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1

result formats | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

result formats Home Jweers's picture Submitted by Jweers(83) Contributor 16 May, 2013 - 14:22 Multicolor Maps from Compound Queries ask queries compound queries developer Google...

2

multicolor | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

11 11 Varnish cache server Home Groups Community Central Green Button Applications Developer Utility Rate FRED: FRee Energy Database More Public Groups Private Groups Features Groups Blog posts Content Stream Documents Discussions Polls Q & A Events Notices My stuff Energy blogs 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142234911 Varnish cache server multicolor Home Jweers's picture Submitted by Jweers(83) Contributor 16 May, 2013 - 14:22 Multicolor Maps from Compound Queries ask queries compound queries developer Google maps maps multicolor result formats results Semantic Mediawiki Hi all, Recently, a couple of people on OpenEI have asked me how to do compound (or multicolor) maps like this one: Syndicate content 429 Throttled (bot load)

3

Multicolor Maps from Compound Queries | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Multicolor Maps from Compound Queries Multicolor Maps from Compound Queries Home > Groups > OpenEI Community Central Jweers's picture Submitted by Jweers(83) Contributor 16 May, 2013 - 14:22 ask queries compound queries developer Google maps maps multicolor result formats results Semantic Mediawiki Hi all, Recently, a couple of people on OpenEI have asked me how to do compound (or multicolor) maps like this one: Thanks to the new Google Maps v3 API, this is really easy. I put together a quick sample of how this is done, complete with code snippits, here: http://en.openei.org/wiki/User:Jweers/Test5. First, create a compound query, then atttribute a custom marker icon to each query using the ;param=value syntax. The new OpenEI maps extension will take care of the rest. Here is an example of it in use on OpenEI by NREL's Geothermal team:

4

Help:FormattingResults | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FormattingResults FormattingResults Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 UL 2 Google Pie Charts 3 Outline 4 Calendar 5 Timeline 6 Gallery 7 Google Map 8 Geochart Ask Queries are used to pull results from semantic wiki content and can be displayed in a variety of formats. This page lists examples of the more common formats with the code used to generate them and when applicable, links to eternal help documents describing the options available for each format. When writing an ask query, one specifies the format with |format=. The examples below contain the ask query code used to generate them, including the format declaration. UL BioPower Atlas and BioFuels Atlas Biomass Energy Data Book CLIMWAT 2.0 CROPWAT 8.0 {{#ask:[[Category:Tools]] [[ProgramTopics::Resource assessment]] [[ProgramResources::Dataset]]

5

results | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5 5 Varnish cache server Home Groups Community Central Green Button Applications Developer Utility Rate FRED: FRee Energy Database More Public Groups Private Groups Features Groups Blog posts Content Stream Documents Discussions Polls Q & A Events Notices My stuff Energy blogs 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142235135 Varnish cache server results Home Jweers's picture Submitted by Jweers(83) Contributor 16 May, 2013 - 14:22 Multicolor Maps from Compound Queries ask queries compound queries developer Google maps maps multicolor result formats results Semantic Mediawiki Hi all, Recently, a couple of people on OpenEI have asked me how to do compound (or multicolor) maps like this one: Syndicate content 429 Throttled (bot load)

6

Multicolor, High Efficiency, Nanotextured LEDs  

SciTech Connect

We report on research results in this project which synergize advanced material science approaches with fundamental optical physics concepts pertaining to light-matter interaction, with the goal of solving seminal problems for the development of very high performance light emitting diodes (LEDs) in the blue and green for Solid State Lighting applications. Accomplishments in the duration of the contract period include (i) heteroepitaxy of nitrogen-polar LEDs on sapphire, (ii) heteroepitaxy of semipolar (11{bar 2}2) green LEDs on sapphire, (iii) synthesis of quantum-dot loaded nanoporous GaN that emits white light without phosphor conversion, (iv) demonstration of the highest quality semipolar (11{bar 2}2) GaN on sapphire using orientation-controlled epitaxy, (v) synthesis of nanoscale GaN and InGaN medium, and (vi) development of a novel liftoff process for manufacturing GaN thin-film vertical LEDs. The body of results is presented in this report shows how a solid foundation has been laid, with several noticeable accomplishments, for innovative research, consistent with the stated milestones.

Jung Han; Arto Nurmikko

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

7

Single-fiber multi-color pyrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is a fiber-based multi-color pyrometry set-up for real-time non-contact temperature and emissivity measurement. The system includes a single optical fiber to collect radiation emitted by a target, a reflective rotating chopper to split the collected radiation into two or more paths while modulating the radiation for lock-in amplification (i.e., phase-sensitive detection), at least two detectors possibly of different spectral bandwidths with or without filters to limit the wavelength regions detected and optics to direct and focus the radiation onto the sensitive areas of the detectors. A computer algorithm is used to calculate the true temperature and emissivity of a target based on blackbody calibrations. The system components are enclosed in a light-tight housing, with provision for the fiber to extend outside to collect the radiation. Radiation emitted by the target is transmitted through the fiber to the reflective chopper, which either allows the radiation to pass straight through or reflects the radiation into one or more separate paths. Each path includes a detector with or without filters and corresponding optics to direct and focus the radiation onto the active area of the detector. The signals are recovered using lock-in amplification. Calibration formulas for the signals obtained using a blackbody of known temperature are used to compute the true temperature and emissivity of the target. The temperature range of the pyrometer system is determined by the spectral characteristics of the optical components.

Small, IV, Ward (Livermore, CA); Celliers, Peter (Berkeley, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Single-fiber multi-color pyrometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This invention is a fiber-based multi-color pyrometry set-up for real-time non-contact temperature and emissivity measurement. The system includes a single optical fiber to collect radiation emitted by a target, a reflective rotating chopper to split the collected radiation into two or more paths while modulating the radiation for lock-in amplification (i.e., phase-sensitive detection), at least two detectors possibly of different spectral bandwidths with or without filters to limit the wavelength regions detected and optics to direct and focus the radiation onto the sensitive areas of the detectors. A computer algorithm is used to calculate the true temperature and emissivity of a target based on blackbody calibrations. The system components are enclosed in a light-tight housing, with provision for the fiber to extend outside to collect the radiation. Radiation emitted by the target is transmitted through the fiber to the reflective chopper, which either allows the radiation to pass straight through or reflects the radiation into one or more separate paths. Each path includes a detector with or without filters and corresponding optics to direct and focus the radiation onto the active area of the detector. The signals are recovered using lock-in amplification. Calibration formulas for the signals obtained using a blackbody of known temperature are used to compute the true temperature and emissivity of the target. The temperature range of the pyrometer system is determined by the spectral characteristics of the optical components.

Small, W. IV; Celliers, P.

2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

9

Monolithic multi-color light emission/detection device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A single-crystal, monolithic, tandem, multi-color optical transceiver device is described, including (a) an InP substrate having upper and lower surfaces, (b) a first junction on the upper surface of the InP substrate, (c) a second junction on the first junction. The first junction is preferably GaInAsP of defined composition, and the second junction is preferably InP. The two junctions are lattice matched. The second junction has a larger energy band gap than the first junction. Additional junctions having successively larger energy band gaps may be included. The device is capable of simultaneous and distinct multi-color emission and detection over a single optical fiber.

Wanlass, Mark W. (Golden, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Fracturing results in diatomaceous earth formations, South Belridge Field, California  

SciTech Connect

The company began fracturing diatomaceous earth zones in the San Joaquin Valley (CA) in 1976. Fracturing has proved an effective method of exploiting these previously noncommercial reservoirs. Nevertheless, productivity behavior is typified by high initial rates followed by rapid decline. Reasons for this decline have been evaluated and are discussed. Also discussed are laboratory experiments performed to determine an appropriate fracture design for this formation.

Strubhar, M.K.; Andreani, F.S.; Medlin, W.L.; Nabi, S.M.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Fracturing results in diatomaceous earth formations, South Belridge Field, California  

SciTech Connect

Fracturing significantly increases light oil production rates at South Belridge making this an economically successful technique for exploitation of the Reef Ridge reservoir. No fracturing mechanics problems were encountered in any of the treatments. The loosely consolidated formations behaved mechanically much like brittle, elastic rocks. Net oil and gross production is typified by initial high rates and an early rapid decline. The major cause of this early rapid decline is the transient flow effect. This behavior is typical of low permeability oil and gas production. Fractures are vertical, as shown by gamma ray and temperature logs run following several treatments. The fractures grow slightly out of the perforated intervals (10 to 15 feet). Loss of fracture conductivity due to fines migration, scale deposition, and/or fracture healing (imbedment) is not a serious problem. Oil viscosity can vary as much as ten-fold. Some wells produce significant amounts of gas--100 to 200 MCFPD initially. The formation is primarily diatomaceous earth which is very fine particle size siliceous material composed of whole or fragmented diatom tests (skeletons). There is no evidence that clay swelling or dispersion is a problem. Field and laboratory data support this conclusion. Aqueous fracturing fluids were successfully used which confirmed laboratory tests on cores.

Strubhar, M.K.; Medin, W.L.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

compound queries | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- 15:22 Multicolor Maps from Compound Queries ask queries compound queries developer Google maps maps multicolor result formats results Semantic Mediawiki Hi all, Recently, a...

13

ask queries | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- 15:22 Multicolor Maps from Compound Queries ask queries compound queries developer Google maps maps multicolor result formats results Semantic Mediawiki Hi all, Recently, a...

14

maps | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- 15:22 Multicolor Maps from Compound Queries ask queries compound queries developer Google maps maps multicolor result formats results Semantic Mediawiki Hi all, Recently, a...

15

Soap Manufacturing TechnologyChapter 12 Manufacture of Multicolored and Multicomponent Soaps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soap Manufacturing Technology Chapter 12 Manufacture of Multicolored and Multicomponent Soaps Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press Downloadable pdf of\tChapter 12 Manufacture of Mult

16

Uncooled infrared photon detector and multicolor infrared detection using microoptomechanical sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems and methods for infrared detection are described. An optomechanical photon detector includes a semiconductor material and is based on measurement of a photoinduced lattice strain. A multicolor infrared sensor includes a stack of frequency specific optomechanical detectors. The stack can include one, or more, of the optomechanical photon detectors that function based on the measurement of photoinduced lattice strain. The systems and methods provide advantages in that rapid, sensitive multicolor infrared imaging can be performed without the need for a cooling subsystem.

Datskos, Panagiotis G. (Knoxville, TN); Rajic, Solobodan (Knoxville, TN); Datskou, Irene C. (Knoxville, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

New Result Formats on OpenEI | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New Result Formats on OpenEI New Result Formats on OpenEI Home > Groups > OpenEI Community Central Jweers's picture Submitted by Jweers(83) Contributor 25 March, 2013 - 12:22 developer mediawiki OpenEI Semantic Mediawiki wiki As a result of the recent upgrade, and some internal improvements, OpenEI now features a host of new result formats to enhance your wiki content. You can find a list of them right here: http://semantic-mediawiki.org/wiki/Result_formats I would like to call extra attention to two of these: Valuerank, which shows the number of things in a query (e.q. number of companies in a country) without the need for aggregating queries. (Once implemented, this will simplify LEDS maps and solve the latency issues we were seeing with activities/organizations per country). Listwidget, which builds a clean pagination mechanism for navigation

18

Generation and Manipulation of Multi-Color Stationary Light Field Using Electromagnetically Induced Transperancy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamic control of a weak quantum probe light pulse for the generation and quantum manipulations of a stationary multi-color (MC-) light field in a resonant coherent atomic medium using electromagnetically induced transparency is proposed. The manipulations have been analyzed based on the analytical solution of the adiabatic limit in the evolution of MC-light fields resulting from interaction of the slow probe light with the new fields generated in the nondegenerate multi-wave mixing scheme. We have found a critical stopping condition for the MC-light fields where the group velocity of light should reduce down to zero. Semiclassical dynamics and behavior of specific quantum correlations of the MC-light fields have been studied in detail for particular initial quantum states of the probe pulse. The stationary MC-field dynamics are treated in terms of dark MC-polariton states constructed for the studied multi-wave mixing processes. We have found the conditions for optimal manipulation of the MC-light while preserving the delicate quantum correlations of the initial probe light pulse. The quantum manipulations leading to the frequency and direction switching of the initial probe light pulse as well as to the quantum swapping of probe light into the new multi-frequency light fields have been proposed. The possibilities of the interaction time lengthening and enhancement of the electric field amplitudes of the stationary MC-light are also discussed for enhancement of the interactions with weak quantum fields in the spatially limited media.

S. A. Moiseev; B. S. Ham

2006-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

19

Minimum Multicolored Subgraph Problem in Multiplex PCR Primer Set Selection and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minimum Multicolored Subgraph Problem in Multiplex PCR Primer Set Selection and Population is a common generalization of minimum cost multiplex PCR primer set selection and maximum likeli- hood and its variants model two important bioinformatics problems: minimum cost multiplex PCR primer set

Mandoiu, Ion

20

Further results about field theory on the world sheet and string formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

O n The W o r l d Sheet A n d String Formation K o r k u tthe model has two phases: A string forming phase and acan be thought of as the string slope, which is now promoted

Bardakci, Korbut

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicolor result formats" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

THE RESULTS OF TESTING TO EVALUATE CRYSTAL FORMATION AND SETTLING IN THE COLD CRUCIBLE INDUCTION MELTER  

SciTech Connect

The Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) technology offers the potential to increase waste loading for High Level Waste (HLW) glasses leading to significant improvements in waste throughput rates compared to the reference Joule Heated Melter (JHM). Prior to implementation of a CCIM in a production facility it is necessary to better understand processing constraints associated with the CCIM. The glass liquidus temperature requirement for processing in the CCIM is an open issue. Testing was conducted to evaluate crystal formation and crystal settling during processing in the CCIM to gain insight into the effects on processing. A high aluminum/high iron content glass composition with known crystal formation tendencies was selected for testing. A continuous melter test was conducted for approximately 51 hours. To evaluate crystal formation, glass samples were obtained from pours and from glass receipt canisters where the glass melt had varying residence time in the melter. Additionally, upon conclusion of the testing, glass samples from the bottom of the melter were obtained to assess the degree of crystal settling. Glass samples were characterized in an attempt to determine quantitative fractions of crystals in the glass matrix. Crystal identity and relative composition were determined using a combination of x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). Select samples were also analyzed by digesting the glass and determining the composition using inductively coupled atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). There was evidence of crystal formation (primarily spinels) in the melt and during cooling of the collected glass. There was evidence of crystal settling in the melt over the duration of the melter campaign.

Marra, J.

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

22

The Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems: First Results from a Spitzer Legacy Science Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present 3-160 micron photometry obtained with the IRAC and MIPS instruments for the first five targets from the Spitzer Legacy Science Program "Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems" and 4-35 micron spectro-photometry obtained with the IRS for two sources. We discuss in detail our observations of the debris disks surrounding HD 105 (G0V, 30 +- 10 Myr) and HD 150706 (G3V, ~ 700 +- 300 Myr). For HD 105, possible interpretations include large bodies clearing the dust inside of 45 AU or a reservoir of gas capable of sculpting the dust distribution. The disk surrounding HD 150706 also exhibits evidence of a large inner hole in its dust distribution. Of the four survey targets without previously detected IR excess, spanning ages 30 Myr to 3 Gyr, the new detection of excess in just one system of intermediate age suggests a variety of initial conditions or divergent evolutionary paths for debris disk systems orbiting solar-type stars.

M. R. Meyer; L. A. Hillenbrand; D. E. Backman; S. V. W. Beckwith; J. Bouwman; T. Y. Brooke; J. M. Carpenter; M. Cohen; U. Gorti; T. Henning; D. C. Hines; D. Hollenbach; J. S. Kim; J. Lunine; R. Malhotra; E. E. Mamajek; S. Metchev; A. Moro--Martin; P. Morris; J. Najita; D. L. Padgett; J. Rodmann; M. D. Silverstone; D. R. Soderblom; J. R. Stauffer; E. B. Stobie; S. E. Strom; D. M. Watson; S. J. Weidenschilling; S. Wolf; E. Young; C. W. Engelbracht; K. D. Gordon; K. Misselt; J. Morrison; J. Muzerolle; K. Su

2004-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

23

Formation of Dense Partonic Matter in High Energy Heavy-Ion Collisions: Highlights of RHIC Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I review some important results from RHIC experiments. They were obtained in a unique environment for studying QCD bulk matter at temperatures and densities that surpass the limits where hadrons can exist as individual entities, raising the quark-gluon degrees of freedom to prominence. These findings support the major experimental observations from measuring the bulk properties of particle production, particle ratios and chemical freeze-out conditions, elliptic flow followed by hard probes measurements: di-jet fragment azimuthal correlations, high-pt hadron suppression, and heavy-flavors probes. I present the measurements as a function of collision centrality, energy, system size and for different particle species. These results reveal that a dense strongly interacting medium was created in central Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV: the RHIC discovery. Further, they suggest that this medium is partonic. However, the discoveries so far observed at RHIC are far from being understood fully. Accordingly, the focus of the experiments has shifted from the discovery phase to the detailed exploration phase of the properties of this medium.

Rachid Nouicer

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

24

The First Systematic Study of Type Ibc Supernova Multi-color Light-curves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present detailed optical photometry for 25 Type Ibc supernovae within d~150 Mpc obtained with the robotic Palomar 60-inch telescope in 2004-2007. This study represents the first uniform, systematic, and statistical sample of multi-color SNe Ibc light-curves available to date. We correct the light-curves for host galaxy extinction using a new technique based on the photometric color evolution, namely, we show that the (V-R) color of extinction-corrected SNe Ibc at t~10 days after V-band maximum is tightly distributed, (V-R)=0.26+-0.06 mag. Using this technique, we find that SNe Ibc typically suffer from significant host galaxy extinction, E(B-V)~0.4 mag. A comparison of the extinction-corrected light-curves for SNe Ib and Ic reveals that they are statistically indistinguishable, both in luminosity and decline rate. We report peak absolute magnitudes of M_R=-17.9+-0.9 mag and M_R=-18.3+-0.6 mag for SNe Ib and Ic, respectively. Focusing on the broad-lined SNe Ic, we find that they are more luminous than the n...

Drout, Maria R; Gal-Yam, A; Cenko, S B; Fox, D B; Leonard, D C; Sand, D J; Moon, D -S; Arcavi, I; Green, Y

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Multicolor photometry of the galaxies in the central region of Abell 2634  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An optical photometric observation with the BATC multicolor system is carried out for the central 56' x 56' region of the nearby cluster of galaxies, Abell 2634. We achieved the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 5572 sources detected down to $V \\sim 20$ mag, including 178 previously known galaxies, with fourteen filters covering a wavelength range from 3600 \\AA\\ to 10000 \\AA. After excluding the foreground and background galaxies, a sample of 124 known members is formed for an investigation of the SED properties. Based on the knowledge of SED properties of member galaxies, we performed the selection of faint galaxies belonging to Abell 2634. The color-color diagrams are powerful in the star/galaxy separation, and 359 faint galaxies are selected by their color features. The technique of photometric redshift and color-magnitude correlation for the early-type galaxies are applied for these faint galaxies, and a list of 74 faint member galaxies is achieved. Basis on the enlarged sample of member galaxies, the spatial distribution and color-magnitude relation of the galaxies in core region of Abell 2634 are discussed. We find a tendency that the color index dispersion of the early-type members is larger for the outer region, which might reflect some clues about the environmental effect on the evolution of galaxies in a cluster.

Qirong Yuan; Xu Zhou; Jiansheng Chen; Zhaoji Jiang; Jun Ma; Hong Wu; Suijian Xue; Jin Zhu

2002-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

26

High-order optical harmonic generation as a process of single atom interaction with sub-relativistic single- and multicolor laser fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a non-perturbative theory of a single atom interaction with the multicolor laser field. The theory is based on the use of exact mathematical solutions of the boundary value problem for 'an atom in the external field', as a result the case of arbitrary orientation of atomic angular momentum and electromagnetic wave polarization vector can be described in the consistent mathematical form. We also present the results of numerical simulations on silver and argon atoms interaction with single-and two-color laser fields formed by fundamental frequency and second harmonic of Ti:Sapphire laser. The results of numerical calculations show that the efficiency of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) depends strongly on the laser field parameters (especially on the orientation of polarization vectors and chirp of the two-color laser field components). We have demonstrated the saturation of the cut-off frequency in the laser fields of near-atomic strength and investigated the impact of the field phase in the case of ultrashort laser pulses.

Andreev, A. V.; Stremoukhov, S. Yu.; Shoutova, O. A. [M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, physical department, 119991 Leninskie Gory, 1, build. 2, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

27

DIPPER project 871 determination of ideal-gas enthalpies of formation for key compounds, The 1991 project results  

SciTech Connect

Results of a study aimed at improving group-contribution methodology for estimating thermodynamic properties of organic substances are reported. Specific weaknesses where particular group-contribution terms were unknown, or estimated because of lack of experimental data, are addressed by experimental studies of enthalpies of combustion in condensed phase, vapor-pressure measurements, and differential scanning calorimetric (d.s.c.) heat-capacity measurements. Ideal-gas enthalpies of formation of cyclohexene, phthalan (2,5-dihydrobenzo-3,4-furan), isoxazole, n-octylamine, di-n-octylamine, tri-n-octylamine, phenyl isocyanate, and 1,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidine are reported. Two-phase (liquid + vapor) heat capacities were determined for phthalan, isoxazole, the three octylamines, and phenyl isocyanate. Liquid-phase densities along the saturation line were measured for phthalan and isoxazole at 298 to 425 K. The critical temperature and critical density of n-octylamine were determined from d.s.c. results and critical pressure derived from the fitting procedures. Fitting procedures were used to derive critical temperatures, pressures, and densities for cyclohexene (pressure and density only), phthalan, isoxazole, di-n-octylamine, and phenyl isocyanate. Group-additivity parameters or ring-correction terms are derived.

Steele, W.V.; Chirico, R.D.; Knipmeyer, S.E.; Nguyen, A.; Tasker, I.R.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

MoO3 as combined hole injection layer and tapered spacer in combinatorial multicolor microcavity organic light emitting diodes  

SciTech Connect

Multicolor microcavity ({mu}C) organic light-emitting diode (OLED) arrays were fabricated simply by controlling the hole injection and spacer MoO{sub 3} layer thickness. The normal emission was tunable from {approx}490 to 640 nm and can be further expanded. A compact, integrated spectrometer with two-dimensional combinatorial arrays of {mu}C OLEDs was realized. The MoO{sub 3} yields more efficient and stable devices, revealing a new breakdown mechanism. The pixel current density reaches {approx}4 A/cm{sup 2} and a maximal normal brightness {approx}140 000 Cd/m{sup 2}, which improves photoluminescence-based sensing and absorption measurements.

Liu, R.; Xu, Chun; Biswas, Rana; Shinar, Joseph; Shinar, Ruth

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Hierarchical Structure Formation and Modes of Star Formation in Hickson Compact Group 31  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The handful of low-mass, late-type galaxies that comprise Hickson Compact Group 31 is in the midst of complex, ongoing gravitational interactions, evocative of the process of hierarchical structure formation at higher redshifts. With sensitive, multicolor Hubble Space Telescope imaging, we characterize the large population of <10 Myr old star clusters that suffuse the system. From the colors and luminosities of the young star clusters, we find that the galaxies in HCG 31 follow the same universal scaling relations as actively star-forming galaxies in the local Universe despite the unusual compact group environment. Furthermore, the specific frequency of the globular cluster system is consistent with the low end of galaxies of comparable masses locally. This, combined with the large mass of neutral hydrogen and tight constraints on the amount of intragroup light, indicate that the group is undergoing its first epoch of interaction-induced star formation. In both the main galaxies and the tidal-dwarf candida...

Gallagher, S C; Elmegreen, D M; Chandar, R; English, J; Charlton, J C; Gronwall, C; Young, J; Tzanavaris, P; Johnson, K E; de Oliveira, C Mendes; Whitmore, B; Hornschemeier, A E; Maybhate, A; Zabludoff, Ann

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Multicolor Underwater Imaging Techniques.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Studies were conducted on multispectral polarimetric subtraction imaging techniques for underwater imaging that use a broadband light source. The main objective of this study was… (more)

Waggoner, Douglas Scott

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

SEARCH RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home | search results Please enter one or more search words. ADVANCED SEARCH with all the words with the exact phrase with at least one of the words without the words File Format...

32

Influence of defect formation as a result of incorporation of a Mn {delta} layer on the photosensitiviy spectrum of InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of defect formation upon the deposition of a Mn {delta} layer and a GaAs coating layer (with the use of laser evaporation) on the photosensitivity spectra of heterostructures with InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells located in the near-surface region has been studied.

Gorshkov, A. P., E-mail: gorskovap@phys.unn.ru; Karpovich, I. A.; Pavlova, E. D.; Kalenteva, I. L. [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

Science Results Enabled by SDSS Astrometric Observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss several results made possible by accurate SDSS astrometric measurements in a large sky area, with emphasis on asteroids and stellar proper motions obtained by comparing POSS and SDSS. SDSS has observed over 200,000 moving objects in five photometric bands, corresponding to about two orders of magnitude increase over previous multi--color surveys. These data were used to extend the measurement of asteroid size distribution to a smaller size limit, to demonstrate that asteroid dynamical families, defined as clusters in orbital parameter space, also strongly segregate in color space, and to discover a correlation between asteroid age and colors. A preliminary analysis of SDSS-POSS proper motions for about 1 million M dwarf stars demonstrates that, in the 0.1-1 kpc distance range, the rotational velocity and its dispersion for disk stars increase with the distance from the Galactic plane.

Z. Ivezic; N. Bond; M. Juric; J. A. Munn; R. H. Lupton; J. R. Pier; G. S. Hennessy; G. R. Knapp; J. E. Gunn; C. M. Rockosi; T. Quinn

2007-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

34

VALIDATION AND RESULTS OF A PSEUDO-MULTI-ZONE COMBUSTION TRAJECTORY PREDICTION MODEL FOR CAPTURING SOOT AND NOX FORMATION ON A MEDIUM DUTY DIESEL ENGINE  

SciTech Connect

A pseudo-multi-zone phenomenological model has been created with the ultimate goal of supporting efforts to enable broader commercialization of low temperature combustion modes in diesel engines. The benefits of low temperature combustion are the simultaneous reduction in soot and nitric oxide emissions and increased engine efficiency if combustion is properly controlled. Determining what qualifies as low temperature combustion for any given engine can be difficult without expensive emissions analysis equipment. This determination can be made off-line using computer models or through factory calibration procedures. This process could potentially be simplified if a real-time prediction model could be implemented to run for any engine platform this is the motivation for this study. The major benefit of this model is the ability for it to predict the combustion trajectory, i.e. local temperature and equivalence ratio in the burning zones. The model successfully captures all the expected trends based on the experimental data and even highlights an opportunity for simply using the average reaction temperature and equivalence ratio as an indicator of emissions levels alone - without solving formation sub-models. This general type of modeling effort is not new, but a major effort was made to minimize the calculation duration to enable implementation as an input to real-time next-cycle engine controller Instead of simply using the predicted engine out soot and NOx levels, control decisions could be made based on the trajectory. This has the potential to save large amounts of calibration time because with minor tuning (the model has only one automatically determined constant) it is hoped that the control algorithm would be generally applicable.

Bittle, Joshua A. [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University; Gao, Zhiming [ORNL] [ORNL; Jacobs, Timothy J. [Texas A& M University] [Texas A& M University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

File Formats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Page Home Page File Formats MODIS Product Subsets Output Data File Format Descriptions The MODIS product subsets for North America and Worldwide are available in several formats, which are described in the following text. MODIS Land Product ASCII Data Image Data Files in ASCII Grid Format QC-Filtered Data and Statistics Generated for this Request Land Cover Data in ASCII Grid Format Statistical Data for MODIS Land Products in Comma Separated Format Underlying BRDF Parameters Used in Generating this Request (available with Albedo MOD43B and MCD43B only) MODIS Land Product ASCII Data Description of File File Content: Data as read from MODIS Land Product HDF-EOS data files. These data are the starting point for deriving the other subset data products. Data Type: As indicated by Land Product Code (e.g., MOD15A2).

36

Method of fracturing a geological formation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method of fracturing a geological formation surrounding a well bore is disclosed. A relatively small explosive charge is emplaced in a well bore and the bore is subsequently hydraulically pressurized to a pressure less than the formation breakdown pressure and preferably greater than the fracture propagation pressure of the formation. The charge is denoted while the bore is so pressurized, resulting in the formation of multiple fractures in the surrounding formation with little or no accompanying formation damage. Subsequent hydraulic pressurization can be used to propagate and extend the fractures in a conventional manner. The method is useful for stimulating production of oil, gas and possibly water from suitable geologic formations.

Johnson, James O. (2679-B Walnut, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Search Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Search Results. CAS Number, Formula, Name, State, JANAF Table, Links. 7439-97-6, Hg, Mercury, ref, view, ... 7439-97-6, Hg, Mercury, cr,l, view, ...

38

GLODAP Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Results Evaluation of Inorganic Carbon Quality Carbon Thermodynamics Anthropogenic CO2 Radio Carbon Gridded Carbon Fields Click the map to enlarge. Indian Ocean Pacific Ocean...

39

Search Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Search Results. CAS Number, Formula, Name, State, JANAF Table, Links. 7440-33-7, W, Tungsten, cr,l, view, ... 7440-33-7, W, Tungsten, cr, view, ...

40

Semantic Mediawiki | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Semantic Mediawiki Semantic Mediawiki Home Jweers's picture Submitted by Jweers(83) Contributor 7 August, 2013 - 18:23 New Robust References! citation citing developer formatting reference Semantic Mediawiki wiki Check out the new Reference Form. Adding a reference object to OpenEI using this form is the most complete way to cite a reference. After providing the name of your reference, the form will ask for your document type. Jweers's picture Submitted by Jweers(83) Contributor 16 May, 2013 - 14:22 Multicolor Maps from Compound Queries ask queries compound queries developer Google maps maps multicolor result formats results Semantic Mediawiki Hi all, Recently, a couple of people on OpenEI have asked me how to do compound (or multicolor) maps like this one: Jweers's picture Submitted by Jweers(83)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicolor result formats" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Jweers's blog | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jweers's blog Jweers's blog Home > Blogs Jweers's picture Submitted by Jweers(83) Contributor 7 August, 2013 - 18:23 New Robust References! citation citing developer formatting reference Semantic Mediawiki wiki Check out the new Reference Form. Adding a reference object to OpenEI using this form is the most complete way to cite a reference. After providing the name of your reference, the form will ask for your document type. Jweers's picture Submitted by Jweers(83) Contributor 16 May, 2013 - 14:22 Multicolor Maps from Compound Queries ask queries compound queries developer Google maps maps multicolor result formats results Semantic Mediawiki Hi all, Recently, a couple of people on OpenEI have asked me how to do compound (or multicolor) maps like this one: Jweers's picture Submitted by Jweers(83)

42

SAR polar format implementation with MATLAB.  

SciTech Connect

Traditional polar format image formation for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) requires a large amount of processing power and memory in order to accomplish in real-time. These requirements can thus eliminate the possible usage of interpreted language environments such as MATLAB. However, with trapezoidal aperture phase history collection and changes to the traditional polar format algorithm, certain optimizations make MATLAB a possible tool for image formation. Thus, this document's purpose is two-fold. The first outlines a change to the existing Polar Format MATLAB implementation utilizing the Chirp Z-Transform that improves performance and memory usage achieving near realtime results for smaller apertures. The second is the addition of two new possible image formation options that perform a more traditional interpolation style image formation. These options allow the continued exploration of possible interpolation methods for image formation and some preliminary results comparing image quality are given.

Martin, Grant D.; Doerry, Armin Walter

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

STAR FORMATION IN ATOMIC GAS  

SciTech Connect

Observations of nearby galaxies have firmly established, over a broad range of galactic environments and metallicities, that star formation occurs exclusively in the molecular phase of the interstellar medium (ISM). Theoretical models show that this association results from the correlation between chemical phase, shielding, and temperature. Interstellar gas converts from atomic to molecular only in regions that are well shielded from interstellar ultraviolet (UV) photons, and since UV photons are also the dominant source of interstellar heating, only in these shielded regions does the gas become cold enough to be subject to Jeans instability. However, while the equilibrium temperature and chemical state of interstellar gas are well correlated, the timescale required to reach chemical equilibrium is much longer than that required to reach thermal equilibrium, and both timescales are metallicity-dependent. Here I show that the difference in timescales implies that, at metallicities below a few percent of the solar value, well shielded gas will reach low temperatures and proceed to star formation before the bulk of it is able to convert from atomic to molecular. As a result, at extremely low metallicities, star formation will occur in a cold atomic phase of the ISM rather than a molecular phase. I calculate the observable consequences of this result for star formation in low-metallicity galaxies, and I discuss how some current numerical models for H{sub 2}-regulated star formation may need to be modified.

Krumholz, Mark R., E-mail: krumholz@ucolick.org [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Tropical Cyclone Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The physics of tropical cyclone formation is not well understood, and more is known about the mature hurricane than the formative mechanisms that produce it. It is believed part of the reason for this can be traced to insufficient upper-level ...

Michael T. Montgomery; Brian F. Farrell

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Method for laser drilling subterranean earth formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Laser drilling of subterranean earth formations is efficiently accomplished by directing a collimated laser beam into a bore hole in registry with the earth formation and transversely directing the laser beam into the earth formation with a suitable reflector. In accordance with the present invention, the bore hole is highly pressurized with a gas so that as the laser beam penetrates the earth formation the high pressure gas forces the fluids resulting from the drilling operation into fissures and pores surrounding the laser-drilled bore so as to inhibit deleterious occlusion of the laser beam. Also, the laser beam may be dynamically programmed with some time dependent wave form, e.g., pulsed, to thermally shock the earth formation for forming or enlarging fluid-receiving fissures in the bore.

Shuck, Lowell Z. (Morgantown, WV)

1976-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

46

Primary Radiation Damage Formation  

SciTech Connect

The physical processes that give rise to changes in the microstructure, and the physical and mechanical properties of materials exposed to energetic particles are initiated by essentially elastic collisions between atoms in what has been called an atomic displacement cascade. The formation and evolution of this primary radiation damage mechanism are described to provide an overview of how stable defects are formed by displacement cascades, as well as the nature and morphology of the defects themselves. The impact of the primary variables cascade energy and irradiation temperature are discussed, along with a range of secondary factors that can influence damage formation.

Stoller, Roger E [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Warm Water Mass Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Poleward heat transport by the own implies warm Water mass formation, i.e., the retention by the tropical and subtropical ocean of some of its net radiant heat gain. Under what condition net heat retention becomes comparable to latent heat ...

G. T. Csanady

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Parameterized formatting of an XML document by XSL rules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The possibilities of formatting offered by database management systems (DBMS) are insufficient and do not allow emphasizing the various data results. It is the same for the usual browsing of an XML document without any particular rules of formatting. ... Keywords: DOM tree, XHTML document, XML document, XSL rules, XSLT, parameters of formatting

Madani Kenab; Tayeb Ould Braham; Pierre Bazex

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Annual Energy Outlook 2000 - Model Results & Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Forecasts Summary of the AEO2001 Cases Scenarios - Appendix Table G1 bullet1.gif (843 bytes) Model Results (Formats - PDF, ZIP) - Appendix Tables - Reference Case - 1998 to 2020...

50

Annual Energy Outlook 1999 - Model Results & Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

results.gif (6669 bytes) AEO99 Report Available Formats Entire AEO Report as Printed (PDF, 2.2MB) Overview (PDF, 132KB) Legislation and Regulations (PDF, 96KB) Issues in Focus...

51

Formation flow channel blocking  

SciTech Connect

A method is claimed for selectively blocking high permeability flow channels in an underground hydrocarbon material bearing formation having flow channels of high permeability and having flow channels of lesser permeability. The method includes the following steps: introducing a blocking material fluid comprising a blocking material in a carrier into the flow channels through an injection well in communication with the formation; introducing a buffer fluid into the formation through the injection well for the buffer fluid to displace the blocking material fluid away from the injection well; allowing the blocking material to settle in the channels to resist displacement by fluid flowing through the channels; introducing a quantity of an activating fluid into the channels through the injection well at a sufficient rate for the activating fluid to displace the buffer fluid and finger into the high permeability channels to reach the blocking material in the high permeability channels without reaching the blocking material in the low permeability channels, the activating fluid being adapted to activate the blocking material which it reaches to cause blocking of the high permeability channels.

Kalina, A.I.

1982-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

52

Formation of Carbon Dwarfs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the formation of dwarf carbon stars via accretion from a carbon AGB companion in light of the new 107 object sample of Downes et al. (2004). This sample is now large enough to allow good mass determination via comparison of a composite spectrum to theoretical atmospheric models. Carbon dwarfs of spectral type M are indeed main sequence M dwarfs with enhanced metallicity and carbon abundance. We also calculate the predicted abundance of both M and of F/G carbon dwarfs, and show that the latter should be falsifiable in the near future.

Charles L. Steinhardt; Dimitar D. Sasselov

2005-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

53

Hypervelocity impact jet formation  

SciTech Connect

The hypervelocity impact of a particle on a surface generates a jet of shocked material which is thrown from the impact site. A simple analytic model has been developed to obtain expressions for the evolution of this jet of ejecta. The analysis is based on applying the conservation equations of mass and momentum to the problem of a normal impact of a sphere against a semi-infinite flat target. Expressions are developed for the evolution of the jet velocity, jet release point and the locus of points which describe the ejecta envelope. These analytical ejecta profiles are compared with high speed photographs of impact jet formation. 6 refs., 7 figs.

Ang, J.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Self-formation in Microelectronics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The external formation of integrated circuits based on lithographic processes is not the only possible method for manufacturing electron devices, either integrated circuits or photovoltaic cells. Planar technology, based on external formation, requires ... Keywords: Artificial Systems, Development, Microelectronics, Reproduction, Self-Formation

Stepas Janušonis

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Optimal reorganization of agent formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article we address the problem of determining how a structured formation of autonomous undistinguishable agents can be reorganized into another, eventually non-rigid, formation based on changes in the environment, perhaps unforeseeable. The methodology ... Keywords: combinatorial optimization, dynamic programming, formation reorganization

Dalila B. M. M. Fontes; Fernando A. C. C. Fontes

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

A study of coal formation  

SciTech Connect

Coal is a solid, brittle, more or less distinctly stratified, combustible, carbonaceous rock. It is being rediscovered as a reliable energy source, which, historically provided the resource base for the industrialization of the United States economy. A firm understanding of growth in coal development is important to the national energy scene so that the implications of factors influencing coal growth upon the industry`s ability to realize national energy objectives may be determined. As a result, the future of coal development will be facilitated by compiling basic facts on coal reserves, production, and utilization. In view of this, a review and assessment of facts pertaining to the nature and origin of coal is presented. The various properties and uses of coal are then described, followed by a discussion of the process of coal formation.

Jubert, K.; Stevens, G.; Masudi, H.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Estimation of static formation temperatures in geothermal wells | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Estimation of static formation temperatures in geothermal wells Estimation of static formation temperatures in geothermal wells Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Estimation of static formation temperatures in geothermal wells Abstract Stabilized formation temperatures were estimated at different depths in 40 wells from the Los Humeros geothermal field, Mexico, using the Horner and the spherical radial flow (SRF) methods. The results showed that the Horner method underestimates formation temperatures, while the SRF method gives temperatures that are closer to the true formation temperatures. This was supported by numerical simulation of a combined circulation and shut-in period in several wells, and results for well H-26 are presented. Numerical reproduction of logged temperature is more feasible if an initial

58

Category:Formatting Templates | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Formatting Templates Jump to: navigation, search Formatting Templates are Templates used primarily to achieve a certian layout or style on a wiki page. They can be generic, like Template:Clear or specific, like Template:Definition. For help on creating templates, see Help:Templates. Subcategories This category has only the following subcategory. Q [×] Query Results Templates‎ 4 pages Pages in category "Formatting Templates" The following 200 pages are in this category, out of 465 total. (previous 200) (next 200) A Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area

59

Isocurvature Fluctuations Induce Early Star Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The early reionisation of the Universe inferred from the WMAP polarisation results, if confirmed, poses a problem for the hypothesis that scale-invariant adiabatic density fluctuations account for large-scale structure and galaxy formation. One can only generate the required amount of early star formation if extreme assumptions are made about the efficiency and nature of early reionisation. We develop an alternative hypothesis that invokes an additional component of a non-scale-free isocurvature power spectrum together with the scale-free adiabatic power spectrum for inflation-motivated primordial density fluctuations. Such a component is constrained by the Lyman alpha forest observations, can account for the small-scale power required by spectroscopic gravitational lensing, and yields a source of early star formation that can reionise the universe at z~20 yet becomes an inefficient source of ionizing photons by z~10, thereby allowing the conventional adiabatic fluctuation component to reproduce the late thermal history of the intergalactic medium.

Naoshi Sugiyama; Saleem Zaroubi; Joseph Silk

2003-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

60

Positronium formation in positron-hydrogen collisions with Debye potentials  

SciTech Connect

Positronium (Ps) formation cross sections (n = 1, 2) in positron-hydrogen collisions in Debye plasma environment are calculated using the screening approximation model for various Debye screening lengths from the Ps formation thresholds to 50 eV. The effect of the screened Coulomb potential on Ps formation process is investigated by using the Debye-Hueckel potential. The present results are compared with available theoretical calculations.

Ma, J.; Cheng, Y.; Wang, Y. C.; Zhou, Y. [Center for Theoretical Atomic and Molecular Physics, Academy of Fundamental and Interdisciplinary Sciences, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicolor result formats" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Market Structure Across Retail Formats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study how market structure within a product category varies across retail formats. Building on the literature on internal market structure, we estimate a joint store and brand choice model where the loading matrix of brand attributes are allowed to ... Keywords: brand maps, heterogeniety, market structure, retail formats

Karsten Hansen; Vishal Singh

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

formatting | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

formatting formatting Home Jweers's picture Submitted by Jweers(83) Contributor 7 August, 2013 - 18:23 New Robust References! citation citing developer formatting reference Semantic Mediawiki wiki Check out the new Reference Form. Adding a reference object to OpenEI using this form is the most complete way to cite a reference. After providing the name of your reference, the form will ask for your document type. Rmckeel's picture Submitted by Rmckeel(297) Contributor 25 June, 2013 - 07:39 How to create formatted blocks to hold OpenEI wiki content content formatting user interface wiki The OpenEI wiki frontpage uses "boxes" that help organize content. These boxes are frequently re-used across the site. Syndicate content 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

63

Help - Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search Results The search results are displayed ten documents at a time. The Next >> and << Back links at the top and bottom of the list allow you to navigate through the results...

