Sample records for multicolor result formats

  1. OpenEI Community - multicolor

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil and GasOff<div/0 en TheResult FormatsAdvisory

  2. Multicolored Electrochromism in Polymers: Structures and Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanner, David B.

    Multicolored Electrochromism in Polymers: Structures and Devices Avni A. Argun, Pierre-Henri Aubert May 12, 2004 A review of electrochromic (EC) polymers and their applications in absorption/transmission, reflective, and patterned electrochromic devices (ECDs) is presented. Fundamental properties of EC materials

  3. Ultrahigh resolution multicolor colocalization of single fluorescent probes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Shimon; Michalet, Xavier; Lacoste, Thilo D.

    2005-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel optical ruler based on ultrahigh-resolution colocalization of single fluorescent probes is described. Two unique families of fluorophores are used, namely energy-transfer fluorescent beads and semiconductor nanocrystal (NC) quantum dots, that can be excited by a single laser wavelength but emit at different wavelengths. A novel multicolor sample-scanning confocal microscope was constructed which allows one to image each fluorescent light emitter, free of chromatic aberrations, by scanning the sample with nanometer scale steps using a piezo-scanner. The resulting spots are accurately localized by fitting them to the known shape of the excitation point-spread-function of the microscope.

  4. Multicolor, High Efficiency, Nanotextured LEDs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung Han; Arto Nurmikko

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on research results in this project which synergize advanced material science approaches with fundamental optical physics concepts pertaining to light-matter interaction, with the goal of solving seminal problems for the development of very high performance light emitting diodes (LEDs) in the blue and green for Solid State Lighting applications. Accomplishments in the duration of the contract period include (i) heteroepitaxy of nitrogen-polar LEDs on sapphire, (ii) heteroepitaxy of semipolar (11{bar 2}2) green LEDs on sapphire, (iii) synthesis of quantum-dot loaded nanoporous GaN that emits white light without phosphor conversion, (iv) demonstration of the highest quality semipolar (11{bar 2}2) GaN on sapphire using orientation-controlled epitaxy, (v) synthesis of nanoscale GaN and InGaN medium, and (vi) development of a novel liftoff process for manufacturing GaN thin-film vertical LEDs. The body of results is presented in this report shows how a solid foundation has been laid, with several noticeable accomplishments, for innovative research, consistent with the stated milestones.

  5. Single-fiber multi-color pyrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Small, IV, Ward; Celliers, Peter

    2004-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is a fiber-based multi-color pyrometry set-up for real-time non-contact temperature and emissivity measurement. The system includes a single optical fiber to collect radiation emitted by a target, a reflective rotating chopper to split the collected radiation into two or more paths while modulating the radiation for lock-in amplification (i.e., phase-sensitive detection), at least two detectors possibly of different spectral bandwidths with or without filters to limit the wavelength regions detected and optics to direct and focus the radiation onto the sensitive areas of the detectors. A computer algorithm is used to calculate the true temperature and emissivity of a target based on blackbody calibrations. The system components are enclosed in a light-tight housing, with provision for the fiber to extend outside to collect the radiation. Radiation emitted by the target is transmitted through the fiber to the reflective chopper, which either allows the radiation to pass straight through or reflects the radiation into one or more separate paths. Each path includes a detector with or without filters and corresponding optics to direct and focus the radiation onto the active area of the detector. The signals are recovered using lock-in amplification. Calibration formulas for the signals obtained using a blackbody of known temperature are used to compute the true temperature and emissivity of the target. The temperature range of the pyrometer system is determined by the spectral characteristics of the optical components.

  6. Single-fiber multi-color pyrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Small, IV, Ward (Livermore, CA); Celliers, Peter (Berkeley, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is a fiber-based multi-color pyrometry set-up for real-time non-contact temperature and emissivity measurement. The system includes a single optical fiber to collect radiation emitted by a target, a reflective rotating chopper to split the collected radiation into two or more paths while modulating the radiation for lock-in amplification (i.e., phase-sensitive detection), at least two detectors possibly of different spectral bandwidths with or without filters to limit the wavelength regions detected and optics to direct and focus the radiation onto the sensitive areas of the detectors. A computer algorithm is used to calculate the true temperature and emissivity of a target based on blackbody calibrations. The system components are enclosed in a light-tight housing, with provision for the fiber to extend outside to collect the radiation. Radiation emitted by the target is transmitted through the fiber to the reflective chopper, which either allows the radiation to pass straight through or reflects the radiation into one or more separate paths. Each path includes a detector with or without filters and corresponding optics to direct and focus the radiation onto the active area of the detector. The signals are recovered using lock-in amplification. Calibration formulas for the signals obtained using a blackbody of known temperature are used to compute the true temperature and emissivity of the target. The temperature range of the pyrometer system is determined by the spectral characteristics of the optical components.

  7. Remote multi-color excitation using femtosecond propagating surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potma, Eric Olaf

    Remote multi-color excitation using femtosecond propagating surface plasmon polaritons in gold away from a micrometer sized focused laser spot. We attribute the observed remote nonlinear signal of unwanted heating effects at the target site and represents an attractive approach for surface

  8. Monolithic multi-color light emission/detection device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wanlass, Mark W. (Golden, CO)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A single-crystal, monolithic, tandem, multi-color optical transceiver device is described, including (a) an InP substrate having upper and lower surfaces, (b) a first junction on the upper surface of the InP substrate, (c) a second junction on the first junction. The first junction is preferably GaInAsP of defined composition, and the second junction is preferably InP. The two junctions are lattice matched. The second junction has a larger energy band gap than the first junction. Additional junctions having successively larger energy band gaps may be included. The device is capable of simultaneous and distinct multi-color emission and detection over a single optical fiber.

  9. Monolithic multi-color light emission/detection device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wanlass, M.W.

    1995-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A single-crystal, monolithic, tandem, multi-color optical transceiver device is described, including (a) an InP substrate having upper and lower surfaces, (b) a first junction on the upper surface of the InP substrate, (c) a second junction on the first junction. The first junction is preferably GaInAsP of defined composition, and the second junction is preferably InP. The two junctions are lattice matched. The second junction has a larger energy band gap than the first junction. Additional junctions having successively larger energy band gaps may be included. The device is capable of simultaneous and distinct multi-color emission and detection over a single optical fiber. 5 figs.

  10. MULTICOLOR OPTICAL MICROVARIABILITY IN S5 0716+714

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carini, M. T.; Walters, R.; Hopper, L., E-mail: mike.carini@wku.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, 1906 College Heights Blvd., Bowling Green, KY 42101 (United States)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results of a study of multicolor optical microvariability in the Blazar S5 0716+714. S5 0716+714 was observed in the B and I bands continuously for five consecutive nights in 2003 March. This is the first study to apply color analysis, structure function, and cross-correlation analysis on an optical data set with the temporal coverage and photometric quality that characterizes this data. The source displayed variability on timescales from days to tens of minutes in both bands. Discrete events in the light curves lead to the determination of a range in the size of the emission regions of R {<=} 1.07 x10{sup 15} cm to R {<=} 9.8 x10{sup 15} cm, adopting {delta} = 20 from Nesci et al. Hysteresis loops were found in plots of the B-band flux (F{sub B}) and the ratio of the B to the I-band flux (F{sub B/I}); these loops were found to be clockwise for dips in the light curves and counterclockwise for bursts. Their directionality and the symmetric nature of the flares are consistent with the flux variations being dominated by the light crossing time of the emission region and not its intrinsic electron cooling or acceleration timescales. The variability between B and I bands is highly correlated with no significant lags between the B and I-band flux variations detected. Significant lags were detected between the flux in the B band (F{sub B}) and the B/I flux ratio (F{sub B/I}). A structure function analysis shows similar slopes in both bands, lying in the range of -1.0 to -2.0, indicating that the observed variability is the result of a fractional noise process, consistent with the variations arising from a turbulent process. A differential I-band calibration for comparison star 4 from the sequence of Villata et al. is also provided.

  11. Temperature measurements using multicolor pyrometry in thermal radiation heating environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Tairan, E-mail: trfu@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China) [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of CO2 Utilization and Reduction Technology, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, Jiangfan; Duan, Minghao; Zong, Anzhou [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)] [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Temperature measurements are important for thermal-structural experiments in the thermal radiation heating environments such as used for thermal-structural stress analyses. This paper describes the use of multicolor pyrometry for the measurements of diffuse surfaces in thermal radiation environments that eliminates the effects of background radiation reflections and unknown emissivities based on a least-squares algorithm. The near-infrared multicolor pyrometer had a spectral range of 1100–2400 nm, spectrum resolution of 6 nm, maximum sampling frequency of 2 kHz, working distance of 0.6 m to infinity, temperature range of 700–1700 K. The pyrometer wavelength response, nonlinear intensity response, and spectral response were all calibrated. The temperature of a graphite sample irradiated by quartz lamps was then measured during heating and cooling using the least-squares algorithm based on the calibrated irradiation data. The experiments show that higher temperatures and longer wavelengths are more suitable for the thermal measurements in the quartz lamp radiation heating system. This analysis provides a valuable method for temperature measurements of diffuse surfaces in thermal radiation environments.

  12. Uncooled infrared photon detector and multicolor infrared detection using microoptomechanical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Datskos, Panagiotis G. (Knoxville, TN); Rajic, Solobodan (Knoxville, TN); Datskou, Irene C. (Knoxville, TN)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods for infrared detection are described. An optomechanical photon detector includes a semiconductor material and is based on measurement of a photoinduced lattice strain. A multicolor infrared sensor includes a stack of frequency specific optomechanical detectors. The stack can include one, or more, of the optomechanical photon detectors that function based on the measurement of photoinduced lattice strain. The systems and methods provide advantages in that rapid, sensitive multicolor infrared imaging can be performed without the need for a cooling subsystem.

  13. Overexpression of Active Aurora-C Kinase Results in Cell Transformation and Tumour Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Overexpression of Active Aurora-C Kinase Results in Cell Transformation and Tumour Formation Jabbar, IFR140, Rennes, France Abstract Aurora kinases belong to a conserved family of serine/threonine kinases key regulators of cell cycle progression. Aurora-A and Aurora-B are expressed in somatic cells

  14. Multicolor Surface Photometry of Lenticulars I. The Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barway, S; Kembhavi, A K; Pandey, S K; Barway, Sudhanshu; Kembhavi, Ajit K.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present in this paper multicolor surface and aperture photometry in the B, V, R and K' bands for a sample of 34 lenticular galaxies from the UGC catalogue. From surface photometric analysis, we obtain radial profiles of surface brightness, colors, ellipticity, position angle and the Fourier coefficients which describe the departure of isophotal shapes from purely elliptical form and find the presence of dust lanes, patches and ring like structure in several galaxies in the sample. We obtain total integrated magnitudes and colors and find that these are in good agreement with the values from the RC3 catalogue. Isophotal colors are correlated with each other, following the sequence expected for early-type galaxies. The color gradients in lenticulars are more negative than the corresponding gradients in ellipticals. There is a good correlation between B-V and B-R color gradients, and the mean gradient in the B-V, B-R and V-K' colors are -0.13+/-0.06, -0.18+/-0.06, -0.25+/-0.11 magnitude per dex in radius resp...

  15. Multicolor Surface Photometry of Lenticulars I. The Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudhanshu Barway; Y. D. Mayya; Ajit K. Kembhavi; S. K. Pandey

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present in this paper multicolor surface and aperture photometry in the B, V, R and K' bands for a sample of 34 lenticular galaxies from the UGC catalogue. From surface photometric analysis, we obtain radial profiles of surface brightness, colors, ellipticity, position angle and the Fourier coefficients which describe the departure of isophotal shapes from purely elliptical form and find the presence of dust lanes, patches and ring like structure in several galaxies in the sample. We obtain total integrated magnitudes and colors and find that these are in good agreement with the values from the RC3 catalogue. Isophotal colors are correlated with each other, following the sequence expected for early-type galaxies. The color gradients in lenticulars are more negative than the corresponding gradients in ellipticals. There is a good correlation between B-V and B-R color gradients, and the mean gradient in the B-V, B-R and V-K' colors are -0.13+/-0.06, -0.18+/-0.06, -0.25+/-0.11 magnitude per dex in radius respectively.

  16. ESO Imaging Survey IV. Exploring the EIS Multicolor Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Zaggia; I. Hook; R. Mendez; L. da Costa; L. F. Olsen; M. Nonino; A. Wicenec; C. Benoist; E. Bertin; E. Deul; T. Erben; M. D. Guarnieri; R. Hook; I. Prandoni; M. Scodeggio; R. Slijkhuis; R. Wichmann

    1998-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents preliminary lists of potentially interesting point-like sources extracted from multicolor data obtained for a 1.7 square degree region near the South Galactic Pole. The region has been covered by the ESO Imaging Survey (EIS) in B, V,I, and offers a unique combination of area and depth.These lists, containing a total of 330 objects nearly all brighter than I~21.5, over 1.27 square degrees (after removing some bad regions), are by-products of the process of verification and quality control of the object catalogs being produced. Among the color selected targets are candidate very low mass stars/brown dwarfs (54), white-dwarfs (32), and quasars (244). In addition, a probable fast moving asteroid was identified. The objects presented here are natural candidates for follow-up spectroscopic observations and illustrate the usefulness of the EIS data for a broad range of science and for providing possible samples for the first year of the VLT.

  17. Rollable multicolor display using electrically induced blueshift of a cholesteric reactive mesogen mixture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    Rollable multicolor display using electrically induced blueshift of a cholesteric reactive mesogen September 2006 Electrically controllable blueshift of the reflection band in a planar cholesteric reactive mesogen cell is observed. The responsible mechanism is electric-field-induced Helfrich deformation J. Chem

  18. 4.1: Rollable Reflective Multicolor Cholesteric Displays Haiqing Xianyu, Tsung-Hsien Lin, and Shin-Tson Wu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    reactive mesogen and none reactive cholesteric liquid crystal is observed. The electrically undulated display application. Blue Shift in Cholesteric Reactive Mesogen The electrically controllable blue shift: A rollable reflective multicolor display using an electrically tunable blue shift of both cholesteric

  19. Nepheline Formation Study for Sludge Batch 4 (SB4): Phase 1 Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peeler, D. K.; Edwards, T. B.; Reamer, I.A.; Workman, R. J.

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Although it is well known that the addition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to borosilicate glasses enhances the durability of the waste form (through creation of network-forming tetrahedral Na+-[AlO{sub 4/2}]{sup -} pairs), the combination of high Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Na{sub 2}O can lead to the formation of nepheline (NaAlSiO{sub 4})--which can negatively impact durability. Given the projected high concentration of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in SB4 (Lilliston 2005) and the potential use of a high Na{sub 2}O based frit to improve melt rate and a high Na{sub 2}O sludge due to settling problems, the potential formation of nepheline in various SB4 systems continues to be assessed. Twelve SB4-based glasses were fabricated and their durabilities (via the Product Consistency Test [PCT]) measured to assess the potential for nepheline formation and its potential negative impact on durability. In terms of ''acceptability'', the results indicate that all of the study glasses produced are acceptable with respect to durability as defined by the PCT (normalized boron release values for all nepheline (NEPH) glasses were much lower than that of the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass (16.695 g/L)). The most durable glass is NEPH-04 (quenched) with a normalized boron release (NL [B]) of 0.61 g/L, while the least durable glass is NEPH-01 centerline canister cooled (ccc) with an NL [B] of 2.47 g/L (based on the measured composition). In terms of predictability, most of the study glasses are predictable by the {Delta}G{sub p} model. Those that are not predictable (i.e., they fall outside of the prediction limits) actually fall below the prediction interval (i.e., they are over predicted by the model) suggesting the model is conservative. The Phase 1 PCT results suggest that for those glasses prone to nepheline formation (using the 0.62 value developed by Li et al. (2003) as a guide), a statistically significant difference in PCT response was observed for the two heat treatments but the impact on durability was of little or no practical concern. When one couples the PCT responses with the X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) results and/or visual observations, one could conclude that the formation of nepheline in these glasses does have a negative impact on durability. However, that impact may be of statistical significance, but the practical impact may not be sufficient to avoid a specific candidate frit for the SB4 glass system. The results of this study not only suggest that the 0.62 value appears to be a reasonable guide to monitor sludge--frit systems with respect to potential nepheline formation, but also that the impact of nepheline, although statistically significant, has little or no practical impact in the SB4 system to durability as measured by the PCT. This latter statement must be qualified to some extent given only two glasses were selected which were actually ''prone to nepheline formation'' based on this general guide and the relatively volume % of nepheline formed based on XRD results ({approx} 0.5 vol%). If the presence of nepheline has no appreciable, adverse impact on durability for the recently revised SB4 systems, then as decisions regarding the viability of the SB4 options and the down select of candidate frits are pursued, little weight will be given to minimizing the likelihood of nepheline and the decisions will be dominated by waste throughput criteria. That is, the frit selection process will not have to consider the impact of nepheline on the ultimate durability of the product and can focus on recommending a frit that when coupled with the sludge can be processed over a waste loading (WL) interval of interest to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) with melt rates meeting production expectations.

  20. Star Formation along the Hubble sequence: results from a new Halpha Galaxy Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neville S. Shane; Phil A. James

    2001-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We are conducting a large survey of star formation within ~400 nearby spiral and irregular galaxies through imaging of the Halpha emission. We present here some of our first results from 104 of the galaxies in our sample, investigating the variation of SFR and Halpha EWs along the Hubble sequence for these galaxies. We find a strong dependence of SFR on Hubble type, peaking for Sbc galaxies, but with large dispersions within each type. There is a possible dependence of SFR on bar presence, but none on group membership. There is an increase in EWs for later Hubble types, but with large dispersions within each type. We find no dependence of EW on bar presence, group membership or on absolute magnitude.

  1. Experimental results of water film formation on various fuel forms from a fire suppression system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, R.H.; Davis, J.R.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the study was to determine the thickness and coverage of water film formations on various materials during fire sprinkler deluge. An exhaustive literature search revealed that no applicable research data exists that governs water film formations from fire protection systems. Therefore, a controlled, infield, mockup was created to predict the thickness and coverage of water film on fissile material forms. This paper discusses the background, experimental procedure and the characterization of these water films.

  2. Stimulation results in the low-permeability Wasatch formation - An evolution to foam fracturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, P.C.; Bailey, D.E.; Evertz, G.L.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wasatch Formation of the Uinta Basin in eastern Utah is typical of many formations in the Rocky Mountains, having low permeability and high sensitivity to water. Stimulation treatments with several types of fracturing fluids, including oilwater emulsion fluids, complex gel fluids and foam fluids, have been generally successful. Production decline curves from twenty four wells in the field were used for comparison of the different stimulation methods. Although foam fracturing has been used for the shortest period of time, comparison of the production histories show the relatively higher efficiency of the foam fracturing treatments compared to other stimulation methods in the Wasatch formation. Foam fluids gave higher production rates and higher flowing pressures than offset wells fractured with complex gel fluids. A stimulation model for oil and gas production was used to match the production history from this reservoir. The model allowed a projection of gas production based on early production from the wells and knowledge of the reservoir.

