Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicrystalline silicon solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Engineering Metal Impurities in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering Metal Impurities in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells Print Transition metals are one of the main culprits in degrading the efficiency of multicrystalline solar...

2

Engineering Metal Impurities in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering Metal Impurities in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells Print Engineering Metal Impurities in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells Print Transition metals are one of the main culprits in degrading the efficiency of multicrystalline solar cells. With a suite of x-ray microprobe techniques, a multi-institutional collaboration led by researchers from the University of California, Berkeley, and Berkeley Lab studied the distribution of metal clusters in a variety of multicrystalline solar cells before and after processing. Their discovery that the size, spatial distribution, and chemical binding of metals within clusters is just as important as the total metal concentration in limiting the performance of multicrystalline silicon solar cells led to the concept of defect engineering by optimizing growth and processing sequences to trap metals in their least harmful state.

3

Engineering Metal Impurities in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering Metal Impurities in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells Print Engineering Metal Impurities in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells Print Transition metals are one of the main culprits in degrading the efficiency of multicrystalline solar cells. With a suite of x-ray microprobe techniques, a multi-institutional collaboration led by researchers from the University of California, Berkeley, and Berkeley Lab studied the distribution of metal clusters in a variety of multicrystalline solar cells before and after processing. Their discovery that the size, spatial distribution, and chemical binding of metals within clusters is just as important as the total metal concentration in limiting the performance of multicrystalline silicon solar cells led to the concept of defect engineering by optimizing growth and processing sequences to trap metals in their least harmful state.

4

multicrystalline silicon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This manuscript concerns the application of infrared birefringence imaging (IBI) to quantify macroscopic and microscopic internal stresses in multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) solar cell materials. We review progress to date, and advance four closely related topics. (1) We present a method to decouple macroscopic thermally-induced residual stresses and microscopic bulk defect related stresses. In contrast to previous reports, thermally-induced residual stresses in wafer-sized samples are generally found to be less than 5 MPa, while defect-related stresses can be several times larger. (2) We describe the unique IR birefringence signatures, including stress magnitudes and directions, of common microdefects in mc-Si solar cell materials including: {beta}-SiC and {beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} microdefects, twin bands, nontwin grain boundaries, and dislocation bands. In certain defects, local stresses up to 40 MPa can be present. (3) We relate observed stresses to other topics of interest in solar cell manufacturing, including transition metal precipitation, wafer mechanical strength, and minority carrier lifetime. (4) We discuss the potential of IBI as a quality-control technique in industrial solar cell manufacturing.

Ganapati, Vidya; Schoenfelder, Stephan; Castellanos, Sergio; Oener, Sebastian; Koepge, Ringo; Sampson, Aaron; Marcus, Matthew A.; Lai, Barry; Morhenn, Humphrey; Hahn, Giso; Bagdahn, Joerg; Buonassisi1, Tonio

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

5

Texturization of multicrystalline silicon solar cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A significant efficiency gain for crystalline silicon solar cells can be achieved by surface texturization. This research was directed at developing a low-cost, high-throughput and reliable texturing method that can create ...

Li, Dai-Yin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Impact of defect type on hydrogen passivation effectiveness in multicrystalline silicon solar cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we examine the effectiveness of hydrogen passivation at grain boundaries as a function of defect type and microstructure in multicrystalline silicon. We analyze a specially prepared solar cell with alternating ...

Bertoni, Mariana I.

7

Simulation of Device Parameters of High Efficiency Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the simulation of the reported experimental results of high efficiency multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) solar cells, using PC1D software, are reported in this study. Results obtained by various groups have been incorporated and compared in this study. The highest efficiency reported so far for mc-Si solar cells is 20{center_dot}4% and 17-18% by research laboratories and commercial houses, respectively. The efficiency can be further enhanced if passivation characteristics on both the front and back surface are improved. The role of back surface recombination has become more significant in light of the use of thin mc-Si wafers by the solar cell industry. Based on the passivation characteristics and considering the understanding of the past three decades of studies, the authors have proposed and simulated a structure for mc-Si solar cells to improve the performance of the same. The results of our modeled structure of mc-Si solar cell show an efficiency of 21{center_dot}88% with short-circuit current density, J{sub sc} = 39{center_dot}39 mA/cm2, and open circuit voltage, V{sub oc} = 0{center_dot}666 V.

Budhraja, V.; Misra, D.; Ravindra, N. M.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Analysis of copper-rich precipitates in silicon: chemical state,gettering, and impact on multicrystalline silicon solar cellmaterial  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this study, synchrotron-based x-ray absorption microspectroscopy (mu-XAS) is applied to identifying the chemical states of copper-rich clusters within a variety of silicon materials, including as-grown cast multicrystalline silicon solar cell material with high oxygen concentration and other silicon materials with varying degrees of oxygen concentration and copper contamination pathways. In all samples, copper silicide (Cu3Si) is the only phase of copper identified. It is noted from thermodynamic considerations that unlike certain metal species, copper tends to form a silicide and not an oxidized compound because of the strong silicon-oxygen bonding energy; consequently the likelihood of encountering an oxidized copper particle in silicon is small, in agreement with experimental data. In light of these results, the effectiveness of aluminum gettering for the removal of copper from bulk silicon is quantified via x-ray fluorescence microscopy (mu-XRF),and a segregation coefficient is determined from experimental data to beat least (1-2)'103. Additionally, mu-XAS data directly demonstrates that the segregation mechanism of Cu in Al is the higher solubility of Cu in the liquid phase. In light of these results, possible limitations for the complete removal of Cu from bulk mc-Si are discussed.

Buonassisi, Tonio; Marcus, Matthew A.; Istratov, Andrei A.; Heuer, Matthias; Ciszek, Theodore F.; Lai, Barry; Cai, Zhonghou; Weber,Eicke R.

2004-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

9

Temperature-Dependent Photoluminescence Imaging and Characterization of a Multi-Crystalline Silicon Solar Cell Defect Area: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Photoluminescence (PL) imaging is used to detect areas in multi-crystalline silicon that appear dark in band-to-band imaging due to high recombination. Steady-state PL intensity can be correlated to effective minority-carrier lifetime, and its temperature dependence can provide additional lifetime-limiting defect information. An area of high defect density has been laser cut from a multi-crystalline silicon solar cell. Both band-to-band and defect-band PL imaging have been collected as a function of temperature from ~85 to 350 K. Band-to-band luminescence is collected by an InGaAs camera using a 1200-nm short-pass filter, while defect band luminescence is collected using a 1350-nm long pass filter. The defect band luminescence is characterized by cathodo-luminescence. Small pieces from adjacent areas within the same wafer are measured by deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). DLTS detects a minority-carrier electron trap level with an activation energy of 0.45 eV on the sample that contained defects as seen by imaging.

Johnston, S.; Yan, F.; Li, J.; Romero, M. J.; Al-Jassim, M.; Zaunbrecher, K.; Sidelkheir, O.; Blosse, A.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Low cost manufacturing of light trapping features on multi-crystalline silicon solar cells : jet etching method and cost analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study was conducted in order to determine low cost methods to improve the light trapping ability of multi-crystalline solar cells. We focused our work on improving current wet etching methods to achieve the ...

Berrada Sounni, Amine

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Infrared birefringence imaging of residual stress and bulk defects in multicrystalline silicon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This manuscript concerns the application of infrared birefringence imaging (IBI) to quantify macroscopic and microscopic internal stresses in multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) solar cell materials. We review progress to ...

Ganapati, Vidya

12

Synchrotron-based investigations of the nature and impact of ironcontamination in multicrystalline silicon solar cell materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Synchrotron-based microprobe techniques were used to obtain precise and systematic information about the size distribution, spatial distribution, shape, electrical activity, and chemical states of iron-rich impurity clusters in multicrystalline silicon materials used for cost-effective solar cells. These experimentally observed properties of iron-rich clusters allow one to derive conclusions about the origins of iron contamination, the mechanisms for incorporating large amounts of Fe into mc-Si, quantitative information about the distribution of Fe in mc-Si and the impacts of such contamination on solar cell performance. Two distinct groups of iron-rich clusters have been identified in both materials: (a) the occasional large (diameter greater than or equal to 1 mu-m) particles, either oxidized and/or present with multiple other metal species reminiscent of stainless steels or ceramics, which are believed to originate from a foreign source such as the growth surfaces, production equipment, or feedstock, and (b) the more numerous, homogeneously distributed, and smaller iron silicide precipitates (dia. less than or equal to 800 nm, often < 100 nm), originating from a variety of possible formation mechanisms involving atomically dissolved iron in the melt or in the crystal. It was found that iron silicide nanoprecipitates account for bulk Fe concentrations as high as 1014-15cm-3 and can have a large negative impact on device performance because of their homogeneous distribution along structural defects. The large (dia. greater than or equal to 1 mu-m) particles, while containing elevated amounts of metals, are low in spatial density and thus deemed to have a low direct impact on device performance, although they may have a large indirect impact via the dissolution of Fe, thus assisting the formation of iron silicide nanoprecipitates. These results demonstrate that it is not necessarily the total Fe content that limits mc-Si device performance, but the distribution of Fe within the material.

Buonassisi, Tonio; Istratov, Andrei A.; Heuer, Matthias; Marcus,Matthew A.; Jonczyk, Ralf; Lai, Barry; Cai, Zhonghou; Heald, Steven; Warta, Wilhelm; Isenberg, Joerg; Schindler, Roland; Weber, Eicke R.

2004-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

13

High-Efficiency 6?? Multicrystalline Black Solar Cells Based on Metal-Nanoparticle-Assisted Chemical Etching  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) photovoltaic (PV) solar cells with nanoscale surface texturing by metal-nanoparticle-assisted etching are proposed to achieve high power efficiency. The investigation of average nanorod ...

Hsu, W. Chuck

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Assembly and characterization of colloid-based antireflective coatings on multicrystalline silicon solar cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the centerpoint of the solar cell samples. At that distance, the intensity of the light source was mapped, the light source employed for this study was less energetic than solar energy fluxes, which are in the rangeN-coated and uncoated solar cells. We also thank Greg Parsons for the use of a light meter, Dale Bachelor for assistance

Velev, Orlin D.

15

Interactions of structural defects with metallic impurities in multicrystalline silicon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Interactions between structural defects and metallic impurities were studied in multicrystalline silicon for solar cells applications. The objective was to gain insight into the relationship between solar cell processing, metallic impurity behavior and the resultant effect on material/device performance. With an intense synchrotron x-ray source, high sensitivity x-ray fluorescence measurements were utilized to determine impurity distributions with a spatial resolution of {approx} 1{micro}m. Diffusion length mapping and final solar cell characteristics gauged material/device performance. The materials were tested in both the as-grown state and after full solar cell processing. Iron and nickel metal impurities were located at structural defects in as-grown material, while after solar cell processing, both impurities were still observed in low performance regions. These results indicate that multicrystalline silicon solar cell performance is directly related to metal impurities which are not completely removed during typical processing treatments. A discussion of possible mechanisms for this incomplete removal is presented.

McHugo, S.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (US). Advanced Light Source; Hieslmair, H.; Weber, E.R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (US). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering; Rosenblum, M.D.; Kalejs, J.P. [ASE Americas Inc., Billerica, MA (US)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Effect of Front-Side Silver Metallization on Underlying n+-p Junction in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on the effect of front-side Ag metallization on the underlying n+-p junction of multicrystalline Si solar cells. The junction quality beneath the contacts was investigated by characterizing the uniformities of the electrostatic potential and doping concentration across the junction, using scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy and scanning capacitance microscopy. We investigated cells with a commercial Ag paste (DuPont PV159) and fired at furnace setting temperatures of 800 degrees, 840 degrees, and 930 degrees C, which results in actual cell temperatures ~100 degrees C lower than the setting temperature and the three cells being under-, optimal-, and over-fired. We found that the uniformity of the junction beneath the Ag contact was significantly degraded by the over-firing, whereas the junction retained good uniformity with the optimal- and under-fire temperatures. Further, Ag crystallites with widely distributed sizes from <100 nm to several ?m were found at the Ag/Si interface of the over-fired cell. Large crystallites were imaged as protrusions into Si deeper than the junction depth. However, the junction was not broken down; instead, it was reformed on the entire front of the crystallite/Si interface. We propose a mechanism of the junction-quality degradation, based on emitter Si melting at the temperature around the Ag-Si eutectic point during firing, and subsequent recrystallization with incorporation of impurities in the Ag paste and with formation of crystallographic defects during quenching.

Jiang, C. S.; Li, Z. G.; Moutinho, H. R.; Liang, L.; Ionkin, A.; Al-Jassim, M. M.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Rate limiting mechanism of transition metal gettering in multicrystalline silicon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors have performed studies on multicrystalline silicon used for solar cells in the as-grown state and after a series of processing and gettering steps. The principal goal of this work is to determine the rate limiting step for metal impurity gettering from multicrystalline silicon with an emphasis on the release of impurities from structural defects. Synchrotron-based x-ray fluorescence mapping was used to monitor the release process. Copper and nickel impurities were found to reside primarily at dislocations in the as-grown state of the material. Short annealing treatments rapidly dissolved the impurity agglomerates. Based on these results and modeling of the dissolution process, copper and nickel is in the form of small agglomerates (< 10 nm) clustered together over micron-scale regions in the as-grown material. Aluminum gettering further disintegrated the agglomerates to below the sensitivity of the system, 2--5 nm in radii. No significant barrier to release of copper or nickel from dislocations was observed.

McHugo, S.A.; Thompson, A.C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Imaizumi, M. [Toyota Technological Inst., Nagoya (Japan); Hieslmair, H.; Weberr, E.R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Two-Dimensional Measurement of n+-p Asymmetrical Junctions in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells Using AFM-Based Electrical Techniques with Nanometer Resolution: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lateral inhomogeneities of modern solar cells demand direct electrical imaging with nanometer resolution. We show that atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based electrical techniques provide unique junction characterizations, giving a two-dimensional determination of junction locations. Two AFM-based techniques, scanning capacitance microscopy/spectroscopy (SCM/SCS) and scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM), were significantly improved and applied to the junction characterizations of multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) cells. The SCS spectra were taken pixel by pixel by precisely controlling the tip positions in the junction area. The spectra reveal distinctive features that depend closely on the position relative to the electrical junction, which allows us to indentify the electrical junction location. In addition, SKPFM directly probes the built-in potential over the junction area modified by the surface band bending, which allows us to deduce the metallurgical junction location by identifying a peak of the electric field. Our results demonstrate resolutions of 10-40 nm, depending on the techniques (SCS or SKPFM). These direct electrical measurements with nanometer resolution and intrinsic two-dimensional capability are well suited for investigating the junction distribution of solar cells with lateral inhomogeneities.

Jiang, C. S.; Moutinho, H. R.; Li, J. V.; Al-Jassim, M. M.; Heath, J. T.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Method for processing silicon solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The instant invention teaches a novel method for fabricating silicon solar cells utilizing concentrated solar radiation. The solar radiation is concentrated by use of a solar furnace which is used to form a front surface junction and back-surface field in one processing step. The present invention also provides a method of making multicrystalline silicon from amorphous silicon. The invention also teaches a method of texturing the surface of a wafer by forming a porous silicon layer on the surface of a silicon substrate and a method of gettering impurities. Also contemplated by the invention are methods of surface passivation, forming novel solar cell structures, and hydrogen passivation. 2 figs.

Tsuo, Y.S.; Landry, M.D.; Pitts, J.R.

1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

20

Imaging Study of Multi-Crystalline Silicon Wafers Throughout the Manufacturing Process: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Imaging techniques are applied to multi-crystalline silicon bricks, wafers at various process steps, and finished solar cells. Photoluminescence (PL) imaging is used to characterize defects and material quality on bricks and wafers. Defect regions within the wafers are influenced by brick position within an ingot and height within the brick. The defect areas in as-cut wafers are compared to imaging results from reverse-bias electroluminescence and dark lock-in thermography and cell parameters of near-neighbor finished cells. Defect areas are also characterized by defect band emissions. The defect areas measured by these techniques on as-cut wafers are shown to correlate to finished cell performance.

Johnston, S.; Yan, F.; Zaunbracher, K.; Al-Jassim, M.; Sidelkheir, O.; Blosse, A.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicrystalline silicon solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Infrared birefringence imaging of residual stress and bulk defects in multicrystalline silicon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manuscript concerns the application of infrared birefringence imaging (IBI) to quantify macroscopic and microscopic internal stresses in multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) solar cell materials. We review progress to date, and advance four closely related topics. (1) We present a method to decouple macroscopic thermally-induced residual stresses and microscopic bulk defect related stresses. In contrast to previous reports, thermally-induced residual stresses in wafer-sized samples are generally found to be less than 5 MPa, while defect-related stresses can be several times larger. (2) We describe the unique IR birefringence signatures, including stress magnitudes and directions, of common microdefects in mc-Si solar cell materials including: {beta}-SiC and {beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} microdefects, twin bands, nontwin grain boundaries, and dislocation bands. In certain defects, local stresses up to 40 MPa can be present. (3) We relate observed stresses to other topics of interest in solar cell manufacturing, including transition metal precipitation, wafer mechanical strength, and minority carrier lifetime. (4) We discuss the potential of IBI as a quality-control technique in industrial solar cell manufacturing.

Ganapati, Vidya; Schoenfelder, Stephan; Castellanos, Sergio; Oener, Sebastian; Koepge, Ringo; Sampson, Aaron; Marcus, Matthew A.; Lai, Barry; Morhenn, Humphrey; Hahn, Giso; Bagdahn, Joerg; Buonassisi1, Tonio

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

22

Performance Limitations of mc-Si Solar Cells Caused by Defect Clusters: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents a combination of numerical and experimental methods used to characterize defect clusters in multicrystalline silicon solar cells.

Sopori, B.; Rupnowski, P.; Mehta, V.; Budhraja, V.; Johnston, S.; Call, N.; Moutinho, H.; Al-Jassim, M.; Shaikh, A /; Seacrist, M.; Carlson, D.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Self Aligned Cell: Scaling Up Manufacture of a Cost Effective Cell Architecture for Multicrystalline Silicon Photovoltaics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two areas of technology for fabrication of higher efficiency Si-wafer solar cells were addressed: (1) the formation of structured texturing that is an improvement over the industry-standard isotexture process for multicrystalline wafers. (2) the formation of fine line (damage, thus allowing for better advances in sawing and a more robust wet process. 1366 Technologies developed 2 pilot machines for 1) deposition and patterning of low-cost resist layers to enable simultaneous Honeycomb front texturing and groove formation for multicrystalline Si wafers, and 2) fine-line dispensing of materials that are self aligned to the grooves.

Gabor, A.; van Mierlo, F.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Self Aligned Cell: Scaling Up Manufacture of a Cost Effective Cell Architecture for Multicrystalline Silicon Photovoltaics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two areas of technology for fabrication of higher efficiency Si-wafer solar cells were addressed: (1) the formation of structured texturing that is an improvement over the industry-standard isotexture process for multicrystalline wafers. (2) the formation of fine line (<50 micron) metallization seed layers in a self-aligned manner where the fingers can be automatically and perfectly lined up to a selective emitter and where expensive silver screen printing paste can be mostly replaced by plating up the seed layers with silver or copper. The benefits are: a) Lower reflectivity , b) Decoupling the performance of the texture from the saw damage, thus allowing for better advances in sawing and a more robust wet process. 1366 Technologies developed 2 pilot machines for 1) deposition and patterning of low-cost resist layers to enable simultaneous Honeycomb front texturing and groove formation for multicrystalline Si wafers, and 2) fine-line dispensing of materials that are self aligned to the grooves.

Gabor, A.; van Mierlo, F.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

TEXTURING OF SOLAR ELLS  

POTENTIAL APPLI ATIONS Multicrystalline Silicon Solar cells Antireflective surface TE HNOLOGI AL ENEFITS For more information or Cost-effective licensing ...

26

High-efficiency solar cells using HEM silicon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Developments in Heat Exchanger Method (HEM) technology for production of multicrystalline silicon ingot production have led to growth of larger ingots (55 cm square cross section) with lower costs and reliability in production. A single reusable crucible has been used to produce 18 multicrystalline 33 cm square cross section 40 kg ingots, and capability to produce 44 cm ingots has been demonstrated. Large area solar cells of 16.3% (42 cm{sup 2}) and 15.3% (100 cm{sup 2}) efficiency have been produced without optimization of the material production and the solar cell processing.

Khattak, C.P.; Schmid, F. [Crystal Systems, Inc., Salem, MA (United States); Schubert, W.K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

27

Cheaper Silicon Found Effective for Solar Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cheaper Silicon Found Effective for Solar Cells Cheaper Silicon Found Effective for Solar Cells A research team from the University of California at Berkeley, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, using U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) synchrotron light sources, has successfully shown that inexpensive silicon has the potential to be used for photovoltaic (PV) devices, commonly known as solar cells. In a new approach-whose findings were published online in Nature Materials (August 14, 2005)-the researchers used nanodefect engineering to control transition metal contamination in order to produce impurity-rich, performance-enhanced multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) material. "Solar energy is often touted as the most promising and secure energy

28

Comparison of Photoluminescence Imaging on Starting Multi-Crystalline Silicon Wafers to Finished Cell Performance: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Photoluminescence (PL) imaging techniques can be applied to multicrystalline silicon wafers throughout the manufacturing process. Both band-to-band PL and defect-band emissions, which are longer-wavelength emissions from sub-bandgap transitions, are used to characterize wafer quality and defect content on starting multicrystalline silicon wafers and neighboring wafers processed at each step through completion of finished cells. Both PL imaging techniques spatially highlight defect regions that represent dislocations and defect clusters. The relative intensities of these imaged defect regions change with processing. Band-to-band PL on wafers in the later steps of processing shows good correlation to cell quality and performance. The defect band images show regions that change relative intensity through processing, and better correlation to cell efficiency and reverse-bias breakdown is more evident at the starting wafer stage as opposed to later process steps. We show that thermal processing in the 200 degrees - 400 degrees C range causes impurities to diffuse to different defect regions, changing their relative defect band emissions.

Johnston, S.; Yan, F.; Dorn, D.; Zaunbrecher, K.; Al-Jassim, M.; Sidelkheir, O.; Ounadjela, K.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

THE USE OF AMORPHOUS SILICON IN FABRICATING A PHOTOVOLTAIC-THERMAL SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

& irradiation intensity 1 INTRODUCTION With the high increase in PV system production and solar energy use this information and solar irradiation data [4], electricity production during the entire lifetime of the PV system grade silicon Multicrystalline silicon ingot Multicrystalline silicon wafer Solar cell PV module PV

Kherani, Nazir P.

30

New Method for Rapid Measurement of Orientations and Sizes of Grains in Multicrystalline Silicon Wafers  

SciTech Connect

We describe a new technique for rapid measurement of orientations and sizes of various grains in a multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) wafer. The wafer is texture etched to expose (111) faces nearest to each surface. Because grains of different orientations result in uniquely different texture shapes, they also have well-defined reflectance values. Hence, the process of determining the grain orientations is brought down to making reflectance maps. Reflectance maps are produced by PVSCAN or reflectometer (GT FabScan), and then transformed into orientation maps. Because the grain boundaries are very well delineated in the reflectance maps, they are also excellent for making measurements of size and distribution of grains. We will compare the results of this technique with other standard techniques.

Sopori, B.; Guhabiswas, D.; Rupnowski, P.; Shet, S.; Devayajanam, S.; Moutinho, H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

New Tool Quantitatively Maps Minority-Carrier Lifetime of Multicrystalline Silicon Bricks (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL's new imaging tool could provide manufacturers with insight on their processes. Scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have used capabilities within the Process Development and Integration Laboratory (PDIL) to generate quantitative minority-carrier lifetime maps of multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) bricks. This feat has been accomplished by using the PDIL's photoluminescence (PL) imaging system in conjunction with transient lifetime measurements obtained using a custom NREL-designed resonance-coupled photoconductive decay (RCPCD) system. PL imaging can obtain rapid high-resolution images that provide a qualitative assessment of the material lifetime-with the lifetime proportional to the pixel intensity. In contrast, the RCPCD technique provides a fast quantitative measure of the lifetime with a lower resolution and penetrates millimeters into the mc-Si brick, providing information on bulk lifetimes and material quality. This technique contrasts with commercially available minority-carrier lifetime mapping systems that use microwave conductivity measurements. Such measurements are dominated by surface recombination and lack information on the material quality within the bulk of the brick. By combining these two complementary techniques, we obtain high-resolution lifetime maps at very fast data acquisition times-attributes necessary for a production-based diagnostic tool. These bulk lifetime measurements provide manufacturers with invaluable feedback on their silicon ingot casting processes. NREL has been applying the PL images of lifetime in mc-Si bricks in collaboration with a U.S. photovoltaic industry partner through Recovery Act Funded Project ARRA T24. NREL developed a new tool to quantitatively map minority-carrier lifetime of multicrystalline silicon bricks by using photoluminescence imaging in conjunction with resonance-coupled photoconductive decay measurements. Researchers are not hindered by surface recombination and can look deeper into the material to map bulk lifetimes. The tool is being applied to silicon bricks in a project collaborating with a U.S. photovoltaic industry partner. Photovoltaic manufacturers can use the NREL tool to obtain valuable feedback on their silicon ingot casting processes.

Not Available

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Characterization of Multicrystalline Silicon Modules with System Bias Voltage Applied in Damp Heat  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As it is considered economically favorable to serially connect modules to build arrays with high system voltage, it is necessary to explore potential long-term degradation mechanisms the modules may incur under such electrical potential. We performed accelerated lifetime testing of multicrystalline silicon PV modules in 85 degrees C/ 85% relative humidity and 45 degrees C/ 30% relative humidity while placing the active layer in either positive or negative 600 V bias with respect to the grounded module frame. Negative bias applied to the active layer in some cases leads to more rapid and catastrophic module power degradation. This is associated with significant shunting of individual cells as indicated by electroluminescence, thermal imaging, and I-V curves. Mass spectroscopy results support ion migration as one of the causes. Electrolytic corrosion is seen occurring with the silicon nitride antireflective coating and silver gridlines, and there is ionic transport of metallization at the encapsulant interface observed with damp heat and applied bias. Leakage current and module degradation is found to be highly dependent upon the module construction, with factors such as encapsulant and front glass resistivity affecting performance. Measured leakage currents range from about the same seen in published reports of modules deployed in Florida (USA) and is accelerated to up to 100 times higher in the environmental chamber testing.

Hacke, P.; Kempe, M.; Terwilliger, K.; Glick, S.; Call, N.; Johnston, S.; Kurtz, S.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Silicon solar cell assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A silicon solar cell assembly comprising a large, thin silicon solar cell bonded to a metal mount for use when there exists a mismatch in the thermal expansivities of the device and the mount.

Burgess, Edward L. (Albuquerque, NM); Nasby, Robert D. (Albuquerque, NM); Schueler, Donald G. (Albuquerque, NM)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Solar Cell Silicon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2011 ... About this Symposium. Meeting, 2012 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium, Solar Cell Silicon. Sponsorship, The Minerals, Metals...

35

Defect-Band Emission Photoluminescence Imaging on Multi-Crystalline Si Solar Cells: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Defect-band photoluminescence (PL) imaging with an InGaAs camera was applied to multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) wafers, which were taken from different heights of different Si bricks. Neighboring wafers were picked at six different processing steps, from as-cut to post-metallization. By using different cut-off filters, we were able to separate the band-to-band emission images from the defect-band emission images. On the defect-band emission images, the bright regions that originate from the grain boundaries and defect clusters were extracted from the PL images. The area fraction percentage of these regions at various processing stages shows a correlation with the final cell electrical parameters.

Yan, F.; Johnston, S.; Zaunbrecher, K.; Al-Jassim, M.; Sidelkheir, O.; Blosse, A.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Solar Cell Silicon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... continued and costs have been cut dramatically along the production value chain. The most important feedstock for crystalline solar cells is high purity silicon .

37

Enabling Thin Silicon Solar Cell Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enabling Thin Silicon Solar Cell Technology Enabling Thin Silicon Solar Cell Technology Print Friday, 21 June 2013 10:49 Generic silicon solar cells showing +45, -45, and...

38

High Efficiency, Low Cost Solar Cells Manufactured Using 'Silicon Ink' on Thin Crystalline Silicon Wafers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reported are the development and demonstration of a 17% efficient 25mm x 25mm crystalline Silicon solar cell and a 16% efficient 125mm x 125mm crystalline Silicon solar cell, both produced by Ink-jet printing Silicon Ink on a thin crystalline Silicon wafer. To achieve these objectives, processing approaches were developed to print the Silicon Ink in a predetermined pattern to form a high efficiency selective emitter, remove the solvents in the Silicon Ink and fuse the deposited particle Silicon films. Additionally, standard solar cell manufacturing equipment with slightly modified processes were used to complete the fabrication of the Silicon Ink high efficiency solar cells. Also reported are the development and demonstration of a 18.5% efficient 125mm x 125mm monocrystalline Silicon cell, and a 17% efficient 125mm x 125mm multicrystalline Silicon cell, by utilizing high throughput Ink-jet and screen printing technologies. To achieve these objectives, Innovalight developed new high throughput processing tools to print and fuse both p and n type particle Silicon Inks in a predetermined pat-tern applied either on the front or the back of the cell. Additionally, a customized Ink-jet and screen printing systems, coupled with customized substrate handling solution, customized printing algorithms, and a customized ink drying process, in combination with a purchased turn-key line, were used to complete the high efficiency solar cells. This development work delivered a process capable of high volume producing 18.5% efficient crystalline Silicon solar cells and enabled the Innovalight to commercialize its technology by the summer of 2010.

Antoniadis, H.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Impact of iron contamination in multicrystalline silicon solarcells: origins, chemical states, and device impacts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Synchrotron-based microprobe techniques have been applied to study the distribution, size, chemical state, and recombination activity of Fe clusters in two types of mc-Si materials: block cast mc-Si, and AstroPower Silicon Film(TM) sheet material. In sheet material, high concentrations of metals were found at recombination-active, micron-sized intragranular clusters consisting of micron and sub-micron sized particles. In addition, Fe nanoparticles were located in densities of {approx}2'107 cm-2 along recombination-active grain boundaries. In cast mc-Si,two types of particles were identified at grain boundaries: (1) micron-sized oxidized Fe particles accompanied by other metals (Cr, Mn, Ca, Ti), and (2) a higher number of sub-micron FeSi2 precipitates that exhibited a preferred orientation along the crystal growth direction. In both materials, it is believed that the larger Fe clusters are inclusions of foreign particles, from which Fe dissolves in the melt to form the smaller FeSi2 nanoprecipitates, which by virtue of their more homogeneous distribution are deemed more dangerous to solar cell device performance. Based on this understanding, strategies proposed to reduce the impact of Fe on mc-Si electrical properties include gettering, passivation, and limiting the dissolution of foreign Fe-rich particles in the melt.

Buonassisi, Tonio; Heuer, Matthias; Istratov, Andrei A.; Marcus,Matthew A.; Jonczyk, Ralf; Lai, Barry; Cai, Zhonghou; Schindler, Roland; Weber, Eicke R.

2004-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

40

Nanostructured plasmonics silicon solar cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report a plasmonics silicon solar cell design, with the possibility of lower cost and higher efficiency. The proposed solar cell consists of a radial p-n junction silicon nanopillar arrays in combination with metallic nanoparticles resolved at the ... Keywords: Antireflection coating, Optical absorption, Power conversion efficiency, Solar cells

Pushpa Raj Pudasaini, Arturo A. Ayon

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicrystalline silicon solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Silicon Valley Solar Inc SV Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Silicon Valley Solar Inc SV Solar Jump to: navigation, search Name Silicon Valley Solar Inc (SV Solar) Place Santa Clara, California Zip 95051 Sector Solar Product A US-based...

42

Statistically meaningful data on the chemical state of ironprecipitates in processed multicrystalline silicon usingsynchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

X-ray fluorescence microscopy (mu-XRF), x-ray beam induced current (XBIC), and x-ray absorption spectromicroscopy (mu-XAS) were performed on fully-processed Bay Six cast multicrystalline silicon and aluminum-gettered AstroPower Silicon-Film(TM) sheet material. Over ten iron precipitates--predominantly of iron silicide--were identified at low lifetime regions in both materials, both at grain boundaries and intragranular defects identified by XBIC. In addition, large (micron-sized) particles containing oxidized iron and other impurities (Ca, Cr, Mn) were found in BaySix material. The smaller iron silicide precipitates were more numerous and spatially distributed than their larger oxidized iron counterparts, and thus deemed more detrimental to minority carrier diffusion length.

Buonassisi, T.; Heuer, M.; Istratov, A.A.; Weber, E.R.; Cai, Z.; Lai, B.; Marcus, M.; Lu, J.; Rozgonyi, G.; Schindler, R.; Jonczyk, R.; Rand, J.

2004-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

43

Compensated amorphous silicon solar cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An amorphous silicon solar cell incorporates a region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon fabricated by a glow discharge wherein said intrinsic region is compensated by P-type dopants in an amount sufficient to reduce the space charge density of said region under illumination to about zero.

Carlson, David E. (Yardley, PA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

The Quest for Inexpensive Silicon Solar Cells  

To learn more about NREL's silicon solar cell research, visit the Silicon Materials and Devices Web site. Did you find what you needed? Yes No. Thank ...

45

Compensated amorphous silicon solar cell  

SciTech Connect

An amorphous silicon solar cell including an electrically conductive substrate, a layer of glow discharge deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon over said substrate and having regions of differing conductivity with at least one region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The layer of hydrogenated amorphous silicon has opposed first and second major surfaces where the first major surface contacts the electrically conductive substrate and an electrode for electrically contacting the second major surface. The intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon region is deposited in a glow discharge with an atmosphere which includes not less than about 0.02 atom percent mono-atomic boron. An improved N.I.P. solar cell is disclosed using a BF.sub.3 doped intrinsic layer.

Devaud, Genevieve (629 S. Humphrey Ave., Oak Park, IL 60304)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Available Technologies:Improved Amorphous Silicon Solar Cells  

Solar cells; Large solar panels; ADVANTAGES. Increased performance ; Less expensive than crystalline silicon solar cells; Enables thinner, lighter solar panels;

47

Available Technologies: Thinner Film Silicon Solar Cells  

Berkeley Lab scientists have designed a new approach to create highly efficient thin film silicon solar cells. This technology promises to lower solar cell material ...

48

Cermet layer for amorphous silicon solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A transparent high work function metal cermet forms a Schottky barrier in a Schottky barrier amorphous silicon solar cell and adheres well to the P+ layer in a PIN amorphous silicon solar cell.

Hanak, Joseph J. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Amorphous silicon solar cells  

SciTech Connect

The fabrication, performance, and applications of a-Si solar cells are discussed, summarizing the results of recent experimental investigations and trial installations. Topics examined include the fundamental principles and design strategies of solar power installations; the characteristics of monocrystalline-Si solar cells; techniques for reducing the cost of solar cells; independent, linked, and hybrid solar power systems; proposed satellite solar power systems; and the use of solar cells in consumer appliances. Consideration is given to the history of a-Si, a-Si fabrication techniques, quality criteria for a-Si films, solar cells based on a-Si, and techniques for increasing the efficiency and lowering the cost of a-Si solar cells. Graphs, diagrams, drawings, and black-and-white and color photographs are provided. 136 references.

Takahashi, K.; Konagai, M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Solar Cell Silicon - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2012 ... About this Symposium. Meeting, 2013 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium, Solar Cell Silicon. Sponsorship, TMS Extraction and...

51

Method for processing silicon solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The instant invention teaches a novel method for fabricating silicon solar cells utilizing concentrated solar radiation. The solar radiation is concentrated by use of a solar furnace which is used to form a front surface junction and back-surface field in one processing step. The present invention also provides a method of making multicrystallline silicon from amorphous silicon. The invention also teaches a method of texturing the surface of a wafer by forming a porous silicon layer on the surface of a silicon substrate and a method of gettering impurities. Also contemplated by the invention are methods of surface passivation, forming novel solar cell structures, and hydrogen passivation.

Tsuo, Y. Simon (Golden, CO); Landry, Marc D. (Lafayette, CO); Pitts, John R. (Lakewood, CO)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

PV Crystalox Solar AG formerly PV Silicon AG | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PV Crystalox Solar AG formerly PV Silicon AG PV Crystalox Solar AG formerly PV Silicon AG Jump to: navigation, search Name PV Crystalox Solar AG (formerly PV Silicon AG) Place Abingdon, England, United Kingdom Zip OX14 4SE Sector Solar Product UK-based manufacturer of multicrystalline ingots and wafers to the solar industry; as of early 2009, to output solar-grade polysilicon. Coordinates 36.71049°, -81.975194° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.71049,"lon":-81.975194,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

53

Laser wafering for silicon solar.  

SciTech Connect

Current technology cuts solar Si wafers by a wire saw process, resulting in 50% 'kerf' loss when machining silicon from a boule or brick into a wafer. We want to develop a kerf-free laser wafering technology that promises to eliminate such wasteful wire saw processes and achieve up to a ten-fold decrease in the g/W{sub p} (grams/peak watt) polysilicon usage from the starting polysilicon material. Compared to today's technology, this will also reduce costs ({approx}20%), embodied energy, and green-house gas GHG emissions ({approx}50%). We will use short pulse laser illumination sharply focused by a solid immersion lens to produce subsurface damage in silicon such that wafers can be mechanically cleaved from a boule or brick. For this concept to succeed, we will need to develop optics, lasers, cleaving, and high throughput processing technologies capable of producing wafers with thicknesses < 50 {micro}m with high throughput (< 10 sec./wafer). Wafer thickness scaling is the 'Moore's Law' of silicon solar. Our concept will allow solar manufacturers to skip entire generations of scaling and achieve grid parity with commercial electricity rates. Yet, this idea is largely untested and a simple demonstration is needed to provide credibility for a larger scale research and development program. The purpose of this project is to lay the groundwork to demonstrate the feasibility of laser wafering. First, to design and procure on optic train suitable for producing subsurface damage in silicon with the required damage and stress profile to promote lateral cleavage of silicon. Second, to use an existing laser to produce subsurface damage in silicon, and third, to characterize the damage using scanning electron microscopy and confocal Raman spectroscopy mapping.

Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Sweatt, William C.; Jared, Bradley Howell

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Enabling Thin Silicon Solar Cell Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enabling Thin Silicon Solar Cell Enabling Thin Silicon Solar Cell Technology Enabling Thin Silicon Solar Cell Technology Print Friday, 21 June 2013 10:49 Generic silicon solar cells showing +45°, -45°, and dendritic crack patterns. The effort to shift U.S. energy reliance from fossil fuels to renewable sources has spurred companies to reduce the cost and increase the reliability of their solar photovoltaics (SPVs). The use of thinner silicon in SPV technologies is being widely adopted because it significantly reduces costs; however, silicon is brittle, and thinner silicon, coupled with other recent trends in SPV technologies (thinner glass, lighter or no metal frames, increased use of certain polymers for encapsulation of the silicon cells), is more susceptible to stress and cracking. When the thin

55

Laser wafering for silicon solar.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current technology cuts solar Si wafers by a wire saw process, resulting in 50% 'kerf' loss when machining silicon from a boule or brick into a wafer. We want to develop a kerf-free laser wafering technology that promises to eliminate such wasteful wire saw processes and achieve up to a ten-fold decrease in the g/W{sub p} (grams/peak watt) polysilicon usage from the starting polysilicon material. Compared to today's technology, this will also reduce costs ({approx}20%), embodied energy, and green-house gas GHG emissions ({approx}50%). We will use short pulse laser illumination sharply focused by a solid immersion lens to produce subsurface damage in silicon such that wafers can be mechanically cleaved from a boule or brick. For this concept to succeed, we will need to develop optics, lasers, cleaving, and high throughput processing technologies capable of producing wafers with thicknesses electricity rates. Yet, this idea is largely untested and a simple demonstration is needed to provide credibility for a larger scale research and development program. The purpose of this project is to lay the groundwork to demonstrate the feasibility of laser wafering. First, to design and procure on optic train suitable for producing subsurface damage in silicon with the required damage and stress profile to promote lateral cleavage of silicon. Second, to use an existing laser to produce subsurface damage in silicon, and third, to characterize the damage using scanning electron microscopy and confocal Raman spectroscopy mapping.

Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Sweatt, William C.; Jared, Bradley Howell

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Amorphous silicon solar cell allowing infrared transmission  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An amorphous silicon solar cell with a layer of high index of refraction material or a series of layers having high and low indices of refraction material deposited upon a transparent substrate to reflect light of energies greater than the bandgap energy of the amorphous silicon back into the solar cell and transmit solar radiation having an energy less than the bandgap energy of the amorphous silicon.

Carlson, David E. (Yardley, PA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Potential of Silicon Solar Cells from Metallurgical Process Route  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2013 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Solar Cell Silicon. Presentation Title, Potential of Silicon Solar Cells from...

58

Techniques of Nanoscale Silicon Texturing of Solar Cells ...  

Patent 6,329,296: Metal catalyst technique for texturing silicon solar cells Textured silicon solar cells and techniques for their manufacture ...

59

Stress and Fracture of Silicon Solar Cells as Revealed by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Stress and Fracture of Silicon Solar Cells as Revealed by ... thinner and thinner silicon in the solar photovoltaic (PV) technologies due to the...

60

Tandem junction amorphous silicon solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An amorphous silicon solar cell has an active body with two or a series of layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon arranged in a tandem stacked configuration with one optical path and electrically interconnected by a tunnel junction. The layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon arranged in tandem configuration can have the same bandgap or differing bandgaps.

Hanak, Joseph J. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicrystalline silicon solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Silicon concentrator solar cell research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work conducted between December 1990 and May 1992 continuing research on silicon concentrator solar cells. The objectives of the work were to improve the performance of high-efficiency cells upon p-type substrates, to investigate the ultraviolet stability of such cells, to develop concentrator cells based on n-type substrates, and to transfer technology to appropriate commercial environments. Key results include the identification of contact resistance between boron-defused areas and rear aluminum as the source of anomalously large series resistance in both p- and n-type cells. A major achievement of the present project was the successful transfer of cell technology to both Applied Solar Energy Corporation and Solarex Corporation.