64

ANI Testbed: Published Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testbed Results R&D Overview 100G Testbed Testbed Description Testbed Results Current Testbed Research Proposal Process Terms and Conditions Virtual Circuits (OSCARS) Performance...

65

Grid result checking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Result checking is the theory and practice of proving that the result of an execution of a program on an input is correct. Result checking has most often been envisioned in the framework of program testing or property testing, where the issue is the ... Keywords: grids, result checking, simulation

Cécile Germain-Renaud; Dephine Monnier-Ragaigne

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

CONTAM Overview - Simulation Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Currently there are two types: boundary layer diffusion (BLS) deposition/ resuspension (DVR). Table — CONTAM Results Files. ...

67

CMS: First Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A summary of the LHC and CMS detector performance is given and the first CMS results are presented. In particular

Paolo Checchia; The CMS collaboration

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Review of Test Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GAC004 Revision 1 Effective June 2008 Review of Test Results Prepared by Electric Transportation Applications Prepared by: Date: Garrett...

69

Mechanisms of Banner Cloud Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Banner clouds are clouds in the lee of steep mountains or sharp ridges. Their formation has previously been hypothesized as due to three different mechanisms: (i) vertical uplift in a lee vortex (which has a horizontal axis), (ii) adiabatic ...

Matthias Voigt; Volkmar Wirth

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Hail Formation via Microphysical Recycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is suggested that alternation of low-density riming and wet growth processes play a role in hailstone formation. Such alternation of growth processes, which has been called microphysical recycling, is envisioned to operate in the following ...

John C. Pflaum

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Geothermal resources Frio Formation, South Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary study of the Frio sand distribution and formation temperatures and pressures was undertaken in order to define prospective areas in which a more detailed reservoir analysis is necessary prior to the selection of a site for a geothermal well. As a result two potential geothermal fairways were identified--one in the south part of the area in Hidalgo, Willacy, and Cameron Counties, and the other in the north part in north-central Nueces County.

Bebout, D.G.; Dorfman, M.H.; Agagu, O.K.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Non Poisson intermittent events in price formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The formation of price in a financial market is modelled as a chain of Ising spin with three fundamental figures of trading. We investigate the time behaviour of the model, and we compare the results with the real EURO/USD change rate. By using the test of local Poisson hypothesis, we show that this minimal model leads to clustering and "declustering" in the volatility signal, typical of the real market data.

Greco, A; Sorriso-Valvo, L; Carbone, Vincenzo; Greco, Antonella; Sorriso-Valvo, Luca

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Marked correlations in galaxy formation models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The two-point correlation function has been the standard statistic for quantifying how galaxies are clustered. The statistic uses the positions of galaxies, but not their properties. Clustering as a function of galaxy property, be it type, luminosity, color, etc., is usually studied by analysing a subset of the full population, the galaxies in the subset chosen because they have a similar range of properties. We explore an alternative technique---marked correlations---in which one weights galaxies by some property or `mark' when measuring clustering statistics. Marked correlations are particularly well-suited to quantifying how the properties of galaxies correlate with their environment. Therefore, measurements of marked statistics, with luminosity, stellar mass, color, star-formation rate, etc. as the mark, permit sensitive tests of galaxy formation models. We make measurements of such marked statistics in semi-analytic galaxy formation models to illustrate their utility. These measurements show that close pairs of galaxies are expected to be red, to have larger stellar masses, and to have smaller star formation rates. We also show that the simplest unbiased estimator of the particular marked statistic we use extensively is very simple to measure---it does not require construction of a random catalog---and provide an estimate of its variance. Large wide-field surveys of the sky are revolutionizing our view of galaxies and how they evolve. Our results indicate that application of marked statistics to this high quantity of high-quality data will provide a wealth of information about galaxy formation.

Ravi K. Sheth; Andrew J. Connolly; Ramin Skibba

2005-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

74

An interpretation of soliton formation and parametric instabilities. Interim report  

SciTech Connect

It is shown that soliton formation and the resulting plasma heating are nothing more than the description in configuration space of well-known parametric processes and quasilinear theory. (GRA)

Manheimer, W.M.; Papadopoulos, K.

1975-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Mutual Intrusion of a Gravity Current and Density Front Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional prognostic model was employed to examine the mutual intrusion of a gravity current and the formation of a density front. The results indicated strong vertical motion near the front and, with Earth rotation included, a baroclinic ...

Dono-Ping Wang

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

NZERTF, Recent Research Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A. Hunter Fanney, Chief Building Environment Division (301) 975-5864 hunter.fanney@nist.gov. *. Bookmark and Share. Recent Research Results. ...

2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

77

Search Results Quadrats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lassoquadratss-searchresults-quadrat2006.lasso (1 of 2)61507 10:18 AM Search Results Quadrats 3183 Lederman Science Center Docent .P 3184 Lederman Science Center...

78

Diffraction Results from CDF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present final results by the CDF II collaboration on diffractive W and Z production, report on the status of ongoing analyses on diffractive dijet production and on rapidity gaps between jets, and briefly summarize results obtained on exclusive production pointing to their relevance to calibrating theoretical models used to predict exclusive Higgs-boson production at the LHC.

Goulianos, Konstantin

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

From the Office Document Format Battlefield  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two most common XML-based formats for office application suites are now international standards. Unfortunately, the Open Document Format and Office Open XML are similar but imperfectly compatible. Keywords: ODF, OOXML, XML, document format, office application

Jirka Kosek

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

IMPACTS OF BIOFILM FORMATION ON CELLULOSE FERMENTATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project addressed four major areas of investigation: i) characterization of formation of Cellulomonas uda biofilms on cellulose; ii) characterization of Clostridium phytofermentans biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; iii) characterization of Thermobifida fusca biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; and iii) description of the architecture of mature C. uda, C. phytofermentans, and T. fusca biofilms. This research is aimed at advancing understanding of biofilm formation and other complex processes involved in the degradation of the abundant cellulosic biomass, and the biology of the microbes involved. Information obtained from these studies is invaluable in the development of practical applications, such as the single-step bioconversion of cellulose-containing residues to fuels and other bioproducts. Our results have clearly shown that cellulose-decomposing microbes rapidly colonize cellulose and form complex structures typical of biofilms. Furthermore, our observations suggest that, as cells multiply on nutritive surfaces during biofilms formation, dramatic cell morphological changes occur. We speculated that morphological changes, which involve a transition from rod-shaped cells to more rounded forms, might be more apparent in a filamentous microbe. In order to test this hypothesis, we included in our research a study of biofilm formation by T. fusca, a thermophilic cellulolytic actinomycete commonly found in compost. The cellulase system of T. fusca has been extensively detailed through the work of David Wilson and colleagues at Cornell, and also, genome sequence of a T. fusca strain has been determine by the DOE Joint Genome Institute. Thus, T. fusca is an excellent subject for studies of biofilm development and its potential impacts on cellulose degradation. We also completed a study of the chitinase system of C. uda. This work provided essential background information for understanding how C. uda colonizes and degrades insoluble substrates. Major accomplishments of the project include: • Development of media containing dialysis tubing (described by the manufacturer as “regenerated cellulose”) as sole carbon and energy source and a nutritive surface for the growth of cellulolytic bacteria, and development of various microscopic methods to image biofilms on dialysis tubing. • Demonstration that cultures of C. phytofermentans, an obligate anaerobe, C. uda, a facultative aerobe, and T. fusca, a filamentous aerobe, formed microbial communities on the surface of dialysis tubing, which possessed architectural features and functional characteristics typical of biofilms. • Demonstration that biofilm formation on the nutritive surface, cellulose, involves a complex developmental processes, including colonization of dialysis tubing, formation of cell clusters attached to the nutritive surface, cell morphological changes, formation of complex structures embedded in extracellular polymeric matrices, and dispersal of biofilm communities as the nutritive surface is degraded. • Determination of surface specificity and regulatory aspects of biofilm formation by C. phytofermentans, C. uda, and T. fusca. • Demonstration that biofilm formation by T. fusca forms an integral part of the life cycle of this filamentous cellulolytic bacterium, including studies on the role of mycelial pellet formation in the T. fusca life cycle and a comparison of mycelial pellets to surface-attached T. fusca biofilms. • Characterization of T. fusca biofilm EPS, including demonstration of a functional role for EPS constituents. • Correlation of T. fusca developmental life cycle and cellulase gene expression.

Leschine, Susan

2009-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicolor result formats" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Geospatial | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

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82

A WISE VIEW OF STAR FORMATION IN LOCAL GALAXY CLUSTERS  

SciTech Connect

We present results from a systematic study of star formation in local galaxy clusters using 22 {mu}m data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). The 69 systems in our sample are drawn from the Cluster Infall Regions Survey, and all have robust mass determinations. The all-sky WISE data enable us to quantify the amount of star formation, as traced by 22 {mu}m, as a function of radius well beyond R{sub 200}, and investigate the dependence of total star formation rate upon cluster mass. We find that the fraction of star-forming galaxies increases with cluster radius but remains below the field value even at 3R{sub 200}. We also find that there is no strong correlation between the mass-normalized total specific star formation rate and cluster mass, indicating that the mass of the host cluster does not strongly influence the total star formation rate of cluster members.

Chung, Sun Mi; Gonzalez, Anthony H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-2055 (United States); Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Stern, Daniel [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Stanford, Spencer A. [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Brodwin, Mark [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Jarrett, Thomas, E-mail: schung@astro.ufl.edu [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

83

Magnetic fields and radiative feedback in the star formation process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Star formation is a complex process involving the interplay of many physical effects, including gravity, turbulent gas dynamics, magnetic fields and radiation. Our understanding of the process has improved substantially in recent years, primarily as a result of our increased ability to incorporate the relevant physics in numerical calculations of the star formation process. In this contribution we present an overview of our recent studies of star cluster formation in turbulent, magnetised clouds using self-gravitating radiation-magnetohydrodynamics calculations (Price and Bate 2008, 2009). Our incorporation of magnetic fields and radiative transfer into the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method are discussed. We highlight how magnetic fields and radiative heating of the gas around newborn stars can solve several of the key puzzles in star formation, including an explanation for why star formation is such a slow and inefficient process. However, the presence of magnetic fields at observed strengths in collaps...

Price, Daniel J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Formation of Globular Clusters in Galaxy Mergers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a high-resolution simulation of globular cluster formation in a galaxy merger. For the first time in such a simulation, individual star clusters are directly identified and followed on their orbits. We quantitatively compare star formation in the merger to that in the unperturbed galaxies. The merging galaxies show a strong starburst, in sharp contrast to their isolated progenitors. Most star clusters form in the tidal tails. With a mass range of $5\\times10^{5}$--$5\\times 10^{6} M_{\\odot}$, they are identified as globular clusters. The merger remnant is an elliptical galaxy. Clusters with different mass or age have different radial distributions in the galaxy. The cluster mass spectrum appears to be roughly log-normal. Our results show that the high specific frequency and bimodal distribution of metallicity observed in elliptical galaxies are natural products of gas-rich mergers, supporting a merger origin for the ellipticals and their globular cluster systems.

Li, Y; Klessen, R S; Li, Yuexing; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; Klessen, Ralf S.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Formation of Globular Clusters in Galaxy Mergers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a high-resolution simulation of globular cluster formation in a galaxy merger. For the first time in such a simulation, individual star clusters are directly identified and followed on their orbits. We quantitatively compare star formation in the merger to that in the unperturbed galaxies. The merging galaxies show a strong starburst, in sharp contrast to their isolated progenitors. Most star clusters form in the tidal features. With a mass range of $5\\times10^{5}$--$5\\times 10^{6} M_{\\odot}$, they are identified as globular clusters. The merger remnant is an elliptical galaxy. Clusters with different mass or age have different radial distributions in the galaxy. Our results show that the high specific frequency and bimodal distribution of metallicity observed in elliptical galaxies are natural products of gas-rich mergers, supporting a merger origin for the ellipticals and their globular cluster systems.

Yuexing Li; Mordecai-Mark Mac Low; Ralf S. Klessen

2004-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

86

QCD String formation and the Casimir Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three distinct scales are identified in the excitation spectrum of the gluon field around a static quark-antiquark pair as the color source separation R is varied. The spectrum, with string-like excitations on the largest length scales of 2-3 fm, provides clues in its rich fine structure for developing an effective bosonic string description. New results are reported from the three-dimensional Z(2) and SU(2) gauge models, providing further insight into the mechanism of bosonic string formation. The precocious onset of string-like behavior in the Casimir energy of the static quark-antiquark ground state is observed below R=1 fm where most of the string eigenmodes do not exist and the few stable excitations above the ground state are displaced. We find no firm theoretical foundation for the widely held view of discovering string formation from high precision ground state properties below the 1 fm scale.

K. Jimmy Juge; J. Kuti; C. Morningstar

2004-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

87

Core Measure Results  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Core Measure Core Measure Results FY 07 Results FY 08 Results FY 09 Results FY 10 Target FY 10 Customer Perspective: Customer Satisfaction: -Timeliness NM 81 NM NM NM -Quality NM 90 NM NM NM Effective Service Partnership: -Extent of Customer Satisfaction with the responsiveness, etc. NM 87 NM NM NM Internal Business Perspective: Acquisition Excellence: -Extent to which internal quality control systems are effective 86 87 84 87 88 Most Effective Use of Contracting Approaches to Maximize Efficiency and Cost Effectiveness: Use of Electronic Commerce: - % of delivery & purchase orders issued electronically as a % of total simplified actions 70 72 89 99 100 - % of new competitive transactions > $100K conducted through EC 70 72 91 100 95 Performance Based Service Contracts: - PBSCs awarded as a % of eligible new

88

Recent results from SPEAR  

SciTech Connect

Recent results from SPEAR include measurements of Cabibbo-suppressed decay modes of the tau (Mark II), and a limit on the decay J/psi ..-->.. ..gamma.. + axion (Crystal Ball).

Porter, F.C.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Search Results Quadrats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lassoquadratss-searchresults-quadrat2007.lasso (1 of 2)2808 10:29 PM Search Results Quadrats 3584 Lederman Science Center Public16B 3586 Lederman Science Center...

90

Search Results Quadrats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2arr.lasso121112 5:07:23 PM Search Results Quadrats Public Quadrats Data collected by the public with the guidance of docents. Click the Quadrat Id to view more details about...

91

Ultrahigh resolution multicolor colocalization of single fluorescent nanocrystals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of highly luminescent CdSe/CdS core/shell nanocrystals withSpectroscopy of Single CdSe Nanocrystallite Quantum Dots,”intermittency in single CdSe/CdS core/shell nanocrystals,”

Michalet, X.; Lacoste, T.D.; Pinaud, F.; Chemla, D.S.; Alivisatos, A.P.; Weiss, S.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Diversifying search results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the problem of answering ambiguous web queries in a setting where there exists a taxonomy of information, and that both queries and documents may belong to more than one category according to this taxonomy. We present a systematic approach to ... Keywords: marginal utility, relevance, result diversification

Rakesh Agrawal; Sreenivas Gollapudi; Alan Halverson; Samuel Ieong

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Key Research Results Achievement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

daylighting options for specific spaces with sample design layouts · Various HVAC system types that achieve%energysavingsovercode.NREL developedthesimulationtoolsandledthe committeethatproducedtheguides. Key Result TheAdvanced school in Greensburg, Kansas, used many of the energy efficiency measures outlined in the Advanced Energy

94

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Model Results  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 with Projections to 2025 Data Tables Adobe Acrobat Reader Logo Adobe Acrobat Reader is required for PDF format MS Excel Viewer Spreadsheets are provided in excel Model Results in...

95

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Model Results  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 with Projections to 2025 Data Tables Adobe Acrobat Reader Logo Adobe Acrobat Reader is required for PDF format MS Excel Viewer Spreadsheets are provided in excel Model Results in...

96

Photoionising feedback in star cluster formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the first ever hydrodynamic calculations of star cluster formation that incorporate the effect of feedback from ionising radiation. In our simulations, the ionising source forms in the cluster core at the intersection of several dense filaments of inflowing gas. We show that these filaments collimate ionised outflows and suggest such an environmental origin for at least some observed outflows in regions of massive star formation. Our simulations show both positive feedback (i.e. promotion of star formation in neutral gas compressed by expanding HII regions) and negative feedback (i.e. suppression of the accretion flow in to the central regions). We show that the volume filling factor of ionised gas is very different in our simulations than would result from the case where the central source interacted with an azimuthally smoothed gas density distribution. As expected, gas density is the key parameter in determining whether clusters are unbound by photoionising radiation. Nevertheless, we find - on account of the acceleration of a small fraction of the gas to high velocities in the outflows - that the deposition in the gas of an energy that exceeds the binding energy of the cluster is not a sufficient criterion for unbinding the bulk of the cluster mass.

J. E. Dale; I. A. Bonnell; C. J. Clarke; M. R. Bate

2005-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

97

Living Laboratory Demonstration Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current market is populated with technologies designed for demand-side management applications by targeting power at the load. Automated panelboards bring a unique opportunity to the realm of demand-side management because they are specifically designed to manage loads at the branch circuit. This report investigates the applications and use of automated panelboards in commercial and industrial applications. The report also includes the results of a test performed on an automated panel designed for re...

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

98

Formation of molecular hydrogen on amorphous silicate surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experimental results on the formation of molecular hydrogen on amorphous silicate surfaces are presented and analyzed using a rate equation model. The energy barriers for the relevant diffusion and desorption processes are obtained. They turn out to be significantly higher than those obtained for polycrystalline silicates, demonstrating the importance of grain morphology. Using these barriers we evaluate the efficiency of molecular hydrogen formation on amorphous silicate grains under interstellar conditions. It is found that unlike polycrystalline silicates, amorphous silicate grains are efficient catalysts of H_2 formation in diffuse interstellar clouds.

Ling Li; Giulio Manico; Emanuele Congiu; Joe Roser; Sol Swords; Hagai B. Perets; Adina Lederhendler; Ofer Biham; John Robert Brucato; Valerio Pirronello; Gianfranco Vidali

2007-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

99

Unusual formations of the free electromagnetic field in vacuum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that there are exact solutions of the free Maxwell equations (FME) in vacuum allowing an existence of stable spherical formations of the free magnetic field and ring-like formations of the free electric field. It is detected that a form of these spheres and rings does not change with time in vacuum. It is shown that these convergent solutions are the result of an interference of some divergent solutions of FME. One can surmise that these electromagnetic formations correspond to Kapitsa's hypothesis about interference origin and a structure of fireball.

Andrew E. Chubykalo; Augusto Espinoza

2005-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

100

Clinical and Isokinetic Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The importance of the menisci for transmitting workloads in the knee joint to protect the articular cartilage is widely acknowledged. Therefore various techniques have been introduced to repair the damaged meniscus. We performed an arthroscopic meniscus repair with a modified outside-in technique on 29 patients (average 25 years) between 2/91 and 10/94. The average time between trauma and operation was 29 weeks (1-186) the follow-up 16.3 months (4-49). All the patients were interviewed by phone 23 were available for clinical respectively isokinetic examination, and categorized following the Lysholm and Lais scores. Twenty-eight patients were happy with the result of the procedure. Following the Lysholm score we found 78 % good]excellent results (Lais score 74%). Isokinetic testing showed a muscular deficit of less than 20 % in 91 % of the cases for flexion (extension 69%). No significant influence neither of the age of the patient nor the time period between trauma and operation on the outcome of the procedure could be found. No complications were reported. Based on our results and well aware of the deleterious long term effects of total meniscectomy the arthroscopic menical repair performed by an experienced surgeon should be generous choice of therapy for the treatment of the ruptured meniscus.

Arthroscopic Meniscus Repair; Christoph Erggelet A; Carmen Grosse B; Hans-rudolph Henche B; Bart De Koning

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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101

WMAP First Year Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) science team has released results from the first year of operation at the Earth-Sun L2 Lagrange point. The maps are consistent with previous observations but have much better sensitivity and angular resolution than the COBE DMR maps, and much better calibration accuracy and sky coverage than ground-based and balloon-borne experiments. The angular power spectra from these ground-based and balloon-borne experiments are consistent within their systematic and statistical uncertainties with the WMAP results. WMAP detected the large angular-scale correlation between the temperature and polarization anisotropies of the CMB caused by electron scattering since the Universe became reionized after the "Dark Ages", giving a value for the electron scattering optical depth of 0.17+/-0.04. The simplest Lambda-CDM model with n=1 and Omega_tot=1 provides an adequate fit to the WMAP data and gives parameters which are consistent with determinations of the Hubble constant and observations of the accelerating Universe using supernovae. The time-ordered data, maps, and power spectra from WMAP can be found at http://lambda.gsfc.nasa.gov along with 13 papers by the WMAP science team describing the results in detail.

E. L. Wright

2003-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

102

Monolithic or hierarchical star formation? A new statistical analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider an analytic model of cosmic star formation which incorporates supernova feedback, gas accretion and enriched outflows, reproducing the history of cosmic star formation, metallicity, supernovae type II rates and the fraction of baryons allocated to structures. We present a new statistical treatment of the available observational data on the star formation rate and metallicity that accounts for the presence of possible systematics. We then employ a Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo method to compare the predictions of our model with observations and derive constraints on the 7 free parameters of the model. We find that the dust correction scheme one chooses to adopt for the star formation data is critical in determining which scenario is favoured between a hierarchical star formation model, where star formation is prolonged by accretion, infall and merging, and a monolithic scenario, where star formation is rapid and efficient. We distinguish between these modes by defining a characteristic minimum mass, M > 10^{11} M_solar, in our fiducial model, for early type galaxies where star formation occurs efficiently. Our results indicate that the hierarchical star formation model can achieve better agreement with the data, but that this requires a high efficiency of supernova-driven outflows. In a monolithic model, our analysis points to the need for a mechanism that drives metal-poor winds, perhaps in the form of supermassive black hole-induced outflows. Furthermore, the relative absence of star formation beyond z ~ 5 in the monolithic scenario requires an alternative mechanism to dwarf galaxies for reionizing the universe at z ~ 11, as required by observations of the microwave background. While the monolithic scenario is less favoured in terms of its quality-of-fit, it cannot yet be excluded.

Marios Kampakoglou; Roberto Trotta; Joe Silk

2007-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

103

DOE Average Results  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE DOE Average Results FY 12 DOE Target FY 12 Customer Perspective: Customer Satisfaction: -Timeliness 92 88 -Quality 94 92 Effective Service Partnership: -Extent of Customer Satisfaction with the responsiveness, etc. 90 92 Internal Business Perspective: Acquisition Excellence: -Extent to which internal quality control systems are effective 90 88 Most Effective Use of Contracting Approaches to Maximize Efficiency and Cost Effectiveness: Use of Competition: -% of total $'s obligated on competitive acquisitions >$3000 (Agency Level Only) 94 85 -% of acquisition actions competed for actions > $3000 (Agency Level Only) 65 68 Performance Based Acquisition: - % PBA actions relative to total eligible new acquisition actions (applicable to new actions > $25K) 82

104

Recent Results from HAPPEX  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New measurements of the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic scattering of 3GeV electrons off hydrogen and helium-4 targets at theta{sub lab} = 6 degrees are reported. The helium-4 result is A = (+6.40 {+-} 0.23 (stat) {+-} 0.12 (syst)) * 10{sup -6}. The hydrogen result is A = (-1.58 {+-} 0.12 (stat) {+-} 0.04 (syst)) * 10{sup -6}. The asymmetry for hydrogen is a function of a linear combination of G{sub E}{sup s} and G{sub M}{sup s}, the strange quark contributions to the electric and magnetic form factors of the nucleon respectively, and that for helium-4 is a function solely of G{sub E}{sup s}. The combination of the two measurements separates G{sub E}{sup s} and G{sub M}{sup s} and provide new limits on the role of strange quarks in the nucleon charge and magnetization distributions. We extract G{sub E}{sup s} = 0.002 {+-} 0.014 {+-} 0.007 at Q{sup 2} = 0.077 GeV{sup 2} and G{sub E}{sup s} + 0.09 G{sub M}{sup s} = 0.007 {+-} 0.011 {+-} 0.006 at Q{sup 2} = 0.109 GeV{sup 2}.

Robert Michaels

2006-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

105

Iron Mountain Electromagnetic Results  

SciTech Connect

Iron Mountain Mine is located seventeen miles northwest of Redding, CA. After the completion of mining in early 1960s, the mine workings have been exposed to environmental elements which have resulted in degradation in water quality in the surrounding water sheds. In 1985, the EPA plugged ore stoops in many of the accessible mine drifts in an attempt to restrict water flow through the mine workings. During this process little data was gathered on the orientation of the stoops and construction of the plugs. During the last 25 years, plugs have begun to deteriorate and allow acidic waters from the upper workings to flow out of the mine. A team from Idaho National Laboratory (INL) performed geophysical surveys on a single mine drift and 3 concrete plugs. The project goal was to evaluate several geophysical methods to determine competence of the concrete plugs and orientation of the stopes.

Gail Heath

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Undulator Transportation Test Results  

SciTech Connect

A test was performed to determine whether transporting and handling the undulators makes any changes to their properties. This note documents the test. No significant changes to the test undulator were observed. After the LCLS undulators are tuned and fiducialized in the Magnetic Measurement Facility (MMF), they must be transported to storage buildings and transported to the tunnel. It has been established that the undulators are sensitive to temperature. We wish to know whether the undulators are also sensitive to the vibrations and shocks of transportation. To study this issue, we performed a test in which an undulator was measured in the MMF, transported to the tunnel, brought back to the MMF, and re-measured. This note documents the test and the results.

Wolf, Zachary

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

107

Results from hadron colliders  

SciTech Connect

The present status of hadron collider physics is reviewed. The total cross section for {bar p} + p has been measured at 1.8 TeV: {sigma}{sub tot} = 72.1 {plus minus} 3.3 mb. New data confirm the UA2 observation of W/Z {yields} {bar q}q. Precision measurements of M{sub W} by UA2 and CDF give an average value M{sub W} = 80.13 {plus minus} 0.30 GeV/c{sup 2}. When combined with measurements of M{sub Z} from LEP and SLC this number gives sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W} = 0.227 {plus minus} 0.006, or m{sub top} = 130{sub {minus}60}{sup +40} GeV/c{sup 2} from the EWK radiative correction term {Delta}r. Evidence for hadron colliders as practical sources of b quarks has been strengthened, while searches for t quarks have pushed the mass above M{sub W}: m{sub top} > 89 GeV/c{sup 2} 95% cl (CDF Preliminary). Searches beyond the standard model based on the missing E{sub T} signature have not yet produced any positive results. Future prospects for the discovery of the top quark in the range m{sub top} < 200 GeV/c{sup 2} look promising. 80 refs., 35 figs., 7 tabs.

Pondrom, L.G. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (USA))

1990-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

108

Search Results Quadrats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1arr.lasso[3/10/12 2:57:33 PM] 1arr.lasso[3/10/12 2:57:33 PM] Search Results Quadrats Public Quadrats Data collected by the public with the guidance of docents. Click the Quadrat Id to view more details about that record. Quadrat Id School Teacher Prairie Plot 4940 Lederman Science Center Docent16B Fermilab 16B 4941 Lederman Science Center Docent16B Fermilab 16B 4942 Lederman Science Center Docent16B Fermilab 16B 4946 Lederman Science Center Docent16B Fermilab 16B 4947 Lederman Science Center Docent16B Fermilab 16B 4948 Lederman Science Center Docent16B Fermilab 16B 4949 Lederman Science Center Docent16B Fermilab 16B 4950 Lederman Science Center Docent16B Fermilab 16B Database Maintainer: prairie-data@fnal.gov Web Maintainer: ed-webmaster@fnal.gov Last Updated: February 18, 2011 http://eddata.fnal.gov/lasso/quadrats/s-searchresults-quadrat.lasso

109

Notices Accessible Format: Individuals with  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

472 Federal Register 472 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 83 / Monday, April 30, 2012 / Notices Accessible Format: Individuals with disabilities can obtain this document in an accessible format (e.g., braille, large print, audiotape, or computer diskette) on request to the program contact person listed under FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT. Electronic Access to This Document: The official version of this document is the document published in the Federal Register. Free Internet access to the official edition of the Federal Register and the Code of Federal Regulations is available via the Federal Digital System at: www.gpo.gov/fdsys. At this site you can view this document, as well as all other documents of this Department published in the Federal Register, in text or Adobe Portable Document

110

Help:Formatting | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Formatting Formatting Jump to: navigation, search You can format your text using wiki markup. This consists of normal characters like asterisks, single quotes or equation marks which have a special function in the wiki, sometimes depending on their position. For example, to format a word in italic, you include it in two single quotes like ''this'' Contents 1 Text formatting markup 2 Paragraphs 3 HTML 4 Other formatting Text formatting markup Description You type You get character formatting - applies anywhere Italic text ''italic'' italic Bold text '''bold''' bold Bold and italic '''''bold & italic''''' bold & italic Escape wiki markup no ''markup'' no ''markup'' section formatting - only at the beginning of the line Headings of different levels

111

Rapid Gas Hydrate Formation Processes: Will They Work?  

SciTech Connect

Researchers at DOE’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have been investigating the formation of synthetic gas hydrates, with an emphasis on rapid and continuous hydrate formation techniques. The investigations focused on unconventional methods to reduce dissolution, induction, nucleation and crystallization times associated with natural and synthetic hydrates studies conducted in the laboratory. Numerous experiments were conducted with various high-pressure cells equipped with instrumentation to study rapid and continuous hydrate formation. The cells ranged in size from 100 mL for screening studies to proof-of-concept studies with NETL’s 15-Liter Hydrate Cell. Results from this work demonstrate that the rapid and continuous formation of methane hydrate is possible at predetermined temperatures and pressures within the stability zone of a Methane Hydrate Stability Curve (see Figure 1).

Brown, T.D.; Taylor, C.E.; Bernardo, M.P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Formation Testing Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Formation Testing Techniques Formation Testing Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Formation Testing Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Formation Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Downhole Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Formation Testing Techniques: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition References No exploration activities found. Print PDF Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Formation_Testing_Techniques&oldid=601973" Categories: Downhole Techniques Exploration Techniques

113

Nuclear Reaction Rates and Carbon Star Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have studied how the third dredge-up and the carbon star formation in low-mass Asymptotic Giant Branch stars depends on certain key nuclear reaction rates. We find from a set of complete stellar evolution calculations of a 2Msun model with Z=0.01 including mass loss, that varying either the N14(p,g)O15 or the 3-alpha reaction rate within their uncertainties as given in the NACRE compilation results in dredge-up and yields that differ by a factor of 2. Model tracks with a higher rate for the 3-alpha rate and a lower rate for the N14(p,g)O15 reaction both show more efficient third dredge-up. New experimental results for the N14(p,g)O15 reaction rates are surveyed, yielding a rate which is about 40% lower than the tabulated NACRE rate, and smaller than NACRE's lower limit. We discuss the possible implications of the revised nuclear reaction stellar evolution calculations that aim to reproduce the observed carbon star formation at low mass, which requires efficient third dredge-up.

Falk Herwig; Sam M. Austin

2004-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

114

A SIMPLE LAW OF STAR FORMATION  

SciTech Connect

We show that supersonic MHD turbulence yields a star formation rate (SFR) as low as observed in molecular clouds, for characteristic values of the free-fall time divided by the dynamical time, t{sub ff}/t{sub dyn}, the Alfvenic Mach number, M{sub a}, and the sonic Mach number, M{sub s}. Using a very large set of deep adaptive-mesh-refinement simulations, we quantify the dependence of the SFR per free-fall time, {epsilon}{sub ff}, on the above parameters. Our main results are (1) that {epsilon}{sub ff} decreases exponentially with increasing t{sub ff}/t{sub dyn}, but is insensitive to changes in M{sub s}, for constant values of t{sub ff}/t{sub dyn} and M{sub a}. (2) Decreasing values of M{sub a} (stronger magnetic fields) reduce {epsilon}{sub ff}, but only to a point, beyond which {epsilon}{sub ff} increases with a further decrease of M{sub a}. (3) For values of M{sub a} characteristic of star-forming regions, {epsilon}{sub ff} varies with M{sub a} by less than a factor of two. We propose a simple star formation law, based on the empirical fit to the minimum {epsilon}{sub ff}, and depending only on t{sub ff}/t{sub dyn}: {epsilon}{sub ff} Almost-Equal-To {epsilon}{sub wind}exp (- 1.6 t{sub ff}/t{sub dyn}). Because it only depends on the mean gas density and rms velocity, this law is straightforward to implement in simulations and analytical models of galaxy formation and evolution.

Padoan, Paolo [ICREA and ICC, University of Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Haugbolle, Troels [Centre for Star and Planet Formation, University of Copenhagen, Oestervoldgade 5-7., DK-1350, Copenhagen (Denmark); Nordlund, Ake, E-mail: ppadoan@icc.ub.edu, E-mail: haugboel@nbi.dk, E-mail: aake@nbi.dk [Centre for Star and Planet Formation and Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100, Copenhagen (Denmark)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

115

Wormhole formation in dissolving fractures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the dissolution of artificial fractures with three-dimensional, pore-scale numerical simulations. The fluid velocity in the fracture space was determined from a lattice-Boltzmann method, and a stochastic solver was used for the transport of dissolved species. Numerical simulations were used to study conditions under which long conduits (wormholes) form in an initially rough but spatially homogeneous fracture. The effects of flow rate, mineral dissolution rate and geometrical properties of the fracture were investigated, and the optimal conditions for wormhole formation determined.

Szymczak, P

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Petrophysical evaluation of subterranean formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and systems are provided for evaluating petrophysical properties of subterranean formations and comprehensively evaluating hydrate presence through a combination of computer-implemented log modeling and analysis. Certain embodiments include the steps of running a number of logging tools in a wellbore to obtain a variety of wellbore data and logs, and evaluating and modeling the log data to ascertain various petrophysical properties. Examples of suitable logging techniques that may be used in combination with the present invention include, but are not limited to, sonic logs, electrical resistivity logs, gamma ray logs, neutron porosity logs, density logs, NRM logs, or any combination or subset thereof.

Klein, James D; Schoderbek, David A; Mailloux, Jason M

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

117

The Formation of Hurricane Frederic of 1979  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-resolution global model forecast of the formation of Hurricane Frederic of 1979 is analyzed by means of several diagnostic computations on the model's output history. The formation is addressed from an analysis of limited-area energetics ...

T. N. Krishnamurthi; H. S. Bedi; Darlene Oosterhof; Vivek Hardiker

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Western North Pacific Monsoon Depression Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Relatively few studies have been carried out as to the conditions leading to the formation of monsoon depressions in the western North Pacific. Two monsoon depression formations during July 2007 were analyzed using ECMWF analyses and satellite ...

Jodi C. Beattie; Russell L. Elsberry

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Dynamics and control of electromagnetic satellite formations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Satellite formation flying is an enabling technology for many space missions, especially for space-based telescopes. Usually there is a tight formation-keeping requirement that may need constant expenditure of fuel or at ...

Ahsun, Umair, 1972-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Negative ion formation processes: A general review  

SciTech Connect

The principal negative ion formation processes will be briefly reviewed. Primary emphasis will be placed on the more efficient and universal processes of charge transfer and secondary ion formation through non-thermodynamic surface ionization. 86 refs., 20 figs.

Alton, G.D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicolor result formats" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Stoichiometric calculations [32] indicate that these two samples would contain approximately the same volume fractions of CSH gel, which suggests ...

2002-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

122

Treating nahcolite containing formations and saline zones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for treating a nahcolite containing subsurface formation includes removing water from a saline zone in or near the formation. The removed water is heated using a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. The heated water is provided to the nahcolite containing formation. A fluid is produced from the nahcolite containing formation. The fluid includes at least some dissolved nahcolite. At least some of the fluid is provided to the saline zone.

Vinegar, Harold J

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

123

Unifying biological image formats with HDF5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The biosciences need an image format capable of high performance and long-term maintenance. Is HDF5 the answer?

Matthew T. Dougherty; Michael J. Folk; Erez Zadok; Herbert J. Bernstein; Frances C. Bernstein; Kevin W. Eliceiri; Werner Benger; Christoph Best

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

A metrics framework for evaluating group formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many approaches to learning and teaching rely upon students working in groups. So far, many Computer-Supported Group Formation systems have been designed to facilitate the formation of optimal groups in learning. However, evaluating the quality of automated ... Keywords: efficiency, group formation, optimization

Asma Ounnas; David E. Millard; Hugh C. Davis

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Coring in deep hardrock formations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy is involved in a variety of scientific and engineering feasibility studies requiring extensive drilling in hard crystalline rock. In many cases well depths extend from 6000 to 20,000 feet in high-temperature, granitic formations. Examples of such projects are the Hot Dry Rock well system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico and the planned exploratory magma well near Mammoth Lakes, California. In addition to these programs, there is also continuing interest in supporting programs to reduce drilling costs associated with the production of geothermal energy from underground sources such as the Geysers area near San Francisco, California. The overall progression in these efforts is to drill deeper holes in higher temperature, harder formations. In conjunction with this trend is a desire to improve the capability to recover geological information. Spot coring and continuous coring are important elements in this effort. It is the purpose of this report to examine the current methods used to obtain core from deep wells and to suggest projects which will improve existing capabilities. 28 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

Drumheller, D.S.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Star Formation and Chemical Evolution of Lyman-Break Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The number density and clustering properties of Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs) observed at redshift $z\\sim 3$ are best explained by assuming that they are associated with the most massive haloes at $z\\sim 3$ predicted in hierarchical models of structure formation. In this paper we study, under the same assumption, how star formation and chemical enrichment may have proceeded in the LBG population. A consistent model, in which the amount of cold gas available for star formation must be regulated, is suggested. It is found that gas cooling in dark haloes provides a natural regulation process. In this model, the star formation rate in an LBG host halo is roughly constant over about 1 Gyr. The predicted star formation rates and effective radii are consistent with observations. The metallicity of the gas associated with an LBG is roughly equal to the chemical yield, or about the order of $1 Z_{\\odot}$ for a Salpeter IMF. The contribution to the total metals of LBGs is roughly consistent with that obtained from the observed cosmic star formation history. The model predicts a marked radial metallicity gradient in a galaxy, with the gas in the outer region having much lower metallicity. As a result, the metallicities for the damped Lyman-alpha absorption systems expected from the LBG population are low. Since LBG halos are filled with hot gas in this model, their contributions to the soft X-ray background and to the UV ionization background are calculated and discussed.

Chenggang Shu

2000-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

127

Hybrid System Design for Formations of Autonomous Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooperative control of multiple unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) poses significant theoretical and technical challenges. Recent advances in sensing, communication and computation enable the conduct of cooperative multiple-UAV missions deemed impossible in the recent past. We are interested in solving the Formation Reconfiguration Planning (FRP) problem which is focused on determining a nominal state and input trajectory for each vehicle such that the group can start from the given initial configuration and reach its given final configuration at the specified time while satisfying a set of given inter- and intra- vehicle constraints. Each solution of a FRP problem represents a distinct reconfiguration mode. When coupled with formation keeping modes, they can form a hybrid automaton of formation maneuvers in which a transition from one formation maneuver to another formation maneuver is governed by a finite automaton. This paper focuses on the implementation of the optimized hybrid system approach to formation reconfiguration for a group of 1 real and 3 virtual UAVs. Experimental results performed in the Richmond Field Station by using a helicopter-based Berkeley Aerial Robot are presented. 1

Shannon Zelinski; T. John Koo; Shankar Sastry

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Magnetic Fields in Population III Star Formation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We study the buildup of magnetic fields during the formation of Population III star-forming regions, by conducting cosmological simulations from realistic initial conditions and varying the Jeans resolution. To investigate this in detail, we start simulations from identical initial conditions, mandating 16, 32 and 64 zones per Jeans length, and studied the variation in their magnetic field amplification. We find that, while compression results in some amplification, turbulent velocity fluctuations driven by the collapse can further amplify an initially weak seed field via dynamo action, provided there is sufficient numerical resolution to capture vortical motions (we find this requirement to be 64 zones per Jeans length, slightly larger than, but consistent with previous work run with more idealized collapse scenarios). We explore saturation of amplification of the magnetic field, which could potentially become dynamically important in subsequent, fully-resolved calculations. We have also identified a relatively surprising phenomena that is purely hydrodynamic: the higher-resolved simulations possess substantially different characteristics, including higher infall-velocity, increased temperatures inside 1000 AU, and decreased molecular hydrogen content in the innermost region. Furthermore, we find that disk formation is suppressed in higher-resolution calculations, at least at the times that we can follow the calculation. We discuss the effect this may have on the buildup of disks over the accretion history of the first clump to form as well as the potential for gravitational instabilities to develop and induce fragmentation.

Turk, Matthew J.; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Abel, Tom; Bryan, Greg

2012-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

129

Dilute Surfactant Methods for Carbonate Formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the best hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. Laboratory-scale surfactant brine imbibition experiments give high oil recovery (35-62% OOIP) for initially oil-wet cores through wettability alteration and IFT reduction. Core-scale simulation results match those of the experiments. Initial capillarity-driven imbibition gives way to a final gravity-driven process. As the matrix block height increases, surfactant alters wettability to a lesser degree, or permeability decreases, oil production rate decreases. The scale-up to field scale will be further studied in the next quarter.

Kishore K. Mohanty

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Molecular Hydrogen Formation on Amorphous Silicates Under Interstellar Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experimental results on the formation of molecular hydrogen on amorphous silicate surfaces are presented for the first time and analyzed using a rate equation model. The energy barriers for the relevant diffusion and desorption processes are obtained. They turn out to be significantly higher than those obtained earlier for polycrystalline silicates, demonstrating the importance of grain morphology. Using these barriers we evaluate the efficiency of molecular hydrogen formation on amorphous silicate grains under interstellar conditions. It is found that unlike polycrystalline silicates, amorphous silicate grains are efficient catalysts of H$_{2}$ formation within a temperature range which is relevant to diffuse interstellar clouds. The results also indicate that the hydrogen molecules are thermalized with the surface and desorb with low kinetic energy. Thus, they are unlikely to occupy highly excited states.