  3. Experimental results of water film formation on various fuel forms from a fire suppression system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, R.H.; Davis, J.R.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the study was to determine the thickness and coverage of water film formations on various materials during fire sprinkler deluge. The primary criticality safety concern with automatic fire suppression systems is the increased amount of water that a film adds to the interstitial volume of an array per unit time. An exhaustive literature search revealed that no applicable research data exist that govern water film formations from fire protection systems. Therefore, a controlled, infield, mockup was created to predict the thickness and coverage of water film on fissile material forms. This paper discusses the background, experimental procedure, and the characterization of these water films.

  4. The Conditions for Star Formation at Low Metallicity: Results from the LMC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. G. Elmegreen; J. Palous; J. M. Oliveira; J. Th Van Loon; Stanimirovi? S

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract. We present our recent work on the conditions under which star formation occurs in a metal-poor environment, the Large Magellanic Cloud ([Fe/H] ? ?0.4). Water masers are used as beacons of the current star formation in Hii regions. Comparing their location with the dust morphology imaged with the Spitzer Space Telescope, and additional H? imaging and groundbased near-infrared observations, we conclude that the LMC environment seems favourable to sequential star formation triggered by massive star feedback (Oliveira et al. 2006). Good examples of this are 30 Doradus and N 113. There are also Hii regions, such as N 105A, where feedback may not be responsible for the current star formation although the nature of one young stellar object (YSO) suggests that feedback may soon start making an impact. The chemistry in one YSO hints at a stronger influence from irradiation effects in a metal-poor environment where shielding by dust is suppressed (van Loon 2005).

  5. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of human blastocysts andcytotrophoblasts by multi-color FISH and Spectra Imaging analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weier, Jingly F.; Ferlatte, Christy; Baumgartner, Adolf; Jung,Christine J.; Nguyen, Ha-Nam; Chu, Lisa W.; Pedersen, Roger A.; Fisher,Susan J.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2006-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical chromosome aberrations in gametes typically lead to failed fertilization, spontaneous abortion or a chromosomally abnormal fetus. By means of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), we now can screen human embryos in vitro for aneuploidy before transferring the embryos to the uterus. PGD allows us to select unaffected embryos for transfer and increases the implantation rate in in vitro fertilization programs. Molecular cytogenetic analyses using multi-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of blastomeres have become the major tool for preimplantation genetic screening of aneuploidy. However, current FISH technology can test for only a small number of chromosome abnormalities and hitherto failed to increase the pregnancy rates as expected. We are in the process of developing technologies to score all 24 chromosomes in single cells within a 3 day time limit, which we believe is vital to the clinical setting. Also, human placental cytotrophoblasts (CTBs) at the fetal-maternal interface acquire aneuploidies as they differentiate to an invasive phenotype. About 20-50% of invasive CTB cells from uncomplicated pregnancies were found aneuploidy, suggesting that the acquisition of aneuploidy is an important component of normal placentation, perhaps limiting the proliferative and invasive potential of CTBs. Since most invasive CTBs are interphase cells and possess extreme heterogeneity, we applied multi-color FISH and repeated hybridizations to investigate individual CTBs. In summary, this study demonstrates the strength of Spectral Imaging analysis and repeated hybridizations, which provides a basis for full karyotype analysis of single interphase cells.

  6. NEPHELINE FORMATION STUDY FOR SLUDGE BATCH 4: PHASE 3 EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Phase 3 study was undertaken to complement the previous phases of the nepheline formation studies1, 2 by continuing the investigation into the ability of the nepheline discriminator to predict the occurrence of nepheline crystallization in Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) glasses and into the impact of such phases on the durability of the SB4 glasses. The Phase 3 study had two primary objectives. The first was to continue to demonstrate the ability of the discriminator value to adequately predict the nepheline formation potential for specific glass systems of interest. The second was to generate additional data that have a high probability of supporting the SB4 variability study. To support these two objectives, sixteen glasses were selected based on the most recent SB4 compositional projection, Case 15C Blend 1.3 Four different frits were included, based on previous assessments of projected operating windows and melt rate,4, 5 with four WLs selected for each frit. Eight of these frit-sludge combinations covered WLs which tightly bound the nepheline discriminator value of 0.62, with the intent of refining this value to a level of confidence where it can be incorporated into offline administrative controls and/or the Process Composition Control System (PCCS) to support Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) acceptability decisions. The remaining eight frit-sludge combinations targeted lower WLs (35 and 40%) and were prepared and analyzed to contribute needed data to the ComPro database6 to support a potential variability study for SB4.

  7. New Result Formats on OpenEI | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpen EnergyNelsoniX LtdNew Energy OpportunitiesNew Result

  8. Biogeochemical Processes in a Clay Formation In-situ Experiment: Part B Results from overcoring and evidence of strong buffering by the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2 Biogeochemical Processes in a Clay Formation In-situ Experiment: Part B ­ Results from overcoring in the Opalinus Clay formation was carried out at the Mont Terri underground rock laboratory (Jura Mountains/precipitation reactions. After five years, the 4.5 m long vertical test interval was overcored and Opalinus clay samples

  9. A Precise Distance Indicator: Type Ia Supernova Multicolor Light Curve Shapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam Riess; William Press; Robert Kirshner

    1996-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an empirical method that uses multicolor light curve shapes (MLCS) to estimate the luminosity, distance, and total line-of-sight extinction of Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia). The empirical correlation between the MLCS and the luminosity is derived from a ``training set'' of nine SN Ia light curves with independent distance and reddening estimates. We find that intrinsically dim SN Ia are redder and have faster light curves than the bright ones which are slow and blue. By thirty-five days after maximum the intrinsic color variations become negligable. A formal treatment of extinction employing Bayes' theorem is used to estimate the best value and its uncertainty. Applying MLCS to both light curves and to color curves provides enough information to determine which supernovae are dim because they are distant, which are intrinsically dim, and which are dim because of extinction by dust. The precision of the MLCS distances is examined by constructing a Hubble diagram with an independent set of twenty SN Ia's. The dispersion of 0.12 mag indicates a typical distance accuracy of 5 % for a single object, and the intercept yields a Hubble constant on the Cepheid distance scale (Sandage et al 1994, 1996) of H_0=65 \\pm 3 (statistical) km/s/Mpc ( \\pm 6 total error). The slope of 0.2010 pm 0.0035 mag over the distance interval 32.2 < mu < 38.3 yields the most precise confirmation of the linearity of the Hubble law.

  10. Establishing Dual Electrogenerated Chemiluminescence and Multi-Color Electrochromism in Functional Ionic Transition Metal Complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puodziukynaite, Egle; Oberst, Justin L.; Dyer, Aubrey L.; Reynolds, John R.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combination of electrochromism and electroluminescence in functional materials could lead to single-layer dual electrochromic/electroluminescent (EC/EL) display devices, capable of simultaneous operation in emissive and reflective modes. Whereas such next generation displays could provide optimal visibility in any ambient lighting situation, materials available that exhibit such characteristics in the active layer are limited due to the required intrinsic multifunctionality (i.e., redox activity, electroluminescence, electrochromism, and ion conductivity) and to date can only be achieved via the rational design of ionic transition-metal complexes. Reported herein is the synthesis and characterization of a new family of acrylate-containing ruthenium (tris)bipyridine-based coordination complexes with multifunctional characteristics. Potential use of the presented compounds in EC/EL devices is established, as they are applied as cross-linked electrochromic films and electrochemiluminescent layers in light-emitting electrochemical cell devices. Electrochromic switching of the polymeric networks between yellow, orange, green, brown and transmissive states is demonstrated, and electrochemiluminescent devices based on the complexes synthesized show red-orange to deep red emission with ?{sub max} ranging from 680 to 722 nm and luminance up to 135 cd/m{sup 2}. Additionally, a dual EC/EL device prototype is presented where light emission and multicolor electrochromism occur from the same pixel comprised of a single active layer, demonstrating a true combination of these properties in ionic transition-metal complexes.

  11. Multicolor Infrared Observations of SN 2006aj, the Supernova Associated with XRF 060218 - Paper I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kocevski, D; Bloom, J S; Foley, R; Starr, D; Blake, C H; Wood-Vasey, M; Falco, E E; Butler, N R; Skrutskie, M F; Szentgyorgyi, A; Kocevski, Daniel; Modjaz, Maryam; Bloom, Joshua S.; Foley, Ryan; Starr, Daniel; Blake, Cullen H.; Wood-Vasey, Michael; Falco, Emilio E.; Butler, Nathaniel R.; Skrutskie, Mike; Szentgyorgyi, Andrew

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report simultaneous multicolor near-infrared (NIR) observations of the supernova associated with x-ray Flash 060218 during the first 16 days after the high energy event. We find that the light curve rises and peaks relatively fast compared to other SN Ic, with the characteristic broad NIR peak seen in all three bands. We find that the rise profile before the peak is largely independent of NIR wavelength, each band appearing to transition into a plateau phase around day 10--13. Since the light curve is in the plateau phase when our observations end at day 16, we can only place limits on the peak absolute magnitudes, but we estimate that SN 2006aj is one of the lowest NIR luminosity XRF/GRB associated SNe observed to date. The broad peaks observed in the {\\em JHK$_s$} bands point to a large increase in the NIR contribution of the total flux output from days 10--16. This evolution can be seen in the broad color and SED diagrams constructed using {\\em UBVRIJHK$_s$} monochromatic flux measurements for the first...

  12. MoO3 as combined hole injection layer and tapered spacer in combinatorial multicolor microcavity organic light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, R.; Xu, Chun; Biswas, Rana; Shinar, Joseph; Shinar, Ruth

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multicolor microcavity ({mu}C) organic light-emitting diode (OLED) arrays were fabricated simply by controlling the hole injection and spacer MoO{sub 3} layer thickness. The normal emission was tunable from {approx}490 to 640 nm and can be further expanded. A compact, integrated spectrometer with two-dimensional combinatorial arrays of {mu}C OLEDs was realized. The MoO{sub 3} yields more efficient and stable devices, revealing a new breakdown mechanism. The pixel current density reaches {approx}4 A/cm{sup 2} and a maximal normal brightness {approx}140 000 Cd/m{sup 2}, which improves photoluminescence-based sensing and absorption measurements.

  13. Supernova Explosions of Super-Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars: Multicolor Light Curves of Electron-Capture Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tominaga, Nozomu; Nomoto, Ken'ichi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electron-capture supernova (ECSN) is a core-collapse supernova explosion of a super-asymptotic giant branch (SAGB) star with a main-sequence mass $M_{\\rm ms}\\sim7-9.5M_\\odot$. The explosion takes place in accordance with core bounce and subsequent neutrino heating and is a unique example successfully produced by first-principle simulation. This allows us to derive a first self-consistent multicolor light curves of a core-collapse supernova. Adopting the explosion properties derived by the first-principle simulation, i.e., the low explosion energy of $1.5\\times10^{50}$ erg and the small $^{56}$Ni mass of $2.5\\times10^{-3}M_\\odot$, we perform a multigroup radiation hydrodynamics calculation of ECSNe and present multicolor light curves of ECSNe of SAGB stars with various envelope mass and hydrogen abundance. We demonstrate that a shock breakout has peak luminosity of $L\\sim2\\times10^{44}$ erg/s and can evaporate circumstellar dust up to $R\\sim10^{17}$ cm for a case of carbon dust, that plateau luminosity and ...

  14. Formation of gas-phase peroxides in a rural atmosphere: An interpretation of the recent SOS/SERON field results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.H.; Tang, I.N. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Weinstein-Lloyd, J.B. [State Univ. of New York, Old Westbury, NY (United States). Chemistry/Physics Dept.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen perioxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and certain organic peroxides such as hydroxymethyl-hydroperoxide (HMHP), are gas-phase oxidants present in the atmosphere at ppbv concentration levels. These oxidants play an important role in atmospheric chemistry. In addition, precipitation containing H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is toxic to trees, and it has also been suggested that organic peroxides formed presumably by ozone reactions with biogenic alkenes are responsible for leaf disorders. Recently, we have developed a nonenzymatic method or aqueous-phase H{sub 2}O{sub 2} measurement, using Fenton reagent and fluorescent hydroxy- benzoic acid. The new method, in conjunction with the well-known method of p-hydroxyphenylacetic acid and horseradish peroxidase for total peroxides, and together with an improved gas scrubber to mitigate sampling line problems, has been successfully deployed in recent SOS/SERON field measurements in rural Georgia. For the first time, continuously measured and speciated gas-phase peroxide data have become available, making it possible to examine some aspects of the ozone chemistry leading to the formation of these oxidants. It is observed that daily H{sub 2}O{sub 2} maximum frequently occurs at a different time than does HMHP, and that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration, but not HMHP, tends to correlate with solar fluxes measured at the same location. These findings seem to indicate that the formation mechanisms for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and organic peroxides are basically different. It is likely that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is formed from radical-radical recombination, while HMHP is formed by ozone-alkene reactions. Since the gas-phase ozone-alkene reactions are usually too slow to account for the diurnal concentration variations observed for HMHP, heterogeneous processes involving ozone and alkenes are also a possibility.

  15. SUPERNOVA EXPLOSIONS OF SUPER-ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS: MULTICOLOR LIGHT CURVES OF ELECTRON-CAPTURE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tominaga, Nozomu [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Konan University, 8-9-1 Okamoto, Kobe, Hyogo 658-8501 (Japan); Blinnikov, Sergei I. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP), Moscow 117218 (Russian Federation); Nomoto, Ken'ichi, E-mail: tominaga@konan-u.ac.jp, E-mail: Sergei.Blinnikov@itep.ru, E-mail: nomoto@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electron-capture supernova (ECSN) is a core-collapse supernova (CCSN) explosion of a super-asymptotic giant branch (SAGB) star with a main-sequence mass M{sub MS} {approx} 7-9.5 M{sub Sun }. The explosion takes place in accordance with core bounce and subsequent neutrino heating and is a unique example successfully produced by first-principle simulations. This allows us to derive a first self-consistent multicolor light curve of a CCSN. Adopting the explosion properties derived by the first-principle simulation, i.e., the low explosion energy of 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 50} erg and the small {sup 56}Ni mass of 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} M{sub Sun }, we perform a multi-group radiation hydrodynamics calculation of ECSNe and present multicolor light curves of ECSNe of SAGB stars with various envelope masses and hydrogen abundances. We demonstrate that a shock breakout has a peak luminosity of L {approx} 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1} and can evaporate circumstellar dust up to R {approx} 10{sup 17} cm for the case of carbon dust, that the plateau luminosity and plateau duration of ECSNe are L {approx} 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1} and t {approx} 60-100 days, respectively, and that a plateau is followed by a tail with a luminosity drop by {approx}4 mag. The ECSN shows a bright and short plateau that is as bright as typical Type II plateau supernovae, and a faint tail that might be influenced by the spin-down luminosity of a newborn pulsar. Furthermore, the theoretical models are compared with ECSN candidates: SN 1054 and SN 2008S. We find that SN 1054 shares the characteristics of the ECSNe. For SN 2008S, we find that its faint plateau requires an ECSN model with a significantly low explosion energy of E {approx} 10{sup 48} erg.

  16. The Recent Cluster Formation Histories of NGC 5253 and NGC 3077: Environmental Impact on Star Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Harris; D. Calzetti; J. S. Gallagher III; D. A. Smith; C. J. Conselice

    2003-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present multicolor photometry of bright star cluster candidates in the nearby starburst galaxies NGC 3077 and NGC 5253, observed with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 in both broadband (F300W, F547M and F814W) and narrowband (F487N and F656N) filters. By comparing the photometry with theoretical population synthesis models, we estimate the age and mass of each star cluster, which provides constraints on the recent star formation histories of the host galaxies. We compare the star cluster populations in these dwarf starburst galaxies to those of the nuclear starburst in the barred spiral M 83, and discuss implications for our understanding of the nature and evolution of starburst events.

  17. The Recent Cluster Formation Histories of NGC 5253 and NGC 3077: Environmental Impact on Star Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, J; Smith, D A; Conselice, C J

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present multicolor photometry of bright star cluster candidates in the nearby starburst galaxies NGC 3077 and NGC 5253, observed with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 in both broadband (F300W, F547M and F814W) and narrowband (F487N and F656N) filters. By comparing the photometry with theoretical population synthesis models, we estimate the age and mass of each star cluster, which provides constraints on the recent star formation histories of the host galaxies. We compare the star cluster populations in these dwarf starburst galaxies to those of the nuclear starburst in the barred spiral M 83, and discuss implications for our understanding of the nature and evolution of starburst events.

  18. Luminosity Functions And Evolution Of Blue Galaxies In A Deep Multicolor CCD Field Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles T. Liu; Richard F. Green; Patrick B. Hall; Patrick S. Osmer

    1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A complete sample of 659 field galaxies with 17.0$Green 1998). Total number counts of the galaxies in the U-band give a count slope d(logN)/dM = 0.55 $\\pm$ 0.05, consistent with previous studies. The 545 galaxies in the sample classified as spectral type Sbc or bluer are analyzed for signs of evolution with redshift, and for unusual star formation histories. The U-band luminosity function of these blue galaxies at 0.02$energy distributions indicating strong starburst activity, is observed at z$\\gtrsim$0.3 but not at z$<$0.3. This population is confirmed via spectroscopy of part of the sample. These may be galaxies temporarily brightened by global starbursts, which subsequently fade and redden at lower redshifts.

  19. MULTI-COLOR OPTICAL AND NEAR-INFRARED LIGHT CURVES OF 64 STRIPPED-ENVELOPE CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bianco, F. B.; Modjaz, M. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Hicken, M.; Friedman, A.; Kirshner, R. P.; Challis, P.; Marion, G. H. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bloom, J. S. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Wood-Vasey, W. M. [PITT PACC, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 3941 O'Hara Street, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Rest, A., E-mail: fb55@nyu.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a densely sampled, homogeneous set of light curves of 64 low-redshift (z ? 0.05) stripped-envelope supernovae (SNe of Type IIb, Ib, Ic, and Ic-BL). These data were obtained between 2001 and 2009 at the Fred L. Whipple Observatory (FLWO) on Mount Hopkins in Arizona, with the optical FLWO 1.2 m and the near-infrared (NIR) Peters Automated Infrared 1.3 m telescopes. Our data set consists of 4543 optical photometric measurements on 61 SNe, including a combination of U BV RI, U BV r{sup ?}i{sup ?}, and u{sup ?} BV r{sup ?}i{sup ?}, and 1919 JHK{sub s} NIR measurements on 25 SNe. This sample constitutes the most extensive multi-color data set of stripped-envelope SNe to date. Our photometry is based on template-subtracted images to eliminate any potential host-galaxy light contamination. This work presents these photometric data, compares them with data in the literature, and estimates basic statistical quantities: date of maximum, color, and photometric properties. We identify promising color trends that may permit the identification of stripped-envelope SN subtypes from their photometry alone. Many of these SNe were observed spectroscopically by the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) SN group, and the spectra are presented in a companion paper. A thorough exploration that combines the CfA photometry and spectroscopy of stripped-envelope core-collapse SNe will be presented in a follow-up paper.