Green, M.A.; Zhao, J.; Wang, A.; Dai, X.; Milne, A.; Cai, S.; Aberle, A.; Wenham, S.R. [Univ. of New South Wales, Kensington, NSW (AU). Centre for Photovoltaic Devices and Systems

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Real-Space Microscopic Electrical Imaging of n+-p Junction Beneath Front-Side Ag Contact of Multicrystalline Si Solar Cells  

SciTech Connect

We investigated the quality of the n+-p diffused junction beneath the front-side Ag contact of multicrystalline Si solar cells by characterizing the uniformities of electrostatic potential and doping concentration across the junction using the atomic force microscopy-based electrical imaging techniques of scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy and scanning capacitance microscopy. We found that Ag screen-printing metallization fired at the over-fire temperature significantly degrades the junction uniformity beneath the Ag contact grid, whereas metallization at the optimal- and under-fire temperatures does not cause degradation. Ag crystallites with widely distributed sizes were found at the Ag-grid/emitter-Si interface of the over-fired cell, which is associated with the junction damage beneath the Ag grid. Large crystallites protrude into Si deeper than the junction depth. However, the junction was not broken down; instead, it was reformed on the entire front of the crystallite/Si interface. We propose a mechanism of junction-quality degradation, based on emitter Si melting at the temperature around the Ag-Si eutectic point during firing, and subsequent re-crystallization with incorporation of Ag and other impurities and with formation of crystallographic defects during quenching. The effect of this junction damage on solar cell performance is discussed.

Jiang, C. S.; Li, Z. G.; Moutinho, H. R.; Liang, L.; Ionkin, A.; Al-Jassim, M. M.

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

Magnetically Guided Shaping for Solar Cell Silicon Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2014 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Solar Cell Silicon. Presentation Title, Magnetically Guided Shaping for Solar...

64

Rapid thermal processing of high-efficiency silicon solar cells with controlled in-situ annealing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Silicon solar cell efficiencies of 17.1%, 16.4%, 14.8%, and 14.9% have been achieved on FZ, Cz, multicrystalline (mc-Si), and dendritic web (DW) silicon, respectively, using simplified, cost-effective rapid thermal processing (RTP). These represent the highest reported efficiencies for solar cells processed with simultaneous front and back diffusion with no conventional high-temperature furnace steps. Appropriate diffusion temperature coupled with the added in-situ anneal resulted in suitable minority-carrier lifetime and diffusion profiles for high-efficiency cells. The cooling rate associated with the in-situ anneal can improve the lifetime and lower the reverse saturation current density (J{sub 0}), however, this effect is material and base resistivity specific. PECVD antireflection (AR) coatings provided low reflectance and efficient front surface and bulk defect passivation. Conventional cells fabricated on FZ silicon by furnace diffusions and oxidations gave an efficiency of 18.8% due to greater short wavelength response and lower J{sub 0}.

Doshi, P.; Rohatgi, A.; Ropp, M.; Chen, Z. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). Univ. Center of Excellence for Photovoltaics Research and Education; Ruby, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Meier, D.L. [EBARA Solar, Inc., Large, PA (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Manufacture of silicon carbide using solar energy  

SciTech Connect

A method is described for producing silicon carbide particles using solar energy. The method is efficient and avoids the need for use of electrical energy to heat the reactants. Finely divided silica and carbon are admixed and placed in a solar-heated reaction chamber for a time sufficient to cause a reaction between the ingredients to form silicon carbide of very small particle size. No grinding of silicon carbide is required to obtain small particles. The method may be carried out as a batch process or as a continuous process.

Glatzmaier, Gregory C. (Boulder, CO)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Manufacture of silicon carbide using solar energy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a method is described for producing silicon carbide particles using solar energy. The method is efficient and avoids the need for use of electrical energy to heat the reactants. Finely divided silica and carbon are admixed and placed in a solar-heated reaction chamber for a time sufficient to cause a reaction between the ingredients to form silicon carbide of very small particle size. No grinding of silicon carbide is required to obtain small particles. The method may be carried out as a batch process or as a continuous process.

Glatzmaier, G.C.

1991-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

67

Compensated amorphous-silicon solar cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An amorphous silicon solar cell including an electrically conductive substrate, a layer of glow discharge deposited hydrogenated amorphous silicon having regions of differing conductivity with at least one region of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The layer of hydrogenated amorphous silicon has opposed first and second major surfaces where the first major surface contacts the elecrically conductive substrate and an electrode for electrically contacting the second major surface. The intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon region is deposited in a glow discharge with an atmosphere which includes not less than about 0.02 atom percent mono-atomic boron. An improved N.I.P. solar cell is disclosed using a BF/sub 3/ doped intrinsic layer.

Devaud, G.

1982-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

68

Three dimensional amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Three dimensional deep contact amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon (a-Si/{micro}c-Si) solar cells are disclosed which use deep (high aspect ratio) p and n contacts to create high electric fields within the carrier collection volume material of the cell. The deep contacts are fabricated using repetitive pulsed laser doping so as to create the high aspect p and n contacts. By the provision of the deep contacts which penetrate the electric field deep into the material where the high strength of the field can collect many of the carriers, thereby resulting in a high efficiency solar cell. 4 figs.

Kaschmitter, J.L.

1996-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

69

Three dimensional amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Three dimensional deep contact amorphous silicon/microcrystalline silicon (a-Si/.mu.c-Si) solar cells which use deep (high aspect ratio) p and n contacts to create high electric fields within the carrier collection volume material of the cell. The deep contacts are fabricated using repetitive pulsed laser doping so as to create the high aspect p and n contacts. By the provision of the deep contacts which penetrate the electric field deep into the material where the high strength of the field can collect many of the carriers, thereby resulting in a high efficiency solar cell.

Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Plasma etching, texturing, and passivation of silicon solar cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors improved a self-aligned emitter etchback technique that requires only a single emitter diffusion and no alignments to form self-aligned, patterned-emitter profiles. Standard commercial screen-printed gridlines mask a plasma-etchback of the emitter. A subsequent PECVD-nitride deposition provides good surface and bulk passivation and an antireflection coating. The authors used full-size multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) cells processed in a commercial production line and performed a statistically designed multiparameter experiment to optimize the use of a hydrogenation treatment to increase performance. They obtained an improvement of almost a full percentage point in cell efficiency when the self-aligned emitter etchback was combined with an optimized 3-step PECVD-nitride surface passivation and hydrogenation treatment. They also investigated the inclusion of a plasma-etching process that results in a low-reflectance, textured surface on multicrystalline silicon cells. Preliminary results indicate reflectance can be significantly reduced without etching away the emitter diffusion.

Ruby, D.S.; Yang, P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Zaidi, S.; Brueck, S. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Roy, M.; Narayanan, S. [Solarex, Frederick, MD (United States)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Efficient light trapping structure in thin film silicon solar cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thin film silicon solar cells are believed to be promising candidates for continuing cost reduction in photovoltaic panels because silicon usage could be greatly reduced. Since silicon is an indirect bandgap semiconductor, ...

Sheng, Xing

72

GCL Solar Energy Technology Holdings formerly GCL Silicon aka...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GCL Solar Energy Technology Holdings formerly GCL Silicon aka Jiangsu Zhongneng Polysilicon Jump to: navigation, search Name GCL Solar Energy Technology Holdings (formerly GCL...

73

Harmful Shunting Mechanisms Found in Silicon Solar Cells (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Scientists developed near-field optical microscopy for imaging electrical breakdown in solar cells and identified critical electrical breakdown mechanisms operating in industrial silicon and epitaxial silicon solar cells.

Not Available

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Inverted amorphous silicon solar cell utilizing cermet layers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An amorphous silicon solar cell incorporating a transparent high work function metal cermet incident to solar radiation and a thick film cermet contacting the amorphous silicon opposite to said incident surface.

Hanak, Joseph J. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

gas phase interactions as sources of contamination in solar silicon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2014 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Solar Cell Silicon. Presentation Title, GAS PHASE INTERACTIONS AS...

76

Solar Cell Silicon: Production and Recyling - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, 2010 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium, Solar Cell Silicon: Production and Recyling. Sponsorship, The Minerals...

77

Solid Oxide Membrane Process for Solar Grade Silicon Production ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Solid Oxide Membrane Process for Solar Grade Silicon ... Polysilicon in Photovoltaics: Market Conditions & Competing PV Technologies.

78

Removal of Inclusions from Solar Grade Silicon Using ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polysilicon in Photovoltaics: Market Conditions & Competing PV Technologies ... Removal of Inclusions from Solar Grade Silicon Using Electromagnetic Field.

79

Imaging Techniques for the Characterization of Multi-Crystalline ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Solar Cell Silicon ... On the Segregation of Impurities in Solar Silicon ... Silicon PV Wafers: Correlation of Mechanical Properties and Crack...

80

Performance of Ultrathin Silicon Solar Microcells with Nanostructures of Relief  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of relief as light trapping structures (LTS) on thin, monocrys- talline silicon solar cells derived fromPerformance of Ultrathin Silicon Solar Microcells with Nanostructures of Relief Formed by Soft, Urbana, Illinois 61801 ABSTRACT Recently developed classes of monocrystalline silicon solar microcells

Rogers, John A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicrystalline silicon solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Metal electrode for amorphous silicon solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An amorphous silicon solar cell having an N-type region wherein the contact to the N-type region is composed of a material having a work function of about 3.7 electron volts or less. Suitable materials include strontium, barium and magnesium and rare earth metals such as gadolinium and yttrium.

Williams, Richard (Princeton, NJ)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Defect Clusters: Approaches for Overcoming Their Detrimental Impact on Solar Cell Performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our analyses show that defect clusters can lower the efficiency of multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) solar cells by 2 to 4 absolute percentage points. This large loss can be recovered if impurities precipitated at the defect cluster sites can be gettered. We describe a new technique for gettering precipitated impurities.

Sopori, B.; Tan, T.; Carlson, D.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high photo-conversion efficiency indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cell is spray deposited from a solution containing indium trichloride. The solar cell exhibits an Air Mass One solar conversion efficiency in excess of about 10%.

Feng, Tom (Morris Plains, NJ); Ghosh, Amal K. (New Providence, NJ)

1982-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

84

Efficiency of silicon solar cells containing chromium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Efficiency of silicon solar cells containing about 10.sup.15 atoms/cm.sup.3 of chromium is improved about 26% by thermal annealing of the silicon wafer at a temperature of 200.degree. C. to form chromium precipitates having a diameter of less than 1 Angstrom. Further improvement in efficiency is achieved by scribing laser lines onto the back surface of the wafer at a spacing of at least 0.5 mm and at a depth of less than 13 micrometers to preferentially precipitate chromium near the back surface and away from the junction region of the device. This provides an economical way to improve the deleterious effects of chromium, one of the impurities present in metallurgical grade silicon material.

Frosch, Robert A. Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space (New Port Beach, CA); Salama, Amal M. (New Port Beach, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Amorphous and Microcrystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We review the progress made by amorphous silicon solar cells, including the emerging technology of solar cells of microcrystalline silicon. The long-term trend in the efficiency of stabilized laboratory cells based on a-Si:H has been a rise of {approx}0.6 % per year. The recent trend in the a-Si,Ge:H cell efficiency alone, measured in the spectral window assigned to the bottom device in a triple-junction cell, has been an increase of {approx}0.16% per year. These improvements have brought within reach the target of 15% efficiency identified by EPRI and DOE for widespread application. Our review leads to an identification of areas of promising research, with emphasis on the fundamental science required to reach the 15% target, and then to move to the next-level efficiency goal.

Wagner, S. (Princeton University); Carlson, D. E. (Solarex); Branz, H. M. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Substrate for thin silicon solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic device for converting solar energy into electrical signals comprises a substrate, a layer of photoconductive semiconductor material grown on said substrate, wherein the substrate comprises an alloy of boron and silicon, the boron being present in a range of from 0.1 to 1.3 atomic percent, the alloy having a lattice constant substantially matched to that of the photoconductive semiconductor material and a resistivity of less than 1{times}10{sup {minus}3} ohm-cm. 4 figures.

Ciszek, T.F.

1995-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

87

Substrate for thin silicon solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic device for converting solar energy into electrical signals comprises a substrate, a layer of photoconductive semiconductor material grown on said substrate, wherein the substrate comprises an alloy of boron and silicon, the boron being present in a range of from 0.1 to 1.3 atomic percent, the alloy having a lattice constant substantially matched to that of the photoconductive semiconductor material and a resistivity of less than 1.times.10.sup.-3 ohm-cm.

Ciszek, Theodore F. (Evergreen, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Thinner Film Silicon Solar Cells - Energy Innovation Portal  

Technology Marketing Summary Berkeley Lab scientists have designed a new approach to create thin film silicon solar cells with a potential increase in ...

89

Slag-based Refining of Silicon and Solar Cell Advances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 6, 2013 ... There has been a strong commercial push recently towards thinner and thinner silicon in the solar photovoltaic (PV) technologies due to the...

90

On the Segregation of Impurities in Solar Silicon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, On the Segregation of Impurities in Solar Silicon ... Abstract Scope, The exponential increase of the photovoltaic market leads to a shortage of...

91

Improved Amorphous Silicon Solar Cells - Energy Innovation Portal  

Alex Zettl, Jeffrey Grossman and Lucas Wagner of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have invented hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells with 30% improved ...

92

Low Cost, High Efficiency Tandem Silicon Solar Cells and LEDs  

iency solar cells that leverage the well-established design and manufacturing technology of silicon cells while delivering the performance previously achievable only by far more complex and expensive tandem solar cells.

93

High temperature investigations of crystalline silicon solar cell materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Crystalline silicon solar cells are a promising candidate to provide a sustainable, clean energy source for the future. In order to bring about widespread adoption of solar cells, much work is needed to reduce their cost. ...

Hudelson, George David Stephen, III

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Amorphous silicon/polycrystalline thin film solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved photovoltaic solar cell is described including a p-type amorphous silicon layer, intrinsic amorphous silicon, and an n-type polycrystalline semiconductor such as cadmium sulfide, cadmium zinc sulfide, zinc selenide, gallium phosphide, and gallium nitride. The polycrystalline semiconductor has an energy bandgap greater than that of the amorphous silicon. The solar cell can be provided as a single-junction device or a multijunction device.

Ullal, H.S.

1991-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

95

Mono-Like Ingot/Wafers Made of Solar-Grade Silicon for Solar Cells ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2012 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Solar Cell Silicon. Presentation Title, Mono-Like Ingot/Wafers Made of...

96

EELE408 Photovoltaics Lecture 16: Silicon Solar Cell Fabrication Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 EELE408 Photovoltaics Lecture 16: Silicon Solar Cell Fabrication Techniques Dr. Todd J. Kaiser - Bozeman Screen Printed Solar Cells · Starting wafer is about 0.5 mm thick and 10 x 10 cm2. The wafer is p-type and lightly doped with Boron (1016/cm3) 2 Screen Printed Solar Cells · Saw Damage Etch ­ The starting wafer

Kaiser, Todd J.

97

Solar cell structure incorporating a novel single crystal silicon material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel hydrogen rich single crystal silicon material having a band gap energy greater than 1.1 eV can be fabricated by forming an amorphous region of graded crystallinity in a body of single crystalline silicon and thereafter contacting the region with atomic hydrogen followed by pulsed laser annealing at a sufficient power and for a sufficient duration to recrystallize the region into single crystal silicon without out-gassing the hydrogen. The new material can be used to fabricate semiconductor devices such as single crystal silicon solar cells with surface window regions having a greater band gap energy than that of single crystal silicon without hydrogen.

Pankove, Jacques I. (Princeton, NJ); Wu, Chung P. (Trenton, NJ)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Fabricating amorphous silicon solar cells by varying the temperature _of the substrate during deposition of the amorphous silicon layer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process for fabricating amorphous silicon solar cells in which the temperature of the substrate is varied during the deposition of the amorphous silicon layer is described. Solar cells manufactured in accordance with this process are shown to have increased efficiencies and fill factors when compared to solar cells manufactured with a constant substrate temperature during deposition of the amorphous silicon layer.

Carlson, David E. (Yardley, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Joint Solar Silicon GmbH Co KG JSSI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Silicon GmbH Co KG JSSI Jump to: navigation, search Name Joint Solar Silicon GmbH & Co KG (JSSI) Place Germany Sector Solar Product Joint venture between Degussa and SolarWorld for...

100

Defect behavior of polycrystalline solar cell silicon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The major objective of this study, conducted from October 1988 to September 1991, was to gain an understanding of the behavior of impurities in polycrystalline silicon and the influence of these impurities on solar cell efficiency. The authors studied edge-defined film-fed growth (EFG) and cast poly-Si materials and solar cells. With EFG Si they concentrated on chromium-doped materials and cells to determine the role of Cr on solar cell performance. Cast poly-Si samples were not deliberately contaminated. Samples were characterized by cell efficiency, current-voltage, deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), surface photovoltage (SPV), open-circuit voltage decay, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements. They find that Cr forms Cr-B pairs with boron at room temperature and these pairs dissociate into Cr{sub i}{sup +} and B{sup {minus}} during anneals at 210{degrees}C for 10 min. Following the anneal, Cr-B pairs reform at room temperature with a time constant of 230 h. Chromium forms CrSi{sub 2} precipitates in heavily contaminated regions and they find evidence of CrSi{sub 2} gettering, but a lack of chromium segregation or precipitation to grain boundaries and dislocations. Cr-B pairs have well defined DLTS peaks. However, DLTS spectra of other defects are not well defined, giving broad peaks indicative of defects with a range of energy levels in the band gap. In some high-stress, low-efficiency cast poly-Si they detect SiC precipitates, but not in low-stress, high-efficiency samples. SPV measurements result in nonlinear SPV curves in some materials that are likely due to varying optical absorption coefficients due to locally varying stress in the material.

Schroder, D.K.; Park, S.H.; Hwang, I.G.; Mohr, J.B.; Hanly, M.P. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (US). Center for Solid State Electronics Research

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicrystalline silicon solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Geometry control of recrystallized silicon wafers for solar applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cost of manufacturing crystalline silicon wafers for use in solar cells can be reduced by eliminating the waste streams caused by sawing ingots into individual wafers. Professor Emanuel Sachs has developed a new method ...

Ruggiero, Christopher W

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Harmful Shunting Mechanisms Found in Silicon Solar Cells (Revised...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for the degradation in open-circuit voltage and high dark currents in epitaxial silicon solar cells. The technique is also appli- cable to other PV technologies such as CIGS and...

103

Japan Solar Silicon Co Ltd JSS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Japan Solar Silicon Co Ltd JSS Japan Solar Silicon Co Ltd JSS Jump to: navigation, search Name Japan Solar Silicon Co Ltd (JSS) Place Tokyo, Japan Sector Solar Product A JV company between Chisso, Nippon Mining Holdings, and Toho Titanium, to manufacture and retail solar-grade polysilicon. Coordinates 35.670479°, 139.740921° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.670479,"lon":139.740921,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

104

Silicon Valley Power - Solar Electric Buy Down Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Electric Buy Down Program Solar Electric Buy Down Program Silicon Valley Power - Solar Electric Buy Down Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate Residential: $20,000 Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Incentives step down over time as installed capacity goals are met. Check program web site for current incentive level. '''Rebate levels as of 9/20/12:''' Residential: $2.00/watt AC Commercial (up to 100 kW): $1.10/watt AC Commercial (>100 kW to 1 MW): $0.15/kWh for 5 years Provider Silicon Valley Power Silicon Valley Power (SVP) offers incentives for the installation of new grid-connected solar electric (photovoltaic, or PV) systems. Incentive levels will step down over the life of the program as certain installed

105

Photovoltaic Measurements in Single-Nanowire Silicon Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photovoltaic Measurements in Single-Nanowire Silicon Solar Cells Michael D. Kelzenberg, Daniel B Single-nanowire solar cells were created by forming rectifying junctions in electrically contacted vapor-voltage measurements were made under simulated Air Mass 1.5 global illumination. Photovoltaic spectral response

Heaton, Thomas H.

106

Silicon-film{trademark} on ceramic solar cells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Silicon-Film{trademark} design achieves high performance through the use of a thin silicon layer. Optimally designed thin crystalline solar cells (<50 microns thick) have performance advantages over conventional thick devices. The enhancement in performance requires the incorporation of back-surface passivation and light trapping. The high-performance Silicon-Film{trademark} design employs a metallurgical barrier between the low-cost substrate and the thin silicon layer. The properties of the metallurgical barrier must be engineered to implement specific device requirements, such as high back-surface reflectivity. Recent advances in process development are described here.

Hall, R.B.; Bacon, C.; DiReda, V.; Ford, D.H.; Ingram, A.E.; Lampo, S.M.; Rand, J.A.; Ruffins, T.R.; Barnett, A.M. [AstroPower, Inc., Newark, DE (United States)

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Copper doped polycrystalline silicon solar cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Photovoltaic cells having improved performance are fabricated from polycrystalline silicon containing copper segregated at the grain boundaries.

Lovelace, Alan M. Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space (La Canada, CA); Koliwad, Krishna M. (La Canada, CA); Daud, Taher (La Crescenta, CA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

III-V/Silicon Lattice-Matched Tandem Solar Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A two-junction device consisting of a 1.7-eV GaNPAs junction on a 1.1-eV silicon junction has the theoretical potential to achieve nearly optimal efficiency for a two-junction tandem cell. We have demonstrated a monolithic III-V-on-silicon tandem solar cell in which most of the III-V layers are nearly lattice-matched to the silicon substrate. The cell includes a GaNPAs top cell, a GaP-based tunnel junction (TJ), and a diffused silicon junction formed during the epitaxial growth of GaNP on the silicon substrate. To accomplish this, we have developed techniques for the growth of high crystalline quality lattice-matched GaNPAs on silicon by metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy.

Geisz, J.; Olson, J.; Friedman, D.; Kurtz, S.; McMahon, W.; Romero, M.; Reedy, R.; Jones, K.; Norman, A.; Duda, A.; Kibbler, A.; Kramer, C.; Young, M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Epitaxial silicon growth for solar cells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this contract were: (1) to determine the feasibility of silicon epitaxial growth on low-cost silicon substrates for the development of silicon sheet capable of producing low-cost, high efficiency solar cells; (2) to achieve a goal of 12% (AM-0) efficient solar cells fabricated on thin epitaxial layers (<25 ..mu..m) grown on low-cost substrates; and (3) to evaluate the add-on cost for the epitaxial process and to develop low-cost epitaxial growth procedures for application in conjunction with low-cost silicon substrates. The basic epitaxial procedures and solar-cell fabrication and evaluation techniques are described, followed by a discussion of the development of baseline epitaxial solar-cell structures, grown on high-quality conventional silicon substrates. This work resulted in the definition of three basic structures which reproducibly yielded efficiencies in the range of 12 to 13.7%. These epitaxial growth procedures and baseline structures were then used to grow diagnostic layers and solar cells on four potentially low-cost silicon substrates. A description of the crystallographic properties of such layers and the performance of epitaxially grown solar cells fabricated on these materials is given. The major results were the achievement of cell efficiencies of 10.6 to 11.2% on multigrained substrates and approx. 13% on a low-cost single-crystal substrate. An advanced epitaxial reactor, the Rotary Disc, is described. The results of growing solar-cell structures of the baseline type and on low-cost substrates are given. The add-on cost for the epitaxial process is assessed. These cost estimates show a value of approx. 0.46/W using existing or near-term technologies and project an add-on cost of $0.10/W for future reactors.

D'Aiello, R.V.; Robinson, P.H.; Richman, D.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Improved performance of self-aligned, selective-emitter silicon solar cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors improved a self-aligned emitter etchback technique that requires only a single emitter diffusion and no alignment to form self-aligned, patterned-emitter profiles. Standard commercial screen-printed gridlines mask a plasma-etchback of the emitter. A subsequent PECVD-nitride deposition provides good surface and bulk passivation and an antireflection coating. They used full-size multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) cells processed in a commercial production line and performed a statistically designed multiparameter experiment to optimize the use of a hydrogenation treatment to increase performance. They obtained an improvement of almost a full percentage point in cell efficiency when the self-aligned emitter etchback was combined with an optimized 3-step PECVD-nitride surface passivation and hydrogenation treatment. They also investigated the inclusion of a plasma-etching process that results in a low-reflectance, textured surface on multicrystalline silicon cells. Preliminary results indicate reflectance can be significantly reduced without etching away the emitter diffusion.

Ruby, D.S.; Yang, P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Zaidi, S.; Brueck, S. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Roy, M.; Narayanan, S. [Solarex, Frederick, MD (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

MIS and SIS solar cells on polycrystalline silicon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

MIS and SIS structured solar cells are receiving much attention in the photovoltaic community. Seemingly, these cells could be a viable alternative to thermally diffused p-n junctions for use on thin-film polycrystalline silicon substrates. This review describes MIS/SIS structured solar cells and the possible advantages of these structures for use with thin-film polycrystalline silicon. The results of efficiency calculations are presented. Also addressed are lifetime stability and fabrication techniques amenable to large scale production. Finally, the relative advantages and disadvantages of these cells and the results obtained are presented.

Cheek, G.; Mertens, R.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Solar EnerTech PAIS Jin Yu Silicon Wuhai Municipal Gvrnt JV | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PAIS Jin Yu Silicon Wuhai Municipal Gvrnt JV PAIS Jin Yu Silicon Wuhai Municipal Gvrnt JV Jump to: navigation, search Name Solar EnerTech, PAIS, Jin Yu Silicon, & Wuhai Municipal Gvrnt JV Place Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China Sector Solar Product A solar silicon processing joint venture between Solar EnerTech, PAIS, Jin Yu Silicon, and the Wuhai Municipal Government was formed. References Solar EnerTech, PAIS, Jin Yu Silicon, & Wuhai Municipal Gvrnt JV[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Solar EnerTech, PAIS, Jin Yu Silicon, & Wuhai Municipal Gvrnt JV is a company located in Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China . References ↑ "[ Solar EnerTech, PAIS, Jin Yu Silicon, & Wuhai Municipal

113

Point-Contact Silicon Solar Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new type of silicon photovoltaic cell called the point-contact cell is under development. This report describes the cell and an analytic model developed for use in design optimization. Necessary future cell development work is discussed.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Modelling and fabrication of high-efficiency silicon solar cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the research conducted on modelling and development of high-efficiency silicon solar cells during the period May 1989 to August 1990. First, considerable effort was devoted toward developing a ray-tracing program for the photovoltaic community to quantify and optimize surface texturing for solar cells. Second, attempts were made to develop a hydrodynamic model for device simulation. Such a model is somewhat slower than drift-diffusion type models like PC-1D, but it can account for more physical phenomena in the device, such as hot carrier effects, temperature gradients, thermal diffusion, and lattice heat flow. In addition, Fermi-Dirac statistics have been incorporated into the model to deal with heavy doping effects more accurately. Third and final component of the research includes development of silicon cell fabrication capabilities and fabrication of high-efficiency silicon cells. 84 refs., 46 figs., 10 tabs.

Rohatgi, A.; Smith, A.W.; Salami, J. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Electrical Engineering] [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Electrical Engineering

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

GCL Solar Energy Technology Holdings formerly GCL Silicon aka Jiangsu  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Energy Technology Holdings formerly GCL Silicon aka Jiangsu Solar Energy Technology Holdings formerly GCL Silicon aka Jiangsu Zhongneng Polysilicon Jump to: navigation, search Name GCL Solar Energy Technology Holdings (formerly GCL Silicon, aka Jiangsu Zhongneng Polysilicon) Place Xuzhou, Jiangsu Province, China Zip 221131 Sector Solar Product China-based solar grade polysilicon producer. Coordinates 34.255489°, 117.190201° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.255489,"lon":117.190201,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

116

Method for forming indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high photo-conversion efficiency indium oxide/n-silicon heterojunction solar cell is spray deposited from a solution containing indium trichloride. The solar cell exhibits an Air Mass One solar conversion efficiency in excess of about 10%.

Feng, Tom (Morris Plains, NJ); Ghosh, Amal K. (New Providence, NJ)

1984-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

117

Semiconductor grade, solar silicon purification project. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Motorola's low cost poly silicon program is described. In the process, SiF/sub 4/, a low cost by-product is reacted with mg silicon to form SiF/sub 2/ gas which is polymerized. The (SiF/sub 2/)/sub x/ polymer is heated forming volatile Si/sub x/F/sub y/ homologues which disproportionate (C.V.D.) on a silicon particle bed forming silicon and SiF/sub 4/. During the initial phases of the investigation the silicon analysis procedure relied heavily on S.S.M.S. and E.S. analysis. This analysis demonstrated that major purification had occurred and some samples were indistinguishable from semiconductor grade silicon (except possibly for phosphorus). However, more recent electrical analysis via crystal growth reveals that the product contains compensated phosphorus and boron. Work on the control or removal of the electrically active donors and acceptors could yield a product suitable for solar application. The low projected product cost and short energy payback time suggest that the economics of this process will result in a cost less than the J.P.L./D.O.E. goal of $10/Kg (1975 dollars). Finally, assuming a successful demonstration of a pilot facility, the process appears to be readily scalable to a major silicon purification facility as was proposed by Motorola and R. Katzen.

Ingle, W.M.; Rosler, R.S.; Thompson, S.W.; Chaney, R.E.

1979-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

118

The Silicon Solar Cell Turns 50  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Daryl Chapin, Calvin Fuller, and Gerald Daryl Chapin, Calvin Fuller, and Gerald Pearson likely never imagined inventing a solar cell that would revolutionize the photovoltaics industry. There wasn't even a photovoltaics industry to revolu- tionize in 1952. The three scientists were simply trying to solve problems within the Bell tele- phone system. Traditional dry cell batteries, which worked fine in mild climates, degraded too rapidly in the tropics and ceased to work when needed. The company therefore asked its famous research arm-Bell Laboratories-to explore alternative sources of freestand- ing power. Daryl Chapin got the assign- ment. At that time, his job was to test wind machines, thermoelectric gensets, and steam engines. Being a solar energy enthusiast, he suggested that the investi- gation include solar cells. His supervisor

119

High-efficiency concentrator silicon solar cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents results from extensive process development in high-efficiency Si solar cells. An advanced design for a 1.56-cm{sup 2} cell with front grids achieved 26% efficiency at 90 suns. This is especially significant since this cell does not require a prismatic cover glass. New designs for simplified backside-contact solar cells were advanced from a status of near-nonfunctionality to demonstrated 21--22% for one-sun cells in sizes up to 37.5 cm{sup 2}. An efficiency of 26% was achieved for similar 0.64-cm{sup 2} concentrator cells at 150 suns. More fundamental work on dopant-diffused regions is also presented here. The recombination vs. various process and physical parameters was studied in detail for boron and phosphorous diffusions. Emitter-design studies based solidly upon these new data indicate the performance vs design parameters for a variety of the cases of most interest to solar cell designers. Extractions of p-type bandgap narrowing and the surface recombination for p- and n-type regions from these studies have a generality that extends beyond solar cells into basic device modeling. 68 refs., 50 figs.

Sinton, R.A.; Cuevas, A.; King, R.R.; Swanson, R.M. (Stanford Univ., CA (USA). Solid-State Electronics Lab.)

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Accurate performance measurement of silicon solar cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the research is a testing `recipe' that uses low-cost equipment and gives an estimate of measurement is an important part of the solar cell manufacturing process. Two classes of measurement can be considered measurement ­ for cell sorting and process improvement. This work describes techniques that address both

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicrystalline silicon solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Chlorine Free Technology for Solar-Grade Silicon Manufacturing: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Due to the development of the solar energy industry, a significant increase of polysilicon feedstock (PSF) production will be required in near future. The creation of special technology of solar grade polysilicon feedstock production is an important problem. Today, semiconductor-grade polysilicon is mainly manufactured using the trichlorosilane (SiHCl3) distillation and reduction. The feed-stock for trichlorosilane is metallurgical-grade silicon, the product of reduction of natural quartzite (silica). This polysilicon production method is characterized by high energy consumption and large amounts of wastes, containing environmentally harmful chlorine based compounds. In the former USSR the principles of industrial method for production of monosilane and polycrystalline silicon by thermal decomposition of monosilane were founded. This technology was proved in industrial scale at production of gaseous monosilane and PSF. We offered new chlorine free technology (CFT). Originality and novelty of the process were confirmed by Russian and US patents.

Strebkov, D. S.; Pinov, A. P.; Zadde, V. V.; Lebedev, E. N.; Belov, E. P.; Efimov, N. K.; Kleshevnikova, S. I.; Touryan, K.; Bleak, D.

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Fourth workshop on the role of point defects/defect complexes in silicon device processing. Summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 4th Point Defect Workshop was aimed at reviewing recent new understanding of the defect engineering techniques that can improve the performance of solar cells fabricated on low-cost silicon substrates. The theme of the workshop was to identify approaches that can lead to 18% commercial silicon solar cells in the near future. These approaches also define the research tasks for the forthcoming new DOE/NREL silicon materials research program. It was a consensus of the workshop attendees that the goal of 18%-efficient multicrystalline silicon solar cells is right on target, and the payoff for the investment by DOE will manifest itself in the next few years as reduced costs for high-efficiency cell fabrication.

Tan, T.; Jastrzebski, L.; Sopori, B.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Junction Transport in Epitaxial Film Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report our progress toward low-temperature HWCVD epitaxial film silicon solar cells on inexpensive seed layers, with a focus on the junction transport physics exhibited by our devices. Heterojunctions of i/p hydrogenated amorphous Si (a-Si) on our n-type epitaxial crystal Si on n++ Si wafers show space-charge-region recombination, tunneling or diffusive transport depending on both epitaxial Si quality and the applied forward voltage.

Young, D. L.; Li, J. V.; Teplin, C. W.; Stradins, P.; Branz, H. M.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Processes for producing low cost, high efficiency silicon solar cells  

SciTech Connect

Processes which utilize rapid thermal processing (RTP) are provided for inexpensively producing high efficiency silicon solar cells. The RTP processes preserve minority carrier bulk lifetime .tau. and permit selective adjustment of the depth of the diffused regions, including emitter and back surface field (bsf), within the silicon substrate. Silicon solar cell efficiencies of 16.9% have been achieved. In a first RTP process, an RTP step is utilized to simultaneously diffuse phosphorus and aluminum into the front and back surfaces, respectively, of a silicon substrate. Moreover, an in situ controlled cooling procedure preserves the carrier bulk lifetime .tau. and permits selective adjustment of the depth of the diffused regions. In a second RTP process, both simultaneous diffusion of the phosphorus and aluminum as well as annealing of the front and back contacts are accomplished during the RTP step. In a third RTP process, the RTP step accomplishes simultaneous diffusion of the phosphorus and aluminum, annealing of the contacts, and annealing of a double-layer antireflection/passivation coating SiN/SiO.sub.x.

Rohatgi, Ajeet (Marietta, GA); Chen, Zhizhang (Duluth, GA); Doshi, Parag (Atlanta, GA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Washington Silicon Plant Makes Way for Cheaper Solar-and Jobs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Washington Silicon Plant Makes Way for Cheaper Solar-and Jobs Washington Silicon Plant Makes Way for Cheaper Solar-and Jobs Washington Silicon Plant Makes Way for Cheaper Solar-and Jobs November 2, 2010 - 2:00pm Addthis REC Silicon received a $154 million 48C tax credit for a $1.7 billion expansion of its Moses Lake, WA, plant. | Photo courtesy of REC Silicon | REC Silicon received a $154 million 48C tax credit for a $1.7 billion expansion of its Moses Lake, WA, plant. | Photo courtesy of REC Silicon | Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE In most industries, if it's expensive to make, it's probably expensive to buy. This is particularly evident in the solar world. Refining the raw material used in photovoltaic panels, silicon, is not a cheap endeavor, and has kept the price of panels more expensive than other energy sources.

126

Silicon Ink for High-Efficiency Solar Cells Captures a Share of the Market (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fact sheet on 2011 R&D 100 Award winner Silicon Ink. Liquid silicon has arrived, and with it comes a power boost for solar cells and dramatic cost savings for cell manufacturers.

Not Available

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Silicon halide-alkali metal flames as a source of solar grade silicon. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The object of this program was to determine the feasibility of using continuous high-temperature reactions of alkali metals and silicon halides to produce silicon in large quantities and of suitable purity for use in the production of photovoltaic solar cells. Equilibrium calculations showed that a range of conditions were available where silicon was produced as a condensed phase but the byproduct alkali metal salt was a vapor. A process was proposed using the vapor phase reaction of Na with SiCl/sub 4/. Low pressure experiments were performed demonstrating that free silicon was produced and providing experience with the construction of reactant vapor generators. Further experiments at higher reagent flow rates were performed in a low temperature flow tube configuration with co-axial injection of reagents. Relatively pure silicon was produced in these experiments. A high temperature graphite flow tube was built and continuous separation of Si from NaCl was demonstrated. A larger-scaled well-stirred reactor was built. Experiments were performed to investigate the compatibility of graphite-based reactor materials of construction with sodium. At 1100 to 1200 K none of these materials were found to be suitable. At 1700 K the graphites performed well with little damage except to coatings of pyrolytic graphite and silicon carbide which were damaged.

Olson, D.B.; Miller, W.J.; Gould, R.K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Thin film polycrystalline silicon solar cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the present quarter efficiency of heterostructure solar cells has been increased from 13 to 13.7% for single crystal and from 10.3 to 11.2% for polysilicon. For polysilicon the improvements can be attributed to reductions in grid-area coverage and in reflection losses and for single crystal to a combination of reduction in grid-area coverage and increase in fill factor. The heterostructure cells in both cases were IT0/n-Si solar cells. Degradation in Sn0/sub 2//n-Si solar cells can be greatly reduced to negligible proportions by proper encapsulation. The cells used in stability tests have an average initial efficiency of 11% which reduces to a value of about 10.5% after 6 months of exposure to sunlight and ambient conditions. This small degradation occurs within the first month, and the efficiency remains constant subsequently. The reduction in efficiency is due to a decrease in the open-circuit voltage only, while the short-circuit current and fill factor remain constant. The effects of grain-size on the Hall measurements in polysilicon have been analyzed and interpreted, with some modifications, using a model proposed by Bube. This modified model predicts that the measured effective Hall voltage is composed of components originating from the bulk and space-charge region. For materials with large grains, the carrier concentration is independent of the inter-grain boundary barrier, whereas the mobility is dependent on it. However, for small rains, both the carrier density and mobility depend on the barrier. These predictions are consistant with experimental results of mm-size Wacker polysilicon and ..mu..m-size NTD polysilicon.

Ghosh, A. K.; Feng, T.; Eustace, D. J.; Maruska, H. P.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Deutsche Solar AG formerly Bayer Solar GmbH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AG formerly Bayer Solar GmbH AG formerly Bayer Solar GmbH Jump to: navigation, search Name Deutsche Solar AG (formerly Bayer Solar GmbH) Place Freiberg/Sachsen, Germany Zip 9599 Sector Solar Product Producers of mono- and multicrystalline silicon wafers for solar cells. Coordinates 50.916956°, 13.339619° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":50.916956,"lon":13.339619,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

130

Distribution of Oxygen in mc-Silicon Ingots for Solar Cell Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 1, 2007 ... Distribution of Oxygen in mc-Silicon Ingots for Solar Cell Applications by Marisa Di Sabatino, Eivind J. vrelid, Espen Olsen, Thorvald A. Engh...

131

Purification of solar-grade silicon by induction melting in cold crucible  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, New method for purification of SoG-Si (solar-grade silicon) is ... suitable for using in directional solidification process (DS) for PV application.

132

And the Award Goes to... Silicon Ink Solar Technology Supported by  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

And the Award Goes to... Silicon Ink Solar Technology Supported by And the Award Goes to... Silicon Ink Solar Technology Supported by SunShot's PV Incubator And the Award Goes to... Silicon Ink Solar Technology Supported by SunShot's PV Incubator July 19, 2011 - 5:00pm Addthis Innovalight’s silicon ink technology | Photo courtesy of Innovalight Innovalight's silicon ink technology | Photo courtesy of Innovalight What does this mean for me? Pioneering startup Innovalight partnered with NREL to invent the first liquid silicon on the market. When paired with Innovalight's industrial screen printing process, this silicon ink technology offers a novel path to producing solar cells with higher conversion efficiencies at lower cost. A pair of presenters approach the microphone carrying a sealed envelope, a faint drum roll is heard, cameras zoom in on the anxious faces of the

133

And the Award Goes to... Silicon Ink Solar Technology Supported by  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

And the Award Goes to... Silicon Ink Solar Technology Supported by And the Award Goes to... Silicon Ink Solar Technology Supported by SunShot's PV Incubator And the Award Goes to... Silicon Ink Solar Technology Supported by SunShot's PV Incubator July 19, 2011 - 5:00pm Addthis Innovalight’s silicon ink technology | Photo courtesy of Innovalight Innovalight's silicon ink technology | Photo courtesy of Innovalight What does this mean for me? Pioneering startup Innovalight partnered with NREL to invent the first liquid silicon on the market. When paired with Innovalight's industrial screen printing process, this silicon ink technology offers a novel path to producing solar cells with higher conversion efficiencies at lower cost. A pair of presenters approach the microphone carrying a sealed envelope, a faint drum roll is heard, cameras zoom in on the anxious faces of the

134

Beyond Silicon: Cutting the Costs of Solar Power | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beyond Silicon: Cutting the Costs of Solar Power Beyond Silicon: Cutting the Costs of Solar Power Stories of Discovery & Innovation Beyond Silicon: Cutting the Costs of Solar Power Enlarge Photo Courtesy of University of Illinois Mechanically flexible, high efficiency solar module that uses an interconnected array of microscale GaAs photovoltaic cells, grown in a multilayer stack on a wafer and then printed onto a sheet of plastic. Enlarge Photo 04.15.11 Beyond Silicon: Cutting the Costs of Solar Power New method of fabricating semiconductors from gallium arsenide promises more affordable solar power, improved semiconductor devices. The biggest single barrier to widespread adoption of solar power continues to be the cost of solar cells. University of Illinois materials scientists supported by the DOE Office of Science have scored a

135

Simulation and process development for ion-implanted N-type silicon solar cells .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??As the efficiency potential for the industrial P-type Al-BSF silicon solar cell reaches its limit, new solar cell technologies are required to continue the pursuit (more)

Ning, Steven

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

High-performance porous silicon solar cell development. Final report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the program was to demonstrate use of porous silicon in new solar cell structures. Porous silicon technology has been developed at Spire for producing visible light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The major aspects that they have demonstrated are the following: porous silicon active layers have been made to show photovoltaic action; porous silicon surface layers can act as antireflection coatings to improve the performance of single-crystal silicon solar cells; and porous silicon surface layers can act as antireflection coatings on polycrystalline silicon solar cells. One problem with the use of porous silicon is to achieve good lateral conduction of electrons and holes through the material. This shows up in terms of poor blue response and photocurrents which increase with increasing reverse bias applied to the diode.

