity, calcium-based sorbents: Calcium silicate sorbents. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A search is being carried out for new calcium-based SO{sub 2} sorbents for induct injection. More specifically, a search is being carried out for induct injection calcium silicate sorbents that are highly cost effective. The objectives of the past year were to study the sorption of SO{sub 2} by representative calcium silicates, to study the composition of the Ca(OH){sub 2}-fly ash sorbent, and to install a humidity sensor in the sorption system.

Kenney, M.E.; Chiang, Ray-Kuang

1993-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

16

Carbon Dioxide Capture Process with Regenerable Sorbents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dioxide Capture Process with Regenerable Sorbents Dioxide Capture Process with Regenerable Sorbents sorbent material. Additionally, the design of the system incorporates a cross- flow moving-bed reactor where the gas flows horizontally through a "panel" of solid sorbent that is slowly moving down-wards under gravity flow. With the expanded use of fossil fuels expected throughout the world, the increase in CO 2 emissions may prove to contribute even more significantly to global climate change. To address this problem, carbon sequestration scientists and engineers have proposed a number of methods to remove CO 2 from gas streams, such as chemical absorption with a solvent, membrane separation, and cryogenic fractionation. However, all of these methods are expensive and possibly cost-prohibitive for a specific application.

17

Adsorption and Ultrasound-Assisted Sorbent Regeneration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work was conducted for the department of Energy. In this work, we developed a class of new sorbents that were highly sulfur selective and had high sulfur capacities. The study consisted of two sections. Development of the new sorbents is described in Section 1, and Section was a fundamental study, conducted for a better understanding for desulfurization of jet fuels. More details of the results are given blow separately for the two sections.

Yuhe Wang; Liping Ma; Ralph T. Yang

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

18

Toward a cost equation for a multielement station B. G. Clark, May 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Toward a cost equation for a multielement station B. G. Clark, May 2001 For purposes of deciding whether a multielement station for the eVLA is an economical way to construct them, we need a cost equation, relating the cost of the station to the number of elements and their size. I propose to list here

Groppi, Christopher

19

Sulfur tolerant highly durable CO.sub.2 sorbents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sorbent for the capture of carbon dioxide from a gas stream is provided, the sorbent containing calcium oxide (CaO) and at least one refractory dopant having a Tammann temperature greater than about 530.degree. C., wherein the refractory dopant enhances resistance to sintering, thereby conserving performance of the sorbent at temperatures of at least about 530.degree. C. Also provided are doped CaO sorbents for the capture of carbon dioxide in the presence of SO.sub.2.

Smirniotis, Panagiotis G. (Cincinnati, OH); Lu, Hong (Urbana, IL)

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

20

Topical Report 5: Sorbent Performance Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ADA-ES has completed an extensive sorbent screening program funded primarily through DOE NETL cooperative agreement DE-NT0005649 with support from EPRI and industry cost-share participants. Tests were completed on simulated and actual flue gas. The overall project objective is to address the viability and accelerate development of a solid-based postcombustion CO2 capture technology that can be retrofit to the existing fleet of coal-fired power plants. An important component of the viability assessment was to evaluate the state of development of sorbents and measure key performance characteristics under realistic operating conditions.

Krutka, Holly; Sjostrom, Sharon

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multielement sorbent trap" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

Madden, Deborah A. (Boardman, OH); Holmes, Michael J. (Washington Township, Stark County, OH)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Alkaline sorbent injection for mercury control  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mercury removal system for removing mercury from combustion flue gases is provided in which alkaline sorbents at generally extremely low stoichiometric molar ratios of alkaline earth or an alkali metal to sulfur of less than 1.0 are injected into a power plant system at one or more locations to remove at least between about 40% and 60% of the mercury content from combustion flue gases. Small amounts of alkaline sorbents are injected into the flue gas stream at a relatively low rate. A particulate filter is used to remove mercury-containing particles downstream of each injection point used in the power plant system.

Madden, Deborah A. (Boardman, OH); Holmes, Michael J. (Washington Township, Stark County, OH)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Capture of carbon dioxide by solid amine sorbents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The reaction of tetraethylorthrosilcate (TEOS) with y-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS) has produced stable solid amine sorbents for the capture of carbon dioxide. The resulting amine-enriched silicon sorbent (SBA-15) has been proven to be competitive with existing environmental CO2 controlled life sorbents based on the immobilised amine technology. XPS analysis has indicated that the amine groups (N1s Peak) were incorporated onto the surfaces of this amine-based sorbent in the range of 7%. The performance of the SBA-15 was comparable to the commercially available immobilised amine sorbent (IAS).

M.L. Gray; Y. Soong; K.J. Champagne; H.W. Pennline; J. Baltrus; R.W. Stevens Jr.; R. Khatri; S.S.C. Chuang

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

detonation trap  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

detonation trap [It prevents a detonation initiated in one part of a system...] ? Detonationsfang m, Detonationsfänger m

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Carbon dioxide capture process with regenerable sorbents  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process to remove carbon dioxide from a gas stream using a cross-flow, or a moving-bed reactor. In the reactor the gas contacts an active material that is an alkali-metal compound, such as an alkali-metal carbonate, alkali-metal oxide, or alkali-metal hydroxide; or in the alternative, an alkaline-earth metal compound, such as an alkaline-earth metal carbonate, alkaline-earth metal oxide, or alkaline-earth metal hydroxide. The active material can be used by itself or supported on a substrate of carbon, alumina, silica, titania or aluminosilicate. When the active material is an alkali-metal compound, the carbon-dioxide reacts with the metal compound to generate bicarbonate. When the active material is an alkaline-earth metal, the carbon dioxide reacts with the metal compound to generate carbonate. Spent sorbent containing the bicarbonate or carbonate is moved to a second reactor where it is heated or treated with a reducing agent such as, natural gas, methane, carbon monoxide hydrogen, or a synthesis gas comprising of a combination of carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The heat or reducing agent releases carbon dioxide gas and regenerates the active material for use as the sorbent material in the first reactor. New sorbent may be added to the regenerated sorbent prior to subsequent passes in the carbon dioxide removal reactor.

Pennline, Henry W. (Bethel Park, PA); Hoffman, James S. (Library, PA)

2002-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

26

New high-capacity, calcium-based sorbents, calcium silicate sorbents. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A search is being carried out for new calcium-based SO{sub 2} sorbents for induct injection. More specifically, a search is being carried out for induct injection calcium silicate sorbents that are highly cost effective. The current year objectives include the study of sorbents made by hydrating ordinary or Type I portland cement or portland cement clinker (a cement intermediate) under carefully selected conditions. Results of this study show that an excellent portland cement sorbent can be prepared by milling cement at 120{degrees}C at 600 rpm for 15 minutes with MgO-stabilized ZrO{sub 2} beads. They also show that clinker, which is cheaper than cement can be used interchangeably with cement as a starting material. Further, it is clear that while a high surface area may be a desirable property of a good sorbent, it is not a requisite property. Among the hydration reaction variables, milling time is highly important, reaction temperature is important and stirring rate and silicate-to-H{sub 2}O ratio are moderately important. The components of hydrated cement sorbent are various combinations of C-S-H, calcium silicate hydrate:Ca(OH){sub 2};AFm. a phase in hydrated cement.

Kenney, M.E.

1996-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

27

Regenerable Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent and Regenerable Multifunctional Hydrogen Sulfide and Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent for High Temperature Gas Streams  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Chloride and Hydrogen Sulfide Hydrogen Chloride and Hydrogen Sulfide Removal Sorbents for High Temperature Gas Streams Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,767,000 entitled "Regenerable Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent and Regenerable Multifunctional Hydrogen Sulfide and Hydrogen Chloride Removal Sorbent for High Temperature Gas Streams." Disclosed in this patent is the invention of a unique regenerable sorbent process that can remove contaminants from gas produced by the gasification of fossil fuels. Specifically, the process removes hydrogen chloride by using the regenerable sorbent and simultaneously extracts hydrogen chloride compounds and hydrogen

28

Enhancing the use of coals by gas reburning-sorbent injection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to evaluate and demonstrate a cost effective emission control technology for acid rain precursors, oxides of nitrogen (NO[sub x]) and sulfur (SO[sub x]) on two coal fired utility boilers in Illinois. The units selected are representative of pre-NSPS design practices: tangential and cyclone fired. Work on a third unit, wall fired, has been stopped because of funding limitations. The specific objectives are to demonstrate reductions of 60 percent in NO[sub x] and 50 percent in SO[sub x] emissions, by a combination of two developed technologies, gas reburning (GR) and sorbent injection (SI). With GR, about 80--85 percent of the coal fuel is fired in the primary combustion zone. The balance of the fuel is added downstream as natural gas to create a slightly fuel rich environment in which NO[sub x] is converted to N[sub 2]. The combustion process is completed by overfire air addition. So[sub x] emissions are reduced by injecting dry sorbents (usually calcium based) into the upper furnace. The sorbents trap SO[sub x] as solid sulfates that are collected in the particulate control device. This project is conducted in three phases at each site: (1) Design and Permitting; (2) Construction and Startup; and, (3) Operation, Data Collection, Reporting and Disposition. Technology transfer to industry is accomplished through the formation of an industry panel.

Not Available

1992-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

29

KINETICS OF HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION SORBENTS FOR TRANSPORT REACTORS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hot-gas desulfurization for the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process has been investigated by many researchers to remove effectively hydrogen sulfide with various metal oxide sorbents at elevated temperatures. Various metal oxide sorbents are formulated with metal oxides such as Fe, Co, Zn, and Ti. Initial reaction kinetics of formulated sorbents with hydrogen sulfide is studied in the presence of various amounts of moisture and hydrogen at various reaction temperatures. The objectives of this research are to study initial reaction kinetics for a sorbent-hydrogen sulfide heterogeneous reaction system, to investigate effects of concentrations of hydrogen sulfide, hydrogen, and moisture on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents, and to evaluate effects of temperature and sorbent amounts on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents. Experimental data on initial reaction kinetics of hydrogen sulfide with metal oxide sorbents were obtained with a 0.83-cm{sup 3} differential reactor. In this report, the reactivity of AHI-5 was examined. This sorbent was obtained from the Research Triangle Institute (RTI). The sorbent in the form of 70 {micro}m particles are reacted with 9000-18000 ppm hydrogen sulfide at 350-500 C. The range of space time of reaction gas mixtures is 0.071-0.088 s. The range of reaction duration is 4-10800 s.

K.C. Kwon

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Study of photon attenuation coefficients of some multielement materials. [123-1250 keV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Total photon mass attenuation of six multielement shielding materials (concrete, plaster of paris, quick lime, black cement, white cement, and silica) is measured in the 123- to 1,250-keV energy range. The experimental results are analyzed in terms of cross sections, effective atomic numbers, and electron densities. Considerable sensitivity of the total mass attenuation coefficients and effective atomic numbers to variations in oxygen content are found in these multielement materials.

Bhandal, G.S. (N.J.S.A. Government Coll., Punjab (India)); Singh, K. (Guru Nanak Dev Univ., Amritsar (India). Dept. of Physics)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Layered solid sorbents for carbon dioxide capture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solid sorbent for the capture and the transport of carbon dioxide gas is provided having at least one first layer of a positively charged material that is polyethylenimine or poly(allylamine hydrochloride), that captures at least a portion of the gas, and at least one second layer of a negatively charged material that is polystyrenesulfonate or poly(acryclic acid), that transports the gas, wherein the second layer of material is in juxtaposition to, attached to, or crosslinked with the first layer for forming at least one bilayer, and a solid substrate support having a porous surface, wherein one or more of the bilayers is/are deposited on the surface of and/or within the solid substrate. A method of preparing and using the solid sorbent is provided.

Li, Bingyun; Jiang, Bingbing; Gray, McMahan L; Fauth, Daniel J; Pennline, Henry W; Richards, George A

2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

32

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry, Regenerable Sorbents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes research conducted between July 1, 2006 and September 30, 2006 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal combustion flue gas. Modifications to the integrated absorber/ sorbent regenerator/ sorbent cooler system were made to improve sorbent flow consistency and measurement reliability. Operation of the screw conveyor regenerator to achieve a sorbent temperature of at least 120 C at the regenerator outlet is necessary for satisfactory carbon dioxide capture efficiencies in succeeding absorption cycles. Carbon dioxide capture economics in new power plants can be improved by incorporating increased capacity boilers, efficient flue gas desulfurization systems and provisions for withdrawal of sorbent regeneration steam in the design.

David A. Green; Thomas O. Nelson; Brian S. Turk; Paul D. Box Raghubir P. Gupta

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

33

Supported-sorbent injection. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new retrofitable, wastefree acid-rain control concept was pilot-tested at Ohio Edison`s high-sulfur coal-fired R.E. Burger generating station at the 2-MWe level. During the project, moistened {open_quotes}supported{close_quotes} sorbents, made from a combination of lime and vermiculite or perlite, were injected into a humidified 6,500-acfm flue-gas slipstream. After the sorbents reacted with the sulfur dioxide in the flue gas, they were removed from ductwork with a cyclone and baghouse. The $1.0 million project was co-funded by Sorbent Technologies Corporation, the Ohio Edison Company, and the Ohio Coal Development Office. The project included a preliminary bench-scale testing phase, construction of the pilot plant, parametric studies, numerous series of recycle tests, and a long-term run. The project proceeded as anticipated and achieved its expected results. This duct injection technology successfully demonstrated SO{sub 2}-removal rates of 80 to 90% using reasonable stoichiometric injection ratios (2:1 Ca:S) and approach temperatures (20-25F). Under similar conditions, dry injection of hydrated lime alone typically only achieves 40 to 50% SO{sub 2} removal. During the testing, no difficulties were encountered with deposits in the ductwork or with particulate control, which have been problems in tests of other duct-injection schemes.

Nelson, S. Jr.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

ADVANCED SORBENT DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT OF SORBENTS FOR MOVING-BED AND FLUIDIZED-BED APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power system using high-temperature coal gas cleanup is one of the most promising advanced technologies for the production of electric power from coal in an environmentally acceptable manner. Unlike conventional low-temperature cleanup systems that require costly heat exchangers, high-temperature coal gas cleanup systems can be operated near 482-538 C (900-1000 F) or higher, conditions that are a closer match with the gasifier and turbine components in the IGCC system, thus resulting is a more efficient overall system. GE is developing a moving-bed, high-temperature desulfurization system for the IGCC power cycle in which zinc-based regenerable sorbents are currently being used as desulfurization sorbents. Zinc titanate and other proprietary zinc-based oxides are being considered as sorbents for use in the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program at Tampa Electric Co.'s (TECo) Polk Power Station. Under cold startup conditions at TECo, desulfurization and regeneration may be carried out at temperatures as low as 343 C (650 F), hence a versatile sorbent is desirable to perform over this wide temperature range. A key to success in the development of high-temperature desulfurization systems is the matching of sorbent properties for the selected process operating conditions, namely, sustainable desulfurization kinetics, high sulfur capacity, and mechanical durability over multiple cycles. Additionally, the sulfur species produced during regeneration of the sorbent must be in a form compatible with sulfur recovery systems, such as sulfuric acid or elemental sulfur processes. The overall objective of this program is to develop regenerable sorbents for hydrogen sulfide removal from coal-derived fuel gases in the temperature range 343-538 C (650-1000 F). Two categories of reactor configurations are being considered: moving-bed reactors and fluidized-bed (bubbling and circulating) reactors. In addition, a cost assessment and a market plan for large-scale fabrication of sorbents were developed. As an optional task, long-term bench-scale tests of the best moving-bed sorbents were conducted. Starting from thermodynamic calculations, several metal oxides were identified for potential use as hot gas cleanup sorbents using constructed phase stability diagrams and laboratory screening of various mixed-metal oxide formulations. Modified zinc titanates and other proprietary metal oxide formulations were evaluated at the bench scale and many of them found to be acceptable for operation in the target desulfurization temperature range of 370 C (700 F) to 538 C (1000 F) and regeneration temperatures up to 760 C (1400 F). Further work is still needed to reduce the batch-to-batch repeatability in the fabrication of modified zinc titanates for larger scale applications. The information presented in this Volume 1 report contains the results of moving-bed sorbent development at General Electric's Corporate Research and Development (GE-CRD). A separate Volume 2 report contains the results of the subcontract on fluidized-bed sorbent development at the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT).

R.E Ayala; V.S. Venkataramani; Javad Abbasian; Rachid B. Slimane; Brett E. Williams; Minoo K. Zarnegar; James R. Wangerow; Andy H. Hill

2000-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

35

ADVANCED SORBENT DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM; DEVELOPMENT OF SORBENTS FOR MOVING-BED AND FLUIDIZED-BED APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power system using high-temperature coal gas cleanup is one of the most promising advanced technologies for the production of electric power from coal in an environmentally acceptable manner. Unlike conventional low-temperature cleanup systems that require costly heat exchangers, high-temperature coal gas cleanup systems can be operated near 482-538 °C (900-1000 °F) or higher, conditions that are a closer match with the gasifier and turbine components in the IGCC system, thus resulting is a more efficient overall system. GE is developing a moving-bed, high-temperature desulfurization system for the IGCC power cycle in which zinc-based regenerable sorbents are currently being used as desulfurization sorbents. Zinc titanate and other proprietary zinc-based oxides are being considered as sorbents for use in the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program at Tampa Electric Co.?s (TECo) Polk Power Station. Under cold startup conditions at TECo, desulfurization and regeneration may be carried out at temperatures as low as 343 °C (650 °F), hence a versatile sorbent is desirable to perform over this wide temperature range. A key to success in the development of high-temperature desulfurization systems is the matching of sorbent properties for the selected process operating conditions, namely, sustainable desulfurization kinetics, high sulfur capacity, and mechanical durability over multiple cycles. Additionally, the sulfur species produced during regeneration of the sorbent must be in a form compatible with sulfur recovery systems, such as sulfuric acid or elemental sulfur processes. The overall objective of this program is to develop regenerable sorbents for hydrogen sulfide removal from coal-derived fuel gases in the temperature range 343-538 °C (650-1000 °F). Two categories of reactor configurations are being considered: moving-bed reactors and fluidized-bed (bubbling and circulating) reactors. In addition, a cost assessment and a market plan for large-scale fabrication of sorbents were developed. As an optional task, long-term bench-scale tests of the best moving-bed sorbents were conducted. Starting from thermodynamic calculations, several metal oxides were identified for potential use as hot gas cleanup sorbents using constructed phase stability diagrams and laboratory screening of various mixed-metal oxide formulations. Modified zinc titanates and other proprietary metal oxide formulations were evaluated at the bench scale and many of them found to be acceptable for operation in the target desulfurization temperature range of 370 °C (700 °F) to 538 °C (1000 °F) and regeneration tempera-tures up to 760 °C (1400 °F). Further work is still needed to reduce the batch-to-batch repeatability in the fabrication of modified zinc titanates for larger scale applications. The information presented in this Volume 1 report contains the results of moving-bed sorbent develop-ment at General Electric?s Corporate Research and Development (GE-CRD). A separate Volume 2 report contains the results of the subcontract on fluidized-bed sorbent development at the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT).

R.E. AYALA; V.S. VENKATARAMANI

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

36

Manganese-based sorbents for coal gas desulfurization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The intent of this study is to perform a preliminary screening on a particular Mn-based sorbent, CST-939 (from Chemetals), for hot gas desulfurization. The purpose of the preliminary screening is to determine which temperature and type of coal gas this sorbent demonstrates the greatest capacity and efficiency for sulfur removal. The following conclusions were made from the data collected on the CST-939 sorbent: The sorbent efficiency and capacity are much greater at 343{degrees}C (650{degrees}F) than at 871{degrees}C (1,600{degrees}F). The sorbent efficiency and capacity are much greater in the presence of the more highly-reducing Shell gas than with the less-reducing KRW gas. The sorbent showed tremendous capacity for sulfur pickup, with actual loadings as high as 21 weight percent. Oxidative regeneration at 871{degrees}C (1,600{degrees}F) appeared to decompose sulfate; however, unusually high SO{sub 2} release during the second sulfidations and/or reductive regenerations indicated incomplete regeneration. The average crush strength of the reacted sorbent did not indicate any loss of strength as compared to the fresh sorbent. Superior sorbent performance was obtained in the presence of simulated Shell gas at 538{degrees}C (1,000{degrees}F).

Gasper-Galvin, L.D.; Fisher, E.P. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Goyette, W.J. [Chemetals, Inc., Baltimore, MD (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

37

Sorbents and Carbon-Based Materials for Hydrogen Storage Research...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for storing hydrogen in high-surface-area sorbents such as hybrid carbon nanotubes, aerogels, and nanofibers, as well as metal-organic frameworks and conducting polymers. A...

38

Trapping Coyotes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coyotes cause millions of dollars of damage yearly to livestock and crops in Texas. The leaflet explains coyote habits and the types of trap set, such as scent posts, dirt holes, and trail and carcass sets. The variety of traps available and how...

Texas Wildlife Services

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

39

New high-capacity, calcium-based sorbents, calcium silicate sorbents. Final report, 1993--August 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A search is being carried out for new calcium-based S0{sub 2} sorbents for induct injection. More specifically, a search is being carried out for induct injection calcium silicate sorbents that are highly cost effective. The objectives for the current year include the study of sorbents made from Ca(OH){sub 2}, from mixtures of Ca(OH){sub 2} and SiO{sub 2}, and from portland cement. They also include the study of sorbents made from model compounds. During this year, sorbents prepared from Ca(OH){sub 2} and from mixtures of Ca(OH){sub 2} and fumed SiO{sub 2} were investigated. The results show that very good SiO{sub 2}-modified Ca(OH){sub 2} sorbents in which the Si-to-Ca reactant ratio is low can be prepared from Ca(OH){sub 2} and fumed SiO{sub 2}. Sorbents prepared from Ca(OH){sub 2} and natural SiO{sub 2} or natural SiO{sub 2} sources were also studied. The results obtained show that very good SiO{sub 2}-modified Ca(OH){sub 2} sorbents and calcium silicate hydrate sorbents, C-S-H sorbents, can be prepared from Ca(OH){sub 2} and diatomite, pumice or perlite, minerals that are readily available. In addition. sorbents prepared from Ca{sub 3}SiO{sub 5} and {beta}-Ca{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and from mixtures of these compounds and SiO{sub 2} were studied. The results secured demonstrate that very good C-S-H rich sorbents can be prepared from these compounds and from mixtures of them with SiO{sub 2}. They also provide information useful for interpreting the cement sorbent results. Sorbents prepared from cement and from mixtures of cement and natural SiO{sub 2} or SiO{sub 2} sources were investigated as well. The results secured show that cement and mixtures of it with diatomite, pumice or perlite rapidly yield excellent sorbents with the proper reaction conditions.

Kenney, M.C.; Chiang, R.K.; Fillgrove, K.L. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Functionalized sorbent for chemical separations and sequential forming process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A highly functionalized sorbent and sequential process for making are disclosed. The sorbent includes organic short-length amino silanes and organic oligomeric polyfunctional amino silanes that are dispersed within pores of a porous support that form a 3-dimensional structure containing highly functionalized active binding sites for sorption of analytes.

Fryxell, Glen E. (Kennewick, WA); Zemanian, Thomas S. (Richland, WA)

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multielement sorbent trap" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Advanced Mercury Sorbents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Mercury Sorbents with Low Impact on Power Plant Operations Advanced Mercury Sorbents with Low Impact on Power Plant Operations Apogee Scientific, Inc. (Apogee) will lead a Team comprised of Southern Company Services, TXU, Tennessee Valley Authority, EPRI, URS Group, University of Illinois-Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS), Southern Research Institute (SRI), Calgon Carbon, and TDA Research, Inc., to evaluate a number of advanced sorbents for removing vapor-phase mercury from coal-fired flue gas that have minimal impact on by-product utilization and/or on existing particulate collection devices (PCD). The main objective of this program is to evaluate several advanced sorbents for removing mercury from coal-fired flue gas while posing minimal impact on plant operations through three advanced sorbent concepts: 1) Sorbents which minimize impact on concrete production through selective chemical passivation of activated carbon and use of non-carbon material, 2) sorbents that minimize baghouse pressure drop and ESP emissions, and 3) sorbents that can be recovered and reused.

42

SOx/NOx sorbent and process of use  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An alumina sorbent capable of adsorbing NOx and SOx from waste gases and being regenerated by heating above 600 C. is made by incorporating an alumina stabilizing agent into the sorbent. A preferred method is to add the stabilizer when the alumina is precipitated. The precipitated powder is formed subsequently into a slurry, milled and dripped to form the stabilizing spheroidal alumina particles. These particles are impregnated with an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal to form the stabilized sorbent. Alumina stabilizers include one or more of silica, lanthana, other rare earths, titania, zirconia and alkaline earths.

Ziebarth, M.S.; Hager, M.J.; Beeckman, J.W.; Plecha, S.

1993-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

43

Octahedral molecular sieve sorbents and catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Octahedral molecular sieve sorbents and catalysts are disclosed, including silver hollandite and cryptomelane. These materials can be used, for example, to catalyze the oxidation of CO.sub.x (e.g., CO), NO.sub.x (e.g., NO), hydrocarbons (e.g., C.sub.3H.sub.6) and/or sulfur-containing compounds. The disclosed materials also may be used to catalyze other reactions, such as the reduction of NO.sub.2. In some cases, the disclosed materials are capable of sorbing certain products from the reactions they catalyze. Silver hollandite, in particular, can be used to remove a substantial portion of certain sulfur-containing compounds from a gas or liquid by catalysis and/or sorption. The gas or liquid can be, for example, natural gas or a liquid hydrocarbon.

Li, Liyu [Richland, WA; King, David L [Richland, WA

2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

44

Evaluation of Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The power industry in the U.S. is faced with meeting new regulations to reduce the emissions of mercury compounds from coal-fired plants. These regulations are directed at the existing fleet of nearly 1,100 boilers. These plants are relatively old with an average age of over 40 years. Although most of these units are capable of operating for many additional years, there is a desire to minimize large capital expenditures because of the reduced (and unknown) remaining life of the plant to amortize the project. Injecting a sorbent such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. This is the final site report for tests conducted at Laramie River Station Unit 3, one of five sites evaluated in this DOE/NETL program. The overall objective of the test program is to evaluate the capabilities of activated carbon injection at five plants: Sunflower Electric's Holcomb Station Unit 1, AmerenUE's Meramec Station Unit 2, Missouri Basin Power Project's Laramie River Station Unit 3, Detroit Edison's Monroe Power Plant Unit 4, and AEP's Conesville Station Unit 6. These plants have configurations that together represent 78% of the existing coal-fired generation plants. The goals for the program established by DOE/NETL are to reduce the uncontrolled mercury emissions by 50 to 70% at a cost 25 to 50% lower than the benchmark established by DOE of $60,000/lb mercury removed. The goals of the program were exceeded at Laramie River Station by achieving over 90% mercury removal at a sorbent cost of $3,980/lb ($660/oz) mercury removed for a coal mercury content of 7.9 lb/TBtu.

Sharon Sjostrom

2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

45

Enhancing the use of coals by gas reburning-sorbent injection. Quarterly report No. 20, July 1--September 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to evaluate and demonstrate a cost effective emission control technology for acid rain precursors, oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) and sulfur (SO{sub x}) on two coal fired utility boilers in Illinois. The units selected are representative of pre-NSPS design practices: tangential and cyclone fired. Work on a third unit, wall fired, has been stopped because of funding limitations. The specific objectives are to demonstrate reductions of 60 percent in NO{sub x} and 50 percent in SO{sub x} emissions, by a combination of two developed technologies, gas reburning (GR) and sorbent injection (SI). With GR, about 80--85 percent of the coal fuel is fired in the primary combustion zone. The balance of the fuel is added downstream as natural gas to create a slightly fuel rich environment in which NO{sub x} is converted to N{sub 2}. The combustion process is completed by overfire air addition. So{sub x} emissions are reduced by injecting dry sorbents (usually calcium based) into the upper furnace. The sorbents trap SO{sub x} as solid sulfates that are collected in the particulate control device. This project is conducted in three phases at each site: (1) Design and Permitting; (2) Construction and Startup; and, (3) Operation, Data Collection, Reporting and Disposition. Technology transfer to industry is accomplished through the formation of an industry panel.

Not Available

1992-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Regenerable Immobilized Aminosilane Sorbents for Carbon Dioxide Capture  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Immobilized Aminosilane Sorbents Immobilized Aminosilane Sorbents for Carbon Dioxide Capture Opportunity Research is currently active on the patent-pending technology titled "Regenerable Immobilized Aminosilane Sorbents for Carbon Dioxide Capture." The technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview Carbon sequestration entails a multi-step process in which CO 2 is first separated / captured from gas streams followed by permanent storage. Carbon capture represents a critical step in the process and accounts for a considerable portion of the overall cost. Newly developed, high capacity amine-based sorbents offer many advantages over existing technology including increased CO

47

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Evaluation of Sorbent  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control Evaluation of Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control ADA Environmental Solutions will evaluate injection of activated carbon and other sorbents to remove mercury for a variety of coal and air pollution control equipment configurations. The scope of work is for 36 months and intended to gather operating data that will document actual performance levels and accurate cost information to assess the costs of controlling mercury from coal fired utilities. Testing will be conducted at four different host sites that represent a significant percentage of unit configurations. The subsequent cost analyses will include capital costs, by-product utilization issues, sorbent usage, any necessary enhancements, such as SO3 control or flue gas conditioning, balance of plant, manpower requirements and waste issues. The host sites are Sunflower Electric's Holcomb Station, Ontario Power Generation's Nanticoke Station, AmerenUE's Meramec Station and American Electric Power's (AEP) Conesville Station.

48

sorbent-univerisity-north-dakota | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of North Dakota (UND) is scaling up and demonstrating a solid sorbent technology for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and separation from coal combustion-derived flue gas. The...

49

eval-solid-sorbent | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Solid Sorbents as a Retrofit Technology for CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0004343 3-D model and Photograph of 1 kW System 3-D model and Photograph of 1 kW System...

50

Process for preparing zinc oxide-based sorbents  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure relates to zinc oxide-based sorbents, and processes for preparing and using them. The sorbents are preferably used to remove one or more reduced sulfur species from gas streams. The sorbents comprise an active zinc component, optionally in combination with one or more promoter components and/or one or more substantially inert components. The active zinc component is a two phase material, consisting essentially of a zinc oxide (ZnO) phase and a zinc aluminate (ZnAl.sub.2O.sub.4) phase. Each of the two phases is characterized by a relatively small crystallite size of typically less than about 500 Angstroms. Preferably the sorbents are prepared by converting a precursor mixture, comprising a precipitated zinc oxide precursor and a precipitated aluminum oxide precursor, to the two-phase, active zinc oxide containing component.

Gangwal, Santosh Kumar (Cary, NC); Turk, Brian Scott (Durham, NC); Gupta, Raghubir Prasad (Durham, NC)

2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

51

Design Optimization of MultiElement Aerodynamic Configurations Using a Viscous  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design Optimization of Multi­Element Aerodynamic Configurations Using a Viscous Adjoint Method.S.A An adjoint-based Navier-Stokes design and optimization method for multi-element aerodynamic configurations effects. Using a viscous continuous adjoint formulation, the necessary aerodynamic gradient information

Kim, Sangho

52

Pump radiation distribution in multi-element first cladding laser fibres  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pump radiation transfer is studied experimentally in multi-element first cladding laser fibres. A model of this process is proposed, which is in good agreement with experimental results. An all-fibre single-mode cw ytterbium laser based on a three-element first cladding fibre with an output power of 100W is fabricated. (lasers)

Mel'kumov, Mikhail A; Bufetov, Igor' A; Bubnov, M M; Shubin, Aleksei V; Semenov, S L; Dianov, Evgenii M [Fiber Optics Research Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

53

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Sorbent Injection for Small  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sorbent Injection for Small ESP Mercury Control in Low Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Coal Flue Gas Sorbent Injection for Small ESP Mercury Control in Low Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Coal Flue Gas URS Group and their test team will evaluate sorbent injection for mercury control on sites with low-SCA ESPs, burning low sulfur Eastern bituminous coals. Full-scale tests will be performed at Plant Yates Units 1 and 2 to evaluate sorbent injection performance across a cold-side ESP/wet FGD and a cold-side ESP with a dual NH3/SO3 flue gas conditioning system, respectively. Short-term parametric tests on Units 1 and 2 will provide data on the effect of sorbent injection rate on mercury removal and ash/FGD byproduct composition. Tests on Unit 2 will also evaluate the effect of dual-flue gas conditioning on sorbent injection performance. Results from a one-month injection test on Unit 1 will provide insight to the long-term performance and variability of this process as well as any effects on plant operations. The goals of the long-term testing are to obtain sufficient operational data on removal efficiency over time, effects on the ESP and balance of plant equipment, and on injection equipment operation to prove process viability.

54

Evaluation of Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The power industry in the U.S. is faced with meeting new regulations to reduce the emissions of mercury compounds from coal-fired plants. These regulations are directed at the existing fleet of nearly 1,100 boilers. These plants are relatively old with an average age of over 40 years. Although most of these units are capable of operating for many additional years, there is a desire to minimize large capital expenditures because of the reduced (and unknown) remaining life of the plant to amortize the project. Injecting a sorbent such as powdered activated carbon into the flue gas represents one of the simplest and most mature approaches to controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired boilers. This is the final site report for tests conducted at DTE Energy's Monroe Power Plant, one of five sites evaluated in this DOE/NETL program. The overall objective of the test program was to evaluate the capabilities of activated carbon injection at five plants: Sunflower Electric's Holcomb Station Unit 1, AmerenUE's Meramec Station Unit 2, Missouri Basin Power Project's Laramie River Station Unit 3, Detroit Edison's Monroe Power Plant Unit 4, and AEP's Conesville Station Unit 6. These plants have configurations that together represent 78% of the existing coal-fired generation plants. The goals for the program established by DOE/NETL were to reduce the uncontrolled mercury emissions by 50 to 70% at a cost 25 to 50% lower than the target established by DOE of $60,000/lb mercury removed. The results from Monroe indicate that using DARCO{reg_sign} Hg would result in higher mercury removal (80%) at a sorbent cost of $18,000/lb mercury, or 70% lower than the benchmark. These results demonstrate that the goals established by DOE/NETL were exceeded during this test program. The increase in mercury removal over baseline conditions is defined for this program as a comparison in the outlet emissions measured using the Ontario Hydro method during the baseline and long-term test periods. The change in outlet emissions from baseline to long-term testing was 81%.

Sharon Sjostrom

2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

55

Interaction of trapped ions with trapped atoms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, I present results from two Paul-trap based ion traps carried out in the Vuleti? laboratory: the Atom-Ion trap for collision studies between cold atoms and cold ions, and the Cavity-Array trap for studying ...

Grier, Andrew T. (Andrew Todd)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

LIFAC sorbent injection desulfurization demonstration project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In December 1990, the US Department of Energy selected 13 projects for funding under the Federal Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 3). One of the projects selected was the project sponsored by LIFAC North America, (LIFAC NA), titled LIFAC Sorbent Injection Desulfurization Demonstration Project.'' The host site for this $17 million, three-phase project is Richmond Power and Light's Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2 in Richmond, Indiana. The LIFAC technology uses upper-furnace limestone injection with patented humidification of the flue gas to remove 75--80% of the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) in the flue gas. In November 1990, after a ten (10) month negotiation period, LIFAC NA and the US DOE entered into a Cooperative Agreement for the design, construction, and demonstration of the LIFAC system. This report is the first Technical Progress Report covering the period from project execution through the end of December 1990. Due to the power plant's planned outage schedule, and the time needed for engineering, design and procurement of critical equipment, DOE and LIFAC NA agreed to execute the Design Phase of the project in August 1990, with DOE funding contingent upon final signing of the Cooperative Agreement.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Enhanced durability of desulfurization sorbents for fluidized-bed applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To extend the operating temperature range and further improve the durability of fluidizable sorbents, zinc titanate, another leading regenerable sorbent, was selected for development in the later part of this project. A number of zinc titanate formulations were prepared in the 50 to 300 {mu}m range using granulation and spray drying methods. Important sorbent preparation variables investigated included zinc to titanium ratio, binder type, binder amount, and various chemical additives such as cobalt and molybdenum. A number of sorbents selected on the basis of screening tests were subjected to bench-scale testing for 10 cycles at high temperature, high pressure (HTHP) conditions using the reactor system designed and constructed during the base program. This reactor system is capable of operation either as a 2.0 in. or 3.0 in. I.D. bubbling bed and is rated up to 20 atm operation at 871{degrees}C. Bench-scale testing variables included sorbent type, temperature (550 to 750{degrees}C), gas type (KRW or Texaco gasifier gas), steam content of coal gas, and fluidizing gas velocity (6 to 15 cm/s). The sorbents prepared by spray drying showed poor performance in terms of attrition resistance and chemical reactivity. On the other hand, the granulation method proved to be very successful. For example, a highly attrition-resistant zinc titanate formulation, ZT-4, prepared by granulation exhibited virtually no zinc loss and demonstrated a constant high reactivity and sulfur capacity over 10 cycles, i.e., approximately a 60 percent capacity utilization, with Texaco gas at 750{degrees}C, 15 cm/s fluidizing velocity and 15 atm pressure. The commercial potential of the granulation method for zinc titanate manufacture was demonstrated by preparing two 80 lb batches of sorbent with zinc to titanium mol ratios of 0.8 and 1.5.

Gupta, R.P.; Gangwal, S.K.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Enhanced durability of desulfurization sorbents for fluidized-bed applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To extend the operating temperature range and further improve the durability of fluidizable sorbents, zinc titanate, another leading regenerable sorbent, was selected for development in the later part of this project. A number of zinc titanate formulations were prepared in the 50 to 300 [mu]m range using granulation and spray drying methods. Important sorbent preparation variables investigated included zinc to titanium ratio, binder type, binder amount, and various chemical additives such as cobalt and molybdenum. A number of sorbents selected on the basis of screening tests were subjected to bench-scale testing for 10 cycles at high temperature, high pressure (HTHP) conditions using the reactor system designed and constructed during the base program. This reactor system is capable of operation either as a 2.0 in. or 3.0 in. I.D. bubbling bed and is rated up to 20 atm operation at 871[degrees]C. Bench-scale testing variables included sorbent type, temperature (550 to 750[degrees]C), gas type (KRW or Texaco gasifier gas), steam content of coal gas, and fluidizing gas velocity (6 to 15 cm/s). The sorbents prepared by spray drying showed poor performance in terms of attrition resistance and chemical reactivity. On the other hand, the granulation method proved to be very successful. For example, a highly attrition-resistant zinc titanate formulation, ZT-4, prepared by granulation exhibited virtually no zinc loss and demonstrated a constant high reactivity and sulfur capacity over 10 cycles, i.e., approximately a 60 percent capacity utilization, with Texaco gas at 750[degrees]C, 15 cm/s fluidizing velocity and 15 atm pressure. The commercial potential of the granulation method for zinc titanate manufacture was demonstrated by preparing two 80 lb batches of sorbent with zinc to titanium mol ratios of 0.8 and 1.5.

Gupta, R.P.; Gangwal, S.K.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Preparation and selection of Fe-Cu sorbent for COS removal in syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A series of iron-based sorbents prepared with iron trioxide hydrate, cupric oxide by a novel method was studied in a fixed-bed reactor for COS removal from syngas at moderate temperature. In addition, the sorbent...

Bowu Cheng; Zhaofei Cao; Yong Bai…

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Novel Sorbent to Clean Biogas for Fuel Cell Combined Heat and...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Novel Sorbent to Clean Biogas for Fuel Cell Combined Heat and Power - Fact Sheet, 2011 Novel Sorbent to Clean Biogas for Fuel Cell Combined Heat and Power - Fact Sheet, 2011 TDA...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multielement sorbent trap" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

R&D Strategies for Compressed, Cryo-Compressed and Cryo-Sorbent...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

R&D Strategies for Compressed, Cryo-Compressed and Cryo-Sorbent Hydrogen Storage Technologies Workshops R&D Strategies for Compressed, Cryo-Compressed and Cryo-Sorbent Hydrogen...

62

Sorbents and Carbon-Based Materials for Hydrogen Storage Research and Development  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy's research and development on sorbents and carbon-based materials for hydrogen storage targets breakthrough concepts for storing hydrogen in high-surface-area sorbents...

63

Direct sulfur recovery during sorbent regeneration. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research project was to improve the direct elemental sulfur yields that occur during the regeneration of SO{sub 2}-saturated MgO-vermiculite sorbents (MagSorbents) by examining three approaches or strategies. The three approaches were regeneration-gas recycle, high-pressure regeneration, and catalytic reduction of the SO{sub 2} gas using a new catalyst developed by Research Triangle Institute (RTI). Prior to the project, Sorbent Technologies Corporation (Sorbtech) had developed a sorbent-regeneration process that yielded directly a pure elemental sulfur product. In the process, typically about 25 to 35 percent of the liberated S0{sub 2} was converted directly to elemental sulfur. The goal of this project was to achieve a conversion rate of over 90 percent. Good success was attained in the project. About 90 percent or more conversion was achieved with two of the approaches that were examined, regeneration-gas recycle and use of the RTI catalyst. Of these approaches, regeneration-gas recycle gave the best results (essentially 100 percent conversion in some cases). In the regeneration-gas recycle approach, saturated sorbent is simply heated to about 750{degree}C in a reducing gas (methane) atmosphere. During heating, a gas containing elemental sulfur, water vapor, H{sub 2}S, S0{sub 2}, and C0{sub 2} is evolved. The elemental sulfur and water vapor in the gas stream are condensed and removed, and the remaining gas is recycled back through the sorbent bed. After several recycles, the S0{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S completely disappear from the gas stream, and the stream contains only elemental sulfur, water vapor and C0{sub 2}.

Nelson, S.G.; Little, R.C. [Sorbent Technologies Corp., Twinsburg, OH (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

A Reusable Calcium-Based Sorbent for Desulfurizing Hot Coal Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project has been to develop a superior, regenerable, calcium-based sorbent for desulfurizing hot coal gas. The sorbent should be strong, durable, inexpensive to manufacture, and capable of being reused many times. To achieve these objectives the project has focused on the development of the very promising core-in-shell sorbent.

Wheelock, T.D.; Hasler, D.J.L.

2002-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

65

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Low Cost Sorbent for  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Low Cost Sorbent for Capturing CO2 Emissions Generated by Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants Low Cost Sorbent for Capturing CO2 Emissions Generated by Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants Project No.: DE-NT0005497 TDA sorbent test equipment TDA sorbent test equipment. TDA Research Inc. will produce and evaluate a low-cost solid sorbent developed in prior laboratory testing. The process uses an alkalized alumina adsorbent to capture carbon dioxide (CO2) at intermediate temperature and near ambient pressure. The physical adsorbent is regenerated with low-pressure steam. Although the regeneration is primarily by concentration swing, the adsorption of steam on the sorbent during regeneration also provides approximately 8°C to 10°C of temperature swing, further enhancing the regeneration rate. The sorbent is transferred between two moving bed reactors. Cycling results in gas

66

Solid Sorbents for Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Gas Streams at Low Temperatures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sorbents for Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Sorbents for Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Gas Streams at Low Temperatures Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 6,908,497 entitled "Solid Sorbents for Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Gas Streams at Low Temperatures." Disclosed in this patent is a new low-cost carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) sorbent that can be used in large-scale gas-solid processes. Researchers have developed a new method to prepare these sorbents by treating substrates with an amine and/or an ether in a way that either one comprises at least 50 weight percent of the sorbent. The sorbent captures compounds contained in gaseous fluids through chemisorptions and/or

67

NETL: Evaluation of Dry Sorbent Technology for Pre-Combustion CO2 Capture  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Dry Sorbent Technology for Pre-Combustion CO2 Capture Evaluation of Dry Sorbent Technology for Pre-Combustion CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0000465 Scanning Electron Microsopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Miscroscopy (TEM) images of a multi-functional sorbent synthesized by a novel method. Scanning Electron Microsopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Miscroscopy (TEM) images of a multi-functional sorbent synthesized by a novel method. URS and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are investigating a dry sorbent process configured to combine the water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction with carbon dioxide (CO2) removal for coal gasification systems. A combination of process simulation modeling and sorbent molecular and thermodynamic analyses will be performed to predict optimal sorbent properties and identify optimal operating temperature and pressure ranges

68

Enhancing the use of coals by gas reburning-sorbent injection. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to evaluate and demonstrate a cost effective emission control technology for acid rain precursors, oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) and sulfur (SO{sub x}), on two coal fired utility boilers in Illinois. The units selected are representative of pre-NSPS design practices: tangential and cyclone fired. Work on a third unit, wall fired, has been stopped because of funding limitations. The specific objectives are to demonstrate reductions of 60 percent in NO{sub x} and 50 percent in SO{sub x} emissions, by a combination of two developed technologies, gas reburning (GR) and sorbent injection (SI). With GR, about 80--85 percent of the coal fuel is fired in the primary combustion zone. The balance of the fuel is added downstream as natural gas to create a slightly fuel rich environment in which NO{sub x} is converted to N{sub 2}. The combustion process is completed by overfire air addition. SO{sub x} emissions are reduced by injecting dry sorbents (usually calcium based) into the upper furnace. The sorbents trap SO{sub x} as solid sulfates that are collected in the particulate control device. This project is conducted in three phases at each site: (1) Design and Permitting, (2) Construction and Startup, and (3) Operation, Data Collection, Reporting and Disposition. Technology transfer to industry is accomplished through the formation of an industry panel. Phase I of the project commenced on June 5, 1987. Phases I, II and III for the Illinois Power Project have been completed; Phases I and II for the CWLP project have been completed; Phase III is in progress. All site activities have been completed with the exception of restoration at CWLP.