  20. The VMC Survey - XIV. First results on the look-back time star-formation rate tomography of the Small Magellanic Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubele, Stefano; Kerber, Leandro; Cioni, Maria-Rosa L; Piatti, Andres E; Zaggia, Simone; Bekki, Kenji; Bressan, Alessandro; Clementini, Gisella; de Grijs, Richard; Emerson, Jim P; Groenewegen, Martin A T; Ivanov, Valentin D; Marconi, Marcella; Marigo, Paola; Moretti, Maria-Ida; Ripepi, Vincenzo; Subramanian, Smitha; Tatton, Benjamin L; van Loon, Jacco Th

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyse deep images from the VISTA survey of the Magellanic Clouds in the YJKs filters, covering 14 sqrdeg (10 tiles), split into 120 subregions, and comprising the main body and Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). We apply a colour--magnitude diagram reconstruction method that returns their best-fitting star formation rate SFR(t), age-metallicity relation (AMR), distance and mean reddening, together with 68% confidence intervals. The distance data can be approximated by a plane tilted in the East-West direction with a mean inclination of 39 deg, although deviations of up to 3 kpc suggest a distorted and warped disk. After assigning to every observed star a probability of belonging to a given age-metallicity interval, we build high-resolution population maps. These dramatically reveal the flocculent nature of the young star-forming regions and the nearly smooth features traced by older stellar generations. They document the formation of the SMC Wing at ages <0.2 Gyr and the peak of star formation ...

  1. Distinguishing triplet energy transfer and trap-assisted recombination in multi-color organic light-emitting diode with an ultrathin phosphorescent emissive layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xue, Qin, E-mail: xueqin19851202@163.com; Liu, Shouyin [Department of Physical Science and Technology, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Xie, Guohua; Chen, Ping; Zhao, Yi; Liu, Shiyong [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrathin layer of deep-red phosphorescent emitter tris(1-phenylisoquinoline) iridium (III) (Ir(piq){sub 3}) is inserted within different positions of the electron blocking layer fac-tris (1-phenylpyrazolato-N,C{sup 2?})-iridium(III) (Ir(ppz){sub 3}) to distinguish the contribution of the emission from the triplet exciton energy transfer/diffusion from the adjacent blue phosphorescent emitter and the trap-assisted recombination from the narrow band-gap emitter itself. The charge trapping effect of the narrow band-gap deep-red emitter which forms a quantum-well-like structure also plays a role in shaping the electroluminescent characteristics of multi-color organic light-emitting diodes. By accurately controlling the position of the ultrathin sensing layer, it is considerably easy to balance the white emission which is quite challenging for full-color devices with multiple emission zones. There is nearly no energy transfer detectable if 7 nm thick Ir(ppz){sub 3} is inserted between the blue phosphorescent emitter and the ultrathin red emitter.

  2. HIERARCHICAL STRUCTURE FORMATION AND MODES OF STAR FORMATION IN HICKSON COMPACT GROUP 31

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallagher, S. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Durrell, P. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Youngstown State University, Youngstown, OH 44555 (United States); Elmegreen, D. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, NY 12604 (United States); Chandar, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606-3390 (United States); English, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MN R3T 2N2 (Canada); Charlton, J. C.; Gronwall, C.; Young, J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Tzanavaris, P.; Hornschemeier, A. E. [Laboratory for X-ray Astrophysics, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Johnson, K. E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Mendes de Oliveira, C. [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica, e Ciencias Atmosfericas da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Whitmore, B.; Maybhate, Aparna [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218-2463 (United States); Zabludoff, Ann [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)], E-mail: sgalla4@uwo.ca

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The handful of low-mass, late-type galaxies that comprise Hickson Compact Group 31 (HCG 31) is in the midst of complex, ongoing gravitational interactions, evocative of the process of hierarchical structure formation at higher redshifts. With sensitive, multicolor Hubble Space Telescope imaging, we characterize the large population of < 10 Myr old star clusters (SCs) that suffuse the system. From the colors and luminosities of the young SCs, we find that the galaxies in HCG 31 follow the same universal scaling relations as actively star-forming galaxies in the local universe despite the unusual compact group environment. Furthermore, the specific frequency of the globular cluster system is consistent with the low end of galaxies of comparable masses locally. This, combined with the large mass of neutral hydrogen and tight constraints on the amount of intragroup light, indicate that the group is undergoing its first epoch of interaction-induced star formation. In both the main galaxies and the tidal-dwarf candidate, F, stellar complexes, which are sensitive to the magnitude of disk turbulence, have both sizes and masses more characteristic of z = 1-2 galaxies. After subtracting the light from compact sources, we find no evidence for an underlying old stellar population in F-it appears to be a truly new structure. The low-velocity dispersion of the system components, available reservoir of H I, and current star formation rate of {approx}10 M {sub sun} yr{sup -1} indicate that HCG 31 is likely to both exhaust its cold gas supply and merge within {approx}1 Gyr. We conclude that the end product will be an isolated, X-ray-faint, low-mass elliptical.

  3. result formats | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind Home Rmckeel'slinkedpolicy

  4. Help:FormattingResults | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORTEnergyFarms AHefei Sungrow Power SupplyProvidingsearchesHelp

  5. OpenEI Community - result formats

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil and GasOff<div/0

  6. Mixed-mode diesel HCCI with External Mixture Formation: Preliminary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mixed-mode diesel HCCI with External Mixture Formation: Preliminary Results Mixed-mode diesel HCCI with External Mixture Formation: Preliminary Results 2003 DEER Conference...

  7. Alternate Thesis & Dissertation Formats Manuscript Format Guidelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayfield, John

    Alternate Thesis & Dissertation Formats Manuscript Format Guidelines In addition to the standard format for dissertation/thesis, the Graduate School allows for the use of an alternative format. The manuscript format refers to the use of articles and/or book chapters to replace the standard dissertation

  8. multicolor | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind Home Rmckeel'slinked open datameetingsmockups

  9. Method of fracturing a geological formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, James O. (2679-B Walnut, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method of fracturing a geological formation surrounding a well bore is disclosed. A relatively small explosive charge is emplaced in a well bore and the bore is subsequently hydraulically pressurized to a pressure less than the formation breakdown pressure and preferably greater than the fracture propagation pressure of the formation. The charge is denoted while the bore is so pressurized, resulting in the formation of multiple fractures in the surrounding formation with little or no accompanying formation damage. Subsequent hydraulic pressurization can be used to propagate and extend the fractures in a conventional manner. The method is useful for stimulating production of oil, gas and possibly water from suitable geologic formations.

  10. Star Formation and Galaxy Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. K. C. Yee

    2000-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The dependence of star formation rate on galaxian environment is a key issue in the understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. However, the study of this subject is complex and observationally challenging. This paper reviews some of the current results, drawing mostly from recent large redshift surveys such the LCRS, the MORPH collaboration, and the CNOC1 and CNOC2 redshift surveys.

  11. Isolating Triggered Star Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barton, Elizabeth J.; Arnold, Jacob A.; /UC, Irvine; Zentner, Andrew R.; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U., EFI; Bullock, James S.; /UC, Irvine; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo

    2007-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Galaxy pairs provide a potentially powerful means of studying triggered star formation from galaxy interactions. We use a large cosmological N-body simulation coupled with a well-tested semi-analytic substructure model to demonstrate that the majority of galaxies in close pairs reside within cluster or group-size halos and therefore represent a biased population, poorly suited for direct comparison to 'field' galaxies. Thus, the frequent observation that some types of galaxies in pairs have redder colors than 'field' galaxies is primarily a selection effect. We use our simulations to devise a means to select galaxy pairs that are isolated in their dark matter halos with respect to other massive subhalos (N= 2 halos) and to select a control sample of isolated galaxies (N= 1 halos) for comparison. We then apply these selection criteria to a volume-limited subset of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey with M{sub B,j} {le} -19 and obtain the first clean measure of the typical fraction of galaxies affected by triggered star formation and the average elevation in the star formation rate. We find that 24% (30.5 %) of these L* and sub-L* galaxies in isolated 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc pairs exhibit star formation that is boosted by a factor of {approx}> 5 above their average past value, while only 10% of isolated galaxies in the control sample show this level of enhancement. Thus, 14% (20 %) of the galaxies in these close pairs show clear triggered star formation. Our orbit models suggest that 12% (16%) of 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc close pairs that are isolated according to our definition have had a close ({le} 30 h{sup -1} kpc) pass within the last Gyr. Thus, the data are broadly consistent with a scenario in which most or all close passes of isolated pairs result in triggered star formation. The isolation criteria we develop provide a means to constrain star formation and feedback prescriptions in hydrodynamic simulations and a very general method of understanding the importance of triggered star formation in a cosmological context.

  12. (Non) formation of methanol by direct hydrogenation of formate...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Non) formation of methanol by direct hydrogenation of formate on copper catalysts. (Non) formation of methanol by direct hydrogenation of formate on copper catalysts. Abstract: We...

  13. ABSTRACT & DISSERTATION FORMAT GUIDELINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Yi

    2 ABSTRACT & DISSERTATION FORMAT GUIDELINES The Knowledge Navigation Center (second floor these guidelines. The most up-to-date version of the Abstract and Dissertation Format Guidelines is available;2 Abstract Format Guidelines ABSTRACT Title of the Dissertation by by Student's Name Chair: Chair's name Text

  14. First Structure Formation and the First Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael L. Norman; Tom Abel; Greg Bryan

    2000-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the results of recent 3D simulations of first structure formation in relationship to the formation of the first stars. On the basis of a new, high-resolution AMR simulation (spatial dynamic range = 30,000,000), we conclude that the first stars are likely to be massive.

  15. Heating tar sands formations to visbreaking temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Colmenares, Tulio Rafael (Houston, TX); Zhang, Etuan (Houston, TX); Marino, Marian (Houston, TX); Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Ryan, Robert Charles (Houston, TX); Beer, Gary Lee (Houston, TX); Dombrowski, Robert James (Houston, TX); Jaiswal, Namit (Houston, TX)

    2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat may be controlled so that at least a majority of the section reaches an average temperature of between 200.degree. C. and 240.degree. C., which results in visbreaking of at least some hydrocarbons in the section. At least some visbroken hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  16. Multi-color Near Infra-red Intra-day and Short Term Variability of the Blazar S5 0716+714

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alok C. Gupta; Sang-Mok Cha; Sungho Lee; Ho Jin; Soojong Pak; Seoung-hyun Cho; Bongkon Moon; Youngsik Park; In-Soo Yuk; Uk-won Nam; Jaemann Kyeong

    2008-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we report results of our near-infrared (NIR) photometric variability studies of the BL Lacertae object S5 0716+714. NIR photometric observations spread over 7 nights during our observing run April 2-9, 2007 at 1.8 meter telescope equipped with KASINICS (Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute Near Infrared Camera System) and J, H, and Ks filters at Bohyunsan Optical Astronomy Observatory (BOAO), South Korea. We searched for intra-day variability, short term variability and color variability in the BL Lac object. We have not detected any genuine intra-day variability in any of J, H, and Ks passbands in our observing run. Significant short term variability ~ 32.6%, 20.5% and 18.2% have been detected in J, H, Ks passbands, respectively, and ~ 11.9% in (J-H) color.

  17. Kinetic models of opinion formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Toscani

    2006-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce and discuss certain kinetic models of (continuous) opinion formation involving both exchange of opinion between individual agents and diffusion of information. We show conditions which ensure that the kinetic model reaches non trivial stationary states in case of lack of diffusion in correspondence of some opinion point. Analytical results are then obtained by considering a suitable asymptotic limit of the model yielding a Fokker-Planck equation for the distribution of opinion among individuals.

  18. Sequentially Triggered Star Formation in OB Associations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Preibisch; Hans Zinnecker

    2006-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss observational evidence for sequential and triggered star formation in OB associations. We first review the star formation process in the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association, the nearest OB association to the Sun, where several recent extensive studies have allowed us to reconstruct the star formation history in a rather detailed way. We then compare the observational results with those obtained for other OB associations and with recent models of rapid cloud and star formation in the turbulent interstellar medium. We conclude that the formation of whole OB subgroups (each consisting of several thousand stars) requires large-scale triggering mechanisms such as shocks from expanding wind and supernova driven superbubbles surrounding older subgroups. Other triggering mechanisms, like radiatively driven implosion of globules, also operate, but seem to be secondary processes, forming only small stellar groups rather than whole OB subgroups with thousands of stars.

  19. Host Galaxy Extinction of SNIa: Co-evolution of ISM Structure and Extinction Law with Star-Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. W. Holwerda

    2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a mechanism that may modify the extinction law for SNIa observed at higher redshift. Starting from the observations that (1) SNIa occur predominantly in spiral galaxies, (2) star-formation ejects ISM out of the plane of spirals, (3) star-formation alters the extinction properties of the dust in the ISM, and (4) there is substantially more star-formation at higher redshift, I propose that spiral galaxies have a dustier halo in the past than they do now. The ejected material's lower value of $R_V$ will lead to a lower average value ($\\bar{R}_V$) for SNIa observed at higher redshift. Two relations in SNIa observations indicate evolution of the average $R_V$: the relation of observed $R_V$ with inclination of the host galaxy at low redshift and the matching of the distribution of extinction values ($A_V$) for SNIa in different redshift intervals. The inclination effect does point to a halo with lower $R_V$ values. In contrast, the distributions of $A_V$ values match best for a $\\bar{R}_V(z)$ evolution that mimics the relation of SNIa dimming with redshift attributed to the cosmological constant. However, even in the worse case scenario, the evolution $\\bar{R}_V$ can not fully explain the dimming of SNIa: host galaxy extinction law evolution is not a viable alternative to account for the dimming of SNIa. Future observations of SNIa --multi-color lightcurves and spectra-- will solve separately for values of $A_V$ and $R_V$ for each SNIa . Solving for evolution of $\\bar{R}_V$ (and $A_V$) with redshift will be important for the coming generation of cosmological SNIa measurements and has the bonus science of insight into the distribution of dust-rich ISM in the host galaxies in the distant past.

  20. Formation of polar ring galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Bournaud; F. Combes

    2003-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Polar ring galaxies are peculiar systems in which a gas rich, nearly polar ring surrounds an early-type or elliptical host galaxy. Two formation scenarios for these objects have been proposed: they are thought to form either in major galaxy mergers or by tidal accretion of the polar material from a gas rich donor galaxy. Both scenarios are studied through N-body simulations including gas dynamics and star formation. Constraints on physical parameters are drawn out, in order to determine which scenario is the most likely to occur. Polar ring galaxies from each scenario are compared with observations and we discuss whether the accretion scenario and the merging scenario account for observational properties of polar ring galaxies. The conclusion of this study is that the accretion scenario is both the most likely and the most supported by observations. Even if the merging scenario is rather robust, most polar ring galaxies are shown to be the result of tidal gas accretion events.

  1. Rapid gas hydrate formation process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Unione, Alfred J.

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure provides a method and apparatus for forming gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas. The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone which may be wholly included within the body of a spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction zone, where the reaction zone is under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for formation of the gas hydrate. The reaction zone pressure is less than the mixing zone pressure so that expansion of the hydrate-forming gas in the mixture provides a degree of cooling by the Joule-Thompson effect and provides more intimate mixing between the water and the hydrate-forming gas. The result of the process is the formation of gas hydrates continuously and with a greatly reduced induction time. An apparatus for conduct of the method is further provided.

  2. The Formation of the Hubble Sequence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher J. Conselice

    2003-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The history of galaxy formation via star formation and stellar mass assembly rates is now known with some certainty, yet the connection between high redshift and low redshift galaxy populations is not yet clear. By identifying and studying individual massive galaxies at high-redshifts, z > 1.5, we can possibly uncover the physical effects driving galaxy formation. Using the structures of high-z galaxies, as imaged with the Hubble Space Telescope, we argue that it is now possible to directly study the progenitors of ellipticals and disks. We also briefly describe early results that suggest many massive galaxies are forming at z > 2 through major mergers.

  3. Core/Multishell Nanowire Heterostructures as Multicolor,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yat

    of dislocations originating from lattice mismatch between GaN and a planar growth substrate. Second, alloys of III by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition with an n-GaN core and InxGa1-xN/GaN/p-AlGaN/p-GaN shells, where controlled during synthesis. Electrical measurements show that the p-AlGaN/p-GaN shell structure yields

  4. 41EurASEAA 2006, Bougon papers Natural processes iNvolved iN the formatioN of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    site formation processes. A sedimentological study indicated that the fossiliferous layer resulted from

  5. Observing Massive Galaxy Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher J. Conselice

    2002-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A major goal of contemporary astrophysics is understanding the origin of the most massive galaxies in the universe, particularly nearby ellipticals and spirals. Theoretical models of galaxy formation have existed for many decades, although low and high redshift observations are only beginning to put constraints on different ideas. We briefly describe these observations and how they are revealing the methods by which galaxies form by contrasting and comparing fiducial rapid collapse and hierarchical formation model predictions. The available data show that cluster ellipticals must have rapidly formed at z > 2, and that up to 50% of all massive galaxies at z ~ 2.5 are involved in major mergers. While the former is consistent with the monolithic collapse picture, we argue that hierarchal formation is the only model that can reproduce all the available observations.

  6. Gas Cooling Through Galaxy Formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mariwan A. Rasheed; Mohamad A. Brza

    Abstract-- Gas cooling was studied in two different boxes of sizes and by simulation at same redshifts. The gas cooling is shown in four different redshifts (z=1.15, 0.5, 0.1 and 0). In the simulation the positions of the clumps of cooled gas were studied with slices of the two volumes and also the density of cooled gas of the two volumes shown in the simulation. From the process of gas cooling it is clear that this process gives different results in the two cases. Index Term- Gas Cooling, Simulation, galaxy Formation. I.

  7. JPEG File Interchange Format

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Eric

    2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    interchange format compressed image representation • PC or Mac or Unix workstation compatible • Standard color space: one or three components. For three components, YCbCr (CCIR 601-256 levels) • APP0 marker used to specify Units, X pixel density, Y pixel... by the Macintosh but not by PCs or workstations. JPEG File Interchange Format, Version 1.02 2 Standard color space The color space to be used is YCbCr as defined by CCIR 601 (256 levels). The RGB components calculated by linear conversion from YCbCr shall...

  8. Hair follicle Formation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    Hair follicle Formation of new follicles Bud Healed skin Hair bulge Open wound Epidermis a b Dermis 1950s and help to explain the controversy. What is the origin of the cells that make up these new hair follicles? Are they derived from existing hair follicles located at the wound edge

  9. (Non) formation of methanol by direct hydrogenation of formate on copper catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Yong; Mims, Charles A.; Disselkamp, Robert S.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Peden, Charles HF; Campbell, C. T.