Maruska, P. [Spire Corp., Bedford, MA (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

High-Resolution X-Ray and Light Beam Induced Current (LBIC) Measurements of Multcrystalline Silicon Solar Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High-resolution, spatially-resolved x-ray Laue patterns and high-resolution light beam induced current (LBIC) measurements are combined to study two multicrystalline solar cells made from the Heat Exchanger Method (HEM) and the Sting Ribbon Growth technique. The LBIC measurements were made at 4 different wavelengths (488, 633, 780, and 980 nm), resulting in penetration depths ranging from <1 {mu}m to >100 {mu}m. There is a strong correlation between the x-ray and LBIC measurements, showing that some twins and grain boundaries are effective in the reduction of local quantum efficiency, while others are benign.

Jellison Jr, Gerald Earle [ORNL; Budai, John D [ORNL; Bennett, Charlee J C [ORNL; Tischler, Jonathan Zachary [ORNL; Duty, Chad E [ORNL; Yelundur, V. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Rohatgi, A. [Georgia Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Back-Contact Crystalline-Silicon Solar Cells and Modules  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper summarizes recent progress in the development of back-contact crystalline-silicon (c-Si) solar cells and modules at Sandia National Laboratories. Back-contact cells have potentially improved efficiencies through the elimination of grid obscuration and allow for significant simplifications in the module assembly process. Optimization of the process sequence has improved the efficiency of our back-contact cell (emitter wrap through) from around 12% to near 17% in the past 12 months. In addition, recent theoretical work has elucidated the device physics of emitter wrap-through cells. Finally, improvements in the assembly processing back-contact cells are described.

Bode, M.D.; Garrett, S.E.; Gee, J.M.; Jimeno, J.C.; Smith, D.D.

1999-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

139

Wacker Schott Solar GmbH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Schott Solar GmbH Schott Solar GmbH Jump to: navigation, search Name Wacker Schott Solar GmbH Place Alzenau, Germany Sector Solar Product JV set up between Wacker Chemie and Schott Solar to produce multicrystalline silicon ingots and solar wafers. Coordinates 50.086317°, 9.073625° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":50.086317,"lon":9.073625,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

140

Processes for producing low cost, high efficiency silicon solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Processes which utilize rapid thermal processing (RTP) are provided for inexpensively producing high efficiency silicon solar cells. The RTP processes preserve minority carrier bulk lifetime .tau. and permit selective adjustment of the depth of the diffused regions, including emitter and back surface field (bsf), within the silicon substrate. In a first RTP process, an RTP step is utilized to simultaneously diffuse phosphorus and aluminum into the front and back surfaces, respectively, of a silicon substrate. Moreover, an in situ controlled cooling procedure preserves the carrier bulk lifetime .tau. and permits selective adjustment of the depth of the diffused regions. In a second RTP process, both simultaneous diffusion of the phosphorus and aluminum as well as annealing of the front and back contacts are accomplished during the RTP step. In a third RTP process, the RTP step accomplishes simultaneous diffusion of the phosphorus and aluminum, annealing of the contacts, and annealing of a double-layer antireflection/passivation coating SiN/SiO.sub.x. In a fourth RTP process, the process of applying front and back contacts is broken up into two separate respective steps, which enhances the efficiency of the cells, at a slight time expense. In a fifth RTP process, a second RTP step is utilized to fire and adhere the screen printed or evaporated contacts to the structure.

Rohatgi, Ajeet (Marietta, GA); Doshi, Parag (Altanta, GA); Tate, John Keith (Lawrenceville, GA); Mejia, Jose (Atlanta, GA); Chen, Zhizhang (Duluth, GA)

1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicrystalline silicon solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Processes for producing low cost, high efficiency silicon solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Processes which utilize rapid thermal processing (RTP) are provided for inexpensively producing high efficiency silicon solar cells. The RTP processes preserve minority carrier bulk lifetime {tau} and permit selective adjustment of the depth of the diffused regions, including emitter and back surface field (bsf), within the silicon substrate. In a first RTP process, an RTP step is utilized to simultaneously diffuse phosphorus and aluminum into the front and back surfaces, respectively, of a silicon substrate. Moreover, an in situ controlled cooling procedure preserves the carrier bulk lifetime {tau} and permits selective adjustment of the depth of the diffused regions. In a second RTP process, both simultaneous diffusion of the phosphorus and aluminum as well as annealing of the front and back contacts are accomplished during the RTP step. In a third RTP process, the RTP step accomplishes simultaneous diffusion of the phosphorus and aluminum, annealing of the contacts, and annealing of a double-layer antireflection/passivation coating SiN/SiO{sub x}. In a fourth RTP process, the process of applying front and back contacts is broken up into two separate respective steps, which enhances the efficiency of the cells, at a slight time expense. In a fifth RTP process, a second RTP step is utilized to fire and adhere the screen printed or evaporated contacts to the structure. 28 figs.

Rohatgi, A.; Doshi, P.; Tate, J.K.; Mejia, J.; Chen, Z.

1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

142

Amorphous-silicon thin-film heterojunction solar cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The investigation of amorphous silicon materials at MTSEC has had two major thrusts: (1) to improve the amorphous material, i.e., obtain a low state density in the gap, improve the carrier collection depth and diminish non-radiative recombinations; and (2) to attempt to understand and improve on the limitations of the junction devices while evaluating the amorphous silicon materials. In the first of these efforts, the investigation has continued to examine the modifications to the a-Si(H) network by alloying silicon with other group IVA elements, either in binary or ternary compositions, and/or by replacing the hydrogenation for defect compensation with a combination of hydrogenation and alkylation or hydrogenation and halogenation. The doped junction layers are being examined in an attempt to determine the limiting characteristics of the junctions in solar cell devices of these amorphous materials. Amorphous alloys of Si-Ge, Si-C, Si-Sn were prepared as well as ternary compositions of Si-Ge-C and Si-Sn-C. In addition, Na vapor was added to the gas feed to deposit a-Si(Na, H) films, and to prepare Si-Sn, fluoride was added along with the tin by vapor additions of SnF/sub 4/ to the gas feed. The optical properties of these materials were measured, and structural and compositional information was obtained from the IR vibrational spectra using the scanning electron microscope and from analyses using scanning Auger microscopy. Electrical measurements have included the dark conductivity and the photo conductivity under room fluorescent light and at AM1 conditions. With alloys that displayed promising photoconductive properties n-i-p devices were prepared to assess the solar cell properties. Details are presented. (WHK)

Cretella, M. C.; Gregory, J. A.; Sandstrom, D. B.; Paul, W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Development of Solar Grade (SoG) Silicon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The rapid growth of the photovoltaics (PV) industry is threatened by the ongoing shortage of suitable solar grade (SoG) silicon. Until 2004, the PV industry relied on the off spec polysilicon from the electronics industry for feedstock. The rapid growth of PV meant that the demand for SoG silicon predictably surpassed this supply. The long-term prospects for PV are very bright as costs have come down, and efficiencies and economies of scale make PV generated electricity ever more competitive with grid electricity. However, the scalability of the current process for producing poly silicon again threatens the future. A less costly, higher volume production technique is needed to supply the long-term growth of the PV industry, and to reduce costs of PV even further. This long-term need was the motivation behind this SBIR proposal. Upgrading metallurgical grade (MG) silicon would fulfill the need for a low-cost, large-scale production. Past attempts to upgrade MG silicon have foundered/failed/had trouble reducing the low segregation coefficient elements, B, P, and Al. Most other elements in MG silicon can be purified very efficiently by directional solidification. Thus, in the Phase I program, Crystal Systems proposed a variety of techniques to reduce B, P, and Al in MG silicon to produce a low cost commercial technique for upgrading MG silicon. Of the variety of techniques tried, vacuum refining and some slagging and additions turned out to be the most promising. These were pursued in the Phase II study. By vacuum refining, the P was reduced from 14 to 0.22 ppmw and the Al was reduced from 370 ppmw to 0.065 ppmw. This process was scaled to 40 kg scale charges, and the results were expressed in terms of half-life, or time to reduce the impurity concentration in half. Best half-lives were 2 hours, typical were 4 hours. Scaling factors were developed to allow prediction of these results to larger scale melts. The vacuum refining required the development of new crucibles, as well as liners and coatings to allow the vacuum to be achieved. These developments also hold the promise of lower cost ingot growth, because several of these developments led to a reusable crucible. Liners and coatings were tested on 37 runs, under a variety of conditions. Although many of these did not fulfill the requirements of the program, several were very successful, particularly in allowing the crucible to be reused several times. The most interesting result was with slags and additives used to reduce P and Al. Although slags have been much studied with little success in removing P and B effectively, certain modeling suggested a particular type of slagging might be effective. This was tried, and found to be highly effective for P and surprisingly effective for B, as well. The best results indicate that > 99% of the P was removed, and > 75% of the B was removed by a slagging treatment. An operability issue involving separation of the slag and silicon was the final technical problem preventing the full-scale use of this technique, and there has been progress on this front. A slagging/additive technique is highly promising, because the rates of equilibration are very high, and this is a rapid technique that scales very well to large volumes with little increase in time. Materials of containment and slag/metal separation are issues that are continuing to be developed.

Joyce, David B; Schmid, Frederick

2008-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

144

Silicon materials task of the low cost solar array project (Phase III): effect of impurities and processing on silicon solar cells. Fourteenth quarterly report, January-March 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to determine how various processes, impurities, and impurity-process interactions affect the properties of silicon and the performance of terrestrial solar cells made from silicon. The data provide a basis for cost-benefit analysis to the producers and users of Solar Grade Silicon. The Phase III effort encompasses five major topics: (1) examination of the interaction of impurities with processing treatments, (2) generation of a data base and modeling of impurity effects in n-base solar cells, (3) extension of previous p-base studies to include impurities likely to be introduced during silicon production, refining or crystal growth, (4) a consideration of the potential impact of anisotropic (nonuniform) impurity distribution in large Czochralski and ribbon solar cells and, (5) a preliminary investigation of the permanence of impurity effects in silicon solar cells. During this quarter (1) the mechanisms responsible for impurity deactivation during high temperature gettering treatments was examined in detail, (2) the sead to tang and center to edge variation in Czechralski ingot properties for commercial-size ingots doped with Ti and Mn was evaluated, and (3) aging effects in solar cells doped with Ti or Mo were assessed. Also, an analysis of impurity effects on crystal structure breakdown, and the monitoring of ingot lifetimes by photoconductive decay lifetime measurement before and after processing were continued. The highlights of this work are described. (WHK)

Hopkins, R.H.; Davis, J.R.; Blais, P.D.; Rohatgi, A.; Campbell, R.B.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Stapleton, R.E.; Mollenkopf, H.C.; McCormick, J.R.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Solar Cells Beyond Silicon Keld West, The Danish Polymer Centre, Ris National Laboratory, DK-4000  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Solar Cells Beyond Silicon Keld West, The Danish Polymer Centre, Risø National Laboratory, DK of utilising solar energy, but this direct energy transfer does not involve the elements of focusing solar energy in a way that is economically competitive, also in regions where other energy sources

146

Metal catalyst technique for texturing silicon solar cells  

SciTech Connect

Textured silicon solar cells and techniques for their manufacture utilizing metal sources to catalyze formation of randomly distributed surface features such as nanoscale pyramidal and columnar structures. These structures include dimensions smaller than the wavelength of incident light, thereby resulting in a highly effective anti-reflective surface. According to the invention, metal sources present in a reactive ion etching chamber permit impurities (e.g. metal particles) to be introduced into a reactive ion etch plasma resulting in deposition of micro-masks on the surface of a substrate to be etched. Separate embodiments are disclosed including one in which the metal source includes one or more metal-coated substrates strategically positioned relative to the surface to be textured, and another in which the walls of the reaction chamber are pre-conditioned with a thin coating of metal catalyst material.

Ruby, Douglas S. (Albuquerque, NM); Zaidi, Saleem H. (Albuquerque, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Degradation of ITO/silicon solar cells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research under this contract investigated the degradation mechanisms and projected lifetime of indium tin oxide (ITO/P-silicon) solar cells. Both single and polycrystalline silicon cells were investigated. Thermal degradation of the cells was shown to proceed by the growth of an interfacial SiO/sub 2/ which resulted from oxygen diffusion through the ITO. The growth of the interfacial SiO/sub 2/ causes reduction in fill factor but not V/sub oc/ or I/sub sc/ until the degradation is severe. While thermal degradation occurs, it proceeds very slowly at 50/sup 0/C and the cell efficiency is projected to remain above 50% of its original value for 10/sup 5/ years at this temperature. Cells subjected to illuminated load testing at room temperature for 840 hours showed no reduction in output. However, some changes were noted in the dark characteristics. The mechanism causing the change is not known. Preliminary noise spectral density reliability tests were conducted but the results were inconclusive.

Wilmsen, C.W. (ed.)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Hydrogenation of Dislocation-Limited Heteroepitaxial Silicon Solar Cells: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Post-deposition hydrogenation by remote plasma significantly improves performance of heteroepitaxial silicon solar cells. Heteroepitaxial deposition of thin crystal silicon on sapphire for photovoltaics (PV) is an excellent model system for the study and improvement of deposition on inexpensive Al2O3-coated (100) biaxially-textured metal foils. Without hydrogenation, PV conversion efficiencies are less than 1% on our model system. Performance is limited by carrier recombination at electrically active dislocations that result from lattice mismatch, and other defects. We find that low-temperature hydrogenation at 350 degrees C is more effective than hydrogenation at 610 degrees C. In this work, we use measurements such as spectral quantum efficiency, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), and vibrational Si-H spectroscopies to understand the effects of hydrogenation on the materials and devices. Quantum efficiency increases most at red and green wavelengths, indicating hydrogenation is affecting the bulk more than the surface of the cells. SIMS shows there are 100X more hydrogen atoms in our cells than dangling bonds along dislocations. Yet, Raman spectroscopy indicates that only low temperature hydrogenation creates Si-H bonds; trapped hydrogen does not stably passivate dangling-bond recombination sites at high temperatures.

Bolen, M. L.; Grover, S.; Teplin, C. W.; Bobela, D.; Branz, H. M.; Stradins, P.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

The effects of concentrated ultraviolet light on high-efficiency silicon solar cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The importance of stability in the performance of solar cells is clearly recognized as fundamental. Some of the highest efficiency silicon solar cells demonstrated to date, such as the Point Contact solar cell and the Passivated Emitter solar cell, rely upon the passivation of cell surfaces in order to minimize recombination, which reduces cell power output. Recently, it has been shown that exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light of wavelengths present in the terrestrial solar spectrum can damage a passivating silicon-oxide interface and increase recombination. In this study, we compared the performance of Point Contact and Passivated Emitter solar cells after exposure to UV light. We also examined the effect of UV exposure on oxide-passivated silicon wafers. We found that current Passivated Emitter designs are stable at both one-sun and under concentrated sunlight. The evolution of Point Contact concentrator cell performance shows a clear trend towards more stable cells. 15 refs., 18 figs.

Ruby, D.S.; Schubert, W.K.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Solar Grade Silicon from Agricultural By-products  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this project, Mayaterials developed a low cost, low energy and low temperature method of purifying rice hull ash to high purity (5-6Ns) and converting it by carbothermal reduction to solar grade quality silicon (Sipv) using a self-designed and built electric arc furnace (EAF). Outside evaluation of our process by an independent engineering firm confirms that our technology greatly lowers estimated operating expenses (OPEX) to $5/kg and capital expenses (CAPEX) to $24/kg for Sipv production, which is well below best-in-class plants using a Siemens process approach (OPEX of 14/kg and CAPEX of $87/kg, respectively). The primary limiting factor in the widespread use of photovoltaic (PV) cells is the high cost of manufacturing, compared to more traditional sources to reach 6 g Sipv/watt (with averages closer to 8+g/watt). In 2008, the spot price of Sipv rose to $450/kg. While prices have since dropped to a more reasonable $25/kg; this low price level is not sustainable, meaning the longer-term price will likely return to $35/kg. The 6-8 g Si/watt implies that the Sipv used in a module will cost $0.21-0.28/watt for the best producers (45% of the cost of a traditional solar panel), a major improvement from the cost/wafer driven by the $50/kg Si costs of early 2011, but still a major hindrance in fulfilling DOE goal of lowering the cost of solar energy below $1/watt. The solar cell industry has grown by 40% yearly for the past eight years, increasing the demand for Sipv. As such, future solar silicon price spikes are expected in the next few years. Although industry has invested billions of dollars to meet this ever-increasing demand, the technology to produce Sipv remains largely unchanged requiring the energy intensive, and chlorine dependent Siemens process or variations thereof. While huge improvements have been made, current state-of-the-art industrial plant still use 65 kWh/kg of silicon purified. Our technology offers a key distinction to other technologies as it starts one step upstream from all other Sipv production efforts. Our process starts by producing high purity SiO2/C feedstocks from which Sipv can be produced in a single, chlorine free, final EAF step. Specifically, our unique technology, and the resultant SiO2/C product can serve as high purity feedstocks to existing metallurgical silicon (Simet) producers, allowing them to generate Sipv with existing US manufacturing infrastructure, reducing the overall capital and commissioning schedule. Our low energy, low CAPEX and OPEX process purifies the silica and carbon present in rice hull ash (RHA) at low temperatures (< 200C) to produce high purity (5-6 Ns) feedstock for production of Sipv using furnaces similar to those used to produce Simet. During the course of this project we partnered with Wadham Energy LP (Wadham), who burns 220k ton of rice hulls (RH)/yr generating 200 GWh of electricity/yr and >30k ton/yr RHA. The power generation step produces much more energy (42 kWh/kg of final silicon produced) than required to purify the RHA (5 kWh/kg of Sipv, compared to 65 kWh/kg noted above. Biogenic silica offers three very important foundations for producing high purity silicon. First, wastes from silica accumulating plants, such as rice, corn, many grasses, algae and grains, contain very reactive, amorphous silica from which impurities are easily removed. Second, plants take up only a limited set of, and minimal quantities of the heavy metals present in nature, meaning fewer minerals must be removed. Third, biomass combustion generates a product with intrinsic residual carbon, mixed at nanometer length scales with the SiO2. RHA is 80-90 wt% high surface area (20 m2/g), amorphous SiO2 with some simple mineral content mixed intimately with 5-15 wt% carbon. The mineral content is easily removed by low cost, acid washes using Mayaterials IP, leading to purified rice hull ash (RHAclean) at up to 6N purity. This highly reactive silica is partially extracted from RHAclean at 200 C in an environmentally benign process to adjust SiO2:C ratios to those needed in EA

Richard M. Laine

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

151

Solar Grade Silicon from Agricultural By-products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this project, Mayaterials developed a low cost, low energy and low temperature method of purifying rice hull ash to high purity (5-6Ns) and converting it by carbothermal reduction to solar grade quality silicon (Sipv) using a self-designed and built electric arc furnace (EAF). Outside evaluation of our process by an independent engineering firm confirms that our technology greatly lowers estimated operating expenses (OPEX) to $5/kg and capital expenses (CAPEX) to $24/kg for Sipv production, which is well below best-in-class plants using a Siemens process approach (OPEX of 14/kg and CAPEX of $87/kg, respectively). The primary limiting factor in the widespread use of photovoltaic (PV) cells is the high cost of manufacturing, compared to more traditional sources to reach 6 g Sipv/watt (with averages closer to 8+g/watt). In 2008, the spot price of Sipv rose to $450/kg. While prices have since dropped to a more reasonable $25/kg; this low price level is not sustainable, meaning the longer-term price will likely return to $35/kg. The 6-8 g Si/watt implies that the Sipv used in a module will cost $0.21-0.28/watt for the best producers (45% of the cost of a traditional solar panel), a major improvement from the cost/wafer driven by the $50/kg Si costs of early 2011, but still a major hindrance in fulfilling DOE goal of lowering the cost of solar energy below $1/watt. The solar cell industry has grown by 40% yearly for the past eight years, increasing the demand for Sipv. As such, future solar silicon price spikes are expected in the next few years. Although industry has invested billions of dollars to meet this ever-increasing demand, the technology to produce Sipv remains largely unchanged requiring the energy intensive, and chlorine dependent Siemens process or variations thereof. While huge improvements have been made, current state-of-the-art industrial plant still use 65 kWh/kg of silicon purified. Our technology offers a key distinction to other technologies as it starts one step upstream from all other Sipv production efforts. Our process starts by producing high purity SiO2/C feedstocks from which Sipv can be produced in a single, chlorine free, final EAF step. Specifically, our unique technology, and the resultant SiO2/C product can serve as high purity feedstocks to existing metallurgical silicon (Simet) producers, allowing them to generate Sipv with existing US manufacturing infrastructure, reducing the overall capital and commissioning schedule. Our low energy, low CAPEX and OPEX process purifies the silica and carbon present in rice hull ash (RHA) at low temperatures (30k ton/yr RHA. The power generation step produces much more energy (42 kWh/kg of final silicon produced) than required to purify the RHA (5 kWh/kg of Sipv, compared to 65 kWh/kg noted above. Biogenic silica offers three very important foundations for producing high purity silicon. First, wastes from silica accumulating plants, such as rice, corn, many grasses, algae and grains, contain very reactive, amorphous silica from which impurities are easily removed. Second, plants take up only a limited set of, and minimal quantities of the heavy metals present in nature, meaning fewer minerals must be removed. Third, biomass combustion generates a product with intrinsic residual carbon, mixed at nanometer length scales with the SiO2. RHA is 80-90 wt% high surface area (20 m2/g), amorphous SiO2 with some simple mineral content mixed intimately with 5-15 wt% carbon. The mineral content is easily removed by low cost, acid washes using Mayaterials IP, leading to purified rice hull ash (RHAclean) at up to 6N purity. This highly reactive silica is partially extracted from RHAclean at 200 C in an environmentally benign process to adjust SiO2:C ratios to those needed in EA

Richard M. Laine

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

152

The Characterization of Micro-Channel Structure Poly Silicon Solar Cell Shaped by Laser Carving Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AbstractOn the increasing efficiency of solar cell manufacturing is a continuous challenge to the photovoltaic industry. This paper discusses using laser carving to shape circular micro channels on the surface of polycrystalline silicon solar cells in order to enhance their efficiency. According to the research findings, when the radius of circular-micro channels structure for 15?m, the efficiency of the solar cell is raised from 14.28 % to 15.78%. Detail features of efficiency and IV curve are also discussed. Index Termspoly silicon, solar cell, micro channel, laser carving I.

Liann B. Chang; Hsin C. Chen; Chao S. Lai; Chung W. Liao

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Effects of Solar Radiation on the Performance of Pyrgeometers with Silicon Domes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of the Eppley pyrgeometer with a silicon dome presents several anomalies during daytime measurements. These problems are related mainly to the solar heating of the dome, which causes nearly instantaneous fluctuations, about 1%2% ...

L. Alados-Arboledas; J. Vida; J. I. Jimnez

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Preparation of Solar Grade Silicon Precursor by Electrolysis SiO2 in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Al-Si alloy, a precursor of solar grade silicon, was prepared by direct electrolysis in cryolite molten salt at 950 oC using high purity silica as...

155

Amorphous silicon Schottky barrier solar cells incorporating a thin insulating layer and a thin doped layer  

SciTech Connect

Amorphous silicon Schottky barrier solar cells which incorporate a thin insulating layer and a thin doped layer adjacent to the junction forming metal layer exhibit increased open circuit voltages compared to standard rectifying junction metal devices, i.e., Schottky barrier devices, and rectifying junction metal insulating silicon devices, i.e., MIS devices.

Carlson, David E. (Yardley, PA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Silicon Solar Cells with Front Hetero-Contact and Aluminum Alloy Back Junction: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We prototype an alternative n-type monocrystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cell structure that utilizes an n/i-type hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) front hetero-contact and a back p-n junction formed by alloying aluminum (Al) with the n-type Si wafer.

Yuan, H.-C.; Page, M. R.; Iwaniczko, E.; Xu, Y.; Roybal, L.; Wang, Q.; Branz, H. M.; Meier, D. L.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

PROCEEDINGS O F THE IEEE, VOL.56, NO. 1, JANUARY196837 [`I J. J. Wysocki,"Lithium-doped radiation-resistant silicon solar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,"Lithium-doped radiation-resistant silicon solar cells," IEEE Trans. Nuclear Science. vol.NS-13, pp. 168-173, December 1966 damagein semiconductorsXI1: Effects ofhighenergy electrons in silicon and silicon solar cells," Contract NAS 5-3805, May 25, 1966. 14] R. V. Tauke, "Thermal annealing of irradiated n-on-p silicon solar cells

Teich, Malvin C.

158

Thin Single Crystal Silicon Solar Cells on Ceramic Substrates: November 2009 - November 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this program we have been developing a technology for fabricating thin (cost raw materials. This 'handling layer' has sufficient strength for device and module processing and fabrication. Successful production of full sized (125 mm X 125 mm) silicon on ceramic wafers with 50 micrometre thick single crystal silicon has been achieved and device process flow developed for solar cell fabrication. Impurity transfer from the ceramic to the silicon during the elevated temperature consolidation process has resulted in very low minority carrier lifetimes and resulting low cell efficiencies. Detailed analysis of minority carrier lifetime, metals analysis and device characterization have been done. A full sized solar cell efficiency of 8% has been demonstrated.

Kumar, A.; Ravi, K. V.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Silicon materials task of the low cost solar array project (Phase III). Effect of impurities and processing on silicon solar cells. Fifteenth quarterly report, April-June 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program is to define the effects of impurities, various thermochemical processes, and any impurity-process interactions on the performance of terrestrial silicon solar cells. The results of the study form a basis for silicon producers, wafer manufacturers, and cell fabricators to develop appropriate cost-benefit relationships for the use of less pure, less costly Solar Grade silicon. The first reported determinations of the segregation coefficients of tungsten, tantalum, and cobalt for the Czochralski pulling of silicon single crystals were performed. Sensitive neutron activation analysis was used to determine the metal impurity content of the silicon (C/sub S/) while atomic absorption was used to measure the metal content of the residual liquid (C/sub L/) from which the doped crystals were grown. Gettering of Ti-doped silicon wafers improves cell performance by 1 to 2% (absolute) for the highest temperatures and longest times. The measured profile for Ti centers formed after an 850/sup 0/C gettering operation was fitted by a mathematical expression for the out-diffusion of an impurity species. By means of cell performance data and the newly-measured segregation coefficients curves were computed to predict the variation in cell efficiency with impurity concentration for Mo, Ta, W, Nb, and Co, materials commonly employed in the construction of high temperature silicon processing equipment. Using data for second and third generation n-base ingots the cell performance curves were updated for single impurities in n-type silicon. Most impurities degrade n-base cells less than p-base devices. The effect is larges for Mo, Al, Mn, Ti, and V while Fe and Cr behave much the same in both types of solar cells. In contrast Ni and Cu both degrade n-base devices (apparently by a junction mechanism) more severely than p-base cells. (WHK)

Hopkins, R.H.; Davis, J.R.; Blais, P.D.; Rohatgi, A.; Campbell, R.B.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Stapleton, R.E.; Mollenkopf, H.C.; McCormick, J.R.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Silicon web process development. Low Cost Solar Array Project: Large Area Silicon Test Task. Annual report, April 1978-April 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Silicon dendritic web is a unique mode of ribbon growth in which crystallographic and surface tension forces, rather than shaping dies, are used to control crystal form. The single crystal webs, typically 2-4 cm wide, have been made into solar cells which exhibit AMl conversion efficiencies as high as 15.5%. During crystallization, silicon webs effectively segregate metal impurities to the melt (k/sub eff/ approx. 10/sup -5/) so that the use of cheaper, less pure silicon as feedstock for crystal growth appears feasible. A research program to significantly increase web output rate and to show the feasibility for simultaneous melt replenishment and growth is described. Also, an economic analysis of the silicon web process is presented. (WHK)

Duncan, C.S.; Hopkins, R.H.; Seidensticker, R.G.; McHugh, J.P.; Hill, F.E.; Heimlich, M.E.; Driggers, J.M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicrystalline silicon solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Silicon materials task of the low-cost solar-array project. Effect of impurities and processing on silicon solar cells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The object of the program has been to investigate the effects of various processes, metal contaminants, and contaminant-process interactions on the properties of silicon and on the performance of terrestrial silicon solar cells. The study has encompassed topics such as thermochemical (gettering) treatments, base-doping concentration, base-doping type (n vs. p), grain boundary-impurity interaction in polycrystalline devices, and long-term effects of impurities and impurity impacts on high-efficiency cells, as well as a preliminary evaluation of some potential low-cost silicon materials. The effects have been studied of various metallic impurities, introduced singly or in combination into Czochralski, float zone, and polycrystalline silicon ingots and into silicon ribbons grown by the dendritic web process. The solar cell data indicate that impurity-induced performance loss is caused primarily by a reduction in base diffusion length. An analytical model based on this observation has been developed and verified experimentally for both n- and p-base material. Studies of polycrystalline ingots containing impurities indicate that solar cell behavior is species sensitive and that a fraction of the impurities are segregated to the grain boundaries. HCl and POCl gettering improve the performance of single-crystal solar cells containing Fe, Cr, and Ti. In contrast Mo-doped material is barely affected. The efficiencies of solar cells fabricated on impurity-doped wafers is lower when the front junction is formed by ion implantation than when conventional diffusion techniques are used. For most impurity-doped solar cells stability is expected for projected times beyond 20 years. Feedstock impurity concentrations below one part per million for elements like V, or 100 parts per million for more benign impurities like Cu or Ni, will be required.

Hopkins, R.H.; Davis, J.R.; Rohatgi, A.; Hanes, M.H.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Mollenkopf, H.C.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

High Efficiency and High Rate Deposited Amorphous Silicon-Based Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a triple cell showing 10.7% stable efficiency. Figure 4-1 Schematic diagram of the Hot Wire CVD deposition. Task 7: High-rate deposition of a-Si based solar cells We have conducted extensive research using a hot1 High Efficiency and High Rate Deposited Amorphous Silicon-Based Solar Cells PHASE I Annual

Deng, Xunming

163

Solar-grade silicon by directional solidification in carbon crucibles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Directional solidification of silicon in carbon crucibles was achieved by using two variations of the Bridgman-Stockbarger method. One was a static technique wherein liquid silicon in a carbon crucible was positioned in a tamperature gradient of about ...

T. F. Ciszek; G. H. Schwuttke; K. H. Yang

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Comparison of electronic structure of as grown and solar grade silicon samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparison of the electronic structure of two different types of silicon materials viz., (i) as grown silicon and (ii) solar silicon has been carried out utilizing maximum entropy method and pair distribution function using powder X-ray data sets. The precise electron density maps have been elucidated for the two samples. The covalent nature of the bonding between atoms in both the samples is found to be well pronounced and clearly seen from the electron density maps. The electron densities at the middle of the Si-Si bond are found to be 0.47 and 0.45 e/A{sup 3} for as grown silicon and solar silicon respectively. In this work, the local structural information has also been obtained by analyzing the atomic pair distribution functions of these two samples.

Saravanan, R., E-mail: saragow@dataone.in; Sheeba, R. A. J. R. [Madura College, Research Centre and PG Department of Physics (India)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

165

Amorphous silicon cell array powered solar tracking apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An array of an even number of amorphous silicon solar cells are serially connected between first and second terminals of opposite polarity. The terminals are connected to one input terminal of a DC motor whose other input terminal is connected to the mid-cell of the serial array. Vane elements are adjacent the end cells to selectively shadow one or the other of the end cells when the array is oriented from a desired attitude relative to the sun. The shadowing of one cell of a group of cells on one side of the mid-cell reduces the power of that group substantially so that full power from the group of cells on the other side of the mid-cell drives the motor to reorient the array to the desired attitude. The cell groups each have a full power output at the power rating of the motor. When the array is at the desired attitude the power output of the two groups of cells balances due to their opposite polarity so that the motor remains unpowered.

Hanak, Joseph J. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

STRC's Process for Producing Low Cost Solar Silicon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2011 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Silicon Production, Purification and Recycling for Photovoltaic Cells.

167

QQ3, Etched Silicon Pillar Array Solar Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2009 Electronic Materials Conference. Symposium, Electronic Materials Conference. Presentation Title, QQ3, Etched Silicon Pillar...

168

Solar silicon definition. Progress report, 15 October 1974--15 September 1975  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was conducted to determine the optimum silicon quality for cost-effective solar cells suitable for large-scale terrestrial utilization. The effects of selected impurities upon the solar cell performance were investigated by preparation and characterization of a matrix of silicon samples. Evaluation of the I-V curves to obtain the slope of the forward current of simple p-n junctions provided rapid material evaluation. Experimental techniques were demonstrated for achieving reliable data from diodes and solar cells. The primary electrical parameters measured were I-V characteristics. (auth)

Wakefield, G.F.; Brown, G.A.; Chu, T.L.; Harrap, V.

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Lattice-Matched GaNPAs-On-Silicon Tandem Solar Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A two-junction device consisting of a 1.7-eV GaNPAs junction on a 1.1-eV silicon junction has the theoretical potential to achieve nearly optimal efficiency for a two-junction tandem cell. We have demonstrated a monolithic III-V-on-silicon tandem solar cell in which most of the III-V layers are nearly lattice-matched to the silicon substrate. The cell includes a 1.8 eV GaNPAs top cell, a GaP-based tunnel junction (TJ), and a diffused silicon junction formed during the epitaxial growth of GaNP on the silicon substrate. This tandem on silicon has a Voc of 1.53 V and an AM1.5G efficiency of 5.2% without any antireflection coating. Low currents in the top cell are the primary limitation to higher efficiency at this point.

Geisz, J. F.; Olson, J. M.; Friedman, D. J.; Jones, K. M.; Reedy, R. C.; Romero, M. J.

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Thin film polycrystalline silicon solar cells. Second technical progress report, July 16, 1980-October 15, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this contract are to fabricate large area thin film silicon solar cells with AM1 efficiency of 10% or greater with good reproducibility and good yield and to assess the feasibility of implementing this process for manufacturing solar cells at a cost of $300/kWe. Efforts have been directed to the purification of metallurgical silicon, the preparation and characterization of substrates and epitaxial silicon layers, and the fabrication and characterization of solar cells. The partial purification of metallurgical silicon by extraction with aqua regia has been further investigated in detail, and the resulting silicon was analyzed by the atomic absorption technique. The unidirectional solidification of aqua regia-extracted metallurgical silicon on graphite was used for the preparation of substrates, and the impurity distribution in the substrate was determined and compared with the impurity content in metallurgical silicon. The effects of heat treatment on the impurity distribution in the substrate and in the epitaxial layer have also been investigated. Large area (30 to 60 cm/sup 2/) solar cells have been prepared from aqua regia-extracted metallurgical silicon substrates by depositing a p-n junction structure using the thermal reduction of trichlorosilane containing appropriate dopants. The AM1 efficiencies are about 9% for cells of 30 to 35 cm/sup 2/ area. Larger area, 60 cm/sup 2/, thin film solar cells have been fabricated for the first time, and their AM1 efficiencies are slightly higher than 8%. The spectral response, minority carrier diffusion length, and I/sub sc/-V/sub oc/ relation in a number of solr cells have been measured.

None

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Fundamental understanding and development of low-cost, high-efficiency silicon solar cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objectives of this program are (1) to develop rapid and low-cost processes for manufacturing that can improve yield, throughput, and performance of silicon photovoltaic devices, (2) to design and fabricate high-efficiency solar cells on promising low-cost materials, and (3) to improve the fundamental understanding of advanced photovoltaic devices. Several rapid and potentially low-cost technologies are described in this report that were developed and applied toward the fabrication of high-efficiency silicon solar cells.

ROHATGI,A.; NARASIMHA,S.; MOSCHER,J.; EBONG,A.; KAMRA,S.; KRYGOWSKI,T.; DOSHI,P.; RISTOW,A.; YELUNDUR,V.; RUBY,DOUGLAS S.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Thin Single Crystal Silicon Solar Cells on Ceramic Substrates: November 2009 - November 2010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this program we have been developing a technology for fabricating thin (< 50 micrometres) single crystal silicon wafers on foreign substrates. We reverse the conventional approach of depositing or forming silicon on foreign substrates by depositing or forming thick (200 to 400 micrometres) ceramic materials on high quality single crystal silicon films ~ 50 micrometres thick. Our key innovation is the fabrication of thin, refractory, and self-adhering 'handling layers or substrates' on thin epitaxial silicon films in-situ, from powder precursors obtained from low cost raw materials. This 'handling layer' has sufficient strength for device and module processing and fabrication. Successful production of full sized (125 mm X 125 mm) silicon on ceramic wafers with 50 micrometre thick single crystal silicon has been achieved and device process flow developed for solar cell fabrication. Impurity transfer from the ceramic to the silicon during the elevated temperature consolidation process has resulted in very low minority carrier lifetimes and resulting low cell efficiencies. Detailed analysis of minority carrier lifetime, metals analysis and device characterization have been done. A full sized solar cell efficiency of 8% has been demonstrated.

Kumar, A.; Ravi, K. V.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Coaxial silicon nanowires as solar cells and nanoelectronic power sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(EERE) Fuel Cell Technologies Program (FCT) Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production R&D portfolioSANDIA REPORT SAND2011-3622 Unlimited Release Printed May 2011 Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen://www.ntis.gov/help/ordermethods.asp?loc=7-4-0#online #12;3 SAND2011-3622 Unlimited Release Printed May 2011 Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen

Marcus, Charles

174

Silicon Materials Task of the Low Cost Solar Array Project (Phase II). Effect of impurities and processing on silicon solar cells. Phase II. Summary and eleventh quarterly report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effects of various processes, metal contaminants and contaminant-process interactions on the performance of terrestrial silicon solar cells were investigated. A variety of aspects including thermal treatments, crystal growth rate, base doping concentration (low resistivity), base doping type (n vs. p), grain boundary structure, and carbon/oxygen-metal interactions (float zone vs Czochralski growth) were studied. The effects of various metallic impurities were studied, introduced singly or in combination into Czochralski, float zone and polycrystalline silicon ingots and into silicon ribbons grown by the dendritic web process. The totality of the solar cell data (comprising over 4000 cells) indicate that impurity-induced performance loss is primarily due to reduction in base diffusion length. Based on this assumption an analytical model has been developed which predicts cell performance as a function of metal impurity content. The model has now been verified for p-base material by correlating the projected and measured performance of solar cells made on 19 ingots bearing multiple impurities.

Hopkins, R.H.; Davis, J.R.; Blais, P.D.; Rohatgi, A.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Hanes, M.H.; McCormick, J.R.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Thin film polycrystalline silicon solar cells. Quarterly report No. 1, October 1-December 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The MoSi/sub 2/ separation layer growth rate has been studied as a function of time and temperature. The presence of small amounts of O/sub 2/ in the silicon deposition ambient were found to inhibit the growth rate of the MoSi/sub 2/ layer and also to affect the reliability of shear separation. Void formation in silicon at the Si-MoSi/sub 2/ interface, due predominantly to diffusion of silicon through the MoSi/sub 2/ layer was observed. This is believed to be responsible for shear separation occurring in the silicon film. Gas chromatograhic procedures were developed for characterizing the silicon deposition process. Coherent twin bundles in the grain-enhanced silicon films were not found to adversely influence solar cell efficiency. Several 1 cm x 2 cm solar cells were fabricated. Performance characteristics of these cells are discussed; the best device had a conversion efficiency of 10.7% (under simulated AM1 illumination) with V/sub OC/ = 0.545 V, J/sub SC/ = 28.65 mA/cm/sup 2/ and FF = 68.3%.

Sarma, K.R.; Rice, M.J.; Legge, R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Optimization of interdigitated back contact silicon heterojunction solar cells by two-dimensional numerical simulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper, two-dimensional (2D) simulation of interdigitated back contact silicon heterojunction (IBC-SHJ) solar cells is presented using Sentaurus Device, a software package of Synopsys TCAD. A model is established incorporating a distribution of trap states of amorphous-silicon material and thermionic emission across the amorphous-silicon / crystalline-silicon heterointerface. The 2D nature of IBC-SHJ device is evaluated and current density-voltage (J-V) curves are generated. Optimization of IBC-SHJ solar cells is then discussed through simulation. It is shown that the open circuit voltage (VOC) and short circuit current density (JSC) of IBC-SHJ solar cells increase with decreasing front surface recombination velocity. The JSC improves further with the increase of relative coverage of p-type emitter contacts, which is explained by the simulated and measured position dependent laser beam induced current (LBIC) line scan. The S-shaped J-V curves with low fill factor (FF) observed in experiments are also simulated, and three methods to improve FF by modifying the intrinsic a-Si buffer layer are suggested: (i) decreased thickness, (ii) increased conductivity, and (iii) reduced band gap. With all these optimizations, an efficiency of 26% for IBC-SHJ solar cells is potentially achievable.

Lu, Meijun; Das, Ujjwal; Bowden, Stuart; Hegedus, Steven; Birmire, Robert

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

177

Status of Amorphous and Crystalline Thin Film Silicon Solar Cell Activities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reviews the recent activities and accomplishments of the national Amorphous Silicon Team and a (crystalline) thin-film-Si subteam that was implemented in 2002 to research solar cell devices based on thin crystalline Si based layers. This paper reports the evolution of team organization, the technical highlights from the recent team meetings, and an outlook on commercialization potential.

von Roedern, B.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Low Cost, High Efficiency Tandem Silicon Solar Cells and LEDs  

Wladek Walukiewicz, Joel Ager, and Kin Man Yu of Berkeley Lab have developed high-efficiency solar cells that leverage the well-established design and ...

179

Role of Amorphous Silicon and Tunneling in Heterojunction with Intrinsic Thin Layer (HIT) Solar Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work analyzes heterojunction with intrinsic thin layer (HIT) solar cells using numerical simulations. The differences between the device physics of cells with p- and n-type crystalline silicon (c-Si) wafers are substantial. HIT solar cells with n-type wafers essentially form a n/p/n structure, where tunneling across the junction heterointerfaces is a critical transport mechanism required to attain performance exceeding 20%. For HIT cells with p-type wafers, only tunneling at the back-contact barrier may be important. For p-wafer cells, the hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) between the indium tin oxide (ITO) and crystalline silicon may act as a passivating buffer layer but, otherwise, does not significantly contribute to device performance. For n-wafer cells, the carrier concentration and band alignment of this a-Si:H layer are critical to device performance.

Kanevce, A.; Metzger, W. K.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Schottky barrier amorphous silicon solar cell with thin doped region adjacent metal Schottky barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A Schottky barrier amorphous silicon solar cell incorporating a thin highly doped p-type region of hydrogenated amorphous silicon disposed between a Schottky barrier high work function metal and the intrinsic region of hydrogenated amorphous silicon wherein said high work function metal and said thin highly doped p-type region forms a surface barrier junction with the intrinsic amorphous silicon layer. The thickness and concentration of p-type dopants in said p-type region are selected so that said p-type region is fully ionized by the Schottky barrier high work function metal. The thin highly doped p-type region has been found to increase the open circuit voltage and current of the photovoltaic device.