Hagai B. Perets; Adina Lederhendler; Ofer Biham; Gianfranco Vidali; Ling Li; Sol Swords; Emanuele Congiu; Joe Roser; Giulio Manico; John Robert Brucato; Valerio Pirronello

2007-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

131

Molecular cloud formation and magnetic fields in spiral galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present ongoing hydrodynamic and MHD simulations of molecular cloud formation in spiral galaxies. The hydrodynamic results show the formation of molecular gas clouds where spiral shocks compress atomic gas to high densities. The spiral shocks also produce structure in the spiral arms, provided the gas is cold (gas than when a single phase is assumed. We also discuss very recent results from galactic-scale MHD calculations. From observational comparisons of the magnetic and thermal pressure, magnetic fields are expected to be a major factor in explaining the dynamics of the ISM, from kpc scales to those of star formation. We describe the difference in structure of the spiral arms, and the evolution of the global magnetic field for a range of field strengths.

Clare Dobbs; Daniel Price; Ian Bonnell

2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

132

Search Results | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search Results Search Results Search Results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 10 of 49,006 results. Rebate COOLAdvantage Program '''''Note: Residents affected by Hurricane Sandy...

133

ORNL DAAC, global climate data, GIS formats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data in GIS Formats Data in GIS Formats ORNL DAAC has re-released a key climatology data set in two additional formats especially suitable for geographic information system (GIS) users. Version 2.1 of "Global 30-Year Mean Monthly Climatology, 1930-1960 (Cramer and Leemans)" now offers the data in ASCII GRID format and binary format. These formats can be read directly into software packages such as ESRI's ARC/INFO and ERDAS' IMAGINE. The Cramer and Leemans climatology data set contains monthly averages of mean temperature, temperature range, precipitation, rain days, and sunshine hours for the terrestrial surface of the globe. It is gridded at a 0.5-degree longitude/latitude resolution. The Cramer and Leemans data are also available in the original ASCII format, which can be read in FORTRAN or with programs such as SAS.

134

Star Formation History and Other Properties of the Northern HDF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The original analysis of the star formation history in the NICMOS Deep images of the NHDF is extended to the entire NHDF utilizing NICMOS and WFPC2 archival data. The roughly constant star formation rate from redshifts 1 to 6 found in this study is consistent with the original results. Star formation rates from this study, Lyman break galaxies and sub-mm observations are now in concordance The spike of star formation at redshift 2 due to 2 ULIRGs in the small Deep NICMOS field is smoothed out in the larger area results presented here. The larger source base of this study allows comparison with predictions from hierarchical galaxy formation models. In general the observation are consistent with the predictions. The observed luminosity functions at redshifts 1-6 are presented for future comparisons with theoretical galaxy evolution calculations. Mid and far infrared properties of the sources are also calculated and compared with observations. A candidate for the VLA source VLA 3651+1221 is discussed.

Rodger I. Thompson

2003-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

135

The Fluid Mechanics of Gravitational Structure Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The standard model for gravitational structure formation in astrophysics, astronomy, and cosmology is questioned. Cold dark matter (CDM) hierarchical clustering cosmology neglects particle collisions, viscosity, turbulence and diffusion and makes predictions in conflict with observations. From Jeans 1902 and CDMHC, the non-baryonic dark matter NBDM forms small clumps during the plasma epoch after the big bang that ``cluster'' into larger clumps. CDM halo clusters collect the baryonic matter (H and He) by gravity so that after 300 Myr of ``dark ages'', huge, explosive (Population III) first stars appear, and then galaxies and galaxy clusters. Contrary to CDMHC cosmology, ``hydro-gravitational-dynamics'' HGD cosmology suggests the diffusive NBDM material cannot clump and the clumps cannot cluster. From HGD, the big bang results from an exothermic turbulent instability at Planck scales (10^{-35} m). Turbulent stresses cause an inflation of space and fossil density turbulence remnants that trigger gravitational i...

Gibson, C H

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Mental Representations Formed From Educational Website Formats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increasing popularity of web-based distance education places high demand on distance educators to format web pages to facilitate learning. However, limited guidelines exist regarding appropriate writing styles for web-based distance education. This study investigated the effect of four different writing styles on reader’s mental representation of hypertext. Participants studied hypertext written in one of four web-writing styles (e.g., concise, scannable, objective, and combined) and were then administered a cued association task intended to measure their mental representations of the hypertext. It is hypothesized that the scannable and combined styles will bias readers to scan rather than elaborately read, which may result in less dense mental representations (as identified through Pathfinder analysis) relative to the objective and concise writing styles. Further, the use of more descriptors in the objective writing style will lead to better integration of ideas and more dense mental representations than the concise writing style.

Elizabeth T. Cady; Kimberly R. Raddatz; Tuan Q. Tran; Bernardo de la Garza; Peter D. Elgin

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

The Influence of Bismuth on Microstructure and Porosity Formation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results show that a small amount of bismuth has no significant impact on the formation of ... A Multi-Scale 3D Model of the Vacuum Arc Remelting Process ... Deformation Prediction of a Heavy Hydro Turbine Blade During Casting Process

138

Signalling pathway in appressorium formation in Magnaporthe grisea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We identified a synthetic hexapeptide that blocks Magnaporthe grisea appressorium formation, in artificial hydrophobic surface. The results suggest that peptides interfere with surface recognition. M. grisea non pathogenic pth1 mutants were complemented by N. crassa orthologous gene suggesting that the biochemical function of pth1 has not evolved specifically to play a role in appressorium development.

Filippi, Marta Cristina

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

OXIDES OF NITROGEN: FORMATION AND CONTROL IN RESOURCE RECOVERY FACILITIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

utilizing all of the known techniques for NOx reduction. To be precise, the NOx formed within the flame] and several others [6, 7] have suggested certain reduction methods which are consistent with NOx formation, not solid waste. The results of NOx reduction techniques in coal combustion should be applied with caution

Columbia University

140

The Star Formation History in a Hierarchical Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observations now probe the star formation history of the Universe back to a redshift of $z\\sim5$. We investigate whether the predictions of semi-analytic models of galaxy formation based on hierarchical Cold Dark Matter (CDM) type models are in agreement with these direct observations and also with the ``fossil'' evidence contained in constraints on the ages of present day early-type galaxies. Previous models predicted that the star formation rate density falls off rather steeply at $z\\ga 2$, and correspondingly that the majority of the stars in the Universe formed at relatively low redshift. We investigate the effect of including a bursting mode of star formation, assuming that galaxy-galaxy mergers trigger starbursts and using the merger rate that arises naturally in the CDM merging hierarchy. The resulting starbursts substantially increase the global star formation rate at high redshift, leading to predictions that are in good agreement with the star formation rate density at $z\\sim3$ obtained from sub-millimeter observations (SCUBA) and optical/UV estimates after correction for dust extinction. The mass of stars formed at $z \\ge 3$ is correspondingly in better agreement with the fossil evidence. We also investigate complementary global quantities such as the mass of cold gas and the average metallicity of cold gas as a function of redshift, and the integrated extra-galactic background light. We argue that these observations, taken together, provide strong constraints on the star formation history of the Universe, and that hierarchical models of the CDM type are in reasonable agreement with these observations when starbursts are included.

Rachel S. Somerville; Joel R. Primack

1998-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicolor result formats" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Engineering Escherichia coli to Control Biofilm Formation, Dispersal, and Persister Cell Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofilms are formed in aquatic environments by the attachment of bacteria to submerged surfaces, to the air/liquid interface, and to each other. Although biofilms are associated with disease and biofouling, the robust nature of biofilms; for example, their ability to tolerate chemical and physical stresses, makes them attractive for beneficial biotechnology applications such as bioremediation and biofuels. Based on an understanding of diverse signals and regulatory networks during biofilm development, biofilms can be engineered for these applications by manipulating extracellular/intercellular signals and regulators. Here, we rewired the global regulator H-NS of Escherichia coli to control biofilm formation using random protein engineering. H-NS variant K57N was obtained that reduces biofilm formation 10-fold compared with wild-type H-NS (wild-type H-NS increases biofilm formation whereas H-NS K57N reduces it) via its interaction with the nucleoid-associated proteins Cnu and StpA. H-NS K57N leads to enhanced excision of the defective prophage Rac and results in cell lysis through the activation of a host killing toxin HokD. We also engineered another global regulator, Hha, which interacts with H-NS, to disperse biofilms. Hha variant Hha13D6 was obtained that causes nearly complete biofilm dispersal by increasing cell death by the activation of proteases. Bacterial quorum sensing (QS) systems are important components of a wide variety of engineered biological devices, since autoinducers are useful as input signals because they are small, diffuse freely in aqueous media, and are easily taken up by cells. To demonstrate that biofilms may be controlled for biotechnological applications such as biorefineries, we constructed a synthetic biofilm engineering circuit to manipulate biofilm formation. By using a population-driven QS switch based on the LasI/LasR system and biofilm dispersal proteins Hha13D6 and BdcAE50Q (disperses biofilms by titrating cyclic diguanylate), we displaced an existing biofilm and then removed the second biofilm. Persisters are a subpopulation of metabolically-dormant cells in biofilms that are resistant to antibiotics; hence, understanding persister cell formation is important for controlling bacterial infections. Here, we engineered toxin MqsR with greater toxicity and demonstrated that the more toxic MqsR increases persistence by decreasing the ability of the cell to respond to antibiotic stress through its RpoS-based regulation of acid resistance, multidrug resistance, and osmotic resistance systems.

Hong, Seok Hoon

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

NETL: NATCARB - CO2 Storage Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Formations Storage Formations NATCARB CO2 Storage Formations CO2 Storage Resource Methodology NATCARB Viewer The NATCARB Viewer is available at: http://www.natcarbviewer.com. 2012 Atlas IV DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) were charged with providing a high-level, quantitative estimate of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage resource available in subsurface environments of their regions. Environments considered for CO2 storage were categorized into five major geologic systems: oil and gas reservoirs, unmineable coal areas, saline formations, shale, and basalt formations. Where possible, CO2 storage resource estimates have been quantified for oil and gas reservoirs, saline formations, and unmineable coal in the fourth edition of the United States Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas (Atlas IV). Shale and basalt

143

Minimizing formation damage during gravel pack operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is described for minimizing formation damage caused by intrusive fluids prior to a gravel packing operation in loosely consolidated formations penetrated by at least one well. The method comprises: filling the casing of the well with an underbalanced completion fluid; placing within the well a removable packer capable of isolating the space between the casing and the formation from the downhole well pressure; setting through the packer a first tubing suitable for perforating and stabilizing the flow of fluids into the well; perforating the casing; and introducing a blocking agent into the formation via the perforations which agent upon solidification is sufficient to minimize formation damage by avoiding the introduction of formation fluids.

Jennings, A.R. Jr.

1987-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

144

STAR FORMATION IN DENSE CLUSTERS  

SciTech Connect

A model of core-clump accretion with equally likely stopping describes star formation in the dense parts of clusters, where models of isolated collapsing cores may not apply. Each core accretes at a constant rate onto its protostar, while the surrounding clump gas accretes as a power of protostar mass. Short accretion flows resemble Shu accretion and make low-mass stars. Long flows resemble reduced Bondi accretion and make massive stars. Accretion stops due to environmental processes of dynamical ejection, gravitational competition, and gas dispersal by stellar feedback, independent of initial core structure. The model matches the field star initial mass function (IMF) from 0.01 to more than 10 solar masses. The core accretion rate and the mean accretion duration set the peak of the IMF, independent of the local Jeans mass. Massive protostars require the longest accretion durations, up to 0.5 Myr. The maximum protostar luminosity in a cluster indicates the mass and age of its oldest protostar. The distribution of protostar luminosities matches those in active star-forming regions if protostars have a constant birthrate but not if their births are coeval. For constant birthrate, the ratio of young stellar objects to protostars indicates the star-forming age of a cluster, typically {approx}1 Myr. The protostar accretion luminosity is typically less than its steady spherical value by a factor of {approx}2, consistent with models of episodic disk accretion.

Myers, Philip C., E-mail: pmyers@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

145

Research Spending and Results | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Spending and Results Research Spending and Results BusinessUSA Data/Tools Apps Challenges Let's Talk BusinessUSA You are here Data.gov » Communities » BusinessUSA » Data Research Spending and Results Dataset Summary Description Research.gov Research Spending and Results is an online, user-friendly platform to access and search detailed information about federally funded science and engineering research and education, giving the general public, the scientific community and Congress visibility into the results achieved with federally-funded research. Research awards are easily searchable by agency, awardee, award amount and date, state and congressional district (where award was made and the work is being performed), and key word such as a field of science. Information can be reviewed online or exported to various file formats, such as XML, CSV and XLS. Detailed information on federally funded research can be found for multiple agencies. Information provided for each award includes: * Award recipient (institution and researcher), * Award Amount and funds obligated to date, * Period of Performance, * State and Congressional district of where the award was made and where the work is being performed., * Award Abstract describing the research effort, * Citations of Journals Published as a result of the award

146

Chemical pathways for the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews chemical reactions leading to the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes. The general features of the chemistry of the organic compounds in the Hanford wastes are briefly outlined. The radiolytic and thermal free radical reactions that are responsible for the initiation and propagation of the oxidative degradation reactions of the nitrogen-containing complexants, trisodium HEDTA and tetrasodium EDTA, are outlined. In addition, the roles played by three different ionic reaction pathways for the oxidation of the same compounds and their degradation products are described as a prelude to the discussion of the formation of ammonia. The reaction pathways postulated for its formation are based on tank observations, laboratory studies with simulated and actual wastes, and the review of the scientific literature. Ammonia derives from the reduction of nitrite ion (most important), from the conversion of organic nitrogen in the complexants and their degradation products, and from radiolytic reactions of nitrous oxide and nitrogen (least important). Reduction of nitrite ions is believed to be the most important source of ammonia. Whether by radiolytic or thermal routes, nitrite reduction reactions proceed through nitrogen dioxide, nitric oxide, the nitrosyl anion, and the hyponitrite anion. Nitrite ion is also converted into hydroxylamine, another important intermediate on the pathway to form ammonia. These reaction pathways additionally result in the formation of nitrous oxide and molecular nitrogen, whereas hydrogen formation is produced in a separate reaction sequence.

Stock, L.M.; Pederson, L.R.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

The Formation and Fate of Trihalomethanes in Power Plant Cooling Water Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trihalomethanes (THMs) are semi-volatile compounds that form in water when chlorine or bromine reacts with dissolved organic carbon. This report investigates the formation and fate of THM compounds in power plant cooling water systems, THM health risks, a generalized mechanism of THM formation, and the applicability of existing THM research to power plant cooling. The report presents results of a two-site sampling and analytical program designed to identify THM formation potential in cooling towers using...

2004-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

148

ICE 62755 Standard N42 Data Format  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IEC 62755 Standard N42 Data Format. Summary: The purpose ... The structure of the data is described by an XML schema. The schema ...

2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

149

Simplified Electrode Formation using Stabilized Lithium Metal ...  

A team of Berkeley Lab researchers led by Gao Liu has developed a doping process for lithium ion battery electrode formation that can boost a cell’s ...

150

Nanocrystal Formation in Glasses - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Nanocrystal Formation in Glasses ... copper have been treated in hydrogen atmospheres to form nanocrystals imbedded in a glassy matrix.

151

Heating systems for heating subsurface formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods and systems for heating a subsurface formation are described herein. A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a sealed conduit positioned in an opening in the formation and a heat source. The sealed conduit includes a heat transfer fluid. The heat source provides heat to a portion of the sealed conduit to change phase of the heat transfer fluid from a liquid to a vapor. The vapor in the sealed conduit rises in the sealed conduit, condenses to transfer heat to the formation and returns to the conduit portion as a liquid.

Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

152

Simultaneous Planet and Sun Formation Evidence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simultaneous Planet and Sun Formation Evidence Name: Christie Status: student Grade: 9-12 Location: SC Country: USA Date: May 2, 2011 Question: What specific evidence indicates...

153

Molecular Cloud Evolution II. From cloud formation to the early stages of star formation in decaying conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the formation of giant dense cloud complexes and of stars within them by means of SPH numerical simulations of the mildly supersonic collision of gas streams (``inflows'') in the warm neutral medium (WNM). The resulting compressions cause cooling and turbulence generation in the gas, forming a cloud that then becomes self-gravitating and undergoes global collapse. Simultaneously, the turbulent, nonlinear density fluctuations induce fast, local collapse events. The simulations show that: a) The clouds are not in a state of equilibrium. Instead, they undergo secular evolution. Initially, their mass and gravitational energy |Eg| increase steadily, while the turbulent energy Ek reaches a plateau. b) When |Eg| becomes comparable to Ek, global collapse begins, causing a simultaneous increase in both that maintains a near-equipartition condition |Eg| ~ 2 Ek. c) Longer inflow durations delay the onset of global and local collapse, by maintaining a higher turbulent velocity dispersion in the cloud over longer times. d) The star formation rate is large from the beginning, without any period of slow and accelerating star formation. e) The column densities of the local star-forming clumps are very similar to reported values of the column density required for molecule formation, suggesting that locally molecular gas and star formation occur nearly simultaneously. The MC formation mechanism discussed here naturally explains the apparent ``virialized'' state of MCs and the ubiquitous presence of HI halos around them. Within their assumptions, our simulations support the scenario of rapid star formation after MCs are formed, although long (>~ 15 Myr) accumulation periods do occur during which the clouds build up their gravitational energy, and which are expected to be spent in the atomic phase.

E. Vazquez-Semadeni; G. C. Gomez; A. K. Jappsen; J. Ballesteros-Paredes; R. F. Gonzalez; R. S. Klessen

2006-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

154

TMS Proceedings Manuscript Instructions: One-Column Format  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TMS ENERGY INITIATIVES · KNOWLEDGE RESOURCE CENTER · MATERIALS ... Formatting Guide (PDF) This file contains basic formatting instructions for ...

155

Deep Space Formation Flying Spacecraft Path Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efficient algorithms for collision-free energy sub-optimal path planning for formations of spacecraft flying in deep space are presented. The idea is to introduce a set of way-points through which the spacecraft are required to pass, combined with ... Keywords: formation flying spacecraft, path planning for multiple mobile robot systems, trajectory generation

Cornel Sultan; Sanjeev Seereram; Raman K. Mehra

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Methods for forming wellbores in heated formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for forming a wellbore in a heated formation includes flowing liquid cooling fluid to a bottom hole assembly in a wellbore in a heated formation. At least a portion of the liquid cooling fluid is vaporized at or near a region to be cooled. Vaporizing the liquid cooling fluid absorbs heat from the region to be cooled.

Guimerans, Rosalvina Ramona; Mansure, Arthur James

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

157

Concept formation using incremental Gaussian mixture models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a new algorithm for incremental concept formation based on a Bayesian framework. The algorithm, called IGMM (for Incremental Gaussian Mixture Model), uses a probabilistic approach for modeling the environment, and so, it can rely ... Keywords: Bayesian methods, EM algorithm, clustering, concept formation, finite mixtures, incremental learning, unsupervised learning

Paulo Martins Engel; Milton Roberto Heinen

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Field Development Strategies for Bakken Shale Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

July 2010 Field Development Strategies for Bakken Shale Formation SPE 139032 S.Zargari, S Bakken Formation is comprised of 3 Members: · Upper Shale Member­ Source & Seal · Middle "Siltstone" Member­ Reservoir & Migration Conduit · Lower Shale Member- Source & Seal #12;July 2010 Reservoir

Mohaghegh, Shahab

159

1998 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 User Survey Results 1998 User Survey Results Respondent Summary NERSC has completed its first user survey since its move to Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The survey is...

160

CO2 Sequestration in Basalt Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 SequeStratiOn in BaSalt FOrmatiOnS Background There is growing concern that buildup of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), in the atmosphere is contributing to global climate change. One option for mitigating this effect is to sequester CO 2 in geologic formations. Numerous site assessments for geologic sequestration of CO 2 have been conducted in virtually every region of the United States. For the most part, these studies have involved storing CO 2 in saline formation, deep coal seams, and depleted oil and gas reservoirs. Another option, however, is basalt formations. Basalt is a dark-colored, silica-rich, volcanic rock that contains cations-such as calcium, magnesium, and iron-that can combine with CO 2 to form carbonate minerals. Basalt formations have not received much

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicolor result formats" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

I/O Formats at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

I/O Formats I/O Formats I/O Formats Software I/O continues to be one of the main bottlenecks for scientific applications. Here are two software packages that many application developers use to manage input/output of heterogeneous types of binary application data used on many different platforms. HDF5 and NETCDF are both implemented on top of MPI-IO and have gained popularity as alternatives to basic POSIX API. HDF5 is a machine-independent and self-documenting file format. Each HDF5 file "looks" like a directory tree, with subdirectories, and leaf nodes that contain the actual data. This means that data can be found in a file by referring to its name, rather than its location in the file. NetCDF is a file format and support library developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR).

162

Analysis of Star Formation in Galaxy-like Objects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, we investigate the effects of hierarchical aggregation on the triggering of star formation in galactic-like objects. We include a simple star formation model to transform the cold gas in dense regions into stars. Simulations with different parameters have been performed in order to quantify the dependence of the results on the parameters. We then resort to stellar population synthesis models to trace the color evolution of each object with red-shift and in relation to their merger histories. We find that, in a hierarchical clustering scenario, the process of assembling of the structure is one natural mechanism that may trigger star formation. The resulting star formation rate history for each individual galactic object is composed of a continuous one ($\\leq 3 \\rm{M_{\\odot}/yr}$) and a series of star bursts. We find that even the accretion of a small satellite can be correlated with a stellar burst. Massive mergers are found to be more efficient at transforming gas into stars

Patricia B. Tissera

1999-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

163

Formation of negative hydrogen ion: Polarization electron capture and nonthermal shielding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of the nonthermal shielding on the formation of the negative hydrogen ion (H{sup -}) by the polarization electron capture are investigated in partially ionized generalized Lorentzian plasmas. The Bohr-Lindhard method has been applied to obtain the negative hydrogen formation radius and cross section as functions of the collision energy, de Broglie wave length, Debye length, impact parameter, and spectral index of the plasma. The result shows that the nonthermal character of the plasma enhances the formation radius of the negative hydrogen, especially, for small Debye radii. It is found that the nonthermal effect increases the formation cross section of the negative hydrogen. It is also found that the maximum position of the formation cross section approaches to the collision center with an increase of the spectral index. In addition, it is found that the formation cross section significantly decreases with an increase of the Debye length, especially, for small spectral indices.

Ki, Dae-Han [Department of Applied Physics, Hanyang University, Ansan, Kyunggi-Do 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Young-Dae [Department of Applied Physics, Hanyang University, Ansan, Kyunggi-Do 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Bio-Nano Technology, Hanyang University, Ansan, Kyunggi-Do 426-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 Eighth Street, Troy, New York 12180-3590 (United States)

2012-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

164

Eddy formation and propagation in the eastern tropical Pacific  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observations of eddies in the eastern tropical Pacific from TOPEX altimetry data show that there are seasonal and interannual variations in eddy activity. Comparisons between time of eddy formation and corresponding wind data show that not all eddies are caused by winds blowing offshore from the coast of Central America. Plots of eddy tracks from TOPEX data show that some of these eddies last for over 6 months and travel more than 250 of longitude toward the west. Others go more towards the equator and dissipate quickly. A General Circulation Model is used to study the formation and propagation aspects of these eddies. Results from experiments exploring the formation mechanism show that high frequency wind bursts are sufficient but not necessary for eddy formation in the eastern tropical Pacific. Eddy activity remains almost the same if only the annual harmonic of the wind field is used to force the model. Forcing the model with only the high frequency wind component produces almost no eddies. The formation of eddies during periods of weak offshore winds suggests other possible mechanisms, such as unstable mean flows, for the formation of the eddies. Experiments done to study the propagation of the eddies show that the eddies are greatly affected by the structure of the background flow. Eddies formed in September or October encounter a strong westward flowing current and do not dissipate rapidly. These eddies do not travel south beyond the region of shear between the currents. They last for more than 6 months and travel westward for more than 250 of longitude. Eddies formed in March and April encounter a strong eastward flow dissipate quickly and propagate towards the equator where they disappear. These eddies last for less than four months and cover less than 150 of longitude. Eddies generated in January show properties between these two extreme cases.

Jhingran, Vikas Gopal

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

THE STAR FORMATION HISTORY OF M32  

SciTech Connect

We use deep Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys/High Resolution Channel observations of a field within M32 (F1) and an M31 background field (F2) to determine the star formation history (SFH) of M32 from its resolved stellar population. We find that 2-5 Gyr old stars contribute {approx}40% {+-} 17% of M32's mass, while {approx}55% {+-} 21% of M32's mass comes from stars older than 5 Gyr. The mass-weighted mean age and metallicity of M32 at F1 are (Age) = 6.8 {+-} 1.5 Gyr and ([M/H]) = -0.01 {+-} 0.08 dex. The SFH additionally indicates the presence of young (<2 Gyr old), metal-poor ([M/H] {approx} -0.7) stars, suggesting that blue straggler stars contribute {approx}2% of the mass at F1; the remaining {approx}3% of the mass is in young metal-rich stars. Line-strength indices computed from the SFH imply a light-weighted mean age and metallicity of 4.9 Gyr and [M/H] = -0.12 dex, and single stellar population-equivalent parameters of 2.9 {+-} 0.2 Gyr and [M/H] = 0.02 {+-} 0.01 dex at F1 ({approx}2.7 r{sub e} ). This contradicts spectroscopic studies that show a steep age gradient from M32's center to 1 r{sub e} . The inferred SFH of the M31 background field F2 reveals that the majority of its stars are old, with {approx}95% of its mass already acquired 5-14 Gyr ago. It is composed of two dominant populations; {approx}30% {+-} 7.5% of its mass is in a 5-8 Gyr old population, and {approx}65% {+-} 9% of the mass is in an 8-14 Gyr old population. The mass-weighted mean age and metallicity of F2 are (Age) = 9.2 {+-} 1.2 Gyr and ([M/H]) = -0.10 {+-} 0.10 dex, respectively. Our results suggest that the inner disk and spheroid populations of M31 are indistinguishable from those of the outer disk and spheroid. Assuming the mean age of M31's disk at F2 ({approx}1 disk scale length) to be {approx}5-9 Gyr, our results agree with an inside-out disk formation scenario for M31's disk.

Monachesi, Antonela; Trager, Scott C. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, P.O. Box 800, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Lauer, Tod R.; Mighell, Kenneth J. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 26732, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States); Hidalgo, Sebastian L. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Via Lactea s/n, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Freedman, Wendy; Dressler, Alan [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Grillmair, Carl, E-mail: antonela@umich.edu [Spitzer Science Center, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

166

Tags | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tags Tags Home > Community OpenEI imported Open Data data Utility Rates developer United States linked open data Legal review Energy data Categorical Exclusions workshop Big Data LOD Town Hall meeting API Green Button BHFS quarterly meeting Solar clean energy web services forum analysis energy permitting utility rate Renewable Energy NREL wiki Datapalooza geothermal DOE Smart Grid Innovation GRR Literature Review NEPA Semantic Mediawiki EDI Wind roadmap current energy ocean energy feedback transmission result formats multicolor Google maps results design FONSI GMREC compound queries maps Performance interface MHK LEDS Tidal building power plant GTO challenge marine energy levelized cost of energy CBS Wave Cost Current facilities management indoor architecture

167

Computer Simulation of Scale Formation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper summarizes results of recent analyses performed by Battelle-Northwest in EPRI project RP 653-3: Computer Simulation of Scaling in Geothermal Systems. The results reported here are drawn primarily from case evaluations performed over the 12 months since the preceding EPRI Geothermal Symposium held in Monterey in June 1979. The present project is a continuation of a previous project designated RP 653-1. The ultimate objective of research performed in this project is to develop analytical tools (computer codes) and the supporting thermophysical and chemical data base that can be used to predict scaling and corrosion in geothermal power generating systems.

Lessor, D.L.; Kreid, D.K.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

A numerical and experimental study of in-situ NO formation in laminar NH3-seeded syngas diffusion flames.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Oxides of nitrogen formed during combustion are significant threats to our environment. They result in the formation of “acid rain”, smog, and depletion of… (more)

Li, Miao

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

A numerical and experimental study of in-situ NO formation in laminar NH3-seeded syngas diffusion flames.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Oxides of nitrogen formed during combustion are significant threats to our environment. They result in the formation of "acid rain", smog, and depletion of the… (more)

Li, Miao

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Engineering Glass Passivation Layers -Model Results  

SciTech Connect

The immobilization of radioactive waste into glass waste forms is a baseline process of nuclear waste management not only in the United States, but worldwide. The rate of radionuclide release from these glasses is a critical measure of the quality of the waste form. Over long-term tests and using extrapolations of ancient analogues, it has been shown that well designed glasses exhibit a dissolution rate that quickly decreases to a slow residual rate for the lifetime of the glass. The mechanistic cause of this decreased corrosion rate is a subject of debate, with one of the major theories suggesting that the decrease is caused by the formation of corrosion products in such a manner as to present a diffusion barrier on the surface of the glass. Although there is much evidence of this type of mechanism, there has been no attempt to engineer the effect to maximize the passivating qualities of the corrosion products. This study represents the first attempt to engineer the creation of passivating phases on the surface of glasses. Our approach utilizes interactions between the dissolving glass and elements from the disposal environment to create impermeable capping layers. By drawing from other corrosion studies in areas where passivation layers have been successfully engineered to protect the bulk material, we present here a report on mineral phases that are likely have a morphological tendency to encrust the surface of the glass. Our modeling has focused on using the AFCI glass system in a carbonate, sulfate, and phosphate rich environment. We evaluate the minerals predicted to form to determine the likelihood of the formation of a protective layer on the surface of the glass. We have also modeled individual ions in solutions vs. pH and the addition of aluminum and silicon. These results allow us to understand the pH and ion concentration dependence of mineral formation. We have determined that iron minerals are likely to form a complete incrustation layer and we plan to look more closely at Vivianite [Fe3(PO4)2-8(H2O)] and Siderite [FeCO3] in the next stage of the project.

Skorski, Daniel C.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Strachan, Denis M.; Lepry, William C.

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

171

Ensemble Clustering for Result Diversification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Ensemble Clustering for Result Diversification Dong Nguyen Human Media Interaction University of Twente d.nguyen@utwente.nl ...

2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

172

Scale formation at various locations in a geothermal operation due to injection of imported waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The injection of waters that are not native to a geothermal formation generates various physical and chemical problems. The major chemical problem resulting from such injections is the formation of sulfate scales (particularly CaSO4, BaSO4 and SrSO4) at various locations starting from the injection well through the production well to the surface facilities of any geothermal operation. One of the ways to prevent this type of scale formation is by reducing the sulfate concentration of the injection waters. The effect of sulfate deionization on scale formation at various locations of the geothermal operations is studied. Some experimental results on the CaSO4 scale formation in porous media upon heating an injection water with and without addition of scale inhibitors are also given.

Vetter, O.J.; Kandarpa, V.

1982-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

173

KETENE FORMATION IN INTERSTELLAR ICES: A LABORATORY STUDY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation of ketene (H{sub 2}CCO, ethenone) in polar and apolar ices was studied with in situ 0.8 MeV proton irradiation, far-UV photolysis, and infrared spectroscopic analyses at 10-20 K. Using isotopically enriched reagents, unequivocal evidence was obtained for ketene synthesis in H{sub 2}O-rich and CO{sub 2}-rich ices, and several reaction products were identified. Results from scavenging experiments suggested that ketene was formed by free-radical pathways, as opposed to acid-base processes or redox reactions. Finally, we use our results to draw conclusions about the formation and stability of ketene in the interstellar medium.

Hudson, Reggie L.; Loeffler, Mark J., E-mail: Reggie.Hudson@NASA.gov [Astrochemistry Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

174

Communicating Results | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Communicating Results Communicating Results Communicating Results Communicating Results: Provide exam results to participants, as well as information regarding any conditions that may require follow-up medical care with their personal physicians or specialists, and provide information regarding possible compensation for work-related illnesses. Follow-up care is not covered by the program. Occupational medicine physicians review the results from the screening exams, along with the completed medical and occupational exposure history questionnaires, to determine whether there are any abnormal findings that may require immediate attention or whether the findings may have been caused by a work-related exposure. Participants requiring urgent medical attention for an abnormal test result are contacted immediately by phone,

175

From design experiments to formative interventions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The discussion of design experiments has largely ignored the Vygotskian tradition of formative interventions based on the principle of double stimulation. This tradition offers a radical approach to learning reasearch which focuses on the agency of the ...

Yrjö Engeström

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Electromagnetic formation flight of satellite arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposed methods of actuating spacecraft in sparse aperture arrays use propellant as a reaction mass. For formation flying systems, propellant becomes a critical consumable which can be quickly exhausted while maintaining ...

Kwon, Daniel W., 1980-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Rapid Gas Hydrate Formation Process Opportunity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Hydrate Formation Process Gas Hydrate Formation Process Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking collaborative research and licensing partners interested in implementing United States Non-provisional Patent Application entitled "Rapid Gas Hydrate Formation Process." Disclosed in this application is a method and device for producing gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas such as methane (CH 4 ) or carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone, which may be contained within the body of the spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction vessel, under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for gas hydrate formation. The reaction

178

Ice Formation in Gas-Diffusion Layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of California. Ice Formation in Gas-Diffusion Layers Thomasconditions, ice forms in the gas-diffusion layer (GDL) of areaction of reactant gases (1). A number of strategies exist

Dursch, Thomas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Thermodynamic Aspects of Tropical Cyclone Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermodynamic aspects of tropical cyclone (TC) formation near the center of the wave pouch, a region of approximately closed Lagrangian circulation within the wave critical layer, are examined through diagnoses of a high-resolution numerical ...

Zhuo Wang

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Eddy Formation in 2½-Layer, Quasigeostrophic Jets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation of nonlinear eddies in unstable 2½-layer, quasigeostrophic jets is investigated using a piecewise constant potential vorticity, “contour dynamical” model. Both infinite and semi-infinite jet dynamics are explored, considering a ...

Ilson C. A. da Silveira; Glenn R. Flierl

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicolor result formats" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Essential Dynamics of Secondary Eyewall Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors conduct an analysis of the dynamics of secondary eyewall formation in two modeling frameworks to obtain a more complete understanding of the phenomenon. The first is a full-physics, three-dimensional mesoscale model in which the ...

Sergio F. Abarca; Michael T. Montgomery

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Numerical Simulation of Macrosegregation Formation during ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct Numerical Simulation of Inclusion Turbulent Deposition at Liquid ... Flow and Shrinkage Pipe Formation on Macrosegregation of Investment Cast -TiAl Alloys ... Numerical Modeling of the Interaction between a Foreign Particle an ...

183

Interactive Cloud Formation and Climatic Temperature Perturbations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-dimensional climate model with an interactive cloud formation program is developed to investigate its effects on temperature perturbations due to various radiative forcings including doubling of CO2, a 2% increase of the solar constant and ...

Kuo-Nan Liou; S. C. S. Ou; P. J. Lu

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Does Format of Pricing Contract Matter?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Working Paper No. XL05-002 Does Format of Pricing Contractquantity discount contract does not include a fixed fee andtariff. Also, division equivalence does not hold because the

Ho, Teck H; Zhang, Juanjuan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Predicting Nepheline Formation with Artificial Neural Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... model has been developed to predict nepheline (NaAlSiO4) formation in compositions of interest for waste glasses projected to be formed at the Hanford Site.

186

Fuzzy coalition formation among rational cooperative agents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Formation of coalitions in multi-agent systems (MAS) enables the development of efficient organizations. In the article, a model of fuzzy cooperative game with coalitions is described. It extends the model of the fuzzy coalition game with associated ...

Leonid B. Sheremetov; José C. Romero Cortés

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Modeling deposit formation in diesel injector nozzle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formation of deposit in the diesel injector nozzle affects the injection behavior and hinders performance. Under running condition, deposit precursors are washed away by the ensuing injection. However, during the cool down ...

Sudhiesh Kumar, Chintoo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

The Formation of New England Coastal Fronts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coastal fronts are a frequent late fall and early winter feature of eastern New England weather. Data from a mesoscale observing network is used to describe the process of coastal frontogenesis and to determine the causes of formation. Three ...

John W. Nielsen

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Lisburne Formation fracture characterization and flow modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluation of fractured reservoirs for fluid flow and optimal well placement is often very complicated. In general, fractures enhance permeability and increase access to matrix surface, but their random aspects create difficulties for analysis and performance prediction. Each reservoir has unique aspects which require individual assessment. This study examined fracture properties in a part of the Carboniferous Lisburne Formation. Field study of outcrops yielded information on two sets of large-scale fractures (NNW and ENE orientations) from the lower Wahoo Limestone in the eastern Sadlerochit Mountains. Several statistical methods were used on these data to find appropriate models describing the megafracture properties. For NNW fracture height and ENE fracture spacing, the gamma model appears to adequately describe the distribution. NNW fracture spacing and ENE fracture height are lognormally distributed. Results of the statistical analyses were used as input for fracture set generation and modeling using "FracMan". Modeling different borehole orientations in the fractured domain revealed that horizontal wells with 60? azimuth have an optimal trajectory, resulting in the maximum number and area of fracture connections. The orientation maximizing the number of fracture connections did not necessarily give the maximum area. Conductivity analysis showed that the fracture network is weakly anisotropic and above the percolation threshold. The fracture conductance is strongly dependent on the NNW fracture set; larger fractures influence fluid flow more than smaller fractures. Fracture strike and dip variability increased the system interconnectivity, but did not affect the optimal wellbore orientation. Incorporating ENE fracture termination against the NNW fractures decreased the system conductance and shifted the optimal wellbore trajectory towards the direction perpendicular to the NNW set. Reservoir engineering implications of this study include: guidelines for optimal wellbore orientations, the relative placement of injectors and producers along the bisectors between the two fracture sets, and the importance of including fracture terminations. Further work should investigate the influence of variations in fracture aperture and transmissivities, and drainage area, and extend the analysis to additional units of the Lisburne Group.

Karpov, Alexandre Valerievich

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Search Results | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Search Results » Search Results Search Results » Search Results Search Results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 10 of 48,807 results. Rebate COOLAdvantage Program '''''Note: Residents affected by Hurricane Sandy are eligible for an additional rebate of $200 for qualifying heat pumps, geothermal heat pumps, and air conditioners purchased on or after October... http://energy.gov/node/681216 Rebate CPS Energy- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program CPS Energy offers a variety of rebates for energy efficiency related improvements to residential homes, including: appliances, HVAC equipment, insulation, and equipment recycling.. Rebate... http://energy.gov/node/681221 Rebate CPS Energy- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebates CPS Energy, San Antonio's municipal electric utility, offers energy

191

2006 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 User Survey Results 6 User Survey Results Show All | 1 2 3 4 5 ... 15 | Next » 2006 User Survey Results Table of Contents Survey Results Users are invited to provide overall comments about NERSC: Here are the survey results: Respondent Demographics Overall Satisfaction and Importance All Satisfaction, Importance and Usefulness Ratings All Usefulness Topics Hardware Resources Software Visualization and Data Analysis HPC Consulting Services and Communications Web Interfaces Training Comments about NERSC Survey Results Many thanks to the 256 users who responded to this year's User Survey. This represents a response rate of about 13 percent of the active NERSC users. The respondents represent all six DOE Science Offices and a variety of home institutions: see Respondent Demographics. The survey responses provide feedback about every aspect of NERSC's

192

SIMULATION OF THE FORMATION OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION  

SciTech Connect

We present a radiative magnetohydrodynamics simulation of the formation of an active region (AR) on the solar surface. The simulation models the rise of a buoyant magnetic flux bundle from a depth of 7.5 Mm in the convection zone up into the solar photosphere. The rise of the magnetic plasma in the convection zone is accompanied by predominantly horizontal expansion. Such an expansion leads to a scaling relation between the plasma density and the magnetic field strength such that B {proportional_to} rhov{sup 1/2}. The emergence of magnetic flux into the photosphere appears as a complex magnetic pattern, which results from the interaction of the rising magnetic field with the turbulent convective flows. Small-scale magnetic elements at the surface first appear, followed by their gradual coalescence into larger magnetic concentrations, which eventually results in the formation of a pair of opposite polarity spots. Although the mean flow pattern in the vicinity of the developing spots is directed radially outward, correlations between the magnetic field and velocity field fluctuations allow the spots to accumulate flux. Such correlations result from the Lorentz-force-driven, counterstreaming motion of opposite polarity fragments. The formation of the simulated AR is accompanied by transient light bridges between umbrae and umbral dots. Together with recent sunspot modeling, this work highlights the common magnetoconvective origin of umbral dots, light bridges, and penumbral filaments.

Cheung, M. C. M.; Title, A. M. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Rempel, M. [High Altitude Observatory, NCAR, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Schuessler, M. [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Katlenburg-Lindau, 37191 (Germany)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Reliability Results of NERSC Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of various systems at NERSC. They graciously provided meReliability Results of NERSC Systems Akbar Mokhtarani,William Kramer, Jason Hick NERSC - LBNL Abstract In order to

Mokhtarani, Akbar; Petascale Data Storage Institute (PDSI)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Model Results  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Model Results Model Results (To view or print in PDF format, Adobe Acrobat Reader 5.0 is required Download Acrobat Reader Now.) Adobe Acrobat Logo AEO2003 Appendix Tables XLS format A - Reference Case Forecast - PDF (728KB) Reference Case Forecast, Annual 2000-2025 - PDF (1115KB), HTML, XLS B - Economic Growth Case Comparisons - PDF (190KB) High Economic Case, Annual 2000-2025 - PDF (2482KB), XLS Low Economic Case, Annual 2000-2025 - PDF (3937KB), XLS C - Oil Price Case Comparisons - PDF (186KB) High Oil Price Case, Annual 2000-2025 - PDF (2533KB), XLS Low Oil Price Case, Annual 2000-2025 - PDF (2344KB), XLS D - Crude Oil Equivalence Summary - PDF (32KB) E - Household Expenditures - PDF (30KB) F - Results from Side Cases - PDF (89KB) G - Major Assumptions for the Forecast - PDF (160KB), HTML

195

Purification of Polyhydroxybutyrate Synthase from Its Native Organism, Ralstonia eutropha: Implications for the Initiation and Elongation of Polymer Formation in Vivo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Class I polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthase (PhaC) from Ralstonia eutropha catalyzes the formation of PHB from (R)-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA, ultimately resulting in the formation of insoluble granules. Previous mechanistic ...