    2010-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We have attempted to hydrogenate adsorbed formate species on copper catalysts to probe the importance of this postulated mechanistic step in methanol synthesis. Surface formate coverages up to 0.25 were produced at temperatures between 413K and 453K on supported (Cu/SiO2) copper and unsupported copper catalysts. The adlayers were produced by various methods including (1) steady state catalytic conditions in CO2-H2 (3:1, 6 bar) atmospheres, and (2) by exposure of the catalysts to formic acid. As reported in earlier work, the catalytic surface at steady state contains bidentate formate species with coverages up to saturation levels of ~ 0.25 at the low temperatures of this study. The reactivity of these formate adlayers was investigated at relevant reaction temperatures in atmospheres containing up to 6 bar H2 partial pressure by simultaneous mass spectrometry (MS) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy measurements. The yield of methanol during the attempted hydrogenation (“titration”) of these adlayers was insignificant (<0.2 mol % of the formate adlayer) even in dry hydrogen partial pressures up to 6 bar. Hydrogen titration of formate species produced from formic acid also failed to produce significant quantities of methanol, and attempted titration in gases consisting of CO-hydrogen mixtures or dry CO2 were also unproductive. The formate decomposition kinetics, measured by IR, were also unaffected by these changes in the gas composition. Similar experiments on unsupported copper also failed to show any methanol. From these results, we conclude that methanol synthesis on copper cannot result from the direct hydrogenation of (bidentate) formate species in simple steps involving adsorbed H species alone. Furthermore, experiments performed on both supported (Cu/SiO2) and unsupported copper catalysts gave similar results implying that the methanol synthesis reaction mechanism only involves metal surface chemistry. Pre-exposure of the bidentate formate adlayer to oxidation by O2 or N2O produces a change to a monodentate configuration. Attempted titration of this monodentate formate/O coadsorbed layer in dry hydrogen produces significant quantities of methanol, although decomposition of formate to carbon dioxide and hydrogen remains the dominant reaction pathway. Simultaneous production of water is also observed during this titration as the copper surface is re-reduced. These results indicate that co-adsorbates related to surface oxygen or water-derived species may be critical to methanol production on copper, perhaps assisting in the hydrogenation of adsorbed formate to adsorbed methoxyl.

  10. Star formation bursts in isolated spiral galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Clarke; D. Gittins

    2006-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the response of the gaseous component of a galactic disc to the time dependent potential generated by N-body simulations of a spiral galaxy. The results show significant variation of the spiral structure of the gas which might be expected to result in significant fluctuations in the Star Formation Rate (SFR). Pronounced local variations of the SFR are anticipated in all cases. Bursty histories for the global SFR, however, require that the mean surface density is much less (around an order of magnitude less) than the putative threshold for star formation. We thus suggest that bursty star formation histories, normally attributed to mergers and/or tidal interactions, may be a normal pattern for gas poor isolated spiral galaxies.

  11. Planning and Search Exam format

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alechina, Natasha

    is the frame problem. Revision 5 #12;Exam topics: planning Classical planning. How the problem definitionPlanning and Search Revision Revision 1 #12;Outline Exam format Exam topics How to revise Revision 2 #12;Exam format 4 questions out of 6 same format as 2010-2011 and 2011-2012 exams (on G52PAS

  12. Formation of Carbon Dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles L. Steinhardt; Dimitar D. Sasselov

    2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the formation of dwarf carbon stars via accretion from a carbon AGB companion in light of the new 107 object sample of Downes et al. (2004). This sample is now large enough to allow good mass determination via comparison of a composite spectrum to theoretical atmospheric models. Carbon dwarfs of spectral type M are indeed main sequence M dwarfs with enhanced metallicity and carbon abundance. We also calculate the predicted abundance of both M and of F/G carbon dwarfs, and show that the latter should be falsifiable in the near future.

  13. Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen on BaOPt(111). Formation, characterization and reactivity of adsorbed oxygen on BaOPt(111). Abstract: The formation...

  14. Formation of double-$?$ hypernuclei at PANDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Gaitanos; A. B. Larionov; H. Lenske; U. Mosel

    2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the formation of single- and double-$\\Lambda$ hypernuclei in antiproton-induced reactions relevant for the forthcoming PANDA experiment at FAIR. We use the Giessen Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (GiBUU) transport model with relativistic mean-fields for the description of non-equilibrium dynamics and the statistical multifragmentation model (SMM) for fragment formation. This combined approach describes the dynamical properties of strangeness and fragments in low energy $\\bar{p}$-induced reactions fairly well. We then focus on the formation of double-$\\Lambda$ hypernuclei in high energy $\\bar{p}$-nucleus collisions on a primary target including the complementary $\\Xi$-induced reactions to a secondary one, as proposed by the PANDA collaboration. Our results show that a copious production of double-$\\Lambda$ hyperfragments is possible at PANDA. In particular, we provide first theoretical estimations on the double-$\\Lambda$ production cross section, which strongly rises with decreasing energy of the secondary $\\Xi$-beam.

  15. Galaxy formation with radiative and chemical feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graziani, L; Schneider, R; Kawata, D; de Bennassuti, M; Maselli, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we introduce GAMESH, a novel pipeline which implements self-consistent radiative and chemical feedback in a computational model of galaxy formation. By combining the cosmological chemical-evolution model GAMETE with the radiative transfer code CRASH, GAMESH can post process realistic outputs of a N-body simulation describing the redshift evolution of the forming galaxy. After introducing the GAMESH implementation and its features, we apply the code to a low-resolution N-body simulation of the Milky Way formation and we investigate the combined effects of self-consistent radiative and chemical feedback. Many physical properties, which can be directly compared with observations in the Galaxy and its surrounding satellites, are predicted by the code along the merger-tree assembly. The resulting redshift evolution of the Local Group star formation rates, reionisation and metal enrichment along with the predicted Metallicity Distribution Function of halo stars are critically compared with observations. We dis...

  16. The Formation of Primordial Luminous Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emanuele Ripamonti; Tom Abel

    2005-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In these lecture notes we review the current knowledge about the formation of the first luminous objects. We start from the cosmological context of hierarchical models of structure formation, and discuss the main physical processes which are believed to lead to primordial star formation, i.e. the cooling processes and the chemistry of molecules (especially H2) in a metal-free gas. We then describe the techniques and results of numerical simulations, which indicate that the masses of the first luminous objects are likely to be much larger than that of present-day stars. Finally, we discuss the scenario presented above, exposing some of the most interesting problems which are currently being investigated, such as that of the feedback effects of these objects.

  17. The Efficiency of Globular Cluster Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean E. McLaughlin

    1999-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    (Abridged): The total populations of globular cluster systems (GCSs) are discussed in terms of their connection to the efficiency of globular cluster formation---the mass fraction of star-forming gas that was able to form bound stellar clusters rather than isolated stars or unbound associations---in galaxy halos. Observed variations in GCS specific frequencies (S_N=N_gc/L_gal), both as a function of galactocentric radius in individual systems and globally between entire galaxies, are reviewed in this light. It is argued that trends in S_N do not reflect any real variation in the underlying efficiency of cluster formation; rather, they result from ignoring the hot gas in many large ellipticals. This claim is checked and confirmed in each of M87, M49, and NGC 1399, for which existing data are combined to show that the volume density profile of globular clusters, rho_cl, is directly proportional to the sum of (rho_gas+rho_stars) at large radii. The constant of proportionality is the same in each case: epsilon=0.0026 +/- 0.0005 in the mean. This is identified with the globular cluster formation efficiency. The implication that epsilon might have had a universal value is supported by data on the GCSs of 97 early-type galaxies, on the GCS of the Milky Way, and on the ongoing formation of open clusters. These results have specific implications for some issues in GCS and galaxy formation, and they should serve as a strong constraint on more general theories of star and cluster formation.

  18. Step- vs. kink-formation energies on Pt(111)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FEIBELMAN,PETER J.

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ab-initio kink-formation energies are about 0.25 and 0.18 eV on the (100)- and (111)-microfacet steps of Pt(111), while the sum of the step-formation energies is 0.75 eV/atom. These results imply a specific ratio of formation energies for the two step types, namely 1.14, in excellent agreement with experiment. If kink-formation costs the same energy on the two step types, an inference recently drawn from scanning probe observations of step wandering, this ratio ought to be 1.

  19. FORMATION GESTION DU STRESS CONTEXTE, PUBLIC, FINALITE DE LA FORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brest, Université de

    FORMATION GESTION DU STRESS CONTEXTE, PUBLIC, FINALITE DE LA FORMATION La vie moderne et le stress : mettre en place des stratégies de gestion , étudier quelques aspects essentiels de la et cas cliniques composés par les participants ou fournis par le formateur . - Jeux de rôle en sous

  20. Stratified chaos in a sand pile formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ate Poortinga; Jan G. Wesseling; Coen J. Ritsema

    2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Sand pile formation is often used to describe stratified chaos in dynamic systems due to self-emergent and scale invariant behaviour. Cellular automata (Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld model) are often used to describe chaotic behaviour, as simulating physical interactions between individual particles is computationally demanding. In this study, we use a state-of-the-art parallel implementation of the discrete element method on the graphical processing unit to simulate sand pile formation. Interactions between individual grains were simulated using a contact model in an Euler integration scheme. Results show non-linear self-emergent behaviour which is in good agreement with experimental results, theoretical work and self organized criticality (SOC) approaches. Moreover, it was found that the fully deterministic model, where the position and forces on every individual particle can be determined every iteration has a brown noise signal in the x and y direction, where the signal is the z direction is closer to a white noise spectrum.

  1. Star formation in the multiverse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bousso, Raphael; Leichenauer, Stefan [Center for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-7300 (United States) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720-8162 (United States)

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a simple semianalytic model of the star formation rate as a function of time. We estimate the star formation rate for a wide range of values of the cosmological constant, spatial curvature, and primordial density contrast. Our model can predict such parameters in the multiverse, if the underlying theory landscape and the cosmological measure are known.

  2. Formation depths of Fraunhofer lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurtovenko, E A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have summed up our investigations performed in 1970--1993. The main task of this paper is clearly to show processes of formation of spectral lines as well as their distinction by validity and by location. For 503 photospheric lines of various chemical elements in the wavelength range 300--1000 nm we list in Table the average formation depths of the line depression and the line emission for the line centre and on the half-width of the line, the average formation depths of the continuum emission as well as the effective widths of the layer of the line depression formation. Dependence of average depths of line depression formation on excitation potential, equivalent widths, and central line depth are demonstrated by iron lines.

  3. Masers and star formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent L. Fish

    2007-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent observational and theoretical advances concerning astronomical masers in star forming regions are reviewed. Major masing species are considered individually and in combination. Key results are summarized with emphasis on present science and future prospects.

  4. Sequestration of Dissolved CO2 in the Oriskany Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dilmore, R.M.; Allen, D.E. (Salem State College, Salem, MA); McCarthy-Jones, J.R.; Hedges, S.W.; Soong, Yee

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments were conducted to determine the solubility of CO2 in a natural brine solution of the Oriskany formation under elevated temperature and pressure conditions. These data were collected at temperatures of 22 and 75 °C and pressures between 100 and 450 bar. Experimentally determined data were compared with CO2 solubility predictions using a model developed by Duan and Sun (Chem. Geol. 2003, 193, 257-271). Model results compare well with Oriskany brine CO2 solubility data collected experimentally, suggesting that the Duan and Sun model is a reliable tool for estimating solution CO2 capacity in high salinity aquifers in the temperature and pressure range evaluated. The capacity for the Oriskany formation to sequester dissolved CO2 was calculated using results of the solubility models, estimation of the density of CO2 saturated brine, and available geographic information system (GIS) information on the formation depth and thickness. Results indicate that the Oriskany formation can hold approximately 0.36 gigatonnes of dissolved CO2 if the full basin is considered. When only the region where supercritical CO2 can exist (temperatures greater than 31° C and pressures greater than 74 bar) is considered, the capacity of the Oriskany formation to sequester dissolved CO2 is 0.31 gigatonnes. The capacity estimate considering the potential to sequester free-phase supercritical CO2 if brine were displaced from formation pore space is 8.8 gigatonnes in the Oriskany formation.

  5. Treating tar sands formations with karsted zones

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

    2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may have one or more karsted zones. Methods may include providing heat from one or more heaters to one or more karsted zones of the tar sands formation to mobilize fluids in the formation. At least some of the mobilized fluids may be produced from the formation.

  6. Dimensionality effects in Turing pattern formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teemu Leppanen; Mikko Karttunen; Kimmo Kaski; Rafael A. Barrio

    2003-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of morphogenesis and Turing instability are revisited from the point of view of dimensionality effects. First the linear analysis of a generic Turing model is elaborated to the case of multiple stationary states, which may lead the system to bistability. The difference between two- and three-dimensional pattern formation with respect to pattern selection and robustness is discussed. Preliminary results concerning the transition between quasi-two-dimensional and three-dimensional structures are presented and their relation to experimental results are addressed.

  7. Modelling new particle formation events in the South African savannah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gierens, Rosa; Laakso, Lauri; Mogensen, Ditte; Vakkari, Ville; Buekes, Johan P.; Van Zyl, Pieter; Hakola, H.; Guenther, Alex B.; Pienaar, J. J.; Boy, Michael

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Africa is one of the less studied continents with respect to atmospheric aerosols. Savannahs are complex dynamic systems sensitive to climate and land-use changes, but the interaction of these systems with the atmosphere is not well understood. Atmospheric particles, called aerosols, affect the climate on regional and global scales, and are an important factor in air quality. In this study, measurements from a relatively clean savannah environment in South Africa were used to model new particle formation and growth. There already are some combined long-term measurements of trace gas concentrations together with aerosol and meteorological variables available, but to our knowledge this is the first detailed simulation that includes all the main processes relevant to particle formation. The results show that both of the particle formation mechanisms investigated overestimated the dependency of the formation rates on sulphuric acid. From the two particle formation mechanisms tested in this work, the approach that included low volatile organic compounds to the particle formation process was more accurate in describing the nucleation events than the approach that did not. To obtain a reliable estimate of aerosol concentration in simulations for larger scales, nucleation mechanisms would need to include organic compounds, at least in southern Africa. This work is the first step in developing a more comprehensive new particle formation model applicable to the unique environment in southern Africa. Such a model will assist in better understanding and predicting new particle formation – knowledge which could ultimately be used to mitigate impacts of climate change and air quality.

  8. Predictions from star formation in the multiverse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bousso, Raphael; Leichenauer, Stefan [Center for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-7300 (United States) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720-8162 (United States)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute trivariate probability distributions in the landscape, scanning simultaneously over the cosmological constant, the primordial density contrast, and spatial curvature. We consider two different measures for regulating the divergences of eternal inflation, and three different models for observers. In one model, observers are assumed to arise in proportion to the entropy produced by stars; in the others, they arise at a fixed time (5 or 10x10{sup 9} years) after star formation. The star formation rate, which underlies all our observer models, depends sensitively on the three scanning parameters. We employ a recently developed model of star formation in the multiverse, a considerable refinement over previous treatments of the astrophysical and cosmological properties of different pocket universes. For each combination of observer model and measure, we display all single and bivariate probability distributions, both with the remaining parameter(s) held fixed and marginalized. Our results depend only weakly on the observer model but more strongly on the measure. Using the causal diamond measure, the observed parameter values (or bounds) lie within the central 2{sigma} of nearly all probability distributions we compute, and always within 3{sigma}. This success is encouraging and rather nontrivial, considering the large size and dimension of the parameter space. The causal patch measure gives similar results as long as curvature is negligible. If curvature dominates, the causal patch leads to a novel runaway: it prefers a negative value of the cosmological constant, with the smallest magnitude available in the landscape.

  9. Predictions from Star Formation in the Multiverse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raphael Bousso; Stefan Leichenauer

    2009-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute trivariate probability distributions in the landscape, scanning simultaneously over the cosmological constant, the primordial density contrast, and spatial curvature. We consider two different measures for regulating the divergences of eternal inflation, and three different models for observers. In one model, observers are assumed to arise in proportion to the entropy produced by stars; in the others, they arise at a fixed time (5 or 10 billion years) after star formation. The star formation rate, which underlies all our observer models, depends sensitively on the three scanning parameters. We employ a recently developed model of star formation in the multiverse, a considerable refinement over previous treatments of the astrophysical and cosmological properties of different pocket universes. For each combination of observer model and measure, we display all single and bivariate probability distributions, both with the remaining parameter(s) held fixed, and marginalized. Our results depend only weakly on the observer model but more strongly on the measure. Using the causal diamond measure, the observed parameter values (or bounds) lie within the central $2\\sigma$ of nearly all probability distributions we compute, and always within $3\\sigma$. This success is encouraging and rather nontrivial, considering the large size and dimension of the parameter space. The causal patch measure gives similar results as long as curvature is negligible. If curvature dominates, the causal patch leads to a novel runaway: it prefers a negative value of the cosmological constant, with the smallest magnitude available in the landscape.

  10. Use-driven concept formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, Jennifer M. (Jennifer Marie)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When faced with a complex task, humans often identify domain-specific concepts that make the task more tractable. In this thesis, I investigate the formation of domain-specific concepts of this sort. I propose a set of ...

  11. K-Basin gel formation studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, M.A.

    1998-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A key part of the proposed waste treatment for K Basin sludge is the elimination of reactive uranium metal by dissolution in nitric acid (Fkirnent, 1998). It has been found (Delegard, 1998a) that upon nitric acid dissolution of the sludge, a gel sometimes forms. Gels are known to sometimes impair solid/liquid separation and/or material transfer. The purpose of the work reported here is to determine the cause(s) of the gel formation and to determine operating parameters for the sludge dissolution that avoid formation of gel. This work and related work were planned in (Fkunent, 1998), (Jewett, 1998) and (Beck, 1998a). This report describes the results of the tests in (Beck, 1998a) with non-radioactive surrogates.

  12. Reconstructing the Star Formation Histories of Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uta Fritze; Thomas Lilly

    2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a methodological study to find out how far back and to what precision star formation histories of galaxies can be reconstructed from CMDs, from integrated spectra and Lick indices, and from integrated multi-band photometry. Our evolutionary synthesis models GALEV allow to describe the evolution of galaxies in terms of all three approaches and we have assumed typical observational uncertainties for each of them and then investigated to what extent and accuracy different star formation histories can be discriminated. For a field in the LMC bar region with both a deep CMD from HST observations and a trailing slit spectrum across exactly the same field of view we could test our modelling results against real data.

  13. Drill-in fluids control formation damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halliday, W.S. (Baker Hughes Inteq, Houston, TX (United States))

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several factors led to development, oil company interest in, and use of payzone drilling fluids, including operator concern about maximizing well production, increasing acceptance of horizontal drilling and openhole completion popularity. This article discusses water-base drill-in'' fluid systems and applications. Payzone damage, including fine solids migration, clay swelling and solids invasion, reduces effective formation permeability, which results in lower production rates. Formation damage is often caused by invasion of normal drilling fluids that contain barite or bentonite. Drill-in systems are designed with special bridging agents to minimize invasion. Several bridging materials designed to form effective filter cake for instantaneous leak-off control can be used. Bridging materials are also designed to minimize stages and time required to clean up wells before production. Fluids with easy-to-remove bridging agents reduce completion costs. Drill-in fluid bridging particles can often be removed more thoroughly than those in standard fluids.

  14. Negative feedback effects on star formation history and cosmic reionization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lei Wang; Jirong Mao; Shouping Xiang; Ye-Fei Yuan

    2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    After considering the effects of negative feedback on the process of star formation, we explore the relationship between star formation process and the associated feedback, by investigating how the mechanical feedback from supernovae(SNe) and radiative feedback from luminous objects regulate the star formation rate and therefore affect the cosmic reionization.Based on our present knowledge of the negative feedback theory and some numerical simulations, we construct an analytic model in the framework of the Lambda cold dark matter model. In certain parameter regions, our model can explain some observational results properly. In large halos(T_vir>10000 K), both mechanical and radiative feedback have a similar behavior: the relative strength of negative feedback reduces as the redshift decreases. In contrast, in small halos (T_virfeedback gets stronger when the redshift decreases. And the star formation rate in these small halos depends very weakly on the star-formation efficiency. Our results show that the radiative feedback is important for the early generation stars. It can suppress the star formation rate considerably. But the mechanical feedback from the SNe explosions is not able to affect the early star formation significantly. The early star formation in small-halo objects is likely to be self-regulated. The radiative and mechanical feedback dominates the star formation rate of the PopII/I stars all along. The feedback from first generation stars is very strong and should not be neglected. However, their effects on the cosmic reionization are not significant, which results in a small contribution to the optical depth of Thomson scattering.