Carlson, David E. (Yardley, PA); Wronski, Christopher R. (Princeton, NJ)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicrystalline silicon solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Cost-Effective Silicon Wafers for Solar Cells: Direct Wafer Enabling Terawatt Photovoltaics  

SciTech Connect

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: 1366 is developing a process to reduce the cost of solar electricity by up to 50% by 2020from $0.15 per kilowatt hour to less than $0.07. 1366s process avoids the costly step of slicing a large block of silicon crystal into wafers, which turns half the silicon to dust. Instead, the company is producing thin wafers directly from molten silicon at industry-standard sizes, and with efficiencies that compare favorably with todays state-of-the-art technologies. 1366s wafers could directly replace wafers currently on the market, so there would be no interruptions to the delivery of these products to market. As a result of 1366s technology, the cost of silicon wafers could be reduced by 80%.

None

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

MIS solar cells on thin polycrystalline silicon. Progress report No. 3, September 1-November 30, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first task of this project involves electron-beam deposition of thin silicon films on low cost substrates. The goal is to obtain 20 ..mu..m thick films having 20 ..mu..m diameter crystallites which may be recrystallized to > 40 ..mu..m. Material characterization and device studies are to be included in efforts to reach a 6% conversion efficiency. The second task deals with MIS solar cell fabrication on various types of silicon including poly-Si, ribbon-Si, silicon on ceramic, and thin film silicon. Conduction mechanism studies, optimum engineering design, and modification of the fabrication process are to be used to achieve 13% efficiency on Xtal-Si and 11% efficiency on poly-Si. The third task involves more detailed test procedures and includes spectral response, interface and grain boundary effects, computer analysis, materials studies, and grain boundary passivation. Progress is detailed. (WHK)

Anderson, W.A.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Electron energy-loss spectroscopy of boron-doped layers in amorphous thin film silicon solar cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electron energy-loss spectroscopy of boron-doped layers in amorphous thin film silicon solar cells. de Bariloche, Argentina 3 ECN Solar Energy, High Tech Campus, Building 5, 5656 AE Eindhoven energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) is used to study p-doped layers in n-i-p amorphous thin film Si solar

Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

184

Transmissive metallic contact for amorphous silicon solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A transmissive metallic contact for amorphous silicon semiconductors includes a thin layer of metal, such as aluminum or other low work function metal, coated on the amorphous silicon with an antireflective layer coated on the metal. A transparent substrate, such as glass, is positioned on the light reflective layer. The metallic layer is preferably thin enough to transmit at least 50% of light incident thereon, yet thick enough to conduct electricity. The antireflection layer is preferably a transparent material that has a refractive index in the range of 1.8 to 2.2 and is approximately 550A to 600A thick.

Madan, A.

1984-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

185

Silicon Materials Task of the Low Cost Solar Array Project (Phase II). Effect of impurities and processing on silicon solar cells. Tenth quarterly report, 1 January 1978--31 March 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to determine how various processes, impurities and impurity-process interactions affect the properties of silicon and the performance of terrestrial solar cells made from silicon. The development of this data base permits the definition of the tolerable impurity levels in a low-cost solar grade silicon and identifies processes which mitigate or enhance impurity effects in silicon. The data further provide the silicon manufacturer with a means to select materials of construction which minimize product contamination and permit the cost effective selection of chemical processes for silicon purification. For the silicon ingot, sheet or ribbon manufacturer the data suggest what silicon feedstock purity must be selected to produce wafers suitable for cell production and what furnace materials minimize wafer contamination. The cell manufacturer may use the data to define an acceptable wafer purity for cell processing or to identify processes which minimize impurity impact on efficiency. In short the data provide a basis for cost-benefit analysis to the producers and users of Solar Grade Silicon. During this quarter the focus of the experimental activity has been in the following four areas: (1) effects of crystal growth rate and thermal processing of silicon on impurity distribution and electrical activity, (2) impurity-grain boundary interactions in polycrystalline silicon, (3) preliminary measurements of impurity trap levels, trap concentrations and capture cross sections by Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy of purposely contaminated solar cells and (4) improvement of the solar cell-impurity concentration data base for n- and p-type silicon for subsequent modeling studies.

Hopkins, R.H.; Davis, J.R.; Blais, P.D.; Rohatgi, A.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Hanes, M.H.; McCormick, J.R.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

In-Line Crack and Stress Detection in Silicon Solar Cells Using Resonance Ultrasonic Vibrations  

SciTech Connect

Statement of Problem and Objectives. Wafer breakage in automated solar cell production lines is identified as a major technical problem and a barrier for further cost reduction of silicon solar module manufacturing. To the best of our knowledge, there are no commercial systems addressing critical needs for in-line inspection of the mechanical quality of solar wafers and cells. The principal objective of the SBIR program is to validate through experiments and computer modeling the applicability of the Resonance Ultrasonic Vibrations system, which ultimately can be used as a real-time in-line manufacturing quality control tool for fast detection of mechanically unstable silicon solar cells caused by cracks. The specific objective of Phase II is to move the technology of in-line crack detection from the laboratory level to commercial demonstration through development of a system prototype. The fragility of silicon wafers possessing low mechanical strength is attributed to peripheral and bulk millimeter-length cracks. The research program is based on feasibility results obtained during Phase I, which established that: (i) the Resonance Ultrasonic Vibrations method is applicable to as-cut, processed wafers and finished cells; (ii) the method sensitivity depends on the specific processing step; it is highest in as-cut wafers and lowest in wafers with metallization pattern and grid contacts; (iii) the system is capable of matching the 2.0 seconds per wafer throughput rate of state-of-art solar cell production lines; (iv) finite element modeling provides vibration mode analysis along with peak shift versus crack length and crack location dependence; (v) a high 91% crack rejection rate was confirmed through experimentation and statistical analysis. The Phase II project has the following specific tasks: (i) specify optimal configurations of the in-line system?¢????s component hardware and software; (ii) develop and justify a system prototype that meets major specifications for an in-line crack detection unit, such as high throughput rate, high level of stability, reproducibility of data acquisition and analysis, and high sensitivity with respect to crack length and crack location; (iii) design a system platform that allows easy integration within and adaptation to various solar cell belt-type production lines; (iv) develop a testing protocol providing quality certification of the production-grade system. Commercial Application of the proposed activity consists of bringing to the solar market a new high-tech product based on an innovative solution and patented methodology to contribute to cost reduction of silicon solar module production. The solar industry, with crystalline silicon as a dominant segment, shows outstanding performance, with approximately 25% yearly growth during the last years. Despite a slowdown with only 5.6 GW installations in 2009, solar module production for the 2010 and 2011 years was recovered. According to European Photonics Industry Consortium new solar PV installations grow by 56% compared to 2010 reached 64.7 GW in 2011. Revenues in the PV industry reached a record high of $93 billion in 2011, a 13.4 percent gain over 2010 â?? and 150 percent over 2009. This growth was forecasted to continue in 2013 with double digits growth. The solar industry is economically driven to make solar panels of the highest conversion efficiency and reliability at the lowest production cost. The Resonance Ultrasonic Vibration system addresses critical needs of the silicon-based solar industry by providing a quality control method and tool, which will improve productivity, increase reliability of products and reduce manufacturing cost of solar panels.

Ostapenko, Sergei

2013-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

187

14th Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells& Modules: Materials and Processes; Summary of Discussion Sessions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 14th Workshop discussion sessions addressed funding needs for Si research and for R&D to enhance U.S. PV manufacturing. The wrap-up session specifically addressed topics for the new university silicon program. The theme of the workshop, Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Leapfrogging the Barriers, was selected to reflect the astounding progress in Si PV technology during last three decades, despite a host of barriers and bottlenecks. A combination of oral, poster, and discussion sessions addressed recent advances in crystal growth technology, new cell structures and doping methods, silicon feedstock issues, hydrogen passivation and fire through metallization, and module issues/reliability. The following oral/discussion sessions were conducted: (1) Technology Update; (2) Defects and Impurities in Si/Discussion; (3) Rump Session; (4) Module Issues and Reliability/Discussion; (5) Silicon Feedstock/Discussion; (6) Novel Doping, Cells, and Hetero-Structure Designs/Discussion; (7) Metallization/Silicon Nitride Processing/Discussion; (8) Hydrogen Passivation/Discussion; (9) Characterization/Discussion; and (10) Wrap-Up. This year's workshop lasted three and a half days and, for the first time, included a session on Si modules. A rump session was held on the evening of August 8, which addressed efficiency expectations and challenges of c Si solar cells/modules. Richard King of DOE and Daren Dance of Wright Williams& Kelly (formerly of Sematech) spoke at two of the luncheon sessions. Eleven students received Graduate Student Awards from funds contributed by the PV industry.

Sopori, B.; Tan, T.; Sinton, R.; Swanson, D.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Silicon on ceramic process. Silicon sheet growth development for the Large-Area Silicon Sheet Task of the Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Annual report No. 2, September 17, 1976--September 19, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research program is to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon by coating one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large-grain polycrystalline silicon from the melt. In the past year significant progress was made in all areas of the program. The physical and chemical properties of the standard mullite refractory used for the majority of the coating runs (McDanel MV20 and Coors S1SI) have been characterized. A number of experimental compositions have been identified and procured from Coors. Characterization of the standard compositions revealed that the thermal expansion of mullite depends on both relative amounts of glass phase and on the impurity level in the glass. Since the thermal expansion in mullite exceeds that of silicon, the silicon coating should be in a state of compression. This was confirmed by x-ray measurements. After modifying and cleaning the dip-coating facility, silicon on ceramic (SOC) solar cells were fabricated which demonstrate that the SOC process can produce silicon of solar cell quality. SOC cells having 1 cm/sup 2/ active areas demonstrated measured conversion efficiencies as high as 7.2 percent. Typical open-ciruit voltages (V/sub oc/) and short-circuit current densities (J/sub sc/) were 0.51 volt and 20 mA/cm/sup 2/, respectively. Since the active surface of these solar cells is a highly reflective ''as-grown'' surface, one can expect improvement in J/sub sc/ after an anti-reflection (AR) coating is applied. Results of an economic analysis of the SOC process are presented.

Zook, J.D.; Heaps, J.D.; Maciolek, R.B.; Koepke, B.; Butter, C.D.; Schuldt, S.B.

1977-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

189

Development of high-efficiency silicon solar cells and modeling the impact of system parameters on levelized cost of electricity .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this thesis is to develop low-cost high-efficiency crystalline silicon solar cells which are at the right intersection of cost and performance to (more)

Kang, Moon Hee

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Low-cost, deterministic quasi-periodic photonic structures for light trapping in thin film silicon solar cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Light trapping has been an important issue for thin film silicon solar cells because of the low absorption coefficient in the near infrared range. In this paper, we present a photonic structure which combines anodic aluminum ...

Sheng, Xing

191

Simulated Co-Optimization of Crystalline Silicon Solar Cell Throughput and Efficiency Using Continuously Ramping Phosphorus Diffusion Profiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Defect engineering is essential for the production of high-performance silicon photovoltaic (PV) devices with cost-effective solar-grade Si input materials. Phosphorus diffusion gettering (PDG) can mitigate the detrimental ...

Morishige, Ashley Elizabeth

192

Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project quarterly report-2, July 1976--September 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential for future widespread use of photovoltaic systems for the generation of electric power was the motivation for the establishment, in January 1975, of the Photovoltaic Conversion Program by ERDA's Division of Solar Energy. The Program's activities are planned to develop and to promote the use of photovoltaic systems to such an extent that the private sector will produce and utilize cost-competitive photovoltaic systems. As part of the ERDA Program, the Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project (LCSSAP) was established in January 1975. The project objective is to develop the national capability to produce low-cost, long-life photovoltaic arrays at a rate greater than 500 megawatts per year and a price of less than $500 per kilowatt peak by 1986. The array performance objectives include an efficiency greater than 10% and an operating lifetime in excess of 20 years. The approach is to reduce the cost of solar cell arrays by improving solar array manufacturing technology and by increasing solar array production capacity and quantity. Forty-three contracts have been awarded to date, to industrial firms and university and independent laboratories for experimental work, process development and analysis, technology assessment, and the production of solar-array modules. Approximately 42 kW of state-of-the-art modules have been delivered; contracts have been issued and design development has begun for 130 kW of moderately advanced modules. Efforts of the LCSSA Project are organized into an Analysis and Integration Task, four Technology Development Tasks--covering the areas of Silicon Material, Large Area Silicon Sheet, Encapsulation, and Automated Array Assembly--and a Large Scale Procurement Task, an Engineering Task, and an Operations Task. Research findings are discussed, and project planning is outlined.

Not Available

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project quarterly report-2, July 1976--September 1976  

SciTech Connect

The potential for future widespread use of photovoltaic systems for the generation of electric power was the motivation for the establishment, in January 1975, of the Photovoltaic Conversion Program by ERDA's Division of Solar Energy. The Program's activities are planned to develop and to promote the use of photovoltaic systems to such an extent that the private sector will produce and utilize cost-competitive photovoltaic systems. As part of the ERDA Program, the Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project (LCSSAP) was established in January 1975. The project objective is to develop the national capability to produce low-cost, long-life photovoltaic arrays at a rate greater than 500 megawatts per year and a price of less than $500 per kilowatt peak by 1986. The array performance objectives include an efficiency greater than 10% and an operating lifetime in excess of 20 years. The approach is to reduce the cost of solar cell arrays by improving solar array manufacturing technology and by increasing solar array production capacity and quantity. Forty-three contracts have been awarded to date, to industrial firms and university and independent laboratories for experimental work, process development and analysis, technology assessment, and the production of solar-array modules. Approximately 42 kW of state-of-the-art modules have been delivered; contracts have been issued and design development has begun for 130 kW of moderately advanced modules. Efforts of the LCSSA Project are organized into an Analysis and Integration Task, four Technology Development Tasks--covering the areas of Silicon Material, Large Area Silicon Sheet, Encapsulation, and Automated Array Assembly--and a Large Scale Procurement Task, an Engineering Task, and an Operations Task. Research findings are discussed, and project planning is outlined.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Release of impurities from structural defects in polycrystalline silicon solar cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is critical to understand the behavior of metallic impurities in polycrystalline silicon used for solar cells. These impurities significantly increase the minority carrier recombination rate and, in turn, degrade cell performance. Impurity gettering is a commonly used method to remove these impurities from the material, however, past work has suggested that impurity release from structural defects drastically limits the gettering process. Presently, there is only a limited understanding of impurity release from structural defects. In this work, a correlation between structural defects and the location of metal impurities in as-grown material is established and the release of nickel and copper from structural defects in polycrystalline silicon was studied in as-grown material and after sequential thermal treatments which dissolve the impurities into the silicon matrix. Synchrotron-based x-ray fluorescence impurity mapping with spatial resolution of {approx} 1 {micro}m, was used to determine impurity distributions after each thermal treatment.

McHugo, S.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Advanced Light Source; Imaizumi, M. [Toyota Technological Inst., Nagoya (Japan)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

High velocity continuous-flow reactor for the production of solar grade silicon. Second quarterly report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to determine the feasibility of a high volume-high velocity continuous reduction reactor as an economical means for producing solar grade polycrystalline silicon. Preheated streams of hydrogen and bromosilanes are used as feed to the reduction reactor. Nucleation and deposition sites are provided by the additional feed of preheated silicon particles to the reactor. The effort has been directed at studying the chemistry taking place in the reactor, determining the factors which influence its course, and making necessary reactor modifications as dictated by observed results. The initial reactor design has been extensively changed. Energy losses due to gas expansion in the nozzle/mixer section of the reactor dictated these design changes. A ''Tee'' configuration, in which the two preheated gas streams are merged at right angles without any expansion, has replaced the nozzle/mixer. Results of the hydrogen reduction of tetrabromosilane with and without the use of silicon deposition substrate particles are analyzed.

Woerner, L.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Silicon solar cells made by a self-aligned, selective-emitter, plasma-etchback process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A potentially low-cost process for forming and passivating a selective emitter. The process uses a plasma etch of the heavily doped emitter to improve its performance. The grids of the solar cell are used to mask the plasma etch so that only the emitter in the region between the grids is etched, while the region beneath the grids remains heavily doped for low contact resistance. This process is potentially low-cost because it requires no alignment. After the emitter etch, a silicon nitride layer is deposited by plasma-enhanced, chemical vapor deposition, and the solar cell is annealed in a forming gas.

Ruby, Douglas S. (Albuquerque, NM); Schubert, William K. (Albuquerque, NM); Gee, James M. (Albuquerque, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Light Trapping for Thin Silicon Solar Cells by Femtosecond Laser Texturing: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Femtosecond laser texturing is used to create nano- to micron-scale surface roughness that strongly enhances light-trapping in thin crystalline silicon solar cells. Light trapping is crucial for thin solar cells where a single light-pass through the absorber is insufficient to capture the weakly absorbed red and near-infrared photons, especially with an indirect-gap semiconductor absorber layer such as crystalline Si which is less than 20 um thick. We achieve enhancement of the optical absorption from light-trapping that approaches the Yablonovitch limit.

Lee, B. G.; Lin, Y. T.; Sher, M. J.; Mazur, E.; Branz, H. M.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Solar cells utilizing pulsed-energy crystallized microcrystalline/polycrystalline silicon  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing multi-terminal devices such as solar cells wherein a pulsed high energy source is used to melt and crystallize amorphous silicon deposited on a substrate which is intolerant to high processing temperatures, whereby the amorphous silicon is converted into a microcrystalline/polycrystalline phase. Dopant and hydrogenation can be added during the fabrication process which provides for fabrication of extremely planar, ultra shallow contacts which results in reduction of non-current collecting contact volume. The use of the pulsed energy beams results in the ability to fabricate high efficiency microcrystalline/polycrystalline solar cells on the so-called low-temperature, inexpensive plastic substrates which are intolerant to high processing temperatures.

Kaschmitter, J.L.; Sigmon, T.W.

1995-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

199

Multi-Layer Inkjet Printed Contacts for Silicon Solar Cells: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ag, Cu, and Ni metallizations were inkjet printed with near vacuum deposition quality. The approach developed can be easily extended to other conductors such as Pt, Pd, Au, etc. Thick highly conducting lines of Ag and Cu demonstrating good adhesion to glass, Si, and printed circuit board (PCB) have been printed at 100-200 C in air and N2 respectively. Ag grids were inkjet-printed on Si solar cells and fired through the silicon nitride AR layer at 850 C, resulting in 8% cells. Next generation inks, including an ink that etches silicon nitride, have now been developed. Multi-layer inkjet printing of the etching ink followed by Ag ink produced contacts under milder conditions and gave solar cells with efficiencies as high as 12%.

Curtis, C. J.; van hest, M.; Miedaner, A.; Kaydanova, T.; Smith, L.; Ginley, D. S.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Large-area Silicon-Film{trademark} panels and solar cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes AstroPower`s success in improving its material and processing capabilities during the first phase of this 3-year contract through the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) program. Key results include the demonstration of a 14.6%-efficient Silicon-Film{trademark} solar cell. This laboratory result (1.0 cm{sup 2}) provides the direction needed to develop and optimize continuous, in-line production processes. The continuous nature of the Silicon-Film{trademark} sheet fabrication process is being extended into the solar-cell processing sequence. Plans are in place to make the wafer cleaning, gettering, and diffusion steps all continuous during the scope of this program.

Rand, J.A.; Barnett, A.M.; Checchi, J.C. [AstroPower, Inc., Newark, DE (United States)] [and others

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicrystalline silicon solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Solar cells utilizing pulsed-energy crystallized microcrystalline/polycrystalline silicon  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing multi-terminal devices such as solar cells wherein a pulsed high energy source is used to melt and crystallize amorphous silicon deposited on a substrate which is intolerant to high processing temperatures, whereby to amorphous silicon is converted into a microcrystalline/polycrystalline phase. Dopant and hydrogenization can be added during the fabrication process which provides for fabrication of extremely planar, ultra shallow contacts which results in reduction of non-current collecting contact volume. The use of the pulsed energy beams results in the ability to fabricate high efficiency microcrystalline/polycrystalline solar cells on the so-called low-temperature, inexpensive plastic substrates which are intolerant to high processing temperatures.

Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA); Sigmon, Thomas W. (Beaverton, OR)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Methods for manufacturing geometric multi-crystalline cast materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods are provided for casting one or more of a semi-conductor, an oxide, and an intermetallic material. With such methods, a cast body of a geometrically ordered multi-crystalline form of the one or more of a semiconductor, an oxide, and an intermetallic material may be formed that is free or substantially free of radially-distributed impurities and defects and having at least two dimensions that are each at least about 10 cm.

Stoddard, Nathan G

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

203

Microcrystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Final Technical Progress Report, 1 July 2001--31 August 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the research under this subcontract is to explore, identify, evaluate, and develop non-conventional photovoltaic technologies capable of making a breakthrough in the production of low-cost electricity from sunlight. The specific objectives are to (1) develop microwave glow-discharge parameters for the deposition of high-quality microcrystalline silicon (mc-Si:H) thin films at high rate, (2) characterize this microcrystalline material, and (3) fabricate high-efficiency microcrystalline nip solar cells.

Guha, S.; Yang. J.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

17th Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells and Modules: Materials and Processes; Workshop Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Center for Photovoltaics sponsored the 17th Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells & Modules: Materials and Processes, held in Vail, CO, August 5-8, 2007. This meeting provided a forum for an informal exchange of technical and scientific information between international researchers in the photovoltaic and relevant non-photovoltaic fields. The theme of this year's meeting was 'Expanding Technology for a Future Powered by Si Photovoltaics.'

Sopori, B. L.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

GaNPAs Solar Cells that Can Be Lattice-Matched to Silicon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

III-V semiconductors grown on silicon substrates are very attractive for lower-cost, high-efficiency multijunction solar cells, but lattice-mismatched alloys that result in high dislocation densities have been unable to achieve satisfactory performance. GaNxP1-x-yAsy is a direct-gap III-V alloy that can be grown lattice-matched to Si when y= 4.7x - 0.1. We have proposed the use of lattice-matched GaNPAs on silicon for high-efficiency multijunction solar cells. We have grown GaNxP1-x-yAsy on GaP (with a similar lattice constant to silicon) by metal-organic chemical vapor phase epitaxy with direct bandgaps in the range of 1.5 to 2.0 eV. We have demonstrated the performance of single-junction GaNxP1-x-yAsy solar cells grown on GaP substrates and shown improvements in material quality by reducing carbon and hydrogen impurities through optimization of growth conditions. We have achieved quantum efficiencies (QE) in these cells as high as 60% and PL lifetimes as high as 3.0 ns.

Geisz, J. F.; Friedman, D. J.; McMahon, W. E.; Ptak, A. J.; Kibbler, A. E.; Olson, J. M.; Kurtz, S.; Kramer, C.; Young, M.; Duda, A.; Reedy, R. C.; Keyes, B. M.; Dippo, P.; Metzger, W. K.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Low temperature front surface passivation of interdigitated back contact silicon heterojunction solar cell  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The interdigitated back contact silicon heterojunction (IBC-SHJ) solar cell requires a low temperature front surface passivation/anti-reflection structure. Conventional silicon surface passivation using SiO2 or a-SiNx is performed at temperature higher than 400C, which is not suitable for the IBC-SHJ cell. In this paper, we propose a PECVD a-Si:H/a-SiNx:H/a-SiC:H stack structure to passivate the front surface of crystalline silicon at low temperature. The optical properties and passivation quality of this structure are characterized and solar cells using this structure are fabricated. With 2 nm a-Si:H layer, the stack structure exhibits stable passivation with effective minority carrier lifetime higher than 2 ms, and compatible with IBC-SHJ solar cell processing. A critical advantage of this structure is that the SiC allows it to be HF resistant, thus it can be deposited as the first step in the process. This protects the a-Si/c-Si interface and maintains a low surface recombination velocity.

Shu, Brent; Das, Ujjwal; Jani, Omkar; Hegedus, Steve; Birkmire, Robert

2009-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

207

Silicon materials task of the Low-Cost Solar Array Project: Phase IV. Effects of impurities and processing on silicon solar cells. Twenty-first quarterly report, October-December 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program is to define the effects of impurities, various thermochemical processes, and any impurity-process interactions upon the performance of terrestrial solar cells. The results of the study form a basis for silicon producers, wafer manufacturers, and cell fabricators to develop appropriate cost-benefit relationships for the use of less pure, less costly solar grade silicon. Cr is highly mobile in silicon even at temperatures as low as 600/sup 0/C. Contrasting with earlier data for Mo, Ti, and V, Cr concentrations vary from place to place in polycrystalline silicon wafers and the electrically-active Cr concentration in the polysilicon is more than an order of magnitude smaller than would be projected from single crystal impurity data. We hypothesize that Cr diffuses during ingot cooldown after groth, preferentially segregates to grain boundaries and becomes electrically deactivated. Both Al and Au introduce deep levels when grown into silicon crystals. Accelerated aging data from Ni-contaminated silicon imply that no significant impurity-induced cell performance reduction should be expected over a twenty-year device lifetime. Combined electrical bias and thermal stressing of silicon solar cells containing Nb, Fe, Cu, Ti, Cr, and Ag, respectively produces no performance loss after 100 hour exposures up to 225/sup 0/C. Ti and V, but not Mo, can be gettered from polycrystalline silicon by POCl/sub 3/ or HCl at temperatures of 1000 and 1100/sup 0/C.

Hopkins, R.H.; Hanes, M.H.; Davis, J.R.; Rohatgi, A.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Mollenkopf, H.C.

1981-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

208

Phase 2 of the array automated assembly task for the low cost silicon solar array project. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies were conducted on several fundamental aspects of electroless nickel/solder metallization for silicon solar cells. A process proposed by Motorola, which precedes the electroless nickel plating with several steps of palladium plating and heat treatment, was compared directly with single step electroless nickel plating. Work has directed toward answering specific questions concerning the effect of silicon surface oxide on nickel plating, effects of thermal stresses on the metallization, sintering of nickel plated on silicon, and effects of exposure to the plating solution on solar cell characteristics. The Motorola process was compared with simple electroless nickel plating in a series of parallel experiments. Results are presented. (WHK)

Petersen, R.C.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Development of large-area monolithically integrated Silicon-Film photovoltaic modules. Annual subcontract report, 16 November 1991--31 December 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work to develop Silicon-Film{trademark} Product III into a low-cost, stable solar cell for large-scale terrestrial power applications. The Product III structure is a thin (< 100-{mu}m) polycrystalline layer of silicon on a durable, insulating, ceramic substrate. The insulating substrate allows the silicon layer to be isolated and metallized to form a monolithically interconnected array of solar cells. High efficiency is achievable with the use of light trapping and a passivated back surface. The long-term goal for the product is a 1200-cm{sup 2}, 18%-efficient, monolithic array. The short-term objectives are to improve material quality and to fabricate 100 cm{sup 2} monolithically interconnected solar cell arrays. Low minority-carrier diffusion length in the silicon film and series resistance in the interconnected device structure are presently limiting device performance. Material quality is continually improving through reduced impurity contamination. Metallization schemes, such as a solder-dipped interconnection process, have been developed that will allow low-cost production processing and minimize R{sub s} effects. Test data for a nine-cell device (16 cm{sup 2}) indicated a V{sub oc} of 3.72 V. These first-reported monolithically interconnected multicrystalline silicon-on-ceramic devices show low shunt conductance (< 0.1 mA/cm{sup 2}) due to limited conduction through the ceramic and no process-related metallization shunts.

Rand, J.A.; Cotter, J.E.; Ingram, A.E.; Ruffins, T.R.; Shreve, K.P.; Hall, R.B.; Barnett, A.M. [AstroPower, Inc., Newark, DE (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Experimental and Molecular Simulation Studies of Silicon ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Solar Cell Silicon ... On the Segregation of Impurities in Solar Silicon ... Silicon PV Wafers: Correlation of Mechanical Properties and Crack...

211

Production of solar grade (SoG) silicon by refining liquid metallurgical grade (MG) silicon: Annual Report: June 10 1998--October 19, 1999  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pyro-metallurgical refining techniques are being developed for use with molten metallurgical-grade (MG) silicon so that directionally solidified refined MG silicon can be used as solar-grade (SoG) silicon feedstock for photovoltaic applications. The most problematic impurity elements are B and P because of their high segregation coefficients. Refining processes such as evacuation, formation of impurity complexes, oxidation of impurities, and slagging have been effective in removal of impurities from MG silicon. Charge sizes have been scaled up to 60 kg. Impurity analysis of 60-kg charges after refining and directional solidification has shown reduction of most impurities to <1 ppma and B and P to the 10-ppma level. It has been demonstrated that B and P, as well as other impurities, can be reduced from MG silicon. Further reduction of impurities will be necessary for use as SoG silicon. The procedures developed are simple and scaleable to larger charge sizes and carried out in a foundry or MG silicon production plant. Therefore, SoG silicon production using these procedures should be at low cost.

Khattak, C.P.; Joyce, D.B.; Schmid, F.

1999-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

212

Solar-Grade Silicon from Metallurgical-Grade Silicon Via Iodine Chemical Vapor Transport Purification: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This conference paper describes the atmospheric-pressure in an ''open'' reactor, SiI2 transfers from a hot (>1100C) Si source to a cooler (>750C) Si substrate and decomposes easily via 2SiI2 Si+ SiI4 with up to 5?m/min deposition rate. SiI4 returns to cyclically transport more Si. When the source is metallurgical-grade Si, impurities can be effectively removed by three mechanisms: (1) differing free energies of formation in forming silicon and impurity iodides; (2) distillation; and (3) differing standard free energies of formation during deposition. Distillation has been previously reported. Here, we focused on mechanisms (1) and (3). We made feedstock, analyzed the impurity levels, grew Czochralski single crystals, and evaluated crystal and photovoltaic properties. Cell efficiencies of 9.5% were obtained. Incorporating distillation (step 2) should increase this to a viable level.

Ciszek, T. F.; Wang, T. H.; Page, M. R.; Bauer, R. E.; Landry, M. D.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Silicon-on ceramic process. Silicon sheet growth and device developmentt for the Large-Area Silicon Sheet Task of the Low-Cost Solar Array Project. Quarterly report No. 13, October 1-December 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research on the technical and economic feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon by coating inexpensive ceramic substrates with a thin layer of polycrystalline silicon is reported. The coating methods to be developed are directed toward a minimum-cost process for producing solar cells with a terrestrial conversion efficiency of 11 percent or greater. By applying a graphite coating to one face of a ceramic substrate, molten silicon can be caused to wet only that graphite-coated face and produce uniform thin layers of large-grain polycrystalline silicon; thus, only a minimal quantity of silicon is consumed. A variety of ceramic materials have been dip coated with silicon. The investigation has shown that mullite substrates containing an excess of SiO/sub 2/ best match the thermal expansion coefficient of silicon and hence produce the best SOC layers. With such substrates, smooth and uniform silicon layers 25 cm/sup 2/ in area have been achieved with single-crystal grains as large as 4 mm in width and several cm in length. Crystal length is limited by the length of the substrate. The thickness of the coating and the size of the crystalline grains are controlled by the temperature of the melt and the rate at which the substrate is withdrawn from the melt. The solar-cell potential of this SOC sheet silicon is promising. To date, solar cells with areas from 1 to 10 cm/sup 2/ have been fabricated from material with an as-grown surface. Conversion efficiencies of about 10 percent with antireflection (AR) coating have been achieved. Such cells typically have open-circuit voltage and short-circuit current densities of 0.55V and 23 mA/cm/sup 2/, respectively.

Chapman, P W; Zook, J D; Grung, B L; McHenry, K; Schuldt, S B

1980-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Low-cost silicon solar array project. First annual report, January 1975--March 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project (LSSA) was established to greatly reduce the price of solar arrays by the improvement of manufacturing technology, by adaptation of mass production techniques, and by helping achievement of user acceptance. The Project's approach includes the development of technology, its transfer by industry to commercial practice, the evaluation of the economics involved, and the stimulation of market growth. The activities and progress of the LSSA Project during its first year are described in this document which covers all Project activities, with primary emphasis on the technical plans and accomplishments. The development of manufacturing technology is now and will continue to be performed principally by industries and universities. To date, 24 contractors are working on new silicon-refinement processes, silicon-sheet-growth techniques, encapsulants, and automated-assembly studies. Nine more contractors have been selected to perform additional technology investigations and their contracts are being negotiated. Additional contracts will be issued in the future as promising ideas appear. (WDM)

Not Available

1976-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

215

Silicon materials task of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project (Part 2). Fifth quarterly report and summary, 1 October 1976--31 December 1976. [Definition of purity requirements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to develop and define purity requirements for Solar Grade Silicon by exploring the effects of metal impurities on the performance of terrestrial silicon solar cells. The first phase of this effort is now completed. Fifty-two Czochralski ingots and forty-four dendritic web specimens have been grown, chemically analyzed, sampled, and tested for OCD and PCD lifetime and solar cell performance. The results of this study, compiled with much of the experimental data, are intended both as a summary of the work and as a reference for metal impurity effects on silicon solar cells.

Hopkins, R.H.; Davis, J.R.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Blais, P.D.; McHugh, J.P.; Seidensticker, R.G.; McCormick, J.R.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Determination of a definition of solar grade silicon. Second quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar device fabrication and evaluation are the key elements of this contract. Test devices from sixteen experimental crystals have been processed to date. A 12-chip LED, specifically developed for this project, now provides ten times more light than the standard lamp and allows meaningful measurements of the minority carrier lifetime in the substrate before processing. In Czochralski crystal growth thirteen acceptable single crystals resulted from 23 runs. All but one of the originally scheduled float-zone crystals and two second-generation crystals have been grown. All material prepared has been characterized and has been found to deviate considerably from semiconductor silicon standards. (WDM)

Hill, D.E.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Silicon Materials Task of the Low Cost Solar Array Project (Phase II). Ninth quarterly report, October 1--December 31, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It was proposed to investigate and define the effects of various processes, contaminants and process-contaminant interactions in the performance of terrestrial solar cells. The major effort has been in the areas of crystal growth and thermal processing, comparison of impurity effects in low and high resistivity silicon, modeling the behavior of p-type ingots containing Mo and C, and, quantitative analysis of bulk lifetime and junction degradation effects in contaminated solar cells. The lifetime of uncontaminated silicon was mesured as a function of heat treatment temperature (200 to 1200/sup 0/C). The performance of solar cells fabricated on silicon web crystals grown from melts containing about 10/sup 18/cm/sup -3/ of Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Ti and V, respectively, were measured. Deep level spectroscopy of metal-contaminated ingots has been employed to determine the level and density of recombination centers due to Ti, V, Ni, and Cr.

Hopkins, R.H.; Davis, J.R.; Blais, P.D.; Rohatgi, A.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Hanes, M.H.; McCormick, J.R.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Silicon materials task of the Low-Cost Solar Array Project (Phase IV). Effects of impurities and processing on silicon solar cells. Twentieth quarterly report, July-September 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program is to define the effects of impurities, various thermochemical processes and any impurity-process interactions upon the performance of terrestrial solar cells. The results of the study form a basis for silicon producers, wafer manufacturers, and cell fabricators to develop appropriate cost-benefit relationships for the use of less pure, less costly solar grade silicon. Spectral response measurements made on single crystal and polycrystalline silicon solar cells containing specific impurities agreed well with measured cell efficiencies. For polycrystalline cells it is shown that both grain boundaries and metallic impurities reduce carrier lifetime, resulting in reduced red response and reduced cell efficiency. Spectral response and DLTS measurements on chromium-doped polycrystalline silicon cells indicate an interaction between chromium and grain boundaries; the nature of this interaction is not yet understood. Measurements were made to evaluate possible long term effects of copper contamination on solar cell performance. Nine groups of cells, including a baseline cell group, are undergoing electrical/temperature tests to determine whether electric fields play a role in long term cell degradation. A mathematical model for impurity effects in high efficiency solar cells has been developed.

Hopkins, R.H.; Hanes, M.H.; Davis, J.R.; Rohatgi, A.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Mollenkopf, H.C.

1980-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

219

Back surface cell structures for reducing recombination in CZ silicon solar cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mass-produced terrestrial CZ silicon solar cells are currently entering the domain in which bulk diffusion length is comparable to the cell thickness, so that recombination at the back surface can have a significant effect on device performance. Three manufacturable processes that address the problem of back recombination are examined here: boron diffusion from a deposited doped SiO{sub 2}, layer; Al-alloyed layers using screen-printed paste; and use of a collecting n* layer on the back interdigitated with the positive electrode. 104-cm{sup 2} cells fabricated at Siemens Solar Industries using these back surface structures are characterized by current-voltage, spectral response, photoconductivity decay, and SIMS measurements.

King, R.R.; Mitchell, K.W. [Siemens Solar Industries, Camarillo, CA (United States); Gee, J.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

220

Ninth workshop on crystalline silicon solar cell materials and processes: Summary discussion sessions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the panel discussions included with the Ninth Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cell Materials and Processes. The theme for the workshop was ``R and D Challenges and Opportunities in Si Photovoltaics.'' This theme was chosen because it appropriately reflects a host of challenges that the growing production of Si photovoltaics will be facing in the new millennium. The anticipated challenges will arise in developing strategies for cost reduction, increased production, higher throughput per manufacturing line, new sources of low-cost Si, and the introduction of new manufacturing processes for cell production. At the same time, technologies based on CdTe and CIS will come on line posing new competition. With these challenges come new opportunities for Si PV to wean itself from the microelectronics industry, to embark on a more aggressive program in thin-film Si solar cells, and to try new approaches to process monitoring.

Sopori, B.; Tan, T.; Swanson, D.; Rosenblum, M.; Sinton, R.

1999-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicrystalline silicon solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

High deposition rate preparation of amorphous silicon solar cells by rf glow discharge decomposition of disilane  

SciTech Connect

The optical and electrical properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films produced by rf glow discharge decomposition of disilane diluted in helium (Si/sub 2/H/sub 6//He = 1/9) have been studied while systematically varying the film deposition rate. The properties and composition of the films were monitored by measuring the optical band gap, IR vibrational spectrum, dark conductivity, and the photoconductivity as a function of the deposition rate. The photoluminescence of the high deposition rate films gave a peak at 1.33 eV. These films, whose properties are rather similar to those of the conventional a-Si:H films prepared from monosilane, have been used to fabricate nip-type a-Si:H solar cells. At a deposition rate of 11 A/sec, a conversion efficiency of 6.86% was obtained. This high efficiency shows that disilane is applicable for mass production fabrication of a-Si:H solar cells.

Kenne, J.; Ohashi, Y.; Matsushita, T.; Konagai, M.; Takahashi, K.

1984-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

Silicon sheet with molecular beam epitaxy for high efficiency solar cells. Final technical report, March 22, 1982-April 30, 1984  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A two-year program has been carried out for the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in which the UCLA silicon MBE facility has been used to attempt to grow silicon solar cells of high efficiency. MBE ofers the potential of growing complex and arbitrary doping profiles with 10 A depth resolution. It is the only technique taht can readily grow built-in front and back surface fields of any desired depth and value in silicon solar cells, or the more complicated profiles needed for a double junction cascade cell, all in silicon, connected in series by a tunnel junction. Although the dopant control required for such structures has been demonstrated in silicon by UCLA, crystal quality at the p-n junctions is still too poor to allow the other advantages to be exploited. Results from other laboratories indicate that this problem will soon be overcome. A computer analysis of the double cascade all in silicon shows that efficiencies can be raised over that of any single silicon cell by 1 or 2%, and that open circuit voltage of almost twice that of a single cell should be possible.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Field collapse due to band-tail charge in amorphous silicon solar cells  

SciTech Connect

It is common for the fill factor to decrease with increasing illumination intensity in hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells. This is especially critical for thicker solar cells, because the decrease is more severe than in thinner cells. Usually, the fill factor under uniformly absorbed red light changes much more than under strongly absorbed blue light. The cause of this is usually assumed to arise from space charge trapped in deep defect states. The authors model this behavior of solar cells using the Analysis of Microelectronic and Photonic Structures (AMPS) simulation program. The simulation shows that the decrease in fill factor is caused by photogenerated space charge trapped in the band-tail states rather than in defects. This charge screens the applied field, reducing the internal field. Owing to its lower drift mobility, the space charge due to holes exceeds that due to electrons and is the main cause of the field screening. The space charge in midgap states is small compared with that in the tails and can be ignored under normal solar-cell operating conditions. Experimentally, the authors measured the photocapacitance as a means to probe the collapsed field. They also explored the light intensity dependence of photocapacitance and explain the decrease of FF with the increasing light intensity.

Wang, Qi; Crandall, R.S. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Schiff, E.A. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Quarterly report 3, October 1976--December 1976  

SciTech Connect

The potential for future widespread use of photovoltaic systems for the generation of electric power was the motivation for the establishment, in January 1975, of the Photovoltaic Conversion Program by ERDA's Division of Solar Energy. The Program's activities are planned to develop and to promote the use of photovoltaic systems to such an extent that the private sector will produce and utilize cost-competitive photovoltaic systems. As part of the ERDA Program, the Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project (LSSA) was established in January 1975. The activities and progress of the LSSA Project during the months of October, November, and December 1976 are described. The Project objective is to develop the national capability to produce low-cost, long-life photovoltaic arrays at a rate greater than 500 megawatts per year and a price of less than $500 per kilowatt peak by 1986. The array performance goals include an efficiency greater than 10% and an operating lifetime in excess of 20 years. The approach is to reduce the cost of solar cell arrays by improving solar array manufacturing technology and by increasing solar array production capacity and quantity. Forty-seven contracts have been awarded to date, to industrial firms and university and independent laboratories for experimental work, process development and analysis, technology assessment, and the production of solar-array modules. Approximately 58 kW of state-of-the-art modules have been delivered; design development is under way for a second block of moderately advanced modules, and planning for subsequent module procurements has begun.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Quarterly report 3, October 1976--December 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential for future widespread use of photovoltaic systems for the generation of electric power was the motivation for the establishment, in January 1975, of the Photovoltaic Conversion Program by ERDA's Division of Solar Energy. The Program's activities are planned to develop and to promote the use of photovoltaic systems to such an extent that the private sector will produce and utilize cost-competitive photovoltaic systems. As part of the ERDA Program, the Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project (LSSA) was established in January 1975. The activities and progress of the LSSA Project during the months of October, November, and December 1976 are described. The Project objective is to develop the national capability to produce low-cost, long-life photovoltaic arrays at a rate greater than 500 megawatts per year and a price of less than $500 per kilowatt peak by 1986. The array performance goals include an efficiency greater than 10% and an operating lifetime in excess of 20 years. The approach is to reduce the cost of solar cell arrays by improving solar array manufacturing technology and by increasing solar array production capacity and quantity. Forty-seven contracts have been awarded to date, to industrial firms and university and independent laboratories for experimental work, process development and analysis, technology assessment, and the production of solar-array modules. Approximately 58 kW of state-of-the-art modules have been delivered; design development is under way for a second block of moderately advanced modules, and planning for subsequent module procurements has begun.