Cho, Mimi

196

Hydraulic fracturing of jointed formations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measured by volume, North America's largest hydraulic fracturing operations have been conducted at Fenton Hill, New Mexico to create geothermal energy reservoirs. In the largest operation 21,000 m/sup 3/ of water were injected into jointed granitic rock at a depth of 3.5 km. Microearthquakes induced by this injection were measured with geophones placed in five wells drilled into, or very close, to the reservoir, as well as 11 surface seismometers. The large volume of rock over which the microearthquakes were distributed indicates a mechanism of hydraulic stimulation which is at odds with conventional fracturing theory, which predicts failure along a plane which is perpendicular to the least compressive earth stress. A coupled rock mechanics/fluid flow model provides much of the explanation. Shear slippage along pre-existing joints in the rock is more easily induced than conventional tensile failure, particularly when the difference between minimum and maximum earth stresses is large and the joints are oriented at angles between 30 and 60 degrees to the principal earth stresses, and a low viscosity fluid like water is injected. Shear slippage results in local redistribution of stresses, which allows a branching, or dendritic, stimulation pattern to evolve, in agreement with the patterns of microearthquake locations. These results are qualitatively similar to the controversial process known as ''Kiel'' fracturing, in which sequential injections and shut-ins are repeated to create dendritic fractures for enhanced oil and gas recovery. However, we believe that the explanation is shear slippage of pre-existing joints and stress redistribution, not proppant bridging and fluid blocking as suggested by Kiel. 15 refs., 10 figs.

Murphy, H.D.; Fehler, M.C.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Formation and Evolution of Frontal Rainbands and Geostrophic Potential Vorticity Anomalies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A viscous semigeostrophic model is developed and used to study the formation and evolution of frontal rainbands in association with the dry and moist geostrophic potential vorticity (GPV) anomalies. The numerical results show that when moist GPV (...

Qin Xu

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Methods for synthesizing alane without the formation of adducts and free of halides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process is provided to synthesize an alane without the formation of alane adducts as a precursor. The resulting product is a crystallized .alpha.-alane and is a highly stable product and is free of halides.

Zidan, Ragaiy; Knight, Douglas A; Dinh, Long V

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

199

On the Reasons for the Formation and Variability of the Azores Current  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent studies have shown that the formation of the well-defined, zonally oriented Azores Current may be the result of water mass transformation associated with the Mediterranean outflow in the Gulf of Cadiz. As the denser Mediterranean water ...

Denis L. Volkov; Lee-Lueng Fu

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Results on hard diffractive production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of experiments at hadron colliders probing the structure of the pomeron through hard diffraction are reviewed. Some results on deep inelastic diffractive scattering obtained at HERA are also discussed and placed in perspective. By using a properly normalized pomeron flux factor in single diffraction dissociation as dictated by unitarity

Konstantin Goulianos; The CDF Collaboration

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicolor result formats" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

CDF results on B decays  

SciTech Connect

The authors present recent CDF results on B lifetimes, B meson mass measurements, ratios of branching ratios, and rare decays. In addition, they present the first measurement of time-dependent B{sub d} mixing at CDF. Several results have been updated and a few new ones included since the workshop.

Skarha, J.E. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Forward Physics and BRAHMS results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report here the BRAHMS measurements of particle production in d+Au and p+p collisions at RHIC. The results presented here are compared to previous p+A measurements at lower energies in fixed target mode. Some preliminary results on abundances of identified particles at high rapidity are also presented.

Ramiro Debbe; for the BRAHMS Collaboration

2005-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

203

Top physics results at CDF  

SciTech Connect

The most recent results on top quark physics at CDF are reported. Measurements of cross-section and mass are presented, and the status of single top quark production searches are discussed. The results obtained from probing various top quark properties are also presented.

Vickey, Trevor; /Illinois U., Urbana

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Recent Sediments of Bolinas Bay, California: Part C -- Interpretation and Summary of Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formation Monterey Formation Franciscan FormationMiddle Miocene Marine Monterey Formation) Upper Cretaceousrocks Cenozoic formations, the Monterey Fm. , and form the

Wilde, Pat; Isselhardt, C.; Osuch, L.; Yancey, T.

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Multiple stalk formation as a pathway of defect-induced membrane fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose that the first stage of membrane fusion need not be the formation of a single stalk. Instead, we consider a scenario for defect-induced membrane fusion that proceeds cooperatively via multiple stalk formation. The defects (stalks or pores) attract each other via membrane-mediated capillary interactions that result in a condensation transition of the defects. The resulting dense phase of stalks corresponds to the so-called fusion intermediate.

D. B. Lukatsky; Daan Frenkel

2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

206

Formation damage in underbalanced drilling operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formation damage has long been recognized as a potential source of reduced productivity and injectivity in both horizontal and vertical wells. From the moment that the pay zone is being drilled until the well is put on production, a formation is exposed to a series of fluids and operations that can reduce its productive capacity. Any process that causes a loss in the productivity of an oil-, gas-, or water-saturated formation has a damaging effect on the reservoir. These damage mechanisms predominantly fall into three major classifications: mechanical, chemical, and biological. Underbalanced drilling operations involve drilling a portion of the wellbore at fluid pressures less than that of the target formation. This technology has been used to prevent or minimize problems associated with invasive formation damage, which often greatly reduces the productivity of oil and gas reservoirs, mainly in openhole horizontal-well applications. Underbalanced drilling is not a solution for all formation-damage problems. Damage caused by poorly designed and/or executed underbalanced drilling programs can equal or exceed that which may occur with a well-designed conventional overbalanced drilling program. Four techniques are currently available to achieve underbalanced conditions while drilling. These include using lightweight drilling fluids, injecting gas down the drillpipe, injecting gas into a parasite string, and using foam. This study provides an analysis of a number of potential damage mechanisms present when drilling underbalanced. It describes each one and its influence on the productivity of a well. Additionally it presents a general description of the different techniques that can be applied to carry out successful, cost-effective UBD operations, and discusses how these techniques may be used to reduce or eliminate formation damage.

Reyes Serpa, Carlos Alberto

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

2000 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 User Survey Results 0 User Survey Results Show All | 1 2 3 4 5 ... 10 | Next » 2000 User Survey Results Table of Contents Response Summary User Information Overall Satisfaction and Importance All Satisfaction Questions and FY 1999 to FY 2000 Changes Consulting and Account Support Web and Communications Hardware Resources Software Resources Training User Comments Response Summary NERSC extends its thanks to all the users who participated in this year's survey. Your responses provide feedback about every aspect of NERSC's operation, help us judge the quality of our services, give DOE information on how well NERSC is doing, and point us to areas we can improve. Every year we institute changes based on the survey; the FY 1999 survey resulted in the following changes: We created a long-running queue (12 hours maximum) for jobs using up

208

2005 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 User Survey Results 5 User Survey Results Show All | 1 2 3 4 5 ... 10 | Next » 2005 User Survey Results Table of Contents Response Summary Respondent Demographics All Satisfaction, Importance and Usefulness Ratings Hardware Resources Software Visualization and Data Analysis Services and Communications Web Interfaces Training Comments about NERSC Response Summary Many thanks to the 201 users who responded to this year's User Survey. The respondents represent all six DOE Science Offices and a variety of home institutions: see Respondent Demographics. The survey responses provide feedback about every aspect of NERSC's operation, help us judge the quality of our services, give DOE information on how well NERSC is doing, and point us to areas we can improve. The survey results are listed below.

209

Main Results of Grossversuch IV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main results of a randomized hail suppression experiment, Grossversuch IV, are presented in this paper. Grossversuch IV tested the “Soviet” hail prevention method during five years (1977–81). The field experiment took place in central ...

B. Federer; A. Waldvogel; W. Schmid; H. H. Schiesser; F. Hampel; Marianne Schweingruber; W. Stahel; J. Bader; J. F. Mezeix; Nadie Doras; G. D'Aubigny; G. DerMegreditchian; D. Vento

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Results from NA61/SHINE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we summarize recent results from NA61/SHINE relevant for heavy ion physics, neutrino oscillations and the interpretation of air showers induced by ultra-high energy cosmic rays.

Unger, M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Automatic categorization of query results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exploratory ad-hoc queries could return too many answers - a phenomenon commonly referred to as "information overload". In this paper, we propose to automatically categorize the results of SQL queries to address this problem. We dynamically generate ...

Kaushik Chakrabarti; Surajit Chaudhuri; Seung-won Hwang

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

DOE Patents Database - Search Results  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Results: Zero matches. Page 1 of 1 Show only () Items Clear all () Items Refine Search Patent Title Inventor(s) Issue Date Patent Number Full Text Top Return to Original...

213

COBE Tutorial and Recent Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some of the technical details involved in taking and analyzing data from COBE are discussed, and recent results from the FIRAS and DMR experiments are summarized. Some of the cosmological implications of these recent data are presented.

Edward L. Wright

1994-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

214

The Fluid Mechanics of Gravitational Structure Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The standard model for gravitational structure formation in astrophysics, astronomy, and cosmology is questioned. Cold dark matter (CDM) hierarchical clustering cosmology neglects particle collisions, viscosity, turbulence and diffusion and makes predictions in conflict with observations. From Jeans 1902 and CDMHC, the non-baryonic dark matter NBDM forms small clumps during the plasma epoch after the big bang that ``cluster'' into larger clumps. CDM halo clusters collect the baryonic matter (H and He) by gravity so that after 300 Myr of ``dark ages'', huge, explosive (Population III) first stars appear, and then galaxies and galaxy clusters. Contrary to CDMHC cosmology, ``hydro-gravitational-dynamics'' HGD cosmology suggests the diffusive NBDM material cannot clump and the clumps cannot cluster. From HGD, the big bang results from an exothermic turbulent instability at Planck scales (10^{-35} m). Turbulent stresses cause an inflation of space and fossil density turbulence remnants that trigger gravitational instability at protosupercluster masses (10^{46} kg) in the H-He plasma. These fragment along plasma turbulence vortex lines to form protogalaxy masses (10^{42} kg) just before the transition to gas. The gas has x10^{-13} smaller viscosity, so it fragments at planetary and globular-star-cluster masses (10^{25} and 10^{36} kg) to form the baryonic dark matter (BDM). Observations from the Hubble Space Telescope show protogalaxies (PGs) in linear clusters reflecting their likely fragmentation on plasma vortex lines. From merging BDM planets, these PGs gently form small stars in globular clusters <1 Myr after the big bang without the dark ages, superstars, or reionization of CDM cosmology.

Carl H. Gibson

2006-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

215

Modeling trihalomethane formation potential from wastewater chlorination. Master's thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The deletion of federally mandated fecal coliform limits has led many states to review and modify their wastewater disinfection requirements. One issue in analyzing wastewater disinfection is the discharge of potentially carcinogenic halogenated organics formed during the chlorination process. This research investigates the formation of one class of the halogenated organics, the trihalomethanes. The applicability of using drinking water trihalomethane formation models for use with wastewater effluent is examined. Three models are compared for predictive capability by using measured trihalomethane values from previous research data. The results show that a previously developed model is applicable for use based on assumptions stated. Results provide environmental managers with worst case predictions for a range of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) parameters. Predictions indicate that trihalomethane formation from the chlorination of wastewater is typically lower than the Safe Drinking Water Act trihalomethane standard of 100 ug/L. The worst case model predictions reach, and in certain extreme cases, pass the standard of 100 ug/L. This level of trihalomethanes formed is minimized if aeration of the receiving bodies of water occurs. Based on this research, the risk of forming trihalomethanes as disinfection by-products from chlorination do not outweigh the benefits gained from proper chlorine disinfection of effluent.

McCormick, C.A.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Protected Loss of Flow Transient Simulation (Quicktime format, High  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering Analysis > Videos Engineering Analysis > Videos Engineering Analysis: Protected Loss of Flow Transient Simulation Quicktime format Quicktime Format - High Bandwidth | Size: 25.94 MB | Bit Rate: 1148 kbps Keywords: flow transient, plot, EBR-II, SAS4A, SASSYS-1, passive safety, protected loss of flow, PLOF, shutdown heat removal test, SHRT-17, SHRT17 Elevation plot showing detailed top of core temperatures in experimental assembly XX09 during a protected loss of flow transient in EBR-II. Surrounding assemblies are depicted using fuel average temperatures. Results show excellent decay heat removal capability of sodium through natural circulation and exceptionally low transient temperatures with metallic fuel. :: Please wait until video loads completely :: Closed Captioning Transcript

217

The geomechanics of CO2 storage in deep sedimentary formations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

formations, such as depleted oil and gas reservoirs,sedimentary formations, including oil and gas reservoirs andassociated with enhanced oil recovery (EOR). At the North-

Rutqvist, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Carbon Isotope Separation and Molecular Formation in Laser-Induced...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Isotope Separation and Molecular Formation in Laser-Induced Plasmas by Laser Ablation Molecular Isotopic Spectrometry Title Carbon Isotope Separation and Molecular Formation...

219

Focus Area 1 - Biomass Formation and Modification : BioEnergy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Formation and Modification BESC biomass formation and modification research involves working directly with two potential bioenergy crops (switchgrass and Populus) to develop...

220

Characterizing the Formation of Secondary Organic Aerosols-Interim...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterizing the Formation of Secondary Organic Aerosols-Interim Report. Title Characterizing the Formation of Secondary Organic Aerosols-Interim Report. Publication Type Report...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicolor result formats" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

1999 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 User Survey Results 9 User Survey Results Show All | 1 2 3 4 5 ... 11 | Next » 1999 User Survey Results Table of Contents Respondent Summary Overall Satisfaction User Information Visualization Consulting and Account Support Information Technology and Communication Hardware Resources Software Training Comments about NERSC All Satisfaction Questions and FY 1998 to FY 1999 Changes Respondent Summary NERSC would like to thank all the users who participated in this year's survey. Your responses provide feedback about every aspect of NERSC's operation, help us judge the quality of our services, give DOE information on how well NERSC is doing, point us to areas we can improve, and show how we compare to similar facilities. This year 177 users responded to our survey, compared with 138 last year.

222

VEMAP 2: Selected Model Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Model Results Model Results The ORNL DAAC announces the release of two data sets from Phase 2 of the Vegetation/Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis Project (VEMAP). The two data sets contain monthly and annual results, respectively, from experiments conducted to compare the ecological responses of the suite of VEMAP models to projected transient scenarios of climate and atmospheric carbon dioxide for the period 1994 to 2100. The models investigated included five biogeochemical cycling models, which simulate plant production and nutrient cycles but rely on a static land-cover type, and two dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs), which combine biogeochemical cycling processes with dynamic biogeographical processes including succession and fire simulation. VEMAP was an international project studying the response of biogeochemical

223

2002 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 User Survey Results 2 User Survey Results Show All | 1 2 3 4 5 ... 11 | Next » 2002 User Survey Results Table of Contents Response Summary User Information Overall Satisfaction and Importance All Satisfaction Questions and Changes from Previous Years Visualization and Grid Computing Web, NIM, and Communications Hardware Resources Software Training User Services Comments about NERSC Response Summary Many thanks to the 300 users who responded to this year's User Survey -- this represents the highest response level in the five years we have conducted the survey. The respondents represent all five DOE Science Offices and a variety of home institutions: see User Information. You can see the FY 2002 User Survey text, in which users rated us on a 7-point satisfaction scale. Some areas were also rated on a 3-point

224

2001 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 User Survey Results 1 User Survey Results Show All | 1 2 3 4 5 ... 11 | Next » 2001 User Survey Results Table of Contents Response Summary User Information Overall Satisfaction and Importance All Satisfaction Questions and Changes from Previous Years NERSC Information Management (NIM) System Web and Communications Hardware Resources Software Training User Services Comments about NERSC Response Summary NERSC extends its thanks to the 237 users who participated in this year's survey; this compares with 134 respondents last year. The respondents represent all five DOE Science Offices and a variety of home institutions: see User Information. Your responses provide feedback about every aspect of NERSC's operation, help us judge the quality of our services, give DOE information on how well

225

2004 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 User Survey Results 4 User Survey Results Show All | 1 2 3 4 5 ... 13 | Next » 2004 User Survey Results Table of Contents Response Summary Respondent Demographics Overall Satisfaction and Importance All Satisfaction, Importance and Usefulness Ratings Hardware Resources Software Security and One Time Passwords Visualization and Data Analysis HPC Consulting Services and Communications Web Interfaces Training Comments about NERSC Response Summary Many thanks to the 209 users who responded to this year's User Survey. The respondents represent all six DOE Science Offices and a variety of home institutions: see Respondent Demographics. The survey responses provide feedback about every aspect of NERSC's operation, help us judge the quality of our services, give DOE information on how well NERSC is doing, and point us to areas we can improve. The

226

New Results on R Aquarii  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first results on new optical data for R Aquarii (based on observations obtained with the 2.5m INT, the 2.5m NOT and the 3.5m NTT) are presented. The morphology and kinematics of the nebula, based on data obtained with the NTT from 1991 to 2000, are discussed. Physical parameters of the outer nebula and the knotty jet are derived using spectra obtained with the INT in 2001. From the analysis of all these data we propose that the spectacular knotty inner structure of R Aqr could result from the interaction of a highly collimated pulsating young jet with the older hourglass inner nebula.

D. R. Goncalves; A. Mampaso; S. Navarro; R. M. L. Corradi

2003-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

227

Energy efficient residence: research results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report on the design, construction, and monitoring of an energy efficient residence and a conventional comparison home by the National Association of Home Builders Research Foundation, Inc. The report describes the two homes in considerable detail, summarizes the results of the energy and other measurements, and evaluates many of the energy conservation techniques used. Finally, these results are synthesized with the foundation's other energy conservation experience into two lists of energy saving design tips for homes in both colder and warmer climates. Most of the design tips are accompanied by brief comments intended to aid in their interpretation and use.

Johnson, R.J.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

In situ oxidation of subsurface formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and systems for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation described herein include providing heat to a first portion of the formation from a plurality of heaters in the first portion, producing produced through one or more production wells in a second portion of the formation, reducing or turning off heat provided to the first portion after a selected time, providing an oxidizing fluid through one or more of the heater wells in the first portion, providing heat to the first portion and the second portion through oxidation of at least some hydrocarbons in the first portion, and producing fluids through at least one of the production wells in the second portion. The produced fluids may include at least some oxidized hydrocarbons produced in the first portion.

Beer, Gary Lee (Houston, TX); Mo, Weijian (Sugar Land, TX); Li, Busheng (Houston, TX); Shen, Chonghui (Calgary, CA)

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

229

Formation of Cyanoformaldehyde in the interstellar space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cyanoformaldehyde (HCOCN) molecule has recently been suspected towards the Sagittarius B2(N) by the Green Bank telescope, though a confirmation of this observation has not yet been made. In and around a star forming region, this molecule could be formed by the exothermic reaction between two abundant interstellar species, H$_2$CO and CN. Till date, the reaction rate coefficient for the formation of this molecule is unknown. Educated guesses were used to explain the abundance of this molecule by chemical modeling. In this paper, we carried out quantum chemical calculations to find out empirical rate coefficients for the formation of HCOCN and different chemical properties during the formation of HCOCN molecules. Though HCOCN is stable against unimolecular decomposition, this gas phase molecule could be destroyed by many other means, like: ion-molecular reactions or by the effect of cosmic rays. Ion-molecular reaction rates are computed by using the capture theories. We have also included the obtained rate coef...

Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sandip K; Saha, Rajdeep; Chakrabarti, Sonali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Innovative nuclear fuels: results and strategy  

SciTech Connect

To facilitate the discovery and design of innovative nuclear fuels, multi-scale models and simulations are used to predict irradiation effects on the thermal conductivity, oxygen diffusivity, and thermal expansion of oxide fuels. The multi-scale approach is illustrated using results on ceramic fuels with a focus on predictions of point defect concentrations, stoichiometry, and phase stability. The high performance computer simulations include coupled heat transport, diffusion, and thermal expansion, gas bubble formation and temperature evolution in a fuel element consisting of UO2 fuel and metallic cladding. The second part of the talk is dedicated to a discussion of an international strategy for developing advanced, innovative nuclear fuels. Four initiative are proposed to accelerate the discovery and design of new materials: (a) Develop an international pool of experts, (b) Create Institutes for Materials Discovery and Design, (c) Create an International Knowledge base for experimental data, models (mathematical expressions), and simulations (codes) and (d) Organize international workshops and conference sessions. The paper ends with a discussion of existing and emerging international collaborations.

Stan, Marius [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Recovery of heavy crude oil or tar sand oil or bitumen from underground formations  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method of producing heavy crude oil or tar sand oil or bitumen from an underground formation. The method consists of utilizing or establishing an aqueous fluid communication path within and through the formation between an injection well or conduit and a production well or conduit by introducing into the formation from the injection well or conduit hot water and/or low quality steam at a temperature in the range about 60{sup 0}-130{sup 0}C and at a substantially neutral or alkaline pH to establish or enlarge the aqueous fluid communication path within the formation from the injection well or conduit to the production well or conduit by movement of the introduced hot water or low quality steam through the formation, increasing the temperature of the injected hot water of low quality steam to a temperature in the range about 110{sup 0}-180{sup 0}C while increasing the pH of the injected hot water or low quality steam to a pH of about 10-13 so as to bring about the movement or migration or stripping of the heavy crude oil or tar sand oil or bitumen from the formation substantially into the hot aqueous fluid communication path with the formation and recovering the resulting produced heavy crude oil or tar sand oil or bitumen from the formation as an emulsion containing less than about 30% oil or bitumen from the production well or conduit.

McKay, A.S.

1989-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

232

Induction heaters used to heat subsurface formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heating system for a subsurface formation includes an elongated electrical conductor located in the subsurface formation. The electrical conductor extends between at least a first electrical contact and a second electrical contact. A ferromagnetic conductor at least partially surrounds and at least partially extends lengthwise around the electrical conductor. The electrical conductor, when energized with time-varying electrical current, induces sufficient electrical current flow in the ferromagnetic conductor such that the ferromagnetic conductor resistively heats to a temperature of at least about 300.degree. C.

Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Bass, Ronald M. (Houston, TX)

2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

233

Parallel heater system for subsurface formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heating system for a subsurface formation is disclosed. The system includes a plurality of substantially horizontally oriented or inclined heater sections located in a hydrocarbon containing layer in the formation. At least a portion of two of the heater sections are substantially parallel to each other. The ends of at least two of the heater sections in the layer are electrically coupled to a substantially horizontal, or inclined, electrical conductor oriented substantially perpendicular to the ends of the at least two heater sections.

Harris, Christopher Kelvin (Houston, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX)

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

234

Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test for the Hanford Central Plateau: Soil Desiccation Pilot Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes results of a pilot test of soil desiccation conducted as part of the Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test program. The report is written in CERCLA treatabilty test report format.

Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Strickland, Christopher E.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Johnson, Christian D.; Greenwood, William J.; Ward, Anderson L.; Clayton, Ray E.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Peterson, John E.; Hubbard, Susan; Chronister, Glen B.; Benecke, Mark W.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Core Measure Average KTR Results  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Measure Measure Average KTR Results FY 12 Target FY 12 DOE M&O CONTRACTOR (KTR) BSC RESULTS FY 2012 Customer Perspective and level of communication provided by the procurement office 95 92 Internal Business Perspective: Assessment (%) of the degree to which the purchasing system is in compliance with stakeholder requirements 97 Local Goals % Delivery on-time (includes JIT, excludes Purchase Cards) 88 84 % of total dollars obligated, on actions > $150K , that were awarded using effective competition 73 Local Goals Rapid Purchasing Techniques: -% of transactions placed by users 77 Local Goals -% of transactions placed through electronic commerce 62 Local Goals Average Cycle Time: -Average cycle time for <= $150K 8 6 to 9 days

236

DOE Patents Database - Search Results  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Issue Date between 07/06/2013 and 01/06/2014 Issue Date between 07/06/2013 and 01/06/2014 Sorted By: Issue Date, Descending Results: 1-25 of exactly 581 matches. Page 1 of 24 Next » Show only (√) Items Clear all (√) Items Refine Search Patent Title Inventor(s) Issue Date Patent Number Full Text A multiprocessor system supports multiple concurrent modes of speculative execution. Speculation identification numbers (IDs) are allocated to speculative threads from a pool of available numbers. The pool is divided into domains, with each domain being assigned to a mode of speculation. Modes of speculation include TM, TLS, and rollback. Allocation of the IDs is carried out with respect to a central state table and using hardware pointers. The IDs are used for writing different versions of speculative results in different ways of a set in a cache memory.

237

Top Physics Results from CDF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The top quark is by far the most massive fundamental particle observed so far, and the study of its properties is interesting for several reasons ranging from its possible special role in electroweak symmetry breaking to its sensitivity to physics beyond the Standard Model. We present recent top physics results from CDF based on 160-320 inverse pb of ppbar collision data at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The ttbar cross section and the top mass have been measured in different decay channels and using different methods. We have searched for evidence of single top production, setting upper limits on its production rate. Other results shown in this conference include studies of the polarization of W bosons from top decays, a search for charged Higgs decaying from top, and a search for additional heavy t' quarks.

Gervasio Gomez

2005-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

238

ATLAS Status and latest results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS experiment is a general-purpose detector located in one of the four interaction points of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Switzerland. In 2010 LHC has been colliding proton beams at the unprecedented centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. The last month of operation was dedicated to Pb-ion collisions at centre-of-mass energy of 2.76 TeV per nucleon. In this talk, a survey of the status of the ATLAS detector in both runs will be presented. The main results in pp collisions, including the study of minimum bias events, jets, W/Z, top and first searches for new physics will be reviewed. First results from heavy Ion collisions will be focussed on charged particle multiplicity, transverse energy, and elliptic flow as a function of collision geometry.

Sbarra, C; The ATLAS collaboration

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Heavy Flavour results from Tevatron  

SciTech Connect

The CDF and D0 experiments finalize the analysis of their full statistics collected in the p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. This paper presents several new results on the properties of hadrons containing heavy b- and c-quarks obtained by both collaborations. These results include the search for the rare decays B{sup 0}, B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} (CDF), the study of CP asymmetry in B{sub s} {yields} J{psi}{phi} decay (CDF, D0), the measurement of the like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry (D0), the measurement of CP asymmetry in D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} and D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays (CDF), and the new measurement of the B{sub s} {yields} D{sub s}{sup (*)+} D{sub s}{sup (*)-} branching fraction (CDF). Both experiments still expect to produce more results on the properties of heavy flavours.

Borissov, G.; /Lancaster U.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Galaxy Formation at z~3: Constraints from Spatial Clustering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use N-body simulations combined with semi-analytic models to compute the clustering properties of modeled galaxies at z~3, and confront these predictions with the clustering properties of the observed population of Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs). Several scenarios for the nature of LBGs are explored, which may be broadly categorized into models in which high-redshift star formation is driven by collisional starbursts and those in which quiescent star formation dominates. For each model, we make predictions for the LBG overdensity distribution, the variance of counts-in-cells, the correlation length, and close pair statistics. Models which assume a one-to-one relationship between massive dark-matter halos and galaxies are disfavored by close pair statistics, as are models in which colliding halos are associated with galaxies in a simplified way. However, when modeling of gas consumption and star formation is included using a semi-analytic treatment, the quiescent and collisional starburst models predict similar clustering properties and none of these models can be ruled out based on the available clustering data. None of the ``realistic'' models predict a strong dependence of clustering amplitude on the luminosity threshold of the sample, in apparent conflict with some observational results.

Risa H. Wechsler; Rachel S. Somerville; James S. Bullock; Tsafrir S. Kolatt; Joel R. Primack; George R. Blumenthal; Avishai Dekel

2000-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicolor result formats" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Mineral ecophysiological evidence for microbial activity in banded iron formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The phosphorus composition of banded-iron formations (BIFs) has been used as a proxy for Precambrian seawater composition and the paleoeredox state of Earth's surface environment. However, it is unclear whether the phosphorus in BIFs originally entered the sediment as a sorbed component of the iron oxyhydroxide particles, or whether it was incorporated into the biomass of marine phytoplankton. We conducted high-resolution mineral analyses and report here the first detection of an Fe(III) acetate salt, as well as nanocrystals of apatite in association with magnetite, in the 2.48 Ga Dales Gorge Member of the Brockman Iron Formation (a BIF), Hamersley, Western Australia. The clusters of apatite are similar in size and morphology to biogenic apatite crystals resulting from biomass decay in Phanerozoic marine sediments, while the formation of an Fe(III) acetate salt and magnetite not only implies the original presence of biomass in the BIF sediments, but also that organic carbon likely served as an electron donor during bacterial Fe(III) reduction. This study is important because it suggests that phytoplankton may have played a key role in the transfer of phosphorus (and other trace elements) from the photic zone to the seafloor.

Li, Dr. Yi-Liang [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Konhauser, Dr, Kurt [University of Alberta; Cole, David R [ORNL; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Pressure measurements in low permeability formations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper examines the performance requirements and identifies candidate hardware implementations for pressure instrumentation that is needed to provide well test data in low permeability formations. Low permeability values are typically defined to be less than 1 microdarcy and are usually encountered in hard rock formations, such as granite, that are of interest in hot dry rock geothermal, deep exploration drilling, and fluid waste disposal. Groundwater flow in these tight formations has been shown to be dominated by flow-through fractures rather than through the formation's intrinsic permeability. In these cases, we cannot use Darcy's law or the usual dimensionless coefficients to estimate the expected scale factors and dynamic responses necessary to properly select and setup the wellbore pressure instrument. This paper shows that the expected instrument responses can be estimated using some recent work by Wang, Narasimhan, and Witherspoon. This paper further describes the minimum electronic capability that the downhole pressure instrument must have in order to provide the required measurement resolution, dynamic range, and transient response. Three specific hardware implementations are presented based on the following transducers: a quartz resonator, a capacitance gauge, and a resistance strain gauge.

Veneruso, A.F.; McConnell, T.D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Polyglots: crossing origins by crossing formats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a heterogeneous system like the web, information is exchanged between components in versatile formats. A new breed of attacks is on the rise that exploit the mismatch between the expected and provided content. This paper focuses on the root cause ... Keywords: cross-domain, injection, polyglot, web security

Jonas Magazinius, Billy K. Rios, Andrei Sabelfeld

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

High temperature simulation of petroleum formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Petroleum formation has been simulated in the laboratory with emphasis on the effects of temperature, mineral catalysis, and starting material structure on the yield and composition of the liquid and gaseous hydrocarbon products. In an attempt to prove the hypothesis that petroleum formation can be simulated using high temperatures, Green River Shale from Colorado, USA, was subjected to pyrolysis for 16 hours at temperatures ranging from 300 to 500/sup 0/C. The sequence of products formed over this temperature range was used as the basis for defining five different zones of maturation reaction: 1) a heterobond cracking zone; 2) a labile carbon bond cracking zone; 3) a free radical synthesis zone; 4) a wet gas formation zone; and 5) an aromatization zone. The role of some typical inorganic components of sedimentary rocks in the origin and maturation of petroleum has been investigated using this high temperature model. The importance of the structure of organic matter in petroelum formation has also been investigated using this high temperature model. Lignin and cellulose are poor sources of liquid hydrocarbons, but cellulose in the presence of carbonate gives a high yield of gaseous hydrocarbons. Protein pyrolysis gives a high oil yield with an alkane distribution similar to petroleum. The lipids produced the highest oil yield of the substances tested but the n-alkanes show an odd carbon length predominance unlike the distribution found in petroleum.

Evans, R.J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Essential Dynamics of Secondary Eyewall Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We conduct an analysis of the dynamics of secondary eyewall formation, in two modeling frameworks to obtain a more complete understanding of the phenomenon. The first is a full-physics, three-dimensional mesoscale model in which we examine an ...

Sergio F. Abarca; Michael T. Montgomery

246

Photoionization and the formation of dwarf galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been argued that a UV photoionizing background radiation field suppresses the formation of dwarf galaxies, and may even inhibit the formation of larger galaxies. In order to test this, we present gas-dynamical simulations of the formation of small objects in a CDM universe with and without a photoionizing background. The objects are selected from a collisionless simulation at a redshift of 2.4, and rerun at higher resolution including the effects of gas dynamics and using a hierarchical grid of particles. Five objects, each with a circular speed of 46 km/sec are simulated. The presence of the photoionizing background has only a small effect on the amount of gas that collapses in these objects, reducing the amount of cold collapsed gas by at most 30%. Analysis of the smaller objects found in the higher resolution simulation indicates that the photoionizing background only significantly affects the formation of objects with a virialized halo mass less than 10^9 soalr masses and circular speeds less than ...

Quinn, T; Efstathiou, G P; Quinn, Thomas; Katz, Neal; Efstathiou, George

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Photoionization and the Formation of Dwarf Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been argued that a UV photoionizing background radiation field suppresses the formation of dwarf galaxies, and may even inhibit the formation of larger galaxies. In order to test this, we present gas-dynamical simulations of the formation of small objects in a CDM universe with and without a photoionizing background. The objects are selected from a collisionless simulation at a redshift of 2.4, and rerun at higher resolution including the effects of gas dynamics and using a hierarchical grid of particles. Five objects, each with a circular speed of 46 km/sec are simulated. The presence of the photoionizing background has only a small effect on the amount of gas that collapses in these objects, reducing the amount of cold collapsed gas by at most 30%. Analysis of the smaller objects found in the higher resolution simulation indicates that the photoionizing background only significantly affects the formation of objects with a virialized halo mass less than 10^9 soalr masses and circular speeds less than 23 km/sec. However, the ionization balance is greatly changed by the presence of the background radiation field. Typical lines of sight through the objects have 4 orders of magnitude less neutral hydrogen column density when the photoionizing background is included.

Thomas Quinn; Neal Katz; George Efstathiou

1995-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

248

Engineering Documents into XML File Formats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

XML has become the preferred language for representing information in documents. The goal of this research work is to allow a user to convert any document on Windows® into a standard and open document format in XML (the Extensible Markup Language). One ...

Chia-Chu Chiang

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Star Formation from Galaxies to Globules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The empirical laws of star formation suggest that galactic-scale gravity is involved, but they do not identify the actual triggering mechanisms for clusters in the final stages. Many other triggering processes satisfy the empirical laws too, including turbulence compression and expanding shell collapse. The self-similar nature of the gas and associated young stars suggests that turbulence is more directly involved, but the small scale morphology of gas around most embedded clusters does not look like a random turbulent flow. Most clusters look triggered by other nearby stars. Such a prominent local influence makes it difficult to understand the universality of the Kennicutt and Schmidt laws on galactic scales. A unified view of multi-scale star formation avoids most of these problems. Ambient self-gravity produces spiral arms and drives much of the turbulence that leads to self-similar structures, while localized energy input from existing clusters and field supernovae triggers new clusters in pre-existing clouds. The hierarchical structure in the gas made by turbulence ensures that the triggering time scales with size, giving the Schmidt law over a wide range of scales and the size-duration correlation for young star fields. The efficiency of star formation is determined by the fraction of the gas above a critical density of around 10^5 m(H2)/cc. Star formation is saturated to its largest possible value given the fractal nature of the interstellar medium.

Bruce G. Elmegreen

2002-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

250

Specifying formative constructs in information systems research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While researchers go to great lengths to justify and prove theoretical links between constructs, the relationship between measurement items and constructs is often ignored. By default, the relationship between construct and item is assumed to be reflective, ... Keywords: composite constructs, formative constructs, latent constructs, measurement models, methodology, reflective constructs, statistical conclusion validity, type i and type II errors

Stacie Petter; Detmar Straub; Arun Rai

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Electricity 5 E Lesson Plan Format  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity 5 E Lesson Plan Format Standards Grade 4- Force, Energy, and Motion- 4.3a & 4.3b. What their experimentation, students should gain a thorough understanding of electricity's characteristics and mode of travel, familiarity with the structure and function of a basic electrical circuit as well as the concept

Marsh, David

252

Measurement and Modeling of SO3 Formation in Coal-Fired Power Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents results from the second full-scale test and associated modeling work conducted under EPRI’s program on measurement and modeling of SO3 formation in coal-fired boilers. The objective of this program is to develop a fundamental understanding of the SO3 formation/depletion process with the hope that this understanding can suggest operational changes that minimize SO3 concentrations at the economizer outlet. The study focuses on SO3 formation up to the economizer outlet because SO3 forma...

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

253

Laboratory studies of PbS scale formation in steel pipes  

SciTech Connect

Experimental results are reported on the deposition rates and the morphology of scales. The data are obtained under conditions that resemble the rather sudden PbS supersaturation occurring in geothermal brines. It is concluded that PbS scale formation is strongly influenced by both pH and concentration, in the range of very small concentrations of practical interest. For a fixed PbS concentration, appreciable scale formation takes place within a limited pH range of about two units. Based on data interpretation, possible mechanisms of sulfide scale formation are suggested.

Andritsos, N.; Karabelas, A.J. (Thessaloniki Univ. (Greece). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Distribution Conductor Burndown Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On overhead distribution circuits, conductor burndown is a well-documented phenomenon. Two systems are especially vulnerable to burndown: covered conductors (also known as tree wires or coated conductors) and small bare wires. In a burndown scenario, a power-follow arc develops on the system, with at least one end of the arc attached to a conductor. The arc heats the conductor, which causes the strands to anneal and lose tensile strength. The burndown event results in the strands breaking and the conduct...

2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

255

APS undulator radiation: First results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first undulator radiation has been extracted from the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The results from the characterization of this radiation are very satisfactory. With the undulator set at a gap of 15.8 mm (K=1.61), harmonics as high as the 17th were observed using a crystal spectrometer. The angular distribution of the third-harmonic radiation was measured, and the source was imaged using a zone plate to determine the particle beam emittance. The horizontal beam emittance was found to be 6.9 {plus_minus} 1.0 nm-rad, and the vertical emittance coupling was found to be less than 3%. The absolute spectral flux was measured over a wide range of photon energies, and it agrees remarkably well with the theoretical calculations based on the measured undulator magnetic field profile and the measured beam emittance. These results indicate that both the emittance of the electron beam and the undulator magnetic field quality exceed the original specifications.

Cai, Z.; Dejus, R.J.; Hartog, P.D.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

Power systems utilizing the heat of produced formation fluid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method includes treating a hydrocarbon containing formation. The method may include providing heat to the formation; producing heated fluid from the formation; and generating electricity from at least a portion of the heated fluid using a Kalina cycle.

Lambirth, Gene Richard (Houston, TX)

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

257

Carbon Monoxide Formation in Fires by High-Temperature ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... experiments. Page 7. FORMATION BY ANAEROBIC WOOD PYROLYSIS 1461 . ... 1990. Milne, T,, in Biomass Gasification. ...

1996-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

258

Data Transfer Nodes Yield Results!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DTN DTN Data Transfer Nodes Yield Results August 1, 2011 | Tags: Accelerator Science, Data Transfer, ESnet Linda Vu, +1 510 495 2402, lvu@lbl.gov The ability to reliably move and share data around the globe is essential to scientific collaboration, that's why three Department of Energy (DOE) Scientific Computing Centers-Argonne and Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facilities, and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC)-have teamed up to focus on optimizing wide area network (WAN) transfers. This ongoing effort began several years ago when each site deployed dedicated transfer nodes (DTNs), optimized for carrying data between the DOE facilities. Today, engineers from each site continue to meet regularly with DOE's Energy Sciences Network staff (ESnet) to develop strategies

259

Microsoft Word - S07076_Results  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Hydrologic and Hydrologic and Natural Gas Sampling and Analysis Results for 2010 December 2010 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited LMS/GSB/S07076 Available for sale to the public from: U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5301 Shawnee Road Alexandria, VA 22312 Telephone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 E-mail: orders@ntis.gov Online Ordering: http://www.ntis.gov/help/ordermethods.aspx Available electronically at http://www.osti.gov/bridge Available for a processing fee to U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0062 Phone: 865.576.8401 Fax: 865.576.5728

260

Microsoft Word - S08153_Results  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Natural Gas and Produced Water Sampling and Analysis Results for 2011 September 2011 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited LMS/GSB/S08153 Available for sale to the public from: U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5301 Shawnee Road Alexandria, VA 22312 Telephone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 E-mail: orders@ntis.gov Online Ordering: http://www.ntis.gov/help/ordermethods.aspx Available electronically at http://www.osti.gov/bridge Available for a processing fee to U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0062 Phone: 865.576.8401 Fax: 865.576.5728

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicolor result formats" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

New Results on Solar Neutrinos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reviews the constraints on the solar neutrino mixing parameters with data collected by the Homestake, SAGE, GALLEX, Kamiokande, SuperKamiokande, Borexino and SNO experiments. An emphasis will be given to the global solar neutrino analyses in terms of matter-enhanced oscillation of two and three active flavors. The results to-date, including both solar model dependent and independent measurements, indicate that electron neutrinos are changing to other active types on route to the Earth from the Sun. The total flux of solar neutrinos is found to be in very good agreement with solar model calculations. Today, solar neutrino measurements focus on greater accuracy for mixing parameters and on better sensitivity to low neutrino energies. This article also summarizes near future prospects in the field of solar neutrino physics.

Alain Bellerive

2010-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

262

MITG test procedure and results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Elements and modules for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator have been performance tested since the inception of the RTG program. These test articles seldom resembled flight hardware and often lacked adequate diagnostic instrumentation. Because of this, performance problems were not identified in the early stage of program development. The lack of test data in an unexpected area often hampered the development of a problem solution. A procedure for conducting the MITG Test was developed in an effort to obtain data in a systematic, unambiguous manner. This procedure required the development of extensive data acquisition software and test automation. The development of a facility to implement the test procedure, the facility hardware and software requirements, and the results of the MITG testing are the subject of this paper.

Eck, M.B.; Mukunda, M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

New Results on Solar Neutrinos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reviews the constraints on the solar neutrino mixing parameters with data collected by the Homestake, SAGE, GALLEX, Kamiokande, SuperKamiokande, Borexino and SNO experiments. An emphasis will be given to the global solar neutrino analyses in terms of matter-enhanced oscillation of two and three active flavors. The results to-date, including both solar model dependent and independent measurements, indicate that electron neutrinos are changing to other active types on route to the Earth from the Sun. The total flux of solar neutrinos is found to be in very good agreement with solar model calculations. Today, solar neutrino measurements focus on greater accuracy for mixing parameters and on better sensitivity to low neutrino energies. This article also summarizes near future prospects in the field of solar neutrino physics.