  15. IMPACTS OF BIOFILM FORMATION ON CELLULOSE FERMENTATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leschine, Susan

    2009-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project addressed four major areas of investigation: i) characterization of formation of Cellulomonas uda biofilms on cellulose; ii) characterization of Clostridium phytofermentans biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; iii) characterization of Thermobifida fusca biofilm development; colonization of cellulose and its regulation; and iii) description of the architecture of mature C. uda, C. phytofermentans, and T. fusca biofilms. This research is aimed at advancing understanding of biofilm formation and other complex processes involved in the degradation of the abundant cellulosic biomass, and the biology of the microbes involved. Information obtained from these studies is invaluable in the development of practical applications, such as the single-step bioconversion of cellulose-containing residues to fuels and other bioproducts. Our results have clearly shown that cellulose-decomposing microbes rapidly colonize cellulose and form complex structures typical of biofilms. Furthermore, our observations suggest that, as cells multiply on nutritive surfaces during biofilms formation, dramatic cell morphological changes occur. We speculated that morphological changes, which involve a transition from rod-shaped cells to more rounded forms, might be more apparent in a filamentous microbe. In order to test this hypothesis, we included in our research a study of biofilm formation by T. fusca, a thermophilic cellulolytic actinomycete commonly found in compost. The cellulase system of T. fusca has been extensively detailed through the work of David Wilson and colleagues at Cornell, and also, genome sequence of a T. fusca strain has been determine by the DOE Joint Genome Institute. Thus, T. fusca is an excellent subject for studies of biofilm development and its potential impacts on cellulose degradation. We also completed a study of the chitinase system of C. uda. This work provided essential background information for understanding how C. uda colonizes and degrades insoluble substrates. Major accomplishments of the project include: • Development of media containing dialysis tubing (described by the manufacturer as “regenerated cellulose”) as sole carbon and energy source and a nutritive surface for the growth of cellulolytic bacteria, and development of various microscopic methods to image biofilms on dialysis tubing. • Demonstration that cultures of C. phytofermentans, an obligate anaerobe, C. uda, a facultative aerobe, and T. fusca, a filamentous aerobe, formed microbial communities on the surface of dialysis tubing, which possessed architectural features and functional characteristics typical of biofilms. • Demonstration that biofilm formation on the nutritive surface, cellulose, involves a complex developmental processes, including colonization of dialysis tubing, formation of cell clusters attached to the nutritive surface, cell morphological changes, formation of complex structures embedded in extracellular polymeric matrices, and dispersal of biofilm communities as the nutritive surface is degraded. • Determination of surface specificity and regulatory aspects of biofilm formation by C. phytofermentans, C. uda, and T. fusca. • Demonstration that biofilm formation by T. fusca forms an integral part of the life cycle of this filamentous cellulolytic bacterium, including studies on the role of mycelial pellet formation in the T. fusca life cycle and a comparison of mycelial pellets to surface-attached T. fusca biofilms. • Characterization of T. fusca biofilm EPS, including demonstration of a functional role for EPS constituents. • Correlation of T. fusca developmental life cycle and cellulase gene expression.

  16. Testing Disk Instability Models for Giant Planet Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alan P. Boss

    2007-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Disk instability is an attractive yet controversial means for the rapid formation of giant planets in our solar system and elsewhere. Recent concerns regarding the first adiabatic exponent of molecular hydrogen gas are addressed and shown not to lead to spurious clump formation in the author's disk instability models. A number of disk instability models have been calculated in order to further test the robustness of the mechanism, exploring the effects of changing the pressure equation of state, the vertical temperature profile, and other parameters affecting the temperature distribution. Possible reasons for differences in results obtained by other workers are discussed. Disk instability remains as a plausible formation mechanism for giant planets.

  17. Formation of molecular hydrogen on amorphous silicate surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ling Li; Giulio Manico; Emanuele Congiu; Joe Roser; Sol Swords; Hagai B. Perets; Adina Lederhendler; Ofer Biham; John Robert Brucato; Valerio Pirronello; Gianfranco Vidali

    2007-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental results on the formation of molecular hydrogen on amorphous silicate surfaces are presented and analyzed using a rate equation model. The energy barriers for the relevant diffusion and desorption processes are obtained. They turn out to be significantly higher than those obtained for polycrystalline silicates, demonstrating the importance of grain morphology. Using these barriers we evaluate the efficiency of molecular hydrogen formation on amorphous silicate grains under interstellar conditions. It is found that unlike polycrystalline silicates, amorphous silicate grains are efficient catalysts of H_2 formation in diffuse interstellar clouds.

  18. Benzene formation in the inner regions of protostellar disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul M. Woods; Karen Willacy

    2006-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Benzene (c-C6H6) formation in the inner 3 AU of a protostellar disk can be efficient, resulting in high abundances of benzene in the midplane region. The formation mechanism is different to that found in interstellar clouds and in protoplanetary nebulae, and proceeds mainly through the reaction between allene (C3H4) and its ion. This has implications for PAH formation, in that some fraction of PAHs seen in the solar system could be native rather than inherited from the interstellar medium.

  19. Photogeneration of an active formate-decomposition catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, A.D. Jr.; King, R.B.; Sailers, E.L. III

    1981-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Some preliminary observations on the decomposition of an active formate species in the reaction of the group 6 metal carbonyl catalyzed water gas shift process were made using a photolytically-generated W(CO)/sub 5/ intermediate. H/sub 2/ production from the aqueous solutions containing Na format and W(CO)/sub 6/ was much more rapid for illuminated solutions than for non-illuminated. However, no measurable hydrogen was produced from either illuminated or non-illuminated solutions when Na formate was replaced by KOH. Essentially the same results were noted for the photolytically-catalyzed production of H/sub 2/ when solutions of tetrahydrofuran were used. It is thus concluded that the H/sub 2/ and CO must result from decomposition of the formate ion in the reaction mixture and that the W(CO)/sub 6/ is a precursor of the catalytically active W(CO)/sub 5/. (BLM)

  20. Star Formation in Mergers and Interacting Galaxies: Gathering the Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtis Struck

    2006-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Selected results from recent studies of star formation in galaxies at different stages of interaction are reviewed. Recent results from the Spitzer Space Telescope are highlighted. Ideas on how large-scale driving of star formation in interacting galaxies might mesh with our understanding of star formation in isolated galaxies and small scale mechanisms within galaxies are considered. In particular, there is evidence that on small scales star formation is determined by the same thermal and turbulent processes in cool compressed clouds as in isolated galaxies. If so, this affirms the notion that the primary role of large-scale dynamics is to gather and compress the gas fuel. In gas-rich interactions this is generally done with increasing efficiency through the merger process.

  1. Examination of the Potential for Formation of Energetic Compounds in Dry Sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, M.J.

    1998-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details initial results from an investigation of the potential formation and fate of energetic compounds in Savannah River Site sludge.

  2. Substructure: Clues to the Formation of Clusters of Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael J. West; Christine Jones; William Forman

    1995-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We have examined the spatial distribution of substructure in clusters of galaxies using Einstein X-ray observations. Subclusters are found to have a markedly anisotropic distribution that reflects the surrounding matter distribution on supercluster scales. Our results suggest a picture in which cluster formation proceeds by mergers of subclusters along large-scale filaments. The implications of such an anisotropic formation process for the shapes, orientations and kinematics of clusters are discussed briefly.

  3. Ice Formation in Gas-Diffusion Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dursch, Thomas

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the University of California. Ice Formation in Gas-Diffusionsub-freezing conditions, ice forms in the gas-diffusionstrategies exist to prevent ice formation, there is little

  4. REGULATORY COOPERATION COUNCIL - WORK PLANNING FORMAT: Natural...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    FORMAT: Natural Gas Use in Transportation REGULATORY COOPERATION COUNCIL - WORK PLANNING FORMAT: Natural Gas Use in Transportation RCC Workplan NGV.PDF More Documents &...

  5. Monolithic or hierarchical star formation? A new statistical analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marios Kampakoglou; Roberto Trotta; Joe Silk

    2007-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider an analytic model of cosmic star formation which incorporates supernova feedback, gas accretion and enriched outflows, reproducing the history of cosmic star formation, metallicity, supernovae type II rates and the fraction of baryons allocated to structures. We present a new statistical treatment of the available observational data on the star formation rate and metallicity that accounts for the presence of possible systematics. We then employ a Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo method to compare the predictions of our model with observations and derive constraints on the 7 free parameters of the model. We find that the dust correction scheme one chooses to adopt for the star formation data is critical in determining which scenario is favoured between a hierarchical star formation model, where star formation is prolonged by accretion, infall and merging, and a monolithic scenario, where star formation is rapid and efficient. We distinguish between these modes by defining a characteristic minimum mass, M > 10^{11} M_solar, in our fiducial model, for early type galaxies where star formation occurs efficiently. Our results indicate that the hierarchical star formation model can achieve better agreement with the data, but that this requires a high efficiency of supernova-driven outflows. In a monolithic model, our analysis points to the need for a mechanism that drives metal-poor winds, perhaps in the form of supermassive black hole-induced outflows. Furthermore, the relative absence of star formation beyond z ~ 5 in the monolithic scenario requires an alternative mechanism to dwarf galaxies for reionizing the universe at z ~ 11, as required by observations of the microwave background. While the monolithic scenario is less favoured in terms of its quality-of-fit, it cannot yet be excluded.

  6. Humic substance formation during wastewater infiltration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siegrist, R.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Hildmann-Smed, R.; Filip, Z.K. (Bundesgesundheitsamt (BGA), Langen (Germany). Inst. fuer Wasser-, Boden- und Lufthygiene); Jenssen, P.D. (Norges Landbrukshoegskole, Aas (Norway). Centre for Soil and Environmental Research)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil infiltration of wastewater effluents is a widely practiced method of treatment and disposal/reuse throughout the world. Renovation of the wastewater results from a wide variety of complex physicochemical and biological processes. One set of processes is speculated to involve the accumulation of organic matter by filtration and sorption followed by formation of humic substances. This humic substance formation can effect the performance of soil treatment systems by contributing to soil pore clogging and reduction in hydraulic capacity, and by yielding reactive substances and an enhancement of purification processes. While there has been a wealth of research into the nature and genesis of humic substances in terrestrial environments, there has been limited research of humic substance formation during soil infiltration of wastewater. The purpose of the research reported herein was to determine if humic substances can form under conditions typical of those present during wastewater infiltration into natural soil systems. This work was conducted during 1989 to 1990 as a collaborative effort between the Centre for Soil and Environmental Research, located in Aas, Norway and the Institute for Water, Soil and Air Hygiene located in Langen, West Germany. 11 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Magnetic phase formation in irradiated austenitic alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gussev, Maxim N [ORNL] [ORNL; Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL] [ORNL; Tan, Lizhen [ORNL] [ORNL; Garner, Francis A. [Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA] [Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Austenitic alloys are often observed to develop magnetic properties during irradiation, possibly associated with radiation-induced acceleration of the ferrite phase. Some of the parametric sensitivities of this phenomenon have been addressed using a series of alloys irradiated in the BOR-60 reactor at 593K. The rate of development of magnetic phase appears to be sensitive to alloy composition. To the first order, the largest sensitivities to accelerate ferrite formation, as explored in this experiment, are associated with silicon, carbon and manganese and chromium. Si, C, and Mn are thought to influence diffusion rates of point defects while Cr plays a prominent role in defining the chromium equivalent and therefore the amount of ferrite at equilibrium. Pre-irradiation cold working was found to accelerate ferrite formation, but it can play many roles including an effect on diffusion, but on the basis of these results the dominant role or roles of cold-work cannot be identified. Based on the data available, ferrite formation is most probably associated with diffusion.

  8. The Formation History of Globular Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean E. McLaughlin

    2000-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The properties of old globular cluster systems in galaxy halos are used to infer quantitative constraints on aspects of generic star (cluster) formation. First, the spatial distribution of globulars in three large galaxies, together with trends in total cluster population vs. galaxy luminosity for 97 early-type systems plus the halo of the Milky Way, imply that bound stellar clusters formed with a universal efficiency throughout early protogalaxies: by mass, always 0.26% of star-forming gas was converted into globulars rather than halo field stars. That this fraction is so robust in the face of extreme variations in local and global galaxy environment suggests that any parcel of gas needs primarily to exceed a relative density threshold in order to form a bound cluster of stars. Second, it is shown that a strict, empirical scaling of total binding energy with luminosity and Galactocentric position is a defining equation for a fundamental plane of Galactic globular clusters. The characteristics of this plane, which subsumes all other observable correlations between the structural parameters of globulars, provide a small but complete set of facts that must be explained by theories of cluster formation and evolution in the Milky Way. It is suggested that the E_b(L,r_{\\rm gc}) relation specifically resulted from star formation efficiencies having been systematically higher inside more massive protoglobular gas clumps.

  9. Physical regimes for feedback in galaxy formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Monaco

    2004-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new (semi-)analytic model for feedback in galaxy formation. The ISM is modeled as a two-phase medium in pressure equilibrium. The remnants of exploding type II SNe percolate into super-bubbles (SBs) that sweep the ISM, heating the hot phase (if the SB is adiabatic) or cooling it (in the snowplow stage, when the interior gas of the SB has cooled). The resulting feedback regimes occur in well-defined regions of the space defined by vertical scale-length and surface density of the structure. When SBs blow out in the adiabatic regime, the efficiency of SNe in heating the ISM is ~5 per cent, with \\~80 per cent of the energy budget injected into the external halo, and the outcoming ISM is self-regulated to a state similar to that found in the Milky Way. Feedback is most efficient when SBs are pressure-confined in the adiabatic regime. In some significant regions of the parameter space confinement takes place in the snowplow stage; then the hot phase has a lower temperature and star formation is quicker. In some critical cases, the hot phase is strongly depleted and the cold phase percolates the whole volume, giving rise to a sudden burst of star formation. Strong galactic winds are predicted to happen only in critical cases. This model provides a starting point for constructing a realistic grid of feedback solutions to be used in galaxy formation codes. The predictive power of this model extends to many properties of the ISM, so that most parameters can be constrained by reproducing the main properties of the Milky Way. (Abridged)

  10. South Mississippi's Hosston, Sligo formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hosston and Sligo formations, of Early Cretaceous age, lie above the Cotton Valley group and below the Pine Island formation. The beds dip southwesterly and become thicker within the Mississippi Interior Salt basin, where virtually all of the Hosston/Sligo oil and gas production occurs. The 3500 ft of alternating sands and shales found at 10,000-17,000 ft depths have the attributes of fluvial deltaic sediments. The Newsom, Bowie Creek, and Seminary fields are representative of recent gas discoveries in the Hosston/Sligo.

  11. The continuous star formation history of a giant HII region in M101

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruben Garcia-Benito; Enrique Perez; Angeles I. Diaz

    2007-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results about the star formation process in the giant HII region NGC 5471 in the outskirts of M101. From resolved HST/WPFC2 photometry we find that star formation has been going for the last 70 Myr. We further compare previous results from integrated infrared-optical photometry with the stellar resolved CMD and we discuss the star formation properties of this region and its individual knots, as well as characterizing the different stellar content. This result has very important consequences in our understanding of the burst versus continuous star formation activity in spiral galaxies.

  12. Numerical investigation of the threshold for primordial black hole formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. C. Niemeyer

    1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    First results of a numerical investigation of primordial black hole formation in the radiation dominated phase of the Early Universe are presented. The simulations follow the gravitational collapse of three different families of high-amplitude density fluctuations imposed at the time of horizon crossing. The threshold for black hole formation, \\delta_{c} \\approx 0.7, is found to be nearly identical for all perturbation families if the control parameter, \\delta, is chosen as the total excess mass within the initial horizon volume. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the scaling of black hole mass with distance from the formation threshold, known to occur in near-critical gravitational collapse, applies to primordial black hole formation.

  13. Rapid Gas Hydrate Formation Processes: Will They Work?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, T.D.; Taylor, C.E.; Bernardo, M.P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers at DOE’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have been investigating the formation of synthetic gas hydrates, with an emphasis on rapid and continuous hydrate formation techniques. The investigations focused on unconventional methods to reduce dissolution, induction, nucleation and crystallization times associated with natural and synthetic hydrates studies conducted in the laboratory. Numerous experiments were conducted with various high-pressure cells equipped with instrumentation to study rapid and continuous hydrate formation. The cells ranged in size from 100 mL for screening studies to proof-of-concept studies with NETL’s 15-Liter Hydrate Cell. Results from this work demonstrate that the rapid and continuous formation of methane hydrate is possible at predetermined temperatures and pressures within the stability zone of a Methane Hydrate Stability Curve (see Figure 1).

  14. Treating tar sands formations with dolomite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may include dolomite and hydrocarbons. Methods may include providing heat at less than the decomposition temperature of dolomite from one or more heaters to at least a portion of the formation. At least some of the hydrocarbon fluids are mobilized in the formation. At least some of the hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  15. Formation Interuniversitaire de Physique Hydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balbus, Steven

    Formation Interuniversitaire de Physique Module : Hydrodynamics S. Balbus 1 #12;TO LEARN.8.3 Piston Driven into Gas Cylinder . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 4.8.4 Driven Acoustic Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 6.2.3 Inertial Drag of a Sphere by an Ideal Fluid . . . . . . . 113 6.3 Line Vortices and Flow

  16. Structurally Electromagnetic Formation Flight (EMFF)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Structurally connected secondary mirror EMFF secondary mirror EMFF Design Electromagnetic Formation for a smaller, simpler system. µEMFF investigates the use of conventional conductors, capacitors, and solar propellants that often limit lifetime, the EMFF system uses solar power to energize a magnetic field

  17. Star Formation in the Multiverse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raphael Bousso; Stefan Leichenauer

    2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a simple semi-analytic model of the star formation rate (SFR) as a function of time. We estimate the SFR for a wide range of values of the cosmological constant, spatial curvature, and primordial density contrast. Our model can predict such parameters in the multiverse, if the underlying theory landscape and the cosmological measure are known.

  18. Earth and Terrestrial Planet Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Seth A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The growth and composition of Earth is a direct consequence of planet formation throughout the Solar System. We discuss the known history of the Solar System, the proposed stages of growth and how the early stages of planet formation may be dominated by pebble growth processes. Pebbles are small bodies whose strong interactions with the nebula gas lead to remarkable new accretion mechanisms for the formation of planetesimals and the growth of planetary embryos. Many of the popular models for the later stages of planet formation are presented. The classical models with the giant planets on fixed orbits are not consistent with the known history of the Solar System, fail to create a high Earth/Mars mass ratio, and, in many cases, are also internally inconsistent. The successful Grand Tack model creates a small Mars, a wet Earth, a realistic asteroid belt and the mass-orbit structure of the terrestrial planets. In the Grand Tack scenario, growth curves for Earth most closely match a Weibull model. The feeding zon...