Not Available

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cell Characterization and Optimization Using In Situ and Ex Situ Spectroscopic Ellipsometry: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We use in-situ and ex-situ spectroscopic ellipsometry to characterize the optical, electronic, and structural properties of individual layers and completed silicon heterojunction devices. The combination of in-situ measurements during thin film deposition with ex-situ measurements of completed devices allows us to understand both the growth dynamics of the materials and the effects of each processing step on material properties. In-situ ellipsometry measurements enable us to map out how the optical properties change with deposition conditions, pointing the way towards reducing the absorption loss and increasing device efficiency. We use the measured optical properties and thickness of the i-, n-, and p-layers in optical device modeling to determine how the material properties affect device performance. Our best solar energy conversion efficiencies are 16.9% for a non-textured, single-sided device with an aluminum back surface field contact on a p-type float zone silicon wafer, and 17.8% for a textured double-sided device on a p-type float zone silicon wafer.

Levi, D.; Iwaniczko, E.; Page, M.; Branz, H.; Wang, T.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Development of manufacturing capability for high-concentration, high-efficiency silicon solar cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents a summary of the major results from a program to develop a manufacturable, high-efficiency silicon concentrator solar cell and a cost-effective manufacturing facility. The program was jointly funded by the Electric Power Research Institute, Sandia National Laboratories through the Concentrator Initiative, and SunPower Corporation. The key achievements of the program include the demonstration of 26%-efficient silicon concentrator solar cells with design-point (20 W/cm{sup 2}) efficiencies over 25%. High-performance front-surface passivations; that were developed to achieve this result were verified to be absolutely stable against degradation by 475 days of field exposure at twice the design concentration. SunPower demonstrated pilot production of more than 1500 of these cells. This cell technology was also applied to pilot production to supply 7000 17.7-cm{sup 2} one-sun cells (3500 yielded wafers) that demonstrated exceptional quality control. The average efficiency of 21.3% for these cells approaches the peak efficiency ever demonstrated for a single small laboratory cell within 2% (absolute). Extensive cost models were developed through this program and calibrated by the pilot-production project. The production levels achieved indicate that SunPower could produce 7-10 MW of concentrator cells per year in the current facility based upon the cell performance demonstrated during the program.

Sinton, R.A.; Verlinden, P.J.; Crane, R.A.; Swanson, R.N. [SunPower Corp., Sunnyvale, CA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Reaching Grid Parity Using BP Solar Crystalline Silicon Technology: A Systems Class Application  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary target market for this program was the residential and commercial PV markets, drawing on BP Solar's premium product and service offerings, brand and marketing strength, and unique routes to market. These two markets were chosen because: (1) in 2005 they represented more than 50% of the overall US PV market; (2) they are the two markets that will likely meet grid parity first; and (3) they are the two market segments in which product development can lead to the added value necessary to generate market growth before reaching grid parity. Federal investment in this program resulted in substantial progress toward the DOE TPP target, providing significant advancements in the following areas: (1) Lower component costs particularly the modules and inverters. (2) Increased availability and lower cost of silicon feedstock. (3) Product specifically developed for residential and commercial applications. (4) Reducing the cost of installation through optimization of the products. (5) Increased value of electricity in mid-term to drive volume increases, via the green grid technology. (6) Large scale manufacture of PV products in the US, generating increased US employment in manufacturing and installation. To achieve these goals BP Solar assembled a team that included suppliers of critical materials, automated equipment developers/manufacturers, inverter and other BOS manufacturers, a utility company, and University research groups. The program addressed all aspects of the crystalline silicon PV business from raw materials (particularly silicon feedstock) through installation of the system on the customers site. By involving the material and equipment vendors, we ensured that supplies of silicon feedstock and other PV specific materials like encapsulation materials (EVA and cover glass) will be available in the quantities required to meet the DOE goals of 5 to 10 GW of installed US PV by 2015 and at the prices necessary for PV systems to reach grid parity in 2015. This final technical report highlights the accomplishments of the BP Solar technical team from 2006 to the end of the project in February 2010. All the main contributors and team members are recognized for this accomplishment and their endeavors are recorded in the twelve main tasks described here.

Cunningham, Daniel W; Wohlgemuth, John; Carlson, David E; Clark, Roger F; Gleaton, Mark; Posbic, John P; Zahler, James

2010-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

229

Reaching Grid Parity Using BP Solar Crystalline Silicon Technology: A Systems Class Application  

SciTech Connect

The primary target market for this program was the residential and commercial PV markets, drawing on BP Solar's premium product and service offerings, brand and marketing strength, and unique routes to market. These two markets were chosen because: (1) in 2005 they represented more than 50% of the overall US PV market; (2) they are the two markets that will likely meet grid parity first; and (3) they are the two market segments in which product development can lead to the added value necessary to generate market growth before reaching grid parity. Federal investment in this program resulted in substantial progress toward the DOE TPP target, providing significant advancements in the following areas: (1) Lower component costs particularly the modules and inverters. (2) Increased availability and lower cost of silicon feedstock. (3) Product specifically developed for residential and commercial applications. (4) Reducing the cost of installation through optimization of the products. (5) Increased value of electricity in mid-term to drive volume increases, via the green grid technology. (6) Large scale manufacture of PV products in the US, generating increased US employment in manufacturing and installation. To achieve these goals BP Solar assembled a team that included suppliers of critical materials, automated equipment developers/manufacturers, inverter and other BOS manufacturers, a utility company, and University research groups. The program addressed all aspects of the crystalline silicon PV business from raw materials (particularly silicon feedstock) through installation of the system on the customers site. By involving the material and equipment vendors, we ensured that supplies of silicon feedstock and other PV specific materials like encapsulation materials (EVA and cover glass) will be available in the quantities required to meet the DOE goals of 5 to 10 GW of installed US PV by 2015 and at the prices necessary for PV systems to reach grid parity in 2015. This final technical report highlights the accomplishments of the BP Solar technical team from 2006 to the end of the project in February 2010. All the main contributors and team members are recognized for this accomplishment and their endeavors are recorded in the twelve main tasks described here.

Cunningham, Daniel W; Wohlgemuth, John; Carlson, David E; Clark, Roger F; Gleaton, Mark; Posbic, John P; Zahler, James

2010-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

230

Delayed fracture of silicon. Silicon sheet growth development for the Large Area Silicon Sheet Task of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bar specimens were cut from ingots of single crystal silicon, and acid-etched prior to testing. Artificial surface flaws were introduced in specimens by indentation with a Knoop hardness tester. The specimens were loaded in four-point bending to 95% of the nominal fracture stress, while keeping the surface area, containing the flaw, wet with test liquids. No evidence of delayed fracture, and, therefore stress corrosion, of single crystal silicon was observed for liquid environments including water, acetone and aqueous solutions of NaCl, NH/sub 4/OH, and HNO/sub 3/, when tested with a flaw parallel to a (110) surface. The fracture toughness was calculated to be K/sub IC/ = 0.591 x 10/sup 6/ N/m/sup 3/2/.

Chen, T.J.; Knapp, W.J.

1978-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

231

Silicon materials task of the low cost solar array project (Phase III). Effects of impurities and processing on silicon solar cells. Phase III summary and seventeenth quarterly report, Volume 2: analysis of impurity behavior  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The object of this phase of the program has been to investigate the effects of various processes, metal contaminants and contaminant-process interactions on the properties of silicon and on the performance of terrestrial silicon solar cells. The study encompassed topics including thermochemical (gettering) treatments, base doping concentration, base doping type (n vs. p), grain boundary-impurity interaction, non-uniformity of impurity distribution, long term effects of impurities, as well as synergic and complexing phenomena. The program approach consists in: (1) the growth of doubly and multiply-doped silicon single crystals containing a baseline boron or phosphorus dopant and specific impurities which produce deep levels in the forbidden band gap; (2) assessment of these crystals by chemical, microstructural, electrical and solar cell tests; (3) correlation of the impurity type and concentration with crystal quality and device performance; and (4) delineation of the role of impurities and processing on subsequent silicon solar cell performance. The overall results reported are based on the assessment of nearly 200 silicon ingots. (WHK)

Hopkins, R.H.; Davis, J.R.; Rohatgi, A.; Campbell, R.B.; Blais, P.D.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Stapleton, R.E.; Mollenkopf, H.C.; McCormick, J.R.

1980-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

232

Inks for Ink Jet Printed Contacts for High Performance Silicon Solar Cells: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA No. CRD-06-199  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The work under the proposed CRADA will be a joint effort by BP Solar and NREL to develop new types of high performance inks for high quality contacts to silicon solar cells. NREL will develop inks that have electronic properties that will allow the formation of high quality ohmic contacts to n- and p-type crystalline silicon, and BP Solar will evaluate these contacts in test contact structures.

Ginley, D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Influence of ITO-silver wire electrode structure on the performance of single-crystal silicon solar cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study aimed to explore the effect of various electrode forms on single-crystal silicon solar cells by changing their front and back electrode structures. The high light penetration depth of the Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) and the high conductivity of ...

Wern-Dare Jheng

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Microscopic Measurements of Electrical Potential in Hydrogenated Nanocrystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report on a direct measurement of electrical potential and field profiles across the n-i-p junction of hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) solar cells, using the nanometer-resolution potential imaging technique of scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM). It was observed that the electric field is nonuniform across the i layer. It is much higher in the p/i region than in the middle and the n/i region, illustrating that the i layer is actually slightly n-type. A measurement on a nc-Si:H cell with a higher oxygen impurity concentration shows that the nonuniformity of the electric field is much more pronounced than in samples having a lower O impurity, indicating that O is an electron donor in nc-Si:H materials. This nonuniform distribution of electric field implies a mixture of diffusion and drift of carrier transport in the nc-Si:H solar cells. The composition and structure of these nc-Si:H cells were further investigated by using secondary-ion mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. The effects of impurity and structural properties on the electrical potential distribution and solar cell performance are discussed.

Jiang, C. S.; Moutinho, H. R.; Reedy, R. C.; Al-Jassim, M. M.; Yan, B.; Yue, G.; Sivec, L.; Yang, J.; Guha, S.; Tong, X.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Development of Commercial Technology for Thin Film Silicon Solar Cells on Glass: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-209  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL has conducted basic research relating to high efficiency, low cost, thin film silicon solar cell design and the method of making solar cells. Two patents have been issued to NREL in the above field. In addition, specific process and metrology tools have been developed by NREL. Applied Optical Sciences Corp. (AOS) has expertise in the manufacture of solar cells and has developed its own unique concentrator technology. AOS wants to complement its solar cell expertise and its concentrator technology by manufacturing flat panel thin film silicon solar cell panels. AOS wants to take NREL's research to the next level, using it to develop commercially viable flat pane, thin film silicon solar cell panels. Such a development in equipment, process, and metrology will likely produce the lowest cost solar cell technology for both commercial and residential use. NREL's fundamental research capability and AOS's technology and industrial background are complementary to achieve this product development.

Sopori, B.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Eighth workshop on crystalline silicon solar cell materials and processes: Extended abstracts and papers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The theme of this workshop is Supporting the Transition to World Class Manufacturing. This workshop provides a forum for an informal exchange of information between researchers in the photovoltaic and non-photovoltaic fields on various aspects of impurities and defects in silicon, their dynamics during device processing, and their application in defect engineering. This interaction helps establish a knowledge base that can be used for improving device fabrication processes to enhance solar-cell performance and reduce cell costs. It also provides an excellent opportunity for researchers from industry and universities to recognize mutual needs for future joint research. The workshop format features invited review presentations, panel discussions, and two poster sessions. The poster sessions create an opportunity for both university and industrial researchers to present their latest results and provide a natural forum for extended discussions and technical exchanges.

NONE

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Silicon solar cell process development, fabrication and analysis. Phase II. Annual report, 1 July 1979-30 June 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar cells were fabricated from EFG (RH) ribbons from multiple dies, silicon on ceramic (SOC), dendritic web, cast silicon by HEM, and semi-continuous CZ from both VARIAN and HAMCO. Baseline and improved solar cells were made from the sheets. Baseline solar cells processed in both Phase I and Phase II, involving cells from EFG, SOC, dendritic web, and HEM, indicated that no significant improvement in silicon sheet quality has been achieved in Phase II. Solar cells from semi-continuous CZ showed cell performance close to the conventional CZ control cells, although the cells from the semi-continuous CZ have shown wider performance range because of variation in crystalline perfection. Generally, process upgrading provided improvement in cell performance, the improvement depending on the process used and the quality of the sheet silicon. Study of the effect of grain size on solar cell performance suggested that the minimum grain size to make solar cells of 10% AMO efficiency is about 500 ..mu..m, which is expected to provide minimum module efficiency of 10% AMI. If other harmful impurities are added in the process of sheet growth, the minimum grain size must be increased. The BSF study showed that the higher the resistivity of the starting substrates, the greater the relative improvement in cell performance, probably because of greater shift in Fermi levels at the back L/H junction (pp+) and also because of the higher initial values of minority carrier diffusion length. This study also suggested that proper control of the back-surface field (BSF) process could minimize the junction shunting problems often introduced by the BSF processing.

Yoo, H.I.; Iles, P.A.; Ho, F.F.; Leung, D.C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array project (LSSA). Quarterly report, April 1976--June 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Activities and progress of the LSSA Project during April, May, and June 1976 are described. This involved the awarding of additional contracts, an evaluation and clarification of plans and working relationships with contractors, the receipt of initial technical results, and an expansion of activity in the evaluation and improvement of the solar cell modules that are included in the Project's first procurement (46 kilowatts). For the most part, the new manufacturing technology is being developed under contract by industries and universities. It includes the consideration of new silicon-refinement processes, silicon sheet-growth techniques, encapsulants, and automated-assembly production. During this report period analytical and experimental accomplishments resulted from day-to-day activities that are the early efforts of a long range plan. Thirty-one contracts have been awarded and two more are being negotiated. Five companies have delivered 20 kilowatts out of a total purchase of 46 kilowatts of ''off-the-shelf'' modules that will be used in ERDA's test and demonstration activities. The same five companies have just been awarded contracts for the purchase of 130 kilowatts of semistandardized modules at an average selling price of $15.50 per watt. (WDM)

Not Available

1976-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

239

High-efficiency one-sun photovoltaic module demonstration using solar-grade CZ silicon. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work was performed jointly by Sandia National Laboratories (Albuquerque, NM) and Siemens Solar Industries (Camarillo, CA) under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA 1248). The work covers the period May 1994 to March 1996. The purpose of the work was to explore the performance potential of commercial, photovoltaic-grade Czochralski (Cz) silicon, and to demonstrate this potential through fabrication of high-efficiency cells and a module. Fabrication of the module was omitted in order to pursue further development of advanced device structures. The work included investigation of response of the material to various fabrication processes, development of advanced cell structures using the commercial material, and investigation of the stability of Cz silicon solar cells. Some important achievements of this work include the following: post-diffusion oxidations were found to be a possible source of material contamination; bulk lifetimes around 75 pts were achieved; efficiencies of 17.6% and 15.7% were achieved for large-area cells using advanced cell structures (back-surface fields and emitter wrap-through); and preliminary investigations into photodegradation in Cz silicon solar cells found that oxygen thermal donors might be involved. Efficiencies around 20% should be possible with commercial, photovoltaic-grade silicon using properly optimized processes and device structures.

Gee, J.M.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Thin-film polycrystalline silicon solar cells. Quarterly report no. 3, October 16, 1980-January 15, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the project are: 1) to develop cell fabrication procedures to further define the maximum capabilities of the conducting oxide/silicon heterojunction solar cells; 2) to optimize the spray fabrication technique for making reproducible high efficiency cells; 3) to assess the stability and the projected lifetime of the cell structure; 4) to identify through appropriate measurements the effects of grain boundaries and intragrain defects on the electronic transport mechanisms in thin-film polycrystalline silicon; and 5) to determine the feasibility of a large-scale fabrication process. Progress is reported.

Ghosh, A. K.; Feng, T.; Eustace, D. J.; Maruska, H. P.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicrystalline silicon solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Deposition, fabrication and analysis of polycrystalline silicon MIS solar cells. Final Report, January 1-December 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discussion of MIS cell fabrication techniques, protovoltaic response data, I-V-T analysis to reveal conduction mechanisms, a detailed computer model, optimum MIS solar cell design, surface state effects, Auger studies, reliability studies and e-beam deposition of thin silicon films are included. The most important features of the work during 1979 include the one pump-down fabrication process, establishing a consistent fabrication sequence, achieving 13% efficiency of 2 cm/sup 2/ area, an evaluation of conduction mechanisms, establishing a detailed computer model and setting up an improved e-beam system to deposit thin silicon films. Details are reported. (WHK)

Anderson, W.A.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Heat exchanger-ingot casting/slicing process. Silicon Sheet Growth Development for the Large Area Silicon Sheet Task of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Eighth quarterly progress report, July 1, 1977--September 30, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Graded crucibles have been developed which are dense enough to avoid penetration of the molten silicon and weak enough to fracture during the cool-down cycle. These crucibles have been used to cast crack-free silicon ingots up to 3.3 kg. Significant progress has been made in the crystallinity of the samples cast. Solar cells made from one of the ingots have yielded over 9% conversion efficiency. The source of silicon carbide in the cast silicon has been identified, both theoretically and experimentally, to be associated with the use of graphite retainers in contact with the crucible. Both 45 ..mu..m and 30 ..mu..m diamonds can be used for efficient slicing of silicon. Wafers sliced with 45 ..mu..m diamond plated wire show a surface roughness of +-0.5 ..mu..m and extent of damage of 3 ..mu..m. In an effort to avoid diamond pullout from impregnated wire it was found that a layer of 0.3 mil thick plating is sufficient to encapsulate the diamonds. A projected cost analysis has shown that the add-on cost of casting and slicing of silicon is $11.57 per square meter.

Schmid, F.; Khattak, C.P.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Large-area Silicon-Film{trademark} panels and solar cells. Phase 2 technical report, January 1996--December 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Silicon-Film{trademark} process is on an accelerated path to large-scale manufacturing. A key element in that development is optimizing the specific geometry of both the Silicon-Film{trademark} sheet and the resulting solar cell. That decision has been influenced by cost factors, engineering concerns, and marketing issues. The geometry investigation has focused first on sheet nominally 15 cm wide. This sheet generated solar cells with areas of 240 cm{sup 2} and 675 cm{sup 2}. Most recently, a new sheet fabrication machine was constructed that produces Silicon-Film{trademark} with a width in excess of 30 cm. Test results have indicated that there is no limit to the width of sheet generated by this process. The new wide material has led to prototype solar cells with areas of 300, 400, and 1,800 cm{sup 2}. Significant advances in solar-cell processing have been developed in support of fabricating large-area devices, including uniform emitter diffusion and anti-reflection coatings.

Rand, J.A.; Barnett, A.M.; Checchi, J.C.; Culik, J.S.; Collins, S.R.; Ford, D.H.; Hall, R.B.; Jackson, E.L.; Kendall, C.L. [AstroPower Inc., Newark, DE (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Quality Characterization of Silicon Bricks using Photoluminescence Imaging and Photoconductive Decay: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Imaging techniques can be applied to multicrystalline silicon solar cells throughout the production process, which includes as early as when the bricks are cut from the cast ingot. Photoluminescence (PL) imaging of the band-to-band radiative recombination is used to characterize silicon quality and defects regions within the brick. PL images of the brick surfaces are compared to minority-carrier lifetimes measured by resonant-coupled photoconductive decay (RCPCD). Photoluminescence images on silicon bricks can be correlated to lifetime measured by photoconductive decay and could be used for high-resolution characterization of material before wafers are cut. The RCPCD technique has shown the longest lifetimes of any of the lifetime measurement techniques we have applied to the bricks. RCPCD benefits from the low-frequency and long-excitation wavelengths used. In addition, RCPCD is a transient technique that directly monitors the decay rate of photoconductivity and does not rely on models or calculations for lifetime. The measured lifetimes over brick surfaces have shown strong correlations to the PL image intensities; therefore, this correlation could then be used to transform the PL image into a high-resolution lifetime map.

Johnston, S.; Yan, F.; Zaunbrecher, K.; Al-Jassim, M.; Sidelkheir, O.; Ounadjela, K.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Large-area silicon-film{sup {trademark}} panels and solar cells. Phase I annual technical report, July 1, 1995--December 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

AstroPower is establishing a low cost manufacturing process for Silicon-Film{trademark} solar cells and panels by taking advantage of the continuous nature of the Silicon-Film{trademark} technology. Under this effort, each step used in Silicon-Film{trademark} panel fabrication is being developed into a continuous/in-line manufacturing process. The following benefits are expected: an accelerated reduction of PV manufacturing cost for installed systems; a foundation for significantly increased production capacity; and a reduction in handling and waste streams. The process development will be based on a new 31-cm wide continuous Silicon-Film{trademark} sheet. Long-term goals include the development of a 24W, 30 cm x 60 cm Silicon-Film{trademark} solar cell and a manufacturing capability for a 384W, 4 inches x 8 inches Silicon-Film{trademark} panel for deployment in utility-scale applications.

Rand, J.A.; Barnett, A.M.; Checchi, J.C.; Culik, J.S. [AstroPower, Inc., Solar Park, Newark, DE (United States)] [and others

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Thin film polycrystalline silicon solar cells. Quarterly report No. 1, January 1, 1979-March 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A theory capable of predicting the performance of polycrystalline silicon solar cells is formulated. It relates grain size to mobility, lifetime, diffusion length, reverse saturation current, open circuit photovoltage and fill factor. Only the diffusion lengths measured by the surface photovoltage technique for grains less than or equal to 5 ..mu..m do not agree with our theory. The reason for this discrepancy is presently being investigated. We conclude that grains greater than or equal to 100 ..mu..m are necessary to achieve efficiencies greater than or equal to 10 percent at AM1 irradiance. The calculations were performed for the case of no grain boundary passivation. At present we are investigating the improvements to be expected from grain boundary passivation. We have determined that the parameters that best fit the available data are as follows: (1) Number of surface states at grain boundaries acting as recombination centers - 1.6 x 10/sup 13//cm/sup 2/. (2) Capture cross section - 2 x 10/sup -16/ cm/sup 2/. (3) Surface recombination velocity at grain boundary - 3.2 x 10/sup 4/ cm/sec. The following types of solar cells are considered in the model: SnO/sub 2//Si Heterostructure, MIS, and p/n junction. In all types of solar cells considered, grain boundary recombination plays a dominant role, especially for small grains. Though the calculations were originally expected to yield only order of magnitude results, they have proven to be accurate for most parameters within 10 percent.

Ghosh, A.K.; Feng, T.; Maruska, H.P.; Fishman, C.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Research on high-efficiency, single-junction, monolithic, thin-film amorphous silicon solar cells: Annual subcontract report, May 1985 - Jul 1986  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study was undertaken of the optoelectronic properties of amorphous silicon-hydrogen thin films deposited from disilane at high deposition rates. The information derived from this study was used to fabricate amorphous silicon solar cells with efficiencies exceeding 7%. The intrinsic layer of these solar cells was deposited at 15 angstroms/second. Material properties investigated included dark conductivity, photoconductivity, minority carrier diffusion length, and density of states. The solar cells properties characterized were absolute quantum yield and simulated global AM 1.5 efficiencies. Investigations were undertaken utilizing optical and infrared spectroscopy to optimize the microstructures of the intrinsic amorphous silicon. That work was sponsored by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority. The information was used to optimize the intrinsic layer of amorphous silicon solar cells, resulting in AM 1.5 efficiencies exceeding 7%.

Wiesmann, H.; Dolan, J.; Fricano, G.; Danginis, V.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Silicon materials task of the low cost solar array project (Phase III). Effect of impurities and processing on silicon solar cells. Phase III summary and seventeenth quarterly report, Volume 1: characterization methods for impurities in silicon and impurity effects data base  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The object of Phase III of the program has been to investigate the effects of various processes, metal contaminants and contaminant-process interactions on the performance of terrestrial silicon solar cells. The study encompassed a variety of tasks including: (1) a detailed examination of thermal processing effects, such as HCl and POCl/sub 3/ gettering on impurity behavior, (2) completion of the data base and modeling for impurities in n-base silicon, (3) extension of the data base on p-type material to include elements likely to be introduced during the production, refining, or crystal growth of silicon, (4) effects on cell performance on anisotropic impurity distributions in large CZ crystals and silicon webs, and (5) a preliminary assessment of the permanence of the impurity effects. Two major topics are treated: methods to measure and evaluate impurity effects in silicon and comprehensive tabulations of data derived during the study. For example, discussions of deep level spectroscopy, detailed dark I-V measurements, recombination lifetime determination, scanned laser photo-response, and conventional solar cell I-V techniques, as well as descriptions of silicon chemical analysis are included. Considerable data are tabulated on the composition, electrical, and solar cell characteristics of impurity-doped silicon.

Hopkins, R.H.; Davis, J.R.; Rohatgi, A.; Campbell, R.B.; Blais, P.D.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Stapleton, R.E.; Mollenkopf, H.C.; McCormick, J.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Silicon-on ceramic process. Silicon sheet growth and device development for the large-area silicon sheet and cell development tasks of the low-cost solar array project. Quarterly report No. 12, April 2, 1979-June 29, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research program is to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon. We plan to do this by coating one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large-grain polycrystalline silicon from the melt. During the quarter, significant progress was demonstrated in several areas: (1) a 10-cm/sup 2/ cell having 9.9 percent conversion efficiency (AM1, AR) was fabricated; (2) the Honeywall-sponsored SCIM coating development succeeded in producing a 225-cm/sup 2/ layer of sheet silicon (18 inches x 2 inches); and (3) 100 ..mu..m-thick coatings at pull speed of 0.15 cm/sec wer$obta9ned, although apoproximately 50 percent of the layer exhibited dendritic growth. Other results and accomplishments during the quarter are reported in detail. (WHK)

Chapman, P.W.; Zook, J.D.; Heaps, J.D.; Grung, B.L.; Koepke, B.; Schuldt, S.B.

1979-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

250

Dip coating process. Silicon sheet growth development for the large-area silicon sheet task of the low-cost silicon solar array project. Quarterly report No. 6, March 22, 1977--June 24, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research program is to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon by coating one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large-grain polycrystalline silicon from the melt. Significant progress was made in silicon on ceramic (SOC) solar cell performance. SOC cells having 1 cm/sup 2/ active areas demonstrated measured conversion efficiencies as high as 7.2 percent. Typical open circuit voltages (V/sub oc/) and short circuit current densities (J/sub sc/) were 0.51 volt and 20 mA/cm/sup 2/ respectively. Since the active surface of these solar cells is a highly reflective ''as-grown'' surface, one can expect improvement in J/sub sc/ after an anti-reflection (AR) coating is applied. It is significant that single-crystal comparison cells, also measured without benefit of an AR coating, had efficiencies in the 8.5 percent range with typical V/sub oc/'s and J/sub sc/'s of 0.54 volt and 23 mA/cm/sup 2/, respectively. Therefore, improvement in cell design and junction diffusion techniques should increase the efficiency of both the SOC and single-crystal cells. During this quarter the dip coating facility was inadvertently contaminated, but has since been restored to a purity level exceeding its original state. With this facility, silicon coatings were grown with a single-crystal seed attached to the substrate. Single-crystal silicon was not forthcoming, but the results were nonetheless encouraging. Several of the carbon coating types tried appear promising, including one which has high purity and can be applied uniformly by swab or airbrush.

Zook, J.D.; Heaps, J.D.; Maciolek, R.B.; Koepke, B.; Butter, C.D.; Schuldt, S.B.

1977-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

251

15th Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells and Modules: Materials and Processes; Extended Abstracts and Papers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Center for Photovoltaics sponsored the 15th Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells & Modules: Materials and Processes, held in Vail, CO, August 7-10, 2005. This meeting provided a forum for an informal exchange of technical and scientific information between international researchers in the photovoltaic and relevant non-photovoltaic fields. The workshop addressed the fundamental properties of PV silicon, new solar cell designs, and advanced solar cell processing techniques. A combination of oral presentations by invited speakers, poster sessions, and discussion sessions reviewed recent advances in crystal growth, new cell designs, new processes and process characterization techniques, and cell fabrication approaches suitable for future manufacturing demands. The theme of this year's meeting was 'Providing the Scientific Basis for Industrial Success.' Specific sessions during the workshop included: Advances in crystal growth and material issues; Impurities and defects in Si; Advanced processing; High-efficiency Si solar cells; Thin Si solar cells; and Cell design for efficiency and reliability module operation. The topic for the Rump Session was ''Si Feedstock: The Show Stopper'' and featured a panel discussion by representatives from various PV companies.

Sopori, B. L.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

High performance hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells made at a high deposition rate by glow discharge of disilane  

SciTech Connect

The deposition rate, electronic and optical properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon films prepared from rf glow discharge decomposition of disilane (Si/sub 2/H/sub 6/) diluted in helium have been measured. These films show excellent electrical and optical properties and, most importantly, a high deposition rate coupled with satisfactory solar cell application was realized for the first time. At a deposition rate of 11 A/s, 5.47% and 6.5% conversion efficiencies were obtained with a first trial of n-i-p type solar cells deposited on SnO/sub 2//ITO glass and metal substrates, respectively.

Ohashi, Y.; Kenne, J.; Konagai, M.; Takahashi, K.

1983-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

253

Carbon, oxygen and their interaction with intrinsic point defects in solar silicon ribbon material. Annual report, September 1982-September 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report first provides some background information on intrinsic point defects, and on carbon and oxygen in silicon in so far as it may be relevant for the efficiency of solar cells fabricated from EFG ribbon material. We discuss the co-precipitation of carbon and oxygen and especially of carbon and silicon self interstitials. A simple model for the electrical activity of carbon-self-interstitial agglomerates is presented. We assume that the self-interstitial content of these agglomerates determines their electrical activity and that both compressive stresses (high self-interstitial content) and tensile stresses (low self-interstitial content) give rise to electrical activity of the agglomerates. The self-interstitial content of these carbon-related agglomerates may be reduced by an appropriate high-temperature treatment and enhanced by a supersaturation of self-interstitials generated during formation of the p-n junction of solar cells. It is suggested that oxygen present in supersaturation in carbon-rich silicon may be induced to form SiO/sub 2/ precipitates by self-interstitials generated during phosphorus diffusion. It is proposed that the SiO/sub 2/-Si interface of the precipates gives rise to a continuum of donor states and that these interface states are responsible for at least part of the light-enhancement effects observed in oxygen containing EFG silicon after phosphorus diffusion.

Goesele, U.; Ast, D.G.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Well-Passivated a-Si:H Back Contacts for Double-Heterojunction Silicon Solar Cells: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have developed hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a Si:H) back contacts to both p- and n-type silicon wafers, and employed them in double-heterojunction solar cells. These contacts are deposited entirely at low temperature (<250 C) and replace the standard diffused or alloyed back-surface-field contacts used in single-heterojunction (front-emitter only) cells. High-quality back contacts require excellent surface passivation, indicated by a low surface recombination velocity of minority-carriers (S) or a high open-circuit voltage (Voc). The back contact must also provide good conduction for majority carriers to the external circuit, as indicated by a high light I-V fill factor. We use hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) to grow a-Si:H layers for both the front emitters and back contacts. Our improved a-Si:H back contacts contribute to our recent achievement of a confirmed 18.2% efficiency in double-heterojunction silicon solar cells on p type textured silicon wafers.

Page, M. R.; Iwaniczko, E.; Xu, Y.; Wang, Q.; Yan, Y.; Roybal, L.; Branz, H. M.; Wang, T. H.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Development of Thin Film Silicon Solar Cell Using Inkjet Printed Silicon and Other Inkjet Processes: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-260  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cost of silicon photovoltaics (Si-PV) can be greatly lowered by developing thin-film crystalline Si solar cells on glass or an equally lower cost substrate. Typically, Si film is deposited by thermal evaporation, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, and sputtering. NREL and Silexos have worked under a CRADA to develop technology to make very low cost solar cells using liquid organic precursors. Typically, cyclopentasilane (CPS) is deposited on a glass substrate and then converted into an a-Si film by UV polymerization followed by low-temperature optical process that crystallizes the amorphous layer. This technique promises to be a very low cost approach for making a Si film.

Sopori, B.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Silicon Materials Task of the Low Cost Solar Array Project (part 2). Third quarterly report, 1 April 1976--30 June 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to develop and define purity requirements for solar grade silicon by exploring the effects of metal impurities on the performance of terrestrial silicon solar cells. During this quarter the growth of all first, second, and nearly all third generation ingots was completed and the growth of fourth generation ingots was initiated. Several boron-doped silicon dendritic web baseline samples were grown as well as one web doped with chromium. Chemical analysis of the ingots is proceeding on schedule, though, as expected, difficulties in assessing the impurity levels of lightly-doped ingots have developed. Lifetime measurements were completed for all 38 ingots grown to date. (WDM)

Hopkins, R.H.; Davis, J.R.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Blais, P.D.; McHugh, J.P.; McCormick, J.R.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Silicon Materials Task of the Low Cost Solar Array Project (part 2). Second quarterly report, 1 January 1976--31 March 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program, Part 2 of the Silicon Materials Task, is to develop and define purity requirements for solar cell grade silicon material by evaluating the effects of metal impurities and impurity concentration on the performance of terrestrial silicon solar cells. During this quarter the growth of all first generation doubly-doped Czochralski ingots was completed (baseline boron + Cr, Mn, Cu, Ni, Fe, Ti, V, Mg, Zn, Al, and Zr), as were 90 percent of the second generation ingots, several third generation ingots, and three multiply-doped (B + Cu/Mn, Cu/Cr, Mn/Cr) ingots. (WDM)

Hopkins, R.H.; Davis, J.R.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Blais, P.D.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Technology Development for High-Efficiency Solar Cells and Modules Using Thin (<80 um) Single-Crystal Silicon Wafers Produced by Epitaxy: June 11, 2011 - April 30, 2013  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Final technical progress report of Crystal Solar subcontract NEU-31-40054-01. The objective of this 18-month program was to demonstrate the viability of high-efficiency thin (less than 80 um) monocrystalline silicon (Si) solar cells and modules with a low-cost epitaxial growth process.

Ravi, T. S.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Low Cost Solar Array Project: large area silicon sheet task. Silicon web process development. Quarterly report, October 1-December 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Silicon dendritic web is a ribbon form of silicon which grows directly from the melt without dies and can produce solar cells with AM1 conversion efficiency over 15%. The primary objective of this program is to develop the technology to produce silicon web at a cost compatible with the national goal of 50 cents per peak watt (70 cents per watt in 1980$) of photovoltaic output power. During the period covered by this report the dominant activities were directed at developing methods to increase the period of simultaneous growth of web crystal with melt replenishment. To further this work, an adjustable thermal trimmer to dynamically balance the thermal loads during melt replenishment was designed and tested. The highlights of the concept and initial tests are described. Further studies of growth geometries to enhance web output rate were performed, the economic analysis for web growth was performed, and a potentially lower cost solid state power supply for the growth furnace was tested. Results are reported. (WHK)

Duncan, C.S.; Seidensticker, R.; Hopkins, R.H.; McHugh, J.P.; Hill, F.E.; Skutch, M.E.; Driggers, J.M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Research on the basic understanding of high efficiency in silicon solar cells. Annual report, 1 December 1982-30 November 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents results of research designed to develop a basic understanding of high-efficiency silicon solar cells and achieve cell efficiencies greater than 17% by employing innovative concepts of material preparation, cell design, and fabrication technology. The research program consisted of a theoretical effort to develop models for very high-efficiency cell designs, experimental verification of the designs, and improved understanding of efficiency-limiting mechanisms such as heavy doping effects and bulk and surface recombination. Research was performed on high-lifetime float-zone silicon, the baseline materials, low-resistivity gallium-doped czochralski silicon, and boron-doped float-zone silicon.

Rohatgi, A.; Rai-Choudhury, P.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicrystalline silicon solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Characterization of Epitaxial Film Silicon Solar Cells Grown on Seeded Display Glass: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report characterizations of epitaxial film crystal silicon (c-Si) solar cells with open-circuit voltages (Voc) above 560 mV. The 2-um absorber cells are grown by low-temperature (<750 degrees C) hot-wire CVD (HWCVD) on Corning EAGLE XG display glass coated with a layer-transferred (LT) Si seed. The high Voc is a result of low-defect epitaxial Si (epi-Si) growth and effective hydrogen passivation of defects. The quality of HWCVD epitaxial growth on seeded glass substrates depends on the crystallographic quality of the seed and the morphology of the epitaxial growth surface. Heterojunction devices consist of glass/c-Si LT seed/ epi n+ Si:P/epi n- Si:P/intrinsic a-Si:H/p+ a-Si:H/ITO. Similar devices grown on electronically 'dead' n+ wafers have given Voc {approx}630 mV and {approx}8% efficiency with no light trapping features. Here we study the effects of the seed surface polish on epi-Si quality, how hydrogenation influences the device character, and the dominant junction transport physics.

Young, D. L.; Grover, S.; Teplin, C.; Stradins, P.; LaSalvia, V.; Chuang, T. K.; Couillard, J. G.; Branz, H. M.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Characterization of Epitaxial Film Silicon Solar Cells Grown on Seeded Display Glass: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report characterizations of epitaxial film crystal silicon (c-Si) solar cells with open-circuit voltages (Voc) above 560 mV. The 2-um absorber cells are grown by low-temperature (EAGLE XG display glass coated with a layer-transferred (LT) Si seed. The high Voc is a result of low-defect epitaxial Si (epi-Si) growth and effective hydrogen passivation of defects. The quality of HWCVD epitaxial growth on seeded glass substrates depends on the crystallographic quality of the seed and the morphology of the epitaxial growth surface. Heterojunction devices consist of glass/c-Si LT seed/ epi n+ Si:P/epi n- Si:P/intrinsic a-Si:H/p+ a-Si:H/ITO. Similar devices grown on electronically 'dead' n+ wafers have given Voc {approx}630 mV and {approx}8% efficiency with no light trapping features. Here we study the effects of the seed surface polish on epi-Si quality, how hydrogenation influences the device character, and the dominant junction transport physics.

Young, D. L.; Grover, S.; Teplin, C.; Stradins, P.; LaSalvia, V.; Chuang, T. K.; Couillard, J. G.; Branz, H. M.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Crystal Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells by Hot-Wire CVD: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) is a promising technique for fabricating Silicon heterojunction (SHJ) solar cells. In this paper we describe our efforts to increase the open circuit voltage (Voc) while improving the efficiency of these devices. On p-type c-Si float-zone wafers, we used a double heterojunction structure with an amorphous n/i contact to the top surface and an i/p contact to the back surface to obtain an open circuit voltage (Voc) of 679 mV in a 0.9 cm2 cell with an independently confirmed efficiency of 19.1%. This is the best reported performance for a cell of this configuration. We also made progress on p-type CZ wafers and achieved 18.7% independently confirmed efficiency with little degradation under prolong illumination. Our best Voc for a p-type SHJ cell is 0.688 V, which is close to the 691 mV we achieved for SHJ cells on n type c-Si wafers.

Wang, Q.; Page, M. R.; Iwaniczko, E.; Xu, Y. Q.; Roybal, L.; Bauer, R.; To, B.; Yuan, H. C.; Duda, A.; Yan, Y. F.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Heat exchanger-ingot casting/slicing process. Silicon sheet growth development for the Large Area Silicon Sheet Task of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Final report, Phase I, November 20, 1975--November 20, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proof of concept for silicon casting by the Heat Exchanger Method has been established. One of the major hurdles of ingot cracking has been eliminated with the development of graded crucibles. Such crucibles are compatible with the casting process in that the integrity of the container is maintained at high temperature; however, during the cool-down cycle the crucible fails, thereby leaving a crack-free boule. The controlled growth, heat-flow and cool-down has yielded silicon with a high degree of single crystallinity. Even when the seed melted out, very large grains formed. Solar cell samples made from cast material have yielded conversion efficiency of over 9% (AMI). Representative characterizations of silicon grown has demonstrated a dislocation density of less than 100/cm/sup 2/ and a minority carrier diffusion length of 31 ..mu..m. Excellent surface quality, i.e., surface smoothness and 3 to 5 ..mu..m surface damage, was achieved by multiple wire slicing with fixed diamond abrasive. To achieve this, the silicon workpiece was non-synchronously rocked to produce a radial cut profile and minimize wire contact length. Wire wander was reduced an order of magnitude over the original results by supporting and guiding the wires with grooved rollers. Commercially available impregnated wires that were used failed due to diamond pull-out. Plating after impregnation or electroplating diamonds directly on the core minimized diamond pull-out and corresponding loss in cutting effectiveness. Tungsten wire was the best core material tested because of its high strength, high Young's modulus, and resistance to hydrogen embrittlement. A lighter and longer blade carriage can be used for slicing with wire. This will allow the blade carriage to be reciprocated more rapidly to increase the surface speed. A projected add-on cost calculation shows that these methods will yield silicon for solar cell applications within ERDA/JPL cost goals.

Schmid, F; Khattak, C P

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

NREL's Black Silicon Increases Solar Cell Efficiency by Reducing Reflected Sunlight (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A fact sheet detailing the R&D 100 Award-winning Black Silicon Nanocatalytic Wet-Chemical Etch technology.