NONE

1996-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

69

Enhancing the use of coals by gas reburning-sorbent injection. Quarterly report No. 33, October 1--December 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to evaluate and demonstrate a cost effective emission control technology for acid rain precursors, oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) and sulfur (SO{sub 2}), on two coal fired utility boilers in Illinois. The units selected are representative of pre-NSPS design practices: tangential and cyclone fired. Work on a third unit, wall fired, has been stopped because of funding limitations. The specific objectives are to demonstrate reductions of 60 percent in NO{sub x} and 50 percent in SO{sub x} emissions, by a combination of two developed technologies, gas reburning (GR) and sorbent injection (SI). With GR, about 80--85 percent of the coal fuel is fired in the primary combustion zone. The balance of the fuel is added downstream as natural gas to create a slightly fuel rich environment in which NO{sub x} is converted to N{sub 2}. The combustion process is completed by overfire air addition. SO{sub x} emissions are reduced by injecting dry sorbents (usually calcium based) into the upper furnace. The sorbents trap SO{sub x} as solid sulfates that are collected in the particulate control device. This project is conducted in three phases at each site: (1) Design and Permitting, (2) Construction and Startup, shed through the formation of an industry, and (3) Operation, Data Collection, Reporting and Disposition. Technology transfer to industry is accomplished through the formation of an industry panel. Phase 1 of the project commenced on June 5, 1987. Phases 1, 2 and 3 for the Illinois Power Project have been completed; Phases 1 and 2 for the CWLP project have been completed; Phase 3 is in progress. All site activities have been completed with the exception of restoration at CWLP.

NONE

1996-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

70

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry Regenerable Sorbents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regenerable sorbents based on sodium carbonate (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) can be used to separate carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal-fired power plant flue gas. Upon thermal regeneration and condensation of water vapor, CO{sub 2} is released in a concentrated form that is suitable for reuse or sequestration. During the research project described in this report, the technical feasibility and economic viability of a thermal-swing CO{sub 2} separation process based on dry, regenerable, carbonate sorbents was confirmed. This process was designated as RTI's Dry Carbonate Process. RTI tested the Dry Carbonate Process through various research phases including thermogravimetric analysis (TGA); bench-scale fixed-bed, bench-scale fluidized-bed, bench-scale co-current downflow reactor testing; pilot-scale entrained-bed testing; and bench-scale demonstration testing with actual coal-fired flue gas. All phases of testing showed the feasibility of the process to capture greater than 90% of the CO{sub 2} present in coal-fired flue gas. Attrition-resistant sorbents were developed, and these sorbents were found to retain their CO{sub 2} removal activity through multiple cycles of adsorption and regeneration. The sodium carbonate-based sorbents developed by RTI react with CO{sub 2} and water vapor at temperatures below 80 C to form sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) and/or Wegscheider's salt. This reaction is reversed at temperatures greater than 120 C to release an equimolar mixture of CO{sub 2} and water vapor. After condensation of the water, a pure CO{sub 2} stream can be obtained. TGA testing showed that the Na{sub 2}CO3 sorbents react irreversibly with sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and hydrogen chloride (HCl) (at the operating conditions for this process). Trace levels of these contaminants are expected to be present in desulfurized flue gas. The sorbents did not collect detectable quantities of mercury (Hg). A process was designed for the Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-based sorbent that includes a co-current downflow reactor system for adsorption of CO{sub 2} and a steam-heated, hollow-screw conveyor system for regeneration of the sorbent and release of a concentrated CO{sub 2} gas stream. An economic analysis of this process (based on the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory's [DOE/NETL's] 'Carbon Capture and Sequestration Systems Analysis Guidelines') was carried out. RTI's economic analyses indicate that installation of the Dry Carbonate Process in a 500 MW{sub e} (nominal) power plant could achieve 90% CO{sub 2} removal with an incremental capital cost of about $69 million and an increase in the cost of electricity (COE) of about 1.95 cents per kWh. This represents an increase of roughly 35.4% in the estimated COE - which compares very favorable versus MEA's COE increase of 58%. Both the incremental capital cost and the incremental COE were projected to be less than the comparable costs for an equally efficient CO{sub 2} removal system based on monoethanolamine (MEA).

Thomas Nelson; David Green; Paul Box; Raghubir Gupta; Gennar Henningsen

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

71

Microfabricated Ion Traps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ion traps offer the opportunity to study fundamental quantum systems with high level of accuracy highly decoupled from the environment. Individual atomic ions can be controlled and manipulated with electric fields, cooled to the ground state of motion with laser cooling and coherently manipulated using optical and microwave radiation. Microfabricated ion traps hold the advantage of allowing for smaller trap dimensions and better scalability towards large ion trap arrays also making them a vital ingredient for next generation quantum technologies. Here we provide an introduction into the principles and operation of microfabricated ion traps. We show an overview of material and electrical considerations which are vital for the design of such trap structures. We provide guidance in how to choose the appropriate fabrication design, consider different methods for the fabrication of microfabricated ion traps and discuss previously realized structures. We also discuss the phenomenon of anomalous heating of ions within ion traps, which becomes an important factor in the miniaturization of ion traps.

Marcus D. Hughes; Bjoern Lekitsch; Jiddu A. Broersma; Winfried K. Hensinger

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

72

Effect of beam limiting aperture and collector potential on multi-element focused ion beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A compact microwave driven plasma based multi-element focused ion beam system has been developed. In the present work, the effect of reduced beam limiter (BL) aperture on the focused ion beam parameters, such as current and spot size, and a method of controlling beam energy independently by introducing a biased collector at focal point (FP) are investigated. It is found that the location of FP does not change due to the reduction of BL aperture. The location of FP and beam size are found to be weakly dependent on the collector potential in the range from -8 kV to -18 kV.

Paul, Samit; Chowdhury, Abhishek; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh (India)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

Development of Novel Carbon Sorbents for CO2 Capture  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Sorbents Carbon Sorbents for CO 2 Capture Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Research and Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal re- serves, while at the same time allowing the current fleet of coal-fired power plants to comply with existing and emerging environmental regulations. The EPEC R&D Program portfolio of post- and oxy-combustion carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions control technologies and CO 2 compression is focused on advancing technological options for the existing fleet of coal-fired power plants in the event of carbon constraints. Pulverized coal (PC)-fired power plants are large, stationary sources of CO

74

Adsorption and Desorption of CO2 on Solid Sorbents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ADSORPTION AND DESORPTION OF CO ON SOLID SORBENTS ADSORPTION AND DESORPTION OF CO ON SOLID SORBENTS 2 Ranjani Siriwardane (rsiiw@netl.doe.gov; 304-285-4513) Ming Shen (mshen@netl.doe.gov; 304-285-4112) Edward Fisher (efishe@netl.doe.gov; 304-285-4011) James Poston (jposto@netl.doe.gov; 304-285-4635) Abolghasem Shamsi (ashams@netl.doe.gov; 304-285-4360) U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, 3610 Collins Ferry Road, P.O.Box 880, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 INTRODUCTION Fossil fuels supply more than 98% of the world's energy needs. However, the combustion of fossil fuels is one of the major sources of the green house gas CO . It is necessary to develop 2 technologies that will allow us to utilize the fossil fuels while reducing the emissions of green house gases. Commercial CO capture technology that exists today is very expensive and energy

75

Method for removing metal ions from solution with titanate sorbents  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for removing metal ions from solution comprises the steps of providing titanate particles by spray-drying a solution or slurry comprising sorbent titanates having a particle size up to 20 micrometers, optionally in the presence of polymer free of cellulose functionality as binder, said sorbent being active towards heavy metals from Periodic Table (CAS version) Groups IA, IIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, and VIII, to provide monodisperse, substantially spherical particles in a yield of at least 70 percent of theoretical yield and having a particle size distribution in the range of 1 to 500 micrometers. The particles can be used free flowing in columns or beds, or entrapped in a nonwoven, fibrous web or matrix or a cast porous membrane, to selectively remove metal ions from aqueous or organic liquid.

Lundquist, Susan H. (White Bear Township, MN); White, Lloyd R. (Minneapolis, MN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

NETL Patented CO2-Removal Sorbents Promise Power and Cost Savings |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Patented CO2-Removal Sorbents Promise Power and Cost Savings Patented CO2-Removal Sorbents Promise Power and Cost Savings NETL Patented CO2-Removal Sorbents Promise Power and Cost Savings May 30, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Carbon dioxide removal sorbents developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) could result in power and cost savings for users of some heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems under a recently signed license agreement. NETL, the research and development laboratory for DOE's Office of Fossil Energy, entered into a patent license agreement with Boston-based Enverid Systems Inc. for NETL-developed solid sorbents that remove CO2 from gas streams. NETL's sorbents will be incorporated into an Enverid product called EnClaire™, which adds on to HVAC systems to reduce power

77

REVIEW ARTICLE Optical trapping  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REVIEW ARTICLE Optical trapping Keir C. Neuman and Steven M. Blocka) Department of Biological ago, optical traps have emerged as a powerful tool with broad-reaching applications in biology--and the measurement of nanometer-level displacements of--optically trapped objects. We review progress

Block, Steven

78

Micro-and nano-environments of carbon sequestration: Multi-element STXMNEXAFS spectromicroscopy assessment of microbial carbon and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Micro- and nano-environments of carbon sequestration: Multi-element STXM­NEXAFS spectromicroscopy- and nano-C sequestration environments, and conduct submicron-level investigation of the compositional chem demonstrated the existence of spatially distinct seemingly terminal micro- and nano-C repository zones, where

Lehmann, Johannes

79

Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field-Testing Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work conducted from September 1, 2003 through December 31, 2007 on the project entitled Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field-Testing Program. The project covers the testing at the Detroit Edison St. Clair Plant and the Duke Power Cliffside and Buck Stations. The St. Clair Plant used a blend of subbituminous and bituminous coal and controlled the particulate emissions by means of a cold-side ESP. The Duke Power Stations used bituminous coals and controlled their particulate emissions by means of hot-side ESPs. The testing at the Detroit Edison St. Clair Plant demonstrated that mercury sorbents could be used to achieve high mercury removal rates with low injection rates at facilities that burn subbituminous coal. A mercury removal rate of 94% was achieved at an injection rate of 3 lb/MMacf over the thirty day long-term test. Prior to this test, it was believed that the mercury in flue gas of this type would be the most difficult to capture. This is not the case. The testing at the two Duke Power Stations proved that carbon- based mercury sorbents can be used to control the mercury emissions from boilers with hot-side ESPs. It was known that plain PACs did not have any mercury capacity at elevated temperatures but that brominated B-PAC did. The mercury removal rate varies with the operation but it appears that mercury removal rates equal to or greater than 50% are achievable in facilities equipped with hot-side ESPs. As part of the program, both sorbent injection equipment and sorbent production equipment was acquired and operated. This equipment performed very well during this program. In addition, mercury instruments were acquired for this program. These instruments worked well in the flue gas at the St. Clair Plant but not as well in the flue gas at the Duke Power Stations. It is believed that the difference in the amount of oxidized mercury, more at Duke Power, was the difference in instrument performance. Much of the equipment was purchased used and all of the equipment has nearly reached the end of its useful service.

Ronald Landreth

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

80

Attrition resistant catalysts and sorbents based on heavy metal poisoned FCC catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heavy metal poisoned, spent FCC catalyst is treated by chemically impregnating the poisoned catalyst with a new catalytic metal or metal salt to provide an attrition resistant catalyst or sorbent for a different catalytic or absorption process, such as catalysts for Fischer-Tropsh Synthesis, and sorbents for removal of sulfur gases from fuel gases and flue-gases. The heavy metal contaminated FCC catalyst is directly used as a support for preparing catalysts having new catalytic properties and sorbents having new sorbent properties, without removing or passivating the heavy metals on the spent FCC catalyst as an intermediate step.

Gangwal, S.; Jothimurugesan, K.

1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multielement sorbent trap" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Novel Sorbent to Clean Biogas for Fuel Cell Combined Heat and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Sorbent to Clean Biogas for Fuel Cell Combined Heat and Power Improving Desulfurization to Enable Fuel Cell Utilization of Digester Gases This project will develop a new,...

82

Novel Sorbent to Clean Biogas for Fuel Cell Combined Heat and Power- Fact Sheet, 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Factsheet describing project objective to develop a new, high-capacity, expendable sorbent to remove sulfur species from anaerobic digester gas

83

Attrition resistant catalysts and sorbents based on heavy metal poisoned FCC catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heavy metal poisoned, spent FCC catalyst is treated by chemically impregnating the poisoned catalyst with a new catalytic metal or metal salt to provide an attrition resistant catalyst or sorbent for a different catalytic or absorption processes, such as catalysts for Fischer-Tropsh Synthesis, and sorbents for removal of sulfur gasses from fuel gases and flue-gases. The heavy metal contaminated FCC catalyst is directly used as a support for preparing catalysts having new catalytic properties and sorbents having new sorbent properties, without removing or "passivating" the heavy metals on the spent FCC catalyst as an intermediate step.

Gangwal, Santosh (Cary, NC); Jothimurugesan, Kandaswamy (Hampton, VA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

ASSESSMENT OF LOW COST NOVEL SORBENTS FOR COAL-FIRED POWER PLANT MERCURY CONTROL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The injection of sorbents upstream of a particulate control device is one of the most promising methods for controlling mercury emissions from coal-fired utility boilers with electrostatic precipitators and fabric filters. Studies carried out at the bench-, pilot-, and full-scale have shown that a wide variety of factors may influence sorbent mercury removal effectiveness. These factors include mercury species, flue gas composition, process conditions, existing pollution control equipment design, and sorbent characteristics. The objective of the program is to obtain the necessary information to assess the viability of lower cost alternatives to commercially available activated carbon for mercury control in coal-fired utilities. Prior to injection testing, a number of sorbents were tested in a slipstream fixed-bed device both in the laboratory and at two field sites. Based upon the performance of the sorbents in a fixed-bed device and the estimated cost of mercury control using each sorbent, seventeen sorbents were chosen for screening in a slipstream injection system at a site burning a Western bituminous coal/petcoke blend, five were chosen for screening at a site burning a subbituminous Powder River Basin (PRB) coal, and nineteen sorbents were evaluated at a third site burning a PRB coal. Sorbents evaluated during the program were of various materials, including: activated carbons, treated carbons, other non-activated carbons, and non-carbon material. The economics and performance of the novel sorbents evaluated demonstrate that there are alternatives to the commercial standard. Smaller enterprises may have the opportunity to provide lower price mercury sorbents to power generation customers under the right set of circumstances.

Sharon Sjostrom

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Low Temperature Sorbents for removal of Sulfur Compounds from fluid feed Streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sorbent material is provided comprising a material reactive with sulfur, a binder unreactive with sulfur and an inert material, wherein the sorbent absorbs the sulfur at temperatures between 30 and 200 C. Sulfur absorption capacity as high as 22 weight percent has been observed with these materials.

Siriwardane, Ranjan

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

86

Low Temperature Sorbents for Removal of Sulfur Compounds from Fluid Feed Streams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A sorbent material is provided comprising a material reactive with sulfur, a binder unreactive with sulfur and an inert material, wherein the sorbent absorbs the sulfur at temperatures between 30 and 200 C. Sulfur absorption capacity as high as 22 weight percent has been observed with these materials.

Siriwardane, Ranjani

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Field Demonstration of Enhanced Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alstom Power Inc. has conducted a DOE/NETL-sponsored program (under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-04NT42306) to demonstrate Mer-Cure{trademark}, one of Alstom's mercury control technologies for coal-fired boilers. Mer-Cure{trademark} utilizes a small amount of Mer-Clean{trademark} sorbent that is injected into the flue gas stream for oxidation and adsorption of gaseous mercury. Mer-Clean{trademark} sorbents are carbon-based and prepared with chemical additives that promote oxidation and capture of mercury. Mer-Cure{trademark} is unique in that the sorbent is injected into an environment where the mercury capture kinetics is accelerated. This full-scale demonstration program was comprised of three seven-week long test campaigns at three host sites including PacifiCorp's 240-MW{sub e} Dave Johnston Unit No.3 burning a Powder River Basin (PRB) coal, Basin Electric's 220-MW{sub e} Leland Olds Unit No.1 burning a North Dakota lignite, and Reliant Energy's 170-MW{sub e} Portland Unit No.1 burning an Eastern bituminous coal. All three boilers are equipped with electrostatic precipitators. The goals for this Round 2 program, established by DOE/NETL under the original solicitation, were to reduce the uncontrolled mercury emissions by 50 to 70% at a cost 25 to 50% lower than the previous target of $60,000/lb mercury removed. The results for all three host sites indicated that Mer-Cure{trademark} technology could achieve mercury removal of 90%. The estimated mercury removal costs were 25-92% lower than the benchmark of $60,000/lb mercury removed. The estimated costs for control, at sorbent cost of $1.25 to $2.00/lb respectively, are as follows: (1) Dave Johnston Unit No.3--$2,650 to $4,328/lb Hg removed (92.8% less than $60k/lb); (2) Leland Olds Unit No.1--$8,680 to $13,860/lb Hg removed (76.7% less than $60k/lb); and (3) Portland Unit No.1--$28,540 to $45,065/lb Hg removed (24.9% less than $60k/lb). In summary, the results from demonstration testing at all three host sites show that the goals established by DOE/NETL were exceeded during this test program. Mercury removal performance4 of greater than 90% reduction was above the 50-70% reduction goal, and mercury removal cost of 25-92% lower than the benchmark was above the 25 to 50% cost reduction goal.

Shin Kang; Robert Schrecengost

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

88

Nanoclay-Based Solid Sorbents for CO2 Capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nanoclay-Based Solid Sorbents for CO2 Capture ... As seen from the figure, the untreated nanoclay shows very little CO2 capture, while amine-treated nanoclays show considerably higher CO2 capture capacities, demonstrating the effectiveness of the amine treatment. ... The CO2 sorption capacity increases as the temperature is increased from 50 to 85 °C, and it reaches as high as 7.5% at 85 °C for the nanoclay treated with both APTMS and PEI, although the nanoclays treated with either APTMS or PEI show about 6% CO2 capture capacity. ...

Elliot A. Roth; Sushant Agarwal; Rakesh K. Gupta

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

89

Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test August 21, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The successful bench-scale test of a novel carbon dioxide (CO2) capturing sorbent promises to further advance the process as a possible technological option for reducing CO2 emissions from coal-fired power plants. The new sorbent, BrightBlack™, was originally developed for a different application by Advanced Technology Materials Inc. (ATMI) , a subcontractor to SRI for the Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored test at the University of Toledo. Through partnering with the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and others, SRI developed a method to

90

Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test August 21, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The successful bench-scale test of a novel carbon dioxide (CO2) capturing sorbent promises to further advance the process as a possible technological option for reducing CO2 emissions from coal-fired power plants. The new sorbent, BrightBlack™, was originally developed for a different application by Advanced Technology Materials Inc. (ATMI) , a subcontractor to SRI for the Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored test at the University of Toledo. Through partnering with the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and others, SRI developed a method to

91

Neutral atom traps.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes progress in designing a neutral atom trap capable of trapping sub millikelvin atom in a magnetic trap and shuttling the atoms across the atom chip from a collection area to an optical cavity. The numerical simulation and atom chip design are discussed. Also, discussed are preliminary calculations of quantum noise sources in Kerr nonlinear optics measurements based on electromagnetically induced transparency. These types of measurements may be important for quantum nondemolition measurements at the few photon limit.

Pack, Michael Vern

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Structural traps I, tectonic fold traps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book contains studies of fields that exist because of the presence of an anticline; without the anticline there would be no trap. The fields described in this volume illustrate the complex nature of a trap type that some explorationists mistakenly regard as simple and therefore not worthy of close scrutiny. Anticlinal traps are like all other fields - each has its own peculiar personality. Many of the fields in this volume are sourced from continentally derived organic matter. All have sandstone reservoirs. Most have shale seals, but one, Sarir, has an evaporite seal. Many are faulted anticlines. Some of the anticlines formed in a compressional tectonic setting, whereas others formed in a tensional tectonic setting.

Beaumont, E.A.; Foster, N.H.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Methods and sorbents for utilizing a hot-side electrostatic precipitator for removal of mercury from combustion gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods are provided for reducing emission of mercury from a gas stream by treating the gas with carbonaceous mercury sorbent particles to reduce the mercury content of the gas; collecting the carbonaceous mercury sorbent particles on collection plates of a hot-side ESP; periodically rapping the collection plates to release a substantial portion of the collected carbonaceous mercury sorbent particles into hoppers; and periodically emptying the hoppers, wherein such rapping and emptying are done at rates such that less than 70% of mercury adsorbed onto the mercury sorbent desorbs from the collected mercury sorbent into the gas stream.

Nelson, Sidney (Hudson, OH)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

Nonlinear integrable ion traps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quadrupole ion traps can be transformed into nonlinear traps with integrable motion by adding special electrostatic potentials. This can be done with both stationary potentials (electrostatic plus a uniform magnetic field) and with time-dependent electric potentials. These potentials are chosen such that the single particle Hamilton-Jacobi equations of motion are separable in some coordinate systems. The electrostatic potentials have several free adjustable parameters allowing for a quadrupole trap to be transformed into, for example, a double-well or a toroidal-well system. The particle motion remains regular, non-chaotic, integrable in quadratures, and stable for a wide range of parameters. We present two examples of how to realize such a system in case of a time-independent (the Penning trap) as well as a time-dependent (the Paul trap) configuration.

Nagaitsev, S.; /Fermilab; Danilov, V.; /SNS Project, Oak Ridge

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents for Sulfuric Acid Control, during the time period April 1, 2001 through September 30, 2001. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The coincident removal of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid is also being determined, as is the removal of arsenic, a known poison for NO{sub x} selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. EPRI, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), FirstEnergy Corporation, and the Dravo Lime Company are project co-funders. URS Corporation is the prime contractor. During the current period, American Electric Power (AEP) joined the project as an additional co-funder and as a provider of a host site for testing. This is the fourth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, two long-term sorbent injection tests were conducted, one on Unit 3 at FirstEnergy's Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) and one on Unit 1 at AEP's Gavin Station. These tests determined the effectiveness of injecting alkaline slurries into the upper furnace of the boiler as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions from these units. The alkaline slurries tested included commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Station), and a byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (both Gavin Station and BMP). The tests showed that injecting either the commercial or the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry could achieve up to 70 to 75% sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, the overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Station, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO{sub 3} formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NO{sub x} control than at removing SO{sub 3} formed in the furnace. Balance of plant impacts, primarily on the ESP particulate control device, were also determined during both tests. These results are presented and discussed in this report.

Gary M. Blythe

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

96

Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print Wednesday, 27 April 2005 00:00 In photoelectron spectroscopy experiments performed at the...

97

Organoclay Sorbent for Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Gas Streams at Low Temperatures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Organoclay Sorbent for Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Gas Organoclay Sorbent for Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Gas Streams at Low Temperatures Contact NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov October 2012 Significance * Energy mixing is maximized * Mobilizing of the particulates is complete * No "dead zones" exist * Packing of material is minimized * Eroding effects are significantly reduced Applications * Mixing nuclear waste at Hanford * Any similar industrial process involving heavy solids in a carrier fluid Opportunity Research is currently active on the patent-pending technology "Organoclay Sorbent for Removal of Carbon Dioxide from

98

High-temperature sorbent method for removal of sulfur containing gases from gaseous mixtures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A copper oxide-zinc oxide mixture is used as a sorbent for removing hydrogen sulfide and other sulfur containing gases at high temperatures from a gaseous fuel mixture. This high-temperature sorbent is especially useful for preparing fuel gases for high temperature fuel cells. The copper oxide is initially reduced in a preconditioning step to elemental copper and is present in a highly dispersed state throughout the zinc oxide which serves as a support as well as adding to the sulfur sorption capacity. The spent sorbent is regenerated by high-temperature treatment with an air fuel, air steam mixture followed by hydrogen reduction to remove and recover the sulfur.

Young, John E. (Woodridge, IL); Jalan, Vinod M. (Concord, MA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

High-temperature sorbent method for removal of sulfur-containing gases from gaseous mixtures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A copper oxide-zinc oxide mixture is used as a sorbent for removing hydrogen sulfide and other sulfur containing gases at high temperatures from a gaseous fuel mixture. This high-temperature sorbent is especially useful for preparing fuel gases for high temperature fuel cells. The copper oxide is initially reduced in a preconditioning step to elemental copper and is present in a highly dispersed state throughout the zinc oxide which serves as a support as well as adding to the sulfur sorbtion capacity. The spent sorbent is regenerated by high-temperature treatment with an air fuel, air steam mixture followed by hydrogen reduction to remove and recover the sulfur.

Young, J.E.; Jalan, V.M.

1982-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

100

High-temperature sorbent method for removal of sulfur containing gases from gaseous mixtures  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A copper oxide-zinc oxide mixture is used as a sorbent for removing hydrogen sulfide and other sulfur containing gases at high temperatures from a gaseous fuel mixture. This high-temperature sorbent is especially useful for preparing fuel gases for high temperature fuel cells. The copper oxide is initially reduced in a preconditioning step to elemental copper and is present in a highly dispersed state throughout the zinc oxide which serves as a support as well as adding to the sulfur sorption capacity. The spent sorbent is regenerated by high-temperature treatment with an air fuel, air steam mixture followed by hydrogen reduction to remove and recover the sulfur.

Young, J.E.; Jalan, V.M.

1984-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multielement sorbent trap" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Original articles: Sorption properties of a fibrous polypropylene-polyacrylic acid sorbent and its analytical application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The advantages of fibrous sorbents and their growing role in the preconcentration of trace elements have repeatedly been noted elsewhere. The sorption properties of a sorbent are known to be determined by the nature of its functional groups. In this communication, the authors shall present the results of a study of the sorption properties of a fibrous sorbent based on polypropylene and polyacrylic acid (PP-PAA) which contains carboxyl groups as functional groups, with respect to bismuth(III), zirconium, and titanium (IV), and they shall describe a procedure for the preconcentration of bismuth from solutions of copper alloys followed by its photometric determination.

Chaprasova, L.V.; Shesterova, I.P.; Vaisova, M.; Turabov, N.; Kurbanov, Sh.A. [Tashkent State Univ. (Russian Federation)

1994-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

102

LIFAC Sorbent Injection Desulfurization Demonstration Project: A DOE Assessment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

41 41 LIFAC Sorbent Injection Desulfurization Demonstration Project: A DOE Assessment January 2001 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 880, 3610 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 and P.O. Box 10940, 626 Cochrans Mill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 website: www.netl.doe.gov Disclaimer 2 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference

103

Regenerable immobilized aminosilane sorbents for carbon dioxide capture applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for the separation of carbon dioxide from ambient air and flue gases is provided wherein a phase separating moiety with a second moiety are simultaneously coupled and bonded onto an inert substrate to create a mixture which is subsequently contacted with flue gases or ambient air. The phase-separating moiety is an amine whereas the second moiety is an aminosilane, or a Group 4 propoxide such as titanium (IV) propoxide (tetrapropyl orthotitanate, C.sub.12H.sub.28O.sub.4Ti). The second moiety makes the phase-separating moiety insoluble in the pores of the inert substrate. The new sorbents have a high carbon dioxide loading capacity and considerable stability over hundreds of cycles. The synthesis method is readily scalable for commercial and industrial production.

Gay, McMahan; Choi, Sunho; Jones, Christopher W

2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

104

Evaluating Steam Trap Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~LmT " TRIf' 1 TRIf' 2 Figure 2 It has become common practice for engineers to oversize steam traps and place more emphasis on first cost than on maintenance cost and operating 766 3 4 ESL-IE-86-06-126 Proceedings from the Eighth Annual Industrial...EVALUATING STEAM TRAP PERFORMANCE Noel Y Fuller, P.E. Holston Defense Corporation Kingsport, Tennessee ABSTRACT Laboratory tests were conducted on several types of steam traps at Holston Defense Corporation in Kingsport, Tennessee. Data...

Fuller, N. Y.

105

Regenerable MgO-based sorbent for high temperature CO2 removal from syngas: 3. CO2 capture and sorbent enhanced water gas shift reaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Regenerable MgO-based sorbent, which was prepared and evaluated in the thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) in part 1, was also evaluated in high-pressure packed-bed unit in CO2/N2/H2O mixture and simulated pre-combustion syngas environment. In CO2/N2/H2O environment, the CO2 absorption capacity of the sorbent increases with increasing temperatures from 6.7% at 350 °C to 9.5% 450 °C. The sorbent is capable of achieving over 95% CO2 capture and 40% conversion in the water gas shift (WGS) reaction, which should be attributed to positive effect of WGS reaction in producing CO2 during the process. The sorbent reactivity and absorption capacity toward CO2, as well as its WGS catalytic activity decreases with increasing temperature. The maximum pre-breakthrough WGS conversion occurs at 350 °C, which diminishes as the sorbent is carbonated. The variable diffusivity shrinking core reaction model coupled with the two-fluid computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was shown to accurately predict the break-through gas compositions at different operating conditions.

Emadoddin Abbasi; Armin Hassanzadeh; Shahin Zarghami; Hamid Arastoopour; Javad Abbasian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Advanced in-duct sorbent injection for SO{sub 2} control. Topical report number 3, Subtask 2.3: Sorbent optimization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research project is to develop second-generation duct injection technology as a cost-effective compliance option for the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. Specific process performance goals are to achieve 90% SO{sub 2} removal and 60% sorbent utilization efficiency. Research is focused on the Advanced Coolside process, which has shown the potential of achieving these targets. The objective of Subtask 2.3, Sorbent Optimization, was to explore means of improving performance and economics of the Advanced Coolside process through optimizing the sorbent system. Pilot plant tests of commercial and specially prepared hydrated limes showed that the process is relatively insensitive to sorbent source. This can be an important economic advantage, allowing the use of the lowest cost sorbent available at a site. A pilot plant hydration study conducted in cooperation with Dravo Lime Company further indicated the relative insensitivity of process performance to lime source and to lime physical properties. Pilot plant tests indicated that the use of very small amounts of additives in the Advanced Coolside process can improve performance under some circumstances; however, additives are not necessary to exceed process performance targets.

Rosenhoover, W.A.; Maskew, J.T.; Withum, J.A.; Stouffer, M.R.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

TRAPping Modelica with Python  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This short paper introduces TRAP, a small but powerful compiler development system based on the object-oriented, dynamic language Python. Employing a very high level language as a compiler tool’s base language re...

Thilo Ernst

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Trapping and Probing Antihydrogen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Precision spectroscopy of antihydrogen is a promising path to sensitive tests of CPT symmetry. The most direct route to achieve this goal is to create and probe antihydrogen in a magnetic minimum trap. Antihydrogen has been synthesized and trapped for 1000s at CERN by the ALPHA Collaboration. Some of the challenges associated with achieving these milestones will be discussed, including mixing cryogenic positron and antiproton plasmas to synthesize antihydrogen with kinetic energy less than the trap potential of .5K. Recent experiments in which hyperfine transitions were resonantly induced with microwaves will be presented. The opportunity for gravitational measurements in traps based on detailed studies of antihydrogen dynamics will be described. The talk will conclude with a discussion future antihydrogen research that will use a new experimental apparatus, ALPHA-I.

Wurtele, Jonathan [UC Berkeley and LBNL

2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

109

Structural traps 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book contains studies of oil and gas fields that are mainly structural in nature. Stratigraphy controls the extend of the reservoir in the traps of several fields, but overall, the main trapping features within the group of fields in this volume are structural. Fields covered in this volume include: Endicott Field, Point Arguello Field, West Puerto Chiquito Field, Dukhan Field, Sendji Field, Ruston Field, Raudhatain Field, Hassi Messaoud Field, Snapper Field, Tirrawarra Field, and Sacha Field.

Foster, N.H.; Beaumont, E.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Steam Trap Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

characteristics. 2. Understand advantages and limitations of various checking methods. 3. Use more than one checking method. 4. Understand flash condensate. 5. Condensate makes more noise than steam. 6. Trouble shoot the system. 7. Review trap... or failed steam and condensate flow~' H closed to be undetected -Not always insensitive to back ground or ambient noise -Noise in electrical system if volume too high -Head set quality important -Location of probe on trap, contact force, pressure drop...

Murphy, J. J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Licensing Agreement Moves Two NETL-Patented Carbon Capture Sorbents Closer  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Licensing Agreement Moves Two NETL-Patented Carbon Capture Sorbents Licensing Agreement Moves Two NETL-Patented Carbon Capture Sorbents Closer to Commercialization Licensing Agreement Moves Two NETL-Patented Carbon Capture Sorbents Closer to Commercialization March 23, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Two new patented sorbents used for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture from coal-based power plants have moved closer to commercialization as a result of a licensing agreement between the Office of Fossil Energy's (FE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES). The nonexclusive agreement facilitates negotiations on intellectual property rights, protects proprietary information, and grants non-exclusive licensing of the new technology. Under federal regulations, NETL is authorized to obtain, maintain, and own patent protection for its

112

Licensing Agreement Moves Two NETL-Patented Carbon Capture Sorbents Closer  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Licensing Agreement Moves Two NETL-Patented Carbon Capture Sorbents Licensing Agreement Moves Two NETL-Patented Carbon Capture Sorbents Closer to Commercialization Licensing Agreement Moves Two NETL-Patented Carbon Capture Sorbents Closer to Commercialization March 23, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Two new patented sorbents used for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture from coal-based power plants have moved closer to commercialization as a result of a licensing agreement between the Office of Fossil Energy's (FE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and ADA Environmental Solutions (ADA-ES). The nonexclusive agreement facilitates negotiations on intellectual property rights, protects proprietary information, and grants non-exclusive licensing of the new technology. Under federal regulations, NETL is authorized to obtain, maintain, and own patent protection for its

113

Novel Sorbent to Clean Biogas for Fuel Cell Combined Heat and...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

develop a low-cost, high-capacity expendable sorbent to remove both sulfur species in biogas to ppb levels, making its use possible in a fuel cell CHP unit The high...

114

Analysis of Hydroxide Sorbents for CO2 Capture from Warm Syngas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Analysis of Hydroxide Sorbents for CO2 Capture from Warm Syngas ... (1, 2) However, conventional coal combustion releases large amounts of the greenhouse gas CO2 into the atmosphere. ...

David J. Couling; Ujjal Das; William H. Green

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

115

Zinc-oxide-based sorbents and processes for preparing and using same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Zinc oxide-based sorbents, and processes for preparing and using them are provided. The sorbents are preferably used to remove one or more reduced sulfur species from gas streams. The sorbents comprise an active zinc component, optionally in combination with one or more promoter components and/or one or more substantially inert components. The active zinc component is a two phase material, consisting essentially of a zinc oxide (ZnO) phase and a zinc aluminate (ZnAl.sub.2O.sub.4) phase. Each of the two phases is characterized by a relatively small crystallite size of typically less than about 500 Angstroms. Preferably the sorbents are prepared by converting a precursor mixture, comprising a precipitated zinc oxide precursor and a precipitated aluminum oxide precursor, to the two-phase, active zinc oxide containing component.

Gangwal, Santosh Kumar (Cary, NC); Turk, Brian Scott (Durham, NC); Gupta, Raghubir Prasael (Durham, NC)

2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

116

Structural traps 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book contains studies of fields that exist because of the presence of tectonic faulting. Tectonic faulting occurs because of the release of crustal stresses. Nontectonic faulting is due to other factors, such as salt solution and collapse or detachment from sedimentary loading and slumping. The traps responsible for the fields in this volume are related either directly or indirectly to a fault block. The traps of Amposta, Cano Limon, Ninian, Renqiu, and Sarir are directly related to a fault block. Brent and Magnus fields are the result of traps formed by an unconformity truncation and a tilted fault block. Mobeetie field is the result of a trap indirectly related to a fault block. The anticline associated with the trap formed by differential compaction over a basement fault block. Red Oak field comprises traps both in a fault block and in an overlying anticline formed by differential compaction over the same fault block. With the exception of Cano Limon, all the fault blocks associated with these fields formed mainly under tensional stresses. The fault block associated with Cano Limon field formed by shearing in a strike-slip environment. Another aspect described in each field study is the history of its exploration and development.

Beaumont, E.A.; Foster, N.H.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Theoretical Predictions of the thermodynamic Properties of Solid Sorbents Capture CO2 Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are establishing a theoretical procedure to identify most potential candidates of CO{sub 2} solid sorbents from a large solid material databank to meet the DOE programmatic goal for energy conversion; and to explore the optimal working conditions for the promising CO{sub 2} solid sorbents, especially from room to warm T ranges with optimal energy usage, used for both pre- and post-combustion capture technologies.

Duan, Yuhua; Sorescu, Dan; Luebke David; Pennline, Henry

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

118

NETL: Pilot Testing of a Highly Effective Pre-Combustion Sorbent-Based  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pilot Testing of a Highly Effective Pre-Combustion Sorbent-Based Carbon Capture System Pilot Testing of a Highly Effective Pre-Combustion Sorbent-Based Carbon Capture System Project No.: DE-FE0013105 TDA is developing a new sorbent-based pre-combustion carbon capture technology for integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants. The process, which was evaluated at bench-scale under a previous effort, uses an advanced physical adsorbent that selectively removes CO2 from coal derived synthesis gas (syngas) above the dew point of the gas. The sorbent consists of a mesoporous carbon grafted with surface functional groups that remove CO2 via an acid-base interaction. The reactor design will be optimized by using computational fluid dynamics and adsorption modeling to improve the pressure swing adsorption cycle sequence. The research will include: two 0.1 MWe tests with a fully-equipped prototype unit using actual synthesis gas to prove the viability of the new technology; long-term sorbent life evaluation in a bench-scale setup of 20,000 cycles; the fabrication of a pilot-scale testing unit that will contain eight sorbent reactors; and the design of a CO2 purification sub-system. The CO2 removal technology will significantly improve (3 to 4 percent) the IGCC process efficiency needed for economically viable production of power from coal.

119

Novel Sorbent-Based Process for High Temperature Trace Metal Removal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to demonstrate the efficacy of a novel sorbent can effectively remove trace metal contaminants (Hg, As, Se and Cd) from actual coal-derived synthesis gas streams at high temperature (above the dew point of the gas). The performance of TDA's sorbent has been evaluated in several field demonstrations using synthesis gas generated by laboratory and pilot-scale coal gasifiers in a state-of-the-art test skid that houses the absorbent and all auxiliary equipment for monitoring and data logging of critical operating parameters. The test skid was originally designed to treat 10,000 SCFH gas at 250 psig and 350 C, however, because of the limited gas handling capabilities of the test sites, the capacity was downsized to 500 SCFH gas flow. As part of the test program, we carried out four demonstrations at two different sites using the synthesis gas generated by the gasification of various lignites and a bituminous coal. Two of these tests were conducted at the Power Systems Demonstration Facility (PSDF) in Wilsonville, Alabama; a Falkirk (North Dakota) lignite and a high sodium lignite (the PSDF operator Southern Company did not disclose the source of this lignite) were used as the feedstock. We also carried out two other demonstrations in collaboration with the University of North Dakota Energy Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC) using synthesis gas slipstreams generated by the gasification of Sufco (Utah) bituminous coal and Oak Hills (Texas) lignite. In the PSDF tests, we showed successful operation of the test system at the conditions of interest and showed the efficacy of sorbent in removing the mercury from synthesis gas. In Test Campaign No.1, TDA sorbent reduced Hg concentration of the synthesis gas to less than 5 {micro}g/m{sup 3} and achieved over 99% Hg removal efficiency for the entire test duration. Unfortunately, due to the relatively low concentration of the trace metals in the lignite feed and as a result of the intermittent operation of the PSDF gasifier (due to the difficulties in the handling of the low quality lignite), only a small fraction of the sorbent capacity was utilized (we measured a mercury capacity of 3.27 mg/kg, which is only a fraction of the 680 mg/kg Hg capacity measured for the same sorbent used at our bench-scale evaluations at TDA). Post reaction examination of the sorbent by chemical analysis also indicated some removal As and Se (we did not detect any significant amounts of Cd in the synthesis gas or over the sorbent). The tests at UNDEERC was more successful and showed clearly that the TDA sorbent can effectively remove Hg and other trace metals (As and Se) at high temperature. The on-line gas measurements carried out by TDA and UNDEERC separately showed that TDA sorbent can achieve greater than 95% Hg removal efficiency at 260 C ({approx}200g sorbent treated more than 15,000 SCF synthesis gas). Chemical analysis conducted following the tests also showed modest amounts of As and Se accumulation in the sorbent bed (the test durations were still short to show higher capacities to these contaminants). We also evaluated the stability of the sorbent and the fate of mercury (the most volatile and unstable of the trace metal compounds). The Synthetic Ground Water Leaching Procedure Test carried out by an independent environmental laboratory showed that the mercury will remain on the sorbent once the sorbent is disposed. Based on a preliminary engineering and cost analysis, TDA estimated the cost of mercury removal from coal-derived synthesis gas as $2,995/lb (this analysis assumes that this cost also includes the cost of removal of all other trace metal contaminants). The projected cost will result in a small increase (less than 1%) in the cost of energy.

Gokhan Alptekin

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

120

Development of a Catalyst/Sorbent for Methane Reforming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project led to the further development of a combined catalyst and sorbent for improving the process technology required for converting CH{sub 4} and/or CO into H{sub 2} while simultaneously separating the CO{sub 2} byproduct all in a single step. The new material is in the form of core-in-shell pellets such that each pellet consists of a CaO core surrounded by an alumina-based shell capable of supporting a Ni catalyst. The Ni is capable of catalyzing the reactions of steam with CH{sub 4} or CO to produce H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}, whereas the CaO is capable of absorbing the CO{sub 2} as it is produced. The absorption of CO{sub 2} eliminates the reaction inhibiting effects of CO{sub 2} and provides a means for recovering the CO{sub 2} in a useful form. The present work showed that the lifecycle performance of the sorbent can be improved either by incorporating a specific amount of MgO in the material or by calcining CaO derived from limestone at 1100 C for an extended period. It also showed how to prepare a strong shell material with a large surface area required for supporting an active Ni catalyst. The method combines graded particles of {alpha}-alumina with noncrystalline alumina having a large specific surface area together with a strength promoting additive followed by controlled calcination. Two different additives produced good results: 3 {micro}m limestone and lanthanum nitrate which were converted to their respective oxides upon calcination. The oxides partially reacted with the alumina to form aluminates which probably accounted for the strength enhancing properties of the additives. The use of lanthanum made it possible to calcine the shell material at a lower temperature, which was less detrimental to the surface area, but still capable of producing a strong shell. Core-in-shell pellets made with the improved shell materials and impregnated with a Ni catalyst were used for steam reforming CH{sub 4} at different temperatures and pressures. Under all conditions tested, the CH{sub 4} conversion was large (>80%) and nearly equal to the predicted thermodynamic equilibrium level as long as CO{sub 2} was being rapidly absorbed. Similar results were obtained with both shell material additives. Limited lifecycle tests of the pellets also produced similar results that were not affected by the choice of additive. However, during each lifecycle test the period during which CO{sub 2} was rapidly absorbed declined from cycle to cycle which directly affected the corresponding period when CH{sub 4} was reformed rapidly. Therefore, the results showed a continuing need for improving the lifecycle performance of the sorbent. Core-in-shell pellets with the improved shell materials were also utilized for conducting the water gas shift reaction in a single step. Three different catalyst formulations were tested. The best results were achieved with a Ni catalyst, which proved capable of catalyzing the reaction whether CO{sub 2} was being absorbed or not. The calcined alumina shell material by itself also proved to be a very good catalyst for the reaction as long as CO{sub 2} was being fully absorbed by the core material. However, neither the alumina nor a third formulation containing Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were good catalysts for the reaction when CO{sub 2} was not absorbed by the core material. Furthermore, the Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-containing catalyst was not as good as the other two catalysts when CO{sub 2} was being absorbed.