Bellerive, Alain

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Energy Monitoring - Objectives vs Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Universities, hospitals and similar institutions as well as manufacturers and plants have implemented programs of utility submetering. Submetering of utilities is defined as the measurement of energy at or near the point of use as opposed to gross measurement of energy coming into a building or facility. Without exception, the results achieved have met or exceeded expectations. Most of the programs are continuing in an expanding mode. Results of improvements to the utility distribution system can be measured in reduced usage and improved efficiency after submetering is in place. Networking of this monitoring system further enhances information collection and analysis. When other factors such as outside temperature and time of day are included in the data base, an emerging picture of energy usage for an entire facility is developed. A summary of highlights from several of these programs will be discussed in terms of what has been and is being accomplished. The importance of the commitment of both management and technologists/operators becomes evident as the initial objectives are achieved and expanded to match the innovation and skills of these professionals. The programs highlighted represent a group of progressive companies and institutions which have joined a "savings club." We are familiar with the savings clubs based on the investment of capital, depending strictly on interest to generate funds for us. The kind of savings clubs to be discussed in this paper joins capital with the more important human element to generate significant savings in deferred energy expenses. Steps necessary to "join the club" are listed and the ingredients of commitment and planning are discussed.

McEver, R. M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Argonne TTRDC - Green Racing - Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Results and Recaps Results and Recaps Green Racing Initiative - 2011 Season The Green Racing Initiative, managed by Argonne for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), has become an integral part of the American Le Mans Series (ALMS). The 2011 season continued the growth and acceptance of green racing activities in the Series. In August 2011, ALMS announced that it would implement Green Racing 2.0 in future races. Renewable Fuel Use The 2011 ALMS season saw the use of non-petroleum and renewable fuels become dominant. Every Green Challenge victory in the Gran Turismo (GT) category and five out of nine victories in the Le Mans Prototype (LMP) category were won by a car using advanced fuels. Underlining the significance of this movement to advanced renewable fuels is that teams and engineers from all over the world made the decision to switch to these fuels because of their performance advantages alone. There were no incentives for switching in the form of funding or extra points. ALMS goes to great lengths to balance the performance of all the cars, so the switch to these fuels was made solely because they offered better efficiency and, in some cases, more power. The Green Challenge scoring system, developed by Argonne engineers in cooperation with the ALMS, accurately reflects renewable fuels' characteristics in terms of its greenhouse gas and oil replacement attributes without rewarding their selection of these over conventional fuels. That is what makes this switch to renewable replacements for conventional oil-based fuels all the more significant.

266

Annual Energy Outlook 2002 with Projections to 2020 - Model Results  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Model Results To view PDF Files, Download Free Copy of Adobe Reader Get Acrobat Reader Logo AEO2002 Report Available Formats Entire AEO Report as Printed (PDF, 2,292KB) Preface (PDF, 52KB) Overview (PDF, 117KB) Legislation and Regulations (PDF, 119KB) Issues in Focus (PDF, 172KB) Market Trends Macroeconomic & International Oil Market (PDF, 99KB) Energy Demand (PDF, 99KB) Electricity (PDF, 99KB) Oil and Gas (PDF, 99KB) Coal & Carbon Emissions (PDF, 99KB) Forecast Comparisons (PDF, 83KB) List of Acronyms (PDF, 99KB) Notes and Sources (PDF, 99KB) AEO2002 Appendix Tables XLS format A - Reference Case Forecast PDF (243KB) Reference Case Forecast, Annual 1999-2020 PDF (345KB), HTML, XLS B - Economic Growth Case Comparisons PDF (277KB)

267

Varying heating in dawsonite zones in hydrocarbon containing formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating an oil shale formation comprising dawsonite includes assessing a dawsonite composition of one or more zones in the formation. Heat from one or more heaters is provided to the formation such that different amounts of heat are provided to zones with different dawsonite compositions. The provided heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to the formation. Fluids are produced from the formation.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Xie, Xueying (Houston, TX); Miller, David Scott (Katy, TX)

2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

268

Summary Results of Electricity Distribution System Challenges and Opportunities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, 2012 6, 2012 Summary Results of Electricity Distribution System Challenges & Opportunities From Breakout Group Sessions Red Team Results Top Challenges * Communication * System Awareness & Modeling * Standards and Interoperability * Need a national scale Grid Operating System (Grid OS) including microgrids - a uniform framework towards operating all of the nation's distribution grids using a collaborative approach - DOE needs to develop an advanced SCADA system definition given to system operators * Bring information together from various sources - differing protocols, lack of a data service bus, automated processes * Lack of a standard communication protocols, data formats/interfaces

269

TurningPoint Evaluation Results  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Results of the Knoxville 2012 Meeting Evaluation 15 22.06% 5 7.35% 36 52.94% 0 0% 3 4.41% 6 8.82% 3 4.41% Totals 68 100% 25 17.86% 38 27.14% 38 27.14% 38 27.14% 1 0.71% Totals 140 100% 35 47.30% 36 48.65% 2 2.70% 1 1.35% Totals 74 100% 1.) Please indicate what type of agency or company you represent. Responses Federal 2.) Which breakout sessions did you attend? Responses NRC: Storage and disposal topics NRC: Rulemakings and studies Emerging technologies for HAZMAT shipments Harmonization, DOE directives, TEPP activitie... Tribal State executive State legislature Local Private Other Didn't attend None 3.) Keynote Address: DOE Office of Environmental Management Responses Very Somewhat Not useful 22.1% 7.4% 52.9% 0% 4.4% 8.8% 4.4% Federal Tribal State executive State legislature Local

270

Majorana Thermosyphon Prototype Experimental Results  

SciTech Connect

Objective The Majorana demonstrator will operate at liquid Nitrogen temperatures to ensure optimal spectrometric performance of its High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector modules. In order to transfer the heat load of the detector module, the Majorana demonstrator requires a cooling system that will maintain a stable liquid nitrogen temperature. This cooling system is required to transport the heat from the detector chamber outside the shield. One approach is to use the two phase liquid-gas equilibrium to ensure constant temperature. This cooling technique is used in a thermosyphon. The thermosyphon can be designed so the vaporization/condensing process transfers heat through the shield while maintaining a stable operating temperature. A prototype of such system has been built at PNNL. This document presents the experimental results of the prototype and evaluates the heat transfer performance of the system. The cool down time, temperature gradient in the thermosyphon, and heat transfer analysis are studied in this document with different heat load applied to the prototype.

Fast, James E.; Reid, Douglas J.; Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

271

Molecular Hydrogen Formation on Ice Under Interstellar Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The results of experiments on the formation of molecular hydrogen on low density and high density amorphous ice surfaces are analyzed using a rate equation model. The activation energy barriers for the relevant diffusion and desorption processes are obtained. The more porous morphology of the low density ice gives rise to a broader spectrum of energy barriers compared to the high density ice. Inserting these parameters into the rate equation model under steady state conditions we evaluate the production rate of molecular hydrogen on ice-coated interstellar dust grains.

Hagai B. Perets; Ofer Biham; Giulio Manico; Valerio Pirronello; Joe Roser; Sol Swords; Gianfranco Vidali

2004-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

272

Direct-Write Contacts: Metallization and Contact Formation; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using direct-write approaches in photovoltaics for metallization and contact formation can significantly reduce the cost per watt of producing photovoltaic devices. Inks have been developed for various materials, such as Ag, Cu, Ni and Al, which can be used to inkjet print metallizations for various kinds of photovoltaic devices. Use of these inks results in metallization with resistivities close to those of bulk materials. By means of inkjet printing a metallization grid can be printed with better resolution, i.e. smaller lines, than screen-printing. Also inks have been developed to deposit transparent conductive oxide films by means of ultrasonic spraying.

van Hest, M. F. A. M.; Curtis, C. J.; Miedaner, A.; Pasquarelli, R. M.; Kaydonova, T.; Hersh, P.; Ginley, D. S.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Subtask 1.8 - Investigation of Improved Conductivity and Proppant Applications in the Bakken Formation  

SciTech Connect

Given the importance of hydraulic fracturing and proppant performance for development of the Bakken and Three Forks Formations within the Williston Basin, a study was conducted to evaluate the key factors that may result in conductivity loss within the reservoirs. Various proppants and reservoir rock cores were exposed to several different fracturing and formation fluids at reservoir conditions. The hardness of the rock cores and the strength of the proppants were evaluated prior to and following fluid exposure. In addition, the conductivity of various proppants, as well as formation embedment and spalling, was evaluated at reservoir temperatures and pressures using actual reservoir rock cores. The results of this work suggest that certain fluids may affect both rock and proppant strength, and therefore, fluid exposure needs to be considered in the field. In addition, conductivity decreases within the Bakken Formation appear to be a function of a variety of factors, including proppant and rock strength, as well as formation embedment and spalling. The results of this study highlight the need for advanced conductivity testing, coupled with quantification of formation embedment and spalling. Given the importance of proppant performance on conductivity loss and, ultimately, oil recovery, better understanding the effects of these various factors on proppant and rock strength in the field is vital for more efficient production within unconventional oil and gas reservoirs.

Bethany Kurz; Darren Schmidt; Steven Smith Christopher Beddoe; Corey Lindeman; Blaise Mibeck

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

274

Removing of Formation Damage and Enhancement of Formation Productivity Using Environmentally Friendly Chemicals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Matrix acidizing is used in carbonate formations to create wormholes that connect the formation to the wellbore. Hydrochloric acid, organic acids, or mixtures of these acids are typically used in matrix acidizing treatments of carbonate reservoirs. However, the use of these acids in deep wells has some major drawbacks including high and uncontrolled reaction rate and corrosion to well tubulars, especially those made of chrome-based tubulars (Cr-13 and duplex steel), and these problems become severe at high temperatures. Hydrochloric acid (HCl) and its based fluids have a major drawback in stimulating shallow (low fracture gradient) formations as they may cause face dissolution (formation surface washout) if injected at low rates. The objective of stimulation of sandstone reservoirs is to remove the damage caused to the production zone during drilling or completion operations. Many problems may occur during sandstone acidizing with Hydrochloric/Hydrofluoric acids (HCl/HF) mud acid. Among those problems: decomposition of clays in HCl acids, precipitation of fluosilicates, the presence of carbonate can cause the precipitation of calcium fluorides, silica-gel filming, colloidal silica-gel precipitation, and mixing between various stages of the treatment. To overcome problems associated with strong acids, chelating agents were introduced and used in the field. However, major concerns with most of these chemicals are their limited dissolving power and negative environmental impact. Glutamic acid diacetic acid (GLDA) a newly developed environmentally friendly chelate was examined as stand-alone stimulation fluid in deep oil and gas wells. In this study we used GLDA to stimulate carbonate cores (calcite and dolomite). GLDA was also used to stimulate and remove the damage from different sandstone cores containing different compositions of clay minerals. Carbonate cores (calcite and dolomite) of 6 and 20 in. length and 1.5 in. diameter were used in the coreflood experiments. Coreflood experiments were run at temperatures ranging from 180 to 300oF. Ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA), hydroxyl ethylethylene diaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA), and GLDA were used to stimulate and remove the damage from different sandstone cores at high temperatures. X-ray Computed Topography (CT) scans were used to determine the effectiveness of these fluids in stimulation calcite and dolomite cores and removing the damage from sandstone cores. The sandstone cores used in this study contain from 1 to 18 wt percent illite (swellable and migratable clay mineral). GLDA was found to be highly effective in creating wormholes over a wide range of pH (1.7-13) in calcite cores. Increasing temperature enhanced the reaction rate, more calcite was dissolved, and larger wormholes were formed for different pH with smaller volumes of GLDA solutions. GLDA has a prolonged activity and leads to a decreased surface spending resulting in face dissolution and therefore acts deeper in the formation. In addition, GLDA was very effective in creating wormholes in the dolomite core as it is a good chelate for magnesium. Coreflood experiments showed that at high pH values (pH =11) GLDA, HEDTA, and EDTA were almost the same in increasing the permeability of both Berea and Bandera sandstone cores. GLDA, HEDTA, and EDTA were compatible with Bandera sandstone cores which contains 10 wt percent Illite. The weight loss from the core was highest in case of HEDTA and lowest in case of GLDA at pH 11. At low pH values (pH =4) 0.6M GLDA performed better than 0.6M HEDTA in the coreflood experiments. The permeability ratio (final/initial) for Bandera sandstone cores was 2 in the case of GLDA and 1.2 in the case of HEDTA at pH of 4 and 300oF. At high pH HEDTA was the best chelating agent to stimulate different sandstone cores, and at low pH GLDA was the best one. For Berea sandstone cores EDTA at high pH of 11 was the best in increasing the permeability of the core at 300oF. The low pH GLDA based fluid has been especially designed for high temperature oil well stimulation i

Mahmoud, Mohamed Ahmed Nasr Eldin

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time Print Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time Print The oxide gate layer is critical to every transistor, and present-day layer thicknesses are in the 10-20 Å range (1-2 nm). However, little information exists on the oxidation process at this thickness. Available results are either for thicker layers grown under high-pressure conditions or for only the first couple of monolayers studied under high-vacuum conditions. Now, for the first time, a group of researchers has obtained real-time oxidation results for this elusive range. Using the ambient-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS) endstation at ALS Beamline 9.3.2, they examined oxidation of Si(100) at pressures up to 1 torr and temperatures up to 450 ºC. The Si 2p chemical shifts allowed determination of oxide thickness as a function of time with a precision of 1-2 Å. The initial oxidation rate was very high (up to ~234 Å/h). Then, after an initial oxide thickness of 6-22 Å was formed, the rate decreased markedly (~1.5-4.0Å/h). Neither rate regime can be explained by the standard Deal-Grove (D-G) model for Si oxidation. These results are a significant step toward developing a better understanding of this critical thickness regime.

276

Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time Print Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time Print The oxide gate layer is critical to every transistor, and present-day layer thicknesses are in the 10-20 Å range (1-2 nm). However, little information exists on the oxidation process at this thickness. Available results are either for thicker layers grown under high-pressure conditions or for only the first couple of monolayers studied under high-vacuum conditions. Now, for the first time, a group of researchers has obtained real-time oxidation results for this elusive range. Using the ambient-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS) endstation at ALS Beamline 9.3.2, they examined oxidation of Si(100) at pressures up to 1 torr and temperatures up to 450 ºC. The Si 2p chemical shifts allowed determination of oxide thickness as a function of time with a precision of 1-2 Å. The initial oxidation rate was very high (up to ~234 Å/h). Then, after an initial oxide thickness of 6-22 Å was formed, the rate decreased markedly (~1.5-4.0Å/h). Neither rate regime can be explained by the standard Deal-Grove (D-G) model for Si oxidation. These results are a significant step toward developing a better understanding of this critical thickness regime.

277

Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time Print Looking at Transistor Gate Oxide Formation in Real Time Print The oxide gate layer is critical to every transistor, and present-day layer thicknesses are in the 10-20 Å range (1-2 nm). However, little information exists on the oxidation process at this thickness. Available results are either for thicker layers grown under high-pressure conditions or for only the first couple of monolayers studied under high-vacuum conditions. Now, for the first time, a group of researchers has obtained real-time oxidation results for this elusive range. Using the ambient-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS) endstation at ALS Beamline 9.3.2, they examined oxidation of Si(100) at pressures up to 1 torr and temperatures up to 450 ºC. The Si 2p chemical shifts allowed determination of oxide thickness as a function of time with a precision of 1-2 Å. The initial oxidation rate was very high (up to ~234 Å/h). Then, after an initial oxide thickness of 6-22 Å was formed, the rate decreased markedly (~1.5-4.0Å/h). Neither rate regime can be explained by the standard Deal-Grove (D-G) model for Si oxidation. These results are a significant step toward developing a better understanding of this critical thickness regime.

278

|Result List Refine Search Print E-mail Save Formats: Citation HTML Full Text PDF Full Text  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

twelve-foot remains of the armored dinosaurs known as ankylosaurs, with almost every piece of bony plate

Loope, David B.

279

Formation of titanate nanostructures under different NaOH concentration and their application in wastewater treatment  

SciTech Connect

The effects of the concentration of NaOH on the formation and transformation of various titanate nanostructures were studied. With increasing NaOH concentration, three different formation mechanisms were proposed. Nanotubes can only be obtained under moderate NaOH conditions, and should transform into nanowires with prolonged hydrothermal treatment, and their formation rate is accelerated by increasing NaOH concentration. Low concentration of NaOH results in the direct formation of nanowires, while extra high concentration of NaOH leads to the formation of amorphous nanoparticles. Adsorption and photocatalysis studies show that titanate nanowires and nanotubes might be potential adsorbents for the removal of both heavy metal ions and dyes and photocatalysts for the removal of dyes from wastewater. -- Graphical abstract: The morphologies of the titanates depend deeply on the concentration of NaOH. With increasing NaOH concentration, three different formation mechanisms were proposed. The application of these titanate nanostructures in the wastewater treatment was studied. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} Effect of NaOH concentration on the structures of various titanates was reported. {yields} Three different formation mechanisms were presented with increasing NaOH concentration. {yields} Various titanates were used as adsorbents/photocatalysts in wastewater treatment.

Huang Jiquan [Key Lab of Optoelectronic Materials Chemistry and Physics, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Graduate school of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100049 (China); Cao Yongge, E-mail: caoyongge@fjirsm.ac.c [Key Lab of Optoelectronic Materials Chemistry and Physics, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Deng Zhonghua; Tong Hao [Key Lab of Optoelectronic Materials Chemistry and Physics, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002 (China)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

Formation Damage due to CO2 Sequestration in Saline Aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration is defined as the removal of gas that would be emitted into the atmosphere and its subsequent storage in a safe, sound place. CO2 sequestration in underground formations is currently being considered to reduce the amount of CO2 emitted into the atmosphere. However, a better understanding of the chemical and physical interactions between CO2, water, and formation rock is necessary before sequestration. These interactions can be evaluated by the change in mineral content in the water before and after injection, or from the change in well injectivity during CO2 injection. It may affect the permeability positively due to rock dissolution, or negatively due to precipitation. Several physical and chemical processes cover the CO2 injection operations; multiphase flow in porous media is represented by the flow of the brine and CO2, solute transportation is represented by CO2 dissolution in the brine forming weak carbonic acid, dissolution-deposition kinetics can be seen in the rock dissolution by the carbonic acid and the deposition of the reaction products, hydrodynamic instabilities due to displacement of less viscous brine with more viscous CO2 (viscous fingering), capillary effects and upward movement of CO2 due to gravity effect. The objective of the proposed work is to correlate the formation damage to the other variables, i.e. pressure, temperature, formation rock type, rock porosity, water composition, sulfates concentration in the water, CO2 volume injected, water volume injected, CO2 to water volumetric ratio, CO2 injection rate, and water injection rate. In order to achieve the proposed objective, lab experiments will be conducted on different rock types (carbonates, limestone and dolomite, and sandstone) under pressure and temperature that simulate the field conditions. CO2 will be used at the supercritical phase and different CO2-water-rock chemical interactions will be addressed. Quantitative analysis of the experimental results using a geochemical simulator (CMG-GEM) will also be performed. The results showed that for carbonate cores, maintaining the CO2/brine volumetric ratio above 1.0 reduced bicarbonate formation in the formation brine and helped in minimizing precipitation of calcium carbonate. Additionally, increasing cycle volume in WAG injection reduced the damage introduced to the core. Sulfate precipitation during CO2 sequestration was primarily controlled by temperature. For formation brine with high total dissolved solids (TDS), calcium sulfate precipitation occurs, even at a low sulfate concentration. For dolomite rock, temperature, injection flow rate, and injection scheme don't have a clear impact on the core permeability, the main factor that affects the change in core permeability is the initial core permeability. Sandstone cores showed significant damage; between 35% and 55% loss in core permeability was observed after CO2 injection. For shorter WAG injection the damage was higher; decreasing the brine volume injected per cycle, decreased the damage. At higher temperatures, 200 and 250 degrees F, more damage was noted than at 70 degrees F.

Mohamed, Ibrahim 1984-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicolor result formats" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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281

Factors of paleosol formation in a Late Cretaceous eolian sand sheet paleoenvironment, Marlia Formation, Southeastern Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formation, Southeastern Brazil Patrick Francisco Führ Dal' Bó a, , Giorgio Basilici a , Rômulo Simões), Brazil b IG ­ Universidade Federal do Pará, 66075-110, Belém (PA), Brazil a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i Late Cretaceous The Marília Formation, which crops out in southeastern Brazil, is interpreted as a Late

Ahmad, Sajjad

282

Low voltage arc formation in railguns  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile.

Hawke, R.S.

1985-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

283

Low voltage arc formation in railguns  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile.

Hawke, Ronald S. (Livermore, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Low voltage arc formation in railguns  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low voltage plasma arc is first established across the rails behind the projectile by switching a low voltage high current source across the rails to establish a plasma arc by vaporizing a fuse mounted on the back of the projectile, maintaining the voltage across the rails below the railgun breakdown voltage to prevent arc formation ahead of the projectile. After the plasma arc has been formed behind the projectile a discriminator switches the full energy bank across the rails to accelerate the projectile. A gas gun injector may be utilized to inject a projectile into the breech of a railgun. The invention permits the use of a gas gun or gun powder injector and an evacuated barrel without the risk of spurious arc formation in front of the projectile. 2 figs.

Hawke, R.S.

1987-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

285

Ice Formation in Gas-Diffusion Layers  

SciTech Connect

Under sub-freezing conditions, ice forms in the gas-diffusion layer (GDL) of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) drastically reducing cell performance. Although a number of strategies exist to prevent ice formation, there is little fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of freezing within PEMFC components. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is used to elucidate the effects of hydrophobicity (Teflon® loading) and water saturation on the rate of ice formation within three commercial GDLs. We find that as the Teflon® loading increases, the crystallization temperature decreases due to a change in internal ice/substrate contact angle, as well as the attainable level of water saturation. Classical nucleation theory predicts the correct trend in freezing temperature with Teflon® loading.

Dursch, Thomas; Radke, Clayton J.; Weber, Adam Z.

2010-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

286

The Uflow Computational Model and Intermediate Format  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report motivates and defines a general-purpose, architecture independent, parallel computational model, which captures the intuitions which underlie the design of the United Functions and Objects programming language. The model has two aspects, which turn out to be a traditional dataflow model and an actor-like model, with a very simple interface between the two. Certain aspects of the model, particularly strictness, maximum parallelism, and lack of suspension are stressed. The implications of introducing stateful objects are carefully spelled out. The model has several purposes, although we largely describe it as it would be used for visualising the execution of programs. The model is embodied in a textual intermediate format, and in a set of UFO data structures. This report also serves as a definition of the intermediate format, and gives a brief overview of the data structures. 1 Introduction This report serves two purposes. Firstly, in sections 1 to 9, the Uflow computational...

John Sargeant; Chris Kirkham; Steve Anderson

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

A PKN Hydraulic Fracture Model Study and Formation Permeability Determination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydraulic fracturing is an important method used to enhance the recovery of oil and gas from reservoirs, especially for low permeability formations. The distribution of pressure in fractures and fracture geometry are needed to design conventional and unconventional hydraulic fracturing operations, fracturing during water-flooding of petroleum reservoirs, shale gas, and injection/extraction operation in a geothermal reservoir. Designing a hydraulic fracturing job requires an understanding of fracture growth as a function of treatment parameters. There are various models used to approximately define the development of fracture geometry, which can be broadly classified into 2D and 3D categories. 2D models include, the Perkins-Kern-Nordgren (PKN) fracture model, and the Khristianovic-Geertsma-de. Klerk (KGD) fracture model, and the radial model. 3D models include fully 3D models and pseudo-three-dimensional (P-3D) models. The P-3D model is used in the oil industry due to its simplification of height growth at the wellbore and along the fracture length in multi-layered formations. In this research, the Perkins-Kern-Nordgren (PKN) fracture model is adopted to simulate hydraulic fracture propagation and recession, and the pressure changing history. Two different approaches to fluid leak-off are considered, which are the classical Carter's leak-off theory with a constant leak-off coefficient, and Pressure-dependent leak-off theory. Existence of poroelastic effect in the reservoir is also considered. By examining the impact of leak-off models and poroelastic effects on fracture geometry, the influence of fracturing fluid and rock properties, and the leak-off rate on the fracture geometry and fracturing pressure are described. A short and wide fracture will be created when we use the high viscosity fracturing fluid or the formation has low shear modulus. While, the fracture length, width, fracturing pressure, and the fracture closure time increase as the fluid leak-off coefficient is decreased. In addition, an algorithm is developed for the post-fracture pressure-transient analysis to calculate formation permeability. The impulse fracture pressure transient model is applied to calculate the formation permeability both for the radial flow and linear fracture flow assumption. Results show a good agreement between this study and published work.

Xiang, Jing

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

STAR FORMATION EFFICIENCY IN THE COOL CORES OF GALAXY CLUSTERS  

SciTech Connect

We have assembled a sample of high spatial resolution far-UV (Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys/Solar Blind Channel) and H{alpha} (Maryland-Magellan Tunable Filter) imaging for 15 cool core galaxy clusters. These data provide a detailed view of the thin, extended filaments in the cores of these clusters. Based on the ratio of the far-UV to H{alpha} luminosity, the UV spectral energy distribution, and the far-UV and H{alpha} morphology, we conclude that the warm, ionized gas in the cluster cores is photoionized by massive, young stars in all but a few (A1991, A2052, A2580) systems. We show that the extended filaments, when considered separately, appear to be star forming in the majority of cases, while the nuclei tend to have slightly lower far-UV luminosity for a given H{alpha} luminosity, suggesting a harder ionization source or higher extinction. We observe a slight offset in the UV/H{alpha} ratio from the expected value for continuous star formation which can be modeled by assuming intrinsic extinction by modest amounts of dust (E(B - V) {approx} 0.2) or a top-heavy initial mass function in the extended filaments. The measured star formation rates vary from {approx}0.05 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} in the nuclei of non-cooling systems, consistent with passive, red ellipticals, to {approx}5 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} in systems with complex, extended, optical filaments. Comparing the estimates of the star formation rate based on UV, H{alpha}, and infrared luminosities to the spectroscopically determined X-ray cooling rate suggests a star formation efficiency of 14{sup +18}{sub -8}%. This value represents the time-averaged fraction, by mass, of gas cooling out of the intracluster medium, which turns into stars and agrees well with the global fraction of baryons in stars required by simulations to reproduce the stellar mass function for galaxies. This result provides a new constraint on the efficiency of star formation in accreting systems.

McDonald, Michael; Veilleux, Sylvain; Mushotzky, Richard; Reynolds, Christopher [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Rupke, David S. N., E-mail: mcdonald@astro.umd.edu, E-mail: veilleux@astro.umd.edu [Department of Physics, Rhodes College, Memphis, TN 38112 (United States)

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

289

Formation of hydrocarbons by bacteria and algae  

SciTech Connect

A literature review has been performed summarizing studies on hydrocarbon synthesis by microorganisms. Certain algal and bacterial species produce hydrocarbons in large quantities, 70 to 80% of dry cell mass, when in a controlled environment. The nutritional requirements of these organisms are simple: CO/sub 2/ and mineral salts. The studies were initiated to determine whether or not microorganisms played a role in petroleum formation. 90 references. (DMC)

Tornabene, T.G.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Aromatics oxidation and soot formation in flames  

SciTech Connect

Work during this contract period has been concerned with the mechanisms through which aromatics are formed and destroyed in flames, and the processes responsible for soot formation. Recent progress has been primarily in two areas: experiments and modeling of the soot nucleation process in low pressure benzene flames and preparation for experiments on the destruction mechanisms of benzene. In addition, we have incorporated weak collision'' formalisms into a fall-off computer code.

Howard, J.B.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Aromatics Oxidation and Soot Formation in Flames  

SciTech Connect

This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and the growth process to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) of increasing size, soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The overall objective of the experimental aromatics oxidation work is to extend the set of available data by measuring concentration profiles for decomposition intermediates such as phenyl, cyclopentadienyl, phenoxy or indenyl radicals which could not be measured with molecular-beam mass spectrometry to permit further refinement and testing of benzene oxidation mechanisms. The focus includes PAH radicals which are thought to play a major role in the soot formation process while their concentrations are in many cases too low to permit measurement with conventional mass spectrometry. The radical species measurements are used in critical testing and improvement of a kinetic model describing benzene oxidation and PAH growth. Thermodynamic property data of selected species are determined computationally, for instance using density functional theory (DFT). Potential energy surfaces are explored in order to identify additional reaction pathways. The ultimate goal is to understand the conversion of high molecular weight compounds to nascent soot particles, to assess the roles of planar and curved PAH and relationships between soot and fullerenes formation. The specific aims are to characterize both the high molecular weight compounds involved in the nucleation of soot particles and the structure of soot including internal nanoscale features indicative of contributions of planar and/or curved PAH to particle inception.

Howard, J. B.; Richter, H.

2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

292

Toy Models for Galaxy Formation versus Simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe simple useful toy models for key processes of galaxy formation in its most active phase, at z > 1, and test the approximate expressions against the typical behaviour in a suite of high-resolution hydro-cosmological simulations of massive galaxies at z = 4-1. We address in particular the evolution of (a) the total mass inflow rate from the cosmic web into galactic haloes based on the EPS approximation, (b) the penetration of baryonic streams into the inner galaxy, (c) the disc size, (d) the implied steady-state gas content and star-formation rate (SFR) in the galaxy subject to mass conservation and a universal star-formation law, (e) the inflow rate within the disc to a central bulge and black hole as derived using energy conservation and self-regulated Q ~ 1 violent disc instability (VDI), and (f) the implied steady state in the disc and bulge. The toy models provide useful approximations for the behaviour of the simulated galaxies. We find that (a) the inflow rate is proportional to mass and to (...

Dekel, A; Tweed, D; Cacciato, M; Ceverino, D; Primack, J R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

A Parallel Tree-SPH code for Galaxy Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a new implementation of a parallel Tree-SPH code with the aim to simulate Galaxy Formation and Evolution. The code has been parallelized using SHMEM, a Cray proprietary library to handle communications between the 256 processors of the Silicon Graphics T3E massively parallel supercomputer hosted by the Cineca Supercomputing Center (Bologna, Italy). The code combines the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method to solve hydro-dynamical equations with the popular Barnes and Hut (1986) tree-code to perform gravity calculation with a NlogN scaling, and it is based on the scalar Tree-SPH code developed by Carraro et al(1998)[MNRAS 297, 1021]. Parallelization is achieved distributing particles along processors according to a work-load criterion. Benchmarks, in terms of load-balance and scalability, of the code are analyzed and critically discussed against the adiabatic collapse of an isothermal gas sphere test using 20,000 particles on 8 processors. The code results balanced at more that 95% level. Increasing the number of processors, the load-balance slightly worsens. The deviation from perfect scalability at increasing number of processors is almost negligible up to 32 processors. Finally we present a simulation of the formation of an X-ray galaxy cluster in a flat cold dark matter cosmology, using 200,000 particles and 32 processors, and compare our results with Evrard (1988) P3M-SPH simulations. Additionaly we have incorporated radiative cooling, star formation, feed-back from SNae of type II and Ia, stellar winds and UV flux from massive stars, and an algorithm to follow the chemical enrichment of the inter-stellar medium. Simulations with some of these ingredients are also presented.

Cesario Lia; Giovanni Carraro

1999-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

294

DOE Research Projects to Examine Promising Geologic Formations for CO2  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research Projects to Examine Promising Geologic Formations for Research Projects to Examine Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage DOE Research Projects to Examine Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage September 16, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Department of Energy today announced 11 projects valued at $75.5 million aimed at increasing scientific understanding about the potential of promising geologic formations to safely and permanently store carbon dioxide (CO2). View Project Details Funding for the projects includes $49.75 million from the 2009 American Reinvestment and Recovery Act and will result in substantial employment opportunities for local and regional organizations over the next three years while providing hands-on scientific experience for individuals looking to be employed in the carbon capture and storage (CCS) industry.

295

Formation of the intermediate baryon systems in hadron-nuclear and nuclear-nuclear interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The centrality experiments indicate regime change and saturation in the behavior of some characteristics of the secondary particles emitted in hadron-nuclear and nuclear-nuclear interactions at high energies. The phenomenon has a critical character. The simple models do not explain the effect. We suppose that the responsible mechanism to explain the phenomenon could be the formation and decay of the intermediate baryon systems. Such systems could be formed as a result of nucleon percolation in compressed baryonic matter. Formation of big percolation cluster may change the properties of the medium, e.g., it could lead to the changing its transparency. This could be used to get a signal of the intermediate baryonic system formation. We consider two signals to identify the formation of the intermediate baryon systems: the critical changing of transparency of the strongly interacting matter and the enhancement of light nuclei production with increase in centrality.

M. K. Suleymanov; E. U. Khan; A Kravchakova; Mahnaz Q. Haseeb; S. M. Saleem; Y. H. Huseynaliyev; S Vokal; A. S. Vodopianov; O. B. Abdinov

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

296

Production from multiple zones of a tar sands formation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a portion of the formation. Fluids are produced from the formation through at least one production well that is located in at least two zones in the formation. The first zone has an initial permeability of at least 1 darcy. The second zone has an initial of at most 0.1 darcy. The two zones are separated by a substantially impermeable barrier.

Karanikas, John Michael; Vinegar, Harold J

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

297

ANGULAR MOMENTUM AND GALAXY FORMATION REVISITED  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivated by a new wave of kinematical tracers in the outer regions of early-type galaxies (ellipticals and lenticulars), we re-examine the role of angular momentum in galaxies of all types. We present new methods for quantifying the specific angular momentum j, focusing mainly on the more challenging case of early-type galaxies, in order to derive firm empirical relations between stellar j{sub *} and mass M{sub *} (thus extending earlier work by Fall). We carry out detailed analyses of eight galaxies with kinematical data extending as far out as 10 effective radii, and find that data at two effective radii are generally sufficient to estimate total j{sub *} reliably. Our results contravene suggestions that ellipticals could harbor large reservoirs of hidden j{sub *} in their outer regions owing to angular momentum transport in major mergers. We then carry out a comprehensive analysis of extended kinematic data from the literature for a sample of {approx}100 nearby bright galaxies of all types, placing them on a diagram of j{sub *} versus M{sub *}. The ellipticals and spirals form two parallel j{sub *}-M{sub *} tracks, with log-slopes of {approx}0.6, which for the spirals are closely related to the Tully-Fisher relation, but for the ellipticals derives from a remarkable conspiracy between masses, sizes, and rotation velocities. The ellipticals contain less angular momentum on average than spirals of equal mass, with the quantitative disparity depending on the adopted K-band stellar mass-to-light ratios of the galaxies: it is a factor of {approx}3-4 if mass-to-light ratio variations are neglected for simplicity, and {approx}7 if they are included. We decompose the spirals into disks and bulges and find that these subcomponents follow j{sub *}-M{sub *} trends similar to the overall ones for spirals and ellipticals. The lenticulars have an intermediate trend, and we propose that the morphological types of galaxies reflect disk and bulge subcomponents that follow separate, fundamental j{sub *}-M{sub *} scaling relations. This provides a physical motivation for characterizing galaxies most basically with two parameters: mass and bulge-to-disk ratio. Next, in an approach complementary to numerical simulations, we construct idealized models of angular momentum content in a cosmological context, using estimates of dark matter halo spin and mass from theoretical and empirical studies. We find that the width of the halo spin distribution cannot account for the differences between spiral and elliptical j{sub *}, but that the observations are reproduced well if these galaxies simply retained different fractions of their initial j complement ({approx}60% and {approx}10%, respectively). We consider various physical mechanisms for the simultaneous evolution of j{sub *} and M{sub *} (including outflows, stripping, collapse bias, and merging), emphasizing that the vector sum of all such processes must produce the observed j{sub *}-M{sub *} relations. We suggest that a combination of early collapse and multiple mergers (major or minor) may account naturally for the trend for ellipticals. More generally, the observed variations in angular momentum represent simple but fundamental constraints for any model of galaxy formation.

Romanowsky, Aaron J. [University of California Observatories, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Fall, S. Michael [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

Drilling Through Gas Hydrates Formations: Managing Wellbore Stability Risks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As hydrocarbon exploration and development moves into deeper water and onshore arctic environments, it becomes increasingly important to quantify the drilling hazards posed by gas hydrates. To address these concerns, a 1D semi-analytical model for heat and fluid transport in the reservoir was coupled with a numerical model for temperature distribution along the wellbore. This combination allowed the estimation of the dimensions of the hydratebearing layer where the initial pressure and temperature can dynamically change while drilling. These dimensions were then used to build a numerical reservoir model for the simulation of the dissociation of gas hydrate in the layer. The bottomhole pressure (BHP) and formation properties used in this workflow were based on a real field case. The results provide an understanding of the effects of drilling through hydratebearing sediments and of the impact of drilling fluid temperature and BHP on changes in temperature and pore pressure within the surrounding sediments. It was found that the amount of gas hydrate that can dissociate will depend significantly on both initial formation characteristics and bottomhole conditions, namely mud temperature and pressure. The procedure outlined suggested in this work can provide quantitative results of the impact of hydrate dissociation on wellbore stability, which can help better design drilling muds for ultra deep water operations.

Khabibullin, Tagir R.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Transport in porous and fractured media of the Creede Formation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Direct measurement was made of the hydraulic conductivity of Creede Formation rocks using a new experimental method. The UFA{trademark} method employs open-flow centrifugation. Centrifugation, like gravity, has the effect on a material of a whole-body force exerting equal force at all points within the sample. The equivalent gravitational force exerted throughout the sample can be chosen to be from one to four orders of magnitude higher than earth gravity (from 10 to 10,000 g). The result is an increase in rate of fluid flow equally at all points throughout the sample so that hydraulic steady state is obtained in most geologic materials in hours, even under highly unsaturated conditions. This extraordinarily short time allows direct measurement of transport parameters, such as hydraulic conductivity, diffusion coefficient, and retardation factors, in any porous media over the complete range of field moisture contents. Hydraulic conductivities in the Creede Formation rocks ranged from 10{sup {minus}12} cm/s to 10{sup {minus}7} cm/s (10{sup {minus}9} Darcy to 10{sup {minus}4} Darcy) and showed no correlation with any other physical or mineralogical properties including porosity. The high degree of alteration to clay minerals appears to obscure any porosity/permeability relationship of the kind that occurs in many reservoir rocks. However, down-hole neutron porosities correlated well with laboratory-determined porosities. The objective of this investigation is to determine the hydrologic transport parameters of Creede Formation rocks for use in transport model development and for image analysis of transport pathways to produce a porosity/permeability evolution curve in support of geochemical and isotopic water/rock interaction models.

Conca, J.L.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

300

Open Standards, Open Formats, and Open Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper proposes some comments and reflections on the notion of “openness ” and on how it relates to three important topics: open standards, open formats, and open source. Often, these terms are considered equivalent and/or mutually implicated: “open source is the only way to enforce and exploit open standards”. This position is misleading, as it increases the confusion about this complex and extremely critical topic. The paper clarifies the basic terms and concepts. This is instrumental to suggest a number of actions and practices aiming at promoting and defending openness in modern ICT products and services.

Davide Cerri; Alfonso Fuggetta; Davide Cerri; Alfonso Fuggetta; Cefriel Politecnico Di Milano

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicolor result formats" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Consumption externalities, habit formation and equilibrium efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the welfare properties of the competitive equilibrium in a capital accumulation model where individual preferences are subject to both habit formation and consumption spillovers. Using an additive specification for preferences, according to which the argument in the utility function is a linear combination of present and past values of own consumption and consumption spillovers, we analyze the circumstances under which these spillovers are a source of inefficiency. It is shown that consumption externalities have to interact with habits in order to generate an inefficient dynamic equilibrium. Finally, we characterize optimal tax policies aimed at restoring efficient decentralized paths.

Jaime Alonso-carrera; Jordi Caballé; Xavier Raurich

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Solar cell contact formation using laser ablation  

SciTech Connect

The formation of solar cell contacts using a laser is described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming a poly-crystalline material layer above a single-crystalline substrate. The method also includes forming a dielectric material stack above the poly-crystalline material layer. The method also includes forming, by laser ablation, a plurality of contacts holes in the dielectric material stack, each of the contact holes exposing a portion of the poly-crystalline material layer; and forming conductive contacts in the plurality of contact holes.

Harley, Gabriel; Smith, David; Cousins, Peter

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

303

Massive Black Holes: formation and evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supermassive black holes are nowadays believed to reside in most local galaxies. Observations have revealed us vast information on the population of local and distant black holes, but the detailed physical properties of these dark massive objects are still to be proven. Accretion of gas and black hole mergers play a fundamental role in determining the two parameters defining a black hole: mass and spin. We briefly review here the basic properties of the population of supermassive black holes, focusing on the still mysterious formation of the first massive black holes, and their evolution from early times to now.

Martin J. Rees; Marta Volonteri

2007-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

304

STRUCTURE FORMATION IN THE SYMMETRON MODEL  

SciTech Connect

Scalar fields, strongly coupled to matter, can be present in nature and still be invisible to local experiments if they are subject to a screening mechanism. The symmetron is one such mechanism that relies on restoration of a spontaneously broken symmetry in regions of high density to shield the scalar fifth force. We have investigated structure formation in the symmetron model by using N-body simulations and find observable signatures in both the linear and nonlinear matter power spectrum and on the halo mass function. The mechanism for suppressing the scalar fifth force in high-density regions is also found to work very well.

Davis, Anne-Christine; Li Baojiu [DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Mota, David F.; Winther, Hans A. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, 0315 Oslo (Norway)

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

305

Formation evaluation in liquid-dominated geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies relative to some formation evaluation aspects of geothermal reservoirs are reported. The particular reservoirs considered were the liquid dominated type with a lithology of the sedimentary nature. Specific problems of interest included the resistivity behavior of brines and rocks at elevated temperatures and studies on the feasibility of using the well log resistivity data to obtain estimates of reservoir permeability. Several papers summarizing the results of these studies were presented at various technical meetings for rapid dissemination of the results to potential users. These papers together with a summary of data most recently generated are included. A brief review of the research findings precedes the technical papers. Separate abstracts were prepared for four papers. Five papers were abstracted previously for EDB.

Ershaghi, I.; Dougherty, E.E.; Handy, L.L.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Observational Analysis of Tropical Cyclone Formation Associated with Monsoon Gyres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale monsoon gyres and the involved tropical cyclone formation over the western North Pacific have been documented in previous studies. The aim of this study is to understand how monsoon gyres affect tropical cyclone formation. An ...

Liguang Wu; Huijun Zong; Jia Liang

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Dynamic and thermal control of an electromagnetic formation flight testbed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formation flight of multiple spacecraft is an emerging method for completing complex space missions in an efficient manner. A limitation found in maintaining such formations is the need for precise control at all times. ...