Not Available

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Supporting Information Silicon Nanowire Radial p-n Junction Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The deposition temperature was 450º C with 100 sccm disilane as the silicon source gas, 5 sccm boron trichloride

Yang, Peidong

267

Feasibility of low-cost, high-volume production of silane and pyrolysis of silane to semiconductor-grade silicon. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1978. Low cost silicon solar array project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the silane production program is to determine the feasibility and practicality of high-volume, low-cost production of silane (SiH/sub 4/) as an intermediate for obtaining solar-grade silicon metal. The process is based on the synthesis of SiH/sub 4/ by the catalytic disproportionation of chlorosilanes resulting from the reaction of hydrogen, metallurgical silicon, and silicon tetrachloride. The goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of a silane production cost of under $4.00/kg at a production rate of 1000 MT/year. The objective of the silicon production program is to establish the feasibility and cost of manufacturing semiconductor grade polycrystalline silicon through the pyrolysis of silane. The silane-to-silicon conversion is to be investigated in a fluid bed reactor and in a free space reactor. The process design program is to provide JPL with engineering and economic parameters for an experimental unit sized for 25 metric tons of silicon per year and a product-cost estimate for silicon produced on a scale of 100 metric tons per year. The purpose of the capacitive fluid-bed heating program is to explore the feasibility of using electrical capacitive heating to control the fluidized silicon-bed temperature during the heterogeneous decomposition of silane. In addition, a theoretical fluid-bed silicon deposition model was developed for use in the design of a fluid-bed pyrolysis scheme. Progress is reported in each of these areas. (WHK)

Breneman, W.C.; Farrier, E.G.; Morihara, H.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

16th Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells and Modules: Materials and Processes; Program, Extended Abstracts, and Papers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Center for Photovoltaics sponsored the 16th Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells and Modules: Materials and Processes held August 6-9, 2006 in Denver, Colorado. The workshop addressed the fundamental properties of PV-Si, new solar cell designs, and advanced solar cell processing techniques. It provided a forum for an informal exchange of technical and scientific information between international researchers in the photovoltaic and relevant non-photovoltaic fields. The Workshop Theme was: "Getting more (Watts) for Less ($i)". A combination of oral presentations by invited speakers, poster sessions, and discussion sessions reviewed recent advances in crystal growth, new cell structures, new processes and process characterization techniques, and cell fabrication approaches suitable for future manufacturing demands. The special sessions included: Feedstock Issues: Si Refining and Purification; Metal-impurity Engineering; Thin Film Si; and Diagnostic Techniques.

Sopori, B. L.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Phase I of the Automated Array Assembly Task of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Technical quarterly report No. 2. Motorola report No. 2258/2  

SciTech Connect

Phase I of the Automated Array Assembly Task, LCSSAP, is concerned with a comprehensive assessment of the improvements in existing technology that may be needed in order to develop, by 1985, an industrial capability for low cost, mass production of very durable silicon solar photovoltaic modules and arrays. Both experimental, literature, and theoretical sources are being utilized to evaluate efficient solar cell design criteria and individual and synergistic process effects on the cost effective production and encapsulation of such efficient solar cells.

Coleman, M.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Dip-coating process. Silicon sheet growth development for the large-area silicon sheet task of the low-cost silicon solar array project. Quarterly report No. 7  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research program is to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon by coating one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large-grain polycrystalline silicon from the melt. During the past quarter, significant progress was demonstrated in several areas. Seeded growth of silicon-on-ceramic (SOC) with an EFG ribbon seed was demonstrated. Different types of mullite received from Coors were successfully coated with silicon. A new method of deriving minority carrier diffusion length, L/sub n/, from spectral response measurements was evaluated. ECOMOD cost projections were found to be in good agreement with the interim SAMIS method proposed by JPL. On the less positive side, there was a decrease in cell performance which is believed to be due to an unidentified source of impurities. Also, operation of the new coating system fell behind schedule but is expected to improve in the coming quarter, since construction has now been completed.

Zook, J.D.; Heaps, J.D.; Maciolek, R.B.; Koepke, B.; Butter, C.D.; Schuldt, S.B.

1977-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

271

Washington Silicon Plant Makes Way for Cheaper Solar-and Jobs...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

jobs. | Photo Courtesy of AE Polysilicon Factory Brings Solar Energy Jobs to Former Steel Town Solar films are manufactured at Precision Flow Technologies in Kingston, N.Y.,...

272

Structur? Silicon Deposits Obtained by Electrolysis SiO2 in the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Solar Cell Silicon ... On the Segregation of Impurities in Solar Silicon ... Silicon PV Wafers: Correlation of Mechanical Properties and Crack...

273

Toward a Monolithic Lattice-Matched III-V on Silicon Tandem Solar Cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-junction device consisting of a 1.7-eV GaNPAs junction on a 1.1-eV silicon junction has the theoretical potential to achieve nearly optimal efficiency for a two-junction tandem cell. We have demonstrated some of the key components toward realizing such a cell, including GaNPAs top cells grown on silicon substrates, GaP-based tunnel junctions grown on silicon substrates, and diffused silicon junctions formed during the epitaxial growth of GaNP on silicon. These components have required the development of techniques for the growth of high crystalline quality GaNPAs on silicon by metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy.

Geisz, J. F.; Olson, J. M.; Friedman, D. J.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Method of fabricating conducting oxide-silicon solar cells utilizing electron beam sublimation and deposition of the oxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In preparing tin oxide and indium tin oxide-silicon heterojunction solar cells by electron beam sublimation of the oxide and subsequent deposition thereof on the silicon, the engineering efficiency of the resultant cell is enhanced by depositing the oxide at a predetermined favorable angle of incidence. Typically the angle of incidence is between 40.degree. and 70.degree. and preferably between 55.degree. and 65.degree. when the oxide is tin oxide and between 40.degree. and 70.degree. when the oxide deposited is indium tin oxide. gi The Government of the United States of America has rights in this invention pursuant to Department of Energy Contract No. EY-76-C-03-1283.

Feng, Tom (Morris Plains, NJ); Ghosh, Amal K. (New Providence, NJ)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Application of ITO/Al reflectors for increasing the efficiency of single-crystal silicon solar cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is shown that an increase in the efficiency and manufacturability of single-junction single-crystal silicon photoelectric converters of solar energy requires the use of a back-surface reflector based on conductive transparent indium-tin oxide (ITO) 0.25-2 {mu}m thick. To increase the efficiency and reduce the sensitivity to the angle of light incidence on the photoreceiving surface of multijunction photoelectric converters with vertical diode cells based on single-crystal silicon, ITO/Al reflectors with an ITO layer >1 {mu}m thick along vertical boundaries of diode cells should be fabricated. The experimental study of multijunction photoelectric converters with ITO/Al reflectors at diode cell boundaries shows the necessity of modernizing the used technology of ITO layers to achieve their theoretically calculated thickness.

Kopach, V. R.; Kirichenko, M. V., E-mail: kirichenko_mv@mail.ru; Khrypunov, G. S.; Zaitsev, R. V. [National Technical University, 'Kharkiv Poly technical Institute' (Ukraine)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

A statistical analysis of the effect of PECVD deposition parameters on surface and bulk recombination in silicon solar cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have performed a statistically designed multiparameter experiment using response surface methodology to determine the optimum deposition and anneal conditions for PECVD silicon-oxide and silicon-nitride films on Si solar cells. Our process includes a unique in situ hydrogen plasma treatment to promote bulk defect passivation independently of surface effects. Our goal has been to define a process to optimize cell performance by minimizing recombination while also providing an effective antireflection coating. Our initial results show that excellent emitter-surface passivation, approaching that of the best thermally grown oxides, can be obtained using a single-layer nitride coating whose refractive index is optimized for antireflection purposes. Use of the PECVD-nitride instead of a TiO{sub 2} ARC resulted in an 11% increase in output power.

Ruby, D.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wilbanks, W.L.; Fleddermann, C.B. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

High Volume Manufacturing of Silicon-Film Solar Cells and Modules; Final Subcontract Report, 26 February 2003 - 30 September 2003  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the PV Manufacturing R&D subcontract was to continue to improve AstroPower's technology for manufacturing Silicon-Film* wafers, solar cells, and modules to reduce costs, and increase production yield, throughput, and capacity. As part of the effort, new technology such as the continuous back metallization screen-printing system and the laser scribing system were developed and implemented. Existing processes, such as the silicon nitride antireflection coating system and the fire-through process were optimized. Improvements were made to the statistical process control (SPC) systems of the major manufacturing processes: feedstock preparation, wafer growth, surface etch, diffusion, and the antireflection coating process. These process improvements and improved process control have led to an increase of 5% relative power, and nearly 15% relative improvement in mechanical and visual yield.

Rand, J. A.; Culik, J. S.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Large-Scale PV Module Manufacturing Using Ultra-Thin Polycrystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Final Subcontract Report, 1 April 2002--28 February 2006  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The major objectives of this program were to continue advances of BP Solar polycrystalline silicon manufacturing technology. The Program included work in the following areas. (1) Efforts in the casting area to increase ingot size, improve ingot material quality, and improve handling of silicon feedstock as it is loaded into the casting stations. (2) Developing wire saws to slice 100-..mu..m-thick silicon wafers on 290-..mu..m-centers. (3) Developing equipment for demounting and subsequent handling of very thin silicon wafers. (4) Developing cell processes using 100-..mu..m-thick silicon wafers that produce encapsulated cells with efficiencies of at least 15.4% at an overall yield exceeding 95%. (5) Expanding existing in-line manufacturing data reporting systems to provide active process control. (6) Establishing a 50-MW (annual nominal capacity) green-field Mega-plant factory model template based on this new thin polycrystalline silicon technology. (7) Facilitating an increase in the silicon feedstock industry's production capacity for lower-cost solar-grade silicon feedstock..

Wohlgemuth, J.; Narayanan, M.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Kinetic Model for Gaz-liquid Extraction of Boron from Solar Silicon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, To predict the rate of purification of liquid silicon in liquid/gas ... A New Centrifuge CVD Reactor that will Challenge the Siemens Process.

280

Separation of Si and SiC Microparticles of Solar Grade Silicon ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various methods such as sedimentation, centrifugation, flotation have been ... Boron Removal from Silicon Melts by H2O/H2 Gas Blowing Gas-phase Mass...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicrystalline silicon solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Optimization of transparent and reflecting electrodes for amorphous-silicon solar cells. Final subcontract report, 1 May 1991--30 April 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fluorine-doped zinc oxide was shown to have the lowest absorption loss of any of the known transparent conductors. An apparatus was constructed to deposit textured, transparent, conductive, fluorine-doped zinc oxide layers with uniform thickness over a 10 cm by 10 cm area, using inexpensive, high-productivity atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition. Amorphous silicon solar cells grown on these textured films show very high peak quantum efficiencies (over 90%). However, a significant contact resistance develops at the interface between the amorphous silicon and the zinc oxide. Transparent, conductive gallium-doped zinc oxide films were grown by APCVD at a low enough temperature (260{degree}C) to be deposited on amorphous silicon as a final conductive back contact to solar cells. A quantum-mechanical theory of bonding was developed and applied to some metal oxides; it forms a basis for understanding TCO structures and the stability of their interfaces with silicon.

Gordon, R.G.; Hu, J.; Lacks, D.; Musher, J.; Thornton, J.; Liang, H. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Phase 2 of the automated array assembly task of the Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of investigations and analyses of an advanced process sequence for manufacturing high efficiency solar cells and modules in a cost-effective manner. The entire process sequence is presented and discussed step by step. Emphasis is on process simplicity and minimizing consumed materials. The process sequence incorporates texture etching, plasma processes for damage removal and patterning, ion implantation, low pressure silicon nitride deposition, and plated metal. A reliable module design is presented. Specific process step developments are presnted. Further, a detailed cost analysis has been performed to indicate future areas of fruitful cost reduction effort. Finally, recommendations for advanced investigations are presented.

Coleman, M.G.; Grenon, L.P.; Pastirik, E.M.; Pryor, R.A.; Sparks, T.G.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

18th Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells and Modules: Materials and Processes; Workshop Proceedings, 3-6 August 2008, Vail, Colorado  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Center for Photovoltaics sponsored the 18th Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells & Modules: Materials and Processes, held in Vail, CO, August 3-6, 2008. This meeting provided a forum for an informal exchange of technical and scientific information between international researchers in the photovoltaic and relevant non-photovoltaic fields. The theme of this year's meeting was 'New Directions for Rapidly Growing Silicon Technologies.'

Sopori, B. L.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Silicon materials task of the low cost solar array project(Phase III): effect of impurities and processing on silicon solar cells. Thirteenth quarterly report, October--December 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the program is to define the effects of impurities, various thermochemical processes and any impurity--process interactions on the performance of terrestrial silicon solar cells. Gettering experiments with phosphorus oxychloride gas phase treatments at 950/sup 0/C, 1000/sup 0/C, and 1150/sup 0/C have been completed for two Ti-doped ingots (3 x 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/ and 2.1 x 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -3/ Ti doping levels, respectively), two molybdenum doped ingots (8 x 10/sup 11/ and 4.2 x 10/sup 12/ cm/sup -3/ Mo) and one iron-doped ingot (3 x 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -3/ Fe). First generation Co and W-doped ingots were grown and processed to solar cells. Miniature solar cells and diodes were used to map the characteristics of wafers from a 3 inch diameter ingot doped with Mn or Ti. A model has been developed to describe the behavior of solar cells bearing non-uniform distributions of impurities or defects.

Hopkins, R.H.; Davis, J.R.; Blais, P.D.; Rohatgi, A.; Campbell, R.B.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Mollenkopf, H.C.; McCormick, J.R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Comprehensive Model of Hydrogen Transport into a Solar Cell during Silicon Nitride Processing for Fire-Through Metallization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A mechanism for the transport of H into a Si solar cell during plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) of a hydrogenated silicon nitride (SiN:H) layer and its subsequent fire-through metallization process is described. The PECVD process generates process-induced traps, which ''store'' H at the surface of the solar cell. This stored H is released and diffuses rapidly into the bulk of Si during the high-temperature metallization-firing process. During the ramp-down, the diffused H associates with impurities and defects and passivates them. The firing step partially heals up the surface damage. The proposed model explains a variety of observations and experimental results.

Sopori, B.; Zhang, Y.; Reedy, R.; Jones, K.; Yan, Y.; Al-Jassim, M.; Bathey, B.; Kalejs, J.

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Evaluation of Solar Grade Silicon Produced by the Institute of Physics and Technology: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-211  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL and Solar Power Industries will cooperate to evaluate technology for producing solar grade silicon from industrial waste of the phosphorus industry, as developed by the Institute of Physics and Technology (IPT), Kazakhstan. Evaluation will have a technical component to assess the material quality and a business component to assess the economics of the IPT process. The total amount of silicon produced by IPT is expected to be quite limited (50 kg), so evaluations will need to be done on relatively small quantities (? 5 kg/sample).

Page, M.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Development of processes for the production of solar grade silicon from halides and alkali metals. First quarterly report, October 3-December 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program is directed toward the development of processes involving high temperature reactions of silicon halides with alkali metals for the production of solar grade silicon in volume at low cost. Experiments are being performed to evaluate product separation and collection processes, measure heat release parameters for scaling purposes, determine the effects of reactants and/or products on materials of reactor construction, and make preliminary engineering and economic analyses of a scaled-up process. Samples of the silicon product will be delivered to JPL for evaluation of solar cell performance. During this reporting period the silicon reactor test apparatus reached operational capabilities after a shutdown for two months. Several design improvements were made while returning it to an operational stage. During the initial series of experiments complete product separation of the silicon from the salt was achieved and small samples (approx. = 3 to 40 g) of fused silicon were collected. The test apparatus is now being operated on a routine basis for periods of about twenty minutes. Finally, the initial work began on the engineering and economic analysis for scale-up of the silicon production process.

Dickson, C.R.; Gould, R.K.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

17.1%-Efficient Multi-Scale-Textured Black Silicon Solar Cells without Dielectric Antireflection Coating: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this work we present 17.1%-efficient p-type single crystal Si solar cells with a multi-scale-textured surface and no dielectric antireflection coating. Multi-scale texturing is achieved by a gold-nanoparticle-assisted nanoporous etch after conventional micron scale KOH-based pyramid texturing (pyramid black etching). By incorporating geometric enhancement of antireflection, this multi-scale texturing reduces the nanoporosity depth required to make silicon 'black' compared to nanoporous planar surfaces. As a result, it improves short-wavelength spectral response (blue response), previously one of the major limiting factors in 'black-Si' solar cells. With multi-scale texturing, the spectrum-weighted average reflectance from 350- to 1000-nm wavelength is below 2% with a 100-nm deep nanoporous layer. In comparison, roughly 250-nm deep nanopores are needed to achieve similar reflectance on planar surface. Here, we characterize surface morphology, reflectivity and solar cell performance of the multi-scale textured solar cells.

Toor, F.; Page, M. R.; Branz, H. M.; Yuan, H. C.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

FIRST SOLAR CELLS ON SILICON RIBBONS OBTAINED BY FAST CVD FROM SILANE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.Rauber, Proc. 9th EC Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conf., Freiburg, RFA, 1989 [7] C.R Pinto, J.M.Serra, M.C.Brito, R. Gamboa, J. Maia Alves, A.M. Vallêra, Proc.21st European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference. Vallêra, Proc. 21st European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference and Exhibition, Dresden, 2006, p1064

Lisbon, University of

290

Amorphous Silicon(a-Si: H) Thin Film Based Omnidirectional Control Solar Powered Vehicle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through the paper, our goal is to drive a car with the help of thin film based solar cell. Mechanical and Electrical parts are assembled thereby. The main objective of this project is to collect maximum solar energy from the solar spectrum and use that ... Keywords: Thin film Photovoltaic, Single p-i-n Junction, Steering Mechanism, H-Bridge, Gear motor

Abdullah Moinuddin; Md. Jahidul Hoque; Jony C. Sarker; Akhter Zia

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

SunShot Initiative: Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaics Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

silicon PV cells are the most common solar cells used in commercially available solar panels, representing 87% of world PV cell market sales in 2011. Crystalline silicon...

292

Feasibility of low-cost, high-volume production of silane and pyrolysis of silane to semiconductor-grade silicon. Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Quarterly progress report, January--March 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the silane production program is to determine the feasibility and practicality of high-volume, low-cost production of silane (SiH/sub 4/) as an intermediate for obtaining solar-grade silicon metal. The process is based on the synthesis of SiH/sub 4/ by the catalytic disproportionation of chlorosilanes resulting from the reaction of hydrogen, metallurgical silicon, and silicon tetrachloride. The goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of a silane production cost of under $4.00/kg at a production rate of 1000 MT/year. The objective of the silicon production program is to establish the viability and economic feasibility of manufacturing semiconductor-grade polycrystalline silicon through the pyrolysis of silane. The silane-to-silicon conversion is to be investigated in a fluid bed reactor and a free space reactor. The purpose of the process design program is to provide JPL with engineering and economic parameters for an experimental facility capable of producing 25 metric tons of silicon per year by the pyrolysis of silane gas. An ancillary purpose is to estimate the cost of silicon produced by the same process on a scale of 1000 metric tons per year. The capacitive fluid-bed heating program is exploring the feasibility of utilizing electrical capacitive heating to control the fluidized silicon bed temperature during the heterogeneous decomposition of silane. In addition, a theoretical fluid-bed silicon deposition model is being developed to be used in a design of a fluid-bed pyrolysis process scheme. Research progress is described in detail. (WHK)

Breneman, W.C.; Farrier, E.G.; Morihara, H.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Feasibility of low-cost, high-volume production of silane and pyrolysis of silane to semiconductor-grade silicon. Low cost silicon solar array project. Quarterly progress report for July--September 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project is divided into four tasks: silane production, silicon production, process design, and fluid-bed pyrolysis R and D. The purpose of the silane production task is to determine the feasibility and practicality of high-volume, low-cost production of silane (SiH/sub 4/) as an intermediate for obtaining solar-grade silicon metal. The process is based on the synthesis of SiH/sub 4/ by the catalytic disproportionation of chlorosilanes resulting from the reaction of hydrogen, metallurgical silicon, and silicon tetrachloride. The goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of a silane production cost of under $4.00/kg at a production rate of 1000 MT/year. The objective of the silicon production task is to establish the feasibility and cost of manufacturing semi-conductor grade polycrystalline silicon through the pyrolysis of silane (SiH/sub 4/). The silane-to-silicon conversion is to be investigated in a fluid bed reactor and in a free-space reactor. The process design task is to provide JPL with engineering and economic parameters for an experimental unit sized for 25 metric tons of silicon per year and a product-cost estimate for silicon produced on a scale of 1000 metric tons per year. The purpose of fluid-bed pyrolysis task is to explore the feasibility of using electrical capacitive heating to control the fluidized silicon-bed temperature during the heterogeneous decomposition of silane and to further explore the behavior of a fluid bed. These basic studies will form part of the information necessary to assess technical feasibility of the fluid-bed pyrolysis of silane. Status of these tasks are reported. (WHK)

Breneman, W.C.; Farrier, E.G.; Morihara, H.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

ENHANCED GROWTH RATE AND SILANE UTILIZATION IN AMORPHOUS SILICON AND NANOCRYSTALLINE-SILICON SOLAR CELL DEPOSITION VIA GAS PHASE ADDITIVES  

SciTech Connect

Air Products set out to investigate the impact of additives on the deposition rate of both ???µCSi and ???±Si-H films. One criterion for additives was that they could be used in conventional PECVD processing, which would require sufficient vapor pressure to deliver material to the process chamber at the required flow rates. The flow rate required would depend on the size of the substrate onto which silicon films were being deposited, potentially ranging from 200 mm diameter wafers to the 5.7 m2 glass substrates used in GEN 8.5 flat-panel display tools. In choosing higher-order silanes, both disilane and trisilane had sufficient vapor pressure to withdraw gas at the required flow rates of up to 120 sccm. This report presents results obtained from testing at Air Products?¢???? electronic technology laboratories, located in Allentown, PA, which focused on developing processes on a commercial IC reactor using silane and mixtures of silane plus additives. These processes were deployed to compare deposition rates and film properties with and without additives, with a goal of maximizing the deposition rate while maintaining or improving film properties.

Ridgeway, R.G.; Hegedus, S.S.; Podraza, N.J.

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

295

Crystal Solar Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Crystal Solar Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Crystal Solar Inc. Place Santa Clara, California Zip 94054 Sector Solar Product California-based developer of silicon solar...

296

Development of a process for high capacity arc heater production of silicon for solar arrays. Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project, Silicon Materials Task. Quarterly technical report, October--December 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program has been established at Westinghouse to develop a high temperature silicon production process using existing electric arc heater technology. Silicon tetrachloride and a reductant will be injected into an arc heated mixture of hydrogen and argon. Under these high temperature conditions, a very rapid reaction is expected to occur and proceed essentially to completion, yielding silicon and gaseous sodium chloride. Techniques for high temperature separation and collection of the molten silicon will be developed using standard engineering approaches, and the salt vapor will later be electrolytically separated into its elemental constituents for recycle. While the overall program objective is to produce 1000 metric tons of high quality silicon per year on a continuous basis, Phase I was defined as a comprehensive feasibility and engineering review of the reaction process, and a formulation of the design for a test system to experimentally verify the high temperature reaction. Phase II, currently underway, involves a multi-task approach including (1) a detailed engineering analysis of the entire process; (2) design, fabrication, and assembly of the experimental system; (3) experimental testing of the reduction reaction to produce silicon; and (4) complementary research programs to augment the experimental system design. Progress in each of these areas is detailed.

Reed, W.H.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Nano-texturization for Light Trapping in Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, To address the question whether random or periodic nanostructures lead to better light trapping in solar cells, we design and fabricate three...

298

Advanced laser processing and photoluminescence characterisation of high efficiency silicon solar cells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Many current technologies used in solar cell fabrication have been successfully adapted from the integrated circuits industry. The success of laser processing applications in this (more)

Abbott, Malcolm David

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Rare-earth doped up-converting phosphors for an enhanced silicon solar cell response.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Photovoltaic solar cells can generate electricity directly from sunlight without emitting harmful greenhouse gases. This makes them ideal candidates as large scale future energy producers (more)

Shalav, Avi

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Nanoscale photon management in silicon solar cells Sangmoo Jeong, Shuang Wang, and Yi Cui  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-efficiency and highly stable a-Si:H solar cells deposited at high rate (8 ?/s) with disilane grading process J. Vac. Sci

Cui, Yi

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicrystalline silicon solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Phase I of the Automated Array Assembly Task of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Motorola report No. 2258/1. Technical quarterly report No. 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Phase I of the Automated Array Assembly Task, LCSSAP, is concerned with a comprehensive assessment of the improvements in existing technology that may be needed in order to develop, by 1985, an industrial capability for low cost, mass production of very durable silicon solar photovoltaic modules and arrays. Design criteria for efficient solar cells are discussed, emphasis being given to front metal surface pattern and texture etched front surfaces. A generalized processing matrix, containing competing methods for solar cell manufacturing steps, is outlined. The steps in this processing matrix are discussed and characterized according to immediate and potential usefulness. Representative steps have been chosen for empirical evaluation.

Coleman, M.

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Amorphous silicon solar cells. Quarterly report No. 1, 1 October 1980-31 December 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on the following: theoretical modeling, deposition and doping studies, experimental methods for the characterization of a-Si:H, formation of solar-cell structures, theoretical and experimental evaluation of solar-cell parameters, and stability studies. (MHR)

Carlson, D.E.; Balberg, I.; Crandall, R.S.; Dresner, J.; Goldstein, B.; Hanak, J.J.; Schade, H.E.; Staebler, D.L.; Weakliem, H.A.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Producing Solar Cells By Surface Preparation For Accelerated Nucleation Of Microcrystalline Silicon On Heterogeneous Substrates.  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Attractive multi-junction solar cells and single junction solar cells with excellent conversion efficiency can be produced with a microcrystalline tunnel junction, microcrystalline recombination junction or one or more microcrystalline doped layers by special plasma deposition processes which includes plasma etching with only hydrogen or other specified etchants to enhance microcrystalline growth followed by microcrystalline. nucleation with a doped hydrogen-diluted feedstock.

Yang, Liyou (Plainsboro, NJ); Chen, Liangfan (Langhorne, PA)

1998-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

304

Silicon-on ceramic process: silicon sheet growth and device development for the large-area silicon sheet task of the Low-Cost Solar Array Project. Quarterly report NO. 15, April 1, 1980-June 30, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to investigate the technical feasibility of producing solar-cell-quality sheet silicon which could meet the DOE cost goals. The Honeywell approach is to coat one surface of carbonized ceramic substrates with a thin layer of large-grain polycrystalline silicon from the melt. Results and accomplishments which occurred during the quarter can be summarized as follows: (1) two major problems associated with SCIM-coating wide (10-cm) substrates were identified and solved; (2) the longitudinal temperature profile in SCIM-II has been improved to prevent substrate warping, buckling, and cracking; (3) the transverse temperature profile in SCIM II has been improved to produce more uniform coatings; (4) a strategy to eliminate effects of thermal stress has been developed; (5) the best SOC cell has a total-area conversion efficiency of 10.5% (AM1, AR), for a cell area of 5 cm/sup 2/; (6) a number of experiments are being investigated for improving cell efficiency; (7) for the slow-cooldown experiment, the average efficiency of 29 AR-coated cells was 9.9%, with a standard deviation of 0.3%; (8) encouraging results were obtained on SOC material that had been treated in a hydrogen plasma at Sandia; and (9) thermal modeling has proven to be beneficial in designing modifications of SCIM II.

Whitehead, A B; Zook, J D; Grung, B L; McHenry, K; Schuldt, S B; Chapman, P W

1980-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

305

The Value Proposition for High Lifetime (p-type) and Thin Silicon Materials in Solar PV Applications: Preprint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proposition for High Proposition for High Lifetime (p-type) and Thin Silicon Materials in Solar PV Applications Preprint Alan Goodrich, Michael Woodhouse, and Peter Hacke Presented at the 2012 IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference Austin, Texas June 3-8, 2012 Conference Paper NREL/CP-6A20-55477 June 2012 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

306

Optimization of transparent and reflecting electrodes for amorphous silicon solar cells. Annual subcontract report, April 1, 1994--March 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Transparent and reflecting electrodes are important parts of the structure of amorphous silicon solar cells. We report improved methods for depositing zinc oxide, deposition of tin nitride as a potential reflection-enhancing diffusion barrier between the a-Si and back metal electrodes. Highly conductive and transparent fluorine-doped zinc oxide was successfully produced on small areas by atmospheric pressure CVD from a less hazardous zinc precursor, zinc acetylacetonate. The optical properties measured for tin nitride showed that the back-reflection would be decreased if tin nitride were used instead of zinc oxide as a barrier layer over silver on aluminum. Niobium-doped titanium dioxide was produced with high enough electrical conductivity so that normal voltages and fill factors were obtained for a-Si cells made on it.

Gordon, R.G. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Back-side hydrogenation technique for defect passivation in silicon solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A two-step back-side hydrogenation process includes the steps of first bombarding the back side of the silicon substrate with hydrogen ions with intensities and for a time sufficient to implant enough hydrogen atoms into the silicon substrate to potentially passivate substantially all of the defects and impurities in the silicon substrate, and then illuminating the silicon substrate with electromagnetic radiation to activate the implanted hydrogen, so that it can passivate the defects and impurities in the substrate. The illumination step also annihilates the hydrogen-induced defects. The illumination step is carried out according to a two-stage illumination schedule, the first or low-power stage of which subjects the substrate to electromagnetic radiation that has sufficient intensity to activate the implanted hydrogen, yet not drive the hydrogen from the substrate. The second or high-power illumination stage subjects the substrate to higher intensity electromagnetic radiation, which is sufficient to annihilate the hydrogen-induced defects and sinter/alloy the metal contacts.

Sopori, Bhushan L. (Denver, CO)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Back-side hydrogenation technique for defect passivation in silicon solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A two-step back-side hydrogenation process includes the steps of first bombarding the back side of the silicon substrate with hydrogen ions with intensities and for a time sufficient to implant enough hydrogen atoms into the silicon substrate to potentially passivate substantially all of the defects and impurities in the silicon substrate, and then illuminating the silicon substrate with electromagnetic radiation to activate the implanted hydrogen, so that it can passivate the defects and impurities in the substrate. The illumination step also annihilates the hydrogen-induced defects. The illumination step is carried out according to a two-stage illumination schedule, the first or low-power stage of which subjects the substrate to electromagnetic radiation that has sufficient intensity to activate the implanted hydrogen, yet not drive the hydrogen from the substrate. The second or high-power illumination stage subjects the substrate to higher intensity electromagnetic radiation, which is sufficient to annihilate the hydrogen-induced defects and sinter/alloy the metal contacts. 3 figures.

Sopori, B.L.

1994-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

309

Epitaxial Crystal Silicon Absorber Layers and Solar Cells Grown at 1.8 Microns per Minute: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have grown device-quality epitaxial silicon thin films at growth rates up to 1.8 ?m/min, using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition from silane at substrate temperatures below 750 degrees C. At these rates, which are more than 30 times faster than those used by the amorphous and nanocrystalline Si industry, capital costs for large-scale solar cell production would be dramatically reduced, even for cell absorber layers up to 10 ?m thick. We achieved high growth rates by optimizing the three key parameters: silane flow, depletion, and filament geometry, based on our model developed earlier. Hydrogen coverage of the filament surface likely limits silane decomposition and growth rate at high system pressures. No considerable deterioration in PV device performance is observed when grown at high rate, provided that the epitaxial growth is initiated at low rate. A simple mesa device structure (wafer/epi Si/a-Si(i)/a-Si:H(p)/ITO) with a 2.3 um epitaxial silicon absorber layer was grown at 700 nm/min. The finished device had an open-circuit voltage of 0.424 V without hydrogenation treatment.

Bobela, D. C.; Teplin, C. W.; Young, D. L.; Branz, H. M.; Stradins, P.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

New Approaches for Passivation of Crystalline and Amorphous Silicon: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-351  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New approaches of passivating crystalline, multicrystalline, and amorphous silicon will be explored. These will include the use of aqueous solution of KCN and a proprietary composition formulated by Mallinckrodt Baker, Inc. The surface passivation will be compared with that provided by an iodine-ethanol solution, and bulk passivation will be compared with that of H-passivation obtained by silicon nitride, in a fire-through process.

Sopori, B.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

High efficiency thin film silicon solar cells with novel light trapping : principle, design and processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One major efficiency limiting factor in thin film solar cells is weak absorption of long wavelength photons due to the limited optical path length imposed by the thin film thickness. This is especially severe in Si because ...

Zeng, Lirong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

11th Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cell Materials and Processes, Extended Abstracts and Papers, 19-22 August 2001, Estes Park, Colorado  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 11th Workshop will provide a forum for an informal exchange of technical and scientific information between international researchers in the photovoltaic and non-photovoltaic fields. Discussions will include the various aspects of impurities and defects in silicon--their properties, the dynamics during device processing, and their application for developing low-cost processes for manufacturing high-efficiency silicon solar cells. Sessions and panel discussions will review impurities and defects in crystalline-silicon PV, advanced cell structures, new processes and process characterization techniques, and future manufacturing demands. The workshop will emphasize some of the promising new technologies in Si solar cell fabrication that can lower PV energy costs and meet the throughput demands of the future. The three-day workshop will consist of presentations by invited speakers, followed by discussion sessions. Topics to be discussed are: Si Mechanical properties and Wafer Handling, Advanced Topics in PV Fundamentals, Gettering and Passivation, Impurities and Defects, Advanced Emitters, Crystalline Silicon Growth, and Solar Cell Processing. The workshop will also include presentations by NREL subcontractors who will review the highlights of their research during the current subcontract period. In addition, there will be two poster sessions presenting the latest research and development results. Some presentations will address recent technologies in the microelectronics field that may have a direct bearing on PV.

Sopori, B.

2001-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

313

Excellent Passivation and Low Reflectivity Al2O3/TiO2 Bilayer Coatings for n-Wafer Silicon Solar Cells: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A bilayer coating of Al2O3 and TiO2 is used to simultaneously achieve excellent passivation and low reflectivity on p-type silicon. This coating is targeted for achieving high efficiency n-wafer Si solar cells, where both passivation and anti-reflection (AR) are needed at the front-side p-type emitter. It could also be valuable for front-side passivation and AR of rear-emitter and interdigitated back contact p-wafer cells. We achieve high minority carrier lifetimes {approx}1 ms, as well as a nearly 2% decrease in absolute reflectivity, as compared to a standard silicon nitride AR coating.

Lee, B. G.; Skarp, J.; Malinen, V.; Li, S.; Choi, S.; Branz, H. M.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Experimental optimization of an anisotropic etching process for random texturization of silicon solar cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A multifactor experimental investigation of silicon surface texturing was conducted in Sandia's Photovoltaic Device Fabrication Laboratory using aqueous potassium-hydroxide (KOH) solutions with isopropyl alcohol (IPA) added as a complexing agent. Czochralski, magnetic-Czochralski, and float-zone silicon wafers of different resistivities with both polished and lapped surfaces were included in the experiment. Process variables considered were solution temperature, time in solution, degree of mechanical mixing, KOH concentration, and IPA concentration. Using hemispherical reflectance as the primary gauge of success, process variables were identified that resulted in an effective surface texture with reflectance less than 12% prior to anti-reflection coating. Of particular interest was a low temperature (70 {degrees}C) process with less than 2% concentration of both KOH and IPA and wide process variable tolerances. 6 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

King, D.L.; Buck, M.E.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Efficient Crystalline Si Solar Cell with Amorphous/Crystalline Silicon Heterojunction as Back Contact: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We study an amorphous/crystalline silicon heterojunction (Si HJ) as a back contact in industrial standard p-type five-inch pseudo-square wafer to replace Al back surface field (BSF) contact. The best efficiency in this study is over 17% with open-circuit (Voc) of 0.623 V, which is very similar to the control cell with Al BSF. We found that Voc has not been improved with the heterojunction structure in the back. The typical minority carrier lifetime of these wafers is on the order of 10 us. We also found that the doping levels of p-layer affect the FF due to conductivity and band gap shifting, and an optimized layer is identified. We conclude that an amorphous/crystalline silicon heterojunction can be a very promising structure to replace Al BSF back contact.

Nemeth, B.; Wang, Q.; Shan, W.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Lifetime and diffusion length measurements on silicon material and solar cells. [Intentionally doped with impurities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental methods were evaluated for the determination of lifetime and diffusion length in silicon intentionally doped with potentially lifetime-degrading impurities found in metallurgical grade silicon, impurities which may be residual in low-cost silicon intended for use in terrestrial flat-plat arrays. Results obtained by these methods were compared for mutual consistency. Lifetime measurements were made using a steady-state photoconductivity method, which was compared with a photoconductivity decay technique. Diffusion length determinations were made using short-circuit current measurements under penetrating illumination. This method was compared with a direct measurement of diffusion length using a scanning electron microscope. Mutual consistency among all experimental methods was verified, but steady-state photoconductivity was found preferable to photoconductivity decay at short lifetimes and in the presence of traps. The effects of a number of impurities on lifetime in bulk material, and on diffusion length in cells fabricated from this material, were determined. Results were compared with those obtained by others on the same material and devices using different techniques. General agreement was found in terms of the hierarchy of impurities which degrade the lifetime.

Othmer, S.; Chen, S.C.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Slicing of silicon into sheet material. Silicon sheet growth development for the large area silicon sheet task of the low cost silicon solar array project. Second quarterly report, March 22, 1976--June 20, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Slicing tests of silicon to show the dependence of cutting rate on operating conditions are complete. Cutting rate is linear with cutting force per blade and bladehead speed, and inversely proportional to kerf width (loss) and kerf length. The dimensionless parameter of cutting efficiency is a good measure of the performance of a multiblade slicing system. Low contact pressure between the blades and the silicon workpiece result in increased wafer accuracy and cutting efficiency. Blade wear seems to be stable for all slicing tests, and is slightly lower with low cutting pressure. (WDM)

Holden, S.C.

1976-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

318

Effect of Oxygen and Carbon on Lifetime in Cz Silicon Pulled from ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... recycling feedstock of silicon for Photovoltic (PV) application is investigated. ... Challenges in the Solar Grade Silicon Production through Metallurgical...

319

Structure of Silicon-Based Thin Film Solar Cell Materials: Annual Technical Progress Report, 1 April 2002--31 August 2003  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this research is to achieve a better understanding to improve materials used as the intrinsic layers of amorphous and microcrystalline silicon-based solar cells. Fundamental structural properties will be investigated on atomic and nano-scales. A powerful combination of techniques will be used: analytical high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), including special associated spectroscopic methods, small-angle scattering techniques (SAXS, ASAXS, SANS), and conventional wide-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD).

Williamson, D. L.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

High-efficiency silicon solar cells for use with a prismatic cover at 160 suns  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For this program, Solarex developed a process sequence that could be used in a manufacturing environment to produce high-efficiency silicon concentrator cells. The cells had large gridlines to minimize series resistance losses and a prismatic cover to minimize shadowing. The front surface of the cell was textured to improve absorption of light and passivated to reduce front-surface recombination. Two separate diffusions steps were used: a deep emitter with a light surface concentration and a heavy diffusion to reduce recombination under the front contacts. Cell efficiencies as high as 22.25% were demonstrated at 75 suns and over 21.5% at 150 suns air mass 1.5 illumination. 16 refs., 31 figs., 10 tabs.

Silver, J.R.; Patel, B. (Solarex Corp., Rockville, MD (USA))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicrystalline silicon solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Phase 2 of the automated array assembly task of the low-cost silicon solar array project. Final report, 1 April 1979-31 March 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several specific processing steps, as part of a total process sequence for manufacturing silicon solar cells, were studied during this contract. Ion implantation has been identified as the Motorola preferred process step for impurity doping. Unanalyzed beam ion implantation has been shown to have major cost advantages over analyzed beam implantation. Further, high quality cells have been fabricated using a high current unanalyzed beam. Mechanically masked plasma patterning of silicon nitride has been shown to be capable of forming fine lines on silicon surfaces with spacings between mask and substrate as great as 250 ..mu..m (10 mils). Extensive work was performed on advances in plated metallization. The need for the thick electroless palladium layer has been eliminated. Further, copper has been successfully utilized as a conductor layer, utilizing nickel as a barrier to copper diffusion into the silicon. Plasma etching of silicon for texturing and saw damage removal has been shown technically feasible, but not cost-effective compared to wet chemical etching techniques.

Coleman, M.G.; Pryor, R.A.; Sparks, T.G.; Legge, R.M.; Saltzman, D.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

High-Efficiency Amorphous Silicon and Nanocrystalline Silicon Based Solar Cells and Modules: Annual Technical Progress Report, 30 January 2006 - 29 January 29, 2007  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

United Solar used a-Si:H/a-SiGe:H/a-SiGe:H in two manufacturing plants and improved solar efficiency and reduced manufacturing cost by new deposition methods, optimized deposition parameters, and new materials and cell structures.

Guha, S.; Yang, J.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Development of low cost contacts to silicon solar cells. Final report, 15 October 1978-30 April 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary of work done on the development of a copper based contact system for silicon solar cells is presented. The work has proceeded in three phases: (1) Development of a copper based contact system using plated Pd-Cr-Cu. Good cells were made but cells degraded under low temperature (300/sup 0/C) heat treatments. (2) The degradation in Phase I was identified as copper migration into the cells junction region. A paper study was conducted to find a proper barrier to the copper migration problem. Nickel was identified as the best candidate barrier and this was verified in a heat treatment study using evaporated metal layers. (3) An electroless nickel solution was substituted for the electroless chrominum solution in the original process. Efforts were made to replace the palladium bath with an appropriate nickel layer, but these were unsuccessful. 150 cells using the Pd-Ni-Cu contact system were delivered to JPL. Also a cost study was made on the plating process to assess the chance of reaching 5 cents/watt.

Tanner, D.P.; Iles, P.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Development of high-efficiency solar cells on silicon web. First quarterly progress report, April 20-July 15, 1984  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The major objective of the work reported is to improve web base material with a goal toward obtaining solar cell efficiencies in excess of 18% (AM1). The program consists of the investigation of carrier loss mechanisms in web silicon, development of techniques to reduce carrier recombination in web, and web cell fabrication using effective surface passivation. Web surfaces have been bevelled with the intention of measuring the electrical activity of the twin plane. Web crystals have been intentionally contaminated with vanadium and titanium to examine the twin-plane-assisted internal gettering by DLTS. Model calculations were done to see the effect of twin-plane activity on V/sub oc/ as a function of resistivity of the web material. Experiments were initiated to study the effect of heat treatment and gettering on the minority carrier diffusion length in webs. Fabrication of high-efficiency web cells using several web crystals was initiated. These cells will include surface passivation and double-layer antireflection coating. (LEW)

Rohatgi, A.; Meier, D.L.; Campbell, R.B.; Rai-Choudhury, P.

1984-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

325

Solar  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) leads a large network of researchers and other partners to deliver innovative solar photovoltaic and concentrating solar power technologies that will make solar...