B.H. Shans; T.D. Wheelock; Justinus Satrio; Karl Albrecht; Tanya Harris Janine Keeley; Ben Silva; Aaron Shell; Molly Lohry; Zachary Beversdorf

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multielement sorbent trap" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Development of Novel Sorbents for Uranium Extraction from Seawater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the uranium resource in terrestrial ores is limited, it is difficult to ensure a long-term sustainable nuclear energy technology. The oceans contain approximately 4.5 billion tons of uranium, which is one thousand times the amount of uranium in terrestrial ores. Development of technologies to recover the uranium from seawater would greatly improve the uranium resource availability, sustaining the fuel supply for nuclear energy. Several methods have been previously evaluated including solvent extraction, ion exchange, flotation, biomass collection, and adsorption; however, none have been found to be suitable for reasons such as cost effectiveness, long term stability, and selectivity. Recent research has focused on the amidoxime functional group as a promising candidate for uranium sorption. Polymer beads and fibers have been functionalized with amidoxime functional groups, and uranium adsorption capacities as high as 1.5 g U/kg adsorbent have recently been reported with these types of materials. As uranium concentration in seawater is only ~3 ppb, great improvements to uranium collection systems must be made in order to make uranium extraction from seawater economically feasible. This proposed research intends to develop transformative technologies for economic uranium extraction from seawater. The Lin group will design advanced porous supports by taking advantage of recent breakthroughs in nanoscience and nanotechnology and incorporate high densities of well-designed chelators into such nanoporous supports to allow selective and efficient binding of uranyl ions from seawater. Several classes of nanoporous materials, including mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs), mesoporous carbon nanoparticles (MCNs), meta-organic frameworks (MOFs), and covalent-organic frameworks (COFs), will be synthesized. Selective uranium-binding liagnds such as amidoxime will be incorporated into the nanoporous materials to afford a new generation of sorbent materials that will be evaluated for their uranium extraction efficiency. The initial testing of these materials for uranium binding will be carried out in the Lin group, but more detailed sorption studies will be carried out by Dr. Taylor-Pashow of Savannah River National Laboratory in order to obtain quantitative uranyl sorption selectivity and kinetics data for the proposed materials. The proposed nanostructured sorbent materials are expected to have higher binding capacities, enhanced extraction kinetics, optimal stripping efficiency for uranyl ions, and enhanced mechanical and chemical stabilities. This transformative research will significantly impact uranium extraction from seawater as well as benefit DOE’s efforts on environmental remediation by developing new materials and providing knowledge for enriching and sequestering ultralow concentrations of other metals.

Lin, Wenbin; Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn

2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

122

Coherence in Microchip Traps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report the coherent manipulation of internal states of neutral atoms in a magnetic microchip trap. Coherence lifetimes exceeding 1 s are observed with atoms at distances of 5–130????m from the microchip surface. The coherence lifetime in the chip trap is independent of atom-surface distance within our measurement accuracy and agrees well with the results of similar measurements in macroscopic magnetic traps. Because of the absence of surface-induced decoherence, a miniaturized atomic clock with a relative stability in the 10-13 range can be realized. For applications in quantum information processing, we propose to use microwave near fields in the proximity of chip wires to create potentials that depend on the internal state of the atoms.

Philipp Treutlein; Peter Hommelhoff; Tilo Steinmetz; Theodor W. Hänsch; Jakob Reichel

2004-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

123

THE SAP3 COMPUTER PROGRAM FOR QUANTITATIVE MULTIELEMENT ANALYSIS BY ENERGY DISPERSIVE X-RAY FLUORESCENCE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SAP3 is a dual-function FORTRAN computer program which performs peak analysis of energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectra and then quantitatively interprets the results of the multielement analysis. It was written for mono- or bi-chromatic excitation as from an isotopic or secondary excitation source, and uses the separate incoherent and coherent backscatter intensities to define the bulk sample matrix composition. This composition is used in performing fundamental-parameter matrix corrections for self-absorption, enhancement, and particle-size effects, obviating the need for specific calibrations for a given sample matrix. The generalized calibration is based on a set of thin-film sensitivities, which are stored in a library disk file and used for all sample matrices and thicknesses. Peak overlap factors are also determined from the thin-film standards, and are stored in the library for calculating peak overlap corrections. A detailed description is given of the algorithms and program logic, and the program listing and flow charts are also provided. An auxiliary program, SPCAL, is also given for use in calibrating the backscatter intensities. SAP3 provides numerous analysis options via seventeen control switches which give flexibility in performing the calculations best suited to the sample and the user needs. User input may be limited to the name of the library, the analysis livetime, and the spectrum filename and location. Output includes all peak analysis information, matrix correction factors, and element concentrations, uncertainties and detection limits. Twenty-four elements are typically determined from a 1024-channel spectrum in one-to-two minutes using a PDP-11/34 computer operating under RSX-11M.

Nielson,, K. K.; Sanders,, R. W.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Polyacrylonitrile-Chalcogel Hybrid Sorbents for Radioiodine Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Powders of a Sn2S3 chalcogen-based aerogel (chalcogel) were combined with powdered polyacrylonitrile (PAN) in different mass ratios (SnS33, SnS50, and SnS70 in mass% of chalcogel), dissolved into dimethyl sulfoxide, and dropped into deionized water to form pellets of a porous PAN-chalcogel hybrid material. Pellets of these hybrid sorbents, along with pure powdered (SnSp) and granular (SnSg) forms of the chalcogel, were then used to adsorb iodine gas under both concentrated and dilute conditions. Both the SnSp and SnSg chalcogels showed very high maximum iodine loadings at 67.2 and 68.3 mass%. The maximum iodine loadings in the SnS33 and SnS50 were high at 32.8 and 53.5 mass%. In all cases, X-ray diffraction results showed the formation of Sn-I phases of SnI4 and SnI4(S8)2 revealing that the iodine binding in these materials is mainly due to a chemisorption process although some evidence also exists that supports a physisorption process.

Riley, Brian J.; Pierce, David A.; Chun, Jaehun; Matyas, Josef; Lepry, William C.; Garn, Troy; Law, Jack; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

2014-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

125

Polyacrylonitrile-Chalcogel Hybrid Sorbents for Radioiodine Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Powders of a Sn2S3 chalcogen-based aerogel (chalcogel) were combined with powdered polyacrylonitrile (PAN) in different mass ratios (SnS33, SnS50, and SnS70; # = mass% of chalcogel), dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide, and added dropwise to deionized water to form pellets of a porous PAN-chalcogel hybrid material. These pellets, along with pure powdered (SnSp) and granular (SnSg) forms of the chalcogel, were then used to capture iodine gas under both dynamic (dilute) and static (concentrated) conditions. Both SnSp and SnSg chalcogels showed very high iodine loadings at 67.2 and 68.3 mass%, respectively. The SnS50 hybrid sorbent demonstrated a high, although slightly reduced, maximum iodine loading (53.5 mass%) with greatly improved mechanical rigidity. In all cases, X-ray diffraction results showed the formation of crystalline SnI4 and SnI4(S8)2, revealing that the iodine binding in these materials is mainly due to a chemisorption process, although a small amount of physisorption was observed.

Brian J. Riley; David A. Pierce; Jaehun Chun; Josef Matyas; William C. Lepry; Troy G. Garn; Jack D. Law; Mercouri G. Kanatzidis

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Asymmetric ion trap  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion trap having two end cap electrodes disposed asymmetrically about a center of a ring electrode is disclosed. The inner surface of the end cap electrodes are conformed to an asymmetric pair of equipotential lines of the harmonic formed by the application of voltages to the electrodes. The asymmetry of the end cap electrodes allows ejection of charged species through the closer of the two electrodes which in turn allows for simultaneously detecting anions and cations expelled from the ion trap through the use of two detectors charged with opposite polarity. 4 figs.

Barlow, S.E.; Alexander, M.L.; Follansbee, J.C.

1997-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

127

Asymmetric ion trap  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion trap having two end cap electrodes disposed asymmetrically about a center of a ring electrode. The inner surface of the end cap electrodes are conformed to an asymmetric pair of equipotential lines of the harmonic formed by the application of voltages to the electrodes. The asymmetry of the end cap electrodes allows ejection of charged species through the closer of the two electrodes which in turn allows for simultaneously detecting anions and cations expelled from the ion trap through the use of two detectors charged with opposite polarity.

Barlow, Stephan E. (Richland, WA); Alexander, Michael L. (Richland, WA); Follansbee, James C. (Pasco, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

INVESTIGATION OF MIXED METAL SORBENT/CATALYSTS FOR THE SIMULTANEOUS REMOVAL OF SULFUR AND NITROGEN OXIDES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} using a regenerable solid sorbent will constitute an important improvement over the use of separate processes for the removal of these two pollutants from stack gases and possibly eliminate several shortcomings of the individual SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal operations. The work done at PETC and the DOE-funded investigation of the investigators on the sulfation and regeneration of alumina-supported cerium oxide sorbents have shown that they can perform well at relatively high temperatures (823-900 K) as regenerable desulfurization sorbents. Survey of the recent literature shows that addition of copper oxide to ceria lowers the sulfation temperature of ceria down to 773 K, sulfated ceria-based sorbents can function as selective SCR catalysts even at elevated temperatures, SO{sub 2} can be directly reduced to sulfur by CO on CuO-ceria catalysts, and ceria-based catalysts may have a potential for selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} by methane. These observations indicate a possibility of developing a ceria-based sorbent/catalyst which can remove both SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from flue gases within a relatively wide temperature window, produce significant amounts of elemental sulfur during regeneration, and use methane for the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. The objective of this research is to conduct kinetic and parametric studies of the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} with NH{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} over alumina-supported cerium oxide and copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbent/catalysts; investigate SO{sub 2} removal at lower temperatures by supported copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbents; and investigate the possibility of elemental sulfur production during regeneration with CO or with CH{sub 4}-air mixtures.

Ates Akyurtlu; Jale F. Akyurtlu

2000-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

129

INVESTIGATION OF MIXED METAL SORBENT/CATALYSTS FOR THE SIMULTANEOUS REMOVAL OF SULFUR AND NITROGEN OXIDES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} using a regenerable solid sorbent will constitute an important improvement over the use of separate processes for the removal of these two pollutants from stack gases and possibly eliminate several shortcomings of the individual SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal operations. The work done at PETC and the DOE-funded research of the investigators on the sulfation and regeneration of alumina-supported cerium oxide sorbents have shown that they can perform well at relatively high temperatures (823-900 K) as regenerable desulfurization sorbents. Survey of the recent literature shows that addition of copper oxide to ceria lowers the sulfation temperature of ceria down to 773 K, sulfated ceria-based sorbents can function as selective SCR catalysts even at elevated temperatures, SO{sub 2} can be directly reduced to sulfur by CO on CuO-ceria catalysts, and ceria-based catalysts may have a potential for selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} by methane. These observations indicate a possibility of developing a ceria-based sorbent/catalyst which can remove both SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from flue gases within a relatively wide temperature window, produce significant amounts of elemental sulfur during regeneration, and use methane for the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. The objective of this research is to conduct kinetic and parametric studies of the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} with NH{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} over alumina-supported cerium oxide and copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbent/catalysts; investigate SO{sub 2} removal at lower temperatures by supported copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbents; and investigate the possibility of elemental sulfur production during regeneration with CO or with CH{sub 4} air mixtures.

Ates Akyurtlu; Jale F. Akyurtlu

1999-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

130

Investigation of mixed metal sorbent/catalysts for the simultaneous removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} using a regenerable solid sorbent will constitute an important improvement over the use of separate processes for the removal of these two pollutants from stack gases and possibly eliminate several shortcomings of the individual SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal operations. The work done at PETC and the DOE-funded investigation of the investigators on the sulfation and regeneration of alumina-supported cerium oxide sorbents have shown that they can perform well at relatively high temperatures (823-900 K) as regenerable desulfurization sorbents. Survey of the recent literature shows that addition of copper oxide to ceria lowers the sulfation temperature of ceria down to 773 K, sulfated ceria-based sorbents can function as selective SCR catalysts even at elevated temperatures, SO{sub 2} can be directly reduced to sulfur by CO on CuO-ceria catalysts, and ceria-based catalysts may have a potential for selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} by methane. These observations indicate a possibility of developing a ceria-based sorbent/catalyst which can remove both SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from flue gases within a relatively wide temperature window, produce significant amounts of elemental sulfur during regeneration, and use methane for the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. The objective of this research is to conduct kinetic and parametric studies of the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} with NH{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} over alumina-supported cerium oxide and copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbent/catalysts; investigate SO{sub 2} removal at lower temperatures by supported copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbents; and investigate the possibility of elemental sulfur production during regeneration with CO or with CH{sub 4}-air mixtures.

Akyurtlu, A.; Akyurtlu, J.F.

1999-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

131

Enhanced durability of high-temperature desulfurization sorbents for moving-bed applications. Option 2 Program: Development and testing of zinc titanate sorbents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the most advantageous configurations of the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power system is coupling it with a hot gas cleanup for the more efficient production of electric power in an environmentally acceptable manner. In conventional gasification cleanup systems, closely heat exchangers are necessary to cool down the fuel gases for cleaning, sometimes as low as 200--300{degree}F, and to reheat the gases prior to injection into the turbine. The result is significant losses in efficiency for the overall power cycle. High-temperature coal gas cleanup in the IGCC system can be operated near 1000{degree}F or higher, i.e., at conditions compatible with the gasifier and turbine components, resulting is a more efficient overall system. GE is developing a moving-bed, high-temperature desulfurization system for IGCC power systems in which mixed-metal oxides are currently being used as desulfurization sorbents. The objective of this contract is to identify and test fabrication methods and sorbent chemical compositions that enhance the long-term chemical reactivity and mechanical durability of zinc ferrite and other novel sorbents for moving-bed, high-temperature desulfurization of coal-derived gases. Zinc ferrite was studied under the base program of this contract. In the next phase of this program novel sorbents, particularly zinc titanate-based sorbents, are being studied under the remaining optional programs. This topical report summarizes only the work performed under the Option 2 program. In the course of carrying out the program, more than 25 zinc titanate formulations have been prepared and characterized to identify formulations exhibiting enhanced properties over the baseline zinc titanate formulation selected by the US Department of Energy.

Ayala, R.E.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Venus Fly Trap Experiment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Venus Fly Trap Experiment Venus Fly Trap Experiment Name: Jeremy Bailey Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: My name is Jeremy Bailey, and I am a student of Dorseyville Middle School. I have been working on a science project about Venus' Fly Traps. A recent addition to the project involved designing an experiment about something I found interesting about them. However, I don't know where to get them or how to grow them in the moderate climate of Pittsburgh. Also, I don't know how a successful experiment could be designed. Replies: Jeremy, I believe Venus Fly traps can be found 'in the wild' in the coastal floodplain of the Carolinas. As far as where to buy them, look in the phonebook yellow pages under plants or houseplants and do some calling. I live in eastern Pennsylvania, and over here they even sell them in hardware stores like Hechinger's and Home Depot (in their garden departments). I don't think you will have luck trying to grow them outside, our winters here are a bit too harsh for them. From what I recall they require substantial moisture and more moderate climes. You might try looking for houseplant books at your local library for more detailed information.

133

Nuclear Physics with trapped  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Physics with trapped atoms and ions #12;2/2/2013Dan Melconian #12;2/2/2013Dan Melconian Outline · Scope and applications of nuclear physics precision frontier compliments LHC properties and aquifers in the Sahara #12;2/2/2013Dan Melconian What is Nuclear Physics? · Began with the study

Boas, Harold P.

134

NETL: A Low-Cost, High-Capacity Regenerable Sorbent for CO2 Capture From  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Low Cost, High Capacity Regenerable Sorbent for CO2 Capture from Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants A Low Cost, High Capacity Regenerable Sorbent for CO2 Capture from Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants Project No.: DE-FE0007580 TDA Research, Inc is developing a low cost, high capacity CO2 adsorbent and demonstrating its technical and economic viability for post-combustion CO2 capture for existing pulverized coal-fired power plants. TDA is using an advanced physical adsorbent to selectively remove CO2 from flue gas. The sorbent exhibits a much higher affinity to adsorb CO2 than N2, H2O or O2, enabling effective CO2 separation from the flue gas. The sorbent binds CO2 more strongly than common adsorbents, providing the chemical potential needed to remove the CO2, however, because CO2 does not form a true covalent bond with the surface sites, regeneration can be carried out with only a small energy input. The heat input to regenerate the sorbent is only 4.9 kcal per mol of CO2, which is much lower than that for chemical absorbents or amine based solvents.

135

Hot coal gas desulfurization with manganese-based sorbents. Final report, September 1992--December 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of much current work being performed by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the Department of Energy on hot coal-derived fuel gas desulfurization is in the use of zinc-based sorbents. METC has shown interest in formulating and testing manganese-based pellets as alternative effective sulfur sorbents in the 700 to 1200{degree}C temperature range. To substantiate the potential superiority of Mn-based pellets, a systematic approach toward the evaluation of the desulfurizing power of single-metal sorbents is developed based on thermodynamic considerations. This novel procedure considered several metal-based sorbents and singled out manganese oxide as a prime candidate sorbent capable of being utilized under a wide temperature range, irrespective of the reducing power (determined by CO{sub 2}/CO ratio) of the fuel gas. Then, the thermodynamic feasibility of using Mn-based pellets for the removal of H{sub 2}S from hot-coal derived fuel gases, and the subsequent oxidative regeneration of loaded (sulfided) pellets was established. It was concluded that MnO is the stable form of manganese for virtually all commercially available coal-derived fuel gases. In addition, the objective of reducing the H{sub 2}S concentration below 150 ppMv to satisfy the integrated gasification combined cycle system requirement was shown to be thermodynamically feasible. A novel process is developed for the manufacture of Mn-based spherical pellets which have the desired physical and chemical characteristics required.

Hepworth, M.T.; Slimane, R.B.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Sorbent utilization prediction methodology: sulfur control in fluidized-bed combustors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Government has embarked on an ambitious program to develop and commercialize technologies to efficiently extract energy from coal in an environmentally acceptable manner. One of the more promising new technologies for steam and power generation is the fluidized-bed combustion of coal. In this process, coal is burned in a fluidized bed composed mainly of calcined limestone sorbent. The calcium oxide reacts chemically to capture the sulfur dioxide formed during the combustion and to maintain the stack gas sulfur emissions at acceptable levels. The spent sulfur sorbent, containing calcium sulfate, is a dry solid that can be disposed of along with coal ash or potentially used. Other major advantages of fluidized-bed combustion are the reduction in nitrogen oxide emissions because of the relatively low combustion temperatures, the capability of burning wide varieties of fuel, the high carbon combustion efficiencies, and the high heat-transfer coefficients. A key to the widespread commercialization of fluidized-bed technology is the ability to accurately predict the amount of sulfur that will be captured by a given sorbent. This handbook meets this need by providing a simple, yet reliable, user-oriented methodology (the ANL method) that allows performance of a sorbent to be predicted. The methodology is based on only three essential sorbent parameters, each of which can be readily obtained from standardized laboratory tests. These standard tests and the subsequent method of data reduction are described in detail.

Fee, D.C.; Wilson, W.I.; Shearer, J.A.; Smith, G.W.; Lenc, J.F.; Fan, L.S.; Myles, K.M.; Johnson, I.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Theoretical Screening of Solid Sorbents for CO{sub 2} Capture Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work reported in this presentation was establishing a theoretical procedure to identify most potential candidates of CO{sub 2} solid sorbents from a large solid material databank; and to explore the optimal working conditions for the promised CO{sub 2} solid sorbents and provide guidelines to the experimentalists. Our methodology can predict thermodynamic properties of solid materials and their CO{sub 2} capture reactions. Single solid may not satisfy the industrial operating conditions as CO{sub 2} sorbent, however, by mixing two or more solids, the new formed solid may satisfy the industrial needs. By exploring series of lithium silicates with different Li{sub 2}O/SiO{sub 2} ratio, we found that with decreasing Li{sub 2}O/SiO{sub 2} ratio the corresponding silicate has a lower turnover temperature and vice versa. Compared to pure MgO, the Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and CaCO{sub 3} promoted MgO sorbent has a higher turnover T. These results provide guidelines to synthesize sorbent materials by mixing different solids with different ratio.

Duan, Y [NETL

2013-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

138

Novel regenerable magnesium hydroxide sorbents for CO2 capture at warm gas temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel sorbent consisting of Mg(OH)2 was developed for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture at 200-315 °C suitable for CO2 capture applications such as coal gasification systems. Thermodynamic analysis conducted with the FactSage software package indicated that the Mg(OH)2 sorbent system is highly favorable for CO2 capture up to 400 °C at 30 atm. MgCO3 formed during sorption decomposes to release CO2 at temperatures as low as 375 °C up to 20 atm. MgO rehydroxylation to form Mg(OH)2 is possible at temperatures up to 300 °C at 20 atm. The experimental data show that the sorbent is regenerable at 375 °C at high pressure and that steam does not affect the sorbent performance. A multicycle test conducted in a high-pressure fixed-bed flow reactor at 200 °C with 28% CO2 showed stable reactivity during the cyclic tests. The capture capacity also increased with increasing pressure. The sorbent is unique because it exhibits a high CO2 capture capacity of more than 3 mol/kg at 200 °C and also is regenerable at a low temperature of 375 °C and high pressure. High-pressure regeneration is advantageous because the CO2 compression costs required for sequestration can be reduced.

Siriwardane, R.; Stevens, R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Long-Term Demonstration of Sorbent Enhancement Additive Technology for Mercury Control  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Long-Term DemonsTraTion of sorbenT Long-Term DemonsTraTion of sorbenT enhancemenT aDDiTive TechnoLogy for mercury conTroL Background The 2005 Clean Air Mercury Rule will require significant reductions in mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. The combustion of subbituminous coals typically results in higher fractions of elemental mercury emissions than the combustion of bituminous coals. This complicates mercury capture efforts, particularly for technologies using powdered activated carbon (PAC) injection, because elemental mercury is not readily captured by PAC injection alone. In short, unmodified PACs are better suited for bituminous coals than for subbituminous coals. Various proprietary sorbent enhancement additives (SEA) have been developed to increase the mercury reactivity of PACs, and perhaps fly

140

Using high temperature baghouses to enhance desulfurization following economizer sorbent injection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to explore the potential of using high temperature baghouses to enhance SO{sub 2} removal following upstream sorbent injection, an integrated two-stage reactor system has been built. It consists of an injection stage and a filtration stage. Distinct from one-stage fixed-bed reactors, sorbent particles in this system are initially converted under controlled injection conditions before entering the filtration reactor chamber. By the aid of the system, several unique features regarding the gas-solid reactions in the baghouse after economizer zone sorbent injection have been revealed. Results have shown that the appropriate usage of a high temperature baghouse may substantially enhance the performance of the process. The further SO{sub 2} removal in the baghouse is comprehensively affected by both the conditions in the injection zone and those in the baghouse.

Li, G.; Keener, T.C. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multielement sorbent trap" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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141

Highly Attrition Resistant Zinc Oxide-Based Sorbents for H2S Removal by Spray Drying Technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Primary issues for the fluidized-bed/transport reactor process are high attrition resistant sorbent, its high sorption capacity and regenerability, durability, and cost. The overall objective of this project is the development of a superior attrition resistant zinc oxide-based sorbent for hot gas cleanup in integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC). Sorbents applicable to a fluidized-bed hot gas desulfurization process must have a high attrition resistance to withstand the fast solid circulation between a desulfurizer and a regenerator, fast kinetic reactions, and high sulfur sorption capacity. The oxidative regeneration of zinc-based sorbent usually initiated at greater than 600 C with highly exothermic nature causing deactivation of sorbent as well as complication of sulfidation process by side reaction. Focusing on solving the sorbent attrition and regenerability of zinc oxide-based sorbent, we have adapted multi-binder matrices and direct incorporation of regeneration promoter. The sorbent forming was done with a spray drying technique that is easily scalable to commercial quantity.

Ryu, C.K.; Lee, J.B.; Ahn, D.H.; Kim, J.J.; Yi, C.K.

2002-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

142

Partially Sulfated Lime-Fly Ash Sorbents Activated by Water or Steam for SO2 Removal at a Medium Temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Partially Sulfated Lime-Fly Ash Sorbents Activated by Water or Steam for SO2 Removal at a Medium Temperature ... The low utilization of calcium-based sorbent is caused by the formation of calcium sulfite or sulfate, which have larger molar volumes than CaO or Ca(OH)2. ... ignition?loss ...

Liming Shi; Xuchang Xu

2005-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

143

Enhancing the use of coals by gas reburning-sorbent injection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Clean Coal Technology project will demonstrate a combination of two developed technologies to reduce both NO[sub x] and SO[sub x] emissions: gas reburning and calcium based dry sorbent injection. The demonstrations will be conducted on two pre-NSPS utility boilers representative of the US boilers which contribute significantly to the inventory of acid rain precursor emissions: tangentially and cyclone fired units. Gas reburning is a combustion modification technique that consists of firing 80--85 percent of the fuel (corresponding to the total heat release) in the lower furnace. Reduction of NO[sub x] to molecular nitrogen (N[sub 2]) is accomplished via the downstream injection of the remaining fuel requirement in the form of natural gas (which also reduces the total SO[sub x] emissions). In a third stage, burnout air is injected at lower temperatures in the upper furnace to complete the combustion process without generating significant additional NO[sub x]. Dry sorbent injection consists of injecting calcium based sorbents (such as limestone, dolomite, or hydrated lime) into the combustion products. For sulfation of the sorbent to CaSO[sub 4], an injection temperature of about 1230[degrees]C is optimum, but calcium-sulfur reactions can also take place at lower temperatures. Thus, the sorbent may be injected at different locations, such as with the burnout air, at the exit from the superheater, or into the ducting downstream of the air heater with H[sub 2]0 added for humidification. The calcium sulfate or sulfite products are collected together with unreacted sorbent fly ash by the electrostatic precipitator. The specific goal of this project is to demonstrate NO[sub x] and SO[sub x] emission reductions of 60 percent and 50 percent, respectively, on two coal fired utility boilers having the design characteristics mentioned above.

Not Available

1992-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

144

CO{sub 2} Capture from Flue Gas Using Solid Molecular Basket Sorbents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop a new generation of solid, regenerable polymeric molecular basket sorbent (MBS) for more cost-efficient capture and separation of CO{sub 2} from flue gas of coal-fired power plants. The primary goal is to develop a cost-effective MBS sorbent with better thermal stability. To improve the cost-effectiveness of MBS, we have explored commercially available and inexpensive support to replace the more expensive mesoporous molecular sieves like MCM-41 and SBA- 15. In addition, we have developed some advanced sorbent materials with 3D pore structure such as hexagonal mesoporous silica (HMS) to improve the CO{sub 2} working capacity of MBS, which can also reduce the cost for the whole CO{sub 2} capture process. During the project duration, the concern regarding the desorption rate of MBS sorbents has been raised, because lower desorption rate increases the desorption time for complete regeneration of the sorbent which in turn leads to a lower working capacity if the regeneration time is limited. Thus, the improvement in the thermal stability of MBS became a vital task for later part of this project. The improvement in the thermal stability was performed via increasing the polymer density either using higher molecular weight PEI or PEI cross-linking with an organic compound. Moreover, we have used the computational approach to estimate the interaction of CO{sub 2} with different MBSs for the fundamental understanding of CO{sub 2} sorption, which may benefit the development, design and modification of the sorbents and the process.

Fillerup, Eric; Zhang, Zhonghua; Peduzzi, Emanuela; Wang, Dongxiang; Guo, Jiahua; Ma, Xiaoliang; Wang, Xiaoxing; Song, Chunshan

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

145

Stabilization of spent sorbents from coal gasification. Final technical report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this investigation was to determine the rates of reactions involving partially sulfided dolomite and oxygen, which is needed for the design of the reactor system for the stabilization of sulfide-containing solid wastes from gasification of high sulfur coals. To achieve this objective, samples of partially sulfided dolomite were reacted with oxygen at a variety of operating conditions in a fluidized-bed reactor. The effect of external diffusion was eliminated by using small quantities of the sorbent and maintaining a high flow rate of the reactant gas. The reacted sorbents were analyzed to determine the extent of conversion as a function of operating variables including sorbent particle size, reaction temperature and pressure, and oxygen concentration. The results of sulfation tests indicate that the rate of reaction increases with increasing temperature, increasing oxygen partial pressure, and decreasing sorbent particle size. The rate of the sulfation reaction can be described by a diffuse interface model where both chemical reaction and intraparticle diffusion control the reaction rate. The kinetic model of the sulfation reaction was used to determine the requirements for the reactor system, i.e., reactor size and operating conditions, for successful stabilization of sulfide-containing solid wastes from gasification of high sulfur coals (with in-bed desulfurization using calcium based sorbents). The results indicate that the rate of reaction is fast enough to allow essentially complete sulfation in reactors with acceptable dimensions. The optimum sulfation temperature appears to be around 800{degrees}C for high pressure as well as atmospheric stabilization of the spent sorbents.

Abbasian, J.; Hill, A.H.; Rue, D.M.; Wangerow, J.R. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

146

DEVELOPMENT OF A HYDROGEN MORDENITE SORBENT FOR THE CAPTURE OF KRYPTON FROM USED NUCLEAR FUEL REPROCESSING OFF-GAS STREAMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel new sorbent for the separation of krypton from off-gas streams resulting from the reprocessing of used nuclear fuel has been developed and evaluated. A hydrogen mordenite powder was successfully incorporated into a macroporous polymer binder and formed into spherical beads. The engineered form sorbent retained the characteristic surface area and microporosity indicative of mordenite powder. The sorbent was evaluated for krypton adsorption capacities utilizing thermal swing operations achieving capacities of 100 mmol of krypton per kilogram of sorbent at a temperature of 191 K. A krypton adsorption isotherm was also obtained at 191 K with varying krypton feed gas concentrations. Adsorption/desorption cycling effects were also evaluated with results indicating that the sorbent experienced no decrease in krypton capacity throughout testing.

Mitchell Greenhalgh; Troy G. Garn; Jack D. Law

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Magnetic trap for thulium atoms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the first time ultra-cold thulium atoms were trapped in a magnetic quadrupole trap with a small field gradient (20 Gs cm{sup -1}). The atoms were loaded from a cloud containing 4x10{sup 5} atoms that were preliminarily cooled in a magneto-optical trap to the sub-Doppler temperature of 80 {mu}K. As many as 4x10{sup 4} atoms were trapped in the magnetic trap at the temperature of 40 {mu}K. By the character of trap population decay the lifetime of atoms was determined (0.5 s) and an upper estimate was obtained for the rate constant of inelastic binary collisions for spin-polarised thulium atoms in the ground state (g{sub in} < 10{sup -11}cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}). (magnetic traps)

Sukachev, D D; Sokolov, A V; Chebakov, K A; Akimov, A V; Kolachevskii, N N; Sorokin, Vadim N [P N Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

148

Regenerable sorbents for CO.sub.2 capture from moderate and high temperature gas streams  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for making a granular sorbent to capture carbon dioxide from gas streams comprising homogeneously mixing an alkali metal oxide, alkali metal hydroxide, alkaline earth metal oxide, alkaline earth metal hydroxide, alkali titanate, alkali zirconate, alkali silicate and combinations thereof with a binder selected from the group consisting of sodium ortho silicate, calcium sulfate dihydrate (CaSO.sub.4.2H.sub.2O), alkali silicates, calcium aluminate, bentonite, inorganic clays and organic clays and combinations thereof and water; drying the mixture and placing the sorbent in a container permeable to a gas stream.

Siriwardane, Ranjani V. (Morgantown, WV)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

High-Performance Sorbents for Carbon Dioxide Capture from Air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project has focused on capture of CO{sub 2} from ambient air (“air capture”). If this process is technically and economically feasible, it could potentially contribute to net reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions in ways that are complementary to better developed techniques for CO{sub 2} from concentrated point sources. We focused on cyclic adsorption processes for CO{sub 2} capture from air in which the entire cycle is performed at moderate temperatures. The project involved both experimental studies of sorbent materials and process level modeling of cyclic air capture processes. In our experimental work, a series of amine-functionalized silica adsorbents were prepared and characterized to determine the impact of molecular architecture on CO{sub 2} capture. Some key findings were: • Amine functionalized silicas can be prepared with high enough CO{sub 2} capacities under ambient conditions to merit consideration for use in air capture processes. • Primary amines are better candidates for CO{sub 2} capture than secondary or tertiary amines, both in terms of amine efficiency for CO{sub 2} adsorption and enhanced water affinity. • Mechanistic understanding of degradation of these materials can enable control of molecular architecture to significantly improve material stability. Our process modeling work provided the first publically available cost and energy estimates for cyclic adsorption processes for air capture of CO{sub 2}. Some key findings were: • Cycles based on diurnal ambient heating and cooling cannot yield useful purities or amounts of captured CO{sub 2}. • Cycles based on steam desorption at 110 oC can yield CO{sub 2} purities of ~88%. • The energy requirements for cycles using steam desorption are dominated by needs for thermal input, which results in lower costs than energy input in the form of electricity. Cyclic processes with operational costs of less than $100 tCO{sub 2}-net were described, and these results point to process and material improvements that could substantially reduce these costs. The most critical conclusions from our work are that (i) CO{sub 2} capture from ambient air using moderate temperature cyclic adsorption processes is technically feasible and (ii) the operational costs of realistic versions of these processes are moderate enough to encourage future development of this technology. Because of the very modest net investment that has been made in R&D associated with this approach from all sources worldwide (relative to the massive public and private investment that has been made in technologies for CO{sub 2} from concentrated point sources), our results strongly suggest that continued development of air capture is justified.

Sholl, David; Jones, Christopher

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

150

Geochemical and Mineralogical Investigation of Uranium in Multi–element Contaminated, Organic–rich Subsurface Sediment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alluvial sediments characterized by an abundance of refractory or lignitic organic carbon compounds and reduced Fe and S bearing mineral phases have been identified through drilling activities at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site at Rifle, CO. Regions of the subsurface from which such sediments are derived are referred to as Naturally Reduced Zones (NRZ). We conducted a study with NRZ sediments with the objective to: i.) Characterize solid phase contamination of U and other co-contaminants; ii.) Document the occurrence of potential U host minerals; iii.) Determine U valence state and micron scale spatial association with co-contaminants. Macroscopic (wet chemical batch extractions and a column experiment), microscopic (SEM-EDS), and spectroscopic (Mössbauer, µ-XRF and XANES) techniques were employed. Results showed that sediments’ solid phase had significant concentrations of U, S, As, Zn, V, Cr, Cu and Se, and a remarkable assortment of potential U hosts (sorbents and/or electron donors), such as Fe oxides (hematite, magnetite, Al-substituted goethite), siderite, reduced Fe(II) bearing clays, sulfides of different types, Zn sulfide framboids and multi – element sulfides. Multi-contaminants, micron size (ca. 5 to 30 µm) areas of mainly U(IV) and some U(VI), and/or other electron scavengers or donors such as Se, As, Cr, and V were discovered in the sediments, suggesting complex micron-scale system responses to transient redox conditions, and different extent and rates of competing U redox reactions than those of single contaminant systems. Collectively, the results improve our understanding and ability to predict U and NRZ’s complex behavior and will delineate future research directions to further study both the natural attenuation and persistence of contaminant plumes and their contribution to groundwater contamination.

Qafoku, Nikolla; Gartman, Brandy N.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Arey, Bruce W.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Mouser, Paula J.; Heald, Steve M.; Bargar, John R.; Janot, Noemie; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Long, Philip E.

2014-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

151

Geographic determination of coffee beans using multi-element analysis and isotope ratios of boron and strontium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study aims to evaluate the feasibility of using chemical and isotopic compositions of coffee beans to identify their geographic origins. Twenty-one Coffea arabica beans collected from 14 countries in 3 major coffee-producing regions, Africa, America and Asia, were analysed for multi-element of B, Rb, Sr, Ba, Fe, Mn and Zn, as well as isotopic compositions of B and Sr. Our results demonstrate that the geographic origin of coffee beans could be classified based on concentrations of Rb, Sr and Ba. However, the isotope ratios of B and Sr provide more sensitive information for the growth localities. Combined with literature data, this study indicates that B and Sr isotopes are excellent indicators of the origin of coffee beans.

Hou-Chun Liu; Chen-Feng You; Chiou-Yun Chen; Yu-Ching Liu; Ming-Tsung Chung

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

NETL: SO2-Resistent Immobilized Amine Sorbents for CO2 Capture  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control SO2-Resistent Immobilized Amine Sorbents for CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0001780 DOE is partnering with the University of Akron (Akron) to conduct research and training to develop an effective solid amine sorbent for large scale post-combustion CO2 capture from power plant flue gas. Sorbent materials developed by Akron consist of immobilized carbon and hydrogen structures (paraffin) distributed inside of the amine pores and aromatic amines located on the external surface and the pore mouth of the sorbent. The immobilized paraffinic amines have been shown to display excellent CO2 capture capacity by adsorbing CO2 at temperatures below 55 °C and releasing it at temperatures between 80-120 °C. This effort will focus on increasing scientific understanding of the chemical and physical principles affecting amines deposited on a series of porous solids that generally have large pore space, high surface area, and/or high thermal conductivity.

153

Amino Acid-Functionalized Ionic Liquid Solid Sorbents for Post-Combustion Carbon Capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Amino Acid-Functionalized Ionic Liquid Solid Sorbents for Post-Combustion Carbon Capture ... Amino acid ionic liquids (AAILs) are potential green substitutes of aqueous amine solutions for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture. ... However, the viscous nature of AAILs greatly hinders their further development in CO2 capture applications. ...

Xianfeng Wang; Novruz G. Akhmedov; Yuhua Duan; David Luebke; David Hopkinson; Bingyun Li

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

154

Screening Evaluation of Alternate Sorbents and Methods for Strontium and Actinide Removal from Alkaline Salt Solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes results from screening tests evaluating strontium and actinide removal characteristics of three different titanium-containing sorbents, crystalline silicotitanate (CST) manufactured by UPO, SrTreat(R) offered by Fortum Engineering, sodium nonatitanate developed by Clearfield and coworkers at Texas A and M University and offered commercially by Honeywell. We also report results from an alternate removal method, coprecipitation.

Hobbs, D.T.

2001-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

155

A Regenerable Calcium-Based Core-in-Shell Sorbent for Desulfurizing Hot Coal Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Other materials used in the sorbent formulations included reagent-grade calcium carbonate from the Fisher Co. and calcium sulfate hemihydrate obtained as commercial-grade plaster of Paris. ... Once coated, the pellets were allowed to tumble for 2.0 h to consolidate the coating. ...

T. T. Akiti, Jr.; K. P. Constant; L. K. Doraiswamy; T. D. Wheelock

2002-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

156

Microporous Metal Organic Materials: Promising Candidates as Sorbents for Hydrogen Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microporous Metal Organic Materials: Promising Candidates as Sorbents for Hydrogen Storage Long Pan coordination structures represent a promising new entry to the field of hydrogen storage materials.2 To fully that effectively store hydrogen are needed for use in fuel cell powered vehicles. Among the various candidate

Li, Jing

157

The Elimination of Steam Traps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

claims and misinformation gener ated by over thirty-six steam trap manufacturers in the United States alone. A PARTIAL LIST OF STEAM TRAP MANUFACTURERS AAF GESTRA ANDERSON HIROSS ARMSTRONG HOFFMAN BARNES &JONES HONEYWELL BRAUKMANN BESTOBELL... removal had been devised and these same methods, with minor variations, are employed today. The inverted bucket trap was in vented in 1910 by Otto Arner, a friend of Adam Armstrong. Armstrong began his business career by making bicycle spokes...

Dickman, F.

158

Inspect and Repair Steam Traps  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This tip sheet on inspecting and repairing steam traps provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

159

Trapping triply ionized thorium isotopes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Cold trapped ions have many applications in quantum information science and precision metrology. In this thesis, we present progress toward two objectives involving ions confined… (more)

Churchill, Layne Russell

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print In photoelectron spectroscopy experiments performed at the ALS, a group of researchers has found that electronic transitions normally...

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161

A Low Cost, High Capacity Regenerable Sorbent for Pre-combustion CO{sub 2} Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the proposed research is to develop a low cost, high capacity CO{sub 2} sorbent and demonstrate its technical and economic viability for pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. The specific objectives supporting our research plan were to optimize the chemical structure and physical properties of the sorbent, scale-up its production using high throughput manufacturing equipment and bulk raw materials and then evaluate its performance, first in bench-scale experiments and then in slipstream tests using actual coal-derived synthesis gas. One of the objectives of the laboratory-scale evaluations was to demonstrate the life and durability of the sorbent for over 10,000 cycles and to assess the impact of contaminants (such as sulfur) on its performance. In the field tests, our objective was to demonstrate the operation of the sorbent using actual coal-derived synthesis gas streams generated by air-blown and oxygen-blown commercial and pilot-scale coal gasifiers (the CO{sub 2} partial pressure in these gas streams is significantly different, which directly impacts the operating conditions hence the performance of the sorbent). To support the field demonstration work, TDA collaborated with Phillips 66 and Southern Company to carry out two separate field tests using actual coal-derived synthesis gas at the Wabash River IGCC Power Plant in Terre Haute, IN and the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) in Wilsonville, AL. In collaboration with the University of California, Irvine (UCI), a detailed engineering and economic analysis for the new CO{sub 2} capture system was also proposed to be carried out using Aspen PlusTM simulation software, and estimate its effect on the plant efficiency.

Alptekin, Gokhan

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

162

Enhancing the use of coals by gas reburning-sorbent injection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clean Coal Technology implies the use of coal in an environmentally acceptable manner. Coal combustion results in the emission of two types of acid rain precursors: oxides of sulfur (sox) and oxides of nitrogen (NO[sub x]). This Clean Coal Technology project will demonstrate a combination of two developed technologies to reduce both NO[sub x] and SO[sub x] emissions. Gas reburning and calcium based dry sorbent injection. The demonstrations will be conducted on two pre-NSPS utility boilers representative of the US boilers which contribute significantly to the inventory of acid rain precursor emissions. Gas reburning is a combustion modification technique that consists of firing 80--85 percent of the fuel (corresponding to the total heat release) in the lower furnace. Reduction of NO[sub x] to molecular nitrogen (N[sub 2]) is accomplished via the downstream injection of the remaining fuel requirement in the form of natural gas (which also reduces the total SO[sub x] emissions). In a third stage, burnout air is injected at lower temperatures in the upper furnace to complete the combustion process without generating significant additional NO[sub x]. Dry sorbent injection consists of injecting calcium based sorbents (such as limestone, dolomite, or hydrated lime) into the combustion products. For sulfation of the sorbent to CaSO[sub 4], an injection temperature of about 1230[degrees]C is optimum, but calcium-sulfur reactions can also take place at lower temperatures. Thus, the sorbent may be injected at different locations, such as with the burnout air, at the exit from the superheater, or into the ducting downstream of the air heater with H[sub 2]O added for humidification. The specific goal of this project is to demonstrate NO[sub x] and SO[sub x] emission reductions of 60 percent and 50 percent, respectively, on two coal fired utility boilers having the design characteristics mentioned above.