  19. VEHICLE NETWORKS: ACHIEVING REGULAR FORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VEHICLE NETWORKS: ACHIEVING REGULAR FORMATION MADALENA CHAVES, ROBERT DAY, LUCIA GOMEZ a network of vehicles exchanging information among themselves with the intention of achieving a specified the performance of the vehicle network. A stochastic model for information flow is also considered, allowing

  20. Cloud Formation, Evolution and Destruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estalella, Robert

    Chapter 4 Cloud Formation, Evolution and Destruction We now begin to trace the journey towards a star. How long does this take? The answer is surprisingly short: a good many clouds already contain new stars and these stars tend to be young. The typical cloud cannot spend long, if any time at all

  1. Constraining Galaxy Formation Models with Dwarf Ellipticals in Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher J. Conselice

    2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent observations demonstrate that dwarf elliptical (dE) galaxies in clusters, despite their faintness, are likely a critical galaxy type for understanding the processes behind galaxy formation. Dwarf ellipticals are the most common galaxy type, and are particularly abundant in rich galaxy clusters. The dwarf to giant ratio is in fact highest in rich clusters of galaxies, suggesting that cluster dEs do not form in groups that later merge to form clusters. Dwarf ellipticals are potentially the only galaxy type whose formation is sensitive to global, rather than local, environment. The dominant idea for explaining the formation of these systems, through Cold Dark Matter models, is that dEs form early and within their present environments. Recent results suggest that some dwarfs appear in clusters after the bulk of massive galaxies form, a scenario not predicted in standard hierarchical structure formation models. Many dEs have younger and more metal rich stellar populations than dwarfs in lower density environments, suggesting processes induced by rich clusters play an important role in dE formation. Several general galaxy cluster observations, including steep luminosity functions, and the origin of intracluster light, are natural outcomes of this delayed formation.

  2. RESIDUA UPGRADING EFFICIENCY IMPROVEMENT MODELS: COKE FORMATION PREDICTABILITY MAPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John F. Schabron; A. Troy Pauli; Joseph F. Rovani Jr.

    2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dispersed particle solution model of petroleum residua structure was used to develop predictors for pyrolytic coke formation. Coking Indexes were developed in prior years that measure how near a pyrolysis system is to coke formation during the coke formation induction period. These have been demonstrated to be universally applicable for residua regardless of the source of the material. Coking onset is coincidental with the destruction of the ordered structure and the formation of a multiphase system. The amount of coke initially formed appears to be a function of the free solvent volume of the original residua. In the current work, three-dimensional coke make predictability maps were developed at 400 C, 450 C, and 500 C (752 F, 842 F, and 932 F). These relate residence time and free solvent volume to the amount of coke formed at a particular pyrolysis temperature. Activation energies for two apparent types of zero-order coke formation reactions were estimated. The results provide a new tool for ranking residua, gauging proximity to coke formation, and predicting initial coke make tendencies.

  3. Absorption and elimination of formate following oral administration of calcium formate in female human subjects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanzlik, Robert P.; Fowler, Stephen C.; Eells, Janis T.

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Published abstract: Calcium formate is a water-soluble salt of an essential mineral nutrient with potential for use as a dietary calcium supplement. Formate ion is a product of endogenous and xenobiotic metabolism, but sustained high plasma formate...

  4. Photophoresis boosts giant planet formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teiser, Jens

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the core accretion model of giant planet formation, a solid protoplanetary core begins to accrete gas directly from the nebula when its mass reaches about 5 earth masses. The protoplanet has at most a few million years to reach runaway gas accretion, as young stars lose their gas disks after 10 million years at the latest. Yet gas accretion also brings small dust grains entrained in the gas into the planetary atmosphere. Dust accretion creates an optically thick protoplanetary atmosphere that cannot efficiently radiate away the kinetic energy deposited by incoming planetesimals. A dust-rich atmosphere severely slows down atmospheric cooling, contraction, and inflow of new gas, in contradiction to the observed timescales of planet formation. Here we show that photophoresis is a strong mechanism for pushing dust out of the planetary atmosphere due to the momentum exchange between gas and dust grains. The thermal radiation from the heated inner atmosphere and core is sufficient to levitate dust grains and to ...

  5. Laser beam pulse formatting method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daly, T.P.; Moses, E.I.; Patterson, R.W.; Sawicki, R.H.

    1994-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for formatting a laser beam pulse using one or more delay loops is disclosed. The delay loops have a partially reflective beam splitter and a plurality of highly reflective mirrors arranged such that the laser beam pulse enters into the delay loop through the beam splitter and circulates therein along a delay loop length defined by the mirrors. As the laser beam pulse circulates within the delay loop a portion thereof is emitted upon each completed circuit when the laser beam pulse strikes the beam splitter. The laser beam pulse is thereby formatted into a plurality of sub-pulses. The delay loops are used in combination to produce complex waveforms by combining the sub-pulses using additive waveform synthesis. 8 figs.

  6. Shock Formation in Lovelock Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey S. Reall; Norihiro Tanahashi; Benson Way

    2014-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We argue that Lovelock theories of gravity suffer from shock formation, unlike General Relativity. We consider the propagation of (i) a discontinuity in curvature, and (ii) weak, high frequency, gravitational waves. Such disturbances propagate along characteristic hypersurfaces of a "background" spacetime and their amplitude is governed by a transport equation. In GR the transport equation is linear. In Lovelock theories, it is nonlinear and its solutions can blow up, corresponding to the formation of a shock. We show that this effect is absent in some simple cases e.g. a flat background spacetime, and demonstrate its presence for a plane wave background. We comment on weak cosmic censorship, the evolution of shocks, and the nonlinear stability of Minkowski spacetime, in Lovelock theories.

  7. STAR FORMATION IN NUCLEAR RINGS OF BARRED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, Woo-Young; Kim, Woong-Tae, E-mail: seowy@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: wkim@astro.snu.ac.kr [Center for the Exploration of the Origin of the Universe (CEOU), Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear rings in barred galaxies are sites of active star formation. We use hydrodynamic simulations to study the temporal and spatial behavior of star formation occurring in nuclear rings of barred galaxies where radial gas inflows are triggered solely by a bar potential. The star formation recipes include a density threshold, an efficiency, conversion of gas to star particles, and delayed momentum feedback via supernova explosions. We find that the star formation rate (SFR) in a nuclear ring is roughly equal to the mass inflow rate to the ring, while it has a weak dependence on the total gas mass in the ring. The SFR typically exhibits a strong primary burst followed by weak secondary bursts before declining to very small values. The primary burst is associated with the rapid gas infall to the ring due to the bar growth, while the secondary bursts are caused by re-infall of the ejected gas from the primary burst. While star formation in observed rings persists episodically over a few Gyr, the duration of active star formation in our models lasts for only about half of the bar growth time, suggesting that the bar potential alone is unlikely to be responsible for gas supply to the rings. When the SFR is low, most star formation occurs at the contact points between the ring and the dust lanes, leading to an azimuthal age gradient of young star clusters. When the SFR is large, on the other hand, star formation is randomly distributed over the whole circumference of the ring, resulting in no apparent azimuthal age gradient. Since the ring shrinks in size with time, star clusters also exhibit a radial age gradient, with younger clusters found closer to the ring. The cluster mass function is well described by a power law, with a slope depending on the SFR. Giant gas clouds in the rings have supersonic internal velocity dispersions and are gravitationally bound.

  8. ASC Logo Use Guidelines | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EPS Format The file below contains the EPS format in Adobe Illustrator(tm) for use by graphic designers who produce multi-color documents for offset printing. The EPS logos are...

  9. The Formation of Primordial Luminous Objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ripamonti, Emanuele; /Kapteyn Astron. Inst., Groningen; Abel, Tom; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2005-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The scientific belief that the universe evolves in time is one of the legacies of the theory of the Big Bang. The concept that the universe has an history started to attract the interest of cosmologists soon after the first formulation of the theory: already Gamow (1948; 1949) investigated how and when galaxies could have been formed in the context of the expanding Universe. However, the specific topic of the formation (and of the fate) of the first objects dates to two decades later, when no objects with metallicities as low as those predicted by primordial nucleosynthesis (Z {approx}< 10{sup -10} {approx} 10{sup -8}Z{sub {circle_dot}}) were found. Such concerns were addressed in two seminal papers by Peebles & Dicke (1968; hereafter PD68) and by Doroshkevich, Zel'Dovich & Novikov (1967; hereafter DZN67), introducing the idea that some objects could have formed before the stars we presently observe. (1) Both PD68 and DZN67 suggest a mass of {approx} 10{sup 5} M{sub {circle_dot}} for the first generation of bound systems, based on the considerations on the cosmological Jeans length (Gamow 1948; Peebles 1965) and the possible shape of the power spectrum. (2) They point out the role of thermal instabilities in the formation of the proto-galactic bound object, and of the cooling of the gas inside it; in particular, PD68 introduces H{sub 2} cooling and chemistry in the calculations about the contraction of the gas. (3) Even if they do not specifically address the occurrence of fragmentation, these papers make two very different assumptions: PD68 assumes that the gas will fragment into ''normal'' stars to form globular clusters, while DZN67 assumes that fragmentation does not occur, and that a single ''super-star'' forms. (4) Finally, some feedback effects as considered (e.g. Peebles & Dicke considered the effects of supernovae). Today most of the research focuses on the issues when fragmentation may occur, what objects are formed and how they influence subsequent structure formation. In these notes we will leave the discussion of feedback to lecture notes by Ferrara & Salvaterra and by Madau & Haardt in this same book and focus only on the aspects of the formation of the first objects. The advent of cosmological numerical hydrodynamics in particular allow a fresh new look at these questions. Hence, these notes will touch on aspects of theoretical cosmology to chemistry, computer science, hydrodynamics and atomic physics. For further reading and more references on the subject we refer the reader to other relevant reviews such as Barkana & Loeb 2001, and more recently Ciardi & Ferrara 2004, Glover 2004 and Bromm & Larson 2004. In these notes, we try to give a brief introduction to only the most relevant aspects. We will start with a brief overview of the relevant cosmological concepts in section 2, followed by a discussion of the properties of primordial material (with particular emphasis to its cooling and its chemistry) in section 3. We will then review the technique and the results of numerical simulations in sections 4 and 5: the former will deal with detailed 3D simulations of the formation of gaseous clouds which are likely to transform into luminous objects, while the latter will examine results (mostly from 1D codes) about the modalities of such transformation. Finally, in section 6 we will critically discuss the results of the previous sections, examining their consequences and comparing them to our present knowledge of the universe.

  10. Formation damage in underbalanced drilling operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyes Serpa, Carlos Alberto

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Formation damage has long been recognized as a potential source of reduced productivity and injectivity in both horizontal and vertical wells. From the moment that the pay zone is being drilled until the well is put on production, a formation...

  11. Structure formation: Models, Dynamics and Status

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Padmanabhan

    1995-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The constraints on the models for the structure formation arising from various cosmological observations at different length scales are reviewed. The status of different models for structure formation is examined critically in the light of these observations.

  12. Dynamics and control of electromagnetic satellite formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahsun, Umair, 1972-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Satellite formation flying is an enabling technology for many space missions, especially for space-based telescopes. Usually there is a tight formation-keeping requirement that may need constant expenditure of fuel or at ...

  13. Kinetics and morphology of erbium silicide formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, J.A.; Picraux, S.T.; Wu, C.S.; Lau, S.S.

    1985-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The growth kinetics and surface morphology of erbium silicide formation from Er layers on Si(100) substrates are examined using both fast e-beam annealing and furnace annealing. Very smooth erbium silicide layers have been grown using a line-source e beam to heat and react the Er overlayers with the substrate. This contrasts to the severe pitting observed when Er layers are reacted with Si in conventional furnace annealing. The pitting phenomenon can be explained by a thin contaminant layer at the interface between Er and Si. Our results suggest the contamination barrier is not due to oxygen, as usually assumed, but may be related to the presence of carbon. Rapid e-beam heating to reaction temperatures of approx.1200 K permits dispersion of the barrier layer before substantial silicide growth can occur, allowing smooth silicide growth. Heating to shorter times to just disperse the interface barrier allows uniform layer growth by subsequent furnace annealing and has permitted measurement of the kinetics of erbium silicide formation on crystalline Si. The reaction obeys (time)/sup 1//sup ///sup 2/ kinetics but is shown to be not totally diffusion limited by the ability to sustain multiple interface growth from a single Si source. The growth rates are nearly an order of magnitude slower for the Er/Si(100) interface than for the Er/amorphous-Si, but with a similar activation energy near 1.75 eV in both cases.

  14. Dilute Surfactant Methods for Carbonate Formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the best hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. Laboratory-scale surfactant brine imbibition experiments give high oil recovery (35-62% OOIP) for initially oil-wet cores through wettability alteration and IFT reduction. Core-scale simulation results match those of the experiments. Initial capillarity-driven imbibition gives way to a final gravity-driven process. As the matrix block height increases, surfactant alters wettability to a lesser degree, or permeability decreases, oil production rate decreases. The scale-up to field scale will be further studied in the next quarter.

  15. Pattern formation and propagation during microwave breakdown

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaudhury, Bhaskar [Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie (LAPLACE), INPT, UPS, Universite de Toulouse, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Boeuf, Jean-Pierre [Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie (LAPLACE), INPT, UPS, Universite de Toulouse, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); LAPLACE, CNRS, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Zhu, Guo Qiang [Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie (LAPLACE), INPT, UPS, Universite de Toulouse, 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Northwestern Polytechnique University, Xi'an 710072 (China)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    During microwave breakdown at atmospheric pressure, a sharp plasma front forms and propagates toward the microwave source at high velocities. Experiments show that the plasma front may exhibit a complex dynamical structure or pattern composed of plasma filaments aligned with the wave electric field and apparently moving toward the source. In this paper, we present a model of the pattern formation and propagation under conditions close to recent experiments. Maxwell's equations are solved together with plasma fluid equations in two dimensions to describe the space and time evolution of the wave field and plasma density. The simulation results are in excellent agreement with the experimental observations. The model provides a physical interpretation of the pattern formation and dynamics in terms of ionization-diffusion and absorption-reflection mechanisms. The simulations allow a good qualitative and quantitative understanding of different features such as plasma front velocity, spacing between filaments, maximum plasma density in the filaments, and influence of the discharge parameters on the development of well-defined filamentary plasma arrays or more diffuse plasma fronts.

  16. Magnetic Fields in Population III Star Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turk, Matthew J.; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Abel, Tom; Bryan, Greg

    2012-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the buildup of magnetic fields during the formation of Population III star-forming regions, by conducting cosmological simulations from realistic initial conditions and varying the Jeans resolution. To investigate this in detail, we start simulations from identical initial conditions, mandating 16, 32 and 64 zones per Jeans length, and studied the variation in their magnetic field amplification. We find that, while compression results in some amplification, turbulent velocity fluctuations driven by the collapse can further amplify an initially weak seed field via dynamo action, provided there is sufficient numerical resolution to capture vortical motions (we find this requirement to be 64 zones per Jeans length, slightly larger than, but consistent with previous work run with more idealized collapse scenarios). We explore saturation of amplification of the magnetic field, which could potentially become dynamically important in subsequent, fully-resolved calculations. We have also identified a relatively surprising phenomena that is purely hydrodynamic: the higher-resolved simulations possess substantially different characteristics, including higher infall-velocity, increased temperatures inside 1000 AU, and decreased molecular hydrogen content in the innermost region. Furthermore, we find that disk formation is suppressed in higher-resolution calculations, at least at the times that we can follow the calculation. We discuss the effect this may have on the buildup of disks over the accretion history of the first clump to form as well as the potential for gravitational instabilities to develop and induce fragmentation.

  17. Treating nahcolite containing formations and saline zones

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for treating a nahcolite containing subsurface formation includes removing water from a saline zone in or near the formation. The removed water is heated using a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. The heated water is provided to the nahcolite containing formation. A fluid is produced from the nahcolite containing formation. The fluid includes at least some dissolved nahcolite. At least some of the fluid is provided to the saline zone.

  18. Thermally Triggered Calcium Phosphate Formation from Calcium-Loaded Liposomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of utilizing lipid vesicles for the synthesis of inorganic solids of controlled shape and/or size is well the rapid in situ formation of polymer hydrogels, inorganic solids, and other materials for medical. Mixing of a calcium-loaded lipid vesicle suspension with aqueous inorganic phosphate resulted in a stable

  19. Autonomous Helicopter Formation using Model Predictive Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sastry, S. Shankar

    Autonomous Helicopter Formation using Model Predictive Control Hoam Chung and S. Shankar Sastry are required to fly in tight formations and under harsh conditions. The starting point for safe autonomous into a formation, so that each vehicle can safely maintain sufficient space between it and all other vehicles

  20. Petrophysical evaluation of subterranean formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klein, James D; Schoderbek, David A; Mailloux, Jason M

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and systems are provided for evaluating petrophysical properties of subterranean formations and comprehensively evaluating hydrate presence through a combination of computer-implemented log modeling and analysis. Certain embodiments include the steps of running a number of logging tools in a wellbore to obtain a variety of wellbore data and logs, and evaluating and modeling the log data to ascertain various petrophysical properties. Examples of suitable logging techniques that may be used in combination with the present invention include, but are not limited to, sonic logs, electrical resistivity logs, gamma ray logs, neutron porosity logs, density logs, NRM logs, or any combination or subset thereof.

  1. Electrochemical formation of field emitters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernhardt, Anthony F. (Berkeley, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area.

  2. Mental Representations Formed From Educational Website Formats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elizabeth T. Cady; Kimberly R. Raddatz; Tuan Q. Tran; Bernardo de la Garza; Peter D. Elgin

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The increasing popularity of web-based distance education places high demand on distance educators to format web pages to facilitate learning. However, limited guidelines exist regarding appropriate writing styles for web-based distance education. This study investigated the effect of four different writing styles on reader’s mental representation of hypertext. Participants studied hypertext written in one of four web-writing styles (e.g., concise, scannable, objective, and combined) and were then administered a cued association task intended to measure their mental representations of the hypertext. It is hypothesized that the scannable and combined styles will bias readers to scan rather than elaborately read, which may result in less dense mental representations (as identified through Pathfinder analysis) relative to the objective and concise writing styles. Further, the use of more descriptors in the objective writing style will lead to better integration of ideas and more dense mental representations than the concise writing style.

  3. The Star Formation Density at z=7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Mannucci

    2006-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Near-infrared VLT data of the GOODS-South area were used to look for galaxies at z=7 down to a limiting magnitude of (J+Ks)AB=25.5. No high-redshift candidates were detected, and this provides clear evidence for a strong evolution of the luminosity function between z=6 and z=7, i.e. over a time interval of only 170 Myr. Our constraints provide evidence of a significant decline in the total star formation rate at z=7, which must be less than 40% of that at z=3 and 40-80% of that at z=6. The resulting upper limit to the ionizing flux at z=7 is only marginally consistent with what is required to completely ionize the Universe.

  4. Heating tar sands formations while controlling pressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stegemeier, George Leo (Houston, TX) [Houston, TX; Beer, Gary Lee (Houston, TX) [Houston, TX; Zhang, Etuan (Houston, TX) [Houston, TX

    2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. A pressure in the majority of the section may be maintained below a fracture pressure of the formation. The pressure in the majority of the section may be reduced to a selected pressure after the average temperature reaches a temperature that is above 240.degree. C. and is at or below pyrolysis temperatures of hydrocarbons in the section. At least some hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  5. Plans, Implementation, and Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    About the Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs Office (WIPO) including information on plans, implementations, and results.