326

Bioinspired Molecular Co-Catalysts Bonded to a Silicon Photocathode for Solar Hydrogen Evolution  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The production of fuels from sunlight represents one of the main challenges in the development of a sustainable energy system. Hydrogen is the simplest fuel to produce and although platinum and other noble metals are efficient catalysts for photoelectrochemical hydrogen evolution earth-abundant alternatives are needed for large-scale use. We show that bioinspired molecular clusters based on molybdenum and sulphur evolve hydrogen at rates comparable to that of platinum. The incomplete cubane-like clusters (Mo{sub 3}S{sub 4}) efficiently catalyse the evolution of hydrogen when coupled to a p-type Si semiconductor that harvests red photons in the solar spectrum. The current densities at the reversible potential match the requirement of a photoelectrochemical hydrogen production system with a solar-to-hydrogen efficiency in excess of 10% (ref. 16). The experimental observations are supported by density functional theory calculations of the Mo{sub 3}S{sub 4} clusters adsorbed on the hydrogen-terminated Si(100) surface, providing insights into the nature of the active site.

Hou, Yidong

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

327

Slicing of silicon into sheet material. Silicon sheet growth development for the large area silicon sheet task of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Fifth quarterly report, March 21, 1977--May 27, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The multiblade slurry technique capable of slicing 10 cm ingot into wafers 0.25 mm thick with only 0.20 mm kerf loss and 98% yield has been demonstrated. The total silicon requirement represents an ingot to sheet conversion of 0.95 m/sup 2//kg. Full production slicing tests have demonstrated the cost of MS slicing to contribute $40 to $50/m/sup 2/, with ''best effort'' estimates for today's configuration to be $30 to $35/m/sup 2/. By reducing material cost, and increasing the specific capacity of a saw to slice 900 wafers simultaneously, the long-term cost of MS slicing is estimated to be less than $10/m/sup 2/. The conversion of ingot to sheet is shown to be the most valuable contribution of slicing technology. At today's ingot costs, and with the thin wafer, low kerf loss slicing techniques demonstrated, the silicon material represents 5 to 10 times the cost of the wafering process in finished silicon wafers. Increasing the number of blades used in MS slicing from 100 to 150 to 225 to 300 has resulted in a reduction of yield to 33 to 70% for thin slicing, or an increase in wafer thickness to 0.30 mm slices. The limitation is intrinsic misalignment of multiple blades. A technique to correct this condition is presented and forms a key element in low cost slicing. Analysis of blade material accuracy shows that straightness and flatness specifications can be relaxed. The success of the blade alignment technique will allow lower thickness accuracy requirements. The goal is to use blade materials 50% as costly as used presently, reducing the cost of this expendible material.

Holden, S.C.; Fleming, J.R.

1977-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

328

DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program TPP Final Report - A Value Chain Partnership to Accelerate U.S. PV Industry Growth, GE Global Research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

General Electrics (GE) DOE Solar Energy Technologies TPP program encompassesd development in critical areas of the photovoltaic value chain that affected the LCOE for systems in the U.S. This was a complete view across the value chain, from materials to rooftops, to identify opportunities for cost reductions in order to realize the Department of Energys cost targets for 2010 and 2015. GE identified a number of strategic partners with proven leadership in their respective technology areas to accelerate along the path to commercialization. GE targeted both residential and commercial rooftop scale systems. To achieve these goals, General Electric and its partners investigated three photovoltaic pathways that included bifacial high-efficiency silicon cells and modules, low-cost multicrystalline silicon cells and modules and flexible thin film modules. In addition to these technologies, the balance of system for residential and commercial installations were also investigated. Innovative system installation strategies were pursed as an additional avenue for cost reduction.

Todd Tolliver; Danielle Merfeld; Charles Korman; James Rand; Tom McNulty; Neil Johnson; Dennis Coyle

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

329

Solar Power Industries SPI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Power Industries SPI Solar Power Industries SPI Jump to: navigation, search Name Solar Power Industries (SPI) Place Belle Vernon, Pennsylvania Zip 15012 Product US-based manufacturer of mono and multicrystalline PV cells, modules and systems. References Solar Power Industries (SPI)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Solar Power Industries (SPI) is a company located in Belle Vernon, Pennsylvania . References ↑ "Solar Power Industries (SPI)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Solar_Power_Industries_SPI&oldid=351318" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version

330

Efficiency Improvement of Crystalline Solar Cells: Final Subcontract Report; October 2001--December 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The approach in this subcontract was to use unique analytical tools available at Berkeley to perform systematic fundamental physical studies of the distribution and chemical state of metal clusters in a variety of multicrystalline silicon materials. Two analytical techniques were essential for the success of this project. The total metal concentration in the areas of multicrystalline silicon with high and low lifetime was determined by neutron activation analysis, a technique that involves irradiation of a sample with neutrons in a nuclear reactor and analysis of its residual radioactivity. The distribution and chemical state of metal clusters was characterized by synchrotron radiation-based X-ray microscopes available at the Advanced Light Source (Beamlines 10.3.1 and 10.3.2) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Advanced Photon Source (Beamlines 2-ID-D and 20-ID-B) at Argonne National Laboratory.

Weber, E. R.

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Scatec Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Scatec Solar Jump to: navigation, search Name Scatec Solar Place Norway Product Norwegian PV system integrator with a parent, Norsun, that manufactures monocrystalline silicon...

332

Large scale production task: low cost silicon solar array project. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several design concepts were evaluated and compared with respect to potential for low cost and automation, protection against weathering, potential for array efficiency as a function of weight and area, potential for design flexibility and exposure to electrical breakdown or leakage to ground. This evaluation program narrowed attention to design concepts involving glass as the primary structural and weather resistant component of the module. The leading specific design structure consisted of the solar cell circuit embedded in polyvinyl butyrate by lamination between a glass front surface and a polyester film rear surface. Preliminary evaluation of this structure in high humidity and thermal cycle was promising, and extensive field experience with similar structures in architectural and automotive applications was favorable. The specific design proposed was comprised of 120 two-inch diameter cells in a series-parallel configuration. The laminate was mounted in an aluminum frame with a neoprene gasket providing the requisite mechanical strength with flexibility. The resulting module size of 15 by 46 inches permits three modules to be neatly fitted into the 46 inch square subarray specified by JPL. The design as modified to accommodate subsequent experience is shown. Performance and environmental test results are presented and discussed.

Not Available

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Research on high-efficiency, single-junction, monolithic, thin-film amorphous silicon solar cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes the progress made in obtaining stable, a-Si-based submodules that have a large area and high efficiency. Conversion efficiencies of up to 11.95% were obtained in small-area, single-junction a-Si solar cells using textured TiO{sub 2}, superlattice p-layers, graded carbon concentrations near the p/i interface, and highly reflective ITO/silver back contacts. Single- junction a-SiC and a-SiGe p-i-n cells were also fabricated that had conversion efficiencies of 9%--11%, and some recently fabricated stacked-junction cells had conversion efficiencies of about 10%. In materials research boron-doped microcrystalline SiC films were recently developed containing up to 6 at. % carbon with conductivities of 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}3}/{Omega}-cm at room temperature and activation energies of 0.11 eV. Microcrystalline film growth was shown to be strongly influenced by the nature of the substrate, with nucleation occurring more readily on a-Si substrates than on TiO{sub 2}. Stability studies show that light-induced degradation is usually enhanced by the presence of carbon grading near the p/i interface. In general, adding either germanium (from GeH{sub 4}) or carbon (from CH{sub 4}) to the i-layer of a p-i-n cell leads to enhanced light-induced degradation. 13 refs., 80 figs., 17 tabs.

Catalano, A.W.; Carlson, D.E.; Ayra, R.R.; Bennett, M.S.; D'Aiello, R.V.; Dickson, C.R.; Fortmann, C.M.; Goldstein, B.; McVeigh, J.; Morris, J.; Newton, J.L.; Wiedeman, S. (Solarex Corp., Newtown, PA (USA). Thin Film Div.)

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

High-Efficiency Amorphous Silicon Alloy Based Solar Cells and Modules; Final Technical Progress Report, 30 May 2002--31 May 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The principal objective of this R&D program is to expand, enhance, and accelerate knowledge and capabilities for development of high-efficiency hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and amorphous silicon-germanium alloy (a-SiGe:H) related thin-film multijunction solar cells and modules with low manufacturing cost and high reliability. Our strategy has been to use the spectrum-splitting triple-junction structure, a-Si:H/a-SiGe:H/a-SiGe:H, to improve solar cell and module efficiency, stability, and throughput of production. The methodology used to achieve the objectives included: (1) explore the highest stable efficiency using the triple-junction structure deposited using RF glow discharge at a low rate, (2) fabricate the devices at a high deposition rate for high throughput and low cost, and (3) develop an optimized recipe using the R&D batch large-area reactor to help the design and optimization of the roll-to-roll production machines. For short-term goals, we have worked on the improvement of a-Si:H and a-SiGe:H alloy solar cells. a-Si:H and a-SiGe:H are the foundation of current a-Si:H based thin-film photovoltaic technology. Any improvement in cell efficiency, throughput, and cost reduction will immediately improve operation efficiency of our manufacturing plant, allowing us to further expand our production capacity.

Guha, S.; Yang, J.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Performance and analysis of amorphous silicon p-i-n solar cells made by chemical-vapor deposition from disilane  

SciTech Connect

The photovoltaic performance of amorphous silicon p-i-n solar cells made by chemical-vapor deposition (CVD) from disilane is reported and analyzed. Intrinsic layers were deposited at rates from 0.2 to 50 A/s at temperatures from 380 to 460 /sup 0/C with and without boron doping. Device performance was insensitive to substantial differences in disilane purity. A cell efficiency of 4% was achieved. The primary limitation to higher efficiency was low fill factor (<50%) due to high series resistance (>18 ..cap omega.. cm/sup 2/). Analysis of the series resistance indicated a contact-related resistance of 4--12 ..cap omega.. cm/sup 2/ and a photoconductive resistance composed of intrinsic layer thickness-independent (10 ..cap omega.. cm/sup 2/) and thickness-dependent terms. Analysis of the voltage dependence of the current collection indicated a fill factor of 60% would be expected in the absence of series resistance. The maximum short-circuit current of 12.5 mA/cm/sup 2/ (normalized to 100 mW/cm/sup 2/) resulted with a boron-doped i layer deposited at 440 /sup 0/C at 3.3 A/s. Modeling of the collection efficiency indicated collection widths up to 0.33 ..mu..m for boron-doped and 0.24 ..mu..m for undoped p-i-n devices. In order to achieve high-efficiency cells using CVD from disilane, the limitations imposed by low photoconductivity, a high density of states, and restricted cell design imposed by the high deposition temperatures would have to be overcome.

Hegedus, S.S.; Rocheleau, R.E.; Buchanan, W.; Baron, B.N.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Optimization of transparent and reflecting electrodes for amorphous silicon solar cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work to improve the performance of solar cells by improving the electrical and optical properties of their transparent conducting oxides (TCO) layers. Boron-doped zinc-oxide films were deposited by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition in a laminar-flow reactor from diethyl zinc, tert-butanol, and diborane in the temperature range between 300[degrees]C and 420[degrees]C. When the deposition temperature was above 320[degrees]C, both doped and undoped films have highly oriented crystallites with their c-axes perpendicular to the substrate plane. Films deposited from 0.07% diethyl zinc and 2.4% tert-butanol have electron densities between 3.5 [times] 10[sup 20] cm[sup [minus]3] and 5.5 [times] 10[sup 20] cm[sup [minus]3], conductivities between 250 [Omega][sup [minus]1] and 2500 [Omega][sup [minus]1] and mobilities between 2.5 cm[sup 2]/V-s and 35.0 cm[sup 2]/V-s, depending on dopant concentration, film thickness, and deposition temperature. Optical measurements show that the maximum infrared reflectance of the doped films is close to 90%, compared to about 20% for undoped films. Film visible absorption and film conductivity were found to increase with film thickness. The ratio of conductivity to visible absorption coefficient for doped films was between 0.1 [Omega] and 1.1 [Omega][sup [minus]1]. The band gap of the film changes from 3.3 eV to 3.7 eV when the film is doped with 0.012% diborane.

Gordon, R.G. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry)

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Optimization of transparent and reflecting electrodes for amorphous silicon solar cells. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Transparent conducting fluorine doped zinc oxide was deposited as thin films on soda lime glass substrates by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at substrate temperatures of 460 to 500 degrees C. The precursors diethylzinc, tetramethylethylenediamine and benzoyl fluoride were dissolved in xylene. This solution was nebulized ultrasonically and then flash vaporized by a carrier gas of nitrogen preheated to 150 degrees C. Ethanol was vaporized separately, and these vapors were then mixed to form a homogeneous vapor mixture. Good reproducibility was achieved using this new CVD method. Uniform thicknesses were obtained by moving the heated glass substrates through the deposition zone. The best electrically and optical properties were obtained when the precursor solution was aged for more than a week before use. The films were polycrystalline and highly oriented with the c-axis perpendicular to the substrate. More than 90% of the incorporated fluorine atoms were electrically active as n-type dopants. The electrical resistivity of the films was as low as 5 x 10/sup -4/ Omega cm. The mobility was about 45 cm /Vs. The electron concentration was up to 3 x 10 %sup20;/cm. The optical absorption of the films was about 3-4% at a sheet resistance of 7 ohms/square. The diffuse transmittance was about 10% at a wavelength of 650 nm. Amorphous ilicon solar cells were deposited using the textured fluorine doped zinc oxide films as a front electrode. The short circuit current was increased over similar cells made with fluorine doped tin oxide, but the open circuit voltages and fill factors were reduced. The voltage was restored by overcoating the fluorine-doped zinc oxide with a thin layer of fluorine-doped tin oxide.

Gordon, R.G.; Kramer, K.; Liang, H.; Liu, X.; Pang, D.; Teff, D.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Quantitative analysis of defects in silicon: silicon sheet growth development for the large area silicon sheet task of the Low-Cost Solar Array Project. Quarterly progress report No. 4, 1 January 1979-31 March 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the various steps involved in the chemical polishing and etching of Motorola silicon samples. Data on twins, dislocation pits, and grain boundaries from thirty-one (31) Mobil Tyco silicon sample numbers 47 to 77 are also discussed. A brief review of the changes made to upgrade the Quantimet 720 Image Analysis System is included.

Natesh, R.; Smith, J.M.; Qidwai, H.A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Silicon Production and Refining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 6, 2013 ... The photovoltaic (PV) industry is in rapid growth and a large supply of solar grade silicon (SoG-Si) feedstock must be provided to response the...

340

Effective passivation of the low resistivity silicon surface by a rapid thermal oxide/PECVD silicon nitride stack and its application to passivated rear and bifacial Si solar cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A novel stack passivation scheme, in which plasma silicon nitride (SiN) is stacked on top of a rapid thermal SiO{sub 2} (RTO) layer, is developed to attain a surface recombination velocity (S) approaching 10 cm/s at the 1.3 {Omega}-cm p-type (100) silicon surface. Such low S is achieved by the stack even when the RTO and SiN films individually yield considerably poorer surface passivation. Critical to achieving low S by the stack is the use of a short, moderate temperature anneal (in this study 730 C for 30 seconds) after film growth and deposition. This anneal is believed to enhance the release and delivery of atomic hydrogen from the SiN film to the Si-SiO{sub 2} interface, thereby reducing the density of interface traps at the surface. Compatibility with this post-deposition anneal makes the stack passivation scheme attractive for cost-effective solar cell production since a similar anneal is required to fire screen-printed contacts. Application of the stack to passivated rear screen-printed solar cells has resulted in V{sub oc}`s of 641 mV and 633 mV on 0.65 {Omega}-cm and 1.3 {Omega}-cm FZ Si substrates, respectively. These V{sub oc} values are roughly 20 mV higher than for cells with untreated, highly recombinative back surfaces. The stack passivation has also been used to form fully screen-printed bifacial solar cells which exhibit rear-illuminated efficiency as high as 11.6% with a single layer AR coating.

Rohatgi, A.; Narasimha, S. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Univ. Center for Excellence in Photovoltaics Research and Education; Ruby, D.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicrystalline silicon solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Phase I of the automated array assembly task of the low cost silicon solar array project. Annual technical report. Motorola report No. 2258/4  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work performed to analyze, both technically and economically, the state of technology readiness for the automated production of solar cells and modules is compiled and reviewed critically. The long-term objective solar module characteristics include a selling price of less than $.50/peak watt and a mean-time-before-failure (MTBF) of 20 years in any terrestrial environment. While efficiency is important to attaining the cost goal, it is a most significant factor in array economics; accordingly, this program has stressed high efficiency, with a suggested cell goal of 15 percent. The analysis emphasized technical evaluation of individual process steps first, and then concentrated upon process sequences for making solar cells and modules. Further analysis was performed to yield a detailed cost study of individual process steps; this was applied to the cost analysis of potential process sequences. Potentially economical process sequences formed from process steps deemed to have high technical merit were then identified. Potentially promising technologies needing further development to achieve satisfactory maturity were then identified. It is concluded that, while specific areas of technology need advanced development and the source of silicon needs definition, no fundamentally new technology needs to be developed to permit manufacture of solar cells which will meet the 1985 LSSA Program cost goals.

Coleman, M.G.; Pryor, R.A.; Grenon, L.A.; Lesk, I.A.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Novel duplex vapor-electrochemical method for silicon solar cells. Quarterly progress report No. 9, February 1--April 30, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Economic studies of the SRI process for the production of silicon are described. These studies cover the recovery of SiF/sub 4/ gas from fluosilicic acid (H/sub 2/SiF/sub 6/), sodium reduction of SiF/sub 4/ gas, separation of silicon from the reaction products by leaching the sodium fluorides, conversion of residual fluorides to cryolite, and the environmental treatment of the waste effluents. Since the sodium reduction of SiF/sub 4/ gas is highly exothermic, an attempt was made to understand the problems of heat transfer in the system and possibly predict their effect on the annual rate of silicon production. The details of the process economics are discussed, and the heat transfer studies are described. Economic analyses of the SRI process for the production of silicon show that silicon can be produced at a cost of $6.20/kg with a total fixed capital of $9,006,985 (1975 dollars) for a 1000 MT/yr operation. The cost per kilogram of silicon varies with the annual tonnage produced. On increasing the annual production to 3000 MT/yr, the cost was calculated to be $5.30/kg, while for a 5000 MT/yr operation, the cost of silicon production dropped to $5.00/kg. The yield of acceptable product silicon from the silicon produced was assumed to be 80%. By-product credit was obtained by converting the fluorides of sodium and hydrofluoric acid to marketable cryolite (Na/sub 3/AlF/sub 6/). These calculations also include the cost of environmental treatment and disposal for the waste effluents.

Kapur, V.K.; Nanis, L.; Sanjurjo, A.; Barlett, R.W.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Low Cost Solar Array Project. Feasibility of the silane process for producing semiconductor-grade silicon. Final report, October 1975-March 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The commercial production of low-cost semiconductor-grade silicon is an essential requirement of the JPL/DOE (Department of Energy) Low-Cost Solar Array (LSA) Project. A 1000-metric-ton-per-year commercial facility using the Union Carbide Silane Process will produce molten silicon for an estimated price of $7.56/kg (1975 dollars, private financing), meeting the DOE goal of less than $10/kg. Conclusions and technology status are reported for both contract phases, which had the following objectives: (1) establish the feasibility of Union Carbide's Silane Process for commercial application, and (2) develop an integrated process design for an Experimental Process System Development Unit (EPSDU) and a commercial facility, and estimate the corresponding commercial plant economic performance. To assemble the facility design, the following work was performed: (a) collection of Union Carbide's applicable background technology; (b) design, assembly, and operation of a small integrated silane-producing Process Development Unit (PDU); (c) analysis, testing, and comparison of two high-temperature methods for converting pure silane to silicon metal; and (d) determination of chemical reaction equilibria and kinetics, and vapor-liquid equilibria for chlorosilanes.

Not Available

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Value Proposition for High Lifetime (p-type) and Thin Silicon Materials in Solar PV Applications: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Most silicon PV road maps forecast a continued reduction in wafer thickness, despite rapid declines in the primary incentive for doing so -- polysilicon feedstock price. Another common feature of most silicon-technology forecasts is the quest for ever-higher device performance at the lowest possible costs. The authors present data from device-performance and manufacturing- and system-installation cost models to quantitatively establish the incentives for manufacturers to pursue advanced (thin) wafer and (high efficiency) cell technologies, in an age of reduced feedstock prices. This analysis exhaustively considers the value proposition for high lifetime (p-type) silicon materials across the entire c-Si PV supply chain.

Goodrich, A.; Woodhouse, M.; Hacke, P.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Slicing of silicon into sheet material. Silicon sheet growth development for the large area silicon sheet task of the low cost silicon solar array project. Sixth quarterly report, June 18, 1977--September 18, 1977  

SciTech Connect

The ''Multiple Blade Alignment Device'' has been reported to JPL as a New Technology item, and is currently being reviewed for patent potential. The device has proven difficult to install on a blade package. Successful engagement of the device has resulted in an intrinsic parallelism of the ends of the package to within 3..mu.., compared to standard errors prior to correction of over 50..mu... Measurements of blade misalignment indicate an average runout of 50..mu.. in a 220 blade package. This compares well with predictions based on thickness variation measurements of blades and spacers. Early cutting tests with 0.15 mm blades and 10 cm diameter ingots show lower yield and accuracy and higher cutting speed than previous standard tests. This seems to be a result of effective high abrasive concentration on the blades as a result of the slurry application technique. A similar, more dramatic reduction of yield occurs with a thin slurry oil. This appears to occur by increased slurry transport to the blades and another effective increase of abrasive packing to the cutting region. Design of the large capacity MS saw is proceeding well, with a final conceptual design in progress. A flywheel system for work-piece drive is described. The design offers a practical conservative motion for the drive, requiring a minimum of power. 10 cm MS slices have been sent out for solar cell fabrication. 10 cm diameter and 2 cm square MS slices have been delivered for various surface preparations, and will be fabricated into cells and evaluated for performance. This will develop a minimum surface removal technique for both the damage and profiles peculiar to thin MS sices while allowing high efficiency cell production.

Holden, S.C.; Fleming, J.R.

1977-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

346

Slicing of silicon into sheet material. Silicon sheet growth development for the large area silicon sheet task of the low cost silicon solar array project. Sixth quarterly report, June 18, 1977--September 18, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ''Multiple Blade Alignment Device'' has been reported to JPL as a New Technology item, and is currently being reviewed for patent potential. The device has proven difficult to install on a blade package. Successful engagement of the device has resulted in an intrinsic parallelism of the ends of the package to within 3..mu.., compared to standard errors prior to correction of over 50..mu... Measurements of blade misalignment indicate an average runout of 50..mu.. in a 220 blade package. This compares well with predictions based on thickness variation measurements of blades and spacers. Early cutting tests with 0.15 mm blades and 10 cm diameter ingots show lower yield and accuracy and higher cutting speed than previous standard tests. This seems to be a result of effective high abrasive concentration on the blades as a result of the slurry application technique. A similar, more dramatic reduction of yield occurs with a thin slurry oil. This appears to occur by increased slurry transport to the blades and another effective increase of abrasive packing to the cutting region. Design of the large capacity MS saw is proceeding well, with a final conceptual design in progress. A flywheel system for work-piece drive is described. The design offers a practical conservative motion for the drive, requiring a minimum of power. 10 cm MS slices have been sent out for solar cell fabrication. 10 cm diameter and 2 cm square MS slices have been delivered for various surface preparations, and will be fabricated into cells and evaluated for performance. This will develop a minimum surface removal technique for both the damage and profiles peculiar to thin MS sices while allowing high efficiency cell production.

Holden, S.C.; Fleming, J.R.

1977-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

347

High-Efficiency Amorphous Silicon and Nanocrystalline Silicon-Based Solar Cells and Modules: Final Technical Progress Report, 30 January 2006 - 29 January 2008  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

United Solar Ovonic successfully used its spectrum-splitting a-Si:H/a-SiGe:H/a-SiGe:H triple-junction structure in their manufacturing plants, achieving a manufacturing capacity of 118 MW in 2007, and set up a very aggressive expansion plan to achieve grid parity.

Guha, S.; Yang, J.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Electrochemical deposition of high purity silicon from molten fluoride ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2014 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Solar Cell Silicon. Presentation Title, Electrochemical deposition of high purity...

349

Preparation of High Purity Silicon by Electrolysis-Vacuum Distillation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2010 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Solar Cell Silicon: Production and Recyling. Presentation Title, Preparation of...

350

Development of a process for high capacity arc heater production of silicon for solar arrays. Low-cost solar array project, silicon materials task. Quarterly technical report, January--March 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program has been established at Westinghouse to develop a high temperature silicon production process using existing electric arc heater technology. Silicon tetrachloride and a reductant will be injected into an arc heated mixture of hydrogen and argon. Under these high temperature conditions, a very rapid reaction is expected to occur and proceed essentially to completion, yielding silicon and gaseous sodium chloride. Techniques for high temperature separation and collection of the molten silicon will be developed using standard engineering approaches, and the salt vapor will later be electrolytically separated into its elemental constituents for recycle. Preliminary technical evaluations and economic projections indicate not only that this process appears to be feasible, but that it also has the advantages of rapid, high capacity production of good quality molten silicon at a nominal cost. The program consists of a four-phase effort directed to the development and implementation of this technology. The initial phase of the program, Phase I, was an eleven-month study funded by JPL which was completed in September, 1977. Phase I was defined as a comprehensive feasibility and engineering review of the reaction process, and a formulation of the design for a test system to experimentally verify the high temperature reaction. Phase II, currently underway, involves a multi-task approach including (1) a detailed engineering analysis of the entire process; (2) design, fabrication, and assembly of the experimental system; (3) experimental testing of the reduction reaction to produce silicon and (4) complementary research programs to augment the experimental system design. The Phase II effort was initiated in October, 1977, and work is described in detail on the various stages of this effort.

Reed, W.H.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Thermal Management of Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nanostructured Silicon- Based Solar Cells, 2013. X. C. Tong,compact heat exchangers, and solar cells," Sci-Tech News,2011. C. J. Chen, Physics of Solar Energy: Wiley, 2011. M.

Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Development of mullite substrates and containers. Silicon sheet growth development for the Large Area Silicon Sheet Task of the Low-Cost Silicon Solar array Project. Quarterly report No. 1, October 6, 1977--November 14, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eight mullite bodies of varied compositions and microstructures have been prepared and are being characterized. These compositions will be submersed in molten silicon to study the impurity and surface effects. These various mullite materials will be analyzed for use as substrates for Honeywell Contract No. 954356, silicon on ceramic program and for use as a container of molten silicon. Low cost processing methods are being developed and evaluated for manufacturing large mullite sheets and mullite containers. At present, a state-of-the-art roll compaction process has shown promising initial results for substrates. However, these 0.5mm x 10cm x 1m are extremely fragile. Slip casting or iso pressing are anticipated for containers.

Wirth, D.G.; Sibold, J.D.

1977-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

353

Research on High-Bandgap Materials and Amorphous Silicon-Based Solar Cells, Final Technical Report, 15 May 1994-15 January 1998  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work performed by Syracuse University under this subcontract. Researchers developed a technique based on electroabsorption measurements for obtaining quantitative estimates of the built-in potential Vbi in a-Si:H-based heterostructure solar cells incorporating microcrystalline or a-SiC:H p layers. Using this new electroabsorption technique, researchers confirmed previous estimates of Vbi {yields} 1.0 V in a-Si:H solar cells with ''conventional'' intrinsic layers and either microcrystalline or a-SiC:H p layers. Researchers also explored the recent claim that light-soaking of a-Si:H substantially changes the polarized electroabsorption associated with interband optical transitions (and hence, not defect transitions). Researchers confirmed measurements of improved (5') hole drift mobilities in some specially prepared a-Si:H samples. Disturbingly, solar cells made with such materials did not show improved efficiencies. Researchers significantly clarified the relationship of ambipolar diffusion-length measurements to hole drift mobilities in a-Si:H, and have shown that the photocapacitance measurements can be interpreted in terms of hole drift mobilities in amorphous silicon. They also completed a survey of thin BP:H and BPC:H films prepared by plasma deposition using phosphine, diborane, trimethylboron, and hydrogen as precursor gases.

Schiff, E. A.; Gu, Q.; Jiang, L.; Lyou, J.; Nurdjaja, I.; Rao, P. (Department of Physics, Syracuse University)

1998-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

354

Types of Silicon Used in Photovoltaics  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Siliconused to make some the earliest photovoltaic (PV) devicesis still the most popular material for solar cells. Silicon is also the second-most abundant element in the Earth's crust (after...

355

Nucleation and solidification of silicon for photovoltaics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The majority of solar cells produced today are made with crystalline silicon wafers, which are typically manufactured by growing a large piece of silicon and then sawing it into ~200 pm wafers, a process which converts ...

Appapillai, Anjuli T. (Anjuli Tara)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Becancour Silicon Inc BSI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search Name Becancour Silicon Inc (BSI) Place St. Laurent, Quebec, Canada Zip H4M2M4 Sector Solar Product Canadian supplier of silicon metal for the...

357

Performance and Modeling of Amorphous Silicon Photovoltaics for Building-Integrated Applications (Preprint prepared for Solar 99)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amorphous silicon photovoltaic (PV) modules offer several advantages for building-integrated applications. The material can be deposited on glass or flexible substrates, which allows for products like roofing shingles and integrated PV/building glass. The material also has a uniform surface, which is ideal for many architectural applications. Amorphous silicon modules perform well in warm weather and have a small temperature coefficient for power. Depending on the building load, this may be beneficial when compared to crystalline systems. At the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, we are monitoring the performance of a triple-junction a-Si system. The system consists of 72 roofing shingles mounted directly to simulated roofing structures. This paper examines the performance of the building-integrated amorphous silicon PV system and applicability for covering residential loads. A simple model of system performance is also developed and is presented.

Kroposki, B.; Hansen, R.

1998-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

358

Solar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

time, they looked up. October 6, 2010 DuPont is betting on major growth in the market for solar energy -- and therefore for its Tedlar film, a durable backing for silicon solar...

359

Heat exchanger: ingot casting/slicing process. Silicon sheet growth development for the large area silicon sheet task of the low cost silicon solar array project. First quarterly report, November 20, 1975--December 31, 1975  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Designs for changes to the existing crystal casting furnace and multi-wafer slicer were completed prior to the contract. Equipment supplies necessary for the modifications and silicon material were ordered during the first one and one-quarter month period covered. Assembly preparation and check-out of all systems are on schedule. (auth)

Schmid, F.

1975-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

360

System and method for liquid silicon containment  

SciTech Connect

This invention relates to a system and a method for liquid silicon containment, such as during the casting of high purity silicon used in solar cells or solar modules. The containment apparatus includes a shielding member adapted to prevent breaching molten silicon from contacting structural elements or cooling elements of a casting device, and a volume adapted to hold a quantity of breaching molten silicon with the volume formed by a bottom and one or more sides.

Cliber, James A; Clark, Roger F; Stoddard, Nathan G; Von Dollen, Paul

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicrystalline silicon solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Improved performance of amorphous silicon solar cells via scattering from surface plasmon polaritons in nearby metallic nanoparticles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s to remove the surface oxide. A 20 nm indium tin oxide ITO contact layer was then depos- ited by rf.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory for providing a-Si:H thin films for this work. 1 A. Luque and S An engineered enhancement in short-circuit current density and energy conversion efficiency in amorphous silicon

Yu, Edward T.

362

40 kW of solar cell modules for the Large Scale Production Task, a Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

Forty kilowatts of solar cell modules was produced in this program. This is equivalent to 4123 modules. The average power output per module was 9.7 watts at 16.5 volts, 60/sup 0/C and 100 mW/cm/sup 2/. The peak production rate was 200 modules per week which is equal to 1.9 kW per week. This rate was sustained for over four and one-half months and is equivalent to 100 kW per year. The solar cell module design, electrical and power performance, module preproduction environmental test results, production and shipping schedule, program summary, and delivery are described. A cost analysis section is written. Particular emphasis on the percentage of labor and material utilized in constructing a solar cell module is presented. Also included are cost reduction recommendations. It was concluded from this program that volume production on the order of hundreds of kilowatts per year per company as a minimum is required to significantly reduce the price per watt for solar cell modules. Sensor Technology more than doubled its solar cell module manufacturing facilities since the completion of the JPL Block II procurement. Plans are being made for large scale expansion of our facilities to meet growing JPL/DOE procurements.

Jones, G.T.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Method for fabricating silicon cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for making high-efficiency solar cells. This is accomplished by forming a diffusion junction and a passivating oxide layer in a single high-temperature process step. The invention includes the class of solar cells made using this process, including high-efficiency solar cells made using Czochralski-grown silicon. 9 figs.

Ruby, D.S.; Basore, P.A.; Schubert, W.K.

1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

364

Method for fabricating silicon cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for making high-efficiency solar cells. This is accomplished by forming a diffusion junction and a passivating oxide layer in a single high-temperature process step. The invention includes the class of solar cells made using this process, including high-efficiency solar cells made using Czochralski-grown silicon.

Ruby, Douglas S. (Albuquerque, NM); Basore, Paul A. (Albuquerque, NM); Schubert, W. Kent (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

365

Epitaxial Thin Film Silicon Solar Cells Fabricated by Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition Below 750 ..deg..C: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on fabricating film c-Si solar cells on Si wafer templates by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition. These devices, grown at glass-compatible temperatures 500 mV and efficiencies > 5%.

Alberi, K.; Martin, I. T.; Shub, M.; Teplin, C. W.; Iwaniczko, E.; Xu, Y.; duda, A.; Stradin, P.; Johnston, S. W.; Romero, M. J.; Branz, H. M.; Young, D. L.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Method For Passivating Crystal Silicon Surfaces - Energy ...  

The photovoltaic market remains dominated by silicon wafer-based solar cells. Therefore, there is a need for improvements in the manufacturing ...

367

Silicon Surface and Heterojunction Interface Passivation ...  

Silicon Solar Cell Materials and Processes Vail, Colorado August 10-13, 2003 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado ...

368

Silicon Materials Task of the Low Cost Solar Array Project (Phase II). Sixth quarterly report, 1 January 1977--March 31, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Preliminary studies have been conducted to develop a foundation for the work to be carried out in Phase II of the program, which is designed to investigate the effects of processes and impurities on terrestrial silicon solar cells. Solar cells nearly 10% efficient (without AR coatings) can be made on p-type material with resistivities down to about 0.2 ..cap omega..-cm using a process similar to that employed during Phase I of the program. As resistivity falls below about 0.1 ..cap omega..-cm cell efficiency also falls and process instabilities become more prevalent. For this reason the resistivity of the baseline material chosen to study the combined effects of boron and metal doping will probably be in the 0.1 to 0.3 ..cap omega..-cm range. Initial studies on n-base material indicate that 0.2 ..mu..m deep junctions with adequate sheet resistivities can be obtained by boron diffusion from BBr/sub 3/ at 875/sup 0/C. Slow cooling from the diffusion temperature appears necessary to maintain good lifetime and I/sub sc/ values. p/sup +//n/n/sup +/ cells fabricated on a Westinghouse internal program using this type of processing produce coated cells with 16% efficiencies. Future studies will focus on metal impurity doping of low resistivity p-type and n-type substrates and on gettering and heat treatment effects in standard 4 ..cap omega..-cm p-type material.

Hopkins, R.H.; Davis, J.R.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Blais, P.D.; McCormick, J.R.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Silicon materials task of the low cost solar array project (Part 2). Fourth quarterly report, July 1, 1976--September 30, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During this quarter we have completed the growth of all contract-required Czochralski and silicon dendritic web crystals. The chemical analysis of all the Czochralski ingots is also finished. Preliminary mass spectroscopic evaluation of metal-doped web samples grown at 1.3 cm/min indicates that the effective distribution coefficients for Cu, Ni, and Cr all increase with growth rate as anticipated. For chromium the increase is almost 100 fold compared to the effective k for Czochralski ingots grown at 7.5 cm/hr. PCD lifetime measurements were completed on 46 ingots. The correlation between solar cell performance and PCD lifetime appears valid for all processed wafers except those containing Ti which give lower cell efficiency than would be predicted on the basis of lifetime alone. Solar cell measurements were completed in all but a few of the ingots grown during the contract. In particular, data has now been obtained on the second set of multiply-doped samples containing the impurity combinations Zr/Ti, Cr/Ni, and Cr/Cu/Ni. As in the case of ingots containing only Ti, the Zr/Ti sample shows severely degraded cell efficiency, only about 26% of the baseline. The Cr/Ni and Cr/Cu/Ni samples show efficiencies of 81 and 72% of baseline efficiency reflecting the small effects of Cu and Ni on cell performance and the stronger effect of Cr.

Hopkins, R.H.; Davis, J.R.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Blais, P.D.; McHugh, J.P.; McCormick, J.R.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Novel Effects on the Fracture Strength of Silicon Wafers for the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Solar Cell Silicon. Presentation Title, Novel Effects on the Fracture Strength of Silicon Wafers for the Photovoltaic Industry. Author(s), Tania...

371

EE580 Solar Cells Todd J. Kaiser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7/21/2010 1 EE580 ­ Solar Cells Todd J. Kaiser · Lecture 06 · Solar Cell Materials & Structures 1Montana State University: Solar Cells Lecture 6: Solar Cells Solar Cell Technologies · A) Crystalline Silicon · B) Thin Film · C) Group III-IV Cells 2Montana State University: Solar Cells Lecture 6: Solar

Kaiser, Todd J.

372

Antireflection and SiO2 Surface Passivation by Liquid-Phase Chemistry for Efficient Black Silicon Solar Cells: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report solar cells with both black Si antireflection and SiO2 surface passivation provided by inexpensive liquid-phase chemistry, rather than by conventional vacuum-based techniques. Preliminary cell efficiency has reached 16.4%. Nanoporous black Si antireflection on crystalline Si by aqueous etching promises low surface reflection for high photon utilization, together with lower manufacturing cost compared to vacuum-based antireflection coating. Ag-nanoparticle-assisted black Si etching and post-etching chemical treatment recently developed at NREL enables excellent control over the pore diameter and pore separation. Performance of black Si solar cells, including open-circuit voltage, short-circuit current density, and blue response, has benefited from these improvements. Prior to this study, our black Si solar cells were all passivated by thermal SiO2 produced in tube furnaces. Although this passivation is effective, it is not yet ideal for ultra-low-cost manufacturing. In this study, we report, for the first time, the integration of black Si with a proprietary liquid-phase deposition (LPD) passivation from Natcore Technology. The Natcore LPD forms a layer of solar cells with LPD SiO2 with a spectrum-weighted average reflection lower than 5%, similar to the more costly thermally grown SiO2 approach. However, LPD SiO2 provides somewhat better surface-passivation quality according to the lifetime analysis by the photo-conductivity decay measurement. Moreover, black Si solar cells with LPD SiO2 passivation exhibit higher spectral response at short wavelength compared to those passivated by thermally grown SiO2. With further optimization, the combination of aqueous black Si etching and LPD could provide a pathway for low-cost, high-efficiency crystalline Si solar cells.

Yuan, H. C.; Oh, J.; Zhang, Y.; Kuznetsov, O. A.; Flood, D. J.; Branz, H. M.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Antireflection and SiO2 Surface Passivation by Liquid-Phase Chemistry for Efficient Black Silicon Solar Cells: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report solar cells with both black Si antireflection and SiO2 surface passivation provided by inexpensive liquid-phase chemistry, rather than by conventional vacuum-based techniques. Preliminary cell efficiency has reached 16.4%. Nanoporous black Si antireflection on crystalline Si by aqueous etching promises low surface reflection for high photon utilization, together with lower manufacturing cost compared to vacuum-based antireflection coating. Ag-nanoparticle-assisted black Si etching and post-etching chemical treatment recently developed at NREL enables excellent control over the pore diameter and pore separation. Performance of black Si solar cells, including open-circuit voltage, short-circuit current density, and blue response, has benefited from these improvements. Prior to this study, our black Si solar cells were all passivated by thermal SiO2 produced in tube furnaces. Although this passivation is effective, it is not yet ideal for ultra-low-cost manufacturing. In this study, we report, for the first time, the integration of black Si with a proprietary liquid-phase deposition (LPD) passivation from Natcore Technology. The Natcore LPD forms a layer of <10-nm SiO2 on top of the black Si surface in a relatively mild chemical bath at room temperature. We demonstrate black Si solar cells with LPD SiO2 with a spectrum-weighted average reflection lower than 5%, similar to the more costly thermally grown SiO2 approach. However, LPD SiO2 provides somewhat better surface-passivation quality according to the lifetime analysis by the photo-conductivity decay measurement. Moreover, black Si solar cells with LPD SiO2 passivation exhibit higher spectral response at short wavelength compared to those passivated by thermally grown SiO2. With further optimization, the combination of aqueous black Si etching and LPD could provide a pathway for low-cost, high-efficiency crystalline Si solar cells.

Yuan, H. C.; Oh, J.; Zhang, Y.; Kuznetsov, O. A.; Flood, D. J.; Branz, H. M.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

The Influence of High-Energy Lithium Ion Irradiation on Electrical Characteristics of Silicon and GaAs Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Space-grade Si and GaAs solar cells were irradiated with 15 & 40 MeV Li ions. Illuminated (AM0 condition) and unilluminated I-V curves reveal that the effect of high-energy Li ion irradiation has produced similar effects to that of proton irradiation. However, an additional, and different, defect mechanism is suggested to dominate in the heavier-ion results. Comparison is made with proton-irradiated solar-cell work and with non-ionizing energy-loss (NIEL) radiation-damage models.

B. Jayashree; Ramani; M. C. Radhakrishna; Anil Agrawal; Saif Ahmad Khan; A. Meulenberg

2006-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

375

Quantitative analysis of defects in silicon: silicon sheet growth development for the Large Area Silicon Sheet Task of the Low-Cost Solar Array Project. Quarterly progress report No. 5, April 1-June 30, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During this reporting period a computer program was written for the PDP 11/03 computer that controls the Quantimet 720 Image Analyzing System (QTM 720). This program will facilitate the analysis of silicon samples on the upgraded Quantimet 720 System. Also during this period thirty-two (32) Motorola samples were analyzed for twin boundaries, dislocation pits, and grain boundaries. A discussion of the computer program and the data obtained from the thirty-two (32) Motorola samples are given. The use of the Image Editor on the QTM 720 detected image is also described.

Natesh, R.; Smith, J.M.; Qidwai, H.A.; Bruce, T.

1979-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

376

Epitaxial Thin Film Silicon Solar Cells Fabricated by Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition Below 750 ..deg..C: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

We report on fabricating film c-Si solar cells on Si wafer templates by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition. These devices, grown at glass-compatible temperatures < 750..deg..C, demonstrate open-circuit voltages > 500 mV and efficiencies > 5%.