Not Available

1992-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

163

Desulfurization behavior of iron-based sorbent with MgO and TiO{sub 2} additive in hot coal gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sulfidation behaviors of iron-based sorbent with MgO and MgO-TiO{sub 2} are studied under different isothermal conditions from 623 to 873 K in a fixed bed reactor. The results of sorbents sulfidation experiments indicate that the sorbents with MgO and TiO{sub 2} additives are more attractive than those without additives for desulfurization of hot coal gas. The sulfur capacity (16.17, 18.45, and 19.68 g S/100 g sorbent) of M1F, M3F, and M5F sorbent containing 1, 3, and 5% MgO, respectively, is obviously bigger than that (15.02 g S/100 g sorbent) of M0F without additive. The feasible sulfidation temperature range for M3F sorbent is 773-873 K. The M3F sorbent is optimally regenerated at the temperature of 873 K, under the gas containing 2% oxygen, 15% steam and N{sub 2}, in the space velocity of 2500 h{sup -1}. The sorbent regenerated is also well performed in the second sulfidation (the effective sulfur capacities of 17.98 g S/100 g sorbents and the efficiency of removal sulfur of 99%). The capacity to remove sulfur decreases with steam content increasing in feeding gas from 0 to 10%, but it can restrain the formation of carbon and iron carbide. The addition of TiO{sub 2} in sorbent can shift the optimal sulfidation temperature lower. The iron-based sorbent with 3% MgO and 10% TiO{sub 2} (MFT) is active to the deep removal of H{sub 2}S and COS, especially in the temperature range of 673-723 K. The sulfur removal capacity of MFT sorbent is 21.60 g S/100 g sorbent. 16 refs., 12 figs., 8 tabs.

Weiren Bao; Zong-you Zhang; Xiu-rong Ren; Fan Li; Li-ping Chang [Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan (China). Key Laboratory of Coal Science and Technology

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

Interactions between trace metals, sodium and sorbents in combustion. Quarterly report No. 3, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed research is directed at an understanding of how to exploit interactions between sodium, toxic metals and sorbents, in order to optimize sorbents injection procedures, which can be used to capture and transform these metals into environmentally benign forms. The research will use a 17kW downflow, laboratory combustor, to yield data that can be interpreted in terms of fundamental kinetic mechanisms. Metals to be considered are lead, cadmium, and arsenic. Sorbents will be kaolinite, bauxite, and limestone. The role of sulfur will also be determined.

Wendt, J.O.L.

1995-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

165

Cross-flow, filter-sorbent catalyst for particulate, SO sub 2 and NO sub x control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes work performed on a new concept for integrated pollutant control: a cross-flow filter comprised of layered, gas permeable membranes that act as a particle filter, an SO {sub 2} sorbent, and a NO {sub x} reduction catalyst. One critical element of the R D program is the development of mixed metal oxide materials that serve as combined SO {sub 2} sorbents and NO {sub x} reduction catalysts. In this seventh quarterly progress report, we summarize the performance characteristics of three promising sorbent/catalyst materials tested in powder form.

Benedek, K. (Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Evaluation of Solid Sorbents as a Retrofit Technology for CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Solid Sorbents as a Solid Sorbents as a Retrofit Technology for CO 2 Capture from Coal-fired Power Plants Background Retrofitting the current fleet of pulverized coal (PC)-fired power plants for the separation and sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is one of the most significant challenges for effective, long-term carbon management. Post-combustion CO 2 capture using solid-sorbent based technologies is a potential resolution to this challenge that could be appropriate for both new and existing PC-fired power plant

167

Cryogenic Ion Trapping Systems with Surface-Electrode Traps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present two simple cryogenic RF ion trap systems in which cryogenic temperatures and ultra high vacuum pressures can be reached in as little as 12 hours. The ion traps are operated either in a liquid helium bath cryostat or in a low vibration closed cycle cryostat. The fast turn around time and availability of buffer gas cooling made the systems ideal for testing surface-electrode ion traps. The vibration amplitude of the closed cycled cryostat was found to be below 106 nm. We evaluated the systems by loading surface-electrode ion traps with $^{88}$Sr$^+$ ions using laser ablation, which is compatible with the cryogenic environment. Using Doppler cooling we observed small ion crystals in which optically resolved ions have a trapped lifetime over 2500 minutes.

P. B. Antohi; D. Schuster; G. M. Akselrod; J. Labaziewicz; Y. Ge; Z. Lin; W. S. Bakr; I. L. Chuang

2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

168

Cryogenic silicon surface ion trap  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trapped ions are pre-eminent candidates for building quantum information processors and quantum simulators. They have been used to demonstrate quantum gates and algorithms, quantum error correction, and basic quantum simulations. However, to realise the full potential of such systems and make scalable trapped-ion quantum computing a reality, there exist a number of practical problems which must be solved. These include tackling the observed high ion-heating rates and creating scalable trap structures which can be simply and reliably produced. Here, we report on cryogenically operated silicon ion traps which can be rapidly and easily fabricated using standard semiconductor technologies. Single $^{40}$Ca$^+$ ions have been trapped and used to characterize the trap operation. Long ion lifetimes were observed with the traps exhibiting heating rates as low as $\\dot{\\bar{n}}=$ 0.33 phonons/s at an ion-electrode distance of 230 $\\mu$m. These results open many new avenues to arrays of micro-fabricated ion traps.

Michael Niedermayr; Kirill Lakhmanskiy; Muir Kumph; Stefan Partel; Johannes Edlinger; Michael Brownnutt; Rainer Blatt

2014-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

169

Novel sorbents for removal of gadolinium-based contrast agents in sorbent dialysis and hemoperfusion: preventive approaches to nephrogenic systemic fibrosis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gd based contrast agents in many forms of organocomplex have recently been linked to a debilitating and a potentially fatal skin disease called Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis (NSF) in patients with renal failures. Free Gd released from the complexes by transmetallation is believed to be the most important trigger for NSF. Removal of Gd complex from the patients immediately after the contrast study would prevent the dissociation of Gd and should eliminate NSF as a complication. Although removal of Gd based contrast agents may be accomplished with conventional hemodialysis, it requires three hemodialysis sessions at 3 hours each to remove 98% of the contrast agents. In this work, mesoporous silica material that are functionalized with 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone (1,2-HOPO-SAMMS®) has been evaluated for effective removal of both free and chelated Gd (Magnevist, a brand of gadopentetate dimeglumine) from the dialysate and sodium chloride solution. The material has high affinity, rapid removal rate, and large sorption capacity for both free and chelated Gd, the properties that are far superior to those of activated carbon and zirconium phosphate currently used in the state-of-the-art sorbent dialysis systems. 99% of both free and chelated Gd would be removed in a single pass thru the sorbent bed of 1,2-HOPO-SAMMS®. The sorbent provides an effective and predicable strategy for removing Gd from patients with impaired renal function, thus it would allow for the continued use of contrast MRI while removing the risk of NSF and would represent a safe alternative to traditional contrast studies in the patient population.

Yantasee, Wassana; Fryxell, Glen E.; Porter, George A.; Pattamakomsan, Kanda; Sukwarotwat, Vichaya; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Koonsiripaiboon, View; Xu, Jide; Raymond, Kenneth N.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

A Study of the Zn-based Desulfurization Sorbents for H2S Removal in the IGCC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently, the possibility for the simultaneous removal of H2S and NH3...on the Zn–Ti-based sorbents has been tested by various researchers using several additives like Co, Ni, Fe, Mo and ... W. However, the resea...

Suk Yong Jung; Soo Chool Lee; Hee Kwon Jun; Jae Chang Kim

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Boron nitride nanotubes as novel sorbent for solid-phase microextraction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in environmental water samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) is a novel material that shows potential ability in capturing organic pollutants. In this study, BNNTs fixed on a stainless steel fiber by a sol–gel technique were used as sorbent fo...

Meizhen Fu; Hanzhu Xing; Xiangfeng Chen…

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Regeneration of carboxylic acid-laden basic sorbents by leaching with a volatile base in an organic solvent  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Carboxylic acids are sorbed from aqueous feedstocks onto a solid adsorbent. The acids are freed from the sorbent phase by treating it with an organic solution of alkylamine thus forming an alkylamine/carboxylic acid complex which is decomposed with improved efficiency to the desired carboxylic acid and the alkylamine. Carbon dioxide addition can be used to improve the adsorption or the carboxylic acids by the solid phase sorbent.

King, C. Judson (Kensington, CA); Husson, Scott M. (Berkeley, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Sorbent Injection for Small ESP Mercury Control in Low Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Coal Flue Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sorbent InjectIon for Small eSP Sorbent InjectIon for Small eSP mercury control In low Sulfur eaStern bItumInouS coal flue GaS Background Full-scale field testing has demonstrated the effectiveness of activated carbon injection (ACI) as a mercury-specific control technology for certain coal-fired power plants, depending on the plant's coal feedstock and existing air pollution control device configuration. In a typical configuration, powdered activated carbon (PAC) is injected downstream of the plant's air heater and upstream of the existing particulate control device - either an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) or a fabric filter (FF). The PAC adsorbs the mercury from the combustion flue gas and is subsequently captured along with the fly ash in the ESP or FF. ACI can have some negative side

174

MODELING POWDERED SORBENT INJECTION IN COMBINATION WITHE FABRIC FILTER FOR THE CONTROL OF MERCURY EMISSIONS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

POWDERED SORBENT INJECTION IN POWDERED SORBENT INJECTION IN COMBINATION WITH FABRIC FILTER FOR THE CONTROL OF MERCURY EMISSIONS Joseph R. V. Flora Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 Richard A. Hargis, William J. O'Dowd, Henry W. Pennline National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box, 10940, Pittsburgh, PA 15236 Radisav D. Vidic * Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 ABSTRACT A two-stage mathematical model for mercury removal using powdered activated carbon injection upstream of a baghouse filter was developed, with the first stage accounting for removal in the ductwork and the second stage accounting for additional removal due to the

175

Assessment of sorbent reactivation by water hydration for fluidized bed combustion application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disposal of fluidized bed combustion (FBC) solid residues currently represents one of the major issues in FBC design and operation, and contributes significantly to its operating cost. This issue has triggered research activities on the enhancement of sorbent utilization for in situ sulfur removal. The present study addresses the effectiveness of the reactivation by liquid water hydration of FB spent sorbents. Two materials are considered in the study, namely the bottom ash from the operation of a full-scale utility FB boiler and the raw commercial limestone used in the same boiler. Hydration-reactivation tests were carried out at temperatures of 40{sup o}C and 80{sup o}C and for curing times ranging from 15 minutes to 2d, depending on the sample. The influence of hydration conditions on the enhancement of sulfur utilization has been assessed. A combination of methods has been used to characterize the properties of liquid water-hydrated materials

Fabio Montagnaro; Piero Salatino; Fabrizio Scala; Yinghai Wu; Edward J. Anthony; Lufei Jia [Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Complesso Universitario del Monte di Sant'Angelo, Naples (Italy). Dipartimento di Chimica

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

Vibrational relaxation of trapped molecules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vibrational relaxation of trapped molecules due to collisions with cold atoms is investigated using the results of quantum-mechanical scattering calculations. Trap loss is analyzed using an exactly solvable kinetic model that includes direct collisional quenching and an indirect process of vibrational predissociation. At low atom density, the relaxation is due primarily to collisional quenching. At high atom density, the relaxation involves additional time scales due to the formation and decay of van der Waals complexes. It is shown that the most weakly bound state of the van der Waals complex for a given diatomic vibrational level controls the relaxation at all atom densities. Possible experiments using trapped molecules are discussed.

R. C. Forrey; V. Kharchenko; N. Balakrishnan; A. Dalgarno

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

CO2 Capture from Flue Gas Using SOlid Molecular Basket Sorbents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

from Flue Gas Using Solid from Flue Gas Using Solid Molecular Basket Sorbents Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current fleet of coal-

178

XAFS Investigation of Mercury Sorption on Carbon-based and Other Sorbent Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The sorption of mercury from simulated coal combustion flue gases on coal-derived chars, activated carbons, and zeolites has been examined using mercury LIII XAFS spectroscopy. The energy difference between the two inflection points (IPD) in the mercury XANES spectra has been shown to be a sensitive indicator of the local structure around the mercury adsorbed on the sorbent. The value of the IPD appears to reflect the form of mercury added to the flue gas and to be sensitive to acidic gaseous species such as HCl and H2SO4 that may be present in the flue gas, whether from addition to the flue gas or from the sulfur and chlorine in the coal. The data suggest that well-defined mercury species are not formed on carbon-based sorbents, but rather the structure and chemistry of the sorbed mercury species reflect the different anionic species present in the flue gas, as well as any activating element on the sorbent itself.

Frank E. Huggins; Nora Yap; Gerald P. Huffman

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Investigation of combined SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} removal by ceria sorbents. Quarterly technical progress report, [April--June 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} using a regenerable solid sorbent will constitute an important improvement over the use of separate processes for the removal of these two pollutants from stack gases and possibly eliminate several shortcomings of the individual SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal operations. Recent studies at PETC considered cerium oxide as an alternate sorbent to CuO. The present study aims to determine the effects of ammonia on the sulfation of the sorbent and to obtain a rate expression for the regeneration of alumina-supported CeO{sub 2} sorbents. In this quarter runs for methane regeneration were completed. The data obtained were evaluated and interpreted. When the sulfated sorbent was regenerated with methane coke formation on the sorbent was observed. Treatment of fresh sorbent with methane also resulted in coking. Coke formed on the sorbent disappeared very rapidly after the methane flow was replaced with nitrogen. The order of the regeneration reaction with respect to methane was estimated as 0:76 and the activation energy of the reaction was estimated as 130 kJ/mol. During repeated sulfation-regeneration cycles the decrease in the sulfur capacity after the first cycle was slightly more when regeneration was done with methane compared to that observed with hydrogen regeneration. In the subsequent 4 cycles, the ceria sorbent preserved its sulfur capacity. The regenerated sorbent was able to capture 1.5 sulfur atoms per cerium atom in less than an hour of sulfation, compared to S/Ce of 2.5 for fresh sorbents and 2 for sorbents regenerated with hydrogen.

Akyurtlu, A.; Akyurtlu, J.F.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Mini ion trap mass spectrometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

1995-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multielement sorbent trap" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Mini ion trap mass spectrometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion trap which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10.sup.9 and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10.sup.4 ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products.

Dietrich, Daniel D. (Livermore, CA); Keville, Robert F. (Valley Springs, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Managing the Steam Trap Population  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hundred steam traps installed only 58 were working effectively -- 42% needed attention! These programs had associated cost benefits of at least 100% return on investment, a maximum six month breakeven on cash flow, and an energy cost reduction amounting...

Atlas, R. D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Novel Dipole Trapped Spheromak Configuration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report the observation and characterization of a spheromak formed in the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX) and trapped in a simple dipole magnetic field. The spheromak is studied in the prolate (tilt unsta...

M. R. Brown; C. D. Cothran; J. Fung; M. J. Schaffer; E. Belova

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Rainbow trapping of guided waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rainbow trapping of guided waves Javier Polanco and Rosa M.the propagation of a wave packet that is a superpositionof three s-polarized guided waves with different frequencies

Polanco, Javier; Fitzgerald, Rosa M; Leskova, Tamara A; Maradudin, Alexei A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Quantum Engineering with Trapped Ions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe how to manipulate, and characterize the motional state of a trapped ion. We also give a method to measure an arbitrary motional observable in a single shot.

J. F. Poyatos; S. A. Gardiner; R. Walser…

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Enahancing the Use of Coals by Gas Reburning - Sorbent Injection Volume 5 - Guideline Manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Guideline Manual is to provide recommendations for the application of combined gas reburning-sorbent injection (GR-SI) technologies to pre-NSPS boilers. The manual includes design recommendations, performance predictions, economic projections and comparisons with competing technologies. The report also includes an assessment of boiler impacts. Two full-scale demonstrations of gas reburning-sorbent injection form the basis of the Guideline Manual. Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 1), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler emissions that comprise acid rain precursors, specifically oxides of nitrogen (NOX) and sulfur dioxide (S02). Other project sponsors were the Gas Research Institute and the Illinois State Department of Commerce and Community Affairs. The project involved demonstrating the combined use of Gas Reburning and Sorbent Injection (GR-SI) to assess the air emissions reduction potential of these technologies.. Three potential coal-fired utility boiler host sites were evaluated: Illinois Power's tangentially-fired 71 MWe (net) Hennepin Unit W, City Water Light and Power's cyclone- fired 33 MWe (gross) Lakeside Unit #7, and Central Illinois Light Company's wall-fired 117 MWe (net) Edwards Unit #1. Commercial demonstrations were completed on the Hennepin and Lakeside Units. The Edwards Unit was removed from consideration for a site demonstration due to retrofit cost considerations. Gas Reburning (GR) controls air emissions of NOX. Natural gas is introduced into the furnace hot flue gas creating a reducing reburning zone to convert NOX to diatomic nitrogen (N,). Overfire air is injected into the furnace above the reburning zone to complete the combustion of the reducing (fuel) gases created in the reburning zone. Sorbent Injection (S1) consists of the injection of dry, calcium-based sorbents into furnace hot flue gas to achieve S02 capture. At each site where the techno!o@es were to be demonstrated, petiormance goals were set to achieve air emission reductions of 60 percent for NO. and 50 percent for SO2. These performance goals were exceeded during long term demonstration testing. For the tangentially fired unit, NOX emissions were reduced by 67.2% and S02 emissions by 52.6%. For the cyclone-fired unit, NOX emissions were reduced by 62.9% and SOZ emissions by 57.9%.

None

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Enhancing the Use of Coals by Gas Reburning - Sorbent Injection Volume 5 - Guideline Manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Guideline Manual is to provide recommendations for the application of combined gas reburning-sorbent injection (GR-SI) technologies to pre-NSPS boilers. The manual includes design recommendations, performance predictions, economic projections and comparisons with competing technologies. The report also includes an assessment of boiler impacts. Two full-scale demonstrations of gas reburning-sorbent injection form the basis of the Guideline Manual. Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 1), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler emissions that comprise acid rain precursors, specifically oxides of nitrogen (NOX) and sulfur dioxide (S02). Other project sponsors were the Gas Research Institute and the Illinois State Department of Commerce and Community Affairs. The project involved d,emonstrating the combined use of Gas Reburning and Sorbent Injection (GR-SI) to assess the air emissions reduction potential of these technologies.. Three potential coal-fired utility boiler host sites were evaluated: Illinois Power's tangentially-fired 71 MWe (net) Hennepin Unit #1, City Water Light and Power's cyclone- fired 33 MWe (gross) Lakeside Unit #7, and Central Illinois Light Company's wall-fired 117 MWe (net) Edwards Unit #1. Commercial demonstrations were completed on the Hennepin and Lakeside Units. The Edwards Unit was removed from consideration for a site demonstration due to retrofit cost considerations. Gas Reburning (GR) controls air emissions of NOX. Natural gas is introduced into the furnace hot flue gas creating a reducing reburning zone to convert NOX to diatomic nitrogen (N,). Overfire air is injected into the furnace above the reburning zone to complete the combustion of the reducing (fuel) gases created in the reburning zone. Sorbent Injection (S1) consists of the injection of dry, calcium-based sorbents into furnace hot flue gas to achieve S02 capture. `At each site where the technologies were to be demonstrated, performance goals were set to achieve air emission reductions of 60 percent for NOX and 50 percent for S02. These performance goals were exceeded during long term demonstration testing. For the tangentially fired unit, NO, emissions were reduced by 67.2?40 and SOZ emissions by 52.6Y0. For the cyclone-fired unit, NO, emissions were reduced by 62.9% and SOZ emissions by 57.9Y0.

None

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print In photoelectron spectroscopy experiments performed at the ALS, a group of researchers has found that electronic transitions normally thought to be forbidden can in fact be excited in conjunction with certain types of molecular vibrations. Specifically, they found that when the symmetry of a linear triatomic molecule is broken by asymmetric vibrational modes, photoelectrons can become temporarily trapped by the molecule before ultimately escaping, giving rise to a broad feature in the photoelectron spectrum known as a shape resonance. This process represents a novel type of symmetry-breaking phenomenon that has not been observed previously but appears to be widespread. Such coupling between electronic motion and nuclear motion becomes increasingly important as scientists learn more about the geometry and dynamics of novel chemical structures such as those found in nanodevices and transient chemical species, and the results have implications for studies that use photoelectron spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool.

189

Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print In photoelectron spectroscopy experiments performed at the ALS, a group of researchers has found that electronic transitions normally thought to be forbidden can in fact be excited in conjunction with certain types of molecular vibrations. Specifically, they found that when the symmetry of a linear triatomic molecule is broken by asymmetric vibrational modes, photoelectrons can become temporarily trapped by the molecule before ultimately escaping, giving rise to a broad feature in the photoelectron spectrum known as a shape resonance. This process represents a novel type of symmetry-breaking phenomenon that has not been observed previously but appears to be widespread. Such coupling between electronic motion and nuclear motion becomes increasingly important as scientists learn more about the geometry and dynamics of novel chemical structures such as those found in nanodevices and transient chemical species, and the results have implications for studies that use photoelectron spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool.

190

Theoretical calculating the thermodynamic properties of solid sorbents for CO{sub 2} capture applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since current technologies for capturing CO{sub 2} to fight global climate change are still too energy intensive, there is a critical need for development of new materials that can capture CO{sub 2} reversibly with acceptable energy costs. Accordingly, solid sorbents have been proposed to be used for CO{sub 2} capture applications through a reversible chemical transformation. By combining thermodynamic database mining with first principles density functional theory and phonon lattice dynamics calculations, a theoretical screening methodology to identify the most promising CO{sub 2} sorbent candidates from the vast array of possible solid materials has been proposed and validated. The calculated thermodynamic properties of different classes of solid materials versus temperature and pressure changes were further used to evaluate the equilibrium properties for the CO{sub 2} adsorption/desorption cycles. According to the requirements imposed by the pre- and post- combustion technologies and based on our calculated thermodynamic properties for the CO{sub 2} capture reactions by the solids of interest, we were able to screen only those solid materials for which lower capture energy costs are expected at the desired pressure and temperature conditions. Only those selected CO{sub 2} sorbent candidates were further considered for experimental validations. The ab initio thermodynamic technique has the advantage of identifying thermodynamic properties of CO{sub 2} capture reactions without any experimental input beyond crystallographic structural information of the solid phases involved. Such methodology not only can be used to search for good candidates from existing database of solid materials, but also can provide some guidelines for synthesis new materials. In this presentation, we first introduce our screening methodology and the results on a testing set of solids with known thermodynamic properties to validate our methodology. Then, by applying our computational method to several different kinds of solid systems, we demonstrate that our methodology can predict the useful information to help developing CO{sub 2} capture Technologies.

Duan, Yuhua

2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

191

Theoretical Screening of Mixed Solid Sorbent for Applications to CO{sub 2} Capture Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since current technologies for capturing CO{sub 2} to fight global climate change are still too energy intensive, there is a critical need for development of new materials that can capture CO{sub 2} reversibly with acceptable energy costs. Accordingly, solid sorbents have been proposed to be used for CO{sub 2} capture applications through a reversible chemical transformation. By combining thermodynamic database mining with first principles density functional theory and phonon lattice dynamics calculations, a theoretical screening methodology to identify the most promising CO{sub 2} sorbent candidates from the vast array of possible solid materials has been proposed and validated. The calculated thermodynamic properties of different classes of solid materials versus temperature and pressure changes were further used to evaluate the equilibrium properties for the CO{sub 2} adsorption/desorption cycles. According to the requirements imposed by the pre- and post- combustion technologies and based on our calculated thermodynamic properties for the CO{sub 2} capture reactions by the solids of interest, we were able to screen only those solid materials for which lower capture energy costs are expected at the desired pressure and temperature conditions. Only those selected CO{sub 2} sorbent candidates were further considered for experimental validations. The ab initio thermodynamic technique has the advantage of identifying thermodynamic properties of CO{sub 2} capture reactions without any experimental input beyond crystallographic structural information of the solid phases involved. Such methodology not only can be used to search for good candidates from existing database of solid materials, but also can provide some guidelines for synthesis new materials. In this presentation, we apply our screening methodology to mixing solid systems to adjust the turnover temperature to help on developing CO{sub 2} capture Technologies.

Duan, Yuhua

2014-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

192

An attrition-resistant zinc titanate sorbent for sulfur. Final technical report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the continuing search for good sorbent materials to remove sulfur for hot, coal-derived gases, zinc titanate sorbents have shown great promise. The objective of this project was to extend the work of prior investigators by developing improvements in the compressive strength and, therefore, the cycle life of these sorbents while maintaining good chemical reactivity. Fifteen formulations were prepared and evaluated. The best properties were obtained by blending relatively course (two micron) ZnO and TiO{sub 2} powders to obtain a composition of 50%Zn{sub 2}TiO{sub 4}-50%TiO{sub 2}. When sintered at 1000{degrees}C, it had a compressive strength of 28 MPa or 147 N/mm, which is four times higher than values obtained by prior investigators. It also performed well in thermogravimetric analysis measurements of reactivity, both in screening tests and in simulated coal gas.

Swisher, J.H. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Energy Processes

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

193

Manganese and Ceria Sorbents for High Temperature Sulfur Removal from Biomass-Derived Syngas -- The Impact of Steam on Capacity and Sorption Mode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Syngas derived from biomass and coal gasification for fuel synthesis or electricity generation contains sulfur species that are detrimental to downstream catalysts or turbine operation. Sulfur removal in high temperature, high steam conditions has been known to be challenging, but experimental reports on methods to tackle the problem are not often reported. We have developed sorbents that can remove hydrogen sulfide from syngas at high temperature (700 C), both in dry and high steam conditions. The syngas composition chosen for our experiments is derived from statistical analysis of the gasification products of wood under a large variety of conditions. The two sorbents, Cu-ceria and manganese-based, were tested in a variety of conditions. In syngas containing steam, the capacity of the sorbents is much lower, and the impact of the sorbent in lowering H{sub 2}S levels is only evident in low space velocities. Spectroscopic characterization and thermodynamic consideration of the experimental results suggest that in syngas containing 45% steam, the removal of H{sub 2}S is primarily via surface chemisorptions. For the Cu-ceria sorbent, analysis of the amount of H{sub 2}S retained by the sorbent in dry syngas suggests both copper and ceria play a role in H{sub 2}S removal. For the manganese-based sorbent, in dry conditions, there is a solid state transformation of the sorbent, primarily into the sulfide form.

Cheah, S.; Parent, Y. O.; Jablonski, W. S.; Vinzant, T.; Olstad, J. L.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Molybdenum-based additives to mixed-metal oxides for use in hot gas cleanup sorbents for the catalytic decomposition of ammonia in coal gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to additives to mixed-metal oxides that act simultaneously as sorbents and catalysts in cleanup systems for hot coal gases. Such additives of this type, generally, act as a sorbent to remove sulfur from the coal gases while substantially simultaneously, catalytically decomposing appreciable amounts of ammonia from the coal gases.

Ayala, Raul E. (Clifton Park, NY)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Investigation and Demonstration of Dry Carbon-Based Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Public Service Company of Colorado and ADA Technologies, Inc. have performed a study of the injection of activated carbon for the removal of vapor-phase mercury from coal-fired flue gas streams. The project was completed under contract to the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, with contributions from EPRI and Public Service Company. The prime contractor for the project was Public Service Company, with ADA Technologies as the major subcontractor providing technical support to all aspects of the project. The research and development effort was conducted in two phases. In Phase I a pilot facility was fabricated and tests were performed using dry carbon-based sorbent injection for mercury control on a coal-fired flue gas slipstream extracted from an operating power plant. Phase II was designed to move carbon injection technology towards commercial application on coal-fired power plants by addressing key reliability and operability concerns. Phase II field work included further development work with the Phase I pilot and mercury measurements on several of PSCo's coal-fired generating units. In addition, tests were run on collected sorbent plus fly ash to evaluate the impact of the activated carbon sorbent on the disposal of fly ash. An economic analysis was performed where pilot plant test data was used to develop a model to predict estimated costs of mercury removal from plants burning western coals. Testing in the pilot plant was undertaken to quantify the effects of plant configuration, flue gas temperature, and activated carbon injection rate on mercury removal. All three variables were found to significantly impact the mercury removal efficiency in the pilot. The trends were clear: mercury removal rates increased with decreasing flue gas temperature and with increasing carbon injection rates. Mercury removal was much more efficient with reverse-gas and pulse-jet baghouse configurations than with an ESP as the particulate control device. The native fly ash of the host unit provided significant mercury removal capacity, so that the activated carbon sorbent served as an incremental mercury removal mechanism. Tests run to characterize the waste product, a combination of fly ash and activated carbon on which mercury was present, showed that mercury and other RCRA metals of interest were all below Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) regulatory limits in the leachate. The presence of activated carbon in the fly ash was shown to have an effect on the use of fly ash as an additive in the manufacture of concrete, which could limit the salability of fly ash from a plant where activated carbon was used for mercury control.

Jim Butz; Terry Hunt

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

LONG-TERM DEMONSTRATION OF SORBENT ENHANCEMENT ADDITIVE TECHNOLOGY FOR MERCURY CONTROL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Long-term demonstration tests of advanced sorbent enhancement additive (SEA) technologies have been completed at five coal-fired power plants. The targeted removal rate was 90% from baseline conditions at all five stations. The plants included Hawthorn Unit 5, Mill Creek Unit 4, San Miguel Unit 1, Centralia Unit 2, and Hoot Lake Unit 2. The materials tested included powdered activated carbon, treated carbon, scrubber additives, and SEAs. In only one case (San Miguel) was >90% removal not attainable. The reemission of mercury from the scrubber at this facility prevented >90% capture.

Jason D. Laumb; Dennis L. Laudal; Grant E. Dunham; John P. Kay; Christopher L. Martin; Jeffrey S. Thompson; Nicholas B. Lentz; Alexander Azenkeng; Kevin C. Galbreath; Lucinda L. Hamre

2011-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

197

Theoretical Screening of Solid Sorbents for CO{sub 2} Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By combining thermodynamic database searches with density functional theory and lattice phonon dynamics, a screening methodology was developed to identify promising solid sorbent candidates for CO{sub 2} capture. This methodology has been used to screen hundreds of solid compounds and some of the promising candidates to date have been reported in literature. This screening methodology is particularly relevant for the case of materials for which experimental thermodynamic data is not available. Such areas of interest are represented by the case of solid mixtures and doped materials, where thermodynamic data are generally not available but for which the crystallographic structure is known or can be easily determined.

Duan, Y [NETL; Sorescu, D C [NETL; Luebke, D [NETL; Morreale, B [NETL; Li, B Y; Zhang, B; Johnson, J K; Zhang, K; Li, X S; King, D

2013-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

198

Benchmark Reaction Mechanisms and Kinetics for Lean NOx Traps...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Benchmark Reaction Mechanisms and Kinetics for Lean NOx Traps Development of Chemical Kinetic Models for Lean NOx Traps Modeling the Regeneration Chemistry of Lean NOx Traps...

199

Development of a Dry Sorbent-Based Post Combustion CO2 Capture Technology for Retrofit in Existing Power Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dry Sorbent-Based Dry Sorbent-Based Post Combustion CO 2 Capture Technology for Retrofit in Existing Power Plants Background Currently available commercial processes to remove carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from flue gas streams are costly and energy intensive. RTI International is heading a research team to continue development and scale-up of an innovative process for CO 2 capture that has significant potential to be less expensive and less energy intensive than conventional technologies. The "Dry Carbonate Process" utilizes a dry,

200

Surface characterizatin of palladium-alumina sorbents for high-temperature capture of mercury and arsenic from fuel gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal gasification with subsequent cleanup of the resulting fuel gas is a way to reduce the impact of mercury and arsenic in the environment during power generation and on downstream catalytic processes in chemical production, The interactions of mercury and arsenic with PdlAl2D3 model thin film sorbents and PdlAh03 powders have been studied to determine the relative affinities of palladium for mercury and arsenic, and how they are affected by temperature and the presence of hydrogen sulfide in the fuel gas. The implications of the results on strategies for capturing the toxic metals using a sorbent bed are discussed.

Baltrus, J.P.; Granite, E.J.; Pennline, H.W.; Stanko, D.; Hamilton, H.; Rowsell, L.; Poulston, S.; Smith, A.; Chu, W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multielement sorbent trap" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Sorption kinetics for phenol and nitro-substituted toxic phenols from aqueous solution using clay as sorbent material  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study examined the effectiveness of less-expensive sorbent clay in removing phenols from wastewater by sorption. Batch kinetic experiment showed that phenol and nitro-substituted phenols (o-, m- and p-) sorption on clay was rapid and equilibrium was achieved within 2 h. The kinetics of sorption was found to be of pseudo-second order reaction. The influences of various factors, such as particle size, pH, concentration and temperature on the sorption capacity have been studied. This study showed that clay could be used as an efficient sorbent material for the sorption of phenols from aqueous solution.

Preeti Sagar Nayak; B.K. Singh

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electron Trapping by Molecular Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Electron Trapping by Molecular Vibration Print Wednesday, 27 April 2005 00:00 In photoelectron spectroscopy experiments performed at the ALS, a group of researchers has found that electronic transitions normally thought to be forbidden can in fact be excited in conjunction with certain types of molecular vibrations. Specifically, they found that when the symmetry of a linear triatomic molecule is broken by asymmetric vibrational modes, photoelectrons can become temporarily trapped by the molecule before ultimately escaping, giving rise to a broad feature in the photoelectron spectrum known as a shape resonance. This process represents a novel type of symmetry-breaking phenomenon that has not been observed previously but appears to be widespread. Such coupling between electronic motion and nuclear motion becomes increasingly important as scientists learn more about the geometry and dynamics of novel chemical structures such as those found in nanodevices and transient chemical species, and the results have implications for studies that use photoelectron spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool.

203

Inertial measurement via dynamics of trapped particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe theoretical and practical aspects of the particle trap as an inertial sensor. The insight motivating this approach is that a trapped particle acts like a mass on a spring, but the restoring forces are provided ...

Post, E. Rehmi, 1966-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Carbon Nanotubes in an Optical Trap  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Study of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a single beam optical trap (1064 nm) was done. In the optical trap, repulsion of the CNTS from the laser radiation, bubble formation, broad band...

Ramanandan, Gopika; Dharmadhikari, Aditya K; Ramachandran, Hema; Dharmadhikari, Jayasree A; Mathur, Deepak

205

Condensation of Excitons in a Trap  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Condensation is observed in a gas of indirect excitons confined in an electrostatic trap. Imaging and interferometric measurements detect that excitons condense at the trap bottom and exciton spontaneous coherence emerges with lowering temperature. Below ...

A. A. High; J. R. Leonard; M. Remeika; L. V. Butov; M. Hanson; A. C. Gossard

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

206

Multi-phase CFD modeling of solid sorbent carbon capture system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are used to investigate a low temperature post-combustion carbon capture reactor. The CFD models are based on a small scale solid sorbent carbon capture reactor design from ADA-ES and Southern Company. The reactor is a fluidized bed design based on a silica-supported amine sorbent. CFD models using both Eulerian–Eulerian and Eulerian–Lagrangian multi-phase modeling methods are developed to investigate the hydrodynamics and adsorption of carbon dioxide in the reactor. Models developed in both FLUENT® and BARRACUDA are presented to explore the strengths and weaknesses of state of the art CFD codes for modeling multi-phase carbon capture reactors. The results of the simulations show that the FLUENT® Eulerian–Lagrangian simulations (DDPM) are unstable for the given reactor design; while the BARRACUDA Eulerian–Lagrangian model is able to simulate the system given appropriate simplifying assumptions. FLUENT® Eulerian–Eulerian simulations also provide a stable solution for the carbon capture reactor given the appropriate simplifying assumptions.

Ryan, E. M.; DeCroix, D.; Breault, Ronald W. [U.S. DOE; Xu, W.; Huckaby, E. David [U.S. DOE

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Multi-Phase CFD Modeling of Solid Sorbent Carbon Capture System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations are used to investigate a low temperature post-combustion carbon capture reactor. The CFD models are based on a small scale solid sorbent carbon capture reactor design from ADA-ES and Southern Company. The reactor is a fluidized bed design based on a silica-supported amine sorbent. CFD models using both Eulerian-Eulerian and Eulerian-Lagrangian multi-phase modeling methods are developed to investigate the hydrodynamics and adsorption of carbon dioxide in the reactor. Models developed in both FLUENT® and BARRACUDA are presented to explore the strengths and weaknesses of state of the art CFD codes for modeling multi-phase carbon capture reactors. The results of the simulations show that the FLUENT® Eulerian-Lagrangian simulations (DDPM) are unstable for the given reactor design; while the BARRACUDA Eulerian-Lagrangian model is able to simulate the system given appropriate simplifying assumptions. FLUENT® Eulerian-Eulerian simulations also provide a stable solution for the carbon capture reactor given the appropriate simplifying assumptions.

Ryan, Emily M.; DeCroix, David; Breault, Ronald W.; Xu, Wei; Huckaby, E. D.; Saha, Kringan; Darteville, Sebastien; Sun, Xin

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

208

Molten iron oxysulfide as a superior sulfur sorbent. Final report, [September 1989--1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The studies had as original objective the analysis of conditions for using liquid iron oxysulfide as a desulfuring agent during coal gasification. Ancillary was a comparison of iron oxysulfide with lime as sorbents under conditions where lime reacts with S-bearing gases to form Ca sulfate or sulfide. Primary thrust is to determine the thermodynamic requirements for desulfurization by iron additions (e.g., taconite concentrate) during combustion in gasifiers operating at high equivalence ratios. Thermodynamic analysis of lime-oxygen-sulfur system shows why lime is injected into burners under oxidizing conditions; reducing conditions forms CaS, requiring its removal, otherwise oxidation and release of S would occur. Iron as the oxysulfide liquid has a range of stability and can be used as a desulfurizing agent, if the burner/gasifier operates in a sufficiently reducing regime (high equivalence ratio); this operating range is given and is calculable for a coal composition, temperature, stoichiometry. High moisture or hydrogen contents of the coal yield a poorer degree of desulfurization. Kinetic tests on individual iron oxide particles on substrates or Pt cups with a TGA apparatus fail to predict reaction rates within a burner. Preliminary tests on the Dynamic Containment Burner with acetylene give some promise that this system can produce the proper conditions of coal gasification for use of added iron as a sulfur sorbent.

Hepworth, M.T.

1993-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

209

Review of Orifice Plate Steam Traps  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This guide was prepared to serve as a foundation for making informed decisions about when orifice plate steam traps should be considered for use in new or existing steam systems. It presents background information about different types of steam traps and defines their unique functional and operational characteristics. The advantages and disadvantages associated with using orifice plate steam traps are provided to highlight their capabilities and limitations. Finally, recommendations for using orifice plate steam traps are presented, and possible applications are identified.

210

Optical trapping for undergraduates D. C. Appleyard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical trapping for undergraduates D. C. Appleyard Department of Biological Engineering September 2006 The detailed design of a robust and inexpensive optical trap system is presented. The system experimental modules are described to cover basic concepts in optical trapping and biophysics at a level

Lang, Matthew

211

Finite element simulations of hydrodynamic trapping in microfluidic particle-trap array systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Finite element simulations of hydrodynamic trapping in microfluidic particle- trap array systems;Finite element simulations of hydrodynamic trapping in microfluidic particle-trap array systems Xiaoxiao) simulation is a powerful tool in the design and implementation of microfluidic systems, especially

Nehorai, Arye

212

Low Cost Sorbent for Capturing CO{sub 2} Emissions Generated by Existing Coal-fired Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TDA Research, Inc. has developed a novel sorbent based post-combustion CO{sub 2} removal technology. This low cost sorbent can be regenerated with low-pressure (ca. 1 atm) superheated steam without temperature swing or pressure-swing. The isothermal and isobaric operation is a unique and advantageous feature of this process. The objective of this project was to demonstrate the technical and economic merit of this sorbent based CO{sub 2} capture approach. Through laboratory, bench-scale and field testing we demonstrated that this technology can effectively and efficiently capture CO{sub 2} produced at an existing pulverized coal power plants. TDA Research, Inc is developing both the solid sorbent and the process designed around that material. This project addresses the DOE Program Goal to develop a capture technology that can be added to an existing or new coal fired power plant, and can capture 90% of the CO{sub 2} produced with the lowest possible increase in the cost of energy. .

Elliott, Jeannine

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

213

Evaluation of hybrid polymer containing iron oxides as As(III) and As(V) sorbent for drinking water purification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The objective of this paper was to evaluate the possibility of utilization of a novel hybrid polymer containing iron oxides as an arsenate and arsenite sorbent in water treatment. This material was primarily obtained as a by-product in the water de-ironing process by means of N-chlorosulfonamide polymers. The sorption properties of the hybrid polymer, including pH and coexisting ions’ influence on arsenic removal efficiency, were examined using kinetic and equilibrium experiments in a batch regime. In the column process, conducted with As-spiked natural water containing both As(III) and As(V), the breakthrough of the sorbent bed occurred after the solution amounting to about 4800 bed volumes passed through the column. The regeneration and re-use of the sorbent with NaOH and NaCl solution was also studied, indicating the possibility of repeated use of the sorbent with only a slight decrease in its sorptive properties for four cycles.

Daniel Oci?ski; Irena Jacukowicz-Sobala; Jerzy Raczyk; El?bieta Kocio?ek-Balawejder

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Monodisperse porous polymer particles containing macrocyclic ether as a new class of sorbent for SR(II) separation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Strontium{sup 90} is one of the typical fission products that may be found in high level liquid waste (HLLW). Separation of Sr{sup 90} prior to the vitrification is beneficial to the final treatment of solid radioactive waste. In this study, a new class of sorbent for Sr(II) was developed by loading the macrocyclic ether DtBuCH18C6 into the monodisperse porous polymer particles (MPPPs). The MPPPs are well-known as a promising chromatographic material due to the uniform particle size, porous morphology, good compatibility with organic extractants, and rigid matrix. The structure and micro-morphology of the sorbent particles were characterized. The adsorption behavior towards Sr(II) in HNO{sub 3} media was investigated by both batch and column experiments. High adsorption efficiency and selective separation of Sr(II) was obtained. The sorbent particles can be recycled for at least several times before obvious lose of the adsorption ability. This kind of sorbent possesses the potential to be used for strontium separation in radioactive liquid waste.

Leng, Yuxiao; Bai, Feifei [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Faculty of Chemical Science and Engineering, China University of Petroleum, Beijing 100084 (China); Ye, Gang; Wei, Jichao; Wang, Jianchen; Chen, Jing [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Cross-flow, filter-sorbent catalyst for particulate, SO sub 2 and NO sub x control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This synopsis describes a new concept for integrated pollutant control: a cross-flow filter comprised of layered, gas permeable membranes that act as a particulate filter, an SO{sub 2} sorbent, and a NO{sub x} reduction catalyst.

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Sorbents for High Temperature Removal of Arsenic from Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gokhan O. Alptekin, PhD Robert Copeland, PhD Gokhan O. Alptekin, PhD Robert Copeland, PhD (Primary Contact) TDA Research, Inc TDA Research, Inc 12345 W. 52 nd Avenue 12345 W. 52 nd Avenue Wheat Ridge, CO 80033 Wheat Ridge, CO 80033 Email: copeland@tda.com Email: galptekin@tda.com Tel: (303) 940-2323 Tel: (303) 940-2349 Fax: (303) 422-7763 Fax: (303) 422-7763 Margarita Dubovik Yevgenia Gershanovich TDA Research, Inc TDA Research, Inc 12345 W. 52 nd Avenue 12345 W. 52 nd Avenue Wheat Ridge, CO 80033 Wheat Ridge, CO 80033 Email: dubovik@tda.com Email: ygershan@tda.com Tel: (303) 940-2316 Tel: (303) 940-2346 Fax: (303) 422-7763 Fax: (303) 422-7763 Sorbents for High Temperature Removal of Arsenic from Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas

217

Enhancing the Use of Coals by Gas Reburning-Sorbent Injection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 0 Enhancing the Use of Coals by Gas Reburning-Sorbent Injection A DOE Assessment January 2001 U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 880, 3610 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 and P.O. Box 10940, 626 Cochrans Mill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 website: www.netl.doe.gov Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial

218

INVESTIGATION AND DEMONSTRATION OF DRY CARBON-BASED SORBENT INJECTION FOR MERCURY CONTROL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report describes the activities that have taken place during the first full quarter of the Phase II project ''Investigation and Demonstration of Dry Carbon-Based Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control''. Modifications were completed and sampling began at the 600 acfm pilot-scale particulate control module (PCM) located at the Comanche Station in Pueblo, CO. The PCM was configured as an electrostatic precipitator for these tests. A Perkin-Elmer flue gas mercury analyzer was installed on-site and operated. Initial test results using both manual sampling methodology and the mercury analyzer are presented herein. Preparations were made during this period for full-scale mercury testing of several PSCo units. A site visit was made to Arapahoe and Cherokee Generating Stations to determine sample locations and to develop a test plan.