Neave, Matthew D. (Matthew David)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

SPURIOUS SULFATE FORMATION ON COLLECTED AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FORMATION ON COLLECTED AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLES B. W. Loo, R.FORMATION ON COLLECTED AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLES Billy W. Lao,ON COLLECTED AMBIENT AEROSOL SAMPLES* _B_il_l~y ___ W_. _L~o

Loo, B.W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Source Contributions to VOC's to Ozone Formation in Southeast Texas Using a Source-oriented Air Quality Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Houston-Galveston-Brazoria area is in severe non-attainment status for ozone compliance. Source-oriented mechanistic modeling was used to determine the major sources of VOCs that contributes to ozone formation during the Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS) from August 16, 2000 to September 7, 2000. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)?s Community Scale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) version 4.6 was used as a host model to include a revised Statewide Air Pollution Research Center (SAPRC99) photochemical mechanism with source-oriented extensions to track the contributions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) emissions from diesel engines, biogenic sources, highway gasoline vehicles, fuel combustion, off-highway gasoline engines, solvent utilization and petrochemical industries to ozone formation in the atmosphere. Source-oriented emissions needed to drive the model were generated using a revised Sparse Matrix Operator Kernel Emissions (SMOKE) model version 2.4. VOC/NOx ratios are found to be a critical factor in the formation of ozone. Highest ozone formation rates were observed for ratios from 5-15. The contributions of VOC to ozone formation were estimated based on the linear relationship between the rate of NO to NO2 conversion due to radicals generated from VOC oxidation and the rate of net ozone formation. Petroleum and other industrial sources are the largest anthropogenic sources in the urban Houston region and contribute to 45% of the ozone formation in the HGB area. Highway gasoline vehicles make contributions of approximately 28% to ozone formation. Wildfires contribute to as much 11% of ozone formation on days of high wildfire activity. The model results show that biogenic emissions account for a significant amount of ozone formation in the rural areas. Both highway and off-highway vehicles contribute significantly to ozone formation especially in the downwind region. Diesel vehicles do not contribute significantly to ozone formation due to their low VOC emissions.

Krishnan, Anupama

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Enhanced Lattice Defect Formation Associated with Hydrogen and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Enhanced Lattice Defect Formation Associated with Hydrogen and Hydrogen Embrittlement under Elastic Stress of High-Strength Steel.

311

Formation of Hydrogen Cottrell Atmosphere in Palladium: Theory ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Hydrogen Storage in Materials: Theory and Experiment. Presentation Title, Formation of Hydrogen Cottrell Atmosphere in Palladium: Theory and ...

312

Formation mechanisms and quantification of organic nitrates in atmospheric aerosol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric submicron aerosol . . . . . . . 2.3 Partitioningon SOA organic aerosol formation alkyl nitrate and secondaryPeroxy radical fate . . . . . . Aerosol . . . . . . . .

Rollins, Andrew Waite

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Energy-Driven Pattern Formation Robert V. Kohn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy-Driven Pattern Formation Robert V. Kohn Grad Student and Postdoc Seminar April 22, 2011 Robert V. Kohn Energy-Driven Pattern Formation #12;Overview What is energy-driven pattern formation? Hard by singular perturbation Statics: minimum energy scaling laws Dynamics: patterns induced by steepest

314

Dynamics and flight control of the UAV formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to describe the flight of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) formation by using a 6 degrees of freedom (6 DOF) models. The problem of flight formation will be approached in a simple manner, by using a 3 DOF models, as well ... Keywords: UAV, control, dynamic, flight, formation

Teodor-Viorel Chelaru; Valentin Pana; Adrian Chelaru

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Stability and control of the UAV formations flight  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the flight stability of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) formation by using 3 degrees of freedom (3 DOF) models. The problem of flight formation will be approached in a simple manner, by using 3 DOF nonlinear ... Keywords: automation, control, flight, formation, simulation, stability

Teodor-Viorel Chelaru; Valentin Pan?

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Indian Statistical Institute: Using Multiple Metadata Formats in DSpace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of The University of Manitoba to provide etdms metadata format. However, the user community has often expressed the requirement for other metadata formats like VRA core, IMS etc. Support for many metadata formats will greatly enhance the use of DSpace and the type...

Prasad, A R D

2005-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

317

Heating subsurface formations by oxidizing fuel on a fuel carrier  

SciTech Connect

A method of heating a portion of a subsurface formation includes drawing fuel on a fuel carrier through an opening formed in the formation. Oxidant is supplied to the fuel at one or more locations in the opening. The fuel is combusted with the oxidant to provide heat to the formation.

Costello, Michael; Vinegar, Harold J.

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

318

XML Representation of Constraint Networks: Format XCSP 2.1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a new extended format to represent constraint networks using XML. This format allows us to represent constraints defined either in extension or in intension. It also allows us to reference global constraints. Any instance of the problems CSP (Constraint Satisfaction Problem), QCSP (Quantified CSP) and WCSP (Weighted CSP) can be represented using this format.

Roussel, Olivier

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Method for completing wells in unconsolidated formations  

SciTech Connect

A method is described for producing fluids from a subterranean formation in a formation region of substantially unconsolidated sandlike particles comprising the steps of: penetrating the region to form an uncased wellbore cavity extending within the region; extending within the region; inserting filter means into the cavity, the filter means forming an interior space for gathering fluids from the region for production from the wellbore and the filter means including means for permitting the flow of solids fines into the space with the fluids from the region; causing fluids to flow into the cavity and through the filter means into the space to be produced from the region at a rate which will cause sand particles in the region to flow into and occupy the cavity to form an in situ packing around the filter means; producing fluids from the region through the cavity and into the space and having a limited quantity of solids fines entrained therein smaller than the solid particles retained in the cavity; and controlling the rate of production of fluids to form a cylindrical dilatant zone extending radially outward in the region from the cavity and which is mechanically stable.

Perkins, T.K.

1989-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

320

Enthalpy of Formation of Nitrosylpentaammineruthenium(II)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enthalpy of Formation of Nitrosylpentaammineruthenium(II) from NO+(aq) Enthalpy of Formation of Nitrosylpentaammineruthenium(II) from NO+(aq) and Aquopentaammineruthenium(II) James F. Wishart, Henry Taube, Kenneth J. Breslauer and Stephan S. Isied Inorg. Chem. 25, 1479-1481 (1986) Abstract: An estimate of the enthalpy change associated with the substitution of H2O on (NH3)5RuOH22+ with NO+(aq) has been made by thermochemical measurements on a cycle of reactions, which includes the reaction of (NH3)5RuOH22+ with NO2-(aq) and which involves the assumption that the heat of dissolution of NOBF4(s) to produce NO+(aq) + BF4-(aq) is close to the heat of dissolution of CsBF4(s). The chemistry is complicated because the reaction of (NH3)5RuOH22+ with NO2-(aq) ultimately produces trans-[(NH3)4Ru(OH)NO]2+(aq) rather than [(NH3)5RuNO]3+(aq). Reasonably

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicolor result formats" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

On water ice formation in interstellar clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model is proposed for the formation of water ice mantles on grains in interstellar clouds. This occurs by direct accretion of monomers from the gas, be they formed by gas or surface reactions. The model predicts the existence of a threshold in interstellar light extinction, A(v), which is mainly determined by the adsorption energy of water molecules on the grain material; for hydrocarbon material, chemical simulation places this energy between 0.5 and 2 kcal/mole, which sets the visible exctinction threshold at a few magnitudes, as observed. Once the threshold is crossed, all available water molecules in the gas are quickly adsorbed, forming an ice mantle, because the grain cools down and the adsorption energy on ice is higher than on bare grain. The model also predicts that the thickness of the mantle, and, hence, the optical thickness at 3 mu, grow linearly with A(v), as observed, with a slope which depends upon the total amount of water in the gas. Chemical simulation was also used to determine the adsorption sites and energies of O and OH on hydrocarbons, and study the dynamics of formation of water molecules by surface reactions with gaseous H atoms, as well as their chances of sticking in situ.

Renaud Papoular

2005-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

322

DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. We have conducted adsorption, phase behavior and wettability studies. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases IFT with a minimum at about 0.2 M. Addition of surfactant decreases IFT further. In the absence of surfactant the minerals are oil wet after aging with crude oil. Addition of surfactant solution decreases the contact angle to intermediate wettability. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases anionic surfactant adsorption on calcite surface. Plans for the next quarter include conducting adsorption, phase behavior and wettability studies.

Kishore K. Mohanty

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS  

SciTech Connect

There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. We have conducted adsorption, phase behavior, interfacial tension (IFT) and wettability studies. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases IFT with a minimum at about 0.2 M. Addition of surfactant decreases IFT further. In the absence of surfactant the minerals are oil-wet after aging with crude oil. Addition of surfactant solution decreases the contact angle to intermediate-wet for many surfactants and water-wet for one surfactant. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases anionic surfactant adsorption on calcite surface. Plans for the next quarter include conducting core adsorption, phase behavior, wettability and mobilization studies.

Kishore K. Mohanty

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS  

SciTech Connect

There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. We have conducted adsorption, phase behavior, interfacial tension (IFT) and wettability studies. Alfoterra-38 (0.05 wt%), Alfoterra-35 (0.05 wt%), SS-6656 (0.05 wt%), and DTAB (1 wt%) altered the wettability of the initially oil-wet calcite plate to an intermediate/water-wet state. Low IFT ({approx}10{sup -3} dynes/cm) is obtained with surfactants 5-166, Alfoterra-33 and Alfoterra-38. Plans for the next quarter include conducting wettability and mobilization studies.

Kishore K. Mohanty

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Geologic Study of the Coso Formation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There have been great advances in the last 20 years in understanding the volcanic, structural, geophysical, and petrologic development of the Coso Range and Coso geothermal field. These studies have provided a wealth of knowledge concerning the geology of the area, including general structural characteristics and kinematic history. One element missing from this dataset was an understanding of the sedimentology and stratigraphy of well-exposed Cenozoic sedimentary strata - the Coso Formation. A detailed sedimentation and tectonics study of the Coso Formation was undertaken to provide a more complete picture of the development of the Basin and Range province in this area. Detailed mapping and depositional analysis distinguishes separate northern and southern depocenters, each with its own accommodation and depositional history. While strata in both depocenters is disrupted by faults, these faults show modest displacement, and the intensity and magnitude of faulting does no t record significant extension. For this reason, the extension between the Sierran and Coso blocks is interpreted as minor in comparison to range bounding faults in adjacent areas of the Basin and Range.

D. L. Kamola; J. D. Walker

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Star Formation from Galaxies to Globules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The empirical laws of star formation suggest that galactic-scale gravity is involved, but they do not identify the actual triggering mechanisms for clusters in the final stages. Many other triggering processes satisfy the empirical laws too, including turbulence compression and expanding shell collapse. The self-similar nature of the gas and associated young stars suggests that turbulence is more directly involved, but the small scale morphology of gas around most embedded clusters does not look like a random turbulent flow. Most clusters look triggered by other nearby stars. Such a prominent local influence makes it difficult to understand the universality of the Kennicutt and Schmidt laws on galactic scales. A unified view of multi-scale star formation avoids most of these problems. Ambient self-gravity produces spiral arms and drives much of the turbulence that leads to self-similar structures, while localized energy input from existing clusters and field supernovae triggers new clusters in pre-existing cl...

Elmegreen, B G

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Subterranean formation permeability contrast correction methods  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method of correcting the permeability contrast in a subterranean formation penetrated by a well bore to improve the sweep efficiency of waterflooding operations carried out therein, the formation containing at least one high permeability zone lying adjacent to at least one low permeability zone, which zones are in fluid communication with one another at the boundary therebetween. It comprises isolating the high permeability zone from the low permeability zone; injecting a crosslinkable aqueous polymer solution into the high permeability zone in an amount sufficient to substantially fill some the zone therewith, the crosslinkable aqueous polymer solution being capable of plugging the high permeability zone when crosslinked; isolating the low permeability zone from the high permeability zone; injecting into the low permeability zone an aqueous liquid containing a crosslinking agent which upon contact with the aqueous polymer solution causes the solution to form a crosslinked gel; and displacing the aqueous liquid containing the crosslinking agent through the low permeability zone so that the crosslinking agent contact the aqueous polymer solution and forms a crosslinked gel at least at the boundary between the zones whereby fluid communication between the zones is reduced and subsequently injected flood water is substantially confined to the low permeability zone.

Beardmore, D.H.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems: Placing Our Solar System in Context with Spitzer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We summarize the progress to date of our Legacy Science Program entitled "The Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems" (FEPS) based on observations obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope during its first year of operation. In addition to results obtained from our ground-based preparatory program and our early validation program, we describe new results from a survey for near-infrared excess emission from the youngest stars in our sample as well as a search for cold debris disks around sun-like stars. We discuss the implications of our findings with respect to current understanding of the formation and evolution of our own solar system.

Michael R. Meyer; the FEPS Legacy Science Team

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Nanometer-scale tunnel formation in metallic glass by helium ion irradiation  

SciTech Connect

We have shown that upon high fluence helium ion irradiation, metallic glass Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 45}Ti{sub 5} becomes highly porous at the depth of the helium projected range. The resulting porous region is characterized by the formation of a tunnel like structure and self-linkage of nanometer size gas bubbles. Furthermore, the irradiation leads to the formation of nanometer size Cu{sub x}Zr{sub y} crystals that are randomly distributed. The results of this study indicate that the He-filled bubbles have attractive interactions and experience considerable mobility. Movement of the bubbles is believed to be assisted by ballistic collisions.

Shao Lin [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Gorman, Brian P. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Aitkaliyeva, Assel [Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); David Theodore, N. [CHD-Fab, Freescale Semiconductor, Inc., Chandler, Arizona 85224 (United States); Xie Guoqiang [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

330

COSMIC EVOLUTION OF STAR FORMATION ENHANCEMENT IN CLOSE MAJOR-MERGER GALAXY PAIRS SINCE z = 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The infrared (IR) emission of 'M {sub *} galaxies' (10{sup 10.4} {star} {star formation enhancement induced by galaxy-galaxy interaction. Both the mean IR spectral energy distribution and mean IR luminosity of star-forming galaxies (SFGs) in SFG+SFG (S+S) pairs in the redshift bin of 0.6 star formation enhancement. SFGs in S+S pairs in a lower redshift bin of 0.2 star formation enhancement. Together with the significant and strong sSFR enhancement shown by SFGs in a local sample of S+S pairs (obtained using previously published Spitzer observations), our results reveal a trend for the star formation enhancement in S+S pairs to decrease with increasing redshift. Between z = 0 and z = 1, this decline of interaction-induced star formation enhancement occurs in parallel with the dramatic increase (by a factor of {approx}10) of the sSFR of single SFGs, both of which can be explained by the higher gas fraction in higher-z disks. SFGs in mixed pairs (S+E pairs) do not show any significant star formation enhancement at any redshift. The difference between SFGs in S+S pairs and in S+E pairs suggests a modulation of the sSFR by the intergalactic medium (IGM) in the dark matter halos hosting these pairs.

Xu, C. K.; Shupe, D. L.; Bock, J.; Bridge, C.; Cooray, A.; Lu, N.; Schulz, B. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bethermin, M.; Aussel, H.; Elbaz, D.; Le Floc'h, E.; Riguccini, L. [Laboratoire AIM-Paris-Saclay, CEA/DSM/Irfu, CNRS, Universite Paris Diderot, CE-Saclay, pt courrier 131, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Berta, S.; Lutz, D.; Magnelli, B. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik (MPE), Postfach 1312, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Conley, A. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy 389-UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Franceschini, A. [Dipartimento di Astronomia, Universita di Padova, vicolo Osservatorio, 3, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Marsden, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Oliver, S. J. [Astronomy Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Pozzi, F. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via di Frascati 33, I-00040 Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); and others

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

331

Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation  

SciTech Connect

The main objectives of the project were to monitor, characterize, and quantify in situ the rates of formation and dissociation of methane hydrates at and near the seafloor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, with a focus on the Bush Hill seafloor hydrate mound; to record the linkages between physical and chemical parameters of the deposits over the course of one year, by emphasizing the response of the hydrate mound to temperature and chemical perturbations; and to document the seafloor and water column environmental impacts of hydrate formation and dissociation. For these, monitoring the dynamics of gas hydrate formation and dissociation was required. The objectives were achieved by an integrated field and laboratory scientific study, particularly by monitoring in situ formation and dissociation of the outcropping gas hydrate mound and of the associated gas-rich sediments. In addition to monitoring with the MOSQUITOs, fluid flow rates and temperature, continuously sampling in situ pore fluids for the chemistry, and imaging the hydrate mound, pore fluids from cores, peepers and gas hydrate samples from the mound were as well sampled and analyzed for chemical and isotopic compositions. In order to determine the impact of gas hydrate dissociation and/or methane venting across the seafloor on the ocean and atmosphere, the overlying seawater was sampled and thoroughly analyzed chemically and for methane C isotope ratios. At Bush hill the pore fluid chemistry varies significantly over short distances as well as within some of the specific sites monitored for 440 days, and gas venting is primarily focused. The pore fluid chemistry in the tub-warm and mussel shell fields clearly documented active gas hydrate and authigenic carbonate formation during the monitoring period. The advecting fluid is depleted in sulfate, Ca Mg, and Sr and is rich in methane; at the main vent sites the fluid is methane supersaturated, thus bubble plumes form. The subsurface hydrology exhibits both up-flow and down-flow of fluid at rates that range between 0.5 to 214 cm/yr and 2-162 cm/yr, respectively. The fluid flow system at the mound and background sites are coupled having opposite polarities that oscillate episodically between 14 days to {approx}4 months. Stability calculations suggest that despite bottom water temperature fluctuations, of up to {approx}3 C, the Bush Hill gas hydrate mound is presently stable, as also corroborated by the time-lapse video camera images that did not detect change in the gas hydrate mound. As long as methane (and other hydrocarbon) continues advecting at the observed rates the mound would remain stable. The {_}{sup 13}C-DIC data suggest that crude oil instead of methane serves as the primary electron-donor and metabolic substrate for anaerobic sulfate reduction. The oil-dominated environment at Bush Hill shields some of the methane bubbles from being oxidized both anaerobically in the sediment and aerobically in the water column. Consequently, the methane flux across the seafloor is higher at Bush hill than at non-oil rich seafloor gas hydrate regions, such as at Hydrate Ridge, Cascadia. The methane flux across the ocean/atmosphere interface is as well higher. Modeling the methane flux across this interface at three bubble plumes provides values that range from 180-2000 {_}mol/m{sup 2} day; extrapolating it over the Gulf of Mexico basin utilizing satellite data is in progress.

Miriam Kastner; Ian MacDonald

2006-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

332

The mechanism of HF formation in LiPF6 based organic carbonate electrolytes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The mechanism of HF formation in LiPF6 based organic carbonate electrolytes The mechanism of HF formation in LiPF6 based organic carbonate electrolytes Title The mechanism of HF formation in LiPF6 based organic carbonate electrolytes Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Lux, Simon F., Ivan T. Lucas, Elad Pollak, Stefano Passerini, Martin Winter, and Robert Kostecki Journal Electrochemistry Communications Volume 14 Start Page 47 Issue 1 Pagination 47-50 Date Published 01/2012 Keywords Hydrofluoric acid, LiPF6 degradation, Lithium ion batteries, spectroscopic ellipsometry Abstract Spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to study the time-dependent formation of HF upon the thermal degradation of LiPF6 at 50 °C in a lithium ion battery electrolyte containing ethylene carbonate and diethyl carbonate. The generated HF was monitored by following the etching rate of a 300 nm thick SiO2 layer, grown on both sides of a silicon wafer substrate, as a function of the immersion time in the electrolyte at 50 °C. It was found that the formation of HF starts after 70 h of exposure time and occurs following several different phases. The amount of generated HF was calculated using an empirical formula correlating the etching rate to the temperature. Combining the results of the HF formation with literature data, a simplified mechanism for the formation of the HF involving LiPF6 degradation, and a simplified catalytical reaction pathway of the formed HF and silicon dioxide are proposed to describe the kinetics of HF formation.

333

Parallel TreeSPH: A Tool for Galaxy Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a new implementation of a parallel Tree-SPH code with the aim to simulate Galaxy Formation and Evolution. The code has been parallelized using SHMEM, a Cray proprietary library to handle communications between the 256 processors of the Silicon Graphics T3E massively parallel supercomputer hosted by the Cineca Super-computing Center (Bologna, Italy). The code combines the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method to solve hydro-dynamical equations with the popular Barnes and Hut (1986) tree-code to perform gravity calculation with a $N \\times logN$ scaling, and it is based on the scalar Tree-SPH code developed by Carraro et al (1998)[MNRAS 297, 1021]. Parallelization is achieved distributing particles along processors according to a work-load criterium. Benchmarks, in terms of load-balance and scalability, of the code are analised and critically discussed against the adiabatic collapse of an isothermal gas sphere test using $2 \\times 10^{4}$ particles on 8 processors. The code results balanced at more than 95% level. Increasing the number of processors, the load balance sligthly worsens. The deviation from perfect scalability at increasing number of processors is negligible up to 64 processors. Additionally we have incorporated radiative cooling, star formation, feed-back and an algorithm to follow the chemical enrichment of the interstellar medium.

Cesario Lia; Giovanni Carraro

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Sheath formation criterion in magnetized electronegative plasmas with thermal ions  

SciTech Connect

Taking into account the effect of collisions and positive ion temperatures, the sheath formation criterion is investigated in a weakly magnetized electronegative plasma consisting of electrons, negative and positive ions by using the hydrodynamics equations. It is assumed that the electron and negative ion density distributions are the Boltzmann distribution with two different temperatures. Also, it is assumed that the velocity of positive ions at the sheath edge is not normal to the wall (oblique entrance). Our results show that a sheath region will be formed when the initial velocity of positive ions or the ion Mach number M lies in a specific interval with particular upper and lower limits. Also, it is shown that the presence of the magnetic field affects both of these limits. Moreover, as an practical application, the density distribution of charged particles in the sheath region is studied for an allowable value of M, and it is seen that monotonically reduction of the positive ion density distribution leading to the sheath formation occurs only when M lies between two above mentioned limits.

Hatami, M. M. [Physics Department of K N Toosi University of Technology, 15418-49611 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shokri, B. [Physics Department and Laser-Plasma Research Institute of Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Evin, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

335

Formation of molecular oxygen in ultracold O + OH reaction  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the formation of molecular oxygen in ultracold collisions between hydroxyl radicals and atomic oxygen. A time-independent quantum formalism based on hyperspherical coordinates is employed for the calculations. Elastic, inelastic and reactive cross sections as well as the vibrational and rotational populations of the product O{sub 2} molecules are reported. A J-shifting approximation is used to compute the rate coefficients. At temperatures T = 10--100 mK for which the OH molecules have been cooled and trapped experimentally, the elastic and reactive rate coefficients are of comparable magnitude, while at colder temperatures, T < 1 mK, the formation of molecular oxygen becomes the dominant pathway. The validity of a classical capture model to describe cold collisions of OH and O is also discussed. While very good agreement is found between classical and quantum results at T = 0.3 K, at higher temperatures, the quantum calculations predict a higher rate coefficient than the classical model, in agreement with experimental data for the O + OH reaction. The zero-temperature limiting value of the rate coefficient is predicted to be about 6 x 10{sup -12} cm{sup 3} s{sup 01}, a value comparable to that of barrierless alkali metal atom-dimer systems and about a factor of five larger than that of the tunneling dominated F + H{sub 2} reaction.

Kendrick, Brian Kent [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Quemener, Goulven [UNLV; Balakrishman, Naduvalath [UNLV

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Properly designed underbalanced drilling fluids can limit formation damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Drilling fluids for underbalanced operations require careful design and testing to ensure they do not damage sensitive formations. In addition to hole cleaning and lubrication functions, these fluids may be needed as kill fluids during emergencies. PanCanadian Petroleum Ltd. used a systematic approach in developing and field testing a nondamaging drilling fluid. It was for use in underbalanced operations in the Glauconitic sandstone in the Westerose gas field in Alberta. A lab study was initiated to develop and test a non-damaging water-based drilling fluid for the horizontal well pilot project. The need to develop an inexpensive, nondamaging drilling fluid was previously identified during underbalanced drilling operations in the Weyburn field in southeastern Saskatchewan. A non-damaging fluid is required for hole cleaning, for lubrication of the mud motor, and for use as a kill fluid during emergencies. In addition, a nondamaging fluid is required when drilling with a conventional rig because pressure surges during connections and trips may result in the well being exposed to short periods of near balanced or overbalanced conditions. Without the protection of a filter cake, the drilling fluid will leak off into the formation, causing damage. The amount of damage is related to the rate of leak off and depth of invasion, which are directly proportional to the permeability to the fluid.

Churcher, P.L.; Yurkiw, F.J. [PanCanadian Petroleum Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Bietz, R.F.; Bennion, D.B. [Hycal Energy Research Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1996-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

337

Nucleosome interactions in chromatin: fiber stiffening and hairpin formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use Monte Carlo simulations to study attractive and excluded volume interactions between nucleosome core particles in 30 nm-chromatin fibers. The nucleosomes are treated as disk-like objects having an excluded volume and short range attraction modelled by a variant of the Gay-Berne potential. The nucleosomes are connected via bendable and twistable linker DNA in the crossed linker fashion. We investigate the influence of the nucleosomal excluded volume on the stiffness of the fiber. For parameter values that correspond to chicken erythrocyte chromatin we find that the persistence length is governed to a large extent by that excluded volume whereas the soft linker backbone elasticity plays only a minor role. We further find that internucleosomal attraction can induce the formation of hairpin configurations. Tension-induced opening of such configurations into straight fibers manifests itself in a quasi-plateau in the force-extension curve that resembles results from recent micromanipulation experiments. Such hairpins may play a role in the formation of higher order structures in chromosomes like chromonema fibers.

Boris Mergell; Ralf Everaers; Helmut Schiessel

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

338

Stochastic opinion formation in scale-free networks  

SciTech Connect

The dynamics of opinion formation in large groups of people is a complex nonlinear phenomenon whose investigation is just beginning. Both collective behavior and personal views play an important role in this mechanism. In the present work we mimic the dynamics of opinion formation of a group of agents, represented by two states 1, as a stochastic response of each agent to the opinion of his/her neighbors in the social network and to feedback from the average opinion of the whole. In the light of recent studies, a scale-free Barabsi-Albert network has been selected to simulate the topology of the interactions. A turbulent-like dynamics, characterized by an intermittent behavior, is observed for a certain range of the model parameters. The problem of uncertainty in decision taking is also addressed both from a topological point of view, using random and targeted removal of agents from the network, and by implementing a three-state model, where the third state, zero, is related to the information available to each agent. Finally, the results of the model are tested against the best known network of social interactions: the stock market. A time series of daily closures of the Dow-Jones index has been used as an indicator of the possible applicability of our model in the financial context. Good qualitative agreement is found.

M. Bartolozzi; D. B. Leinweber; A. W. Thomas

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Experimental results: Pilot plant calcine dissolution and liquid feed stability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dissolution of simulated Idaho Chemical Processing Plant pilot plant calcines, containing none of the radioactive actinides, lanthanides or fission products, was examined to evaluate the solubility of calcine matrix materials in acidic media. This study was a necessary precursor to dissolution and optimization experiments with actual radionuclide-containing calcines. The importance of temperature, nitric acid concentration, ratio of acid volume to calcine mass, and time on the amount, as a weight percentage of calcine dissolved, was evaluated. These parameters were studied for several representative pilot plant calcine types: (1) Run No. 74 Zirconia calcine; (2) Run No. 17 Zirconia/Sodium calcine; (3) Run No. 64 Zirconia/Sodium calcine; (3) Run No. 1027 Alumina calcine; and (4) Run No. 20 Alumina/Zirconia/Sodium calcine. Statistically designed experiments with the different pilot plant calcines indicated the effect of the studied process variables on the amount of calcine dissolved decreases in the order: Acid/Calcine Ratio > Temperature > HNO{sub 3} Concentration > Dissolution Time. The following conditions are suitable to achieve greater than 90 wt. % dissolution of most Zr, Al, or Na blend calcines: (1) Maximum nitric acid concentration of 5M; (2) Minimum acid/calcine ratio of 10 mL acid/1 gram calcine; (3) Minimum dissolution temperature of 90{degrees}C; and (4) Minimum dissolution time of 30 minutes. The formation of calcium sulphate (CaSO{sub 4}) precipitates was observed in certain dissolved calcine solutions during the dissolution experiments. Consequently, a study was initiated to evaluate if and under what conditions the resulting dissolved calcine solutions would be unstable with regards to precipitate formation. The results indicate that precipitate formation in the calcine solutions prepared under the above proposed dissolution conditions are not anticipated.

Herbst, R.S.; Fryer, D.S.; Brewer, K.N.; Johnson, C.K.; Todd, T.A.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Formation of an Azores Current Due to Mediterranean Overflow in a Modeling Study of the North Atlantic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mechanism for the formation of the Azores Current is proposed. On the basis of observations and model results, it is argued that the primary cause of the Azores Current is the water mass transformation associated with the Mediterranean overflow ...

Yanli Jia

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

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341

Comments on “Convectively Generated Potential Vorticity in Rainbands and Formation of the Secondary Eyewall in Hurricane Rita of 2005”  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a previous paper Judt and Chen propose that secondary eyewall formation can be the result of the accumulation of convectively generated potential vorticity in the rainbands. They argue that secondary potential vorticity maxima precede the ...

Wesley Terwey; Sergio F. Abarca; Michael T. Montgomery

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Laws of formation of polar smectic phases under a frustrated interaction  

SciTech Connect

The Landau theory of phase transitions with a two-component order parameter is used to systematically calculate the structures and phase diagrams of polar liquid crystals. Commensurate and incommensurate structures with a layer-type period form as a result of a frustration interaction. Phase diagrams are calculated when various short- and long-range interlayer interactions are sequentially introduced. As a result, the nature of formation of various structures is revealed. The calculated phase diagrams explain the formation of various phases, their temperature sequence (including so-called 'unusual' sequence of phases), and the nature of forces responsible for the formation of a certain structure and the shape of a phase diagram.

Dolganov, P. V.; Zhilin, V. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Solid State Physics (Russian Federation); Kats, E. I., E-mail: kats@landau.ac.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics (Russian Federation)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

343

Minimizing formation damage under adverse conditions during gravel pack operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is described for minimizing formation damage caused by intrusive fluids prior to a gravel packing operation in loosely consolidated formations penetrated by at least one well comprising: (a) filling the casing of the well with an underbalanced completion fluid; (b) placing within the well a removable packer capable of isolating the space between the casing and the formation from the downhole well pressure; (c) setting through the packer a first tubing suitable for perforating and stabilizing the flow of fluids into the well; (d) perforating the casing; (e) introducing a blocking agent into the formation via the perforations which agent upon solidification is sufficient to minimize formation damage by avoiding the introduction of formation fluids where the agent is a gel; (f) causing the blocking agent to solidify while forming a solidified plug within the well and a solid mass within the adjacent washed out portion of the formation; (g) removing the first tubing from the well; (h) placing within the well a second tubing having a slotted portion therein sufficient to allow gravel packing of the well and the formation; (i) removing the solidified plug from the wellbore along with solidified gel from the washed-out portion of the formation; and (j) placing a gravel pack within the well and the washed-out portion of the formation via the second tubing which consolidates the formation.

Jennings, A.R. Jr.; Shu, P.

1989-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

344

Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage In September 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy announced the award of 11 projects with a total project value of $75.5 million* to conduct site characterization of promising geologic formations for CO2 storage. These Recovery Act projects will increase our understanding of the potential for these formations to safely and permanently store CO2. The information gained from these projects (detailed below) will further DOE's efforts to develop a national assessment of CO2 storage capacity in deep geologic formations. Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage * Subsequently, the Board of Public Works project in Holland, MI has been

345

Best Practices for Portable Document Format (PDF) Creation | Scientific and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Best Practices for Portable Document Format (PDF) Creation Best Practices for Portable Document Format (PDF) Creation Print page Print page Email page Email page Best Practices for Portable Document Format (PDF) Creation October 2013 The Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is responsible for permanently storing the Department of Energy's (DOE) scientific and technical information (STI) collection. The STI must be collected in a digital format that can be preserved and accessible for years to come. In the late 1990's, OSTI selected the Portable Document Format (PDF) as the preferred format for receiving STI. OSTI continues to use this format for the submission and storage of STI documents. Preservation, content, and accessibility are enhanced by following these best practices for generating

346

Formation Micro-Imager Logs (FMI) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Formation Micro-Imager Logs (FMI) Formation Micro-Imager Logs (FMI) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Formation Micro-Imager Logs (FMI) Author Shakeel Ahmed Published Publisher Not Provided, 2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Formation Micro-Imager Logs (FMI) Citation Shakeel Ahmed. Formation Micro-Imager Logs (FMI) [Internet]. 2013. [cited 2013/10/09]. Available from: http://petphy.blogspot.com/2011/12/formation-micro-imager-logs-fmi.html Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Formation_Micro-Imager_Logs_(FMI)&oldid=687994" Categories: References Geothermal References Uncited References What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

347

The flip-side of galaxy formation: A combined model of Galaxy Formation and Cluster Heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Only ~10% of baryons in the universe are in the form of stars, yet most models of luminous structure formation have concentrated on the properties of the luminous stellar matter. In this paper we focus on the "flip side" of galaxy formation and investigate the properties of the material that is not presently locked up in galaxies. This "by-product" of galaxy formation can be observed as an X-ray emitting plasma (the intracluster medium, hereafter ICM) in groups and clusters, and we present a version of the Durham semi-analytic galaxy formation model GALFORM that allows us to investigate the properties of the ICM. As we would expect on the basis of gravitational scaling arguments, the previous model (presented in Bower et al. 2006) fails to reproduce even the most basic observed properties of the ICM; however, we present a simple modification to the model to allow for heat input into the ICM from the AGN "radio mode" feedback. This heating acts to expel gas from the X-ray luminous central regions of the host halo. With this modification, the model reproduces the observed gas mass fractions and luminosity-temperature relation of groups and clusters. Introducing the heating process into the model requires changes to a number of model parameters in order to retain a good match to the observed galaxy properties. With the revised parameters, the best fitting luminosity function is comparable to that presented in Bower et al. (2006). The new model makes a fundamental step forward, providing a unified model of galaxy and cluster ICM formation. However, the detailed comparison with the data is not completely satisfactory, and we highlight key areas for improvement.

Richard G. Bower; Ian G. McCarthy; Andrew J. Benson

2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

348

Venture Formation | BNL Technology Commercialization and Partnerships  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Entrepreneurs and Investors Entrepreneurs and Investors Venture Formation Resources Entrepreneurship Resource Center - Entrepreneurship.org was created by the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation as a free, online international resource with a vast array of content designed to assist entrepreneurs, business mentors, policy makers, academics and investors through each phase of the entrepreneurial process. U.S. Small Business Administration - The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) is a federally funded organization developed to aid, counsel, assist and protect the interests of small business concerns and new ventures in the United States. Wall Street Journal Entrepreneur Resource - An online how to guide for small businesses and start ups with tips from The Wall Street Journal's reporters and columnists.

349

Orbital entanglement in bond-formation processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The accurate calculation of the (differential) correlation energy is central to the quantum chemical description of bond-formation and bond-dissociation processes. In order to estimate the quality of single- and multi-reference approaches for this purpose, various diagnostic tools have been developed. In this work, we elaborate on our previous observation [J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 3, 3129 (2012)] that one- and two-orbital-based entanglement measures provide quantitative means for the assessment and classification of electron correlation effects among molecular orbitals. The dissociation behavior of some prototypical diatomic molecules features all types of correlation effects relevant for chemical bonding. We demonstrate that our entanglement analysis is convenient to dissect these electron correlation effects and to provide a conceptual understanding of bond-forming and bond-breaking processes from the point of view of quantum information theory.

Boguslawski, Katharina; Barcza, Gergely; Legeza, Ors; Reiher, Markus

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Star-Formation Knots in IRAS Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Images of IRAS galaxies with a range of IR properties are examined for bright knots, both within and outside the galaxy. These are found almost exclusively in galaxies with steep IR spectra, but over a wide range of IR luminosity, and usually without strong nuclear activity. In most cases, the knots are likely to be star-formation induced by tidal interactions, and are seen in the early stages of such interactions. Detailed photometry is presented of knots in six representative galaxies. The knots appear to have a wide range of colour and luminosity, but it is argued that many are heavily reddened. Knots formed outside the parent galaxy may be a new generation of what later become globular clusters, but they appear to have a wide range of luminosities.

J. B. Hutchings

1995-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

351

Interstellar MHD Turbulence and Star Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This chapter reviews the nature of turbulence in the Galactic interstellar medium (ISM) and its connections to the star formation (SF) process. The ISM is turbulent, magnetized, self-gravitating, and is subject to heating and cooling processes that control its thermodynamic behavior. The turbulence in the warm and hot ionized components of the ISM appears to be trans- or subsonic, and thus to behave nearly incompressibly. However, the neutral warm and cold components are highly compressible, as a consequence of both thermal instability in the atomic gas and of moderately-to-strongly supersonic motions in the roughly isothermal cold atomic and molecular components. Within this context, we discuss: i) the production and statistical distribution of turbulent density fluctuations in both isothermal and polytropic media; ii) the nature of the clumps produced by thermal instability, noting that, contrary to classical ideas, they in general accrete mass from their environment; iii) the density-magnetic field correla...

Vazquez-Semadeni, Enrique

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

The Formation of Pluto's Low Mass Satellites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motivated by the New Horizons mission, we consider how Pluto's small satellites -- currently P5, Nix, P4, and Hydra -- grow in debris from the giant impact that forms the Pluto-Charon binary or in solid material captured from the protoplanetary debris disk. If the satellites have masses close to their minimum masses, our analysis suggests that capture of material into a circumplanetary or circumbinary debris disk is a viable mechanism for satellite formation. If the satellites are more massive, they probably form in debris from the giant impact. After the impact, Pluto and Charon accrete some of the debris and eject the rest from the binary orbit. During the ejection, high velocity collisions among debris particles produce a collisional cascade, leading to the ejection of some debris from the system and enabling the remaining debris particles to find stable orbits around the binary. Our numerical simulations of viscous diffusion, coagulation, and migration show that collisional evolution within a ring or disk...

Kenyon, Scott J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Lyman-alpha Emission from Structure Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nature of the interaction between galaxies and the intergalactic medium (IGM) is one of the most fundamental problems in astrophysics. The accretion of gas onto galaxies provides fuel for star formation, while galactic winds transform the nearby IGM in a number of ways. One exciting technique to study this gas is through the imaging of hydrogen Lyman-alpha emission. We use cosmological simulations to study the Lyman-alpha signals expected from the growth of cosmic structure from z=0-5. We show that if dust absorption is negligible, recombinations following the absorption of stellar ionizing photons dominate the total Lyman-alpha photon production rate. However, galaxies are also surrounded by "Lyman-alpha coronae" of diffuse IGM gas. These coronae are composed of a combination of accreting gas and material ejected from the central galaxy by winds. The Lyman-alpha emission from this phase is powered by a combination of gravitational processes and the photoionizing background. While the former dominates at z~0, collisional excitation following photo-heating may well dominate the total emission at higher redshifts. The central regions of these systems are dense enough to shield themselves from the metagalactic ionizing background; unfortunately, in this regime our simulations are no longer reliable. We therefore consider several scenarios for the emission from the central cores, including one in which self-shielded gas does not emit at all. We show that the combination of star formation and cooling IGM gas can explain most of the observed "Lyman-alpha blobs" at z~3, with the important exception of the largest sources. On the other hand, except under the most optimistic assumptions, cooling IGM gas cannot explain the observations on its own.

Steven Furlanetto; Joop Schaye; Volker Springel; Lars Hernquist

2004-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

354

Modeling H2 formation in the turbulent ISM: Solenoidal versus compressive turbulent forcing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results from high-resolution three-dimensional simulations of the turbulent interstellar medium that study the influence of the nature of the turbulence on the formation of molecular hydrogen. We have examined both solenoidal (divergence-free) and compressive (curl-free) turbulent driving, and show that compressive driving leads to faster H2 formation, owing to the higher peak densities produced in the gas. The difference in the H2 formation rate can be as much as an order of magnitude at early times, but declines at later times as the highest density regions become fully molecular and stop contributing to the total H2 formation rate. We have also used our results to test a simple prescription suggested by Gnedin et al. (2009) for modeling the influence of unresolved density fluctuations on the H2 formation rate in large-scale simulations of the ISM. We find that this approach works well when the H2 fraction is small, but breaks down once the highest density gas becomes fully molecular.

Milosavljevic, Milica; Federrath, Christoph; Klessen, Ralf S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Conservation law for distributed entanglement of formation and quantum discord  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a direct relation, based upon a monogamic principle, between entanglement of formation (EOF) and quantum discord (QD), showing how they are distributed in an arbitrary tripartite pure system. By extending it to a paradigmatic situation of a bipartite system coupled to an environment, we demonstrate that the EOF and the QD obey a conservation relation. By means of this relation we show that in the deterministic quantum computer with one pure qubit the protocol has the ability to rearrange the EOF and the QD, which implies that quantum computation can be understood on a different basis as a coherent dynamics where quantum correlations are distributed between the qubits of the computer. Furthermore, for a tripartite mixed state we show that the balance between distributed EOF and QD results in a stronger version of the strong subadditivity of entropy.

F. F. Fanchini; M. F. Cornelio; M. C. de Oliveira; A. O. Caldeira

2010-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

356

Formation flying for a Fresnel lens observatory mission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The employment of a large area Phase Fresnel Lens (PFL) in a gamma-ray telescope offers the potential to image astrophysical phenomena with micro-arcsecond angular resolution. In order to assess the feasibility of this concept, two detailed studies have been conducted of formation flying missions in which a Fresnel lens capable of focussing gamma-rays and the associated detector are carried on two spacecraft separated by up to 10$^6$ km. These studies were performed at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Integrated Mission Design Center (IMDC) which developed spacecraft, orbital dynamics, and mission profiles. The results of the studies indicated that the missions are challenging but could be accomplished with technologies available currently or in the near term. The findings of the original studies have been updated taking account of recent advances in ion thruster propulsion technology.