  6. Coring in deep hardrock formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy is involved in a variety of scientific and engineering feasibility studies requiring extensive drilling in hard crystalline rock. In many cases well depths extend from 6000 to 20,000 feet in high-temperature, granitic formations. Examples of such projects are the Hot Dry Rock well system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico and the planned exploratory magma well near Mammoth Lakes, California. In addition to these programs, there is also continuing interest in supporting programs to reduce drilling costs associated with the production of geothermal energy from underground sources such as the Geysers area near San Francisco, California. The overall progression in these efforts is to drill deeper holes in higher temperature, harder formations. In conjunction with this trend is a desire to improve the capability to recover geological information. Spot coring and continuous coring are important elements in this effort. It is the purpose of this report to examine the current methods used to obtain core from deep wells and to suggest projects which will improve existing capabilities. 28 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. A Random Walk through Star and Planet Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maness, Holly

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and its Neptune-Mass Planet 3.1 Introduction . . . . . . .of Low Mass Star Formation . . . . . 1.3 Planet FormationConstraining Theories of Planet Formation and Evolution .

  8. The Formation of a Bubble from a Submerged Orifice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simmons, Jonathan A; Shikhmurzaev, Yulii D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation of a single bubble from an orifice in a solid surface, submerged in an in- compressible, viscous Newtonian liquid, is simulated. The finite element method is used to capture the multiscale physics associated with the problem and to track the evolution of the free surface explicitly. The results are compared to a recent experimental analysis and then used to obtain the global characteristics of the process, the formation time and volume of the bubble, for a range of orifice radii; Ohnesorge numbers, which combine the material parameters of the liquid; and volumetric gas flow rates. These benchmark calculations, for the parameter space of interest, are then utilised to validate a selection of scaling laws found in the literature for two regimes of bubble formation, the regimes of low and high gas flow rates.

  9. Rapid Gas Hydrate Formation Processes: Will They Work?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Bernardo, Mark P.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers at DOE’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) have been investigating the formation of synthetic gas hydrates, with an emphasis on rapid and continuous hydrate formation techniques. The investigations focused on unconventional methods to reduce dissolution, induction, nucleation and crystallization times associated with natural and synthetic hydrates studies conducted in the laboratory. Numerous experiments were conducted with various high-pressure cells equipped with instrumentation to study rapid and continuous hydrate formation. The cells ranged in size from 100 mL for screening studies to proof-of-concept studies with NETL’s 15-Liter Hydrate Cell. Results from this work demonstrate that the rapid and continuous formationmore »of methane hydrate is possible at predetermined temperatures and pressures within the stability zone of a Methane Hydrate Stability Curve.« less

  10. Win-stay lose-shift strategy in formation changes in football

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tamura, Kohei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Managerial decision making is likely to be a dominant determinant of performance of teams in team sports. Here we use Japanese and German football data to investigate correlates between temporal patterns of formation changes across matches and match results. We found that individual teams and managers both showed win-stay lose-shift behavior, a type of reinforcement learning. In other words, they tended to stick to the current formation after a win and switch to a different formation after a loss. In addition, formation changes did not affect the results of succeeding matches in most cases. The results indicate that a swift implementation of a new formation in the win-stay lose-shift manner may not be a successful managerial rule of thumb.

  11. Spatiotemporal discrete multicolor solitons Zhiyong Xu,* Yaroslav V. Kartashov,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as collapse compressors [19­21]. In contrast with the cubic spatiotemporal solitons, the quadratic ones do not display collapse in both two- and three-dimensional ge- ometries [24]. A still open problem, not analyzed

  12. Chiral Ring of Strange Metals: The Multicolor Limit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikhail Isachenkov; Ingo Kirsch; Volker Schomerus

    2014-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The low energy limit of a dense 2D adjoint QCD is described by a family of ${\\cal N}=(2,2)$ supersymmetric coset conformal field theories. In previous work we constructed chiral primaries for a small number $N primaries are labeled by partitions and identify the ring they generate as the ring of Schur polynomials. Our findings impose strong constraints on the possible dual description through string theory in an $AdS_3$ compactification.

  13. Multicolor Maps from Compound Queries | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu anMicrogreenMoon LakeMountain ElectricMt Princeton

  14. On the star formation history of IZw 18

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Legrand

    1999-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been suggested that a continuous low star formation rate has been the dominant regime in IZw 18 and in dwarf galaxies for the lifetime of these objects (Legrand et al. 1999). Here, we discuss and model various star-forming histories for IZw 18. Particularly, we show that if the metallicity observed in IZw 18 results from starburst events only, the observed colors constrain the fraction of the metals ejected from the galaxy to be less than 50-70 %. We demonstrate that the continuous star formation scenario reproduces the observed parameters of IZw 18. A continuous star formation rate (SFR) of about 10E-4 Msol/yr during 14 Gyr reproduces precisely the observed abundances. This SFR is comparable with the lowest SFR observed in low surface brightness galaxies (van Zee et al. 1997). Generalized to all galaxies, the low continuous SFR scenario accounts for various facts: the presence of star formation in quiescent dwarfs and LSBG, the metallicity increase with time in the most underabundant DLA systems, and the metal content extrapolations to the outskirts of spiral galaxies. Also the apparent absence of galaxies with a metallicity lower than IZw 18, the apparent absence of HI clouds without optical counterparts, and the homogeneity of abundances in dwarfs galaxies are natural outcomes of the scenario. This implies that, even if starbursts are strong and important events in the life of galaxies, their more subdued but continuous star formation regime cannot be ignored when accounting for their chemical evolution.

  15. Modelling New Particle Formation Events in the South African Savannah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gierens, Rosa; Laakso, Lauri; Mogensen, Ditte; Vakkari, Ville; Beukes, J. P.; Van Zyl, Pieter; Hakola, H.; Guenther, Alex B.; Pienaar, J. J.; Boy, Michael

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Africa is one of the less studied continents with respect to atmospheric aerosols. Savannahs are complex dynamic systems sensitive to climate and land-use changes, but the interaction with the atmosphere is not well understood. Atmospheric particles, aka aerosols, affect the climate on regional and global scale, and are an important factor in air quality. In this study measurements from a relatively clean savannah environment in South Africa were used to model new particle formation and growth. There are already some combined long-term measurements of trace gas concentrations together with aerosol and meteorological variables available, but to our knowledge this is the first time detailed simulations, that include all the main processes relevant to particle formation, were done. The results show that both investigated particle formation mechanisms overestimated the formation rates dependency on sulphuric acid. The approach including low volatile organic compounds to the particle formation process was more accurate in describing the nucleation events. To get reliable estimation of aerosol concentration in simulations for larger scales, nucleation mechanisms would need to include organic compounds, at least in southern Africa.

  16. Efficient quantum-classical method for computing thermal rate constant of recombination: Application to ozone formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Scott A.

    : Application to ozone formation Mikhail V. Ivanov and Dmitri Babikov Citation: J. Chem. Phys. 136, 184304 (2012 for computing thermal rate constant of recombination: Application to ozone formation Mikhail V. Ivanov of ozone. Comparison of the predicted rate vs. experimental result is presented. © 2012 American Institute

  17. Influence of active sites organisation on calcium carbonate formation at model biomolecular interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hell, Stefan W.

    aqueous CaCO3 was observed in situ by Brewster angle microscopy, where CaCO3 domains appear bright. Striking differences in kinetics and extent of CaCO3 formation are observed between monolayers containing-carrageenan in the subphase as a further active component resulted in partial inhibition of CaCO3 formation. # 2004 Elsevier B

  18. The Formation of Population III Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazuya Saigo; Tomoaki Matsumoto; Masayuki Umemura

    2004-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the possibility for the formation of Population III binaries. The collapse of a rotating cylinder is simulated with a three-dimensional, high-resolution nested grid, assuming the thermal history of primordial gas. The simulations are done with dimensionless units, and the results are applicable to low-mass as well as massive systems by scaling with the initial density. We find that if the initial angular momentum is as small as $\\beta \\approx 0.1$, where $\\beta$ is the ratio of centrifugal force to pressure force, then the runaway collapse of the cloud stops to form a rotationally-supported disk. After the accretion of the envelope, the disk undergoes a ring instability, eventually fragmenting into a binary. If the initial angular momentum is relatively large, a bar-type instability arises, resulting in the collapse into a single star through rapid angular momentum transfer. The present results show that a significant fraction of Pop III stars are expected to form in binary systems, even if they are quite massive or less massive. The cosmological implications of Population III binaries are briefly discussed.

  19. The Formation of Population III Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saigo, K; Umemura, M; Saigo, Kazuya; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Umemura, Masayuki

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the possibility for the formation of Population III binaries. The collapse of a rotating cylinder is simulated with a three-dimensional, high-resolution nested grid, assuming the thermal history of primordial gas. The simulations are done with dimensionless units, and the results are applicable to low-mass as well as massive systems by scaling with the initial density. We find that if the initial angular momentum is as small as $\\beta \\approx 0.1$, where $\\beta$ is the ratio of centrifugal force to pressure force, then the runaway collapse of the cloud stops to form a rotationally-supported disk. After the accretion of the envelope, the disk undergoes a ring instability, eventually fragmenting into a binary. If the initial angular momentum is relatively large, a bar-type instability arises, resulting in the collapse into a single star through rapid angular momentum transfer. The present results show that a significant fraction of Pop III stars are expected to form in binary systems, even if they ar...

  20. Hazard analysis results report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niemi, B.J., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes and defines the Hazard Analysis Results for the Tank Waste Remediation System Final Safety Analysis Report.

  1. Adaptive Optics in Star Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfgang Brandner

    2003-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past ten years, the concept of adaptive optics has evolved from early experimental stages to a standard observing tool now available at almost all major optical and near-infrared telescope facilities. Adaptive optics will also be essential in exploiting the full potential of the large optical/infrared interferometers currently under construction. Both observations with high-angular resolution and at high contrast, and with a high point source sensitivity are facilitated by adaptive optics. Among the areas which benefit most from the use of adaptive optics are studies of the circumstellar environment (envelopes, disks, outflows), substellar companions and multiple systems, and dense young stellar populations. This contribution highlights some of the recent advances in star formation studies facilitated by adaptive optics, and gives a brief tutorial on optimized observing and data reduction strategies.

  2. Zonal Flow as Pattern Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Jeffrey B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this section, we examine the transition from statistically homogeneous turbulence to inhomogeneous turbulence with zonal flows. Statistical equations of motion can be derived from the quasilinear approximation to the Hasegawa-Mima equation. We review recent work that finds a bifurcation of these equations and shows that the emergence of zonal flows mathematically follows a standard type of pattern formation. We also show that the dispersion relation of modulational instability can be extracted from the statistical equations of motion in a certain limit. The statistical formulation can thus be thought to offer a more general perspective on growth of coherent structures, namely through instability of a full turbulent spectrum. Finally, we offer a physical perspective on the growth of large-scale structures.

  3. Methanol Masers and Star Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Sobolev; A. B. Ostrovskii; M. S. Kirsanova; O. V. Shelemei; M. A. Voronkov; A. V. Malyshev

    2006-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Methanol masers which are traditionally divided into two classes provide possibility to study important parts of the star forming regions: Class~II masers trace vicinities of the massive YSOs while class~I masers are likely to trace more distant parts of the outflows where newer stars can form. There are many methanol transitions which produce observed masers. This allows to use pumping analysis for estimation of the physical parameters in the maser formation regions and its environment, for the study of their evolution. Extensive surveys in different masing transitions allow to conclude on the values of the temperatures, densities, dust properties, etc. in the bulk of masing regions. Variability of the brightest masers is monitored during several years. In some cases it is probably caused by the changes of the dust temperature which follow variations in the brightness of the central YSO reflecting the character of the accretion process. A unified catalogue of the class II methanol masers consisting of more than 500 objects is compiled. Analysis of the data shows that: physical conditions within the usual maser source vary considerably; maser brightness is determined by parameters of some distinguished part of the object - maser formation region; class II methanol masers are formed not within the outflows but in the regions affected by their propagation. It is shown that the "near" solutions for the kinematic distances to the sources can be used for statistical analysis. The luminosity function of the 6.7 GHz methanol masers is constructed. It is shown that improvement of the sensitivity of surveys can increase number of detected maser sources considerably.

  4. Purification of Polyhydroxybutyrate Synthase from Its Native Organism, Ralstonia eutropha: Implications for the Initiation and Elongation of Polymer Formation in Vivo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Mimi

    Class I polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthase (PhaC) from Ralstonia eutropha catalyzes the formation of PHB from (R)-3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA, ultimately resulting in the formation of insoluble granules. Previous mechanistic ...

  5. Pocket formation and the flame surface density equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kollman, W. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Chen, J.H. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The occurrence and properties of singularities in the equation for the surface density function {sigma} {triple_bond}{vert_bar}{del}{Phi}{vert_bar} are analyzed analytically and numerically using data from two dimensional direct numerical simulation (DNS) of pocket formation in a premixed methane-air flame. The various stages and the relevant time scales associated with pocket formation were determined in a previous study. It was found that isolated pockets form if and only if a nondegenerate critical point of a saddle point type appears. The appearance of a singularity in the isoline representing the flame front may have implications to modeling of the terms in the surface density function (sdf) approach during such transient events as pocket formation. The sink and source terms in sdf are evaluated in the neighborhood of a critical point using DNS data during pocket formation, and an analytic representation of a scalar in the vicinity of the critical point which allows for the computation of all kinematic properties. The analytic and computational results show that the normal restoration and dissipation terms in the sdf become singular at the critical point when the pocket emerges. Furthermore, the analytic results show that the singularities exactly cancel, and therefore, the main conclusion is that it is unnecessary to model the singular behavior of these terms at critical points. However, closure of their sum is recommended.

  6. Implantation conditions for diamond nanocrystal formation in amorphous silica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buljan, Maja; Radovic, Iva Bogdanovic; Desnica, Uros V.; Ivanda, Mile; Jaksic, Milko [Ruder Boskovic Institute, P.O. Box 180, 10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Saguy, Cecile; Kalish, Rafi [Physics Department and Solid State Institute, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Djerdj, Igor [Department of Materials, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) Zuerich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Str. 10, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Tonejc, Andelka [Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Gamulin, Ozren [School of Medicine, Zagreb University, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of carbon ion implantation in amorphous silica, which, followed by annealing in a hydrogen-rich environment, leads to preferential formation of carbon nanocrystals with cubic diamond (c-diamond), face-centered cubic (n-diamond), or simple cubic (i-carbon) carbon crystal lattices. Two different annealing treatments were used: furnace annealing for 1 h and rapid thermal annealing for a brief period, which enables monitoring of early nucleation events. The influence of implanted dose and annealing type on carbon and hydrogen concentrations, clustering, and bonding were investigated. Rutherford backscattering, elastic recoil detection analysis, infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, ultraviolet-visible absorption measurements, and Raman spectroscopy were used to study these carbon formations. These results, combined with the results of previous investigations on similar systems, show that preferential formation of different carbon phases (diamond, n-diamond, or i-carbon) depends on implantation energy, implantation dose, and annealing conditions. Diamond nanocrystals formed at a relatively low carbon volume density are achieved by deeper implantation and/or lower implanted dose. Higher volume densities led to n-diamond and finally to i-carbon crystal formation. This observed behavior is related to damage sites induced by implantation. The optical properties of different carbon nanocrystal phases were significantly different.

  7. The Formation and Fragmentation of Primordial Molecular Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Abel; Greg L. Bryan; Michael L. Norman

    1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Many questions in physical cosmology regarding the thermal history of the intergalactic medium, chemical enrichment, reionization, etc. are thought to be intimately related to the nature and evolution of pregalactic structure. In particular the efficiency of primordial star formation and the primordial IMF are of special interest. We present results from high resolution three-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement simulations that follow the collapse of primordial molecular clouds and their subsequent fragmentation within a cosmologically representative volume. Comoving scales from 128 kpc down to 0.5 pc are followed accurately. Dark matter dynamics, hydrodynamics and all relevant chemical and radiative processes (cooling) are followed self-consistently for a cluster normalized CDM structure formation model. Primordial molecular clouds with ~100,000 solar masses are assembled by mergers of multiple objects that have formed hydrogen molecules in the gas phase with a fractional abundance of 100,000/cm^3 are found. We find that less than 1% of the primordial gas in such small scale structures cools and collapses to sufficiently high densities to be available for primordial star formation. Furthermore, our results indicate that the formation of very massive objects, massive black holes, fragmentation of a large fraction of baryons into brown dwars or Jupiter size fragments seems, in contrast to various claims in the literature, very unlikely. The expected escape fraction of UV photons with (h nu) > 11eV is very small.

  8. Radio Triggered Star Formation in Cooling Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. R. McNamara

    1999-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The giant galaxies located at the centers of cluster cooling flows are frequently sites of vigorous star formation. In some instances, star formation appears to have been triggered by the galaxy's radio source. The colors and spectral indices of the young populations are generally consistent with short duration bursts or continuous star formation for durations much less than 1 Gyr, which is less than the presumed ages of cooling flows. The star formation properties are inconsistent with fueling by a continuously accreting cooling flow, although the prevalence of star formation is consistent with repeated bursts and periodic refueling. Star formation may be fueled, in some cases, by cold material stripped from neighboring cluster galaxies.

  9. POX 186: A Dwarf Galaxy in the Process of Formation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael R. Corbin; William D. Vacca

    2002-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present deep U, V and I band images of the "ultracompact" blue dwarf galaxy POX 186 obtained with the Planetary Camera 2 of the Hubble Space Telescope. We have also obtained a near-ultraviolet spectrum of the object with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph, and combine this with a new ground-based optical spectrum. The images confirm the galaxy to be extremely small, with a maximum extent of only 300 pc, a luminosity ~ 10^-4 L*, and an estimated mass ~ 10^7 M(sun). Its morphology is highly asymmetric, with a tail of material on its western side that may be tidal in origin. The U-band image shows this tail to be part of a stream of material in which stars have recently formed. Most of the star formation in the galaxy is however concentrated in a central, compact (d ~ 10 - 15 pc) star cluster. The outer regions of the galaxy are significantly redder than the cluster, with V - I colors consistent with a population dominated by K and M stars. While these results rule out earlier speculation that POX 186 is a protogalaxy, its morphology, mass and active star formation suggest that it represents a recent (within ~ 10^8 yr) collision between two clumps of stars of sub-galactic size (~ 100 pc). POX 186 may thus be a very small dwarf galaxy that, dynamically speaking, is still in the process of formation. This interpretation is supported by the fact that it resides in a void, so its morphology cannot be explained as the result of an encounter with a more massive galaxy. Clumps of stars this small may represent the building blocks required by hierarchical models of galaxy formation, and these results also support the recent "downsizing" picture of galaxy formation in which the least massive objects are the last to form.

  10. Floating insulated conductors for heating subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burns, David; Goodwin, Charles R.

    2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a conduit located in a first opening in the subsurface formation. Three electrical conductors are located in the conduit. A return conductor is located inside the conduit. The return conductor is electrically coupled to the ends of the electrical conductors distal from the surface of the formation. Insulation is located inside the conduit. The insulation electrically insulates the three electrical conductors, the return conductor, and the conduit from each other.