Terry Hunt; Mark Fox; Lillian Stan; Sheila Haythornthwaite; Justin Smith; Jason Ruhl

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Enhancing the use of coals by gas reburning-sorbent injection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clean Coal Technology implies the use of coal in an environmentally acceptable manner. Coal combustion results in the emission of two types of acid rain precursors: oxides of sulfur (SO{sub x}) and oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}). This Clean Coal Technology project will demonstrate a combination of two developed technologies to reduce both NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions: gas reburning and calcium based dry sorbent injection. The demonstrations will be conducted on two pre-NSPS utility boilers representative of the US boilers which contribute significantly to the inventory of acid rain precursor emissions: tangentially and cyclone fired units. Because of cost growth and lack of available funding, no further work has been done after Phase 1 at site B; the wall fired unit.

Not Available

1992-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

220

Development of Fly Ash Derived Sorbents to Capture CO2 from Flue Gas of Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research program focused on the development of fly ash derived sorbents to capture CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas emissions. The fly ash derived sorbents developed represent an affordable alternative to existing methods using specialized activated carbons and molecular sieves, that tend to be very expensive and hinder the viability of the CO{sub 2} sorption process due to economic constraints. Under Task 1 'Procurement and characterization of a suite of fly ashes', 10 fly ash samples, named FAS-1 to -10, were collected from different combustors with different feedstocks, including bituminous coal, PRB coal and biomass. These samples presented a wide range of LOI value from 0.66-84.0%, and different burn-off profiles. The samples also spanned a wide range of total specific surface area and pore volume. These variations reflect the difference in the feedstock, types of combustors, collection hopper, and the beneficiation technologies the different fly ashes underwent. Under Task 2 'Preparation of fly ash derived sorbents', the fly ash samples were activated by steam. Nitrogen adsorption isotherms were used to characterize the resultant activated samples. The cost-saving one-step activation process applied was successfully used to increase the surface area and pore volume of all the fly ash samples. The activated samples present very different surface areas and pore volumes due to the range in physical and chemical properties of their precursors. Furthermore, one activated fly ash sample, FAS-4, was loaded with amine-containing chemicals (MEA, DEA, AMP, and MDEA). The impregnation significantly decreased the surface area and pore volume of the parent activated fly ash sample. Under Task 3 'Capture of CO{sub 2} by fly ash derived sorbents', sample FAS-10 and its deashed counterpart before and after impregnation of chemical PEI were used for the CO{sub 2} adsorption at different temperatures. The sample FAS-10 exhibited a CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of 17.5mg/g at 30 C, and decreases to 10.25mg/g at 75 C, while those for de-ashed counterpart are 43.5mg/g and 22.0 mg/g at 30 C and 75 C, respectively. After loading PEI, the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity increased to 93.6 mg/g at 75 C for de-ashed sample and 62.1 mg/g at 75 C for raw fly ash sample. The activated fly ash, FAS-4, and its chemical loaded counterparts were tested for CO{sub 2} capture capacity. The activated carbon exhibited a CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of 40.3mg/g at 30 C that decreased to 18.5mg/g at 70 C and 7.7mg/g at 120 C. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity profiles changed significantly after impregnation. For the MEA loaded sample the capacity increased to 68.6mg/g at 30 C. The loading of MDEA and DEA initially decreased the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity at 30 C compared to the parent sample but increased to 40.6 and 37.1mg/g, respectively, when the temperature increased to 70 C. The loading of AMP decrease the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity compared to the parent sample under all the studied temperatures. Under Task 4 'Comparison of the CO{sub 2} capture by fly ash derived sorbents with commercial sorbents', the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities of selected activated fly ash carbons were compared to commercial activated carbons. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of fly ash derived activated carbon, FAS-4, and its chemical loaded counterpart presented CO{sub 2} capture capacities close to 7 wt%, which are comparable to, and even better than, the published values of 3-4%.

M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; John M. Andresen; Yinzhi Zhang; Zhe Lu

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multielement sorbent trap" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Evaluation of Type I cement sorbent slurries in the U.C. pilot spray dryer facility. Final report, November 1, 1994--February 28, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research was focused on evaluating hydrated cement sorbents in the U. C. pilot spray dryer. The main goal of this work was to determine the hydration conditions resulting in reactive hydrated cement sorbents. Hydration of cement was achieved by stirring or by grinding in a ball mill at either room temperature or elevated temperatures. Also, the effects of several additives were studied. Additives investigated include calcium chloride, natural diatomite, calcined diatomaceous earth, and fumed silica. The performance of these sorbents was compared with conventional slaked lime. Further, the specific surface area and pore volume of the dried SDA sorbents were measured and compared to reactivity. Bench-scale tests were performed to obtain a more detailed picture of the development of the aforementioned physical properties as a function of hydration time.

Keener, T.C.; Khang, S.J.

1996-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

222

Capturing Energy Savings with Steam Traps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Capturing Energy Savings with Steam Traps Richard C; Bockwinkel General Manager Armstrong Service? A Division of Armstrong International, Inc. Orlando, Florida ABSTRACT This paper will discuss the energy savings potential of steam... Engineer Steam Traps Armstrong International, Inc. Three Rivers, Michigan basis. Finally, it's important to recognize that a steam trap program will reduce steam waste> which will reduce the amount of fuel burned> which will reduce pollutants...

Bockwinkel, R. G.; French, S. A.

223

Reduce Steam Trap Failures at Chambers Works  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ultrasonic Inspection At least 2 times per year Steam Trap Surveyor Submit reports to area management, energy team, and reliability engineers for each area every month Steam Trap Team Leader Control Plan ? Process Owner agrees...Reduce Steam Trap Failures at Chambers Works GB/BB Name: Cyndi Kouba Mentor/MBB: Andrew Degraff Team Members Michael Crowley(Site Energy Lead), (Charlie) Flanigan (Aramids-maintenance), Ben Snyder (Aramids-ATO), Michael Scruggs (Central...

Kouba, C.

224

Investigation of combined SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} removal by ceria sorbents. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} using a regenerable solid sorbent will constitute an important improvement over the use of separate processes for the removal of these two pollutants from stack gases and possibly eliminate several shortcomings of the individual SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal operations. This process will allow simple and reliable cleanup of large volumes of stack gases at a competitive cost; produce a concentrated stream of SO{sub 2} which can easily be converted into valuable by-products; be compatible with existing power generation plants; and essentially eliminate the waste materials generated in some other sulfur removal processes. Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) and UOP/Shell have developed processes which both employ copper oxide-based sorbents in different reactor configurations. More recent studies at PETC considered cerium oxide as an alternate sorbent to CuO. Ceria improves the resistance of the alumina support to thermal sintering and produces a regeneration off-gas stream that can be easily converted to elemental sulfur. It has a potentially higher sulfur capture capacity than copper. It is readily available at a moderate cost. Although it is more expensive than copper oxide, since the cost of metal oxide is a small fraction of the total sorbent cost this may not be a significant factor. The objective of this research is to determine the effects of ammonia on the sulfation of the sorbent; to determine the effects of fly ash on the sulfation and regeneration of the sorbent; to obtain a rate expression for the regeneration of alumina-supported CeO{sub 2} sorbents; to model reactor configurations for a commercial scale combined CeO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} sorbent; and to study alternative designs, effects of design variables on the performance of the facility, and the economics of the process using the developed model.

Akyurtlu, A.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Pilot-scale testing of a new sorbent for combined SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} removal. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new regenerable sorbent concept for SO{sub 2} and NOx removal was pilot-tested at Ohio Edison`s Edgewater generating station at a 1.5 to 2-MW(e) level. A radial panel-bed filter of a new dry, granular sorbent was exposed to flue gas and regenerated in an experimental proof-of-concept program. The project was successful in demonstrating the new sorbent`s ability to achieve 90% SO{sub 2} removal, 30% NOx removal, and over 80% removal of residual particulates with realistic approach temperatures and low pressure drops. Based on the results of this project, the retrofit cost of this technology is expected to be on the order of $400 per ton of SO{sub 2} and $900 per ton of NOx removed. This assumes that gas distribution is even and methane regeneration is used for a 30% average utilization. For a 2.5%-sulfur Ohio coal, this translates to a cost of approximately $17 per ton of coal. Two by-product streams were generated in the process that was tested: a solid, spent-sorbent stream and a highly-concentrated SO{sub 2} or elemental-sulfur stream. While not within the scope of the project, it was found possible to process these streams into useful products. The spent sorbent materials were shown to be excellent substrates for soil amendments; the elemental sulfur produced is innocuous and eminently marketable.

Nelson, S. Jr. [Sorbent Technologies Corp., Twinsburg, OH (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Preparation of sorbents containing ettringite phase from concrete sludge and their performance in removing borate and fluoride ions from waste water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Concrete sludge is an industrial waste slurry containing hydrated cement, aggregates and water. Solid sorbents containing ettringite, Ca6Al2(SO4)3(OH)12·26H2O, were prepared from concrete sludge by adding various amounts of aluminum sulfate to enhance ettringite formation. Anion exchange performance of the sorbents was examined using model waste waters containing boron or fluoride ions. The removal behavior depended on the calcium/aluminum ratio and the heat treatment temperature after drying. For the same Ca/Al ratio, improved removal performance was observed for sorbents treated at higher temperatures. The highest removal capacity was found when the sorbent was prepared with a molar ratio of Ca/Al of 3.2 and heat treatment at 175 °C. The final concentrations of boron and fluoride were 6.3 mg-B/L, and less than 4 mg-F/L for initial concentrations of 100 mg-B/L and 300 mg-F/L. Treatment of the sorbents at higher temperature dehydrated the ettringite phase to form metaettringite phase. The sorbents prepared in the present study can be used in a boron and fluoride removal process that meets the effluent standard in Japan.

Yusuke Tsunashima; Atsushi Iizuka; Junichiro Akimoto; Teruhisa Hongo; Akihiro Yamasaki

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Plant View On Reducing Steam Trap Energy Loss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the steam traps are passing excess steam. This is caused by neglect of aged steam traps which have worn out and misapplication of steam traps by oversizing or using the 'wrong' type trap. Elimination of steam wastes by an effective well engineered steam trap...

Vallery, S. J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Development of Al-stabilized CaO–nickel hybrid sorbent–catalyst for sorption-enhanced steam methane reforming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this work, Al-stabilized CaO–Ni hybrid sorbent–catalysts integrated in a single particle with various nickel loadings (12, 18 and 25 wt% NiO) were developed and tested in cyclic hydrogen production by sorption-enhanced steam methane reforming (SESMR) process. A simple wet-mixing technique based on limestone acidification and two-step calcination was employed to produce hybrid materials with different nickel loadings. All developed materials were characterized by BET, XRD, SEM and TEM and studied during 25 CO2 sorption/regeneration cycles as well as for 10 SESMR cycles. Based on both CO2 sorption and SESMR results, it was concluded that the proposed hybrid sorbent–catalyst with NiO loading of 25 wt% led to the best performances: (i) CaO molar conversion is 41.2% at the end of the 25th sorption cycle and (ii) average CH4 conversion and H2 production efficiency during 10 SESMR cycles are remarkable (99.1% and 96.1%, respectively). For the most efficient hybrid sorbent–catalyst (25 wt% NiO), the influence of CH4 flow rate and steam to carbon ratio (S/C) was also investigated, as well as its behavior during long-term cyclic operation of SESMR (30 cycles), where the H2 production time was just limited to pre-breakthrough period. The very efficient performance (average of H2 yield 97.3%) of the proposed hybrid sorbent–catalyst material in long-term operation confirmed its high potential for use in SESMR process.

Hamid R. Radfarnia; Maria C. Iliuta

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Development of a Dry Sorbent-based Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Technology for Retrofit in Existing Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research and development (R&D) project was to further the development of a solid sorbent-based CO2 capture process based on sodium carbonate (i.e. the Dry Carbonate Process) that is capable of capturing>90% of the CO2 as a nearly pure stream from coal-fired power plant flue gas with <35% increase in the cost of electrictiy (ICOE).

Nelson, Thomas; Coleman, Luke; Anderson, Matthew; Gupta, Raghubir; Herr, Joshua; Kalluri, Ranjeeth; Pavani, Maruthi

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

230

Hydrogen production by sorption-enhanced steam methane reforming process using CaO-Zr/Ni bifunctional sorbent–catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A bifunctional CaO-Zr/Ni (13, 18, and 20.5 wt% NiO) sorbent–catalyst was developed using the wet-mixing/sonication technique and applied for hydrogen production by sorption-enhanced steam methane reforming (SESMR), an intensified process that integrates hydrogen production with CO2 capture. The material was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and N2 physisorption (BET). CO2 sorption efficiency of the developed materials was evaluated during 25 CO2 sorption/regeneration cycles. The prepared sorbent–catalysts were then applied in the SESMR during 10 reaction cycles. The results showed that the bifunctional sorbent–catalyst with 20.5 wt% NiO loading presented the most suitable activity. The H2 yield of ?91% at the end of the 10th SESMR cycle is considerably higher than equilibrium H2 yield that could be obtained by traditional steam methane reforming.

Hamid R. Radfarnia; Maria C. Iliuta

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Brominated Sorbents for Small Cold-Side ESPs, Hot-Side ESPs and Fly Ash Use in Concrete  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work conducted from September 16, 2005 through December 31, 2008 on the project entitled �Brominated Sorbents for Small Cold-Side ESPs, Hot-Side ESPs and Fly Ash Use in Concrete�. The project covers testing at three host sites: Progress Energy H.F. Lee Station and the Midwest Generation Crawford and Will County Stations. At Progress Energy Lee 1, parametric tests were performed both with and without SO{sub 3} injection in order to determine the impact on the mercury sorbent performance. In addition, tests were performed on the hot-side of the air preheater, before the SO{sub 3} is injected, with H-PAC� sorbents designed for use at elevated temperatures. The BPAC� injection provided the expected mercury removal when the SO{sub 3} injection was off. A mercury removal rate due to sorbent of more than 80% was achieved at an injection rate of 8 lb/MMacf. The operation with SO{sub 3} injection greatly reduced the mercury sorbent performance. An important learning came from the injection of H-PAC� on the hot-side of the air preheater before the SO{sub 3} injection location. The H-PAC� injected in this manner appeared to be independent of the SO{sub 3} injection and provided better mercury removal than with injecting on the cold-side with SO{sub 3} injection. Consequently, one solution for plants like Lee, with SO{sub 3} injection, or plants with SO{sub 3} generated by the SCR catalyst, is to inject H-PAC� on the hot-side before the SO{sub 3} is in the flue gas. Even better performance is possible by injecting on the cold-side without the SO{sub 3}, however. During the parametric testing, it was discovered that the injection of B-PAC� (or H-PAC�) was having a positive impact upon ESP performance. It was decided to perform a 3-day continuous injection run with B-PAC� in order to determine whether Lee 1 could operate without SO{sub 3} injection. If the test proved positive, the continuous injection would continue as part of the long-term test. The injection of B-PAC� did allow for the operation of Lee 1 without SO{sub 3} injection and the long-term test was conducted from March 8 through April 7, 2006. The total mercury removal for the 30-day long-term test, excluding the first day when SO{sub 3} was injected and the last day when a plain PAC was used, averaged 85%. The achievement of 85% Hg removal over the 30 days longterm test is another milestone in the history of achievement of the Albemarle Environmental f/k/a Sorbent Technologies Corporation B-PAC� sorbent. A clear indication of the impact of B-PAC� on opacity came at the end of the long-term test. It was hoped that Lee 1 could be operated for several days after the end of the long-term test. It took less than a day before the opacity began to increase. The discovery that B-PAC� can improve ESP performance while capturing a large amount of mercury is another milestone for the B-PAC� mercury sorbent. The parametric testing at the Midwest Generation Crawford Station was divided into two phases; the first using C-PAC�, the concrete friendly sorbent, and the other using nonconcrete friendly materials. The first phase of the parametric tests was conducted before the long-term test. The second phase of the parametric testing was performed after the long-term test in order to avoid contaminating the fly ash containing the concrete friendly sorbents. The parametric test began with an injection rate of 1 lb/MMacf and, after a period to allow the mercury concentration to stabilize, the rate was increased to 3 lb/MMacf. The Hg removal for this test was about 60% due to sorbent and 69% total at the injection rate of 1 lb/MMacf and 80% due to sorbent and 84% total for the 3 lb/MMacf injection rate. The average total vapor phase mercury removal for the first 21 days of the long-term test was 82% at an injection rate o

Ronald Landreth

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

232

Effect of trapping on transport coherence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Influence of a trap (sink) on exciton transfer in molecular aggregates is investigated. Memory functions entering the generalized master equations are calculated. The presence of the sink changes their analytical form. We used the sink in trimers as an example to show that for large trapping-rate parameters the rest of the system is decoupled from the sink.

Ivan Barvk and Pavel Heman

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Entangled states of trapped atomic ions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... typical experiment involves trapping a few ions by using a combination of static and sinusoidally oscillating electric potentials that are applied between the electrodes of a linear quadrupole, an arrangement ... Fig. 1). When the trapped ions are laser cooled, they form a linear 'string', in which the spacings are determined by a balance between the horizontal (axial) ...

Rainer Blatt; David Wineland

2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

234

Investigation of mixed metal sorbent/catalysts for the simultaneous removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides. Semiannual report, Apr 1, 1998--Oct 31, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} using a regenerable solid sorbent will constitute an important improvement over the use of separate processes for the removal of these two pollutants from stack gases and possibly eliminate several shortcomings of the individual SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal operations. The work done at PETC and the DOE-funded investigation of the investigators on the sulfation and regeneration of alumina-supported cerium oxide sorbents have shown that they can perform well at relatively high temperatures (823--900 K) as regenerable desulfurization sorbents. Survey of the recent literature shows that addition of copper oxide to ceria lowers the sulfation temperature of ceria down to 773 K, sulfated ceria-based sorbents can function as selective SCR catalysts even at elevated temperatures, SO{sub 2} can be directly reduced to sulfur by CO on CuO-ceria catalysts, and ceria-based catalysts may have a potential for selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} by methane. These observations indicate a possibility of developing a ceria-based sorbent/catalyst which can remove both SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from flue gases within a relatively wide temperature window, produce significant amounts of elemental sulfur during regeneration, and use methane for the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. The objective of this research is to conduct kinetic and parametric studies of the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} with NH{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} over alumina-supported cerium oxide and copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbent/catalysts; investigate SO{sub 2} removal at lower temperatures by supported copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbents; and investigate the possibility of elemental sulfur production during regeneration with CO or with CH{sub 4} air mixtures. The sorbents consisting of cerium oxide and copper oxide impregnated on alumina have been prepared and characterized. Their sulfation performance has been investigated in a TGA setup, studying mainly the effects of temperature and sorbent composition. The results of the sulfation experiments have been evaluated and presented in this report. A study to model the sulfation selectivity of the two constituents of the sorbents is also underway.

Dr. Ates Akyurtlu; Dr. Jale F. Akyurtlu

1998-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

235

Standard Model tests with trapped radioactive atoms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the use of laser cooling and trapping for Standard Model tests, focusing on trapping of radioactive isotopes. Experiments with neutral atoms trapped with modern laser cooling techniques are testing several basic predictions of electroweak unification. For nuclear $\\beta$ decay, demonstrated trap techniques include neutrino momentum measurements from beta-recoil coincidences, along with methods to produce highly polarized samples. These techniques have set the best general constraints on non-Standard Model scalar interactions in the first generation of particles. They also have the promise to test whether parity symmetry is maximally violated, to search for tensor interactions, and to search for new sources of time reversal violation. There are also possibilites for exotic particle searches. Measurements of the strength of the weak neutral current can be assisted by precision atomic experiments using traps of small numbers of radioactive atoms, and sensitivity to possible time-reversal violating electric dipole moments can be improved.

J. A. Behr; G. Gwinner

2009-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

236

Field evaluation of natural gas and dry sorbent injection for MWC emissions control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), in cooperation with the Olmsted Waste-to-Energy Facility (OWEF) and with subcontracted engineering services from the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER), has completed the detailed engineering and preparation of construction specifications for an Emissions Reduction Testing System (ERTS). The ERTS has been designed for retrofit to one of two 100-ton/day municipal waste combustors at the OWEF, located in Rochester, Minnesota. The purpose of the retrofit is to conduct a field evaluation of a combined natural gas and sorbent injection process (IGT`s METHANE de-TOX{sup SM}, IGT Patent No. 5,105,747) for reducing the emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), hydrochloric acid (HCI), oxides of sulfur (SO{sub x}), carbon monoxide (CO), total hydrocarbons (THC), and chlorinated hydrocarbons (dioxin/furans). In addition, the design includes modifications for the control of heavy metals (HM). Development of the process should allow the waste-to-energy industry to meet the Federal New Source Performance Standards for these pollutants at significantly lower costs when compared to existing technology of Thermal deNO{sub x} combined with spray dryer scrubber/fabric filters. Additionally, the process should reduce boiler corrosion and increase both the thermal and power production efficiency of the facility.

Wohadlo, S.; Abbasi, H.; Cygan, D. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)] Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Investigation of combined SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} removal by Ceria Sorbents. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} using a regenerable solid sorbent will constitute an important improvement over the use of separate processes for the removal of these two pollutants from stack gases and possibly eliminate several shortcomings of the individual SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal operations. This process will allow simple and reliable cleanup of large volumes of stack gases at a competitive cost; produce a concentrated stream of SO{sub 2} which an easily be converted into valuable by-products; be compatible with existing power generation plants; and essentially eliminate the waste materials generated in some other sulfur removal processes. Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) and UOP/Shell have developed processes which both employ copper oxide-based sorbents in different reactor configurations, namely, former uses a regenerative fluidized bed while the latter employs a cyclic fixed bed contactor. More recent studies at PETC considered cerium oxide as an alternate sorbent to CuO{sup (1,2)}. Ceria improves the resistance of the alumina support to thermal sintering and produces a regeneration off-gas stream that can be easily converted to elemental sulfur. It has potentially higher sulfur capture capacity than copper. The objective of this research is to determine the effects of ammonia on the sulfation of the sorbent; to determine the effects of fly ash on the sulfation and regeneration of the sorbent; to obtain a rate expression for the regeneration of alumina-supported CeO{sub 2} sorbents; to model reactor configurations for a commercial scale combined CeO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} sorbent; and to study alternative designs, effects of design variables on the performance of the facility, and the economics of the process using the developed model.

Akyurtlu, A.; Akyurtlu, J.F.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Investigation of combined SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} removal by ceria sorbents. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1993--March 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} using a regenerable solid sorbent will constitute an important improvement over the use of separate processes for the removal of these two pollutants from stack gases and possibly eliminate several shortcomings of the individual SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal operations. This process will allow simple and reliable cleanup of large volumes of stack gases at a competitive cost; produce a concentrated stream of SO{sub 2} which an easily be converted into valuable by-products; be compatible with existing power generation plants; and essentially eliminate the waste materials generated in some other sulfur removal processes. Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) and UOP/Shell have developed processes which both employ copper oxide-based sorbents in different reactor configurations, namely, former uses a regenerative fluidized bed while the latter employs a cyclic fixed bed contactor. More recent studies at PETC considered cerium oxide as an alternate sorbent to CuO. Ceria improves the resistance of the alumina support to thermal sintering and produces a regeneration off-gas stream that can be easily converted to elemental sulfur. It has a potentially higher sulfur capture capacity than copper. The objective of this research is to determine the effects of ammonia on the sulfation of the sorbent; to determine the effects of fly ash on the sulfation and regeneration of the sorbent; to obtain a rate expression for the regeneration of alumina-supported CeO{sub 2} sorbents; to model reactor configurations for a commercial scale combined CeO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} sorbent; and to study alternative designs, effects of design variables on the performance of the facility, and the economics of the process using the developed model.

Akyurtlu, A.; Akyurtlu, J.F.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Investigation of combined SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} removal by Ceria sorbents. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1994--September 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} using a regenerable solid sorbent will constitute an important improvement over the use of separate processes for the removal of these two pollutants from stack gases and possibly eliminate several shortcomings of the individual SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}removal operations. This process will allow simple and reliable cleanup of large volumes of stack gases at a competitive cost; produce a concentrated stream of SO{sub 2} which an easily be converted into valuable by-products; be compatible with existing power generation plants; and essentially eliminate the waste materials generated in some other sulfur removal processes. Recent studies at PETC considered cerium oxide as an alternate sorbent to CuO. Ceria improves the resistance of the alumina support to thermal sintering and produces a regeneration off-gas stream that can be easily converted to elemental sulfur. It has a potentially higher sulfur capture capacity than copper. It is readily available at a moderate cost. Although it is more expensive than copper oxide, since the cost of metal oxide is a small fraction of the total sorbent cost this may not be a significant factor. The objective of this research is to determine the effects of ammonia on the sulfation of the sorbent; to determine the effects of fly ash on the sulfation and regeneration of the sorbent; to obtain a rate expression for the regeneration of alumina-supported CeO{sub 2} sorbents; to model reactor configurations for a commercial scale combined CeO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} sorbent; and to study alternative designs, effects of design variables on the performance of the facility, and the economics of the process using the developed model.

Akyurtlu, A.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Investigation of combined SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} removal by ceria sorbents. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1993--December 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} using a regenerable solid sorbent will constitute an important improvement over the use of separate processes for the removal of these two pollutants from stack gases and possibly eliminate several shortcomings of the individual SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal operations. This process will allow simple and reliable cleanup of large volumes of stack gases as a competitive cost; produce a concentrated stream of SO{sub 2} which can easily be converted into valuable by-products; be compatible with existing power generation plants; and essentially eliminate the waste materials generated in some other sulfur removal processes. Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) and UOP/Shell have developed processes which both employ copper oxide-based sorbents in different reactor configurations, namely, former uses a regenerative fluidized bed while the latter employs a cyclic fixed bed contactor. More recent studies at PETC considered cerium oxide as an alternate sorbent to CuO. Ceria improves the resistance of the alumina support to thermal sintering and produces a regeneration off-gas stream that can be easily converted to elemental sulfur. It has a potentially higher sulfur capture capacity than copper. The objective of this research is to determine the effects of ammonia on the sulfation of the sorbent; to determine the effects of fly ash on the sulfation and regeneration of the sorbent; to obtain a rate expression for the regeneration of alumina-supported CeO{sub 2} sorbents; to model reactor configurations for a commercial scale combined CeO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} sorbent; and to study alternative designs, effects of design variables on the performance of the facility, and the economics of the process using the developed model.

Akyurtlu, A.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multielement sorbent trap" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Investigation of combined SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} removal by ceria sorbents. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} using a regenerable solid sorbent will constitute an important improvement over the use of separate processes for the removal of these two pollutants from stack gases and possibly eliminate several shortcomings of the individual SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal operations. This process will allow simple and reliable cleanup of large volumes of stack gases at a competitive cost; produce a concentrated stream of SO{sub 2} which can easily be converted into valuable by-products; be compatible with existing power generation plants; and essentially eliminate the waste materials generated in some other sulfur removal processes. Recent studies at PETC considered cerium oxide as an alternate sorbent to CuO. Ceria improves the resistance of the alumina support to thermal sintering and produces a regeneration off-gas stream that can be easily converted to elemental sulfur. It has a potentially higher sulfur capture capacity than copper. It is readily available at a moderate cost. Although it is more expensive than copper oxide, since the cost of metal oxide is a small fraction of the total sorbent cost this may not be a significant factor. The objective of this research is to determine the effects of ammonia on the sulfation of the sorbent; to determine the effects of fly ash on the sulfation and regeneration of the sorbent; to obtain a rate expression for the regeneration of alumina-supported CeO{sub 2} sorbents; to model reactor configurations for a commercial scale combined CeO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} sorbent; and to study alternative designs, effects of design variables on the performance of the facility, and the economics of the process using the developed model.

Akyurtlu, A.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Microfabricated Renewable Beads-Trapping/Releasing Flow Cell...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Microfabricated Renewable Beads-TrappingReleasing Flow Cell for Rapid Antigen-Antibody Reaction in Chemiluminescent Immunoassay Microfabricated Renewable Beads-TrappingReleasing...

243

Characterization of Trapped Lignin-Degrading Microbes in Tropical...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Trapped Lignin-Degrading Microbes in Tropical Forest Soil. Characterization of Trapped Lignin-Degrading Microbes in Tropical Forest Soil. Abstract: Lignin is often the most...

244

H2-Assisted NOx Traps: Test Cell Results Vehicle Installations...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

H2-Assisted NOx Traps: Test Cell Results Vehicle Installations H2-Assisted NOx Traps: Test Cell Results Vehicle Installations 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: ArvinMeritor...

245

H2-Assisted NOx Traps: Test Cell Results Vehicle Installations  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sam Crane August 28, 2003 H 2 -Assisted NOx Traps: Test Cell Results Vehicle Installations 2 Project Objectives * Determine Advantages of H 2 Assisted NO x Trap Regeneration *...

246

NOx Adsorber (Lean NOx Trap) Fundamentals (Agreement #10049 ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NOx Adsorber (Lean NOx Trap) Fundamentals (Agreement 10049 - PNNL Project 47120) NOx Adsorber (Lean NOx Trap) Fundamentals (Agreement 10049 - PNNL Project 47120) Presentation...

247

Modeling the Regeneration Chemistry of Lean NOx Traps | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the Regeneration Chemistry of Lean NOx Traps Modeling the Regeneration Chemistry of Lean NOx Traps Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored...

248

Steam Trap Maintenance as a Profit Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Eighteenth Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, April 17-18, 1996 EXCUSES Everybody thinks his or her steam trap maintenance is good. Surveysl have shown the following are the most popular excuses encountered when managers are confronted... for steam traps. 192 ESL-IE-96-04-28 Proceedings from the Eighteenth Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, April 17-18, 1996 5. Set up a trap maintenance program C. Prepare and present a report to that will: management on the results...

Bouchillon, J. L.

249

Compact RF resonator for cryogenic ion traps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on the investigation and implementation of a lumped-component, radio-frequency resonator used in a cryogenic vacuum environment to drive an ion trap. The resonator was required to achieve the voltages necessary to trap (about 100 V), while dissipating as little power as possible (< 250 mW). Ultimately a voltage gain of 100 was measured at 5.7 K. Single calcium ions were confined in a trap driven by this device, providing proof of successful resonator operation at low temperature.

D. Gandolfi; M. Niedermayr; M. Kumph; M. Brownnutt; R. Blatt

2012-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

250

Nonlinear Spectroscopy of Trapped Ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nonlinear spectroscopy employs a series of laser pulses to interrogate dynamics in large interacting many-body systems, and has become a highly successful method for experiments in chemical physics. Current quantum optical experiments approach system sizes and levels of complexity which require the development of efficient techniques to assess spectral and dynamical features with scalable experimental overhead. However, established methods from optical spectroscopy of macroscopic ensembles cannot be applied straightforwardly to few-atom systems. Based on the ideas proposed in [M. Gessner et al. New J. Phys. 16 092001 (2014)], we develop a diagrammatic approach to construct nonlinear measurement protocols for controlled quantum systems and discuss experimental implementations with trapped ion technology in detail. These methods in combination with distinct features of ultra-cold matter systems allow us to monitor and analyze excitation dynamics in both the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom. They are independent of system size, and can therefore reliably probe systems where, e.g., quantum state tomography becomes prohibitively expensive. We propose signals that can probe steady state currents, detect the influence of anharmonicities on phonon transport, and identify signatures of chaotic dynamics near a quantum phase transition in an Ising-type spin chain.

Frank Schlawin; Manuel Gessner; Shaul Mukamel; Andreas Buchleitner

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

251

The Canadian Penning Trap Spectrometer at Argonne  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Canadian Penning Trap (CPT) mass spectrometer is a device used for high-precision mass measurements on short-lived isotopes. It is located at the ATLAS superconducting heavy-ion linac facility where a nove...

G. Savard; R. C. Barber; C. Boudreau…

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

The Canadian Penning Trap Spectrometer at Argonne  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Canadian Penning Trap (CPT) mass spectrometer is a device used for high-precision mass measurements on short-lived isotopes. It is located at the ATLAS superconducting heavy-ion linac facility where a nove...

G. Savard; R. C. Barber; C. Boudreau; F. Buchinger; J. Caggiano…

253

pH-biased isoelectric trapping separations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The classical isoelectric trapping (IET) technique, using the multicompartment electrolyzer (MCE), has been one of the most successful electrophoretic techniques in preparative-scale protein separations. IET is capable of achieving high resolution...

Shave, Evan Eric

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

254

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside formations of shale - fine grained sedimentary rocks that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas. Just a few years ago, much of...

255

Scaling the Ion Trap Quantum Processor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...atomic ion species to act as "refrigerator" ions to quench the...scale beyond the QCCD in a modular architecture, one can link separate...trapped ion technology. (A) Modular distributed...A major challenge in both modular quantum computer...

C. Monroe; J. Kim

2013-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

256

FEMP-FTA--Steam Trap Performance Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Steam Trap Function Steam Trap Function Steam traps are automatic valves used in every steam system to remove conden- sate, air, and other non-condensable gases while preventing or minimizing the passing of steam. If condensate is allowed to collect, it reduces the flow capacity of steam lines and the thermal capacity of heat transfer equipment. In addition, excess condensate can lead to "water hammer," with potentially destructive and dangerous results. Air that remains after system startup reduces steam pressure and temperature and may also reduce the thermal capacity of heat transfer equipment. Non-condensable gases, such as oxygen and carbon dioxide, cause corrosion. Steam that passes through the trap provides no heating ser- vice. This effectively reduces the heating capacity

257

Energy Savings Through Steam Trap Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Savings through Steam Trap Management Chris Gibbs, Account Manager, Armstrong International, Inc., Three Rivers, MI ESL-IE-08-05-08 Proceedings from theThirtieth Industrial Energy Technology Conference...-based steam trap management application developed by Armstrong International. The application calculates steam loss, fuel loss, dollar loss and CO 2 emission generation. The database allows for trend analysis, automatic energy report generation...

Gibbs, C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Muon trapping at monovacancies in iron  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Positive-muon—spin-rotation experiments were performed on electron irradiated iron. A new defect-associated frequency is observed which is assigned to muons trapped at monovacancies. The hyperfine field at the vacancy site is -0.956 T at 140 K. The diffusion constant for ?+ in iron deduced from the trapping rate follows an Arrhenius law with an activation energy of 38±3 meV between 90 and 190 K.

A. Möslang; H. Graf; G. Balzer; E. Recknagel; A. Weidinger; Th. Wichert; R. I. Grynszpan

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Antihydrogen Trapped in the ALPHA Experiment  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

In 2010 the ALPHA collaboration succeeded in trapping antihydrogen atoms for the first time.[i]  Stored antihydrogen promises to be a unique tool for making high precision measurements of the structure of this first anti-atom. Achieving this milestone presented several substantial experimental challenges and this talk will describe how they were overcome.   The unique design features of the ALPHA apparatus will be explained.[ii]  These allow a high intensity positron source and an antiproton imaging detector similar to the one used in the ATHENA[iii] experiment to be combined with an innovative magnet design of the anti-atom trap. This seeks to minimise the perturbations to trapped charged particles which may cause particle loss and heating[iv].   The diagnostic techniques used to measure the diameter, number, density, and temperatures of both plasmas will be presented as will the methods developed to actively compress and cool of both plasma species to sizes and temperatures [v],[vi], [vii] where trapping attempts with a reasonable chance of success can be tried.   The results of the successful trapping experiments will be outlined as well as some subsequent experiments to improve the trapping rate and storage time. [i] 'Trapped antihydrogen' G.B. Andresen et al., Nature 468, 673 (2010) [ii]'A Magnetic Trap for Antihydrogen Confinement' W. Bertsche et al., Nucl. Instr. Meth. Phys. Res. A566, 746 (2006) [iii] Production and detection of cold antihydrogen atoms M.Amoretti et al., Nature 419, 456 (2002). [iv]' Antihydrogen formation dynamics in a multipolar neutral anti-atom trap' G.B. Andresen et al., Phys. Lett. B 685, 141 (2010) [v]' Evaporative Cooling of Antiprotons to Cryogenic Temperatures',                                   G.B. Andresen et al. Phys. Rev. Lett 105, 013003 (2010) [vi]'Compression of Antiproton Clouds for Antihydrogen Trapping' G. B. Andresen et al. Phys. Rev. Lett 100, 203401 (2008) [vii]  'Autoresonant Excitation of Antiproton Plasmas' G.B. Andresen et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 025002 (2011) Organizer: Ferdinand Hahn PH/DT Detector Seminar webpage  

None

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

260

Investigation of combined SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} removal by ceria sorbents. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} using a regenerable solid sorbent will constitute an important improvement over the use of separate processes for the removal of these two pollutants from stack gases and possibly eliminate several shortcomings of the individual SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal operations. Recent studies at PETC considered cerium oxide as an alternate sorbent to CuO. The present study aims to determine the effects of ammonia on the sulfation of the sorbent and to obtain a rate expression for the regeneration of alumina-supported CeO{sub 2} sorbents. The sulfation experiments indicated that 100% conversion of ceria could be attained. Activation energy for the sulfation reaction was found to be 19 kJ/mol. The rate of sulfation reaction is first order with respect to SO{sub 2} and solid reactant concentrations. For regeneration with hydrogen, the activation energy and the reaction order with respect to hydrogen was found to be 114 kJ/mol and 0.56, respectively. The ceria sorbent preserved its activity and structural stability after 6 cycles. The information obtained from these studies will be used to develop models for reactor-regenerator configurations. Subsequently, the SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} removal facility will be integrated into the power production process using a commercial process simulation software. In this quarter of the project, the main focus was on the performance of the experimental program for the regeneration of the ceria sorbent by hydrogen and evaluation of experimental results.

Akyurtlu, A.; Akyurtlu, J.F.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multielement sorbent trap" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Enhancing the use of coals by gas reburning-sorbent injection. Environmental monitoring quarterly report No. 9, July 1--September 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Clean Coal Technology project will demonstrate a combination of two developed technologies to reduce both NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions: gas reburning and calcium based dry sorbent injection. The demonstrations will be conducted on two pre-NSPS utility boilers representative of the US boilers which contribute significantly to the inventory of acid rain precursor emissions: tangentially and cyclone fired units. Gas reburning is a combustion modification technique that consists of firing 80--85 percent of the fuel (corresponding to the total heat release) in the lower furnace. Reduction of NO{sub x} to molecular nitrogen (N{sub 2}) is accomplished via the downstream injection of the remaining fuel requirement in the form of natural gas (which also reduces the total SO{sub x} emissions). In a third stage, burnout air is injected at lower temperatures in the upper furnace to complete the combustion process without generating significant additional NO{sub x}. Dry sorbent injection consists of injecting calcium based sorbents (such as limestone, dolomite, or hydrated lime) into the combustion products. For sulfation of the sorbent to CaSO{sub 4}, an injection temperature of about 1230{degrees}C is optimum, but calcium-sulfur reactions can also take place at lower temperatures. Thus, the sorbent may be injected at different locations, such as with the burnout air, at the exit from the superheater, or into the ducting downstream of the air heater with H{sub 2}0 added for humidification. The calcium sulfate or sulfite products are collected together with unreacted sorbent fly ash by the electrostatic precipitator. The specific goal of this project is to demonstrate NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emission reductions of 60 percent and 50 percent, respectively, on two coal fired utility boilers having the design characteristics mentioned above.

Not Available

1992-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

262

Enhancing the use of coals by gas reburning-sorbent injection: Volume 4 -- Gas reburning-sorbent injection at Lakeside Unit 7, City Water, Light and Power, Springfield, Illinois. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A demonstration of Gas Reburning-Sorbent Injection (GR-SI) has been completed at a cyclone-fired utility boiler. The Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER) has designed, retrofitted and tested a GR-SI system at City Water Light and Power`s 33 MWe Lakeside Station Unit 7. The program goals of 60% NO{sub x} emissions reduction and 50% SO{sub 2} emissions reduction were exceeded over the long-term testing period; the NO{sub x} reduction averaged 63% and the SO{sub 2} reduction averaged 58%. These were achieved with an average gas heat input of 22% and a calcium (sorbent) to sulfur (coal) molar ratio of 1.8. GR-SI resulted in a reduction in thermal efficiency of approximately 1% at full load due to firing natural gas which forms more moisture in flue gas than coal and also results in a slight increase in air heater exit gas temperature. Minor impacts on other areas of unit performance were measured and are detailed in this report. The project at Lakeside was carried out in three phases, in which EER designed the GR-SI system (Phase 1), completed construction and start-up activities (Phase 2), and evaluated its performance with both short parametric tests and a long-term demonstration (Phase 3). This report contains design and technical performance data; the economics data for all sites are presented in Volume 5.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Solar light trapping in slanted conical-pore photonic crystals: Beyond statistical ray trapping  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar light trapping in slanted conical-pore photonic crystals: Beyond statistical ray trapping of AIP content is subject to the terms at: http://jap.aip.org/about/rights_and_permissions #12;Solar Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A7, Canada (Received 8 October 2012; accepted 3 April 2013; published

John, Sajeev

264

Modular cryostat for ion trapping with surface-electrode ion traps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a simple cryostat purpose built for use with surface-electrode ion traps, designed around an affordable, large cooling power commercial pulse tube refrigerator. A modular vacuum enclosure with a single vacuum space facilitates interior access, and enables rapid turnaround and flexiblity for future modifications. Long rectangular windows provide nearly 360 degrees of optical access in the plane of the ion trap, while a circular bottom window near the trap enables NA 0.4 light collection without the need for in-vacuum optics. We evaluate the system's mechanical and thermal characteristics, and we quantify ion trapping performance by trapping 40Ca+, finding small stray electric fields, long ion lifetimes, and low ion heating rates.

Vittorini, Grahame; Brown, Kenneth R; Harter, Alexa W; Doret, S Charles

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Modular cryostat for ion trapping with surface-electrode ion traps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a simple cryostat purpose built for use with surface-electrode ion traps designed around an affordable large cooling power commercial pulse tube refrigerator. A modular vacuum enclosure with a single vacuum space facilitates interior access and enables rapid turnaround and flexibility for future modifications. Long rectangular windows provide nearly 360° of optical access in the plane of the ion trap while a circular bottom window near the trap enables NA 0.4 light collection without the need for in-vacuum optics. We evaluate the system's mechanical and thermal characteristics and we quantify ion trapping performance by trapping 40Ca+ finding small stray electric fields long ion lifetimes and low ion heating rates.

Grahame Vittorini; Kenneth Wright; Kenneth R. Brown; Alexa W. Harter; S. Charles Doret

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Modular cryostat for ion trapping with surface-electrode ion traps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a simple cryostat purpose built for use with surface-electrode ion traps, designed around an affordable, large cooling power commercial pulse tube refrigerator. A modular vacuum enclosure with a single vacuum space facilitates interior access, and enables rapid turnaround and flexiblity for future modifications. Long rectangular windows provide nearly 360 degrees of optical access in the plane of the ion trap, while a circular bottom window near the trap enables NA 0.4 light collection without the need for in-vacuum optics. We evaluate the system's mechanical and thermal characteristics, and we quantify ion trapping performance by trapping 40Ca+, finding small stray electric fields, long ion lifetimes, and low ion heating rates.