Krizmanic, J; Gehrels, N; Krizmanic, John; Skinner, Gerry; Gehrels, Neil

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Formation flying for a Fresnel lens observatory mission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The employment of a large area Phase Fresnel Lens (PFL) in a gamma-ray telescope offers the potential to image astrophysical phenomena with micro-arcsecond angular resolution. In order to assess the feasibility of this concept, two detailed studies have been conducted of formation flying missions in which a Fresnel lens capable of focussing gamma-rays and the associated detector are carried on two spacecraft separated by up to 10$^6$ km. These studies were performed at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Integrated Mission Design Center (IMDC) which developed spacecraft, orbital dynamics, and mission profiles. The results of the studies indicated that the missions are challenging but could be accomplished with technologies available currently or in the near term. The findings of the original studies have been updated taking account of recent advances in ion thruster propulsion technology.

John Krizmanic; Gerry Skinner; Neil Gehrels

2006-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

358

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Cement - Results  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

State Programs Technical Information Plant Assessments Training Calendar Software Tools Energy Management Results Technology Pathways Cement - Results No measured results exist...

359

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Mining: Results  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

State Programs Technical Information Plant Assessments Training Calendar Software Tools Energy Management Results Mining - Results No measured results exist at this time in terms...

360

Oil Recovery Increases by Low-Salinity Flooding: Minnelusa and Green River Formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waterflooding is by far the most widely used method in the world to increase oil recovery. Historically, little consideration has been given in reservoir engineering practice to the effect of injection brine composition on waterflood displacement efficiency or to the possibility of increased oil recovery through manipulation of the composition of the injected water. However, recent work has shown that oil recovery can be significantly increased by modifying the injection brine chemistry or by injecting diluted or low salinity brine. This paper reports on laboratory work done to increase the understanding of improved oil recovery by waterflooding with low salinity injection water. Porous media used in the studies included outcrop Berea sandstone (Ohio, U.S.A.) and reservoir cores from the Green River formation of the Uinta basin (Utah, U.S.A.). Crude oils used in the experimental protocols were taken from the Minnelusa formation of the Powder River basin (Wyoming, U.S.A.) and from the Green River formation, Monument Butte field in the Uinta basin. Laboratory corefloods using Berea sandstone, Minnelusa crude oil, and simulated Minnelusa formation water found a significant relationship between the temperature at which the oil- and water-saturated cores were aged and the oil recovery resulting from low salinity waterflooding. Lower aging temperatures resulted in very little to no additional oil recovery, while cores aged at higher temperatures resulted in significantly higher recoveries from dilute-water floods. Waterflood studies using reservoir cores and fluids from the Green River formation of the Monument Butte field also showed significantly higher oil recoveries from low salinity waterfloods with cores flooded with fresher water recovering 12.4% more oil on average than those flooded with undiluted formation brine.

Eric P. Robertson

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicolor result formats" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Thermoporoelastic Effects of Drilling Fluid Temperature on Rock Drillability at Bit/Formation Interface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A drilling operation leads to thermal disturbances in the near-wellbore stress, which is an important cause of many undesired incidents in well drilling. A major cause of this thermal disturbance is the temperature difference between the drilling fluid and the downhole formation. It is critical for drilling engineers to understand this thermal impact to optimize their drilling plans. This thesis develops a numerical model using partially coupled thermoporoelasticity to study the effects of the temperature difference between the drilling fluid and formation in a drilling operation. This study focuses on the thermal impacts at the bit/formation interface. The model applies the finite-difference method for the pore pressure and temperature solutions, and the finite-element method for the deformation and stress solutions. However, the model also provides the thermoporoelastic effects at the wellbore wall, which involves wellbore fractures and wellbore instability. The simulation results show pronounced effects of the drilling fluid temperature on near-wellbore stresses. At the bottomhole area, a cool drilling fluid reduces the radial and tangential effective stresses in formation, whereas the vertical effective stress increases. The outcome is a possible enhancement in the drilling rate of the drill bit. At the wellbore wall, the cool drilling fluid reduces the vertical and tangential effective stresses but raises the radial effective stress. The result is a lower wellbore fracture gradient; however, it benefits formation stability and prevents wellbore collapse. Conversely, the simulation gives opposite induced stress results to the cooling cases when the drilling fluid is hotter than the formation.

Thepchatri, Kritatee 1984-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Standard Electronic Format Specification for Tank Characterization Data Loader Version 3.5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to describe the standard electronic format for data files that will be sent for entry into the Tank Characterization Database (TCD). There are 2 different file types needed for each data load: (1) Analytical Results and (2) Sample Descriptions.

ADAMS, M.R.

2001-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

363

Molecular gas in early-type galaxies: Fuel for residual star formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Molecular gas in early-type galaxies: Fuel for residual star formation Timothy A. Davis Survey 2. The ATLAS3D CARMA Survey 3. Kinematic Misalignments 4. Origin of the molecular gas The ATLAS3D results: - 23% of early-type galaxies have significant molecular gas reservoirs - Detection rate

Bureau, Martin

364

Katabatic Flows and Their Relation to the Formation of Convective Clouds—Idealized Case Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation of a convective cloud system as a result of a katabatic-induced surface cold front at the eastern Andes Mountains of South America was investigated in a numerical model study. The occurrence of this cloud system is hypothesized to be ...

Katja Trachte; Joerg Bendix

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Early Cloud Formation by Large Area Fires  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fires simultaneously burning in hundreds of square kilometers could result from a nuclear weapon explosion. The strong buoyancy field of such large area fires induces high-velocity fire winds that turn upward in the burning region. This results ...

R. D. Small; K. E. Heikes

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Managing Chemistry Underground: Is Co-Sequestration an Option in Selected Formations?  

SciTech Connect

Geochemical simulations indicate that, although co-injection of CO2 and SO2 in glauconitic sandstone may not result in the permanent sequestration of SO2, other formations are more favorable. In a predominantly dolomite formation, dissolution of calcite, and to a lesser extent, dolomite will provide Ca in solution to promote the precipitation of anhydrite, thus removing the SO2 from solution. In basalt, dissolution of basaltic glass under acidic conditions provides Ca and Fe in solution which promote the sequestration of SO2 as anhydrite and eventually, pyrite.

Bacon, Diana H.; Murphy, Ellyn M.

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

367

Formation of phases in the films of a Ag-In-Se system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Processes of electron-diffraction structure analysis have been used to study the processes of phase formation and phase transitions in thin layers of a Ag-In-Se system. The phases formed at the onset of interaction between the films and phase transformations occurring during annealing of the samples in vacuum are established. It is found that thin films of the AgInSe{sub 2} compound formed as a result of simultaneous or consecutive deposition of components are amorphous, and crystallization brings about the formation of textured films with high structural quality

Ismayilov, D. I.; Kerimova, N. K., E-mail: kerimova-nurlana@mail.ru [Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

368

Geological Sequestration of CO2 by Hydrous Carbonate Formation with Reclaimed Slag  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concept of this project is to develop a process that improves the kinetics of the hydrous carbonate formation reaction enabling steelmakers to directly remove CO2 from their furnace exhaust gas. It is proposed to bring the furnace exhaust stream containing CO2 in contact with reclaimed steelmaking slag in a reactor that has an environment near the unit activity of water resulting in the production of carbonates. The CO2 emissions from the plant would be reduced by the amount sequestered in the formation of carbonates. The main raw materials for the process are furnace exhaust gases and specially prepared slag.

Von L. Richards; Kent Peaslee; Jeffrey Smith

2008-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

369

Cogeneration systems and processes for treating hydrocarbon containing formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. At least one injection well is located in a first portion of the formation. The injection well provides steam from the steam and electricity cogeneration facility to the first portion of the formation. At least one production well is located in the first portion of the formation. The production well in the first portion produces first hydrocarbons. At least one electrical heater is located in a second portion of the formation. At least one of the electrical heaters is powered by electricity from the steam and electricity cogeneration facility. At least one production well is located in the second portion of the formation. The production well in the second portion produces second hydrocarbons. The steam and electricity cogeneration facility uses the first hydrocarbons and/or the second hydrocarbons to generate electricity.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Fowler, Thomas David (Houston, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

370

TESTING HOMOGENEITY WITH GALAXY STAR FORMATION HISTORIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observationally confirming spatial homogeneity on sufficiently large cosmological scales is of importance to test one of the underpinning assumptions of cosmology, and is also imperative for correctly interpreting dark energy. A challenging aspect of this is that homogeneity must be probed inside our past light cone, while observations take place on the light cone. The star formation history (SFH) in the galaxy fossil record provides a novel way to do this. We calculate the SFH of stacked luminous red galaxy (LRG) spectra obtained from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We divide the LRG sample into 12 equal-area contiguous sky patches and 10 redshift slices (0.2 < z < 0.5), which correspond to 120 blocks of volume {approx}0.04 Gpc{sup 3}. Using the SFH in a time period that samples the history of the universe between look-back times 11.5 and 13.4 Gyr as a proxy for homogeneity, we calculate the posterior distribution for the excess large-scale variance due to inhomogeneity, and find that the most likely solution is no extra variance at all. At 95% credibility, there is no evidence of deviations larger than 5.8%.

Hoyle, Ben; Jimenez, Raul [Institut de Ciences del Cosmos (ICC), Universitat de Barcelona (IEEC-UB), Marti i Franques 1, E-08024 Barcelona (Spain); Tojeiro, Rita; Maartens, Roy [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Dennis Sciama Building, Portsmouth PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Heavens, Alan [Imperial Centre for Inference and Cosmology, Astrophysics Group, Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Clarkson, Chris [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre, and Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Surface coating for prevention of crust formation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A flexible surface coating which promotes the removal of deposits as they reach the surface by preventing adhesion and crust formation. Flexible layers are attached to each side of a flexible mesh substrate comprising of a plurality of zones composed of one or more neighboring cells, each zone having a different compressibility than its adjacent zones. The substrate is composed of a mesh made of strands and open cells. The cells may be filled with foam. Studs or bearings may also be positioned in the cells to increase the variation in compressibility and thus the degree of flexing of the coating. Surface loading produces varying amounts of compression from point to point causing the coating to flex as deposits reach it, breaking up any hardening deposits before a continuous crust forms. Preferably one or more additional layers are also used, such as an outer layer of a non-stick material such as TEFLON, which may be pigmented, and an inner, adhesive layer to facilitate applying the coating to a surface.

Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Molecular cloud regulated star formation in galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a numerical implementation of star formation in disk galaxies, in which the conversion of cooling gas to stars in the multiphase interstellar medium is governed by the rate at which molecular clouds are formed and destroyed. In the model, clouds form from thermally unstable ambient gas and get destroyed by feedback from massive stars and thermal conduction. Feedback in the ambient phase cycles gas into a hot galactic fountain or wind. We model the ambient gas hydrodynamically using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). However, we cannot resolve the Jeans mass in the cold and dense molecular gas and, therefore, represent the cloud phase with ballistic particles that coagulate when colliding. We show that this naturally produces a multiphase medium with cold clouds, a warm disk, hot supernova bubbles and a hot, tenuous halo. Our implementation of this model is based on the Gadget N-Body code. We illustrate the model by evolving an isolated Milky Way-like galaxy and study the properties of a disk formed in a rotating spherical collapse. Many observed properties of disk galaxies are reproduced well, including the molecular cloud mass spectrum, the molecular fraction as a function of radius, the Schmidt law, the stellar density profile and the appearance of a galactic fountain.

C. M. Booth; T. Theuns; T. Okamoto

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

373

Lyman-alpha Emission from Structure Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nature of the interaction between galaxies and the intergalactic medium (IGM) is one of the most fundamental problems in astrophysics. The accretion of gas onto galaxies provides fuel for star formation, while galactic winds transform the nearby IGM in a number of ways. One exciting technique to study this gas is through the imaging of hydrogen Lyman-alpha emission. We use cosmological simulations to study the Lyman-alpha signals expected from the growth of cosmic structure from z=0-5. We show that if dust absorption is negligible, recombinations following the absorption of stellar ionizing photons dominate the total Lyman-alpha photon production rate. However, galaxies are also surrounded by "Lyman-alpha coronae" of diffuse IGM gas. These coronae are composed of a combination of accreting gas and material ejected from the central galaxy by winds. The Lyman-alpha emission from this phase is powered by a combination of gravitational processes and the photoionizing background. While the former dominates at ...

Furlanetto, S; Springel, V; Hernquist, L; Furlanetto, Steven; Schaye, Joop; Springel, Volker; Hernquist, Lars

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Constructing Hydraulic Barriers in Deep Geologic Formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many construction methods have been developed to create hydraulic barriers to depths of 30 to 50 meters, but few have been proposed for depths on the order of 500 meters. For these deep hydraulic barriers, most methods are potentially feasible for soil but not for hard rock. In the course of researching methods of isolating large subterranean blocks of oil shale, the authors have developed a wax thermal permeation method for constructing hydraulic barriers in rock to depths of over 500 meters in competent or even fractured rock as well as soil. The technology is similar to freeze wall methods, but produces a permanent barrier; and is potentially applicable in both dry and water saturated formations. Like freeze wall barriers, the wax thermal permeation method utilizes a large number of vertical or horizontal boreholes around the perimeter to be contained. However, instead of cooling the boreholes, they are heated. After heating these boreholes, a specially formulated molten wax based grout is pumped into the boreholes where it seals fractures and also permeates radially outward to form a series of columns of wax-impregnated rock. Rows of overlapping columns can then form a durable hydraulic barrier. These barriers can also be angled above a geologic repository to help prevent influx of water due to atypical rainfall events. Applications of the technique to constructing containment structures around existing shallow waste burial sites and water shutoff for mining are also described. (authors)

Carter, E.E.; Carter, P.E. [Technologies Co, Texas (United States); Cooper, D.C. [Ph.D. Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Irregular spacing of heat sources for treating hydrocarbon containing formations  

SciTech Connect

A method for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation includes providing heat input to a first section of the formation from one or more heat sources located in the first section. Fluids are produced from the first section through a production well located at or near the center of the first section. The heat sources are configured such that the average heat input per volume of formation in the first section increases with distance from the production well.

Miller, David Scott (Katy, TX); Uwechue, Uzo Philip (Houston, TX)

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

376

Formation of molecular hydrogen on analogues of interstellar dust grains: experiments and modelling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular hydrogen has an important role in the early stages of star formation as well as in the production of many other molecules that have been detected in the interstellar medium. In this review we show that it is now possible to study the formation of molecular hydrogen in simulated astrophysical environments. Since the formation of molecular hydrogen is believed to take place on dust grains, we show that surface science techniques such as thermal desorption and time-of-flight can be used to measure the recombination efficiency, the kinetics of reaction and the dynamics of desorption. The analysis of the experimental results using rate equations gives useful insight on the mechanisms of reaction and yields values of parameters that are used in theoretical models of interstellar cloud chemistry.

Gianfranco Vidali; Joe Roser; Giulio Manico; Valerio Pirronello; Hagai B. Perets; Ofer Biham

2005-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

377

Standard Electronic Format Specification for Tank Characterization Data Loader Version 3.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to describe the standard electronic format for data files that will be sent for entry into the Tank Characterization Database (TCD). There are 2 different file types needed for each data load: Analytical Results; and Sample Descriptions. The first record of each file must be a header record. The content of the first 5 fields is ignored. They were used previously to satisfy historic requirements that are no longer applicable. The sixth field of the header record must contain the Standard Electronic Format (SEF) version ID (SEF3.0). The remaining records will be formatted as specified below. Fields within a record will be separated using the ''|'' symbol. The ''|''symbol must not appear anywhere in the file except when used as a delimiter.

ADAMS, M.R.

1999-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

378

Effect of dark matter annihilation on gas cooling and star formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the current paradigm of cosmic structure formation, dark matter plays a key role on the formation and evolution of galaxies through its gravitational influence. On microscopic scales, dark matter particles are expected to annihilate amongst themselves into different products, with some fraction of the energy being transferred to the baryonic component. It is the aim of the present work to show that, in the innermost regions of dark matter halos, heating by dark matter annihilation may be comparable to the cooling rate of the gas. We use analytical models of the dark matter and gas distributions in order to estimate the heating and cooling rates, as well as the energy available from supernova explosions. Depending on the model parameters and the precise nature of dark matter particles, the injected energy may be enough to balance radiative cooling in the cores of galaxy clusters. On galactic scales, it would inhibit star formation more efficiently than supernova feedback. Our results suggest that dark matte...

Ascasibar, Y

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Formation of jet-like spikes from the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mechanism of jet-like spike formation from the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability (ARTI) in the presence of preheating is reported. It is found that the preheating plays an essential role in the formation of the jet-like spikes. In the early stage, the preheating significantly increases the plasma density gradient, which can reduce the linear growth of ARTI and suppress its harmonics. In the middle stage, the preheating can markedly increase the vorticity convection and effectively reduce the vorticity intensity resulting in a broadened velocity shear layer near the spikes. Then the growth of ablative Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is dramatically suppressed and the ARTI remains dominant. In the late stage, nonlinear bubble acceleration further elongates the bubble-spike amplitude and eventually leads to the formation of jet-like spikes.

Wang, L. F.; Ye, W. H.; He, X. T. [HEDPS and CAPT, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Zhang, W. Y. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Sheng, Z. M. [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (MoE) and Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); Yu, M. Y. [Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Institute for Theoretical Physics I, Ruhr University, Bochum D-44780 (Germany)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

Control of polymer gel surface pattern formation and its three dimensional measurement method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the controllability of a gelation surface pattern formation. Recently, we have found and studied a novel kind of pattern formation that occurs during a radical polymerization (gelation) process. The pattern formation is observed in an open top boundary of quasi two dimensional gelation. In previous studies, we have used two dimensional photo based image processing to analyze the patterns. However, the actual pattern is a three dimensional surface deformation. Thus we develop a three dimensional measurement system using a line laser displacement sensor and an automatic x-stage. Patterns measured by the system are analyzed and discussed by means of pattern controllability. In particular, we focus on the possibility of the pattern control using an external temperature field. As a result, we reveal that the global structure can be controlled, whereas the characteristic length scales (wavelength and amplitude) are not controllable.

T. Mizoue; Y. Aoki; M. Tokita; H. Honjo; H. J. Barraza; H. Katsuragi

2011-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicolor result formats" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Method for reducing sulfate formation during regeneration of hot-gas desulfurization sorbents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The regeneration of sulfur sorbents having sulfate forming tendencies and used for desulfurizing hot product gas streams such as provided by coal gasification is provided by employing a two-stage regeneration method. Air containing a sub-stoichiometric quantity of oxygen is used in the first stage for substantially fully regenerating the sorbent without sulfate formation and then regeneration of the resulting partially regenerated sorbent is completed in the second stage with air containing a quantity of oxygen slightly greater than the stoichiometric amount adequate to essentially fully regenerate the sorbent. Sulfate formation occurs in only the second stage with the extent of sulfate formation being limited only to the portion of the sulfur species contained by the sorbent after substantially all of the sulfur species have been removed therefrom in the first stage.

Bissett, Larry A. (Morgantown, WV); Strickland, Larry D. (Morgantown, WV); Rockey, John M. (Westover, WV)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Experimental Study of Acid Fracture Conductivity of Austin Chalk Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acid fracture conductivity and the effect of key variables in the etching process during acid fracturing can be assessed at the laboratory scale. This is accomplished by using an experimental apparatus that simulates acid injection fluxes comparable to those in actual acid fracture treatments. After acid etching, fracture conductivity is measured at different closure stresses. This research work presents a systematic study to investigate the effect of temperature, rock-acid contact time and initial condition of the fracture surfaces on acid fracture conductivity in the Austin Chalk formation. While temperature and rock-acid contact are variables normally studied in fracture conductivity tests, the effect of the initial condition of the fracture surface has not been extensively investigated. The experimental results showed that there is no significant difference in acid fracture conductivity at high closure stress using smooth or rough fracture surfaces. In addition, we analyzed the mechanisms of acid etching and resulting conductivity creation in the two types of fracture surfaces studied by using surface profiles. For smooth surfaces, the mechanism of conductivity creation seems connected to uneven etching of the rock and roughness generation. For rough surfaces, acid conductivity is related to smoothing and deepening of the initial features on the sample surface than by creating more roughness. Finally, we compared the experimental results with Nirode-Kruk correlation for acid fracture conductivity.

Nino Penaloza, Andrea

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Stellar populations in gas-rich galaxy mergers I. Dependence on star formation history  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the nature of stellar populations of major galaxy mergers between late-type spirals considerably abundant in interstellar medium by performing numerical simulations designed to solve both the dynamical and chemical evolution in a self-consistent manner. We particularly consider that the star formation history of galaxy mergers is a crucial determinant for the nature of stellar populations of merger remnants, and therefore investigate how the difference in star formation history between galaxy mergers affects the chemical evolution of galaxy mergers. We found that the rapidity of star formation, which is defined as the ratio of the dynamical time-scale to the time-scale of gas consumption by star formation, is the most important determinant for a number of fundamental characteristics of stellar populations of merger remnants. We mainly demonstrate that even the chemical evolution of elliptical galaxies can be strongly affected by the details of dynamical evolution of galaxy merging. Based upon the present numerical results, we adopt a specific assumption of the luminosity dependence of the rapidity of star formation and thereby discuss how successfully the present merger model can reproduce a number of fundamental chemical, photometric, and spectroscopic characteristics of elliptical galaxies.

Kenji Bekki; Yasuhiro Shioya

1998-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

384

Formation and Incorporation Energies of Fission Gases He, Xe, and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Formation and Incorporation Energies of Fission Gases He, Xe , ... nuclear fuels are bcc alloys of uranium that swell under fission conditions, ...

385

Influence of Feeding Flow and Shrinkage Pipe Formation on ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Influence of Feeding Flow and Shrinkage Pipe Formation on ... CFD–Based Modelling on Interfacial Heat Transfer for Water Quenching.

386

Microsoft Word - Tab 2d - Project Descriptions Press Format ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Descriptions Press Format - SAI TPPs - Final.doc More Documents & Publications Solar America Initiative Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation...

387

Study of the Use of Saline Formations for Combined Thermoelectric...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Study of the Use of Saline Formations for Combined Thermoelectric Power Plant Water Needs and Carbon Sequestration at a Regional-Scale Background Thermoelectric power plants are...

388

Nanostructure Formation and Carbides Dissolution in Rail Steel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 1, 2002 ... Nanostructure Formation and Carbides Dissolution in Rail Steel Deformed by High Pressure Torsion by Yu.V. Ivanisenko, R.Z. Valiev, ...

389

Recovery Act: Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act: Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage A Report on the The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Carbon Sequestration Program within the...

390

Resource Recovery of Coal Bed Methane Formation Water.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??During the excavation of natural gas, petroleum hydrocarbon-polluted brine water, termed production water, is drawn from the coal bed methane formations (CBMF) along with the… (more)

Bishop, Catherine Elizabeth

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Influence of Substrate Temperature and RF Power on the Formation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Influence of Substrate Temperature and RF Power on the Formation of ZnO Nanorods for Solar Driven Hydrogen Production. Author(s) ...

392

Non-Standard Structure Formation Scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observations on galactic scales seem to be in contradiction with recent high resolution N-body simulations. This so-called cold dark matter (CDM) crisis has been addressed in several ways, ranging from a change in fundamental physics by introducing self-interacting cold dark matter particles to a tuning of complex astrophysical processes such as global and/or local feedback. All these efforts attempt to soften density profiles and reduce the abundance of satellites in simulated galaxy halos. In this contribution we are exploring the differences between a Warm Dark Matter model and a CDM model where the power on a certain scale is reduced by introducing a narrow negative feature (''dip''). This dip is placed in a way so as to mimic the loss of power in the WDM model: both models have the same integrated power out to the scale where the power of the Dip model rises to the level of the unperturbed CDM spectrum again. Using N-body simulations we show that that the new Dip model appears to be a viable alternative to WDM while being based on different physics: where WDM requires the introduction of a new particle species the Dip stems from a non-standard inflationary period. If we are looking for an alternative to the currently challenged standard LCDM structure formation scenario, neither the LWDM nor the new Dip model can be ruled out with respect to the analysis presented in this contribution. They both make very similar predictions and the degeneracy between them can only be broken with observations yet to come.

Alexander Knebe; Brett Little; Ranty Islam; Julien Devriendt; Asim Mahmood; Joe Silk

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

393

Fine ash formation during pulverized coal combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, 15 pulverized coal samples were burnt in a drop-tube furnace to investigate the formation of fine particulates and the influence of coal ash properties on their emission. Coal combustion was carried out at 1673 K in air. Fine particles were collected by a cyclone and a low-pressure impactor. The elemental compositions of the collected particles were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. We examined the chemical compositions of the fine particles as a function of particle diameter and examined the proportions of the elements in the parent coal samples. We determined that almost all particles less than 0.22 {mu}m in diameter were formed by means of volatilization-condensation of SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the coal. We also demonstrated that the amount of SiO{sub 2} in particle size less than 0.22 {mu}m in diameter was related to the amount of fine included quartz and clay minerals in the parent coal. The primary components of particles greater than 0.76 {mu}m in diameter were SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and as the diameter of the particles decrease, the mass fractions of iron, magnesium, calcium, and phosphorus increased. However, the particle diameter at which this tendency commenced differed depending on the element. Particles between 0.22 and 0.76 {mu}m in diameter were thought to have been formed by the fragmentation and coalescence of particles in the coal and by the simultaneous condensation of volatilized elements onto other particles. 17 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

Tsuyoshi Teramae; Takayuki Takarada [Idemitsu Kosan Company, Limited, Chiba (Japan). Coal and Environmental Research Laboratory

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

Formation Of A Cold Antihydrogen Beam in AEGIS For Gravity Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The formation of the antihydrogen beam in the AEGIS experiment through the use of inhomogeneous electric fields is discussed and simulation results including the geometry of the apparatus and realistic hypothesis about the antihydrogen initial conditions are shown. The resulting velocity distribution matches the requirements of the gravity experiment. In particular it is shown that the inhomogeneous electric fields provide radial cooling of the beam during the acceleration.

G. Testera; A. S. Belov; G. Bonomi; I. Boscolo; N. Brambilla; R. S. Brusa; V. M. Byakov; L. Cabaret; C. Canali; C. Carraro; F. Castelli; S. Cialdi; M. de Combarieu; D. Comparat; G. Consolati; N. Djourelov; M. Doser; G. Drobychev; A. Dupasquier; D. Fabris; R. Ferragut; G. Ferrari; A. Fischer; A. Fontana; P. Forget; L. Formaro; M. Lunardon; A. Gervasini; M. G. Giammarchi; S. N. Gninenko; G. Gribakin; R. Heyne; S. D. Hogan; A. Kellerbauer; D. Krasnicky; V. Lagomarsino; G. Manuzio; S. Mariazzi; V. A. Matveev; F. Merkt; S. Moretto; C. Morhard; G. Nebbia; P. Nedelec; M. K. Oberthaler; P. Pari; V. Petracek; M. Prevedelli; I. Y. Al-Qaradawi; F. Quasso; O. Rohne; S. Pesente; A. Rotondi; S. Stapnes; D. Sillou; S. V. Stepanov; H. H. Stroke; G. Tino; A. Vairo; G. Viesti; H. Walters; U. Warring; S. Zavatarelli; A. Zenoni; D. S. Zvezhinskij; for the AEGIS Proto-Collaboration

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

395

Formation of A Cold Antihydrogen Beam in AEGIS For Gravity Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The formation of the antihydrogen beam in the AEGIS experiment through the use of inhomogeneous electric fields is discussed and simulation results including the geometry of the apparatus and realistic hypothesis about the antihydrogen initial conditions are shown. The resulting velocity distribution matches the requirements of the gravity experiment. In particular it is shown that the inhomogeneous electric fields provide radial cooling of the beam during the acceleration.

Testera, G; Bonomi, G; Boscolo, I; Brambilla, N; Brusa, R S; Byakov, V M; Cabaret, L; Canali, C; Carraro, C; Castelli, F; Cialdi, S; de Combarieu, M; Comparat, D; Consolati, G; Djourelov, N; Doser, M; Drobychev, G; Dupasquier, A; Fabris, D; Ferragut, R; Ferrari, G; Fischer, A; Fontana, A; Forget, P; Formaro, L; Lunardon, M; Gervasini, A; Giammarchi, M G; Gninenko, S N; Gribakin, G; Heyne, R; Hogan, S D; Kellerbauer, A G; Krasnicky, D; Lagomarsino, V; Manuzio, G; Mariazzi, S; Matveev, V A; Merkt, F; Moretto, S; Morhard, C; Nebbia, G; Nédélec, P; Oberthaler, M K; Pari, P; Petracek, V; Prevedelli, M; Al-Qaradawi, I Y; Quasso, F; Rohne, O; Pesente, S; Rotondi, A; Stapnes, S; Sillou, D; Stepanov, S V; Stroke, Hinko Henry; Tino, G; Vairo, Antonio; Viesti, G; Walters, H; Warring, U; Zavatarelli, S; Zenoni, A; Zvezhinskij, D S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Horizontal drilling in the Lower Glen Rose Formation, Maverick County, Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents preliminary results of a project to assess the economic viability of horizontal drilling in the Lower Glen Rose Formation of Maverick County, Texas. This project is part of an ongoing Department of Energy investigation of directional drilling in the development of gas resources within the United States. The paper includes: project description; results covering geologic setting, reservoir engineering, and seismic surveys; and future work on drilling location selection, drilling, and well completion. (AT)

Drimal, C.E.; Muncey, G.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Horizontal drilling in the Lower Glen Rose Formation, Maverick County, Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents preliminary results of a project to assess the economic viability of horizontal drilling in the Lower Glen Rose Formation of Maverick County, Texas. This project is part of an ongoing Department of Energy investigation of directional drilling in the development of gas resources within the United States. The paper includes: project description; results covering geologic setting, reservoir engineering, and seismic surveys; and future work on drilling location selection, drilling, and well completion. (AT)

Drimal, C.E.; Muncey, G.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Multi-color long-lasting phosphorescence of rare earth ions in CdSiO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences,. Changchun 130022 ... Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, China .

399

Multi-Color Coronagraph Experiment in a Vacuum Testbed with a Binary Shaped Pupil Mask  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We conducted a number of multi-band coronagraph experiments using a vacuum chamber and a binary-shaped pupil mask which in principle should work at all wavelengths, in the context of the research and development on a coronagraph to observe extra-solar planets (exoplanets) directly. The aim of this work is to demonstrate that subtraction of Point Spread Function (PSF) and multi-band experiments using a binary-shaped pupil mask coronagraph would help improve the contrast in the observation of exoplanets. A checkerboard mask, a kind of binary-shaped pupil mask, was used. We improved the temperature stability by installing the coronagraph optics in a vacuum chamber, controlling the temperature of the optical bench, and covering the vacuum chamber with thermal insulation layers. We evaluated how much the PSF subtraction contributes to the high contrast observation by subtracting the images obtained through the coronagraph. We also carried out multi- band experiments in order to demonstrate a more realistic observa...

Haze, Kanae; Abe, Lyu; Kotani, Takayuki; Nakagawa, Takao; Sato, Toshimichi; Yamamuro, Tomoyasu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Formation of Nuclear Disks and Supermassive Black Hole Binaries in Multi-Scale Hydrodynamical Galaxy Mergers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Abridged) We review the results of the first multi-scale, hydrodynamical simulations of mergers between galaxies with central supermassive black holes (SMBHs) to investigate the formation of SMBH binaries in galactic nuclei. We demonstrate that strong gas inflows produce nuclear disks at the centers of merger remnants whose properties depend sensitively on the details of gas thermodynamics. In numerical simulations with parsec-scale spatial resolution in the gas component and an effective equation of state appropriate for a starburst galaxy, we show that a SMBH binary forms very rapidly, less than a million years after the merger of the two galaxies. Binary formation is significantly suppressed in the presence of a strong heating source such as radiative feedback by the accreting SMBHs. We also present preliminary results of numerical simulations with ultra-high spatial resolution of 0.1 pc in the gas component. These simulations resolve the internal structure of the resulting nuclear disk down to parsec scales and demonstrate the formation of a central massive object (~ 10^8 Mo) by efficient angular momentum transport. This is the first time that a radial gas inflow is shown to extend to parsec scales as a result of the dynamics and hydrodynamics involved in a galaxy merger, and has important implications for the fueling of SMBHs. Due to the rapid formation of the central clump, the density of the nuclear disk decreases significantly in its outer region, reducing dramatically the effect of dynamical friction and leading to the stalling of the two SMBHs at a separation of ~1 pc. We discuss how the orbital decay of the black holes might continue in a more realistic model which incorporates star formation and the multi-phase nature of the ISM.

Lucio Mayer; Stelios Kazantzidis; Andres Escala

2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicolor result formats" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Comparison of different procedures to stabilize biogas formation after process failure in a thermophilic waste digestion system: Influence of aggregate formation on process stability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mechanism of process recovery with calcium oxide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Formation of insoluble calcium salts with long chain fatty acids and phosphate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adsorption of VFAs by the precipitates resulting in the formation of aggregates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acid uptake and phosphate release by the phosphate-accumulating organisms. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microbial degradation of volatile fatty acids in the aggregates. - Abstract: Following a process failure in a full-scale biogas reactor, different counter measures were undertaken to stabilize the process of biogas formation, including the reduction of the organic loading rate, the addition of sodium hydroxide (NaOH), and the introduction of calcium oxide (CaO). Corresponding to the results of the process recovery in the full-scale digester, laboratory experiments showed that CaO was more capable of stabilizing the process than NaOH. While both additives were able to raise the pH to a neutral milieu (pH > 7.0), the formation of aggregates was observed particularly when CaO was used as the additive. Scanning electron microscopy investigations revealed calcium phosphate compounds in the core of the aggregates. Phosphate seemed to be released by phosphorus-accumulating organisms, when volatile fatty acids accumulated. The calcium, which was charged by the CaO addition, formed insoluble salts with long chain fatty acids, and caused the precipitation of calcium phosphate compounds. These aggregates were surrounded by a white layer of carbon rich organic matter, probably consisting of volatile fatty acids. Thus, during the process recovery with CaO, the decrease in the amount of accumulated acids in the liquid phase was likely enabled by (1) the formation of insoluble calcium salts with long chain fatty acids, (2) the adsorption of volatile fatty acids by the precipitates, (3) the acid uptake by phosphorus-accumulating organisms and (4) the degradation of volatile fatty acids in the aggregates. Furthermore, this mechanism enabled a stable process performance after re-activation of biogas production. In contrast, during the counter measure with NaOH aggregate formation was only minor resulting in a rapid process failure subsequent the increase of the organic loading rate.

Kleyboecker, A.; Liebrich, M.; Kasina, M. [Microbial GeoEngineering, Helmholtz Centre Potsdam, GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, 14473 Potsdam (Germany); Kraume, M. [Chemical and Process Engineering, Technical University Berlin, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Wittmaier, M. [Institute for Recycling and Environmental Protection, Bremen University of Applied Sciences, 28199 Bremen (Germany); Wuerdemann, H., E-mail: wuerdemann@gfz-potsdam.de [Microbial GeoEngineering, Helmholtz Centre Potsdam, GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, 14473 Potsdam (Germany)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

2008 Publications Resulting from the Use of NERSC Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 2008 Publications Resulting from the Use of NERSC Resources On their Allocation Year 2009 ERCAP Request Forms Principal Investigators reported 1,487 refereed publications (published or submitted) for the preceding 12 months, based on using, at least in part, NERSC resources. A PI Mowfak Al-Jassim Juarez L. F. Da Silva, Yanfa Yan, and Su-Huai Wei, Rules of Structure Formation for the Homologous InMO3(ZnO)n Compounds Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 255501 (2008). Yanfa Yan and S.-H. Wei, Doping asymmetry in wide-bandgap semiconductors: Origins and solutions, Phys. Stat. Sol. (b) 245, 641-652 (2008). Aron Walsh, Yanfa Yan, M. M. Al-Jassim, and Su-Huai Wei Electronic, Energetic, and Chemical Effects of Intrinsic Defects and Fe-Doping of CoAl2O4: A DFT+U Study J. Phys. Chem. C 112; 12044 (2008)

403

A critical review of RHIC experimental results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) was constructed to achieve an asymptotic state of nuclear matter in heavy ion collisions, a near-ideal gas of deconfined quarks and gluons denoted quark-gluon plasma or QGP. RHIC collisions are indeed very different from the hadronic processes observed at the Bevalac and AGS, but high-energy elementary-collision mechanisms are also non-hadronic. The two-component model (TCM) combines measured properties of elementary collisions with the Glauber eikonal model to provide an alternative asymptotic limit for A-A collisions. RHIC data have been interpreted to indicate formation of a {\\em strongly-coupled} QGP or "perfect liquid". In this review I consider the experimental evidence that seems to support such conclusions and alternative evidence that may conflict with those conclusions and suggest different interpretations.

Thomas A. Trainor

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

404

Field results document underbalanced drilling success  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many different techniques are used to maintain underbalanced conditions at the toolface. Whether the operator is trying to avoid drilling problems or prevent formation damage, the key to a safe, successful operation is a reliable method of sealing around the tubulars at the surface for continuous well control. Globally, underbalanced drilling (UBD) is emerging as an important technology to improve production and solve drilling problems with success in many applications with different reservoirs. Improvements in initial flow rates using UBD are being supported by longer term production. UBD techniques and processes are improving through experience and implementation. UBD is becoming a more economical means to optimize reservoir management than conventional overbalanced operations. UBD operations are proving to be safer than conventional overbalanced drilling.

Vozniak, J.; Cuthbertson, R.L.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Optimization of Hydride Rim Formation in Unirradiated Zr 4 Cladding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this work is to build on the results reported in the M2 milestone M2FT 13PN0805051, document number FCRD-USED-2013-000151 (Hanson, 2013). In that work, it was demonstrated that unirradiated samples of zircaloy-4 cladding could be pre-hydrided at temperatures below 400°C in pure hydrogen gas and that the growth of hydrides on the surface could be controlled by changing the surface condition of the samples and form a desired hydride rim on the outside diameter of the cladding. The work performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory since the issuing of the M2 milestone has focused its efforts to optimize the formation of a hydride rim on available zircaloy-4 cladding samples by controlling temperature variation and gas flow control during pre-hydriding treatments. Surface conditioning of the outside surface was also examined as a variable. The results of test indicate that much of the variability in the hydride thickness is due to temperature variation occurring in the furnaces as well as how hydrogen gas flows across the sample surface. Efforts to examine other alloys, gas concentrations, and different surface conditioning plan to be pursed in the next FY as more cladding samples become available

Shimskey, Rick W.; Hanson, Brady D.; MacFarlan, Paul J.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

406

Numerical relativity and the formation of black holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical relativity and the formation of black holes J´er^ome Novak (Jerome in fiziko, Univerza v Ljubljani, March, 6th 2012 #12;Plan 1 Introduction 2 Core-collapse supernova 3 Black #12;Outline 1 Introduction 2 Core-collapse supernova 3 Black hole formation 4 General relativity 5

Â?umer, Slobodan

407

Methodology Formation Mitigation of Process Contaminants (3-MCPD)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

3-MCPD (3-Monochloropropane-1,2-diol )Methodology,Formation,and Mitigation reference papers. Methodology Formation Mitigation of Process Contaminants (3-MCPD) 3-MCPD 2-diol 3-MCPD 3-MCPD Esters 3-monochloropropane-1 acid analysis aocs april articles cert

408

Mutual feedback between star formation and nuclear activity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this invited contribution I review the justifications for the attempts, currently very popular, to include in semi-analytic models of galaxy formation prescriptions to describe the mutual link between the star formation and nuclear activity in galaxies, which has been for surprisingly long time neglected.

Gian Luigi Granato

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

409

Agent-Based Coalition Formation in Disaster Response Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agent-Based Coalition Formation in Disaster Response Applications Ladislau B¨ol¨oni, Senior Member-based coalition formation ap- proach for disaster response applications. We assume that agents are operating 1. INTRODUCTION Efficient disaster response requires participants to form teams and coordinate

Bölöni, Ladislau L

410

Identification of stratigraphic formation interfaces using wavelet and Fourier transforms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to identify the formation interfaces from geophysical well log data using the wavelet transform, and a combination of the wavelet transform and the Fourier transform methods. In the wavelet transform method, the identification ... Keywords: Formation interface, Fourier transform, Geophysical well log, Stratigraphic interface, Wavelet transform

Shih-Yu Pan; Bieng-Zih Hsieh; Ming-Tar Lu; Zsay-Shing Lin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Spectroscopic Elucidation of First Steps of Supported Bimetallic Cluster Formation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Initial steps of bimetallic Ru-Os cluster formation on MgO in the presence of H{sub 2} are analyzed by EXAFS and IR spectroscopy. Ru-Os bond formation takes place after decarbonylation of Ru{sub 3} clusters and subsequently, at higher temperatures, of Os{sub 3} clusters to generate coordinative unsaturation.

Kulkarni, A.; Gates, B.C.; (UCD)

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

412

Discrete mechanics, optimal control and formation flying spacecraft  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Discrete mechanics, optimal control and formation flying spacecraft Oliver Junge Center-Bl¨obaum partially supported by the CRC 376 Oliver Junge Discrete mechanics, optimal control and formation flying spacecraft p.1 #12;Outline mechanical optimal control problem direct discretization of the variational

Patrick, George

413

Quantum Imaging: Enhanced Image Formation Using Quantum States of Light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum Imaging: Enhanced Image Formation Using Quantum States of Light Robert W. Boyd, Kam Wai, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627, USA ABSTRACT We review recent research in the field of quantum imaging. Quantum imaging deals with the formation of images that possess higher resolution or better

Boyd, Robert W.

414

Process for the recovery of petroleum from subterranean formations  

SciTech Connect

An improved polymer flood process for the recovery of petroleum from a subterranean formation wherein a slug of a fresh water aqueous solution of a salt-insensitive polymer is injected into the formation prior to the undertaking of the polymer flood using a fresh water solution containing a partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide.

Grodde, K.; Volz, H.

1981-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

415

UFO (UnFold Operator) default data format  

SciTech Connect

The default format for the storage of x,y data for use with the UFO code is described. The format assumes that the data stored in a file is a matrix of values; two columns of this matrix are selected to define a function of the form y = f(x). This format is specifically designed to allow for easy importation of data obtained from other sources, or easy entry of data using a text editor, with a minimum of reformatting. This format is flexible and extensible through the use of inline directives stored in the optional header of the file. A special extension of the format implements encoded data which significantly reduces the storage required as compared wth the unencoded form. UFO supports several extensions to the file specification that implement execute-time operations, such as, transformation of the x and/or y values, selection of specific columns of the matrix for association with the x and y values, input of data directly from other formats (e.g., DAMP and PFF), and a simple type of library-structured file format. Several examples of the use of the format are given.