Alberi, K.; Martin, I. T.; Shub, M.; Teplin, C. W.; Iwaniczko, E.; Xu, Y.; duda, A.; Stradin, P.; Johnston, S. W.; Romero, M. J.; Branz, H. M.; Young, D. L.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Continuous Czochralski growth: silicon sheet growth development of the large area silicon sheet task of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Second annual progress report, October 1-September 30, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this program is to demonstrate the growth of at least 100 kilograms of mono crystalline ingot from one crucible by the Czochralski (CZ) method. The approach to the continuous growth process being pursued in this effort relies on conventional CZ technology combined with new equipment designs which allow repeated alternate cycles of crystal growth and hot melt replenishment by methods which are suitable for use in a high volume production facility. A Hamco Model CG2000 crystal grower was modified with a special chamber for the storage of a supply of polycrystalline silicon and a vacuum-tight isolation valve to permit retrieval of crystals and melt replenishment without contamination. A number of additional modifications to the facility have been completed in the program, and the process study phase is now under way, with a number of multi-ingot runs having been performed. It is the purpose of this contract extension to describe a program aimed at a more accurate cost analysis of the continuous growth of silicon into material and also an investigative program for the purpose of defining and solving problems which may hinder the development of continuous Czochralski growth. Progress is reported.

Lane, R.L.; Roberts, E.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Development of a model and computer code to describe solar grade silicon production processes. Fifth quarterly report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program aims at developing mathematical models, and computer codes based on these models, which will allow prediction of the product distribution in chemical reactors in which gaseous silicon compounds are converted to condensed-phase silicon. The reactors to be modeled are flow reactors in which silane or one of the halogenated silanes is thermally decomposed or reacted with an alkali metal, H/sub 2/ or H atoms. Because the product of interest is particulate silicon, processes which must be modeled, in addition to mixing and reaction of gas-phase reactants, include the nucleation and growth of condensed Si via coagulation, condensation, and heterogeneous reaction. During this report period computer codes were developed and used to calculate: (1) coefficients for Si vapor and Si particles describing transport due to concentration and temperature gradients (i.e., Fick and Soret diffusion, respectively), and (2) estimates of thermochemical properties of Si n-mers. The former are needed to allow the mass flux of Si to reactor walls to be calculated. Because of the extremely large temperature gradients that exist in some of the reactors to be used in producing Si (particularly the Westinghouse reactor), it was found that thermal (Soret) diffusion can be the dominant transport mechanism for certain sizes of Si particles. The thermochemical estimates are required to allow computation of the formation rate of Si droplets. With the completion of these calculations the information and coding of the particle routines in the modified LAPP code is at the point where debugging can be done and that is now in progress.

Srivastava, R.; Gould, R.K.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Research on high-band-gap materials and amorphous-silicon-based solar cells. Annual subcontract report, May 15, 1994--May 14, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have conducted a survey of thin BP:H and BPC:H films prepared by plasma deposition using phosphine, diborane, tri-methylboron, and hydrogen as precursor gases. The objective of this research is to find out whether such films might offer a superior window layer film for application to wide bandgap a-Si solar cells. The research has shown good optical properties in a-BP:H films, but electrical properties acceptable for use in window layers have not been demonstrated yet. We have also found an interesting, conductive and transparent BPC:H film in a remote deposition region of the reactor, but have been unable to transfer deposition of this film to the standard interelectrode region. We have developed our capability to deposit nip sequence amorphous silicon based solar cells, and have demonstrated an open circuit voltage greater than 0.7 V. We have continued our studies of built-in potentials in a-Si based solar cells using the electroabsorption technique, extending our measurements to include cells with wider bandgap intrinsic layers and Schottky barrier test structures. We have made the first time-of-flight drift mobility measurements on a-Si:H prepared by hot wire (HW) deposition. Initial work has shown that light-soaked HW material can have much better ambipolar diffusion lengths than the plasma-deposited material following extended light soaking. We have performed some theoretical work which addresses a difficulty in understanding photocarrier recombination in a-Si:H first identified by Marvin Silver. In particular, electron-hole recombination is much slower than expected from the well-known {open_quotes}diffusion-controlled{close_quotes} models for Onsager (geminate) recombination and Langevin recombination. This slowness is essential to the success of a-Si in solar cells, but is unexplained. We have done work on high field electron drift mobilities in a-Si:H and on the validity of the Einstein relation connecting the diffusion and drift of holes in a-Si:H.

Schiff, E.A.; Gu, Q.; Jiang, L.; Wang, Q. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Photovoltaic mechanisms in polycrystalline thin film silicon solar cells. Final report, 30 June 1979-29 June 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this program were: (1) to develop appropriate measurement techniques to facilitate a quantitative study of the electrical activity of structural defects and at a grain boundary (G.B.) in terms of generation-recombination, barrier height, and G.B. conductivity; (2) to characterize G.B.s in terms of physical properties such as angle of misfit and local stress, and to correlate them with the electrical activity; (3) to determine the influence of solar cell processing on the electrical behavior of structural defects and G.B.s; and (4) to evaluate polycrystalline solar cell performance based on the above study, and to compare it with the experimentally measured performance. Progress is reported in detail. (WHK)

Sopori, B.L.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicrystalline silicon solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

13th Workshop on Crystalline Silicon Solar Cell Materials and Processes: Summary Discussion, 10-13 August 2003, Vail, Colorado  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 13th Workshop discussion sessions addressed recent progress, critical issues in implementing new technologies, and the role of fundamental R&D in the growing PV industry. For the first time, we included a rump session, which was held on Sunday evening, August 10. This session included a panel of representatives, from various photovoltaic companies, who led a discussion of''R&D Challenges in Si PV.'' A special poster/presentation session was held on Monday evening, August 11, in which NREL/DOE subcontractors highlighted their results of research performed during the current subcontract period. This session served as a subcontract review. The workshop offered special sessions to discuss: (1) High-Efficiency Si Solar Cells, which reviewed progress made in implementing high-efficiency Si solar cell fabrication processes in the manufacturing environment; (2) Advanced Processing, as future potential approaches for making Si solar cells; (3) Commercial Issues, which addressed basic understanding behind recent processes that have been used by the PV industry; and (4) Automation and Equipment, to address capabilities and requirements of new manufacturing equipment.

Sopori, B.; Sinton, R.; Tan, T.; Swanson, D.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Growth of silicon sheets for photovoltaic applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The status of silicon sheet development for photovoltaic applications is critically reviewed. Silicon sheet growth processes are classified according to their linear growth rates. The fast growth processes, which include edge-defined film-fed growth, silicon on ceramic, dendritic-web growth, and ribbon-to-ribbon growth, are comparatively ranked subject to criteria involving growth stability, sheet productivity, impurity effects, crystallinity, and solar cell results. The status of more rapid silicon ribbon growth techniques, such as horizontal ribbon growth and melt quenching, is also reviewed. The emphasis of the discussions is on examining the viability of these sheet materials as solar cell substrates for low-cost silicon photovoltaic systems.

Surek, T.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

AOS Solar Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AOS Solar Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name AOS Solar Inc Product Manufacturer of thin-film silicon-on-glass. References AOS Solar Inc1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

384

Enabling Thin Silicon Technologies for Next Generation Low-cost c ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Solar Cell Silicon ... from fossil fuels to renewable sources has spurred companies to reduce the cost of their solar photovoltaics (PV) systems.

385

Development of advanced methods for continuous Czochralski growth. Silicon sheet growth development for the Large Area Silicon Sheet Task of the Low Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Third quarterly progress report, March 18--July 14, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Six batch melt-replenishment runs were performed. In the most recent, five crystals were grown with a total through-put of 48 kg. In addition to its stated purpose of developing the growth and recharge process for continuous silicon production, this experimentation has served to prove completely both the concept of charging with granular (viz., niblet) feed and the design of the pellet-feeder/isolation-lock assembly. The design of the prototype Czochralski puller was begun on schedule. Layouts of all major components have been prepared, and detailing is currently in progress; bills of material for long-delivery items were released to Manufacturing in June. Two critical components have already undergone advance trials: the recharging mechanism, which has been in use for four months, and the crystal lift mechanism, which has been bench-tested and is to be mounted on the laboratory Varian 2850 puller. Further, the fabrication of the transducer/control assembly - the automation system - has been accelerated in order to permit testing and preliminary process development on the 2850 furnace prior to the completion of the prototype puller. The SAMICS analysis of ingot growth and wafering has been completely revised and has been extended to 1986.

Wolfson, R.G.; Sibley, C.B.; Chartier, C.P.

1978-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

386

Photovoltaic Silicon Cell Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Silicon Cell Basics Silicon Cell Basics Photovoltaic Silicon Cell Basics August 20, 2013 - 2:19pm Addthis Silicon-used to make some the earliest photovoltaic (PV) devices-is still the most popular material for solar cells. Silicon is also the second-most abundant element in the Earth's crust (after oxygen). However, to be useful as a semiconductor material in solar cells, silicon must be refined to a purity of 99.9999%. In single-crystal silicon, the molecular structure-which is the arrangement of atoms in the material-is uniform because the entire structure is grown from the same crystal. This uniformity is ideal for transferring electrons efficiently through the material. To make an effective PV cell, however, silicon has to be "doped" with other elements to make n-type and p-type layers.

387

Phase 2 of the array automated assembly task for the low cost silicon solar array project. Interim report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The LSA Automated Array Assembly Task has as its goal the manufacture of photovoltaic modules at a capacity of 500 MW per year at a cost of $0.50 per peak watt. Divided between ten solar cell manufacturers, each installation should produce 50 MW per year. This implies that automated machinery would continuously produce 120 solar cells per minute. The purpose of this report is to detail the processes and techniques which are believed to have great promise of accomplishing this task. The initial stages of the program were involved in studying the possibility of automated assembly. Phase 1 reviewed a large cross section of processes, conceptual designs, and innovative technologies in preparation for 1986. Through this documentation, a large amount of comprehensive data has been collected. It is these reports upon which the next phase of the program is based. The purpose of Phase 2 is to propose an automated sequence, verify it and present future cost projections. Utilizing the large amount of information available from Phase 1 and drawing from its own experience Solarex has proposed a process sequence which it is believed has great potential of achieving the LSA goals. This report describes the processes, details, the verification tests performed, and estimates the cost of such an automated array assembly.

Wihl, M.; Toro, J.; Scheinine, A.; Anderson, J.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Controlled Structure of Organic-Nanomaterial Solar Cells - Energy ...  

Technology Marketing Summary Organic, polymer-based solar cellslightweight alternatives to conventional, silicon-based solar cellshave great potential for ...

389

Microsoft PowerPoint - BP Solar NSERC Workshop.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* 1979 Invention of Solarex poly-crystalline silicon process * 1980 BP enters solar industry via purchase of Lucas Energy Systems * 1985 BP Solar acquires license for Laser...

390

Matter & Energy Solar Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

See Also: Matter & Energy Solar Energy· Electronics· Materials Science· Earth & Climate Energy at the University of Illinois, the future of solar energy just got brighter. Although silicon is the industry Electronics Over 1.2 Million Electronics Parts, Components and Equipment. www.AlliedElec.com solar energy

Rogers, John A.

391

Crystalline silicon processing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation (consisting of vugraphs) first provides the background motivation for Sandia`s effort for the development of improved crystalline silicon solar cells. It then discusses specific results and progress, and concludes with a brief discussion of options for next year.

Basore, P.A.

1994-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

392

Ray optical light trapping in silicon microwires: exceeding the 2n2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Shen, T. Mallouk, E. Dickey, T. Mayer, and J. Redwing, "Radial junction silicon wire array solar cells

Heaton, Thomas H.

393

Reductive Removal of Phosphorus in Silicon Using CaO-CaF2 Slag  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2013 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Solar Cell Silicon. Presentation Title, Reductive Removal of Phosphorus in...

394

Role of point defects/defect complexes in silicon device processing. Book of abstracts, fourth workshop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 41 abstracts are arranged into 6 sessions: impurities and defects in commercial substrates: their sources, effects on material yield, and material quality; impurity gettering in silicon: limits and manufacturability of impurity gettering and in silicon solar cells; impurity/defect passivation; new concepts in silicon growth: improved initial quality and thin films; and silicon solar cell design opportunities.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Schmid Silicon Technology GmbH SST | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Schmid Silicon Technology GmbH SST Jump to: navigation, search Name Schmid Silicon Technology GmbH (SST) Place Freudenstadt, Germany Zip D-72250 Sector Solar Product Germany-based...

396

The Silicon Mine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mine Mine Jump to: navigation, search Name The Silicon Mine Place Netherlands Sector Solar Product The Silicon Mine (TSM) will produce solar grade polysilicon suitable for the production of wafers or as the base material for the manufacture of solar cells. References The Silicon Mine[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. The Silicon Mine is a company located in Netherlands . References ↑ "The Silicon Mine" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=The_Silicon_Mine&oldid=352196" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

397

NREL: Technology Transfer - The Quest for Inexpensive Silicon ...  

Most of today's solar cells are made out of wafer crystalline silicon. ... Kline discovered that NREL had developed a process called hot-wire chemical ...

398

Vacuum Distillation of Aluminum and Silicon via Carbothermal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Vacuum Distillation of Aluminum and Silicon via Carbothermal Reduction of Their Oxides with Concentrated Solar Energy. Author(s), Peter G.

399

Silicon web process development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Silicon dendritic web is a ribbon form of silicon produced from the melt without die shaping, and capable of fabrication into solar cells with greater than 15% AM1 conversion efficiency. This quarterly report describes the work carried out during the period April to June 1980, as part of Phase III of a DOE/JPL-sponsored effort to develop silicon web process technology compatible with the national goals for low cost photovoltaic output power. We have successfully demonstrated eight hours of silicon web growth with closed loop melt level control, a key contract milestone. The result was achieved using a feedback system in which the change in output from a laser melt level sensor was used to control the rate at which silicon pellets were fed to replace the material frozen into web crystal. The melt level was controlled to about +- 0.1mm, well within the range required for stable long term web growth. This is an important step toward the development of a fully automated silicon web growth machine. A second major highlight of this quarter was the completion of an engineering design for a semi-automated web growth machine embodying all the desired features developed so far as part of this program (including e.g. melt replenishment, level sensing and control) as well as some system simplifications. The completed design will serve as a basis for complete system automation.

Duncan, C.S.; Seidensticker, R.G.; McHugh, J.P.; Skutch, M.E.; Hopkins, R.H.

1980-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

400

Solar Energy Market Forecast | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Energy Market Forecast Solar Energy Market Forecast Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Solar Energy Market Forecast Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Energy Sector: Energy Focus Area: Solar Topics: Market analysis, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Publications Website: giffords.house.gov/DOE%20Perspective%20on%20Solar%20Market%20Evolution References: Solar Energy Market Forecast[1] Summary " Energy markets / forecasts DOE Solar America Initiative overview Capital market investments in solar Solar photovoltaic (PV) sector overview PV prices and costs PV market evolution Market evolution considerations Balance of system costs Silicon 'normalization' Solar system value drivers Solar market forecast Additional resources"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicrystalline silicon solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

No Foolin': Iron Pyrite Solar Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 17, 2009 ... News from the University of California, Berkeley ... Unlike silicon and other solar materials commonly used today, these alternatives are...

402

DOE Solar Decathlon: 2005 Teams - Cornell University  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

benefited from interdisciplinary cooperation. Computer-generated image of Cornell's 2005 Solar Decathlon house. The Cornell house's crystalline-silicon PV panels power a heat pump...

403

SunShot Initiative: Solar Energy Glossary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

silicon wafer undergoes performance testing for efficiency at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The solar glossary contains definitions for technical terms related to...

404

Bangkok Solar Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Bangkok Solar Co Ltd Place Chachoengsao, Thailand Zip 24140 Product Manufacturer of thin-film amorphous silicon modules, distributes in...

405

CRADA Final Report: Process development for hybrid solar cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

development for hybrid solar cells Summary of the specific20 wafers with full tandem solar cell test structure perIIINitride/Silicon Tandem Solar Cell, Appl. Phys. Express

Ager, Joel W

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Efficiency enhancement of luminescent solar concentrations for photovoltaic technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dyes. Photovoltaic (PV) solar cells are used to attach atis fa- vored by the silicon PV solar cells for the LSC PVemission properties for PV solar cells. We studied e?ect of

Wang, Chunhua

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Low cost silicon solar array project, silicon materials task. Establishment of the feasibility of a process capable of low-cost, high-volume production of silane (Step I) and the pyrolysis of silane to semiconductor-grade silicon (Step II). Quarterly progress report, October--December 1977. [Silicon tetrachlorides  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Kinetics and equilibria for the hydrogenation of silicon tetrachloride have shown that conversion to trichlorosilane is substantially increased at higher operating pressures; these results greatly improve the practicality of the overall process. An integrated process development unit for converting metallurgical silicon and hydrogen to high-purity silane has been commissioned. A quartz fluid-bed reactor capable of operating at temperatures of up to 1000/sup 0/C was designed, constructed, and successfully operated. A total of 6.7 Kg of silicon powder was produced in two separate experiments in the free-space reactor without opening the reactor between experiments. No measurable impurities were detected in the silicon powder produced by the free-space reactor, using the cathode layer emission spectroscopic technique. A 152 mm-diameter melt consolidation apparatus was attached to the free-space reactor. The first objective for the overall process was the definition of a preliminary set of functional specifications. All process design efforts are based on these specifications. Preliminary block flow diagrams and heat and material balances for every battery-limit stream were completed for the 25 MT/year experimental facility. A brief parametric study was conducted to select an optimum range of operating pressures for the distillation columns. Conceptual designs have been initiated for the hydrogenation reactor, the free-space reactor, and the consolidation system.

Breneman, W.C.; Cheung, H.; Farrier, E.G.; Morihara, H.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Low Silicon Solar Array Project. Feasibility of low-cost, high-volume production of silane and pyrolysis of silane to semiconductor-grade silicon. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research on silane production in a hydrogenation reactor is described. The kinetics and chemical equilibrium for the liquid phase disproportionation of H/sub 2/SiCl/sub 4/ and HSiCl/sub 3/ were studied and results are presented and discussed. Status of the studies on the feasibility and cost of manufacturing semiconductor grade polycrystalline silicon by the pyrolysis of silane in a fluid bed reactor and in a free space reactor is reported. Process design, the waste disposal system, and equipment specifications for the fluid bed pyrolysis of silane for silicon production are described. (WHK)

Breneman, W.C.; Farrier, E.G.; Morihara, H.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Signet Solar Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Signet Solar Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Signet Solar Inc Place Palo Alto, California Zip 94306 Product US-based manufacturer of amorphous silicon thin-film modules....

410

Solar fuels : integration of molecular catalysts with p-type semiconductor photocathode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

multi junction photovoltaic cell which can generate agrown Silicon nanowires photovoltaic cell with solid/liquidH. Fundamentals of solar cells : photovoltaic solar energy

Kumar, Bhupendra

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Award-Winning Etching Process Cuts Solar Cell Costs (Revised) (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The NREL "black silicon" nanocatalytic wet-chemical etch is an inexpensive, one-step method to minimize reflections from crystalline silicon solar cells. The technology enables high-efficiency solar cells without the use of expensive antireflection coatings.

Not Available

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Evaluation of selected chemical processes for production of low-cost silicon: Phase III. Silicon Material Task, Low-Cost Solar Array Project. Sixteenth/seventeenth quarterly progress report, July-December 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The method under development for the production of semiconductor grade silicon is based on the zinc vapor reduction of silicon tetrachloride in a fluidized bed of seed particles. Construction of the PDU was completed during the report period, the fluidized-bed reactor was coated internally with silicon/SiC, and the operation of several systems was checked out. However, problems with the zinc feed system, unrelated to its basic operability, delayed introduction of zinc vapor to the PDU. At the end of the report period, the zinc feed system stood ready for tests of the control of zinc vapor feed rate by regulation of r.f. induction heating directly coupled to the liquid zinc. A study of the zinc distribution in miniplant silicon products containing zinc at the 300 and 3000 ppM levels suggests that the occlusion of zinc is caused by zinc mist entrained from the vaporizer, and it should be possible to drive the level to below 300 ppM by proper equipment design and process control.

Blocher, J.M. Jr.; Browning, M.F.

1980-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

413

Low-Cost Solar Array Project. Experimental process system development unit for producing semiconductor-grade silicon using the silane-to-silicon process. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on the engineering design, fabrication, assembly, operation, economic analysis, and process support R and D for an Experimental Process System Development Unit (EPSDU) for producing semiconductor-grade silicon using the silane-to-silicon process. Most of the process related equipment has been ordered and is being fabricated. Equipment and building foundations have been completed at the EPSDU site, and all the steel was erected for the gantry. The switch gear/control building and the melter building will be completed during the next quarter. The data collection system design is progressing. Various computer programs are being written which will be used to convert electrical, pneumatic and other raw signals into engineering values. The free-space reactor development work was completed with a final 12-hour run in which the free-space reactor PDU ran flawlessly. Also, the quality control method development task was completed. Slim rods were grown from seed silicon rods for subsequent float zone operation and impurity characterization. An excellent quality epitaxial film was deposited on a silicon wafer. Both undoped ad doped films were deposited and the resistivity of the films have been measured. (WHK)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Solar Chemical Peculiarities? By  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Several investigations of FGK stars in the solar neighborhood have suggested that thin-disk stars with an iron abundance similar to the Sun appear to show higher abundances of other elements, such as silicon, titanium, or nickel. Offsets could arise if the samples contain stars with ages, mean galactocentric distances, or kinematics, that differ on average from the solar values. They could also arise due to systematic errors in the abundance determinations, if the samples contain stars that are different from the Sun regarding their atmospheric parameters. We re-examine this issue by studying a sample of 80 nearby stars with solar-like colors and luminosities. Among these solar analogs, the objects with solar iron abundances exhibit solar abundances of carbon, silicon, calcium, titanium and nickel. 1.

Carlos Allende Prieto

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Solar Chemical Peculiarities?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Several investigations of FGK stars in the solar neighborhood have suggested that thin-disk stars with an iron abundance similar to the Sun appear to show higher abundances of other elements, such as silicon, titanium, or nickel. Offsets could arise if the samples contain stars with ages, mean galactocentric distances, or kinematics, that differ on average from the solar values. They could also arise due to systematic errors in the abundance determinations, if the samples contain stars that are different from the Sun regarding their atmospheric parameters. We re-examine this issue by studying a sample of 80 nearby stars with solar-like colors and luminosities. Among these solar "analogs", the objects with solar iron abundances exhibit solar abundances of carbon, silicon, calcium, titanium and nickel.

Carlos Allende Prieto

2006-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

416

Design, construction and testing of a high-vacuum anneal chamber for in-situ crystallisation of silicon thin-film solar cells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Thin-film solar cells on glass substrates are likely to have a bright future due to the potentially low costs and the short energy payback times. (more)

Weber, Jrgen Wolfgang

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Solar Torx New Solar Ventures | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Torx New Solar Ventures Torx New Solar Ventures Jump to: navigation, search Name Solar Torx / New Solar Ventures Place Arizona Product Set up in November 2005 to secure finance for a thin-film amorphous silicon cell and module manufacturing plant, and an associated 300MW power project. No evidence of progress as of June 2008, has probably been abandoned. References Solar Torx / New Solar Ventures[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Solar Torx / New Solar Ventures is a company located in Arizona . References ↑ "Solar Torx / New Solar Ventures" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Solar_Torx_New_Solar_Ventures&oldid=351340" Categories:

418

Northeast Solar Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Northeast Solar Energy Northeast Solar Energy Research Center (NSERC) A multi-purpose research facility on the BNL campus Solar PV Array Size and Type * ~1.0 MW total - Area 1 sized for testing utility-scale inverters * System voltage level of 1,000V * Connected to BNL electrical distribution system * Capability to test multiple panel technologies with crystalline silicon PV modules making up the bulk of the array * Capability to re-configure the array into

419

Solar cells conversion efficiency maximisation based on sol-gel method and front surface texturisation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents experiments and evaluations on a new silicon solar cell structure obtained by texturisation of the front surface using silicon micromachining technologies. The textured surface of the solar cell is made in order to reduce frontal ... Keywords: light trapping, micromachining, silicon, sol-gel method, solar cells, texturisation

Lucian Milea; Orest Oltu; Claudius Teodorescu; Verona Muntean; Marius Stoian

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Solar cells with a twist Comments ( 35)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar cells with a twist Article Comments ( 35) JULIE STEENHUYSEN REUTERS OCTOBER 7, 2008 AT 9:58 AM EDT CHICAGO -- U.S. researchers have found a way to make efficient silicon-based solar cells of buildings as opportunities for solar energy," Prof. Rogers said in a telephone interview. Solar cells, which

Rogers, John A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicrystalline silicon solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Measurment of Depositing and Bombarding Species Involved in the Plasma Production of Amorphous Silicon and Silicon/Germanium Solar Cells: Annual Technical Report, 1 June 2002 - 31 May 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to measure the molecular species that lead to the growth of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and microcrystalline silicon (..mu..c-Si) photovoltaic (PV) devices from RF discharges. Neutral radicals produce most of the film growth during this PV-device production, and, by implication, radicals primarily determine the device structure and electrical characteristics. The most important feature of the present experiment is thus the measurement of neutral-radical fluxes to the substrate. Additional depositing species that can influence film properties are positive ions and silicon-based particles produced by the discharge; we also measure these positive-ion species here. Some studies have already measured some of these radical and positive-ion species in silane and silane/argon discharges, but not for discharge conditions similar to those used to produce most photovoltaic devices. Our objective is to measure all of these species for conditions typically used for device production. In particular, we have studied 13.6 MHz-excited discharges in pure silane and silane/hydrogen vapors.

Gallagher, A.; Rozsa, K.; Horvath, P.; Kujundcik, D.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Removal of Boron from Silicon by Steam and Hydrogen Impinging Jets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Removal of Boron from Silicon by Steam and Hydrogen Impinging Jets. Author(s) ... grade silicon to the solar grade silicon target in a simple impinging jet setup. ... FOR NEXT GENERATION LOW-COST c-Si PHOTOVOLTAICS SYSTEMS ... Tracing impurities in silicon production in the microwave furnace...

423

Evaluation of selected chemical processes for production of low-cost silicon (Phase II). Silicon Material Task Low-Cost Silicon Solar Array Project. Eighth quarterly progress report, July 1, 1977--September 30, 1977. [Zinc vapor reduction of silicon tetrachloride in fluidized bed of seed particles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported in the design of a large experimental facility for the preparation of high-purity silicon by the zinc vapor reduction of silicon tetrachloride in a fluidized bed of seed particles to form a free-flowing granular product. As of July 25, 1977, the capacity goal for the experimental facility was raised from 25 to 50 MT Si/year. Process flow diagrams and materials/energy flow sheets have been revised to conform to the higher capacity and a plant layout has been developed for locating the facility within an available structure. A unit-by-unit review of instrumentation and other requirements has been made, with the inclusion of those items in the flow diagrams and flow sheets. Alternative designs are presented for a silicon carbide-coated carbon-lined fluidized-bed reactor contained in hot-wall stainless steel, including alternative designs for zinc vaporizers based on detailed heat-transfer calculations. Conditions and equipment for the conversion of by-product chlorine to hypochlorite for use in the treatment of sewage effluent locally were defined. The logistics of 19 percent NaOH delivery and pick-up of 14 percent NaOCL was worked out and equipment suppliers were identified. Heat dissipation requirements for the fluidized bed, Zn/ZnCl/sub 2/ condenser, and SiCl/sub 4/ waste disposal sections were established. Resistivity and purity data were obtained for DuPont's silicon prepared by batchwise zinc reduction of SiCl/sub 4/. A preliminary safety review was made of the experimental facility. During the report period, the miniplant was operated to (1) provide 2.2 kg of product for JPL evaluation, (2) evaluate methods of product withdrawal, and (3) test three zinc vaporizer concepts. Results of the zinc vaporizer tests were consistent with concurrent heat-transfer calculations. An average value of approximately 450 Btu hr/sup -1/ ft/sup -2/ F/sup -1/ for heat transfer from graphite to boiling zinc (1 atm) was determined.

Blocher, J.M. Jr.; Browning, M.F.; Wilson, W.J.; Carmichael, D.C.

1977-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

424

Low Cost Solar Array Project. Task I. Silicon material. Gaseous melt replenishment system. Fifth quarterly progress report, 17 April-17 July 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to develop an improved silicon production reactor with periodic batch delivery of product to either a casting or shotting process or through a liquid silicon transfer system directly to a crystal growth system. Progress is reported. The processes and equipment are scaled such that a modest investment can make available to the Czochralski crystal grower a low cost source of silicon. In addition, the smaller scale of operation means that the systems can be put into operation without large capital investments, guarantees of markets, etc. The chemical reactions are those in commercial usage now: deposition from a hydrogen - chlorosilane mixture. The major innovation is in reactor design which allows a high productivity of silicon. The reactor has been conservatively sized on the basis of epitaxial deposition rates. The conclusion of this calculation is that a reasonably sized system can produce rapidly enough to keep pace with either 10cm or 12cm diameter Czochralski crystal growth operating in a semi-continuous mode. (WHK)

Jewett, D.N.; Bates, H.E.; Hill, D.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Characterization of temperature profile in furnace and solubility of iron in silicon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A better understanding of the behavior of impurities, such as iron, in silicon can lead to increases in solar cell efficiency. The purpose of this thesis was to study the behavior of iron in silicon via three sub-tasks: ...

Modi, Vrajesh Y

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Photon Sciences | About Photon Sciences | Solar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Fabrics? Solar Backpacks? Go Organic! Solar Fabrics? Solar Backpacks? Go Organic! « Back Ioana Gearba and Ron Pindak Ioana Gearba (right), a former researcher at the CFN, and Ron Pindak, Physical and Chemical Sciences Division Head at the NSLS, display the enhanced polythiophene blended solar cells. You've probably noticed solar panels sprouting on rooftops in your neighborhood. Solar panels are made out of multiple solar cells, which are commonly manufactured out of silicon, the same material in sand. When sunlight hits a solar panel, electrons in the silicon get agitated and flow through wires built into the panel, making electricity. Solar panels on roofs are now commonplace. But have you spotted any backpacks sporting solar cells? They're made out of organic materials - commonly polymers, or plastics, for absorbing light and transporting

427

Performance and Reliability of the Solar Progress Photovoltaic Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amorphous silicon is presently a leading contender for cost-effective photovoltaic power generation. Findings reported here confirm that the Solar Progress experimental power plant with amorphous silicon modules operated with high reliability, and no unexpected problems arose.

1991-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

428

Photocharge transport and recombination measurements in amorphous silicon films and solar cells by photoconductive frequency mixing. Annual subcontract report, May 13, 1994--May 12, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The continuous decay of electron drift mobility in intrinsic a-Si:H and a-SiC:H upon light soaking was investigated by the photomixing technique. The photoconductivity, lifetime and drift mobility in intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) while light-soaking were determined using a photomixing technique. In addition to the decay of the photoconductivity and electron lifetime, continuous decay of the electron drift mobility was found during the light soaking process, which reveals a new phenomenon associated with the Staebler-Wronski effect. The drift mobility decreased by a factor of 2 for 20 hour light soaking at 2.5 sun intensity. Experimental data were fitted to a stretched exponential law. Different stretched-exponential parameters for photoconductivity, lifetime and drift mobility were obtained, which indicates the production of defects with different generation kinetics upon light soaking.

Braunstein, R.; Yang, Y.; Dong, S. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

The effect of hydrogen-plasma and PECVD-nitride deposition on bulk and surface passivation in string-ribbon silicon solar cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have investigated whether an in-situ hydrogen or ammonia rf-plasma treatment prior to a PECVD-nitride deposition would promote bulk defect passivation independently of surface effects. We also studied whether the predeposition of a thin silicon-nitride protective layer vbefore performing the plasma treatment would serve to minimize surface damage. We found that for the limited set of deposition conditions in of cells processed using the used five different deposition strategies and compared the resulting cell performance with that investigated so far, the direct deposition of PECVD-nitride produces the best cells on String Ribbon silicon wafers to date, with efficiencies up to 14.5%. Hydrogen and ammonia plasma pretreatments without a protective nitride layer resulted in better bulk passivation, but damaged surfaces. Pretreatments after deposition of the protective layer produced the best surface passivation, but were not effective in passivating the bulk.

Ruby, D.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wilbanks, W.L.; Fleddermann, C.B. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hanoka, J.I. [Evergreen Solar Inc., Waltham, MA (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Impact of solid-phase crystallization of amorphous silicon on the chemical structure of the buried Si/ZnO thin film solar cell interface  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The chemical interface structure between phosphorus-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon and aluminum-doped zinc oxide thin films is investigated with soft x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) before and after solid-phase crystallization (SPC) at 600C. In addition to the expected SPC-induced phase transition from amorphous to polycrystalline silicon, our XES data indicates a pronounced chemical interaction at the buried Si/ZnO interface. In particular, we find an SPC-enhanced formation of Si-O bonds and the accumulation of Zn in close proximity to the interface. For an assumed closed and homogeneous SiO2 interlayer, an effective thickness of (5+2)nm after SPC could be estimated.

Bar, M.; Wimmer, M.; Wilks, R. G.; Roczen, M.; Gerlach, D.; Ruske, F.; Lips, K.; Rech, B.; Weinhardt, L.; Blum, M.; Pookpanratana, S.; Krause, S.; Zhang, Y.; Heske, C.; Yang, W.; Denlinger, J. D.

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

431

Activ Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activ Solar Activ Solar Jump to: navigation, search Name Activ Solar Address Vienna, Wipplingerstrasse 35 Place Austria Zip 1010 Sector Solar Product The company's main business areas include production of silicon products and development of large-scale photovoltaic installations. Number of employees 1001-5000 References Activ Solar[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Activ Solar, headquartered in Vienna (Austria), is a global company focused on the development and manufacture of solar based technology. The company's main business areas include production of silicon products and development of large-scale photovoltaic installations. PJSC Semiconductor Plant, based

432

A charged particle transport analysis of the dose to a silicon-germanium thermoelectric element due to a solar flare event  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A version of the BRYNTRN baryon transport code written at the NASA Langley Research Center has been used to analyze the dose to a typical space reactor thermoelectric (TE) element due to a solar flare event. The code has been used in the past to calculate the dose/dose equivalent distributions to astronauts due to solar flares. It has been modified to accommodate multiple layers of spacecraft and component material. Differential and integrated doses to the TE element are presented and discussed. 5 refs.

Dandini, V.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

CHINT Solar Co Ltd aka Astronergy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CHINT Solar Co Ltd aka Astronergy CHINT Solar Co Ltd aka Astronergy Jump to: navigation, search Name CHINT Solar Co Ltd (aka Astronergy) Place Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, China Zip 310052 Sector Solar Product A subsidiary company of CHINT Group, producing multicrystalline and monocrystalline solar cells, modules, thin-film solar cells and PV application products. Coordinates 30.252501°, 120.165024° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.252501,"lon":120.165024,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

434

Definition: Solar cell | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar cell Solar cell (Redirected from Definition:PV cell) Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Solar cell Converts light into electrical energy. Traditional solar cells are made from silicon; second-generation solar cells (thin-film solar cells) are made from amorphous silicon or nonsilicon materials such as cadmium telluride; and third-generation solar cells are being made from variety of new materials, including solar inks, solar dyes, and conductive plastics.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A solar cell (also called a photovoltaic cell) is an electrical device that converts the energy of light directly into electricity by the photovoltaic effect. It is a form of photoelectric cell (in that its electrical characteristics-e.g. current, voltage, or resistance-vary

435

Silicon Film[trademark] photovoltaic manufacturing technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work on a project to develop an advanced low-cost manufacturing process for a new utility-scale flatplate module based on thin active layers of polycrystalline silicon on a low-cost substrate. This is called the Silicon-Film[trademark] process. This new power module is based on a new large solar cell that is 675 cm[sup 2] in area. Eighteen of these solar cells form a 170-W module. Twelve ofthese modules form a 2-kW array. The program has three components: (1) development of a Silicon-Film[trademark] wafer machine that can manufacture wafer 675 cm[sup 2] in size with a total product cost reductionof 70%; (2) development of an advanced solar cell manufacturing process that will turn the Silicon-Film[trademark] wafer into a 14%-efficient solar cell; and (3) development of an advanced module design based on these large-area, efficient silicon solar cells with an average power of 170 watts. The completion of these three tasks will lead to a new power module designed for utility and other power applications with asubstantially lower cost.

Bottenberg, W.R.; Hall, R.B.; Jackson, E.L.; Lampo, S.; Mulligan, W.E.; Barnett, A.M. (AstroPower, Inc., Newark, DE (United States))

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Concentrator silicon cell research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project continued the developments of high-efficiency silicon concentrator solar cells with the goal of achieving a cell efficiency in the 26 to 27 percent range at a concentration level of 150 suns of greater. The target efficiency was achieved with the new PERL (passivated emitter, rear locally diffused) cell structure, but only at low concentration levels around 20 suns. The PERL structure combines oxide passivation of both top and rear surfaces of the cells with small area contact to heavily doped regions on the top and rear surfaces. Efficiency in the 22 to 23 percent range was also demonstrated for large-area concentrator cells fabricated with the buried contact solar cell processing sequence, either when combined with prismatic covers or with other innovative approaches to reduce top contact shadowing. 19 refs.

Green, M.A.; Wenham, S.R.; Zhang, F.; Zhao, J.; Wang, A. [New South Wales Univ., Kensington (Australia). Solar Photovoltaic Lab.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Electroabsorption and transport measurements and modeling in amorphous-silicon-based solar cells: Phase I technical progress report, 24 March 1998--23 March 1999  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work done by the Syracuse University during Phase 1 of this subcontract. Researchers performed work in the following areas: (1) In ``Electroabsorption measurements and built-in potentials in a-Si:H-based solar cells and devices'', researchers obtained an estimate of Vbi = 1.17 V in cells with a-SiGe:H absorber layers from United Solar Systems Corp. (2) In ``Solar cell modeling employing the AMPS computer program'', researchers began operating a simple AMPS modeling site and explored the effect of conduction bandtail width on Voc computed analytical approximations and the AMPS program. The quantitative differences between the two procedures are discussed. (3) In ``Drift mobility measurements in a-Si:H made with high hydrogen dilution'', researchers measured electron and hole mobilities in several n/i/Ni (semitransparent) cells from Pennsylvania State University with a-Si absorber layers made under maximal hydrogen dilution and found a modest increase in hole mobility in these materials compared to conventional a-Si:H. (4) In ``Electroabsorption spectroscopy in solar cells'', researchers discovered and interpreted an infrared absorption band near 1.0 eV, which they believe is caused by dopants and defects at the n/i interface of cells, and which also has interesting implications for the nature of electroabsorption and for the doping mechanism in n-type material.

Schiff, E. A.; Lyou, J.; Kopidakis, N.; Rao, P.; Yuan, Q.

1999-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

438

Photocharge transport and recombination measurements in amorphous silicon films and solar cells by photoconductive frequency mixing: Annual subcontract report, 20 April 1998--19 April 1999  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the present phase of the program, the transport parameters of a number of amorphous semiconductors prepared by a number of techniques were determined by the photoconductive frequency mixing technique. This technique enabled the authors to determine the drift mobility, md, and the photomixing lifetime, t. The technique is based on the idea of heterodyne detection for photoconductors. When two similarly polarized monochromatic optical beams of slightly different frequencies are incident upon a photoconductor, the generation rate of electron-hole pairs will produce a photocurrent, when a dc-bias is applied, which will contain components resulting from the square of the sum of the individual incident fields. Consequently, a photocurrent will be produced, which will consist of a direct current and a microwave current corresponding to the beat frequency. These two currents allow a separate determination of the drift mobility and the photomixing lifetime of the photogenerated carriers. In the present work, the longitudinal modes of a He-Ne laser were employed to generate a beat frequency of 252 MHz; all the measurements were performed at this frequency for the data indicated in the accompanying figures. The following topics were explored: Measurements of the charge transport parameters of homogeneous a-SiGe:H alloys produced by NREL employing the hot-wire technique; The change in the charge transport parameters in the transition from hydrogenated amorphous silicon to microcrystalline silicon for material produced by NREL and MVSystems; The improvement in instrumentation of the photomixing measurements; Measurements of the hydrostatic dependency of the transport parameters of amorphous silicon; and Preliminary photomixing measurements on p-i-n devices.

Braunstein, R.; Kattwinkel, A.; Liebe, J.; Sun, G.

2000-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

439

Studies of pure and nitrogen-incorporated hydrogenated amorphous carbon thin films and their possible application for amorphous silicon solar cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) and nitrogen-incorporated a-C:H (a-C:N:H) thin films were deposited using radio frequency-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique and studied for their electrical, optical, and nano-mechanical properties. Introduction of nitrogen and increase of self bias enhanced the conductivity of a-C:H and a-C:N:H films, whereas current-voltage measurement reveals heterojunction formation due to their rectifying behavior. The bandgap of these films was changed over wide range from 1.9 eV to 3.45 eV by varying self bias and the nitrogen incorporation. Further, activation energy was correlated with the electronic structure of a-C:H and a-C:N:H films, and conductivity was discussed as a function of bandgap. Moreover, a-C:N:H films exhibited high hardness and elastic modulus, with maximum values as 42 GPa and 430 GPa, respectively, at -100 V. Observed fascinating electrical, optical, and nano-mechanical properties made it a material of great utility in the development of optoelectronic devices, such as solar cells. In addition, we also performed simulation study for an a-Si:H solar cell, considering a-C:H and C:N:H as window layers, and compared their performance with the a-Si:H solar cell having a-SiC:H as window layer. We also proposed several structures for the development of a near full-spectrum solar cell. Moreover, due to high hardness, a-C:N:H films can be used as a protective and encapsulate layer on solar cells, especially in n-i-p configuration on metal substrate. Nevertheless, a-C:H and a-C:N:H as a window layer can avoid the use of additional hard and protective coating and, hence, minimize the cost of the product.

Dwivedi, Neeraj [Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, National Physical Laboratory (CSIR), K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India); Kumar, Sushil [Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, National Physical Laboratory (CSIR), K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Malik, Hitendra K. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Solar cell array interconnects  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrical interconnects are disclosed for solar cells or other electronic components using a silver-silicone paste or a lead-tin (Pb-Sn) no-clean fluxless solder cream, whereby the high breakage of thin (<6 mil thick) solar cells using conventional solder interconnect is eliminated. The interconnects of this invention employs copper strips which are secured to the solar cells by a silver-silicone conductive paste which can be used at room temperature, or by a Pb-Sn solder cream which eliminates undesired residue on the active surfaces of the solar cells. Electrical testing using the interconnects of this invention has shown that no degradation of the interconnects developed under high current testing, while providing a very low contact resistance value. 4 figs.

Carey, P.G.; Thompson, J.B.; Colella, N.J.; Williams, K.A.

1995-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicrystalline silicon solar" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.