Grahame Vittorini; Kenneth Wright; Kenneth R. Brown; Alexa W. Harter; S. Charles Doret

2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

267

A new class of non-zeolitic sorbents for air separations: Lithium ion exchanged pillared clays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Zeolites are the only known sorbents that adsorb N{sub 2} selectively over O{sub 2}, and are used for industrial air separation. Pillared clays (PILCs) have a high Broensted acidity (k.e., high proton density). It is found in this study that when the protons are exchanged by alkali metal ions, in particular Li{sup +}, the ion exchanged pillared clays can exhibit a high N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} adsorption selectivity that rivals that of the zeolites. The first result shows a pure-component adsorption ratio of N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} = 3.2 (at 25 C and 1 atm) for Li{sup +}-exchanged PILC. The N{sub 2} capacity, however, is only 20% that of the zeolite, and remains to be improved. A systematic investigation is conducted on the effects of three factors on the N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} selectivity: (1) starting clays (tetrahedral vs octahedral isomorphous substitution and clays with different charge densities), (2) different metal oxides as pillars, and (3) different ion exchange alkali metal cations (Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, and Cs{sup +}). The highest N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} selectivities are achieved by using clays with the highest charge densities, metal oxides forming pillars with the narrowest gallery spaces, and ion exchange cations with the smallest ionic radii. Effects by all three factors are qualitatively understood. The high N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} selectivity on the Li{sup +} exchanged PILC is the result of the small ionic radius (and hence high polarizing power) of Li{sup +} and the strong quadrupole moment of the N{sub 2} molecule. Moreover, a technique is developed with which the amount of the exchanged cations can exceed that allowed by the original cation exchange capacity of the clay by using a high pH value in the ion exchange solution.

Cheng, L.S.; Yang, R.T. [State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Ball-grid array architecture for microfabricated ion traps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

State-of-the-art microfabricated ion traps for quantum information research are approaching nearly one hundred control electrodes. We report here on the development and testing of a new architecture for microfabricated ion traps, built around ball-grid array (BGA) connections, that is suitable for increasingly complex trap designs. In the BGA trap, through-substrate vias bring electrical signals from the back side of the trap die to the surface trap structure on the top side. Gold-ball bump bonds connect the back side of the trap die to an interposer for signal routing from the carrier. Trench capacitors fabricated into the trap die replace area-intensive surface or edge capacitors. Wirebonds in the BGA architecture are moved to the interposer. These last two features allow the trap die to be reduced to only the area required to produce trapping fields. The smaller trap dimensions allow tight focusing of an addressing laser beam for fast single-qubit rotations. Performance of the BGA trap as characterized with $^{40}$Ca$^+$ ions is comparable to previous surface-electrode traps in terms of ion heating rate, mode frequency stability, and storage lifetime. We demonstrate two-qubit entanglement operations with $^{171}$Yb$^+$ ions in a second BGA trap.

Nicholas D. Guise; Spencer D. Fallek; Kelly E. Stevens; K. R. Brown; Curtis Volin; Alexa W. Harter; Jason M. Amini; Robert E. Higashi; Son Thai Lu; Helen M. Chanhvongsak; Thi A. Nguyen; Matthew S. Marcus; Thomas R. Ohnstein; Daniel W. Youngner

2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

269

Rapid Quantitation of Ascorbic and Folic Acids in SRM 3280 Multivitamin/Multielement Tablets using Flow-Injection Tandem Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

RATIONALE: Ascorbic acid (AA) and folic acid (FA) are water-soluble vitamins and are usually fortified in food and dietary supplements. For the safety of human health, proper intake of these vitamins is recommended. Improvement in the analysis time required for the quantitative determination of these vitamins in food and nutritional formulations is desired. METHODS: A simple and fast (~5 min) in-tube sample preparation was performed, independently for FA and AA, by mixing extraction solvent with a powdered sample aliquot followed by agitation, centrifugation, and filtration to recover an extract for analysis. Quantitative detection was achieved by flow-injection (1 L injection volume) electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) in negative ion mode using the method of standard addition. RESULTS: Method of standard addition was employed for the quantitative estimation of each vitamin in a sample extract. At least 2 spiked and 1 non-spiked sample extract were injected in triplicate for each quantitative analysis. Given an injection-to-injection interval of approximately 2 min, about 18 min was required to complete the quantitative estimation of each vitamin. The concentration values obtained for the respective vitamins in the standard reference material (SRM) 3280 using this approach were within the statistical range of the certified values provided in the NIST Certificate of Analysis. The estimated limit of detections of FA and AA were 13 and 5.9 ng/g, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Flow-injection ESI-MS/MS was successfully applied for the rapid quantitation of FA and AA in SRM 3280 multivitamin/multielement tablets.

Bhandari, Deepak [ORNL] [ORNL; Kertesz, Vilmos [ORNL] [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Charge trapping in imidazolium ionic liquids  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

trapping in imidazolium ionic liquids trapping in imidazolium ionic liquids I. A. Shkrob and J. F. Wishart J. Phys. Chem. B 113, 5582-5592 (2009). [Find paper at ACS Publications] or use ACS Articles on Request Abstract: Room-temperature ionic liquids (ILs) are a promising class of solvents for applications ranging from photovoltaics to solvent extractions. Some of these applications involve the exposure of the ILs to ionizing radiation, which stimulates interest in their radiation and photo- chemistry. In the case of ILs consisting of 1,3-dialkylimidazolium cations and hydrophobic anions, ionization, charge transfer and redox reactions yield charge-trapped species thought to be radicals resulting from neutralization of the constituent ions. Using computational chemistry methods and the recent results on electron spin resonance (ESR) and transient absorption

271

Cavity cooling of an optically trapped nanoparticle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study the cooling of a dielectric nanoscale particle trapped in an optical cavity. We derive the frictional force for motion in the cavity field and show that the cooling rate is proportional to the square of oscillation amplitude and frequency. Both the radial and axial components of the center-of-mass motion of the trapped particle, which are coupled by the cavity field, are cooled. This motion is analogous to two coupled but damped pendulums. Our simulations show that the nanosphere can be cooled to e-1 of its initial momentum over time scales of hundredths of milliseconds.

P. F. Barker and M. N. Shneider

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

272

Thermal electric vapor trap arrangement and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A technique for trapping vapor within a section of a tube is disclosed herein. This technique utilizes a conventional, readily providable thermal electric device having a hot side and a cold side and means for powering the device to accomplish this. The cold side of this device is positioned sufficiently close to a predetermined section of the tube and is made sufficiently cold so that any condensable vapor passing through the predetermined tube section is condensed and trapped, preferably within the predetermined tube section itself. 4 figs.

Alger, T.

1988-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

A Model of Transient Thermal Transport Phenomena Applied to the Carbonation and Calcination of a Sorbent Particle for Calcium Oxide Looping CO2 Capture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

looping is selected as the model cycle because of its suitability for solar-driven carbon dioxide captureA Model of Transient Thermal Transport Phenomena Applied to the Carbonation and Calcination of a Sorbent Particle for Calcium Oxide Looping CO2 Capture Lindsey Yue and Wojciech Lipi´nski, The Australian

274

Cross-flow, filter-sorbent catalyst for particulate, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} control. First quarterly technical progress report, 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This synopsis describes a new concept for integrated pollutant control: a cross-flow filter comprised of layered, gas permeable membranes that act as a particulate filter, an SO{sub 2} sorbent, and a NO{sub x} reduction catalyst.

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Effect of High-Pressure Impregnation on Structure Variation and Desulfurization Property of a Zn-Based Sorbent Prepared Using Lignite as a Support  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effect of High-Pressure Impregnation on Structure Variation and Desulfurization Property of a Zn-Based Sorbent Prepared Using Lignite as a Support ... Lignite reserves are relatively abundant in China; however, its utilization is significantly limited because of its high water content and low calorific value. ...

Xiurong Ren; Qiang He; Yurong Dong; Meijun Wang; Liping Chang; Weiren Bao

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

276

Characterization of Trapped Lignin-Degrading Microbes in Tropical Forest Soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characterization of Trapped Lignin-Degrading Microbes inCharacterization of Trapped Lignin-Degrading Microbes inCharacterization of Trapped Lignin-Degrading Microbes in

DeAngelis, Kristen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Investigation of combined SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} removal by ceria sorbents. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1995--March 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}using a regenerable solid sorbent will constitute an important improvement over the use of separate processes for the removal of these two pollutants from stack gases and possibly eliminate several shortcomings of the individual SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal operations. Recent studies at PETC considered cerium oxide as an alternate sorbent to CuO. The present study aims to determine the effects of ammonia on the sulfation of the sorbent and to obtain a rate expression for the regeneration of alumina-supported CeO{sub 2} sorbents. The sulfation experiments indicated that 100 % conversion of ceria can be attained. Activation energy for the sulfation reaction was found to be 19 kJ/mol. The rate of sulfation reaction is first order with respect to SO{sub 2} and solid reactant concentrations. For regeneration with hydrogen, the activation energy and the reaction order with respect to hydrogen was found to be 114 kJ/mol and 0.56, respectively. The ceria sorbent preserved its activity and structural stability after 6 cycles. In the last quarter regeneration with methane was studied. Since regeneration with methane is more complicated than regeneration with hydrogen, the evaluation of data needs the development of new methods. The information obtained from these studies will be used to develop models for reactor-regenerator configurations. Subsequently, the SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} removal facility will be integrated into the power production process using a commercial process simulation software.

Akyurtlu, A.; Akyurtlu, J.F.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Enhancing the use of coals by gas reburning-sorbent injection. Environmental monitoring quarterly report No. 8, April 1--June 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clean Coal Technology implies the use of coal in an environmentally acceptable manner. Coal combustion results in the emission of two types of acid rain precursors: oxides of sulfur (sox) and oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}). This Clean Coal Technology project will demonstrate a combination of two developed technologies to reduce both NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions. Gas reburning and calcium based dry sorbent injection. The demonstrations will be conducted on two pre-NSPS utility boilers representative of the US boilers which contribute significantly to the inventory of acid rain precursor emissions. Gas reburning is a combustion modification technique that consists of firing 80--85 percent of the fuel (corresponding to the total heat release) in the lower furnace. Reduction of NO{sub x} to molecular nitrogen (N{sub 2}) is accomplished via the downstream injection of the remaining fuel requirement in the form of natural gas (which also reduces the total SO{sub x} emissions). In a third stage, burnout air is injected at lower temperatures in the upper furnace to complete the combustion process without generating significant additional NO{sub x}. Dry sorbent injection consists of injecting calcium based sorbents (such as limestone, dolomite, or hydrated lime) into the combustion products. For sulfation of the sorbent to CaSO{sub 4}, an injection temperature of about 1230{degrees}C is optimum, but calcium-sulfur reactions can also take place at lower temperatures. Thus, the sorbent may be injected at different locations, such as with the burnout air, at the exit from the superheater, or into the ducting downstream of the air heater with H{sub 2}O added for humidification. The specific goal of this project is to demonstrate NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emission reductions of 60 percent and 50 percent, respectively, on two coal fired utility boilers having the design characteristics mentioned above.

Not Available

1992-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

279

Exciton self-trapping in bulk polyethylene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We studied theoretically the behavior of an injected electron-hole pair in crystalline polyethylene. Time-dependent adiabatic evolution by ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations show that the pair will become self-trapped in the perfect crystal, with a trapping energy of about 0.38 eV, with formation of a pair of trans-gauche conformational defects, three C$_2$H$_4$ units apart on the same chain. The electron is confined in the inter-chain pocket created by a local, 120$^\\circ$ rotation of the chain between the two defects, while the hole resides on the chain and is much less bound. Despite the large energy stored in the trapped excitation, there does not appear to be a direct non-radiative channel for electron-hole recombination. This suggests that intrinsic self-trapping of electron-hole pairs inside the ideal quasi-crystalline fraction of PE might not be directly relevant for electrical damage in high-voltage cables.

D. Ceresoli; M. C. Righi; E. Tosatti; S. Scandolo; G. Santoro; S. Serra

2005-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

280

Quantum Stochastic Heating of a Trapped Ion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The resonant heating of a harmonically trapped ion by a standing-wave light field is described as a quantum stochastic process combining a coherent Schroedinger evolution with Bohr-Einstein quantum jumps. Quantum and semi-quantum treatments are compared.

L. Horvath; R. Fisher; M. J. Collett; H. J. Carmichael

2007-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multielement sorbent trap" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Magneto-Optic Trapping of 210Fr  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The alkali element francium has no stable isotopes and has eluded extensive study because sufficient quantities have not been available for detailed investigations. More than 1000 210Fr atoms have now been contained in a magneto-optic trap. This number is sufficient to allow extensive studies of Fr atomic properties that are necessary input for future tests of fundamental interactions.

J. E. Simsarian; A. Ghosh; G. Gwinner; L. A. Orozco; G. D. Sprouse; P. A. Voytas

1996-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

282

TAILORING INORGANIC SORBENTS FOR SRS STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS: OPTIMIZED MONOSODIUM TITANATE PHASE II FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a final report of Phase II testing activities for the development of a modified monosodium titanate (MST) that exhibits improved strontium and actinide removal characteristics compared to the baseline MST material. The activities included determining the key synthesis conditions for preparation of the modified MST, preparation of the modified MST at a larger scale by a commercial vendor, demonstration of the strontium and actinide removal characteristics with actual tank waste supernate and measurement of filtration characteristics. Key findings and conclusions include the following. Testing evaluated three synthetic methods and eleven process parameters for the optimum synthesis conditions for the preparation on an improved form of MST. We selected the post synthesis method (Method 3) for continued development based on overall sorbate removal performance. We successfully prepared three batches of the modified MST using Method 3 procedure at a 25-gram scale. The laboratory prepared modified MST exhibited increased sorption kinetics with simulated and actual waste solutions and similar filtration characteristics to the baseline MST. Characterization of the modified MST indicated that the post synthesis treatment did not significantly alter the particle size distribution, but did significantly increase the surface area and porosity compared to the original MST. Testing indicated that the modified MST exhibits reduced affinity for uranium compared to the baseline MST, reducing risk of fissile loading. Shelf-life testing indicated no change in strontium and actinide performance removal after storing the modified MST for 12-months at ambient laboratory temperature. The material releases oxygen during the synthesis and continues to offgas after the synthesis at a rapidly diminishing rate until below a measurable rate after 4 months. Optima Chemical Group LLC prepared a 15-kilogram batch of the modified MST using the post synthesis procedure (Method 3). Performance testing with simulated and actual waste solutions indicated that the material performs as well as or better than batches of modified MST prepared at the laboratory-scale. Particle size data of the vendor-prepared modified MST indicates a broader distribution centered at a larger particle size and microscopy shows more irregular particle morphology compared to the baseline MST and laboratory prepared modified MST. Stirred-cell (i.e., dead-end) filter testing revealed similar filtration rates relative to the baseline MST for both the laboratory and vendor-prepared modified MST materials. Crossflow filtration testing indicated that with MST-only slurries, the baseline MST produced between 30-100% higher flux than the vendor-prepared modified MST at lower solids loadings and comparable flux at higher solids loadings. With sludge-MST slurries, the modified MST produced 1.5-2.2 times higher flux than the baseline MST at all solids loadings. Based on these findings we conclude that the modified MST represents a much improved sorbent for the separation of strontium and actinides from alkaline waste solutions and recommend continued development of the material as a replacement for the baseline MST for waste treatment facilities at the Savannah River Site.

Hobbs, D; Thomas Peters, T; Michael Poirier, M; Mark Barnes, M; Major Thompson, M; Samuel Fink, S

2007-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

283

Efficient light-trapping nanostructures in thin silicon solar cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine light-trapping in thin crystalline silicon periodic nanostructures for solar cell applications. Using group theory, we show that light-trapping can be improved over a broad band when structural mirror symmetry ...

Han, Sang Eon

284

Carbon dioxide dissolution in structural and stratigraphic traps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO[subscript 2]) in structural and stratigraphic traps is a viable option to reduce anthropogenic emissions. While dissolution of the CO[subscript 2] stored in these traps ...

Hesse, M. A.

285

Energy Conservation Thru Steam Trap Surveys and Preventive Maintenance Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENERGY CONSERVATION THRU STEAM TRAP SURVEYS AND PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE PROGRAMS Terry Boynton, Armstrong, Three Rivers, Mich. Bob Dewhirst, Armstrong, New Braunfels, Texas. This paper will deal with steam trap surveys and preventive maintenance...

Boynton, T.; Dewhirst, B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Effective Steam Trap Selection/Maintenance - Its Payback  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In oil refineries and petrochemical plants large number of steam traps are used to discharge condensate from steam mains, tracers and process equipment. Early efforts on steam traps focused almost exclusively on their selection and sizing...

Garcia, E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

In-Vacuum Active Electronics for Microfabricated Ion Traps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The advent of microfabricated ion traps for the quantum information community has allowed research groups to build traps that incorporate an unprecedented number of trapping zones. However, as device complexity has grown, the number of digital-to-analog converter (DAC) channels needed to control these devices has grown as well, with some of the largest trap assemblies now requiring nearly one hundred DAC channels. Providing electrical connections for these channels into a vacuum chamber can be bulky and difficult to scale beyond the current numbers of trap electrodes. This paper reports on the development and testing of an in-vacuum DAC system that uses only 9 vacuum feedthrough connections to control a 78-electrode microfabricated ion trap. The system is characterized by trapping single and multiple $^{40}$Ca$^+$ ions. The measured axial mode stability, ion heating rates, and transport fidelities for a trapped ion are comparable to systems with external(air-side) commercial DACs.

Nicholas D. Guise; Spencer D. Fallek; Harley Hayden; C-S Pai; Curtis Volin; K. R. Brown; J. True Merrill; Alexa W. Harter; Jason M. Amini; Lisa M. Lust; Kelly Muldoon; Doug Carlson; Jerry Budach

2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

288

Single microbe trap and release in sub-microfluidics. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Single microbe trap and release in sub-microfluidics. Single microbe trap and release in sub-microfluidics. Abstract: Lab-on-a-chip systems have substantially impacted the way...

289

The Rajahmundry Traps, Andhra Pradesh: Evaluation of their petrogenesis relative to the Deccan Traps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Geochemical and geochronological data for rocks from the Rajahmundry Traps, are evaluated for possible correlation with the main Deccan province. Lava flows are found on both banks of the Godavari River and co...

Ajoy K. Baksi

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

E B UNA-TRAP FISHERY E E ITERRANEAN SEA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the bag of the trap to concentrate the tuna prior to capture. Photo supplied by Dr. Alonzo Palau, Genova

291

Dynamic modeling and transient studies of a solid-sorbent adsorber for CO{sub 2} capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) is dedicated to accelerating the commercialization of carbon capture technologies from discovery to development, demonstration, and ultimately the widespread deployment to hundreds of power plants. In this multi-lab initiative in partnership with academic and industrial institutions, the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) leads the development of a multi-scale modeling and simulation toolset for rapid evaluation and deployment of carbon capture systems. One element of the CCSI is focused on optimizing the operation and control of carbon capture systems since this can have a significant impact on the extent and the rate at which commercial-scale capture processes will be scaled-up, deployed, and used in the years to come. Capture processes must be capable of operating over a wide range of transient events, malfunctions, and disturbances, as well as under uncertainties. As part of this work, dynamic simulation and control models, methods, and tools are being developed for CO{sub 2} capture and compression processes and their integration with a baseline commercial-scale supercritical pulverized coal (SCPC) power plant. Solid-sorbent-based post-combustion capture technology was chosen as the first industry challenge problem for CCSI because significant work remains to define and optimize the reactors and processes needed for successful sorbent capture systems. Sorbents offer an advantage because they can reduce the regeneration energy associated with CO{sub 2} capture, thus reducing the parasitic load. In view of this, the current paper focuses on development of a dynamic model of a solid-sorbent CO{sub 2} adsorber-reactor and an analysis of its transient performance with respect to several typical process disturbances. A one-dimensional, non-isothermal, pressure-driven dynamic model of a two-stage bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) adsorber-reactor is developed in Aspen Custom Modeler (ACM). The BFB stages are of overflow-type configuration where the solids leave the stage by flowing over the overflow-weir. Each bed is divided into three regions, namely emulsion, bubble, and cloud-wake regions. In all three regions, the model considers mass and energy balances. Along with the models of the BFB stages, models of other associated hardware are developed and integrated in a single flowsheet. A valid pressure-flow network is developed and a lower-level control system is designed so that the overall CO{sub 2} capture can be maintained at a desired level in face of the typical disturbances. The dynamic model is used for studying the transient responses of a number of important process variables as a result of the disturbances that are typical of post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture processes.

Modekurti, Srinivasarao [WVU; Bhattacharyya, Debangsu [WVU; Zitney, Stephen E. [U.S. DOE

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Enhancing the use of coals by gas reburning-sorbent injection. Quarterly report No. 6, October 1--December 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clean Coal Technology implies the use of coal in an environmentally acceptable manner. Coal combustion results in the emission of two types of acid rain precursors: oxides of sulfur (SO{sub x}) and oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}). This Clean Coal Technology project will demonstrate a combination of two developed technologies to reduce both NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} emissions: gas reburning and calcium based dry sorbent injection. The demonstrations will be conducted on two pre-NSPS utility boilers representative of the US boilers which contribute significantly to the inventory of acid rain precursor emissions: tangentially and cyclone fired units. Because of cost growth and lack of available funding, no further work has been done after Phase 1 at site B; the wall fired unit.

Not Available

1992-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

293

Rotating-radio-frequency ion traps T. Hasegawa*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rf ion trap, the rotating-radio-frequency rotating-rf trap, in which the motion of a charged particleRotating-radio-frequency ion traps T. Hasegawa* Department of Physics, Keio University, Kanagawa and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305, USA Received 9 July 2005; published 20 October 2005 We discuss a radio-frequency

294

Magnetic trapping of metastable 3 P2 atomic strontium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic trapping of metastable 3 P2 atomic strontium S. B. Nagel, C. E. Simien, S. Laha, P. Gupta trapping of metastable 3 P2 atomic strontium. Atoms are cooled in a magneto-optical trap MOT operating cooling on such a transition in strontium may lead to a fast and efficient route to all-optical quantum

Killian, Thomas C.

295

Fundamental limit of nanophotonic light trapping in solar cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fundamental limit of nanophotonic light trapping in solar cells Zongfu Yu1 , Aaswath Raman and is becoming increasingly urgent for current solar cell research. The standard theory of light trapping) Establishing the fundamental limit of nanophotonic light-trapping schemes is of paramount importance

Fan, Shanhui

296

High voltage gas insulated transmission line with continuous particle trapping  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention provides a novel high voltage gas insulated transmission line utilizing insulating supports spaced at intervals with snap-in means for supporting a continuous trapping apparatus and said trapping apparatus having perforations and cutouts to facilitate trapping of contaminating particles and system flexibility.

Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA); Dale, Steinar J. (Monroeville, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Trapped-ion antennae for the transmission of quantum information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Here this interaction is explored using ions or ion strings held in two separate potential wells of a linear segmented ion trap (Fig. 1 ... segmented ion trap (Fig. 1), where the interacting dipoles are produced by the oscillating charges. As the dipole–dipole interaction decreases rapidly with trap separation, it is advantageous ...

M. Harlander; R. Lechner; M. Brownnutt; R. Blatt; W. Hänsel

2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

298

Energy Savings with Computerized Steam Trap Maintenance Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by Armstrong International, Inc. Five other manufacturers each have about a 5% share of the tmp population, and about 5 more account for the remaining steam traps. 6,430 STEAM TRAPS COLl3Il~) FIGURE 3 - Steam trap population by application. 8,430 STEAM... standardized using the inverted bucket steam trap made by Armstrong International, Inc. "or equal", with approval, wherever applicable and sensible. I believe the inverted bucket steam trap is the best one for this. The selection of a good manufacturer...

Klidzejs, A. M.

299

Steam Trap Testing and Evaluation: An Actual Plant Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on there is a hydraul ic shock in the forn! of a water hammer. The standard trap used at the Olin-Joliet Plant is an Armstrong carbon steel inverted bucket. The hydraulic shock has not only broken the valve assembly on the inverted buckets, but has also... service is what caused the traps to fail closed. The last set of traps tested was the Armstrong 1013LV stainless steel inverted buckets. The capacity of these units required that for each coil two traps in parallel would be required. The traps do...

Feldman, A. L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

An ion trap built with photonic crystal fibre technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We demonstrate a surface-electrode ion trap fabricated using techniques transferred from the manufacture of photonic-crystal fibres. This provides a relatively straightforward route for realizing traps with an electrode structure on the 100 micron scale with high optical access. We demonstrate the basic functionality of the trap by cooling a single ion to the quantum ground state, allowing us to measure a heating rate from the ground state of 787(24) quanta/s. Variation of the fabrication procedure used here may provide access to traps in this geometry with trap scales between 100 um and 10 um.

Lindenfelser, F; Kienzler, D; Bykov, D; Uebel, P; Schmidt, M A; Russell, P St J; Home, J P

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multielement sorbent trap" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Theory of diffusion and sorption of various substances through a biporous sorbent membrane for the case of a constant concentration difference at its boundaries and a linear sorption isotherm. I. Case of an exponential kinetic function for the microporous zones  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An analytical solution has been obtained for the passage of the sorbed substance through a membrane of a biporous sorbent for the case of constant concentration differences of the sorptive on its boundaries and a...

V. I. Ulin; P. P. Zolotarev; A. I. Pilipenko

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Use of Bullet Traps and Steel Targets  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

USE OF BULLET TRAPS AND USE OF BULLET TRAPS AND STEEL TARGETS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Health, Safety and Security AVAILABLE ONLINE AT: INITIATED BY: http://www.hss.energy.gov Office of Health, Safety and Security Notices This document is intended for the exclusive use of elements of the Department of Energy (DOE), to include the National Nuclear Security Administration, their contractors, and other government agencies/individuals authorized to use DOE facilities. DOE disclaims any and all liability for personal injury or property damage due to use of this document in any context by any organization, group, or individual, other than during official government activities. Local DOE management is responsible for the proper execution of firearms-related programs for

303

Nonperturbative Coherent Population Trapping: An Analytic Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Coherent population trapping is shown to occur in a driven symmetric double-well potential in the strong-field regime. The system parameters have been chosen to reproduce the 0-?3+ transition of the inversion mode of the ammonia molecule. For a molecule initially prepared in its lower doublet we find that, under certain circumstances, the 3+ level remains unpopulated, and this occurs in spite of the fact that the laser field is resonant with the 0-?3+ transition and intense enough so as to strongly mix the 0+ and 0- ground states. This counterintuitive result constitutes a coherent population trapping phenomenon of nonperturbative origin which cannot be accounted for with the usual models.

V. Delgado and J. M. Gomez Llorente

2002-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

304

Shortcuts to adiabaticity for trapped ultracold gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study, experimentally and theoretically, the controlled transfer of harmonically trapped ultracold gases between different quantum states. In particular we experimentally demonstrate a fast decompression and displacement of both a non-interacting gas and an interacting Bose-Einstein condensate which are initially at equilibrium. The decompression parameters are engineered such that the final state is identical to that obtained after a perfectly adiabatic transformation despite the fact that the fast decompression is performed in the strongly non-adiabatic regime. During the transfer the atomic sample goes through strongly out-of-equilibrium states while the external confinement is modified until the system reaches the desired stationary state. The scheme is theoretically based on the invariants of motion and scaling equations techniques and can be generalized to decompression trajectories including an arbitrary deformation of the trap. It is also directly applicable to arbitrary initial non-equilibrium sta...

Schaff, Jean-François; Labeyrie, Guillaume; Vignolo, Patrizia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Shortcuts to adiabaticity for trapped ultracold gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study, experimentally and theoretically, the controlled transfer of harmonically trapped ultracold gases between different quantum states. In particular we experimentally demonstrate a fast decompression and displacement of both a non-interacting gas and an interacting Bose-Einstein condensate which are initially at equilibrium. The decompression parameters are engineered such that the final state is identical to that obtained after a perfectly adiabatic transformation despite the fact that the fast decompression is performed in the strongly non-adiabatic regime. During the transfer the atomic sample goes through strongly out-of-equilibrium states while the external confinement is modified until the system reaches the desired stationary state. The scheme is theoretically based on the invariants of motion and scaling equations techniques and can be generalized to decompression trajectories including an arbitrary deformation of the trap. It is also directly applicable to arbitrary initial non-equilibrium states.

Jean-François Schaff; Pablo Capuzzi; Guillaume Labeyrie; Patrizia Vignolo

2011-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

306

Magneto-Optical Trapping of Holmium Atoms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We demonstrate sub-Doppler laser cooling and magneto-optical trapping of the rare earth element Holmium. Atoms are loaded from an atomic beam source and captured in six-beam $\\sigma_+ - \\sigma_-$ molasses using a strong $J=15/2 \\leftrightarrow J=17/2$ cycling transition at $\\lambda=410.5 \\rm nm$. Due to the small difference in hyperfine splittings and Land\\'e $g$-factors in the lower and upper levels of the cooling transition the MOT is self-repumped without additional repump light, and deep sub-Doppler cooling is achieved with the magnetic trap turned on. We measure the leakage out of the cycling transition to metastable states and find a branching ratio $\\sim 10^{-5}$ which is adequate for state resolved measurements on hyperfine encoded qubits.

J. Miao; J. Hostetter; G. Stratis; M. Saffman

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

307

Trapped ghosts: a new class of wormholes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We construct examples of static, spherically symmetric wormhole solutions in general relativity with a minimally coupled scalar field $\\phi$ whose kinetic energy is negative in a restricted region of space near the throat (of arbitrary size) and positive far from it. Thus in such configurations a "ghost" is trapped in the strong-field region, which may in principle explain why no ghosts are observed under usual conditions. Some properties of general wormhole models with the $\\phi$ field are revealed: it is shown that (i) trapped-ghost wormholes are only possible with nonzero potentials $V(\\phi)$; (ii) in twice asymptotically flat wormholes, a nontrivial potential $V(\\phi)$ has an alternate sign, and (iii) a twice asymptotically flat wormhole which is mirror-symmetric with respect to its throat has necessarily a zero Schwarzschild mass at both asymptotics.

Kirill A. Bronnikov; Sergey V. Sushkov

2010-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

308

Trapped ghosts: a new class of wormholes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We construct examples of static, spherically symmetric wormhole solutions in general relativity with a minimally coupled scalar field $\\phi$ whose kinetic energy is negative in a restricted region of space near the throat (of arbitrary size) and positive far from it. Thus in such configurations a "ghost" is trapped in the strong-field region, which may in principle explain why no ghosts are observed under usual conditions. Some properties of general wormhole models with the $\\phi$ field are revealed: it is shown that (i) trapped-ghost wormholes are only possible with nonzero potentials $V(\\phi)$; (ii) in twice asymptotically flat wormholes, a nontrivial potential $V(\\phi)$ has an alternate sign, and (iii) a twice asymptotically flat wormhole which is mirror-symmetric with respect to its throat has necessarily a zero Schwarzschild mass at both asymptotics.

Bronnikov, Kirill A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Ion temperature gradient driven turbulence with strong trapped ion resonance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A theory to describe basic characterization of ion temperature gradient driven turbulence with strong trapped ion resonance is presented. The role of trapped ion granulations, clusters of trapped ions correlated by precession resonance, is the focus. Microscopically, the presence of trapped ion granulations leads to a sharp (logarithmic) divergence of two point phase space density correlation at small scales. Macroscopically, trapped ion granulations excite potential fluctuations that do not satisfy dispersion relation and so broaden frequency spectrum. The line width from emission due only to trapped ion granulations is calculated. The result shows that the line width depends on ion free energy and electron dissipation, which implies that non-adiabatic electrons are essential to recover non-trivial dynamics of trapped ion granulations. Relevant testable predictions are summarized.

Kosuga, Y., E-mail: kosuga@riam.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Institute for Advanced Study, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Itoh, S.-I. [Research Center for Plasma Turbulence, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Diamond, P. H. [CASS and CMTFO, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); WCI Center for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Itoh, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Gifu (Japan); Research Center for Plasma Turbulence, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Lesur, M. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

Sorbent Testing for the Solidification of Organic Process Waste streams from the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has tasked MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) with evaluating various sorbents to solidify the radioactive liquid organic waste from the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). REDC recovers and purifies heavy elements (berkelium, californium, einsteinium, and fermium) from irradiated targets for research and industrial applications. Both aqueous and organic waste streams are discharged from REDC. Organic waste is generated from the plutonium/uranium extraction (PUREX), Cleanex, and Pubex processes.1 The PUREX waste derives from an organic-aqueous isotope separation process for plutonium and uranium fission products, the Cleanex waste derives from the removal of fission products and other impurities from the americium/curium product, and the Pubex waste is derived from the separation process of plutonium from dissolved targets. An aqueous waste stream is also produced from these separation processes. MSE has been tasked to test a grouting formula for the aqueous waste stream that includes specially formulated radioactive shielding materials developed by Science and Technology Applications, LLC. This paper will focus on the sorbent testing work. Based on work performed at Savannah River Site (SRS) (Refs. 1, 2), ORNL tested and evaluated three sorbents capable of solidifying the PUREX, Pubex, and Cleanex waste streams and a composite of the three organic waste streams: Imbiber Beads{sup R} IMB230301 (Imbiber Beads), Nochar A610 Petro Bond, and Petroset II Granular{sup TM} (Petroset II-G). Surrogates of the PUREX, Pubex, Cleanex, and a composite organic waste were used for the bench-scale testing. Recommendations resulting from the ORNL testing included follow-on testing by MSE for two of the three sorbents: Nochar Petro Bond and Petroset II-G. MSE recommended that another clay sorbent, Organoclay BM-QT-199, be added to the test sequence. The sorbent/surrogate combinations were tested at bench scale, 19-liter (L) [5-gallon (gal)] bucket scale, and 208-L (55-gal) drum scale. The testing performed by MSE will help ORNL select the right solidification materials and wasteform generation methods for the design of a new treatment facility. The results could also be used to help demonstrate that ORNL could meet the waste acceptance criteria for the ultimate disposal site for the waste-forms. The organics will be solidified as transuranic waste for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, and the aqueous waste stream will be grouted and disposed of at the Nevada Test Site as low-level waste if real waste testing indicates similar results to the surrogate testing. The objective of this work was to identify a sorbent capable of solidifying PUREX, Pubex, and Cleanex organic wastes individually and a composite of the three organic waste streams. The sorbent and surrogate combinations must also be compatible with processing equipment and maintain stability under a variety of conditions that could occur during storage/shipment of the solidified wastes. (authors)

Bickford, J.; Foote, M. [MSE Technology Applications, Inc., Montana (United States); Taylor, P. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Bench-scale Development of an Advanced Solid sorbent-based CO2 Capture Process for Coal-fired Power Plalnts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

scale Development of an scale Development of an Advanced Solid Sorbent-based CO 2 Capture Process for Coal-fired Power Plants Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Existing Plants, Emissions, & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current

312

Partially sulfated lime-fly ash sorbents activated by water or steam for SO{sub 2} removal at a medium temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the reactivity of partially sulfated lime-fly ash sorbents activated by water or steam for SO{sub 2} removal. Sulfation tests were performed at 550{sup o}C using a fixed bed reactor under conditions simulating economizer zone injection flue gas desulfurization. Activation experiments were conducted with water or steam using a range of temperatures between 100 and 550{sup o}C. The results showed that the reactivity of the sorbents was closely related to the content of Ca(OH){sub 2} formed in the activation process, which varied with the water or steam temperature. The sulfur dioxide capture capacity of Ca(OH){sub 2} in the sorbent is higher than that of CaO at a medium temperature. Water or steam temperatures in the range of 100-200{sup o}C are favorable to the formation of Ca(OH){sub 2} from CaO. 15 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

Liming Shi; Xuchang Xu [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China). Department of Thermal Engineering

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Isotopic abundance in atom trap trace analysis  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and system for detecting ratios and amounts of isotopes of noble gases. The method and system is constructed to be able to measure noble gas isotopes in water and ice, which helps reveal the geological age of the samples and understand their movements. The method and system uses a combination of a cooled discharge source, a beam collimator, a beam slower and magneto-optic trap with a laser to apply resonance frequency energy to the noble gas to be quenched and detected.

Lu, Zheng-Tian; Hu, Shiu-Ming; Jiang, Wei; Mueller, Peter

2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

314

Gas turbine engines with particle traps  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas turbine engine (10) incorporates a particle trap (46) that forms an entrapment region (73) in a plenum (24) which extends from within the combustor (18) to the inlet (32) of a radial-inflow turbine (52, 54). The engine (10) is thereby adapted to entrap particles that originate downstream from the compressor (14) and are otherwise propelled by combustion gas (22) into the turbine (52, 54). Carbonaceous particles that are dislodged from the inner wall (50) of the combustor (18) are incinerated within the entrapment region (73) during operation of the engine (10).

Boyd, Gary L. (Tempe, AZ); Sumner, D. Warren (Phoenix, AZ); Sheoran, Yogendra (Scottsdale, AZ); Judd, Z. Daniel (Phoenix, AZ)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

New nano trap protects environment | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New nano trap protects environment New nano trap protects environment By Tona Kunz * October 31, 2012 Tweet EmailPrint This story was originally published in volume 10, number 5 of Innovation magazine. A new type of nanoscale molecular trap makes it possible for industry to store large amounts of hydrogen in small fuel cells or capture, compact and remove volatile radioactive gas from spent nuclear fuel in an affordable, easily commercialized way. The ability to adjust the size of the trap openings to select for specific molecules or to alter how molecules are released at industrially accessible pressures makes the trap uniquely versatile. The trap is constructed of commercially available material and made possible through collaborative work at Argonne and Sandia national laboratories. "This introduces a new class of materials to nuclear waste remediation,"

316

Emittance Measurements of Trapped Electrons from a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent electron beam driven plasma wakefield accelerator experiments carried out at SLAC showed trapping of plasma electrons. These trapped electrons appeared on an energy spectrometer with smaller transverse size than the beam driving the wake. A connection is made between transverse size and emittance; due to the spectrometer's resolution, this connection allows for placing an upper limit on the trapped electron emittance. The upper limit for the lowest normalized emittance measured in the experiment is 1 mm {center_dot} mrad.

Kirby, N.; Berry, M.; Blumenfeld, I.; Decker, F.-J.; Hogan, M.J.; Ischebeck, R.; Iverson, R.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.; /SLAC; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.B.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA; Katsouleas, T.C.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

317

Decoherence in a single trapped ion due to engineered reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The decoherence in trapped ion induced by coupling the ion to the engineered reservoir is studied in this paper. The engineered reservoir is simulated by random variations in the trap frequency, and the trapped ion is treated as a two-level system driven by a far off-resonant plane wave laser field. The dependence of the decoherence rate on the amplitude of the superposition state is given.

X. X. Yi; D. L. Zhou; C. P. Sun

2000-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

318

Gas insulated transmission line having tapered particle trapping ring  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas-insulated transmission line includes an outer sheath, an inner conductor, insulating supports and an insulating gas. A particle-trapping ring is secured to each insulating support, and it is comprised of a central portion and two tapered end portions. The ends of the particle trapping ring have a smaller diameter than the central portion of the ring, so as to enable the use of the particle trapping ring in a curved transmission line.

Cookson, Alan H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Sorbent Testing For Solidification of Process Waste streams from the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tasked MSE Technology Applications, Inc. (MSE) to evaluate sorbents identified by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to solidify the radioactive liquid organic waste from the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at ORNL. REDC recovers and purifies heavy elements (berkelium, californium, einsteinium, and fermium) from irradiated targets for research and industrial applications. Both organic and aqueous waste streams are discharged from REDC. The organic waste is generated from the plutonium/uranium extraction (Purex), Cleanex, and Pubex processes. The Purex waste derives from an organic-aqueous isotope separation process for plutonium and uranium fission products, the Cleanex waste derives from the removal of fission products and other impurities from the americium/curium product, and the Pubex waste is derived from the separation process of plutonium from dissolved targets. MSE had also been tasked to test a grouting formula for the aqueous waste stream that includes radioactive shielding material. The aqueous waste is a mixture of the raffinate streams from the various extraction processes plus the caustic solution that is used to dissolve the aluminum cladding from the irradiated targets. (authors)

Bickford, J. [MSE Technology Applications, Inc., MT (United States); Taylor, P. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Fundamental Limit of Nanophotonic Light-Trapping in Solar Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We use a rigorous electromagnetic approach to develop a light-trapping theory, which reveals that the conventional limit 4n2can be substantially surpassed in nanophotonic...

Yu, Zongfu; Raman, Aaswath; Fan, Shanhui

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multielement sorbent trap" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Neutron-Mirror-Neutron Oscillations in a Trap  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate the rate of neutron-mirror-neutron oscillations for ultracold neutrons trapped in a storage vessel. Recent experimental bounds on the oscillation time are discussed.

B. Kerbikov; O. Lychkovskiy

2008-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

322

Neutron–mirror-neutron oscillations in a trap  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We calculate the rate of neutron–mirror-neutron oscillations for ultracold neutrons trapped in a storage vessel. Recent experimental bounds on the oscillation time are discussed.

B. Kerbikov and O. Lychkovskiy

2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

323

Requirements-Driven Diesel Catalyzed Particulate Trap Design...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Driven Diesel Catalyzed Particulate Trap (DCPT) Design and Optimization Tom Harris, Donna McConnell and Danan Dou Delphi Catalyst Tulsa, Oklahoma 2 Euro 45 Light Duty...

324

Dielectric nanostructures for broadband light trapping in organic solar cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigate broadband light trapping using only dielectric components to improve organic solar cell efficiency. We show that substantial absorption and photocurrent enhancement is...

Raman, Aaswath; Yu, Zongfu; Fan, Shanhui

325

Variational calculation of the trapping rate in thermal barriers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A variational calculation of the trapping rate and trapped ion density in thermal barriers is presented. The effects of diffusion in energy as well as pitch angle scattering are retained. The variational formulation uses the actual trapped-passing boundary in velocity space. The boundary condition is that the trapped ion distribution function matches the passing ion distribution function, which is taken to be a Maxwellian, on the boundary. The results compare well with two-dimensional Fokker-Planck code calculations by Futch and LoDestro.

Li, X.Z.; Emmert, G.A.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Investigation of Aging Mechanisms in Lean NOx Traps | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

"Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland. merit08johnson.pdf More Documents & Publications Investigation of Aging Mechanisms in Lean NOx Traps...

327

Location Of Hole And Electron Traps On Nanocrystalline Anatase...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to two overlapping distributions: hole trap emission associated with oxygen vacancies on (101) exposed surfaces, which peaks in the green, and a broader emission...

328

Characterisation of Dust Particles Trapped in Silica Aerogels.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This thesis involves the study of dust particles trapped in silica aerogel for fusion dust diagnostics purpose. The low velocity impact experiments are done… (more)

Liu, Bing

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Laboratory scale studies of Pd/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} sorbents for the removal of trace contaminants from coal-derived fuel gas at elevated temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) is a promising technology for the use of coal in a clean and efficient manner. In order to maintain the overall efficiency of the IGCC process, it is necessary to clean the fuel gas of contaminants (sulfur, trace compounds) at warm (150–540 °C) to hot (>540 °C) temperatures. Current technologies for trace contaminant (such as mercury) removal, primarily activated carbon based sorbents, begin to lose effectiveness above 100 °C, creating the need to develop sorbents effective at elevated temperatures. As trace elements are of particular environmental concern, previous work by this group has focused on the development of a Pd/?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} sorbent for Hg removal. This paper extends the research to Se (as hydrogen selenide, H{sub 2}Se), As (as arsine, AsH{sub 3}), and P (as phosphine, PH{sub 3}) which thermodynamic studies indicate are present as gaseous species under gasification conditions. Experiments performed under ambient conditions in He on 20 wt.% Pd/?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} indicate the sorbent can remove the target contaminants. Further work is performed using a 5 wt.% Pd/?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} sorbent in a simulated fuel gas (H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) in both single and multiple contaminant atmospheres to gauge sorbent performance characteristics. The impact of H{sub 2}O, Hg and temperature on sorbent performance is explored.

Rupp, Erik C.; Granite, Evan J. [U.S. DOE; Stanko, Dennis C. [U.S. DOE

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

A Microscale Gas Trapping Investigation Markus Buchgraber, Anthony R. Kovscek  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Microscale Gas Trapping Investigation Markus Buchgraber, Anthony R. Kovscek Department of Energy unit Residual Trapping Sgi Sg,max krg krg Sgt(Soi) Sgt,max Gas Saturation Gas relative Land Model * * ** 1 )( gi gi gigt CS S SS + = Sgf Sg Sgt,max kd rg Sg Gas Saturation

Stanford University

331

Biodiversity Conservation and Poverty Traps December 2, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biodiversity Conservation and Poverty Traps December 2, 2009 Co-organizers Alex Travis and Chris biodiversity conservation and poverty traps. Multiple participants observed that Cornell has relatively large. A good deal of discussion concerned the emphasis on biodiversity conservation as opposed to broader

Angenent, Lars T.