Kissel, L.; Biggs, F. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Marking, T.R. (Applied Physics, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Modeling Coupled Processes in Clay Formations for Radioactive Waste Disposal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a result of the termination of the Yucca Mountain Project, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has started to explore various alternative avenues for the disposition of used nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. The overall scope of the investigation includes temporary storage, transportation issues, permanent disposal, various nuclear fuel types, processing alternatives, and resulting waste streams. Although geologic disposal is not the only alternative, it is still the leading candidate for permanent disposal. The realm of geologic disposal also offers a range of geologic environments that may be considered, among those clay shale formations. Figure 1-1 presents the distribution of clay/shale formations within the USA. Clay rock/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures induced by tunnel excavation. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon et al., 2005) have all been under intensive scientific investigations (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relations with flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of nuclear waste. Clay/shale formations may be generally classified as indurated and plastic clays (Tsang et al., 2005). The latter (including Boom clay) is a softer material without high cohesion; its deformation is dominantly plastic. For both clay rocks, coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical (THMC) processes are expected to have a significant impact on the long-term safety of a clay repository. For example, the excavation-damaged zone (EDZ) near repository tunnels can modify local permeability (resulting from induced fractures), potentially leading to less confinement capability (Tsang et al., 2005). Because of clay's swelling and shrinkage behavior (depending on whether the clay is in imbibition or drainage processes), fracture properties in the EDZ are quite dynamic and evolve over time as hydromechanical conditions change. To understand and model the coupled processes and their impact on repository performance is critical for the defensible performance assessment of a clay repository. Within the Natural Barrier System (NBS) group of the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign at DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy, LBNL's research activities have focused on understanding and modeling such coupled processes. LBNL provided a report in this April on literature survey of studies on coupled processes in clay repositories and identification of technical issues and knowledge gaps (Tsang et al., 2010). This report will document other LBNL research activities within the natural system work package, including the development of constitutive relationships for elastic deformation of clay rock (Section 2), a THM modeling study (Section 3) and a THC modeling study (Section 4). The purpose of the THM and THC modeling studies is to demonstrate the current modeling capabilities in dealing with coupled processes in a potential clay repository. In Section 5, we discuss potential future R&D work based on the identified knowledge gaps. The linkage between these activities and related FEPs is presented in Section 6.

Liu, Hui-Hai; Rutqvist, Jonny; Zheng, Liange; Sonnenthal, Eric; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

417

Neutronic Aspects and Recent Experimental Results with ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Neutronic Aspects and Recent Experimental Results with Methane Moderators at IUCF Low Energy Neutron Source (LENS). ...

418

Geologic Study of the Coso Formation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Study of the Coso Formation Study of the Coso Formation Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geologic Study of the Coso Formation Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: There have been great advances in the last 20 years in understanding the volcanic, structural, geophysical, and petrologic development of the Coso Range and Coso geothermal field. These studies have provided a wealth of knowledge concerning the geology of the area, including general structural characteristics and kinematic history. One element missing from this dataset was an understanding of the sedimentology and stratigraphy of well-exposed Cenozoic sedimentary strata - the Coso Formation. A detailed sedimentation and tectonics study of the Coso Formation was undertaken to provide a more complete picture of the

419

Solution mining systems and methods for treating hydrocarbon containing formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for treating an oil shale formation comprising nahcolite is disclosed. The method includes providing a first fluid to a portion of the formation through at least two injection wells. A second fluid is produced from the portion through at least one injection well until at least two injection wells are interconnected such that fluid can flow between the two injection wells. The second fluid includes at least some nahcolite dissolved in the first fluid. The first fluid is injected through one of the interconnected injection wells. The second fluid is produced from at least one of the interconnected injection wells. Heat is provided from one or more heaters to the formation to heat the formation. Hydrocarbon fluids are produced from the formation.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); de Rouffignac, Eric Pierre (Rijswijk, NL); Schoeling, Lanny Gene (Katy, TX)

2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

420

Formation of Stellar Clusters and the Importance of Thermodynamics for Fragmentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss results from numerical simulations of star cluster formation in the turbulent interstellar medium (ISM). The thermodynamic behavior of the star-forming gas plays a crucial role in fragmentation and determines the stellar mass function as well as the dynamic properties of the nascent stellar cluster. This holds for star formation in molecular clouds in the solar neighborhood as well as for the formation of the very first stars in the early universe. The thermodynamic state of the ISM is a result of the balance between heating and cooling processes, which in turn are determined by atomic and molecular physics and by chemical abundances. Features in the effective equation of state of the gas, such as a transition from a cooling to a heating regime, define a characteristic mass scale for fragmentation and so set the peak of the initial mass function of stars (IMF). As it is based on fundamental physical quantities and constants, this is an attractive approach to explain the apparent universality of the IMF in the solar neighborhood as well as the transition from purely primordial high-mass star formation to the more normal low-mass mode observed today.

Ralf S. Klessen; Paul C. Clark; Simon C. O. Glover

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multicolor result formats" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The Relation between Ion Temperature Anisotropy and Formation of Slow Shocks in Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We perform a two-dimensional simulation by using an electromagnetic hybrid code to study the formation of slow-mode shocks in collisionless magnetic reconnection in low beta plasmas, and we focus on the relation between the formation of slow shocks and the ion temperature anisotropy enhanced at the shock downstream region. It is known that as magnetic reconnection develops, the parallel temperature along the magnetic field becomes large in association with the anisotropic PSBL (plasma sheet boundary layer) ion beams, and this temperature anisotropy has a tendency to suppress the formation of slow shocks. Based on our simulation result, we found that the slow shock formation is suppressed due to the large temperature anisotropy near the X-type region, but the ion temperature anisotropy relaxes with increasing the distance from the magnetic neutral point. As a result, two pairs of current structures, which are the strong evidence of dissipation of magnetic field in slow shocks, are formed at the distance x > 11...

Higashimori, Katsuaki

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Microsoft Word - 10-1826 _word format_  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

report contains the results of the audit performed for Summary Category Group S5000 debris waste, August 3-5, 2010. I certify under penalty of law that this document and all...

423

Prediction of subsidence: Relationship between lowering of formation pressure and subsidence due to fluid withdrawal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abnormally low formation pressures develop in petroleum reservoirs during intensive oil and gas production or in aquifers as a result of water extraction. A simple method is presented for calculating (predicting) the amount of compaction (and resulting subsidence) from the pressure drop in formation due to production, i.e., the increase in the effective pressure p{sub e} (p{sub e} = p{sub t} {minus} p{sub p}, where p{sub t} is the total overburden pressure and p{sub p} is the fluid or pore pressure). This work is based on extensive data collected in Russia. For example, large petroliferous areas in Western Siberia became marshlands as a result of fluid withdrawal. One should remember that sophisticated methods, such as FSMT (direct measurement of rock compaction by wireline tools in situ) and GPS (measurement of surface subsidence by satellite microwave Doppler techniques), are not yet available in many areas of the world.

Serebryakov, V.A.; Chilingar, G.V.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Formation of NOx precursors during Chinese pulverized coal pyrolysis in an arc plasma jet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation of NOx precursors (HCN and NH{sub 3}) from the pyrolysis of several Chinese pulverized coals in an arc plasma jet was investigated through both thermodynamic analysis of the C-H-O-N system and experiments. Results of thermodynamic analysis show that the dominant N-containing gaseous species is HCN together with a small amount of ammonia above the temperature of 2000 K. The increase of H content advances the formation of HCN and NH{sub 3}, but the yields of HCN and NH{sub 3} are decreased with a high concentration of O in the system. These results are accordant with the experimental data. The increasing of input power promotes the formation of HCN and NH{sub 3} from coal pyrolysis in an arc plasma jet. Tar-N is not formed during the process. The yield of HCN changes insignificantly with the changing of the residence time of coal particles in the reactor, but that of NH{sub 3} decreases as residence times increase because of the relative instability at high temperature. Adsorption and gasification of CO{sub 2} on the coal surface also can restrain the formation of HCN and NH{sub 3} compare to the results in an Ar plasma jet. Yields of HCN and NH{sub 3} are sensitive to the coal feeding rate, indicating that NOx precursors could interact with the nascent char to form other N-containing species. The formation of HCN and NH{sub 3} during coal pyrolysis in a H{sub 2}/Ar plasma jet are not dependent on coal rank. The N-containing gaseous species is released faster than others in the volatiles during coal pyrolysis in an arc plasma jet, and the final nitrogen content in the char is lower than that in the parent coal, which it is independent of coal type. 16 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

Wei-ren Bao; Jin-cao Zhang; Fan Li; Li-ping Chang [Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan (China). Key Laboratory of Coal Science and Technology

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF THE STAR FORMATION RATE, SPECIFIC STAR FORMATION RATE, AND THE PRESENCE OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI FOR HIGH STELLAR MASS AND LOW STELLAR MASS GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect

Using two volume-limited main galaxy samples of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 8 (SDSS DR8), we explore the environmental dependence of the star formation rate (SFR), specific star formation rate (SSFR), and the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) for high stellar mass (HSM) and low stellar mass (LSM) galaxies. It is found that the environmental dependence of the SFR and SSFR for luminous HSM galaxies and faint LSM ones remains very strong: galaxies in the lowest density regime preferentially have higher SFR and SSFR than galaxies in the densest regime, while the environmental dependence of the SFR and SSFR for luminous LSM galaxies is substantially reduced. Our result also shows that the fraction of AGNs in HSM galaxies decreases as a function of density, while the one in LSM galaxies depends very little on local density. In the faint LSM galaxy sample, the SFR and SSFR of galaxies strongly decrease with increasing density, but the fraction of AGNs depends very little on local density. Such a result can rule out that AGNs are fueled by the cold gas in the disk component of galaxies that is also driving the star formation of those galaxies.

Deng Xinfa; Song Jun; Chen Yiqing; Jiang Peng; Ding Yingping [School of Science, Nanchang University, Jiangxi 330031 (China)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

426

FORMATION FIELDS AND CURRENT EFFICIENCIES IN THE ANODIC OXIDATION OF ZIRCONIUM: A DIRECT COMPARISON OF HIGH-POTENTIAL FORMATION FIELDS WITH THOSE DERIVED FROM LOW-POTENTIAL CHARGING CURVES  

SciTech Connect

Formation fields at selected constant currents were obtained from high- potential unitary formation rates and polarographic current efficiency measurements carried out over the potential range, 20 to 130 volts. These values are compared with formation fields derived from low-potential unitary formation rates alone, in the potential range below 2 v. Results are reported for abraded Kroll process metal at 750 mu a/cm/sup 2/, for abraded and for chemically polished iodide process metal at 100 and 750 mu a/cm/sup 2/ and 100 mu a/cm/sup 2/, respectively. Ionic current efficiencies are reported for several current densities in the high-potential range and for the low-potential localized oxygen evolution process. (auth)

Adams, G.B. Jr.; Lee, T.; Van Bysselberghe, P.

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Neutron formation temperature gauge and neutron activation analysis brine flow meter. Final report, October 1, 1976--March 31, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Feasibility studies of nuclear techniques applicable to the determination of geothermal formation temperature and two-phase brine flow downhole have been performed. The formation temperature gauging technique involves injection of fast neutrons into the formation and analysis of the moderated slow neutron energy distribution by appropriately filtered neutron detectors. The scientific feasibility of the method has been demonstrated by analytical computational and experimental evaluation of the system response. A data analysis method has been developed to determine unambiguously the temperature, neutron absorption cross section and neutron moderating power of an arbitrary medium. The initial phase of a program to demonstrate the engineering feasibility of the technique has been performed. A sonde mockup was fabricated and measurements have been performed in a test stand designed to simulate a geothermal well. The results indicate that the formation temperature determined by this method is independent of differences between the temperature in the borehole fluid and the formation, borehole fluid density, and borehole fluid salinity. Estimates of performance specifications for a formation temperature sonde have been made on the basis of information obtained in this study and a conceptual design of a logging system has been developed. The technique for the determination of fluid flow in a well is based on neutron activation analysis of elements present in the brine. An analytical evaluation of the method has been performed. The results warrant further, experimental evaluation.

Vagelatos, N.; Steinman, D.K.; John, J.

1978-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

428

The 1981 ocean tomography experiment: Preliminary results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary results from a 1981 test ocean acoustic tomography experiment are presented. The system deployed in the southern North Atlantic

The Ocean Tomography Group; R. C. Spindel

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Results of Baldrige Winners' Common Stock Comparison ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Results of Baldrige Winners' Common Stock Comparison Third NIST Stock Investment Study February 1997 Methodology: A hypothetical sum was ...

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

430

Threshold results for semilinear parabolic systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A threshold result was proved in this paper for semilinear parabolic system with pure power type nonlinearities

Xie, Qiuyi Dai Haiyang He Junhui

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Results from Combined NMR and Electrochemical Impedance ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Oxygen-vacancy Transport in Heavily Doped Cubic Zirconia: Results from Combined NMR and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopies.

432

Modeling Molecular Hydrogen and Star Formation in Cosmological Simulations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We describe a phenomenological model for molecular hydrogen formation suited for applications in galaxy formation simulations, which includes on-equilibrium formation of molecular hydrogen on dust and approximate treatment of both its self-shielding and shielding by dust from the dissociating UV radiation. The model is applicable in simulations in which individual star forming regions--the giant molecular complexes--can be identified (resolution of tens of pc) and their mean internal density estimated reliably, even if internal structure is not resolved. In agreement with previous studies, calculations based on our model show that the transition from atomic to fully molecular phase depends primarily on the metallicity, which we assume is directly related to the dust abundance, and clumpiness of the interstellar medium. The clumpiness simply boosts the formation rate of molecular hydrogen, while dust serves both as a catalyst of molecular hydrogen formation and as an additional shielding from dissociating UV radiation. The upshot is that it is difficult to form fully-shielded giant molecular clouds while gas metallicity is low. However, once the gas is enriched to Z {approx} 0.01-0.1 solar, the subsequent star formation and enrichment can proceed at a much faster rate. This may keep star formation efficiency in the low-mass, low-metallicity progenitors of galaxies very low for a certain period of time with the effect similar to a strong 'feedback' mechanism.

Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; /Fermilab /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Tassis, Konstantinos; /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /KICP, Chicago; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Chicago U., EFI

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

STAR FORMATION IN THE OUTER DISK OF SPIRAL GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect

We combine new deep and wide field of view H{alpha} imaging of a sample of eight nearby (d Almost-Equal-To 17 Mpc) spiral galaxies with new and archival H I and CO imaging to study the star formation and the star formation regulation in the outer disk. We find that, in agreement with previous studies, star formation in the outer disk has low covering fractions, and star formation is typically organized into spiral arms. The star formation in the outer disk is at extremely low levels, with typical star formation rate surface densities of {approx}10{sup -5} to 10{sup -6} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}. We find that the ratio of the radial extent of detected H II regions to the radius of the H I disk is typically {approx}>85%. This implies that in order to further our understanding of the implications of extended star formation, we must further our understanding of the formation of extended H I disks. We measure the gravitational stability of the gas disk, and find that the outer gaseous disk is typically a factor of {approx}2 times more stable than the inner star-forming disk. We measure the surface density of outer disk H I arms, and find that the disk is closer to gravitational instability along these arms. Therefore, it seems that spiral arms are a necessary, but not sufficient, requirement for star formation in the outer disk. We use an estimation of the flaring of the outer gas disk to illustrate the effect of flaring on the Schmidt power-law index; we find that including flaring increases the agreement between the power-law indices of the inner and outer disks.

Barnes, Kate L.; Van Zee, Liese [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Cote, Stephanie [Canadian Gemini Office, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, Victoria (Canada); Schade, David, E-mail: barneskl@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: vanzee@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: Stephanie.Cote@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca, E-mail: David.Schade@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, Victoria (Canada)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

434

Imaging Atmospheric Cerenkov Telescopes: Techniques and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The hunt for cosmic TeV particle accelerators is prospering through Imaging Atmospheric Cerenkov Telescopes. We face challenges such as low light levels and MHz trigger rates, and the need to distinguish between particle air showers stemming from primary gamma rays and those due to the hadronic cosmic ray background. Our test beam is provided by the Crab Nebula, a steady accelerator of particles to energies beyond 20 TeV. Highly variable gamma-ray emission, coincident with flares at longer wavelengths, is revealing the particle acceleration mechanisms at work in the relativistic jets of Active Galaxies. These 200 GeV to 20 TeV photons propagating over cosmological distances allow us to place a limit on the infra-red background linked to galaxy formation and, some speculate, to the decay of massive relic neutrinos. Gamma rays produced in neutralino annihilation or the evaporation of primordial black holes may also be detectable. These phenomena and a zoo of astrophysical objects will be the targets of the next generation multi-national telescope facilities.

S. M. Bradbury

2001-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

435

into deeper and larger-volume saline formations. Researchers at  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

into deeper and larger-volume saline formations. Researchers at into deeper and larger-volume saline formations. Researchers at Cranfield have been monitoring the injected CO 2 with instrumentation installed nearly two miles beneath the surface to ensure the safe and permanent storage in the Lower Tuscaloosa Formations. The Cranfield project also has been successful in the deployment of pressure-response monitoring techniques in the injection zone ("in-zone") and above the injection zone ("above zone"). Real-time data collected since July 2008

436

Method for ion implantation induced embedded particle formation via reduction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for ion implantation induced embedded particle formation via reduction with the steps of ion implantation with an ion/element that will chemically reduce the chosen substrate material, implantation of the ion/element to a sufficient concentration and at a sufficient energy for particle formation, and control of the temperature of the substrate during implantation. A preferred embodiment includes the formation of particles which are nano-dimensional (<100 m-n in size). The phase of the particles may be affected by control of the substrate temperature during and/or after the ion implantation process.

Hampikian, Janet M (Decatur, GA); Hunt, Eden M (Atlanta, GA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Systems and methods for producing hydrocarbons from tar sands formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for treating a tar sands formation is disclosed. A plurality of heaters are located in the formation. The heaters include at least partially horizontal heating sections at least partially in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The heating sections are at least partially arranged in a pattern in the hydrocarbon layer. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the hydrocarbon layer. The provided heat creates a plurality of drainage paths for mobilized fluids. At least two of the drainage paths converge. A production well is located to collect and produce mobilized fluids from at least one of the converged drainage paths in the hydrocarbon layer.

Li, Ruijian (Katy, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

438

TIDAL TAILS OF MINOR MERGERS: STAR FORMATION EFFICIENCY IN THE WESTERN TAIL OF NGC 2782  

SciTech Connect

While major mergers and their tidal debris are well studied, they are less common than minor mergers (mass ratios {approx}< 0.3). The peculiar spiral NGC 2782 is the result of a merger between two disk galaxies with a mass ratio of {approx}4: 1 occurring {approx}200 Myr ago. This merger produced a molecular and H I-rich, optically bright eastern tail and an H I-rich, optically faint western tail. Non-detection of CO in the western tail by Braine et al. suggested that star formation had not yet begun to occur in that tidal tail. However, deep H{alpha} narrowband images show evidence of recent star formation in the western tail. Across the entire western tail, we find the global star formation rate per unit area ({Sigma}{sub SFR}) to be several orders of magnitude less than expected from the total gas density. Together with extended FUV+NUV emission from Galaxy Evolution Explorer along the tail, this indicates a low global star formation efficiency in the tidal tail producing lower mass star clusters. The H II region that we observed has a local (few-kiloparsec scale) {Sigma}{sub SFR} from H{alpha} that is less than that expected from the total gas density, which is consistent with other observations of tidal debris. The star formation efficiency of this H II region inferred from the total gas density is low, but normal when inferred from the molecular gas density. These results suggest the presence of a very small, locally dense region in the western tail of NGC 2782 or of a low-metallicity and/or low-pressure star-forming region.

Knierman, Karen; Scowen, Paul; Jansen, Rolf A. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, 550 East Tyler Mall, Room PSF-686 (P.O. Box 871404), Tempe, AZ 85287-1404 (United States); Knezek, Patricia M. [WIYN Consortium, Inc., 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Wehner, Elizabeth, E-mail: karen.knierman@asu.edu, E-mail: paul.scowen@asu.edu, E-mail: rolf.jansen@asu.edu, E-mail: pknezek@noao.edu, E-mail: ewehner@haverford.edu [Department of Astronomy, Haverford College, Haverford, PA 19041 (United States)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

439

THE AVERAGE STAR FORMATION HISTORIES OF GALAXIES IN DARK MATTER HALOS FROM z = 0-8  

SciTech Connect

We present a robust method to constrain average galaxy star formation rates (SFRs), star formation histories (SFHs), and the intracluster light (ICL) as a function of halo mass. Our results are consistent with observed galaxy stellar mass functions, specific star formation rates (SSFRs), and cosmic star formation rates (CSFRs) from z = 0 to z = 8. We consider the effects of a wide range of uncertainties on our results, including those affecting stellar masses, SFRs, and the halo mass function at the heart of our analysis. As they are relevant to our method, we also present new calibrations of the dark matter halo mass function, halo mass accretion histories, and halo-subhalo merger rates out to z = 8. We also provide new compilations of CSFRs and SSFRs; more recent measurements are now consistent with the buildup of the cosmic stellar mass density at all redshifts. Implications of our work include: halos near 10{sup 12} M{sub Sun} are the most efficient at forming stars at all redshifts, the baryon conversion efficiency of massive halos drops markedly after z {approx} 2.5 (consistent with theories of cold-mode accretion), the ICL for massive galaxies is expected to be significant out to at least z {approx} 1-1.5, and dwarf galaxies at low redshifts have higher stellar mass to halo mass ratios than previous expectations and form later than in most theoretical models. Finally, we provide new fitting formulae for SFHs that are more accurate than the standard declining tau model. Our approach places a wide variety of observations relating to the SFH of galaxies into a self-consistent framework based on the modern understanding of structure formation in {Lambda}CDM. Constraints on the stellar mass-halo mass relationship and SFRs are available for download online.

Behroozi, Peter S.; Wechsler, Risa H. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Conroy, Charlie [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

440

Effects of internal hydrogen on the vacancy loop formation probability in Al  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effect of internal hydrogen on the formation of vacancy dislocation loops from heavy-ion generated displacement cascades in Al has been investigated. Samples of high-purity aluminum and aluminum containing 900 and 1300 appM of hydrogen were irradiated at room temperature with 50 keV Kr+ ions. The ion dose rate was typically 2 {times} 10{sup 10}ions cm{sup {minus}2} sec{sup {minus}1} and the ion dose was between 10{sup 11} and 10{sup 13} ion cm{sup {minus}2}. Under these irradiation conditions, dislocation loops were observed in all compositions, although the formation probability was relatively low (less than 10 percent of the displacement cascades produced a vacancy loop). The loop formation probability was further reduced by the presence of hydrogen. No difference in the geometry or the size of the loops created in the hydrogen free and hydrogen charged samples was found. These results are difficult to interpret, and the explanation may lie in the distribution and form of the hydrogen. To account for the large hydrogen concentrations and from calculations of the energy associated with hydrogen entry into aluminum, it has been suggested that the hydrogen enters the aluminum lattice with an accompanying vacancy. This will create hydrogen-vacancy complexes in the material; two dimensional complexes have been detected in the hydrogen-charged, but unirradiated, samples by the small-angle x-ray scattering technique. The possibility of these complexes trapping the vacancies produced by the cascade process exists thus lowering the formation probability. However, such a mechanism must occur within the lifetime of the cascade. Alternatively, if a displacement cascade overlaps with the hydrogen-vacancy complexes, the lower atomic density of the region will result in an increase in the cascade volume (decrease in the local vacancy concentration) which will also reduce the loop formation probability.

Bui, T.X.; Sirois, E.; Robertson, I.M. (Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (USA). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Kirk, M.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Adhesion and formation of microbial biofilms in complex microfluidic devices  

SciTech Connect

Shewanella oneidensis is a metal reducing bacterium, which is of interest for bioremediation and clean energy applications. S. oneidensis biofilms play a critical role in several situations such as in microbial energy harvesting devices. Here, we use a microfluidic device to quantify the effects of hydrodynamics on the biofilm morphology of S. oneidensis. For different rates of fluid flow through a complex microfluidic device, we studied the spatiotemporal dynamics of biofilms, and we quantified several morphological features such as spatial distribution, cluster formation and surface coverage. We found that hydrodynamics resulted in significant differences in biofilm dynamics. The baffles in the device created regions of low and high flow in the same device. At higher flow rates, a nonuniform biofilm develops, due to unequal advection in different regions of the microchannel. However, at lower flow rates, a more uniform biofilm evolved. This depicts competition between adhesion events, growth and fluid advection. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed that higher production of extra-cellular polymeric substances (EPS) occurred at higher flow velocities.

Kumar, Aloke [ORNL; Karig, David K [ORNL; Neethirajan, Suresh [University of Guelph; Suresh, Anil K [ORNL; Srijanto, Bernadeta R [ORNL; Mukherjee, Partha P [ORNL; Retterer, Scott T [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Formation of gold and silver nanostructures within polyvinylpyrollidone (PVP) gel  

SciTech Connect

Study on reduction of Au(III) and Ag(I) and the formation of Au and Ag nanostructures was performed on the gels of metal precursor and PVP polymer mixture. Some comparing samples were prepared for better understanding the role of reactants on the reduction of metal ions and further growth of nanocrystals. The results suggest that, in addition to its function of generating stable colloids, PVP not only has a reducing effect on metal ions, but also acts as a crystal growth modifier. At low temperatures, the reducing effect of PVP is strong on Ag(I) ions in AgNO{sub 3}, while the reduction of complex Au(III) ions in HAuCl{sub 4} is slow, involving two steps of Au(III)->Au(I)->Au. In the study of temperature disturbance on crystal growth, Au nanoplates of new and well-defined star shape were observed. The differences in the size and shape of nanoparticles are discussed from the colloid chemistry. - Graphical abstract: If a temperature difference was introduced to the gel of Au{sup 3+}(H{sub 2}O)-PVP, large sized Au nanoplates with new and well-defined star shape were observed.

Kan Caixia, E-mail: cxkan@nuaa.edu.c [College of Science, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 211100 (China); Wang Changshun [College of Science, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 211100 (China); Zhu Jiejun [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Li Hongchen [College of Science, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 211100 (China)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

443

Star formation in the luminous YSO IRAS 18345-0641  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aims: We aim to understand the star formation associated with the luminous young stellar object (YSO) IRAS 18345-0641 and to address the complications arising from unresolved multiplicity in interpreting the observations of massive star-forming regions. Methods: New infrared imaging data at sub-arcsec spatial resolution are obtained for IRAS 18345-0641. The new data are used along with mid- and far-IR imaging data, and CO (J=3-2) spectral line maps downloaded from archives to identify the YSO and study the properties of the outflow. Available radiative-transfer models are used to analyze the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the YSO. Results: Previous tentative detection of an outflow in the H_2 (1-0) S1 line (2.122 micron) is confirmed through new and deeper observations. The outflow appears to be associated with a YSO discovered at infrared wavelengths. At high angular resolution, we see that the YSO is probably a binary. The CO (3--2) lines also reveal a well defined outflow. Nevertheless, the directio...

Varricatt, Watson P; Davis, Chris J; Ramsay, Suzanne; Currie, Malcolm J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Growth of Dust as the Initial Step Toward Planet Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the results of laboratory measurements and theoretical models concerning the aggregation of dust in protoplanetary disks, as the initial step toward planet formation. Small particles easily stick when they collide and form aggregates with an open, often fractal structure, depending on the growth process. Larger particles are still expected to grow at collision velocities of about 1m/s. Experiments also show that, after an intermezzo of destructive velocities, high collision velocities above 10m/s on porous materials again lead to net growth of the target. Considerations of dust-gas interactions show that collision velocities for particles not too different in surface-to-mass ratio remain limited up to sizes about 1m, and growth seems to be guaranteed to reach these sizes quickly and easily. For meter sizes, coupling to nebula turbulence makes destructive processes more likely. Global aggregation models show that in a turbulent nebula, small particles are swept up too fast to be consistent with observations of disks. An extended phase may therefore exist in the nebula during which the small particle component is kept alive through collisions driven by turbulence which frustrates growth to planetesimals until conditions are more favorable for one or more reasons.

C. Dominik; J. Blum; J. Cuzzi; G. Wurm

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

445

FORMATION OF ORGANIC MOLECULES AND WATER IN WARM DISK ATMOSPHERES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations from Spitzer and ground-based infrared spectroscopy reveal significant diversity in the molecular emission from the inner few AU of T Tauri disks. We explore theoretically the possible origin of this diversity by expanding on our earlier thermal-chemical model of disk atmospheres. We consider how variations in grain settling, X-ray irradiation, accretion-related mechanical heating, and the oxygen-to-carbon ratio can affect the thermal and chemical properties of the atmosphere at 0.25-40 AU. We find that these model parameters can account for many properties of the detected molecular emission. The column density of the warm (200-2000 K) molecular atmosphere is sensitive to grain settling and the efficiency of accretion-related heating, which may account, at least in part, for the large range in molecular emission fluxes that have been observed. The dependence of the atmospheric properties on the model parameters may also help to explain trends that have been reported in the literature between molecular emission strength and mid-infrared color, stellar accretion rate, and disk mass. We discuss whether some of the differences between our model results and the observations (e.g., for water) indicate a role for vertical transport and freezeout in the disk midplane. We also discuss how planetesimal formation in the outer disk (beyond the snowline) may imprint a chemical signature on the inner few AU of the disk and speculate on possible observational tracers of this process.

Najita, Joan R. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Adamkovics, Mate; Glassgold, Alfred E. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

446

Characterization of Hydrogen Complex Formation in III-V Semiconductors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Atomic hydrogen has been found to react with some impurity species in semiconductors. Hydrogenation is a methodology for the introduction of atomic hydrogen into the semiconductor for the express purpose of forming complexes within the material. Efforts to develop hydrogenation as an isolation technique for AlGaAs and Si based devices failed to demonstrate its commercial viability. This was due in large measure to the low activation energies of the formed complexes. Recent studies of dopant passivation in long wavelength (0.98 - 1.55?m) materials suggested that for the appropriate choice of dopants much higher activation energies can be obtained. This effort studied the formation of these complexes in InP, This material is extensively used in optoelectronics, i.e., lasers, modulators and detectors. The experimental techniques were general to the extent that the results can be applied to other areas such as sensor technology, photovoltaics and to other material systems. The activation energies for the complexes have been determined and are reported in the scientific literature. The hydrogenation process has been shown by us to have a profound effect on the electronic structure of the materials and was thoroughly investigated. The information obtained will be useful in assessing the long term reliability of device structures fabricated using this phenomenon and in determining new device functionalities.

Williams, Michael D.

2006-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

447

Solution mining dawsonite from hydrocarbon containing formations with a chelating agent  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for treating an oil shale formation comprising dawsonite includes providing heat from one or more heaters to the formation to heat the formation. Hydrocarbon fluids are produced from the formation. At least some dawsonite in the formation is decomposed with the provided heat. A chelating agent is provided to the formation to dissolve at least some dawsonite decomposition products. The dissolved dawsonite decomposition products are produced from the formation.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

448

COSMOLOGICAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF CLUSTER FORMATION WITH ANISOTROPIC THERMAL CONDUCTION  

SciTech Connect

The intracluster medium (ICM) has been suggested to be buoyantly unstable in the presence of magnetic field and anisotropic thermal conduction. We perform first cosmological simulations of galaxy cluster formation that simultaneously include magnetic fields, radiative cooling, and anisotropic thermal conduction. In isolated and idealized cluster models, the magnetothermal instability (MTI) tends to reorient the magnetic fields radially whenever the temperature gradient points in the direction opposite to gravitational acceleration. Using cosmological simulations of cluster formation we detect radial bias in the velocity and magnetic fields. Such radial bias is consistent with either the inhomogeneous radial gas flows due to substructures or residual MTI-driven field rearrangements that are expected even in the presence of turbulence. Although disentangling the two scenarios is challenging, we do not detect excess bias in the runs that include anisotropic thermal conduction. The anisotropy effect is potentially detectable via radio polarization measurements with LOFAR and the Square Kilometer Array and future X-ray spectroscopic studies with the International X-ray Observatory. We demonstrate that radiative cooling boosts the amplification of the magnetic field by about two orders of magnitude beyond what is expected in the non-radiative cases. This effect is caused by the compression of the gas and frozen-in magnetic field as it accumulates in the cluster center. At z = 0 the field is amplified by a factor of about 10{sup 6} compared to the uniform magnetic field that evolved due to the universal expansion alone. Interestingly, the runs that include both radiative cooling and thermal conduction exhibit stronger magnetic field amplification than purely radiative runs. In these cases, buoyant restoring forces depend on the temperature gradients rather than the steeper entropy gradients. Thus, the ICM is more easily mixed and the winding up of the frozen-in magnetic field is more efficient, resulting in stronger magnetic field amplification. We also demonstrate that thermal conduction partially reduces the gas accretion driven by overcooling despite the fact that the effective conductivity is suppressed below the Spitzer-Braginskii value.

Ruszkowski, M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Lee, D. [Department of Astronomy, ASC/Flash Center, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Brueggen, M. [School of Engineering and Science, Jacobs University Bremen, Campus Ring 1, 28759 Bremen 05233 (Germany); Parrish, I. [Astronomy Department and Theoretical Astrophysics Center, 601 Campbell Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Oh, S. Peng, E-mail: mateuszr@umich.edu, E-mail: dongwook@flash.uchicago.edu, E-mail: m.brueggen@jacobs-university.de, E-mail: iparrish@astro.berkeley.edu, E-mail: peng@physics.ucsb.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

449

The Implications and Flow Behavior of the Hydraulically Fractured Wells in Shale Gas Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale gas formations are known to have low permeability. This low permeability can be as low as 100 nano darcies. Without stimulating wells drilled in the shale gas formations, it is hard to produce them at an economic rate. One of the stimulating approaches is by drilling horizontal wells and hydraulically fracturing the formation. Once the formation is fractured, different flow patterns will occur. The dominant flow regime observed in the shale gas formation is the linear flow or the transient drainage from the formation matrix toward the hydraulic fracture. This flow could extend up to years of production and it can be identified by half slop on the log-log plot of the gas rate against time. It could be utilized to evaluate the hydraulic fracture surface area and eventually evaluate the effectiveness of the completion job. Different models from the literature can be used to evaluate the completion job. One of the models used in this work assumes a rectangular reservoir with a slab shaped matrix between each two hydraulic fractures. From this model, there are at least five flow regions and the two regions discussed are the Region 2 in which bilinear flow occurs as a result of simultaneous drainage form the matrix and hydraulic fracture. The other is Region 4 which results from transient matrix drainage which could extend up to many years. The Barnett shale production data will be utilized throughout this work to show sample of the calculations. This first part of this work will evaluate the field data used in this study following a systematic procedure explained in Chapter III. This part reviews the historical production, reservoir and fluid data and well completion records available for the wells being analyzed. It will also check for data correlations from the data available and explain abnormal flow behaviors that might occur utilizing the field production data. It will explain why some wells might not fit into each model. This will be followed by a preliminary diagnosis, in which flow regimes will be identified, unclear data will be filtered, and interference and liquid loading data will be pointed. After completing the data evaluation, this work will evaluate and compare the different methods available in the literature in order to decide which method will best fit to analyze the production data from the Barnett shale. Formation properties and the original gas in place will be evaluated and compared for different methods.

Almarzooq, Anas Mohammadali S.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Formulation of Non-steady-state Dust Formation Process in Astrophysical Environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The non-steady-state formation of small clusters and the growth of grains accompanied by chemical reactions are formulated under the consideration that the collision of key gas species (key molecule) controls the kinetics of dust formation process. The formula allows us to evaluate the size distribution and condensation efficiency of dust formed in astrophysical environments. We apply the formulation to the formation of C and MgSiO3 grains in the ejecta of supernovae, as an example, to investigate how the non-steady effect influences the formation process, condensation efficiency f_{con}, and average radius a_{ave} of newly formed grains in comparison with the results calculated with the steady-state nucleation rate. We show that the steady-state nucleation rate is a good approximation if the collision timescale of key molecule tau_{coll} is much smaller than the timescale tau_{sat} with which the supersaturation ratio increases; otherwise the effect of the non-steady state becomes remarkable, leading to a lo...

Nozawa, Takaya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Space-radiation-induced point defect formation in optical materials. Ph.D. Thesis  

SciTech Connect

One of the central problems man has faced in his exploration of space is the long and short term effects of the space environment on the performance of spacecraft systems. The results presented in this dissertation represent the first time a definite connection has been made between the space-induced damage of optical systems and the microscopic mechanisms of point defect formation that lead to the damage. Point defect formation was observed in two, and possibly three different optical materials subjected to short-duration space exposure. Three calcium fluoride, two lithium fluoride, and three magnesium fluoride samples were flown on Space Shuttle flight STS-46 as part of the Evaluation of Oxygen Interactions with Materials - Third Phase experiment. Pre-flight and post-flight optical absorption measurements were performed on all of the samples. With the possible exception of the magnesium fluoride samples, every sample clearly showed the formation of F-centers in that section of the sample that was exposed to the low earth orbit environment. Analysis of the flight samples and laboratory experiments on control samples identify solar vacuum ultraviolet radiation as the most probable primary cause of the defect formation.

Allen, J.L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

The initial conditions of star formation: cosmic rays as the fundamental regulators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cosmic rays (CRs) control the thermal, ionization and chemical state of the dense H_2 gas regions that otherwise remain shielded from far-UV and optical stellar radiation propagating through the dusty ISM of galaxies. It is in such CR-dominated regions (CRDRs) rather than Photon-dominated regions (PDRs) of H_2 clouds where the star formation initial conditions are set, making CRs the ultimate star-formation feedback factor in galaxies, able to operate even in their most deeply dust-enshrouded environments. CR-controlled star formation initial conditions naturally set the stage for a near-invariant stellar Initial Mass Function (IMF) in galaxies as long as their average CR energy density U_{CR} permeating their molecular ISM remains within a factor of ~10 of its Galactic value. Nevertheless, in the extreme environments of the compact starbursts found in merging galaxies, where U_{CR}\\sim(few)x10^{3}U_{CR,Gal}, CRs dramatically alter the initial conditions of star formation. In the resulting extreme CRDRs H_2 c...

Papadopoulos, Padelis P

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

HD and H2 formation in low-metallicity dusty gas clouds at high reshift  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Context: The HD and H2 molecules play important roles in the cooling of primordial and very metal-poor gas at high redshift. Aims: Grain surface and gas phase formation of HD and H2 is investigated to assess the importance of trace amounts of dust, 10^{-5}-10^{-3} Zo, in the production of HD and H2. Methods: We consider carbonaceous and silicate grains and include both physisorption and chemisorption, tunneling, and realistic grain surface barriers. We find, for a collapsing gas cloud environment with coupled chemical and thermal balance, that dust abundances as small as 10^{-5} solar lead to a strong boost in the H2 formation rate due to surface reactions. As a result of this enhancement in H2, HD is formed more efficiently in the gas phase through the D+ +H2 reaction. Direct formation of HD on dust grains cannot compete well with this gas phase process for dust temperatures below 150 K. We also derive up-to-date analytic fitting formulae for the grain surface formation of H2 and HD, including the different ...

Cazaux, S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Formation of Self-Organized Anode Patterns in Arc Discharge Simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pattern formation and self-organization are phenomena commonly observed experimentally in diverse types of plasma systems, including atmospheric-pressure electric arc discharges. However, numerical simulations reproducing anode pattern formation in arc discharges have proven exceedingly elusive. Time-dependent three-dimensional thermodynamic nonequilibrium simulations reveal the spontaneous formation of self-organized patterns of anode attachment spots in the free-burning arc, a canonical thermal plasma flow established by a constant DC current between an axi-symmetric electrodes configuration in the absence of external forcing. The number of spots, their size, and distribution within the pattern depend on the applied total current and on the resolution of the spatial discretization, whereas the main properties of the plasma flow, such as maximum temperatures, velocity, and voltage drop, depend only on the former. The sensibility of the solution to the spatial discretization stresses the computational requirements for comprehensive arc discharge simulations. The obtained anode patterns qualitatively agree with experimental observations and confirm that the spots originate at the fringes of the arc - anode attachment. The results imply that heavy-species - electron energy equilibration, in addition to thermal instability, has a dominant role in the formation of anode spots in arc discharges.

Juan Pablo Trelles

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

455

THE IMPACT OF THERMODYNAMICS ON GRAVITATIONAL COLLAPSE: FILAMENT FORMATION AND MAGNETIC FIELD AMPLIFICATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stars form by the gravitational collapse of interstellar gas. The thermodynamic response of the gas can be characterized by an effective equation of state. It determines how gas heats up or cools as it gets compressed, and hence plays a key role in regulating the process of stellar birth on virtually all scales, ranging from individual star clusters up to the galaxy as a whole. We present a systematic study of the impact of thermodynamics on gravitational collapse in the context of high-redshift star formation, but argue that our findings are also relevant for present-day star formation in molecular clouds. We consider a polytropic equation of state, P = k{rho}{sup {Gamma}}, with both sub-isothermal exponents {Gamma} 1. We find significant differences between these two cases. For {Gamma} > 1, pressure gradients slow down the contraction and lead to the formation of a virialized, turbulent core. Weak magnetic fields are strongly tangled and efficiently amplified via the small-scale turbulent dynamo on timescales corresponding to the eddy-turnover time at the viscous scale. For {Gamma} < 1, on the other hand, pressure support is not sufficient for the formation of such a core. Gravitational contraction proceeds much more rapidly and the flow develops very strong shocks, creating a network of intersecting sheets and extended filaments. The resulting magnetic field lines are very coherent and exhibit a considerable degree of order. Nevertheless, even under these conditions we still find exponential growth of the magnetic energy density in the kinematic regime.

Peters, Thomas; Klessen, Ralf S.; Federrath, Christoph; Smith, Rowan J. [Zentrum fuer Astronomie, Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Universitaet Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Schleicher, Dominik R. G. [Institut fuer Astrophysik, Georg-August-Universitaet, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany); Banerjee, Robi [Hamburger Sternwarte, Gojenbergsweg 112, D-21029 Hamburg (Germany); Sur, Sharanya, E-mail: tpeters@physik.uzh.ch [Raman Research Institute, C. V. Raman Avenue, Sadashivnagar, Bangalore 560080 (India)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Image Formation by Incoherent and Coherent Transition Radiation from Flat and Rough Surfaces  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we derive equations for the image formation of transverse profile of a relativistic beam obtained by means of optical transition radiation (OTR) from flat and rough metal surfaces. The moti