332

CONTINUOUS FLOW "RAIL-AND-TRAP" MICROFLUIDIC PROCESSORS FOR AUTONOMOUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONTINUOUS FLOW "RAIL-AND-TRAP" MICROFLUIDIC PROCESSORS FOR AUTONOMOUS BEAD-BASED MIXING laborious and time intensive fluidic mixing procedures. Although microfluidic platforms offer significant, here we present a microfluidic "rail-and-trap" processor that functions autonomously under continuous

Lin, Liwei

333

Trapping of Gun-Injected Plasma by a Tokamak  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is shown that a plasma produced by a Marshall gun can be injected into and trapped by a tokamak plasma. Gun injection raises the line-averaged density and peaks the density profile. Trapping of the gun-injected plasma is explainable in terms of a depolarization current mechanism.

A. W. Leonard; R. N. Dexter; J. C. Sprott

1986-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

334

Pinch Effect for Trapped Particles in a Tokamak  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Conservation of canonical angular momentum is shown to require that all trapped particles drift towards the magnetic axis with velocity cE?B? (E? is the toroidal electric field; B? the poloidal magnetic field). This property, plus an amplification process for the number of trapped particles, will explain the relaxation oscillations which occur for q3.

A. A. Ware

1970-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

335

Novel Dipole Trapped Spheromak Configuration M. R. Brown,1,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Novel Dipole Trapped Spheromak Configuration M. R. Brown,1, * C. D. Cothran,1 J. Fung,1 M. J. Schaffer,2 and E. Belova3 We report the observation and characterization of a spheromak formed in the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX) and trapped in a simple dipole magnetic field. The spheromak is studied

Brown, Michael R.

336

Successful Implementation of a Sustainable Trap Management Program.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

significant cost penalty in delaying implementation of a program to manage the steam trap population. Plants typically embark on a trap management initiative by focusing on a survey, but may not maximize returns because they fail to execute or sustain possible...

Walter, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Steam Traps-The Oft Forgotten Energy Conservation Treasure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In these days of high technology, the steam trap is often treated as a commodity item, forgotten by many and respected by a relative few. Yet, in many facilities, widespread undetected failure of steam traps has wasted 5-15% of a plant's total steam...

Pychewicz, F. S.

338

Solar cell efficiency enhancement via light trapping in printable resonant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar cell efficiency enhancement via light trapping in printable resonant dielectric nanosphere for addressing the key challenge of light trapping in thin-film solar cells. We experimentally and theoretically the absorber, junction, and passivation layers. Recently, a number of innovative solar cell light

Atwater, Harry

339

Dielectric nanostructures for broadband light trapping in organic solar cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dielectric nanostructures for broadband light trapping in organic solar cells Aaswath Raman, Zongfu light trapping configuration for thin-film solar cells," Appl. Phys. Lett. 91, 243501 (2007). 8. M@stanford.edu Abstract: Organic bulk heterojunction solar cells are a promising candidate for low-cost next

Fan, Shanhui

340

Solar cell efficiency enhancement via light trapping in printable resonant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar cell efficiency enhancement via light trapping in printable resonant dielectric nanosphere for addressing the key challenge of light trapping in thin-film solar cells. We experimentally and theoretically, photovoltaics, resonant dielectric structures, solar cells * Corresponding author: e-mail jgrandid

Grandidier, Jonathan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multielement sorbent trap" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Sympathetic cooling of trapped ions with resonant laser radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose a novel model to describe dynamic properties of ions that are cooled by collisions with other laser-cooled ions in a quadrupole rf trap. The limit temperature of the sympathetic Cooling is estimated as functions of the trap and laser parameters, and the mass of the ions.

Shimizu, T.; Oshima, Y.; Moriwaki, Y.; Tachikawa, M. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

342

Particle-optical self-trapping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The formation of a self-guided beam pattern via optical trapping in a suspension of Rayleigh scatterers is studied. An analytic self-guided solution is presented that is valid for low intensities. A numerical solution of the coupled diffusion and optical-wave equations is presented, which shows an evolution toward a steady state that is independent of the initial optical beam shape. At higher intensities, the numerical solution shows the influence of higher-order nonlinearities, which lead to instability. We define a critical optical intensity, in terms of the particle size, refractive index contrast, and thermal energy, that characterizes the onset of higher-order effects. Instability is found that is consistent with past parametric studies of solitons.

Gordon, R.; Blakely, J. T.; Sinton, D. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada V8P 5C2 (Canada); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada V8W 2Y2 (Canada)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

343

Penning trap mass measurements on nobelium isotopes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Penning trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP at GSI Darmstadt allows accurate mass measurements of radionuclides, produced in fusion-evaporation reactions and separated by the velocity filter SHIP from the primary beam. Recently, the masses of the three nobelium isotopes {sup 252-254}No were determined. These are the first direct mass measurements of transuranium elements, which provide new anchor points in this region. The heavy nuclides were produced in cold-fusion reactions by irradiating a PbS target with a {sup 48}Ca beam, resulting in production rates of the nuclei of interest of about one atom per second. In combination with data from decay spectroscopy our results are used to perform a new atomic-mass evaluation in this region.

Dworschak, M.; Block, M.; Ackermann, D.; Herfurth, F.; Hessberger, F. P.; Hofmann, S.; Vorobyev, G. K. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Audi, G. [CSNSM-IN2P3-CNRS, F-91405 Orsay-Campus (France); Blaum, K. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Droese, C.; Marx, G.; Schweikhard, L. [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet, Institut fuer Physik, D-17487 Greifswald (Germany); Eliseev, S.; Ketter, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Fleckenstein, T. [Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, D-35390 Giessen (Germany); Haettner, E.; Plass, W. R.; Scheidenberger, C. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, D-35390 Giessen (Germany); Ketelaer, J. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, Institut fuer Physik, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Kluge, H.-J. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

Contaminant trap for gas-insulated apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A contaminant trap for a gas-insulated electrical conductor is provided. A resinous dielectric body such as Kel-F wax, grease or other sticky polymeric or oligomeric compound is disposed on the inside wall of the outer housing for the conductor. The resinous body is sufficiently sticky at ambient temperatures to immobilize contaminant particles in the insulating gas on the exposed surfaces thereof. An electric resistance heating element is disposed in the resinous body to selectively raise the temperature of the resinous body to a molten state so that the contaminant particles collected on the surface of the body sink into the body so that the surface of the resinous body is renewed to a particle-less condition and, when cooled, returns to a sticky collecting surface.

Adcock, James L. (Knoxville, TN); Pace, Marshall O. (Knoxville, TN); Christophorou, Loucas G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Electrostatic particle trap for ion beam sputter deposition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for the interception and trapping of or reflection of charged particulate matter generated in ion beam sputter deposition. The apparatus involves an electrostatic particle trap which generates electrostatic fields in the vicinity of the substrate on which target material is being deposited. The electrostatic particle trap consists of an array of electrode surfaces, each maintained at an electrostatic potential, and with their surfaces parallel or perpendicular to the surface of the substrate. The method involves interception and trapping of or reflection of charged particles achieved by generating electrostatic fields in the vicinity of the substrate, and configuring the fields to force the charged particulate material away from the substrate. The electrostatic charged particle trap enables prevention of charged particles from being deposited on the substrate thereby enabling the deposition of extremely low defect density films, such as required for reflective masks of an extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) system.

Vernon, Stephen P. (Pleasanton, CA); Burkhart, Scott C. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Ion-trap electrode preparation with Ne$^+$ bombardment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe an ex-situ surface-cleaning procedure that is shown to reduce motional heating from ion-trap electrodes. This precleaning treatment, to be implemented immediately before the final assembly and vacuum processing of ion traps, removes surface contaminants remaining after the electrode-fabrication process. We incorporate a multi-angle ion-bombardment treatment intended to clean the electrode surfaces and interelectrode gaps of microfabricated traps. This procedure helps to minimize redeposition in the gaps between electrodes that can cause electrical shorts. We report heating rates in a stylus-type ion trap prepared in this way that are lower by one order of magnitude compared to a similar untreated stylus-type trap using the same experimental setup.

McKay, K S; Colombe, Y; Jördens, R; Wilson, A C; Slichter, D H; Allcock, D T C; Leibfried, D; Wineland, D J; Pappas, D P

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Ion-trap electrode preparation with Ne$^+$ bombardment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe an ex-situ surface-cleaning procedure that is shown to reduce motional heating from ion-trap electrodes. This precleaning treatment, to be implemented immediately before the final assembly and vacuum processing of ion traps, removes surface contaminants remaining after the electrode-fabrication process. We incorporate a multi-angle ion-bombardment treatment intended to clean the electrode surfaces and interelectrode gaps of microfabricated traps. This procedure helps to minimize redeposition in the gaps between electrodes that can cause electrical shorts. We report heating rates in a stylus-type ion trap prepared in this way that are lower by one order of magnitude compared to a similar untreated stylus-type trap using the same experimental setup.

K. S. McKay; D. A. Hite; Y. Colombe; R. Jördens; A. C. Wilson; D. H. Slichter; D. T. C. Allcock; D. Leibfried; D. J. Wineland; D. P. Pappas

2014-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

348

Enhancing the use of coals by Gas Reburning: Sorbent injection. [Quarterly report], July 28--October 1, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER) has completed demonstrations of Gas Reburning-Sorbent Injection (GR-SI) at two field sites. The discussions which follow pertain to measurements taken from the demonstration at City Water, Light and Power`s (CWLP) Lakeside Station Unit 7 in Springfield, Illinois. Environmental monitoring was conducted for two purposes, to satisfy the requirements of operating permits granted by the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA) and to verify environmental acceptability of the GR-SI process. The GR-SI demonstration program at Lakeside Unit 7 was performed in three phases. Phase I -- Design and Permitting, entailed characterization of the host boiler, then finalization of process and engineering, design of the GR-SI system. Phase I was initiated in June 1987 and completed in March 1989. Phase II -- Construction and Startup, was initiated upon completion of design tasks and was completed in February 1993. Phase III -- Operation, Data Collection, Reporting and Disposition, was conducted from July 1993 to June 1994. In Phase III, the GR-SI system performance was evaluated initially through optimization tests, which are short-term tests in which specific operating parameters are varied to determine their impact on emissions and boiler performance. The optimization testing included GR only tests, SI only tests, and GR-SI tests. Results from these tests, carried out from July 28 to October 1, 1993, are presented in this report. Following Optimization testing, long-term GR-SI operation was initiated to demonstrate the combined technology over an extended period with the unit under dispatch load control. Long-term GR-SI testing was conducted from October 4, 1993 to June 3, 1994. The long-term environmental monitoring data are presented in a separate report.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Demonstration of a Scalable, Multiplexed Ion Trap for Quantum Information Processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A scalable, multiplexed ion trap for quantum information processing is fabricated and tested. The trap design and fabrication process are optimized for scalability to small trap size and large numbers of interconnected ...

Leibrandt, David R.

350

Measurements of electric field noise and light-induced charging in cryogenic surface electrode ion traps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ion traps provide an excellent tool for controlling and observing the state of a single trapped ion. For this reason, ion traps have been proposed as a possible system for large-scale quantum computation. However, many ...

Lachenmyer, Nathan S. (Nathan Scott)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Circulating Optical Particle Trapping through the Integration of Fiber Optics and Microfluidics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A dual-fiber optic trap is integrated with microfluidics, and stable circulatory particle trapping is observed. The unique circulating and flow-dependant nature of the trap enables...

Blakely, J Thomas; Gordon, Reuven; Sinton, David

352

Properties of Trapped Electron Bunches in a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plasma-based accelerators use the propagation of a drive bunch through plasma to create large electric fields. Recent plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) experiments, carried out at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), successfully doubled the energy for some of the 42 GeV drive bunch electrons in less than a meter; this feat would have required 3 km in the SLAC linac. This dissertation covers one phenomenon associated with the PWFA, electron trapping. Recently it was shown that PWFAs, operated in the nonlinear bubble regime, can trap electrons that are released by ionization inside the plasma wake and accelerate them to high energies. These trapped electrons occupy and can degrade the accelerating portion of the plasma wake, so it is important to understand their origins and how to remove them. Here, the onset of electron trapping is connected to the drive bunch properties. Additionally, the trapped electron bunches are observed with normalized transverse emittance divided by peak current, {epsilon}{sub N,x}/I{sub t}, below the level of 0.2 {micro}m/kA. A theoretical model of the trapped electron emittance, developed here, indicates that the emittance scales inversely with the square root of the plasma density in the non-linear 'bubble' regime of the PWFA. This model and simulations indicate that the observed values of {epsilon}{sub N,x}/I{sub t} result from multi-GeV trapped electron bunches with emittances of a few {micro}m and multi-kA peak currents. These properties make the trapped electrons a possible particle source for next generation light sources. This dissertation is organized as follows. The first chapter is an overview of the PWFA, which includes a review of the accelerating and focusing fields and a survey of the remaining issues for a plasma-based particle collider. Then, the second chapter examines the physics of electron trapping in the PWFA. The third chapter uses theory and simulations to analyze the properties of the trapped electron bunches. Chapters four and five present the experimental diagnostics and measurements for the trapped electrons. Next, the sixth chapter introduces suggestions for future trapped electron experiments. Then, Chapter seven contains the conclusions. In addition, there is an appendix chapter that covers a topic which is extraneous to electron trapping, but relevant to the PWFA. This chapter explores the feasibility of one idea for the production of a hollow channel plasma, which if produced could solve some of the remaining issues for a plasma-based collider.

Kirby, Neil; /SLAC

2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

353

Effects of O{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} on the Capture Capacity of a Primary-Amine Based Polymeric CO{sub 2} Sorbent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Post combustion CO{sub 2} capture is most commonly carried out using an amine solution that results in a high parasitic energy cost in the stripper unit due to the need to heat the water which comprises a majority of the amine solution. It is also well known that amine solvents suffer from stability issues due to amine leaching and poisoning by flue gas impurities. Solid sorbents provide an alternative to solvent systems that would potentially reduce the energy penalty of carbon capture. However, the cost of using a particular sorbent is greatly affected by the usable lifetime of the sorbent. This work investigated the stability of a primary amine-functionalized ion exchange resin in the presence of O{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}, both of which are constituents of flue gas that have been shown to cause degradation of various amines in solvent processes. The CO{sub 2} capture capacity was measured over multiple capture cycles under continuous exposure to two simulated flue gas streams, one containing 12 vol% CO{sub 2}, 4% O{sub 2}, 84% N{sub 2}, and the other containing 12.5 vol% CO{sub 2}, 4% O{sub 2}, 431 ppm SO{sub 2}, balance N{sub 2} using a custom-built packed bed reactor. The resin maintained its CO{sub 2} capture capacity of 1.31 mol/kg over 17 capture cycles in the presence of O{sub 2} without SO{sub 2}. However, the CO{sub 2} capture capacity of the resin decreased rapidly under exposure to SO{sub 2} by an amount of 1.3 mol/kg over 9 capture cycles. Elemental analysis revealed the resin adsorbed 1.0 mol/kg of SO{sub 2}. Thermal regeneration was determined to not be possible. The poisoned resin was, however, partially regenerated with exposure to 1.5M NaOH for 3 days resulting in a 43% removal of sulfur, determined through elemental analysis, and a 35% recovery of CO{sub 2} capture capacity. Evidence was also found for amine loss upon prolonged (7 days) continuous exposure to high temperatures (120 #14;C) in air. It is concluded that desulfurization of the flue gas stream prior to CO{sub 2} capture will greatly improve the economic viability of using this solid sorbent in a post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture process.

Hallenbeck, Alexander P.; Kitchin, John R.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Carbon Filter Process for Flue-Gas Carbon Capture on Carbonaceous Sorbents: Field Tests of Steam-Aided Vacuum Swing Adsorption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The final 30 cycles are performed at Pawnee Station, owned by Xcel Energy, in Brush, CO. ... This work was funded by Wyoming’s Enhanced Oil Recovery Institute, Supercritical Fluids LLC, the state of Wyoming’s Clean Coal Program administered by the University of Wyoming’s School of Energy Resources, the Electric Power Research Institute, Pacificorp Energy, Xcel Energy, and a discretionary fund of one of the authors (Maciej Radosz). ... The authors also thank Mr. Ryan Taucher, Pacificorp Energy’s Jim Bridger Power Plant, WY, Mr. Barry Andrews, Xcel Energy’s Pawnee Station, CO, and Dr. Xin Hu, who characterized the sorbents. ...

Bryce Dutcher; Kaspars Krutkramelis; Hertanto Adidharma; Maciej Radosz

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

355

In Situ Infrared Study of the Effect of Amine Density on the Nature of Adsorbed CO2 on Amine-Functionalized Solid Sorbents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Danon et al. observed that the absorbance band formed at 1701 cm–1 during CO2 adsorption on densely loaded APTES/SBA-15 (DAPS) sorbent shifted to higher frequencies (1714 cm–1) after evacuation of CO2, which they assigned to the surface-bound carbamate species instead of carbamic acid. ... Danon, A.; Stair, P. C.; Weitz, E.FTIR Study of CO2 Adsorption on Amine-Grafted SBA-15: Elucidation of Adsorbed Species J. Phys. ... Danon, Alon; Stair, Peter C.; Weitz, Eric ...

Uma Tumuluri; Mathew Isenberg; Chung-Sung Tan; Steven S. C. Chuang

2014-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

356

Advanced Light-Trapping in Thin-Film Silicon Solar Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Light-trapping schemes are essential for high efficiency thin-film Silicon devices. Implementation of various light-trapping/scattering elements will be discussed. An optimum textured...

Wyrsch, Nicolas

357

Trapping and cooling He(2{sup 3}S) metastable atoms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A magneto-optical trap for He(2{sup 3}S) metastable atoms has been constructed, utilizing superconducting magnetic gradient coils and a Ti:Sapphire ring laser for pumping the helium 2{sup 3}S-2{sup 3}P transition. The He(2{sup 3}S) atoms are produced by a weak rf discharge in helium gas at a temperature of 1.4K. The discharge products flow through a small orifice into the trap cell, where a fraction of the He(2{sup 3}S) atoms are trapped and ground state helium atoms are rapidly cryopumped by zeolite pellets that cover most of the cell bottom. Preliminary experiments suggest that {approximately}10{sup 6} atoms are trapped in a small volume at {approximately}1 mK, with a trap lifetime of 10-100 msec limited by resonantly-enhanced He(2{sup 3}S)-He(2{sup 3}P) Penning reactions. Ultimately, it is estimated that a substantial number of atoms can be held at ultra-low temperature in near-perfect vacuum, in a dc magnetic trap. Measurements of decay times of the trapped atoms should yield rate coefficients in the quantum regime for He(2{sup 3}S)-He(2{sup 3}P) and He(2{sup 3}S)-He(2{sup 3}S) Penning reactions, and perhaps the He(2{sup 3}S) radiative lifetime.

Zhao, X.; Soletsky, P.A.; Bryan, W.H.; Ling, X. [and others

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Using malaise traps to sample ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pitfall traps provide an easy and inexpensive way to sample ground-dwelling arthropods (Spence and Niemela 1994; Spence et al. 1997; Abildsnes and Tommeras 2000) and have been used exclusively in many studies of the abundance and diversity of ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae). Despite the popularity of this trapping technique, pitfall traps have many disadvantages. For example, they often fail to collect both small (Spence and Niemela 1994) and �¢����trap-shy�¢��� species (Benest 1989), eventually deplete the local carabid population (Digweed et al. 1995), require a species to be ground-dwelling in order to be captured (Liebherr and Mahar 1979), and produce different results depending on trap diameter and material, type of preservative used, and trap placement (Greenslade 1964; Luff 1975; Work et al. 2002). Further complications arise from seasonal patterns of movement among the beetles themselves (Maelfait and Desender 1990), as well as numerous climatic factors, differences in plant cover, and variable surface conditions (Adis 1979). Because of these limitations, pitfall trap data give an incomplete picture of the carabid community and should be interpreted carefully. Additional methods, such as use of Berlese funnels and litter washing (Spence and Niemela 1994), collection from lights (Usis and MacLean 1998), and deployment of flight intercept devices (Liebherr and Mahar 1979; Paarmann and Stork 1987), should be incorporated in surveys to better ascertain the species composition and relative numbers of ground beetles. Flight intercept devices, like pitfall traps, have the advantage of being easy to use and replicate, but their value to carabid surveys is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate the effectiveness of Malaise traps for sampling ground beetles in a bottomland hardwood forest.

Ulyshen, Michael D., James L. Hanula, and Scott Horn

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Nuclear Fusion for Bose Nuclei Confined in Ion Traps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear fusion of integer spin nuclei confined in an isotropic ion trap is investigated. Solutions of the ground state for charged bosons trapped in the isotropic harmonic oscillator potential are calculated using the equivalent linear two-body method for many-body problems, which is based on an approximate reduction of the many-body Schroedinger equation by the use of a variational principle. Using the ground-state wave function, theoretical estimates of probabilities and rates for nuclear fusion for Bose nuclei confined in ion traps are obtained. Numerical estimates for fusion rates are presented for the case of deuteron-deuteron fusion.

Kim, Yeong E.; Zubarev, Alexander L. [Purdue University (United States)

2000-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

360

Population trapping in Kr and Xe in intense laser fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have observed trapping of population in Rydberg states of atoms and ions exposed to intense laser radiation. The trapping occurs in nonstationary ‘‘wave-packet’’ superposition states, created, via ac Stark-shifted multiphoton resonances during the laser pulse. The formation of these highly excited bound states requires the nonresonant absorption of up to 20 or more photons; some of the ionic Rydberg states lie nearly 32 eV above the ionic ground state. All of the trapped states having binding energies much less than the photon energy but remain stable against ionization even when the multiphoton ionization probability of the atom is saturated.

R. R. Jones; D. W. Schumacher; P. H. Bucksbaum

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multielement sorbent trap" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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361

Laser trapping of short-lived radioactive isotopes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe an experiment which demonstrates the feasibility of trapping significant quantities of short-lived radioactive atoms with laser light. A thermal beam of 22.5 sec half-life Na21 atoms was produced on-line at the LBL 88’’ Cyclotron. After decelerating the beam using a Zeeman-tuned slowing technique we stored about 4×103 Na21 atoms in a magneto-optical trap. The number of trapped atoms is large enough to be used in experimental studies of the beta decay of Na21. The basic method can be adapted for other rare isotopes.

Z-T. Lu; C. Bowers; S. J. Freedman; B. K. Fujikawa; J. L. Mortara; S-Q. Shang; K. P. Coulter; L. Young

1994-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

362

Trap seal for open circuit liquid cooled turbines  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved trap seal for open circuit liquid cooled turbines is disclosed. The trap seal of the present invention includes an annular recess formed in the supply conduit of cooling channels formed in the airfoil of the turbine buckets. A cylindrical insert is located in the annular recesses and has a plurality of axial grooves formed along the outer periphery thereof and a central recess formed in one end thereof. The axial grooves and central recess formed in the cylindrical insert cooperate with the annular recess to define a plurality of S-shaped trap seals which permit the passage of liquid coolant but prohibit passage of gaseous coolant.

Grondahl, Clayton M. (Clifton Park, NY); Germain, Malcolm R. (Ballston Lake, NY)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Purple traps yield Reservation's first detection of Emerald Ash Borer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

traps yield Reservation's first detection of Emerald Ash Borer traps yield Reservation's first detection of Emerald Ash Borer The question of whether or not DOE's forests are infested with Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) has been answered. On May 10, a trap on Highway 95 at the Highway 58 interchange produced the first instance of the destructive non-native insect in Roane County. Five days later, a second trap on Bethel Valley Road near the East Portal turned up the first capture in Anderson County. "Unfortunately, these finds signal the beginning of a decline of ash species throughout the reservation" according to Greg Byrd, forester with the ORNL Natural Resources Program. "Dieback will become more prominent as the insect populations expand. Native ash trees have little defense against this pest, which was

364

Laser ablation loading of a surface-electrode ion trap  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We demonstrate loading by laser ablation of $^{88}$Sr$^+$ ions into a mm-scale surface-electrode ion trap. The laser used for ablation is a pulsed, frequency-tripled Nd:YAG with pulse energies of 1-10 mJ and durations of 3-5 ns. An additional laser is not required to photoionize the ablated material. The efficiency and lifetime of several candidate materials for the laser ablation target are characterized by measuring the trapped ion fluorescence signal for a number of consecutive loads. Additionally, laser ablation is used to load traps with a trap depth (40 meV) below where electron impact ionization loading is typically successful ($\\gtrsim$ 500 meV).

David R. Leibrandt; Robert J. Clark; Jaroslaw Labaziewicz; Paul Antohi; Waseem Bakr; Kenneth R. Brown; Isaac L. Chuang

2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

365

Coherent control of a qubit is trap-free  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There is a strong interest in optimal manipulating of quantum systems by external controls. Traps are controls which are optimal only locally but not globally. If they exist, they can be serious obstacles to the search of globally optimal controls in numerical and laboratory experiments, and for this reason the analysis of traps attracts considerable attention. In this paper we prove that for a wide range of control problems for two-level quantum systems all locally optimal controls are also globally optimal. Hence we conclude that two-level systems in general are trap-free. In particular, manipulating qubits---two-level quantum systems forming a basic building block for quantum computation---is free of traps for fundamental problems such as the state preparation and gate generation.

Alexander Pechen; Nikolay Il'in

2014-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

366

Electron source for a mini ion trap mass spectrometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

1995-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

367

Electron source for a mini ion trap mass spectrometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ion trap which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10.sup.9 and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10.sup.4 ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products.

Dietrich, Daniel D. (Livermore, CA); Keville, Robert F. (Valley Springs, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Neutron lifetime measurements using gravitationally trapped ultracold neutrons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Our experiment using gravitationally trapped ultracold neutrons (UCN) to measure the neutron lifetime is reviewed. Ultracold neutrons were trapped in a material bottle covered with perfluoropolyether. The neutron lifetime was deduced from comparison of UCN losses in the traps with different surface-to-volume ratios. The precise value of the neutron lifetime is of fundamental importance to particle physics and cosmology. In this experiment, the UCN storage time is brought closer to the neutron lifetime than in any experiments before:the probability of UCN losses from the trap was only 1% of that for neutron beta decay. The neutron lifetime obtained,878.5+/-0.7stat+/-0.3sys s, is the most accurate experimental measurement to date.

A. P. Serebrov; V. E. Varlamov; A. G. Kharitonov; A. K. Fomin; Yu. N. Pokotilovski; P. Geltenbort; I. A. Krasnoschekova; M. S. Lasakov; R. R. Taldaev; A. V. Vassiljev; O. M. Zherebtsov

2007-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

369

Neutron lifetime measurements using gravitationally trapped ultracold neutrons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our experiment using gravitationally trapped ultracold neutrons (UCN) to measure the neutron lifetime is reviewed. Ultracold neutrons were trapped in a material bottle covered with perfluoropolyether. The neutron lifetime was deduced from comparison of UCN losses in the traps with different surface-to-volume ratios. The precise value of the neutron lifetime is of fundamental importance to particle physics and cosmology. In this experiment, the UCN storage time is brought closer to the neutron lifetime than in any experiments before: the probability of UCN losses from the trap was only 1% of that for neutron {beta} decay. The neutron lifetime obtained, 878.5{+-}0.7{sub stat}{+-}0.3{sub sys} s, is the most accurate experimental measurement to date.

Serebrov, A. P.; Varlamov, V. E.; Kharitonov, A. G.; Fomin, A. K.; Krasnoschekova, I. A.; Lasakov, M. S.; Taldaev, R. R.; Vassiljev, A. V.; Zherebtsov, O. M. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, RU-188300 Gatchina, Leningrad District (Russian Federation); Pokotilovski, Yu. N. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, RU-141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Geltenbort, P. [Institut Max von Laue Paul Langevin, Boite Postal 156, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

370

A bosonic Josephson junction controlled by a single trapped ion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We theoretically investigate the properties of a double-well bosonic Josephson junction coupled to a single trapped ion. We find that the coupling between the wells can be controlled by the internal state of the ion, which can be used for studying mesoscopic entanglement between the two systems and to measure their interaction with high precision. As a particular example we consider a small $^{87}$Rb Bose-Einstein condensate controlled by a single $^{171}$Yb$^+$ ion. We calculate interwell coupling rates reaching 100 Hz, while the state dependence amounts to 10s of Hz for plausible values of the currently unknown s-wave scattering length between the atom and the ion. The system could be realized in an experiment by combining trapped ions with optical dipole traps for cold atoms or in a combined atom-ion micro trap, where both approaches are within reach using current technology.

Gerritsma, R; Doerk, H; Idziaszek, Z; Calarco, T; Schmidt-Kaler, F

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Mass Spectrometer: Linear Ion Trap Quadrupole (LTQ) Orbitrap...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ion Trap Quadrupole (LTQ) Orbitrap MS - for environmental research (nanoDESI) Instrument ID: 34068 Availability: 10 hours a day, 5 days a week Quick Specs Science Contact Science...

372

Quantum gates, sensors, and systems with trapped ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum information science promises a host of new and useful applications in communication, simulation, and computational algorithms. Trapped atomic ions are one of the leading physical systems with potential to implement ...

Wang, Shannon Xuanyue

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Pt-free, Perovskite-based Lean NOx Trap Catalysts  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Conference Pt-free, Perovskite-based Lean NO x Trap Catalysts Gongshin Qi, Chang H. Kim, and Wei Li GM Global Research & Development 2010 DEER Conference Overview LNT Chemistry...

374

On the generation of bottom-trapped internal tides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The interaction of the barotropic tide with the bottom topography when the tidal frequency ? is smaller than the Coriolis frequency f is examined. The resulting waves are called bottom-trapped internal tides. The energy density associated with ...

Saeed Falahat; Jonas Nycander

375

A variational calculation of the trapping rate in thermal barriers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A variational calculation of the trapping rate and trapped-ion density in thermal barriers is presented. The effects of diffusion in energy as well as pitch-angle scattering are retained. The variational formulation uses the actual trapped/passing boundary in velocity space. The boundary condition is that the trapped-ion distribution function match the passing-ion distribution function, which is taken to be a Maxwellian, on the boundary. The results compare well with the two-dimensional Fokker-Planck code calculations by Futch and LoDestro. The CPU time for a variational calculation is less than 0.1 s using the CRAY-I computer, while a typical Fokker-Planck code calculation takes 10–20 min.

X.Z. Li; G.A. Emmert

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Brief Communication 1195 A gene trap approach in Xenopus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

developed several gene trap vectors, using the green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a marker. Using, including expression in the epiphysis, the olfactory bulb and placodes, the eyes, ear, brain, muscles, tail

Amaya, Enrique

377

Quantum state engineering in ion-traps via adiabatic passage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose two relatively robust schemes to generate entangled W states of three (or generally N) ions in ion trap systems by using adiabatic passage technique and appropriately designed ion-field couplings in a ...

M. Amniat-Talab; M. Saadati-Niari; S. Guérin

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Light trapping limits in plasmonic solar cells: an analytical investigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analytically investigate the light trapping performance in plasmonic solar cells with Si/metallic structures. We consider absorption enhancements for surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) at planar Si/metal interfaces and ...

Sheng, Xing

379

Wednesday, January 30, 2013 Infrared Trapping the "Greenhouse Effect"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wednesday, January 30, 2013 Infrared Trapping ­ the "Greenhouse Effect" Goals ­ to look is the same as a 1.8 degree F change. #12;Last time - Greenhouse effect demo Selective absorption. Greenhouse

Toohey, Darin W.

380

Novel trapping techniques for shaping Bose-Einstein condensates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A combination of radio frequency radiation and magnetic field gradients was used to trap atoms in dressed states. In a magnetic field with a quadrupole minimum. RF fields resonant with the (I F. m)) 11. -1) -- 1, 0) ...

Boyd, Micah (Micah Scott)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multielement sorbent trap" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Light Trapping, Absorption and Solar Energy Harvesting by Artificial Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We provide designs of thin-film solar cells utilizing optimized photonic-crystal light-trapping and numerical simulations of their solar-to-electrical power conversion efficiencies.

John, Sajeev [University of Toronto

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

382

Laser induced rotation of trapped chiral and achiral nematic droplets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the response of optically trapped achiral and chiralised nematic liquid crystal droplets to linear as well as circular polarised light. We find that there is internal dissipation in rotating achiral nematic droplets trapped in glycerine. We also demonstrate that some chiralised droplets rotate under linearly polarised light. The best fit to our data on chiralised droplets indicates that rotational frequency of these droplets with radius R is approximately proportional to1/R^2, rather than to 1/R^3.

Marjan Mosallaeipour; Yashodhan Hatwalne; N. V. Madhusudana; Sharath Ananthamurthy

2010-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

383

Trapped surfaces in Oppenheimer-Snyder black holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Oppenheimer-Snyder solution models a homogeneous round dust cloud collapsing to a black hole. Inside its event horizon there is a region through which trapped surfaces pass. We try to determine exactly where the boundary of this region meets the centre of the cloud. We present explicit examples of the relevant trapped (topological) spheres; they extend into the exterior vacuum region, and are carefully matched at the junction between the cloud and the vacuum.

Ingemar Bengtsson; Emma Jakobsson; José M. M. Senovilla

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

384

The Engineered Approach to Energy and Maintenance Effective Steam Trapping  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

., Chemical Engineering 9/1/75. 4. Maintenance Engineering, May 1976. 5. "How Much Does Lost Steam Cost",Armstrong Machine works, Hydrocarbon Processing, p.129, Jan. 1976. 6. "Setter Steam Trapping Cuts Energy Waste", wesley Yates, Yarway Corp..., Georgia Tech Industrial Energy Extension Service, Chemical Engineering, 2/11/80. 10. ''Basic Facts & Enerqv Saving Tips" ,Lawrence R. O'Dell, Armstrong Machine Works, Heating/Piping/ Air Conditioning, May 1977. 11. Steam Trap Report - Energy Loss...

Krueger, R. G.; Wilt, G. W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Master equation approach to protein folding and kinetic traps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The master equation for 12-monomer lattice heteropolymers is solved numerically and the time evolution of the occupancy of the native state is determined. At low temperatures, the median folding time follows the Arrhenius law and is governed by the longest relaxation time. For good folders, significant kinetic traps appear in the folding funnel whereas for bad folders, the traps also occur in non-native energy valleys.

Marek Cieplak; Malte Henkel; Jan Karbowski; Jayanth R. Banavar

1998-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

386

Design and operation of the electron beam ion trap  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the basic features and operating principles of the Electron Beam Ion Trap. The differences between EBIT and other sources of highly charged ions are outlined. Its features and operating parameters are discussed. The report also explains why certain design choices were necessary and the constraints involved in building an electron beam ion trap. EBIT's evaporation cooling system is described in detail. 13 refs., 8 figs.

Vogel, D.

1990-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

387

Magnetic line trapping and effective transport in stochastic magnetic fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The transport of collisional particles in stochastic magnetic fields is studied using the decorrelation trajectory method. The nonlinear effect of magnetic line trapping is considered together with particle collisions. The running diffusion coefficient is determined for arbitrary values of the statistical parameters of the stochastic magnetic field and of the collisional velocity. The effect of the magnetic line trapping is determined. New anomalous diffusion regimes are found.

M. Vlad; F. Spineanu; J. H. Misguich; R. Balescu

2003-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

388

Measuring the Neutron Lifetime Using Magnetically Trapped Neutrons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The neutron beta-decay lifetime plays an important role both in understanding weak interactions within the framework of the Standard Model and in theoretical predictions of the primordial abundance of 4He in Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. In previous work, we successfully demonstrated the trapping of ultracold neutrons (UCN) in a conservative potential magnetic trap. A major upgrade of the apparatus is nearing completion at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research (NCNR). In our approach, a beam of 0.89 nm neutrons is incident on a superfluid 4He target within the minimum field region of an Ioffe-type magnetic trap. A fraction of the neutrons is downscattered in the helium to energies <200 neV, and those in the appropriate spin state become trapped. The inverse process is suppressed by the low phonon density of helium at temperatures less than 200 mK, allowing the neutron to travel undisturbed. When the neutron decays the energetic electron ionizes the helium, producing scintillation light that is detected using photomultiplier tubes. Statistical limitations of the previous apparatus will be alleviated by significant increases in field strength and trap volume resulting in twenty times more trapped neutrons.

C. M. O'Shaughnessy; R. Golub; K. W. Schelhammer; C. M. Swank; P. -N. Seo; P. R. Huffman; S. N. Dzhosyuk; C. E. H. Mattoni; L. Yang; J. M. Doyle; K. J. Coakley; A. K. Thompson; H. P. Mumm; S. K. Lamoreaux; G. Yang

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

389

Simultaneous removal of H2S and COS using Zn-based solid sorbents in the bench-scale continuous hot gas desulfurization system integrated with a coal gasifier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A bench-scale continuous hot gas desulfurization system using Zn-based solid sorbents was developed to remove H2S and COS simultaneously in a 110 Nm3.../h of real coal-gasified syngas. The bench-scale unit, which...

Young Cheol Park; Sung-Ho Jo; Ho-Jung Ryu…

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

31 - 20640 of 28,905 results. 31 - 20640 of 28,905 results. Download CX-010178: Categorical Exclusion Determination Evaluation of the Multielement Sorbent Trap (ME-ST) Method at an Illinois Coal-Fired Full Scale Test Site CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 04/26/2013 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-010178-categorical-exclusion-determination Download EA-1934: Finding of No Significant Impact Expansion of Active Borrow Areas, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/ea-1934-finding-no-significant-impact Article DOE Takes Next Steps to Expand Strategic Petroleum Reserve to One Billion Barrels Richton, Mississippi is Preferred New Site for Reserve http://energy.gov/articles/doe-takes-next-steps-expand-strategic-petroleum-reserve-one-billion-barrels

391

System and method for trapping and measuring a charged particle in a liquid  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method for trapping a charged particle is disclosed. A time-varying periodic multipole electric potential is generated in a trapping volume. A charged particle under the influence of the multipole electric field is confined to the trapping volume. A three electrode configuration giving rise to a 3D Paul trap and a four planar electrode configuration giving rise to a 2D Paul trap are disclosed.

Reed, Mark A; Krstic, Predrag S; Guan, Weihua; Zhao, Xiongce

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

392

`Quantum explosion' of a trapped one-dimensional Bose gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze free expansion of a trapped one-dimensional Bose gas after a sudden release from the confining trap potential. By using the stationary phase and local density approximations, we show that the long-time asymptotic density profile and the momentum distribution of the gas are determined by the initial distribution of Bethe rapidities (quasimomenta) and hence can be obtained from the solutions to the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz equations. For expansion from a harmonic trap, and in the limits of very weak and very strong interactions, we recover the known scaling solutions of the hydrodynamic approach corresponding to self-similar expansion. For all other power-law traps and arbitrary interaction strengths, the expansion is not self-similar and shows strong dependence on the trap anharmonicity of the shape variation of the density profile during evolution. We also characterize dynamical fermionization of an expanding cloud in terms of its first- and second-order coherences describing phase and density fluctuations.

A. S. Campbell; D. M. Gangardt; K. V. Kheruntsyan

2015-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF ION INJECTION INTO AN EXTENDED TRAP OF THE BNL EBIS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments on the BNL EBIS Test Stand (EBTS) with the ion trap extending beyond the edges of the superconducting solenoid had the main goal to study ion trap operation with a trap length exceeding that of the normal EBTS trap. Preliminary results indicate that the ion trap with length 107 cm is stable and controllable in the same fashion as our normal 70 cm trap with a multiampere electron beam. EBTS operation with ion trap 145 cm long and with electron current up to 3 A in earlier experiments also was stable and yielded more ions than from the basic ''short'' trap. These results increased our confidence in operation of the proposed RHIC in a stable mode and in the correctness of linear scaling of ion intensity with the length of the ion trap.

PIKIN,A.; ALESSI,J.; BEEBE,E.; KPONOU,A.; PRELEC,K.

2001-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

394

Coulomb crystal mass spectrometry in a digital ion trap  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a mass spectrometric technique for identifying the masses and relative abundances of Coulomb-crystallized ions held in a linear Paul trap. A digital radiofrequency waveform is employed to generate the trapping potential, as this can be cleanly switched off, and static dipolar fields subsequently applied to the trap electrodes for ion ejection. Excellent detection efficiency is demonstrated for Ca+ and CaF+ ions from bi-component Ca+/CaF+ Coulomb crystals prepared by reaction of Ca+ with CH3F. A quantitative linear relationship is observed between ion number and the corresponding integrated TOF peak, independent of the ionic species. The technique is applicable to a diverse range of multi-component Coulomb crystals - demonstrated here for Ca+/NH3+/NH4+ and Ca+/CaOH+/CaOD+ crystals - and will facilitate the measurement of ion-molecule reaction rates and branching ratios in complicated reaction systems.

Deb, Nabanita; Smith, Alexander D; Keller, Matthias; Rennick, Christopher J; Heazlewood, Brianna R; Softley, Timothy P

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

"Magic" radio-frequency dressing for trapped atomic microwave clocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It has been proposed to use magnetically trapped atomic ensembles to enhance the interrogation time in microwave clocks. To mitigate the perturbing effects of the magnetic trap, "near-magic field" configurations are employed, where the involved clock transition becomes independent of the atoms potential energy to first order. Still, higher order effects are a dominating source for dephasing, limiting the perfomance of this approach. Here we propose a simple method to cancel the energy dependence to both, first and second order, using weak radio-frequency dressing. We give values for dressing frequencies, amplitudes, and trapping fields for 87Rb atoms and investigate quantitatively the robustness of these "second-order magic" conditions to variations of the system parameters. We conclude that radio-frequency dressing can suppress field-induced dephasing by at least one order of magnitude for typical experimental parameters.

Kazakov, Georgy A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Trapped-flux internal-dipole superconducting motor/generator.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new class of motor/generator (M/G) utilizes the magnetic flux trapping capability of high-temperature superconductors (HTSs). The rotor, consists of a cylindrical shell composed of HTS segments. These segments act as trapped-field magnets, magnetized in such a way that a dipole magnetic field is produced in the interior of the shell. A stator coil assembly is placed in the interior of the shell and current passing through the conductors of the coil produce a rotational torque, either as a hysteresis motor or as a synchronous motor. The coil may be either conventional, with copper wires and an iron core, or composed of superconductors and can be used to establish the trapped fields in the HTSs.

Hull, J. R.

1998-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

397

Trapped Ion Chain Thermometry and Mass Analysis Through Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We demonstrate the temperature measurement of individual laser cooled ions in a linear Coulomb crystal by relating their imaged spatial extent along the linear Paul trap axis to the normal modes of vibration of coupled oscillators in a harmonic potential. We also use the thermal spatial spread of `bright' ions in the case of a two-species mixed chain to measure the secular resonance frequency of vibration of the center-of-mass mode of the entire chain and infer the molecular composition of the co-trapped `dark' ions. These techniques create new possibilities for better understanding of sympathetic cooling in mixed-ion chains and under conditions of non-uniform heat load, improving few-ion mass spectrometry, and making in-situ temperature measurements of individual trapped ions without requiring a scan over the Doppler cooling parameters.

V. Rajagopal; J. P. Marler; M. G. Kokish; B. C. Odom

2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

398

Trapped Ion Chain Thermometry and Mass Analysis Through Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We demonstrate the temperature measurement of individual laser cooled ions in a linear Coulomb crystal by relating their imaged spatial extent along the linear Paul trap axis to the normal modes of vibration of coupled oscillators in a harmonic potential. We also use the thermal spatial spread of `bright' ions in the case of a two-species mixed chain to measure the secular resonance frequency of vibration of the center-of-mass mode of the entire chain and infer the molecular composition of the co-trapped `dark' ions. These techniques create new possibilities for better understanding of sympathetic cooling in mixed-ion chains and under conditions of non-uniform heat load, improving few-ion mass spectrometry, and making in-situ temperature measurements of individual trapped ions without requiring a scan over the Doppler cooling parameters.

Rajagopal, V; Kokish, M G; Odom, B C

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Single Ion Trapping For The Enriched Xenon Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the last decade, a variety of neutrino oscillation experiments have established that there is a mass difference between neutrino flavors, without determining the absolute neutrino mass scale. The Enriched Xenon Observatory for neutrinoless double beta decay (EXO) will search for the rare decays of xenon to determine the absolute value of the neutrino mass. The experiment uses a novel technique to minimize backgrounds, identifying the decay daughter product in real time using single ion spectroscopy. Here, we describe single ion trapping and spectroscopy compatible with the EXO detector. We extend the technique of single ion trapping in ultrahigh vacuum to trapping in xenon gas. With this technique, EXO will achieve a neutrino mass sensitivity of ? m?? ≃ .010 eV.

Waldman, S J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Electron capture by trapped Neq+ ions at very low energies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An electrostatic ion trap is used to trap Neq+ (1?q?10) ions created by a fast xenon beam passing through neon gas. Decay of a given charge state during the trapping time is due to electron-capture collisions with the ambient gas. Measurement of the decay constant versus density yields a rate constant, from which an effective cross section is derived. Neq+ + Ne (q=3-10) and Neq++Xe (q=6-10) collisions have been studied at mean collision energies in the range 1.0-70.0 eV. Marked oscillation of the effective capture cross sections with charge at fixed mean collision energies is observed. A strong velocity dependence of the effective cross section (rising as the velocity decreases) is observed for several collision pairs.

M. H. Prior; Richard Marrus; C. R. Vane

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multielement sorbent trap" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Absorption by cold Fermi atoms in a harmonic trap  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the absorption spectrum for a strongly degenerate Fermi gas confined in a harmonic trap. The spectrum is calculated using both the exact summation and also the Thomas-Fermi (TF) approximation. In the latter case, relatively simple analytical expressions are obtained for the absorption lineshape at large number of trapped atoms. At zero temperature, the approximated lineshape is characterized by a $(1-z^2)^{5/2}$ dependence which agrees well with the exact numerical calculations. At non-zero temperature, the spectrum becomes broader, although remains non-Gaussian as long as the fermion gas is degenerate. The changes in the trap frequency for an electronically excited atom can introduce an additional line broadening.

Gediminas Juzeliunas; Marius Masalas

2000-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

402

Storing Electrons Instead of Positrons Without Trapping of Positive Ions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electrons Instead of Positrons Without Electrons Instead of Positrons Without Trapping of Positive Ions LS-75 T. K. Khoe October, 1986 In this note, a procedure to inject and store electrons in the ring without trapping ions will be described. The minimum injection current per bunch below which ion trapping occur will be determined. Since the vertical beam size is smaller than the horizontal beam size, we will consider the vertical motion only. The following assumptions are made: 1. The bunch period is much longer than the bunch length. This assumption allow us to use the thin lens approximation for the focusing effect of the electron bunch. 2. The bunch length is much larger than the transverse dimensions of the beam. A two-dimensional calculation can then be used to obtain the

403

Double Well Potentials and Quantum Phase Transitions in Ion Traps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We demonstrate that the radial degree of freedom of strings of trapped ions in the quantum regime may be prepared and controlled accurately through the variation of the external trapping potential while at the same time its properties are measurable with high spatial and temporal resolution. This provides a new testbed giving access to static and dynamical properties of the physics of quantum-many-body systems and quantum phase transitions that are hard to simulate on classical computers. Furthermore, it allows for the creation of double well potentials with experimentally accessible tunneling rates, with applications in testing the foundations of quantum physics and precision sensing.

A. Retzker; R. C. Thompson; D. M. Segal; M. B. Plenio

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

404

Quantum Phase Transitions in a Linear Ion Trap  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that the quantum phase transition of the Tavis-Cummings model can be realised in a linear ion trap of the kind proposed for quantum computation. The Tavis-Cummings model describes the interaction between a bosonic degree of freedom and a collective spin. In an ion trap, the collective spin system is a symmetrised state of the internal electronic states of N ions, while the bosonic system is the vibrational degree of freedom of the centre of mass mode for the ions.

G. J. Milburn; Paul Alsing

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Sympathetic Cooling with Two Atomic Species in an Optical Trap  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We simultaneously trap ultracold lithium and cesium atoms in an optical dipole trap formed by the focus of a CO2 laser and study the exchange of thermal energy between the gases. The optically cooled cesium gas efficiently decreases the temperature of the lithium gas through sympathetic cooling. Equilibrium temperatures down to 25 ?K have been reached. The measured cross section for thermalizing 133Cs-7Li collisions is 8×10-12 cm2, for both species unpolarized in their lowest hyperfine ground state. Besides thermalization, we observe evaporation of lithium purely through elastic cesium-lithium collisions (sympathetic evaporation).

M. Mudrich; S. Kraft; K. Singer; R. Grimm; A. Mosk; M. Weidemüller

2002-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

406

Electron Trapping in Shear Alfvén Waves that Power the Aurora  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results from 1D Vlasov drift-kinetic plasma simulations reveal how and where auroral electrons are accelerated along Earth’s geomagnetic field. In the warm plasma sheet, electrons become trapped in shear Alfvén waves, preventing immediate wave damping. As waves move to regions with larger vTe/vA, their parallel electric field decreases, and the trapped electrons escape their influence. The resulting electron distribution functions compare favorably with in situ observations, demonstrating for the first time a self-consistent link between Alfvén waves and electrons that form aurora.

Clare E. J. Watt and Robert Rankin

2009-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

407

Electron Trapping in Shear Alfven Waves that Power the Aurora  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results from 1D Vlasov drift-kinetic plasma simulations reveal how and where auroral electrons are accelerated along Earth's geomagnetic field. In the warm plasma sheet, electrons become trapped in shear Alfven waves, preventing immediate wave damping. As waves move to regions with larger v{sub Te}/v{sub A}, their parallel electric field decreases, and the trapped electrons escape their influence. The resulting electron distribution functions compare favorably with in situ observations, demonstrating for the first time a self-consistent link between Alfven waves and electrons that form aurora.

Watt, Clare E. J.; Rankin, Robert [University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

408

What To Do With Cold Traps and Why  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the 2012 Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, Louisiana, May 29-June 1, 2012 TABLE!1 Failure!Event Historical!Value Flare!Nozzle!Replacement $750,000! Analyzer!Failure!Plant!Shutdown $1,000,000! Flare"out!Fine $1,700,000! Gas... Orleans, Louisiana, May 29-June 1, 2012 TABLE!7 Failure!Events Annual!Cost!/!Trap (360!Traps!in!Unit) Flare!Nozzle!Replacement $694 Analyzer!Failure!Shuts!Plant $1,389 Flare"out!Fine $3,148 Gas!Compressor!Failure $5,000 Main!Turbine!Failure $11...

Risko, J. R.; Walter, J. P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Ion trapping in the emitter sheath in thermionic converters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of ion trapping in the emitter sheath in ignited thermionic converters is studied. The ion trapping prevents the emitter-sheath barrier from being higher than approximately 0.1 eV, when the current decreases in the converter. This gives a condition for the constriction of the arc. I-V curves are calculated for an ignited thermionic converter with a hydrodynamic plasma theory that takes into account the effect of Coulomb scattering and volume recombination, but assumes that the electron temperature is constant in the plasma.

Lundgren, L.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Trapping dynamics of disilane on bare and monohydride-terminated Si(100)-2×1  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The initial trapping probability of disilane on bare and monohydride-terminated Si(100)-2×1 surfaces was measured using molecular beam techniques. On the bare surface, trapping is shown to be very efficient, with near unit trapping probability at incident kinetic energies up to 0.2 eV, and nearly 50% trapping at 1 eV kinetic energy. The monohydride-terminated surface displays significantly less trapping efficiency than the bare surface. Interestingly, trapping probabilities decrease as the angle of incidence is increased, with the decrease becoming more pronounced at higher kinetic energies; this effect is discussed in terms of parallel momentum accommodation dynamics.

B.A. Ferguson; C.T. Reeves; C.B. Mullins

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Operation of a planar-electrode ion trap array with adjustable RF electrodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One path to scaling-up trapped atomic ions for large-scale quantum computing and simulation is to create a two-dimensional array of ion traps in close proximity to each other. A method to control the interactions between nearest neighboring ions is demonstrated and characterized here, using an adjustable radio-frequency (RF) electrode between trapping sites. A printed circuit board planar-electrode ion trap is demonstrated, trapping laser-cooled $^{40}$Ca$^+$ ions. RF shuttling and secular-frequency adjustment are shown as a function of the power applied to the addressed RF electrode. The trapped ion's heating rate is measured via a fluorescence recooling method.

Muir Kumph; Philip Holz; Kirsten Langer; Michael Niedermayr; Michael Brownnutt; Rainer Blatt

2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

412

Investigation of the reaction of OH and CO to form H and CO? by photoelectron-photofragment coincidence spectroscopy in a cryogenic ion beam trap  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spectroscopy in a cryogenic ion beam trap A dissertationspectroscopy in a cryogenic ion beam trap by Christopherof the inclusion of a cryogenic ion beam trap, and its

Johnson, Christopher Joseph

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Paul trapping of charged particles in aqueous solution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1]. Oxygen plasma treatment was...surrounding ionic atmosphere to the motion of...ii) Trapping with large fluctuations...V) Frequency (MHz) b q a i 1...with the surface area of the particle...V, and f=2.5 MHz, using the device...

Weihua Guan; Sony Joseph; Jae Hyun Park; Predrag S. Krsti?; Mark A. Reed

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Reversed magnetization A NOVEL DEVICE FOR CONTINUOUS FLOW MAGNETIC TRAPPING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1. 3 µm5 µm Reversed magnetization A NOVEL DEVICE FOR CONTINUOUS FLOW MAGNETIC TRAPPING AND SORTING Martin d'hères, France ABSTRACT The manipulation of magnetically labeled bio-objects of nano or micrometer sizes is now realizable by combining the magnetic forces with microfluidics. This paper reports

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

415

Measuring the Neutron Lifetime Using Magnetically Trapped Neutrons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The neutron beta-decay lifetime plays an important role both in understanding weak interactions within the framework of the Standard Model and in theoretical predictions of the primordial abundance of 4He in Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. In previous work, we successfully demonstrated the trapping of ultracold neutrons (UCN) in a conservative potential magnetic trap. A major upgrade of the apparatus is nearing completion at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research (NCNR). In our approach, a beam of 0.89 nm neutrons is incident on a superfluid 4He target within the minimum field region of an Ioffe-type magnetic trap. A fraction of the neutrons is downscattered in the helium to energies <200 neV, and those in the appropriate spin state become trapped. The inverse process is suppressed by the low phonon density of helium at temperatures less than 200 mK, allowing the neutron to travel undisturbed. When the neutron decays the energetic electron ionizes the helium, producing sci...

O'Shaughnessy, C M; Schelhammer, K W; Swank, C M; Seo, P -N; Huffman, P R; Dzhosyuk, S N; Mattoni, C E H; Yang, L; Doyle, J M; Coakley, K J; Thompson, A K; Mumm, H P; Lamoreaux, S K; Yang, G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Non-Diversification Traps in Catastrophe Insurance Markets Rustam Ibragimov  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

markets, even though there is a large enough market capacity to reach full risk sharing throughNon-Diversification Traps in Catastrophe Insurance Markets Rustam Ibragimov Dwight Jaffee Johan Walden§ Abstract We develop a model for markets for catastrophic risk. The model explains why insurance

Chaudhuri, Sanjay

417

Gene Traps: Tools for Plant Development and Genomics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...activates GFP expression from the UAS. A battery of enhancer trap lines expressing this...genomic DNA flanking the insertions (). Thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR is particularly...Arabidopsis thaliana T-DNA insert junctions by thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR Lloyd A.M...

Patricia S. Springer

418

The TITAN in-trap decay spectroscopy facility at TRIUMF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article presents an upgraded in-trap decay spectroscopy apparatus which has been developed and constructed for use with TRIUMF's Ion Trap for Atomic and Nuclear science (TITAN). This device consists of an open-access electron-beam ion-trap (EBIT), which is surrounded radially by seven low-energy planar Si(Li) detectors. The environment of the EBIT allows for the detection of low-energy photons by providing backing-free storage of the radioactive ions, while guiding charged decay particles away from the trap centre via the strong (up to 6 T) magnetic field. In addition to excellent ion confinement and storage, the EBIT also provides a venue for performing decay spectroscopy on highly-charged radioactive ions. Recent technical advancements have been able to provide a significant increase in sensitivity for low-energy photon detection, towards the goal of measuring weak electron-capture branching ratios of the intermediate nuclei in the two-neutrino double beta ($2\

K. G. Leach; A. Grossheim; A. Lennarz; T. Brunner; J. R. Crespo López-Urrutia; A. T. Gallant; M. Good; R. Klawitter; A. A. Kwiatkowski; T. Ma; T. D. Macdonald; S. Seeraji; M. C. Simon; C. Andreoiu; J. Dilling; D. Frekers

2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

419

Trapping and Frequency Variability in Electron Acoustic Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trapping and Frequency Variability in Electron Acoustic Waves C.F. Driscoll, F. Anderegg, D 92093 USA Abstract. Electron Acoustic Waves (EAWs) with a phase velocity less than twice the plasma Langmuir waves, and at large excitations resonance is observed over a broad range. Laser Induced

California at San Diego, University of

420

Quantum Reservoir Engineering with Laser Cooled Trapped Ions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We show how to design different couplings between a single ion trapped in a harmonic potential and an environment. The coupling is due to the absorption of a laser photon and subsequent spontaneous emission. The variation of the laser frequencies and intensities allows one to “engineer” the coupling and select the master equation describing the motion of the ion.

J. F. Poyatos; J. I. Cirac; P. Zoller

1996-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multielement sorbent trap" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Light Trapping in Solar Cells Using Resonant Nanostructures P. Spinelli  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Light Trapping in Solar Cells Using Resonant Nanostructures P. Spinelli #12;Summary Photovoltaics solar cell is reduced, due to incomplete absorption of light. In this thesis, we investigate new ways of enhancing light absorption in Si solar cells by using nanostructures that show resonant interaction

van Rooij, Robert

422

Landau Damping of Spin Waves in Trapped Boltzmann Gases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

levels of trapped ultra-cold 87Rb atoms in the nondegenerate regimes. As in spin-polarized Boltzmann) where is the mean-field frequency, S+(z) = s+(z, p)n(p) dp and n(p) = (2mkBT)-1/2 exp[-p2/(2mk

Mullin, William J.

423

Momentum distribution and correlation function of quasicondensates in elongated traps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We calculate the spatial correlation function and momentum distribution of a phase-fluctuating, elongated three-dimensional condensate in a trap and in free expansion. We take the inhomogeneous density profile into account via a local-density approximation. We find an almost Lorentzian momentum distribution, in stark contrast with a Heisenberg-limited Thomas-Fermi condensate.

F. Gerbier; J. H. Thywissen; S. Richard; M. Hugbart; P. Bouyer; A. Aspect

2003-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

424

Multiple isotope magneto-optical trap from a single diode laser  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a dual isotope magneto-optical trap produced using a single diode laser. We generate all the optical frequencies needed for trapping both species using a fiber intensity...

Valenzuela, Victor Manuel; Hamzeloui, Saeed; Gutiérrez, Monica; Gomez, Eduardo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

GreenPower Trap Water-Muffler System | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

GreenPower Trap Water-Muffler System GreenPower Trap Water-Muffler System This hydrated EGR system reduces NOx and enhances fuel efficiency, and the DPF is catalyzed by the...

426

Loading a planar RF Paul Trap from a cold Yb? source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, we demonstrate a functioning planar radio frequency, three-rod Paul Trap, loaded with Yb+ ions that have been photoionized from a source of neutral atoms, which were cooled in a magneto-optical trap. Planar ...

Shields, Brendan John

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Ensemble method to measure the potential energy of nanoparticles in an optical trap  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method is described for measuring the potential energy of nanoparticles in an optical trap by trapping an ensemble of particles with a focused laser beam. The force balance between...

Junio, Joseph; Ng, Jack; Cohen, Joel A; Lin, Zhifang; Ou-Yang, H Daniel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Finite-geometry models of electric field noise from patch potentials in ion traps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We model electric field noise from fluctuating patch potentials on conducting surfaces by taking into account the finite geometry of the ion trap electrodes to gain insight into the origin of anomalous heating in ion traps. ...

Low, Guang Hao

429

Intra-catalyst Reductant Chemistry in Lean NOx Traps: A Study...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Intra-catalyst Reductant Chemistry in Lean NOx Traps: A Study on Sulfur Effects Intra-catalyst Reductant Chemistry in Lean NOx Traps: A Study on Sulfur Effects Presentation given...

430

An all-glass microfluidic cell for the ABEL trap: fabrication and Adam E. Cohen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An all-glass microfluidic cell for the ABEL trap: fabrication and modeling Adam E. Cohen Department trap is a microfluidic cell. In previous incarnations of the ABEL trap, the microfluidic cell microfluidic cell, made entirely out of glass. This new design significantly decreases the rate

Shapiro, Benjamin

431

How to assess light trapping structures versus a Lambertian Scatterer for solar cells ?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

How to assess light trapping structures versus a Lambertian Scatterer for solar cells ? Christian trapping nanostructures for solar cells, which we call the light trapping efficiency (LTE). The LTE has in thin Si solar cells by diffuse back reflectors," Proceedings of the 15th IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists

432

Reduction of the trapping of positrons in dislocated single crystals of iron when charged with hydrogen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The positron annihilation measurement was carried out with the pure iron single crystals deformed in various ways before and after hydrogen permeation. The positron trapping intensity was reduced more in the screw dislocation than in the edge dislocation by hydrogen charging. The trap occupancy by hydrogen was very close to the fraction of the reduction in positron trapping intensity.

Park, Y.K.; Waber, J.T.; Snead, C.L. Jr.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Solar Cell Light Trapping beyond the Ray Optic Limit Dennis M. Callahan,* Jeremy N. Munday,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar Cell Light Trapping beyond the Ray Optic Limit Dennis M. Callahan,* Jeremy N. Munday: Photovoltaic cell, solar cell, local density of optical states (LDOS), light trapping, plasmonic, nanophotonic light trapping, as the solar cell absorber layer thickness is reduced, absorption is also reduced

Atwater, Harry

434

Towards trapped antihydrogen L.V. Jrgensen a,*, G. Andresen b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of antihydrogen physics. The next big step forward is expected to be the trapping of the formed antihydrogen atoms using a magnetic multipole trap. ALPHA is a new international project that started to take data in 2006 in a nested Penning trap [3]. After formation the antihydrogen was no longer bound by the electric

Wurtele, Jonathan

435

A comparison study of gravid and under house CO2 mosquito traps in Harris County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Traps in Harris County, Texas. (May 2008) Stephanie Lyn White, B.S.; B.S., Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Michael P. Ward Harris County Mosquito Control Division (HCMCD) is responsible for surveillance of mosquito species...2 traps for WNV and SLE virus surveillance. Adjusting for the week of collection, results suggest that Gravid traps caught significantly (P = 0.009) more mosquitoes (mean = 23.134 per trap) in the study area than Underhouse traps (mean = 3...

White, Stephanie Lyn

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

436

A Toy Model Study of Decay Trapping | Superconducting Magnet Division  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Toy Model Study of Decay Trapping, reported by Brett Parker A Toy Model Study of Decay Trapping, reported by Brett Parker Introduction A group from the BNL Superconducting Magnet Division is looking at various options for dipole magnets which would be suitable for use in a muon storage ring that is used as a neutrino factory. Since the useful neutrino beams from a neutrino factory come from straight sections it is desirable to minimize the rings arc circumference, in relation to straight section length, in order to ensure that the fraction of muons which decay in the straight section is as large as possible. Therefore superconducting magnets, with higher B-fields and smaller bend radii, are reasonable to consider for this application. Unfortunately the decay electrons generated along with the neutrinos carry on average about a third of the original

437

A bosonic Josephson junction controlled by a single trapped ion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We theoretically investigate the properties of a double-well bosonic Josephson junction coupled to a single trapped ion. We find that the coupling between the wells can be controlled by the internal state of the ion, which can be used for studying mesoscopic entanglement between the two systems and to measure their interaction with high precision. As a particular example we consider a single $^{87}$Rb atom and a small Bose-Einstein condensate controlled by a single $^{171}$Yb$^+$ ion. We calculate inter-well coupling rates reaching hundreds of Hz, while the state dependence amounts to tens of Hz for plausible values of the currently unknown s-wave scattering length between the atom and the ion. The analysis shows that it is possible to induce either the self-trapping or the tunneling regime, depending on the internal state of the ion. This enables the generation of large scale ion-atomic wavepacket entanglement within current technology.

R. Gerritsma; A. Negretti; H. Doerk; Z. Idziaszek; T. Calarco; F. Schmidt-Kaler

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

438

Electromagnetic two-dimensional analysis of trapped-ion eigenmodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A two-dimensional electromagnetic analysis of the trapped-ion instability for the tokamak case with ..beta.. not equal to 0 has been made, based on previous work in the electrostatic limit. The quasineutrality condition and the component of Ampere's law along the equilibrium magnetic field are solved for the perturbed electrostatic potential and the component of the perturbed vector potential along the equilibrium magnetic field. The general integro-differential equations are converted into a matrix eigenvalue-eigenfunction problem by expanding in cubic B-spline finite elements in the minor radius and in Fourier harmonics in the poloidal angle. A model MHD equilibrium with circular, concentric magnetic surfaces and large aspect ratio is used which is consistent with our assemption that B << 1. The effect on the trapped-ion mode of including these electromagnetic extensions to the calculation is considered, and the temperature (and ..beta..) scaling of the mode frequency is shown and discussed.

Kim, D.; Rewoldt, G.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Photoionization of strontium for trapped-ion quantum information processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report a demonstration of simple and effective loading of strontium ions into a linear radio frequency Paul trap using photoionization. The ionization pathway is 5s2 1S0 -- 5s5p 1P1 -- 5p2 1D2, and the 5p2 1D2 final state is auto-ionizing. Both transitions are driven using diode lasers: a grating-stabilized 922 nm diode doubled in a single pass through potassium niobate to 461 nm and a bare diode at 405 nm. Using this technique, we have reduced the background pressure during the ion loading process by a factor of 2 compared to the conventional technique of electron bombardment. Initial ion temperatures are low enough that the ions immediately form crystals. It is also possible to observe the trapping region with a CCD camera during ion creation, allowing specific ion number loading with high probability.

K. Vant; J. Chiaverini; W. Lybarger; D. J. Berkeland

2006-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

440

Measurement-Induced Vibrational Dynamics of a Trapped Ion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Excitation spectra of an individual trapped 138Ba+ ion show sidebands of radial and axial ion vibration in the trap. The second-order sidebands involving radial and axial vibrations would allow swapping these vibrational states; they represent an inverse Raman effect with the role of electronic and vibrational excitation interchanged. Deexcitation sidebands differ from excitation sidebands as the vibrational distribution in the D5/2 level is modified by the ion being reduced to this level in null observations of resonance light. Delayed deexcitation goes along with stochastic cooling that makes the ion collapse into the Fock state |n=1?. Sideband modulation is identified as stroboscopic detection of the light-induced nutation on a vibrational transition with ?n=±1.

B. Appasamy; Y. Stalgies; P. E. Toschek

1998-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multielement sorbent trap" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Engineering two-mode interactions in ion traps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe how two vibrational degrees of freedom of a single trapped ion can be coupled through the action of suitably-chosen laser excitation. We concentrate on a two-dimensional ion trap with dissimilar vibrational frequencies in the x- and y-directions of motion, and derive from first principles a variety of quantized two-mode couplings, concentrating on a linear coupling which takes excitations from one mode to another. We demonstrate how this can result in a state rotation, in which it is possible to transfer the motional state of the ion from say the x-direction to the y-direction without prior knowledge of that motional state.

J. Steinbach; J. Twamley; P. L. Knight

1997-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

442

Engineering superpositions of displaced number states of a trapped ion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a protocol that permits the generation of a subtle with superposition with 2^(l+1) displaced number states on a circle in phase space as target state for the center-of-mass motion of a trapped ion. Through a sequence of 'l' cycles involving the application of laser pulses and no-fluorescence measurements, explicit expressions for the total duration of laser pulses employed in the sequence and probability of getting the ion in the upper electronic state during the 'l' cycles are obtained and analyzed in detail. Furthermore, assuming that the effective relaxation process of a trapped ion can be described in the framework of the standard master equation for the damped harmonic oscillator, we investigate the degradation of the quantum interference effects inherent to superpositions via Wigner function.

Marcelo A. Marchiolli; Wagner D. Jose

2004-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

443

Freely floating structures trapping time-harmonic water waves (revisited)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the coupled small-amplitude motion of the mechanical system consisting of infinitely deep water and a structure immersed in it. The former is bounded above by a free surface, whereas the latter is formed by an arbitrary finite number of surface-piercing bodies floating freely. The mathematical model of time-harmonic motion is a spectral problem in which the frequency of oscillations serves as the spectral parameter. It is proved that there exist axisymmetric structures consisting of $N \\geq 2$ bodies; every structure has the following properties: (i) a time-harmonic wave mode is trapped by it; (ii) some of its bodies (may be none) are motionless, whereas the rest of the bodies (may be none) are heaving at the same frequency as water. The construction of these structures is based on a generalization of the semi-inverse procedure applied earlier for obtaining trapping bodies that are motionless although float freely.

Nikolay Kuznetsov; Oleg Motygin

2014-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

444

Wolf Trap, Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trap, Virginia: Energy Resources Trap, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 38.9398329°, -77.286094° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.9398329,"lon":-77.286094,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

445

Isoelectric Trapping and Mass Spectrometry: Tools for Proteomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ISOELECTRIC TRAPPING AND MASS SPECTROMETRY: TOOLS FOR PROTEOMICS A Dissertation by STEPHANIE MARIE COLOGNA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, David H. Russell Committee Members, Paul S. Cremer Arul Jayaraman Gyula Vigh Head of Department, David H...

Cologna, Stephanie Marie

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

446

Qualitative analysis of trapped Dirac fermions in graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the confinement of Dirac fermions in graphene and in carbon nanotubes by an external magnetic field, mechanical deformations or inhomogeneities in the substrate. By applying variational principles to the square of the Dirac operator, we obtain sufficient and necessary conditions for confinement of the quasi-particles. The rigorous theoretical results are illustrated on the realistic examples of the three classes of traps.

Vit Jakubsky; David Krejcirik

2014-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

447

Adiabatic trapping in coupled kinetic Alfven-acoustic waves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the present work, we have discussed the effects of adiabatic trapping of electrons on obliquely propagating Alfven waves in a low {beta} plasma. Using the two potential theory and employing the Sagdeev potential approach, we have investigated the existence of arbitrary amplitude coupled kinetic Alfven-acoustic solitary waves in both the sub and super Alfvenic cases. The results obtained have been analyzed and presented graphically and can be applied to regions of space where the low {beta} assumption holds true.

Shah, H. A.; Ali, Z. [Department of Physics, G.C. University, 54000 Lahore (Pakistan); Masood, W. [COMSATS, Institute of Information Technology, Park Road, Chak Shahzad, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); National Centre for Physics (NCP), Shahdara Valley Road, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, P. O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

448

Qualitative analysis of trapped Dirac fermions in graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the confinement of Dirac fermions in graphene and in carbon nanotubes by an external magnetic field, mechanical deformations or inhomogeneities in the substrate. By applying variational principles to the square of the Dirac operator, we obtain sufficient and necessary conditions for confinement of the quasi-particles. The rigorous theoretical results are illustrated on the realistic examples of the three classes of traps.

Vit Jakubsky; David Krejcirik

2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

449

Phase-dependent coherent population trapping and optical switching  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose a scheme for achieving phase-dependent coherent population trapping, showing that both the dark state of the atoms and light propagation dynamics depend on the relative phase of the fields. The atomic coherence prepared via adiabatic process plays a key role in the interaction of light with matter. And an optical switching based on the phase-controlled quantum interference is implemented, which may have potential application in high-speed optical communications and quantum information systems.

Kou, J. [College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China); Quantum Engineering Center, Beijing Institute of Control Device, Beijing 100854 (China); Wan, R. G.; Kang, Z. H.; Jiang, L.; Wang, L.; Jiang, Y.; Gao, J. Y. [College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

450

Fabrication and heating rate study of microscopic surface electrode ion traps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report heating rate measurements in a microfabricated gold-on-sapphire surface electrode ion trap with trapping height of approximately 240 micron. Using the Doppler recooling method, we characterize the trap heating rates over an extended region of the trap. The noise spectral density of the trap falls in the range of noise spectra reported in ion traps at room temperature. We find that during the first months of operation the heating rates increase by approximately one order of magnitude. The increase in heating rates is largest in the ion loading region of the trap, providing a strong hint that surface contamination plays a major role for excessive heating rates. We discuss data found in the literature and possible relation of anomalous heating to sources of noise and dissipation in other systems, namely impurity atoms adsorbed on metal surfaces and amorphous dielectrics.

N. Daniilidis; S. Narayanan; S. A. Möller; R. Clark; T. E. Lee; P. J. Leek; A. Wallraff; St. Schulz; F. Schmidt-Kaler; H. Häffner

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

451

Dynamic Modeling and Control Studies of a Two-Stage Bubbling Fluidized Bed Adsorber-Reactor for Solid-Sorbent CO{sub 2} Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A one-dimensional, non-isothermal, pressure-driven dynamic model has been developed for a two-stage bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) adsorber-reactor for solid-sorbent carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture using Aspen Custom Modeler® (ACM). The BFB model for the flow of gas through a continuous phase of downward moving solids considers three regions: emulsion, bubble, and cloud-wake. Both the upper and lower reactor stages are of overflow-type configuration, i.e., the solids leave from the top of each stage. In addition, dynamic models have been developed for the downcomer that transfers solids between the stages and the exit hopper that removes solids from the bottom of the bed. The models of all auxiliary equipment such as valves and gas distributor have been integrated with the main model of the two-stage adsorber reactor. Using the developed dynamic model, the transient responses of various process variables such as CO{sub 2} capture rate and flue gas outlet temperatures have been studied by simulating typical disturbances such as change in the temperature, flowrate, and composition of the incoming flue gas from pulverized coal-fired power plants. In control studies, the performance of a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller, feedback-augmented feedforward controller, and linear model predictive controller (LMPC) are evaluated for maintaining the overall CO{sub 2} capture rate at a desired level in the face of typical disturbances.

Modekurti, Srinivasarao; Bhattacharyya, Debangsu; Zitney, Stephen E.

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

452

Plasma production by the trapping of energetic atoms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The production of a hot plasma by the injection of streams of energetic atoms into a confining magnetic field is discussed. The experiments described are directed towards injection of 20-keV hydrogen or deuterium atoms into a magnetic mirror field. The results of some numerical calculations of the plasma growth to a steady-state in a constant magnetic field are presented, including the calculation of the spatial distribution of the trapped ions. In these calculations, the primary trapping mechanism is the ionization of beam atoms by trapped ions and electrons. Parametric values are assigned to approximate the experimentally attainable conditions. The indicated equilibrium densities are in the range of 1014/cm3, at ? ? 1%, with typical growth times of a few seconds, if the final density is determined by ion-ion scattering into the mirror loss cone.The practical achievement of a hot plasma by this injection method depends upon maximizing the trapping rate, and minimizing the particle loss due to charge-exchange scattering. Severe requirements are therefore placed on the atomic beam intensity and the gas density in the confinement region. Some of the requirements on the build-up conditions imposed by plasma stability considerations are also discussed.Progress toward meeting the technological requirements is described. A highly collimated beam of hydrogen atoms in excess of 5 × 1017 atoms/sec at 20-keV energy has been produced. The cross-sectional area of the beam is 20 cm2 at a distance of 360 cm from the source; the half-angle divergence is less than 10 milliradians. Vacuum techniques have been developed to achieve base pressures in the 10?10 mm Hg range without extensive bakeout procedure. At the same time pumping speeds exceeding 105l/sec for hydrogen are available.A method of trapping the energetic atoms by means of a transient “cold” plasma is also discussed. This procedure greatly increases the initial plasma growth rate. The plasma density attainable depends upon the beam intensity, vacuum, and cold plasma density, the latter two being time-dependent. The generation of a suitable cold plasma is described.

C.C. Damm; A.H. Futch; F. Gordon; A.L. Hunt; E.C. Popp; R.F. Post; J.F. Steinhaus

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

February 1, 1994 / Vol. 19, No. 3 / OPTICS LETTERS Spin relaxation of optically trapped atoms by light scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

February 1, 1994 / Vol. 19, No. 3 / OPTICS LETTERS Spin relaxation of optically trapped atoms of optically trapped atoms that is due to light scattering from the trap laser. We observe relaxation times greater than 2 s for ground-state hyperfine-levelpopulations of 85 Rb atoms trapped in an optical dipole

Heinzen, Daniel J.

454

Heating rates in collisionally opaque alkali-metal atom traps: Role of secondary collisions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Grazing collisions with background gas are the major cause of trap loss and trap heating in atom traps. To first order, these effects do not depend on the trap density. In collisionally opaque trapped atom clouds, however, scattered atoms with an energy E larger than the effective trap depth Eeff, which are destined to escape from the atom cloud, will have a finite probability for a secondary collision. This results in a contribution to the heating rate that depends on the column density ?nl? of the trapped atoms, i.e., the product of density and characteristic size of the trap. For alkali-metal atom traps, secondary collisions are quite important due to the strong long-range interaction with like atoms. We derive a simple analytical expression for the secondary heating rate, showing a dependency proportional to ?nl??Eeff1/2. When extrapolating to a vanishing column density, only primary collisions with the background gas will contribute to the heating rate. This contribution is rather small, due to the weak long-range interaction of the usual background gas species in an ultrahigh-vacuum system—He, Ne, or Ar—with the trapped alkali-metal atoms. We conclude that the transition between trap-loss collisions and heating collisions is determined by a cutoff energy 200??K<~Eeff<~400??K, much smaller than the actual trap depth E in most magnetic traps. Atoms with an energy Eefftrap temperatures. We present results of secondary heating rates for the alkali-metal atoms Li through Cs as a function of the effective trap depth, the column density of the trap, and the species in the background gas. The predictions of our model are in good agreement with the experimental data of Myatt for heating rates in high-density 87Rb-atom magnetic traps at JILA, including the effect of the rf shield and the composition of the background gas. It is shown that collisions with atoms from the Oort cloud also contribute to the heating rate. For 85Rb the calculated heating rate is below the experimentally observed value at JILA, supporting the idea that inelastic collisions in the trap are the major source of heating.

H. C. W. Beijerinck

2000-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

455

Drunken robber, tipsy cop: First passage times, mobile traps, and Hopf bifurcations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For a random walk on a confined one-dimensional domain, we consider mean first passage times (MFPT) in the presence of a mobile trap. The question we address is whether a mobile trap can improve capture times over a stationary trap. We consider two scenarios: a randomly moving trap and an oscillating trap. In both cases, we find that a stationary trap actually performs better (in terms of reducing expected capture time) than a very slowly moving trap; however, a trap moving sufficiently fast performs better than a stationary trap. We explicitly compute the thresholds that separate the two regimes. In addition, we find a surprising relation between the oscillating trap problem and a moving-sink problem that describes reduced dynamics of a single spike in a certain regime of the Gray-Scott model. Namely, the above-mentioned threshold corresponds precisely to a Hopf bifurcation that induces oscillatory motion in the location of the spike. We use this correspondence to prove the uniqueness of the Hopf bifurcation.

Justin C. Tzou; Shuangquan Xie; Theodore Kolokolnikov

2014-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

456

Simulation of dust streaming in toroidal traps: Stationary flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Molecular-dynamic simulations were performed to study dust motion in a toroidal trap under the influence of the ion drag force driven by a Hall motion of the ions in E x B direction, gravity, inter-particle forces, and friction with the neutral gas. This article is focused on the inhomogeneous stationary streaming motion. Depending on the strength of friction, the spontaneous formation of a stationary shock or a spatial bifurcation into a fast flow and a slow vortex flow is observed. In the quiescent streaming region, the particle flow features a shell structure which undergoes a structural phase transition along the flow direction.

Reichstein, Torben; Piel, Alexander [IEAP, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, D-24098 Kiel (Germany)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

457

Nuclear spin qubits in a trapped-ion quantum computer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physical systems must fulfill a number of conditions to qualify as useful quantum bits (qubits) for quantum information processing, including ease of manipulation, long decoherence times, and high fidelity readout operations. Since these conditions are hard to satisfy with a single system, it may be necessary to combine different degrees of freedom. Here we discuss a possible system, based on electronic and nuclear spin degrees of freedom in trapped ions. The nuclear spin yields long decoherence times, while the electronic spin, in a magnetic field gradient, provides efficient manipulation, and the optical transitions of the ions assure a selective and efficient initialization and readout.

M. Feng; Y. Y. Xu; F. Zhou; D. Suter

2009-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

458

Dipole trapped spheromak in a prolate flux conserver  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports the observation and characterization of a spheromak formed in the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX [M. R. Brown Phys. Plasmas6 1717 (1999)]) and trapped in a simple dipole magnetic field. The spheromak is studied in a prolate (tilt unstable) 0.4 m diameter 0.6 m length copper flux conserver in SSX. This plasma does not tilt despite the prolate flux conserver. The spheromak is characterized by a suite of magnetic probe arrays for magnetic structure B ( r t ) ion Doppler spectroscopy for T i and flow and interferometry for n e . Three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulations of this configuration verify its gross sta-bility.

M. R. Brown; C. D. Cothran; J. Fung; M. Chang; J. Horwitz; M. J. Schaffer; J. Leuer; E. V. Belova

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Effect of Trapped Energetic Particles on the Resistive Wall Mode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A stability analysis for the resistive wall mode is studied in the presence of trapped energetic particles (EPs). When the EPs' beta exceeds a critical value, a fishbonelike bursting mode (FLM) with an external kink eigenstructure can exist. This offers the first analytic interpretation of the experimental observations [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 045001 (2009)]. The mode-particle resonances for the FLM and the q=1 fishbone occur in different regimes of the precession frequency of EPs. In certain ranges of the plasma rotation speed and the EPs' beta, a mode conversion can occur between the resistive wall mode and FLM.

Hao, G. Z.; Wang, A. K.; Qiu, X. M. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Post Office Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China); Liu, Y. Q. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Equilibrium state of a trapped two-dimensional Bose gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study experimentally and numerically the equilibrium density profiles of a trapped two-dimensional Rb87 Bose gas and investigate the equation of state of the homogeneous system using the local density approximation. We find a clear discrepancy between in situ measurements and quantum Monte Carlo simulations, which we attribute to a nonlinear variation of the optical density of the atomic cloud with its spatial density. However, good agreement between experiment and theory is recovered for the density profiles measured after time of flight, taking advantage of their self-similarity in a two-dimensional expansion.

Steffen P. Rath, Tarik Yefsah, Kenneth J. Günter, Marc Cheneau, Rémi Desbuquois, Markus Holzmann, Werner Krauth, and Jean Dalibard

2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Prospects for cooling and trapping rotationally hot molecules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cold collisions involving highly rotationally excited diatomic molecules are investigated. As the translational energy is lowered, the total inelastic cross section decreases sharply for specific channels where quasiresonant transitions are no longer energetically allowed. Rate coefficients are given for collisional quenching of rotationally excited H2,D2,T2, and O2 at zero temperature. The specific rotational states that are stable against collisional relaxation would be interesting prospects for cooling and trapping. The application of collisional cooling methods together with recently developed schemes for producing rotationally hot molecules may allow high densities of ultracold “super rotors” to be achieved.

R. C. Forrey

2002-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

462

Stabilization of the resistive wall mode instability by trapped energetic particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A theoretical model for investigating the effect of the trapped energetic particles (EPs) on the resistive wall mode (RWM) instability is proposed. The results demonstrate that the trapped EPs have a dramatic stabilizing effect on the RWM because of resonant interaction between the mode and the magnetic precession drift motion of the trapped EPs. The results also show that the effect of the trapped EPs depends on the wall position. In addition, the stabilizing effect becomes stronger when the plasma rotation is taken into account. For sufficiently fast plasma rotation, the trapped EPs can lead to the complete stabilization of the RWM. Furthermore, the trapped EPs can induce a finite real frequency of the RWM in the absence of plasma rotation.

Hao, G. Z.; Wang, A. K.; Jiang, H. B.; Lu, Gaimin; He, H. D.; Qiu, X. M. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China); Liu, Y. Q. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

463

Destruction of attractive bosonic cloud due to high spatial coherence in tight trap  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study coherence of a trapped bosonic cloud with attractive finite-range interaction in a tight harmonic trap. One-body density and pair-distribution function in the ground state for different trap sizes are calculated. We also calculate healing length and the correlation length which signify the presence of high spatial coherence in a very tight trap leading to the destruction of the condensate for a fixed particle number. This is in marked variance with the usual collapse of the attractive metastable condensate when N>N{sub cr}. Thus we investigate the critical frequency and critical size of the trap for the existence of attractive Bose-Einstein condensation. The finite-range interaction gives a nonlocal effect in the effective many-body potential, and we observe a high-density stable branch besides the known metastable branch. Moreover, the new branch shows universal behavior even in the very tight trap.

Biswas, Anindya; Das, Tapan Kumar [Department of Physics, University of Calcutta, 92 A.P.C. Road, Kolkata 700009 (India); Chakrabarti, Barnali [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade of Sao Paulo, CP 66318, 05315-970 Sao Paulo-SP (Brazil); Department of Physics, Lady Brabourne College, P1/2 Surawardi Avenue, Kolkata 700017 (India); Salasnich, Luca [Dipartimento di Fisica ''Galileo Galilei'' and CNISM, Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, IT-35122 Padova (Italy)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

464

Fast shuttling of a trapped ion in the presence of noise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We theoretically investigate the motional excitation of a single ion caused by spring-constant and position uctuations of a harmonic trap during trap shuttling processes. A detailed study of the sensitivity on noise for several transport protocols and noise spectra is provided. The e?ect of slow spring-constant drifts is also analyzed. Trap trajectories that minimize the excitation are designed combining invariant-based inverse engineering, perturbation theory, and optimal control.

Xiao-Jing Lu; J. G. Muga; Xi Chen; U. G. Poschinger; F. Schmidt-Kaler; A. Ruschhaupt

2014-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

465

Light trapping and near-unity solar absorption in a three-dimensional photonic-crystal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Light trapping and near-unity solar absorption in a three-dimensional photonic-crystal Ping Kuang,1 opens up a new door for light trapping and near-unity solar absorption over broad s and wide angles://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OL.38.004200 There is a great deal of interest in efficient light trapping in thin film solar

John, Sajeev

466

Efficient Collection of 221Fr into a Vapor Cell Magneto-optical Trap  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have efficiently loaded a vapor cell magneto-optical trap from an orthotropic source of 221Fr with a trapping efficiency of 56(10)%. A novel detection scheme allowed us to measure 900 trapped atoms with a signal to noise ratio of ?60 in 1 sec. We have measured the energies and the hyperfine constants of the 7P1/22 and 7P3/22 states.

Z.-T. Lu; K. L. Corwin; K. R. Vogel; C. E. Wieman; T. P. Dinneen; J. Maddi; Harvey Gould

1997-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

467

E-Print Network 3.0 - antiproton trap hipat Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of - Department of Physics, Non-Neutral Plasma Project Collection: Plasma Physics and Fusion 12 Cold Trapped Positrons and Progress to Cold Antihydrogen Summary: over a wide...

468

Synergies of High-Efficiency Clean Combustion and Lean NOx Trap...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Combustion and Lean NOx Trap Catalysts investigation of potential synergies of low emission advanced combustion techniques and advanced lean exhaust catalytic aftertreatment....

469

Technological assessment of light-trapping technology for thin-film Si solar cell.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The proposed light trapping technology of Distributed Bragg Reflector (DBR) with Diffraction Grating (DG) and Anti-Reflection Coating (ARC) for thin film Si solar cell was… (more)

Susantyoko, Rahmat Agung

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

E-Print Network 3.0 - ap-8 trapped proton Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

J. Bebek, Armin Karcher, William F. Kolbe, Natalie A. Roe, Summary: Charge trap identification for proton-irradiated p+ channel CCDs Nick J. Mostek, Christopher J... , we...

471

Coherent population trapping on the sodium D1 line in high magnetic fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider the coherent-population-trapping (CPT) phenomenon in a sodium atomic vapor. The experiment leading to the first observation of CPT is revisited with an improved...

Höller, R; Renzoni, F; Windholz, L; Xu, J H

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472