  11. Nonequilibrium Atmospheric Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aerosol Formation and Growth. Abstract: Airborne particles play a critical role in air quality, human health effects, visibility and climate. Secondary organic aerosols (SOA)...

  12. Standard Format and Content for Emergency Plans

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume addresses recommended emergency plan format and content for Operational Emergency Base Programs and Operational Emergency Hazardous Material Programs. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-3.

  13. Heating systems for heating subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and systems for heating a subsurface formation are described herein. A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a sealed conduit positioned in an opening in the formation and a heat source. The sealed conduit includes a heat transfer fluid. The heat source provides heat to a portion of the sealed conduit to change phase of the heat transfer fluid from a liquid to a vapor. The vapor in the sealed conduit rises in the sealed conduit, condenses to transfer heat to the formation and returns to the conduit portion as a liquid.

  14. Hydrogen Adsorption Induces Interlayer Carbon Bond Formation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Adsorption Induces Interlayer Carbon Bond Formation in Supported Few-Layer Graphene Friday, February 28, 2014 Among the allotropes of carbon, diamond has some of the most...

  15. Treating tar sands formations with dolomite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for treating a karsted formation containing heavy hydrocarbons and dolomite includes providing heat to at least part of one or more karsted layers in the formation from one or more heaters located in the karsted layers. A temperature in at least one of the karsted layers is allowed to reach a decomposition temperature of dolomite in the formation. The dolomite is allowed to decompose and at least some hydrocarbons are produced from at least one of the karsted layers of the formation.

  16. Theoretical Investigations on the Formation and Dehydrogenation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of boron-nitrogen-hydrogen (BNHx) compounds that are promising materials for chemical hydrogen storage. Understanding the kinetics and reaction pathways of formation of these...

  17. Geothermal: Search Results

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Search Results Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced Search New Hot Docs News Related Links The...

  18. User Survey Results | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    have accessed computing resources during the prior year. The results of the most recent survey are posted here with management responses to concerns or issues identified by our...

  19. On the formation of massive stellar clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tenorio-Tagle, G; Silich, S A; Medina-Tanco, G A; Muñoz-Tunón, C; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Palous, Jan; Silich, Sergiy; Medina-Tanco, Gustavo A.; Munoz-Tunon, Casiana

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we model a star forming factory in which the continuous creation of stars results in a highly concentrated, massive (globular cluster-like) stellar system. We show that under very general conditions a large-scale gravitational instability in the ISM, which triggers the collapse of a massive cloud, leads with the aid of a spontaneous first generation of massive stars, to a standing, small-radius, cold and dense shell. Eventually, as more of the collapsing matter is processed and incorporated, the shell becomes gravitationally unstable and begins to fragment, allowing the formation of new stars, while keeping its location. This is due to a detailed balance established between the ram pressure from the collapsing cloud which, together with the gravitational force exerted on the shell by the forming cluster, acts against the mechanical energy deposited by the collection of new stars. We analyze the mass spectrum of fragments that result from the continuous fragmentation of the standing shell and show that it...

  20. Format requirements of thermal neutron scattering data in a nuclear data format to succeed the ENDF format

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In November 2012, the Working Party on Evaluation Cooperation Subgroup 38 (WPEC-SG38) began with the task of developing a nuclear data format and supporting infrastructure to replace the now nearly 50 year old ENDF format. The first step in this process is to develop requirements for the new format and infrastructure. In this talk, I will review the status of ENDF's Thermal Scattering Law (TSL) formats as well as support for this data in the GND format (from which the new format is expected to evolve). Finally, I hope to begin a dialog with members of the thermal neutron scattering community so that their data needs can be accurately and easily accommodated by the new format and tools, as captured by the requirements document. During this discussion, we must keep in mind that the new tools and format must; Support what is in existing data files; Support new things we want to put in data files; and Be flexible enough for us to adapt it to future unanticipated challenges.

  1. Overview of ALICE results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kryshen, E L

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Selected ALICE results on the global event properties, particle spectra, azimuthal anisotropy, heavy flavour and quarkonium production in Pb-Pb collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 2.76 TeV are presented. First results on p-Pb collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 5.02 TeV are briefly reviewed.

  2. Diffraction Results from CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goulianos, Konstantin

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present final results by the CDF II collaboration on diffractive W and Z production, report on the status of ongoing analyses on diffractive dijet production and on rapidity gaps between jets, and briefly summarize results obtained on exclusive production pointing to their relevance to calibrating theoretical models used to predict exclusive Higgs-boson production at the LHC.

  3. Recent results from TRISTAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enomoto, Ryoji [National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TRISTAN results on {gamma}{gamma} physics from 1994 to 1995 are reviewed in this report. We have systematically investigated jet production, the {gamma}-structure function, and charm pair production in {gamma}{gamma} processes. The results are discussed, and future prospects are presented.

  4. Fission and quasi-fission: insights into heavy element formation reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinde, D. J.; Rietz, R. du; Rafiei, R.; Dasgupta, M.; Diaz-Torres, A. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Thomas, R. G. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); B.A.R.C., Mumbai (India)

    2009-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Mass-angle distributions carry detailed information on the characteristics of quasi-fission, and thus of the dynamics of heavy element formation reactions. Recent experimental results are presented and discussed.

  5. Methods for synthesizing alane without the formation of adducts and free of halides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zidan, Ragaiy; Knight, Douglas A; Dinh, Long V

    2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is provided to synthesize an alane without the formation of alane adducts as a precursor. The resulting product is a crystallized .alpha.-alane and is a highly stable product and is free of halides.

  6. Planck 2013 results. XXX. Cosmic infrared background measurements and implications for star formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ade, P A R; Armitage-Caplan, C; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bethermin, M; Bielewicz, P; Blagrave, K; Bobin, J; Bock, J J; Bonaldi, A; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bridges, M; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chen, X; Chiang, H C; Chiang, L -Y; Christensen, P R; Church, S; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Désert, F -X; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Ghosh, T; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D; Helou, G; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Kalberla, P; Keihänen, E; Kerp, J; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lacasa, F; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Langer, M; Lasenby, A; Laureijs, R J; Lawrence, C R; Leonardi, R; León-Tavares, J; Lesgourgues, J; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Mazzotta, P; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Osborne, S; Oxborrow, C A; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Partridge, B; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Roudier, G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savini, G; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Serra, P; Shellard, E P S; Spencer, L D; Starck, J -L; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sureau, F; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Tavagnacco, D; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Tuovinen, J; Türler, M; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Welikala, N; White, M; White, S D M; Winkel, B; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new measurements of CIB anisotropies using Planck. Combining HFI data with IRAS, the angular auto- and cross frequency power spectrum is measured from 143 to 3000 GHz, and the auto-bispectrum from 217 to 545 GHz. The total areas used to compute the CIB power spectrum and bispectrum are about 2240 and 4400 deg^2, respectively. After careful removal of the contaminants, and a complete study of systematics, the CIB power spectrum and bispectrum are measured with unprecedented signal to noise ratio from angular multipoles ell~150 to 2500, and ell~130 to 1100, respectively. Two approaches are developed for modelling CIB power spectrum anisotropies. The first approach takes advantage of the unique measurements by Planck at large angular scales, and models only the linear part of the power spectrum, with a mean bias of dark matter halos hosting dusty galaxies at a given redshift weighted by their contribution to the emissivities. The second approach is based on a model that associates star-forming galaxie...

  7. Mixed-mode diesel HCCI with External Mixture Formation: Preliminary Results

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311,Official FileEnergyAERMOD-PRIME,Department ofMixed Solvent|

  8. Le logiciel "Tigre" en formation PLC 1 Grtice J. Vincent Le logiciel Tigre en formation PLC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    "Tigre" en formation PLC 1 Grétice J. Vincent Le logiciel « Tigre » en formation PLC J. Vincent Le;______________________________________________________________________________________ Le logiciel "Tigre" en formation PLC 2 Grétice J. Vincent 1.1. La lecture Voici l'écran d;______________________________________________________________________________________ Le logiciel "Tigre" en formation PLC 3 Grétice J. Vincent Figure 3 1.2. La démonstration Voici l

  9. Synergistic effect of mixing dimethyl ether with methane, ethane, propane, and ethylene fuels on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and soot formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, S.S. [Corporate Research and Development Division, Hyundai-Kia Motors, Gyeonggi-do 445-706 (Korea); Anh, D.H. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Daejeon 305-380 (Korea); Chung, S.H. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea)

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Characteristics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and soot formation in counterflow diffusion flames of methane, ethane, propane, and ethylene fuels mixed with dimethyl ether (DME) have been investigated. Planar laser-induced incandescence and fluorescence techniques were employed to measure relative soot volume fractions and PAH concentrations, respectively. Results showed that even though DME is known to be a clean fuel in terms of soot formation, DME mixture with ethylene fuel increases PAH and soot formation significantly as compared to the pure ethylene case, while the mixture of DME with methane, ethane, and propane decreases PAH and soot formation. Numerical calculations adopting a detailed kinetics showed that DME can be decomposed to produce a relatively large number of methyl radicals in the low-temperature region where PAH forms and grows; thus the mixture of DME with ethylene increases CH{sub 3} radicals significantly in the PAH formation region. Considering that the increase in the concentration of O radicals is minimal in the PAH formation region with DME mixture, the enhancement of PAH and soot formation in the mixture flames of DME and ethylene can be explained based on the role of methyl radicals in PAH and soot formation. Methyl radicals can increase the concentration of propargyls, which could enhance incipient benzene ring formation through the propargyl recombination reaction and subsequent PAH growth. Thus, the result substantiates the importance of methyl radicals in PAH and soot formation, especially in the PAH formation region of diffusion flames. (author)

  10. Multiple stalk formation as a pathway of defect-induced membrane fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. B. Lukatsky; Daan Frenkel

    2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose that the first stage of membrane fusion need not be the formation of a single stalk. Instead, we consider a scenario for defect-induced membrane fusion that proceeds cooperatively via multiple stalk formation. The defects (stalks or pores) attract each other via membrane-mediated capillary interactions that result in a condensation transition of the defects. The resulting dense phase of stalks corresponds to the so-called fusion intermediate.

  11. Shell Formation and Bone Strength Laying Hens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shell Formation and Bone Strength in Laying Hens Effects of Age, Daidzein and Exogenous Estrogen Cover aquarelle: E. Spörndly-Nees #12;Shell Formation and Bone Strength in Laying Hens Effects of Age eggshells as shell quality declines with age during the laying period. This is a concern for food safety

  12. DISSERTATION FORMATION OF THE HURRICANE EYE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubert, Wayne H.

    DISSERTATION FORMATION OF THE HURRICANE EYE Submitted by Jonathan L. Vigh Department of Atmospheric OF THE HURRICANE EYE BE ACCEPTED AS FULFILLING IN PART REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY. Schubert Department Head: Richard H. Johnson ii #12;ABSTRACT OF DISSERTATION FORMATION OF THE HURRICANE EYE

  13. FAINT RADIO SOURCES AND STAR FORMATION HISTORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waddington, Ian

    FAINT RADIO SOURCES AND STAR FORMATION HISTORY Deborah B. Haarsma 1 , R. Bruce Partridge 1 , Ian 85287­1504 USA Abstract. Faint extragalactic radio sources provide important information about the global history of star formation. Sensitive radio observations of the Hubble Deep Field and other fields

  14. Methods for forming wellbores in heated formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guimerans, Rosalvina Ramona; Mansure, Arthur James

    2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for forming a wellbore in a heated formation includes flowing liquid cooling fluid to a bottom hole assembly in a wellbore in a heated formation. At least a portion of the liquid cooling fluid is vaporized at or near a region to be cooled. Vaporizing the liquid cooling fluid absorbs heat from the region to be cooled.

  15. Sensitivity and Scenario Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Winston

    Presents the results of various scenarios using models used to study water, climate, agriculture and the economy in Pakistan's Indus Basin, and discusses the policy and investment implications. The water allocations per ...

  16. Electroweak results from CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. S. Waters

    2004-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Inclusive W and Z production cross-sections have been measured by CDF and certain electroweak parameters extracted with high precision from these measurements. New results on diboson production at the Tevatron are also presented.

  17. Recent MEG results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Cavoto

    2010-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    New results of a search for the ultra-rare decay $\\mu \\to e \\gamma$ by the MEG collaboration are reported in this contribution. The data were taken during 2009 and correspond to approximately 6.5 10$^{13}$ muon stopped on target. A maximum likelihood analysis sets an upper limit at 90\\% C.L. on the branching ratio, BF($\\mu \\to e \\gamma$) $< $1.5 10$^{-11}$. The results presented here are preliminary.

  18. Room-temperature Formation of Hollow Cu2O Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hung, Ling-I; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Huang, Wenyu; Yang, Peidong

    2010-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Monodisperse Cu and Cu2O nanoparticles (NPs) are synthesized using tetradecylphosphonic acid as a capping agent. Dispersing the NPs in chloroform and hexane at room temperature results in the formation of hollow Cu2O NPs and Cu@Cu2O core/shell NPs, respectively. The monodisperse Cu2O NPs are used to fabricate hybrid solar cells with efficiency of 0.14percent under AM 1.5 and 1 Sun illumination.

  19. On the formation of massive stellar clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillermo Tenorio-Tagle; Jan Palous; Sergiy Silich; Gustavo A. Medina-Tanco; Casiana Munoz-Tunon

    2003-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we model a star forming factory in which the continuous creation of stars results in a highly concentrated, massive (globular cluster-like) stellar system. We show that under very general conditions a large-scale gravitational instability in the ISM, which triggers the collapse of a massive cloud, leads with the aid of a spontaneous first generation of massive stars, to a standing, small-radius, cold and dense shell. Eventually, as more of the collapsing matter is processed and incorporated, the shell becomes gravitationally unstable and begins to fragment, allowing the formation of new stars, while keeping its location. This is due to a detailed balance established between the ram pressure from the collapsing cloud which, together with the gravitational force exerted on the shell by the forming cluster, acts against the mechanical energy deposited by the collection of new stars. We analyze the mass spectrum of fragments that result from the continuous fragmentation of the standing shell and show that its shape is well approximated at the high mass end by a power law with slope -2.25, very close to the value that fits the universal IMF. The self-contamination resultant from the continuous generation of stars is shown to lead to a large metal spread in massive ($\\sim$ 10$^6$ M$_\\odot$) clusters, while clusters with a mass similar to 10$^5$ M$_\\odot$ or smaller, simply reflect the initial metalicity of the collapsing cloud. This is in good agreement with the data available for globular clusters in the Galaxy.

  20. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cell Wall Recipe: A Lesson on Biofuels Students will investigate how changes in the DNA sequence that codes for cell wall formation can have a favorable outcome in producing...

  1. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wall Recipe: A Lesson on Biofuels Students will investigate how changes in the DNA sequence that codes for cell wall formation can have a favorable outcome in producing plants...

  2. Graphene defect formation by extreme ultraviolet generated photoelectrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, A., E-mail: a.gao@utwente.nl; Lee, C. J.; Bijkerk, F. [FOM-Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Edisonbaan 14, 3439 MN Nieuwegein, The Netherlands and XUV Optics Group, MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the effect of photoelectrons on defect formation in graphene during extreme ultraviolet (EUV) irradiation. Assuming the major role of these low energy electrons, we have mimicked the process by using low energy primary electrons. Graphene is irradiated by an electron beam with energy lower than 80?eV. After e-beam irradiation, it is found that the D peak, I(D), appears in the Raman spectrum, indicating defect formation in graphene. The evolution of I(D)/I(G) follows the amorphization trajectory with increasing irradiation dose, indicating that graphene goes through a transformation from microcrystalline to nanocrystalline and then further to amorphous carbon. Further, irradiation of graphene with increased water partial pressure does not significantly change the Raman spectra, which suggests that, in the extremely low energy range, e-beam induced chemical reactions between residual water and graphene are not the dominant mechanism driving defect formation in graphene. Single layer graphene, partially suspended over holes was irradiated with EUV radiation. By comparing with the Raman results from e-beam irradiation, it is concluded that the photoelectrons, especially those from the valence band, contribute to defect formation in graphene during irradiation.

  3. The role of calcium hydroxide in the formation of thaumasite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellmann, F. [Institute for Building Materials Science, Department of Civil Engineering, Bauhaus-University Weimar (Germany)], E-mail: frank.bellmann@bauing.uni-weimar.de; Stark, J. [Institute for Building Materials Science, Department of Civil Engineering, Bauhaus-University Weimar (Germany)

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It has recently been derived by thermodynamic calculation that the presence or absence of calcium hydroxide plays a vital role in the resistance of cement paste or concrete against the formation of thaumasite. To obtain experimental data on this matter, special binders have been mixed and used for the preparation of mortar bars. These specimens were exposed to moderate sulphate attack for a period of 18 months at a temperature of 8 deg. C. Mortar bars containing calcium hydroxide showed visual signs of attack a few months after exposure, leading to expansion, mass loss and complete failure. In contrast to this, no signs of attack were observed when no calcium hydroxide was present in the microstructure. These results confirm the conclusions of earlier thermodynamic calculations that the presence of calcium hydroxide has an important impact on the formation of thaumasite. Calcium-rich C-S-H formed in the presence of calcium hydroxide is vulnerable against sulphate attack and the formation of thaumasite. In the absence of calcium hydroxide, C-S-H has a much lower calcium/silicon ratio and a higher resistance against the formation of thaumasite.

  4. Feedback from Protostellar Outflows in Star and Star Cluster Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher D. Matzner

    2000-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic stresses collimate protostellar winds into a common distribution of force with angle. Sweeping into the ambient medium, such winds drive bipolar molecular outflows whose properties are insensitive to the distribution of ambient gas and to the details of how the wind is launched, and how its intensity varies over time. Moreover, these properties are in accord with the commonly observed features of outflows. This model is simple enough to permit a quantitative study of the feedback effects from low-mass star formation. It predicts the rate at which star-forming gas is ejected by winds, and hence the efficiency with which stars form. Applied to individual star formation, it relates the stellar initial mass function to the distribution of pre-stellar cores. Applied to cluster formation, it indicates whether the resulting stellar system will remain gravitationally bound. Using the energy injection and mass ejection implied by this model, we investigate the dynamical evolution of a molecular clump as a stellar cluster forms within it. This depends critically on the rate at which turbulence decays: it may involve equilibrium star formation (slow decay), overstable oscillations, or collapse (fast decay).

  5. The star formation history of the Sagittarius stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Boer, T J L; Koposov, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first detailed quantitative study of the stellar populations of the Sagittarius (Sgr) streams within the Stripe 82 region, using photometric and spectroscopic observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The star formation history (SFH) is determined separately for the bright and faint Sgr streams, to establish whether both components consist of a similar stellar population mix or have a distinct origin. Best fit SFH solutions are characterised by a well-defined, tight sequence in age-metallicity space, indicating that star formation occurred within a well-mixed, homogeneously enriched medium. Star formation rates dropped sharply at an age of ~5-7 Gyr, possibly related to the accretion of Sgr by the MW. Finally, the Sgr sequence displays a change of slope in age-metallicity space at an age between 11-13 Gyr consistent with the Sgr alpha-element knee, indicating that supernovae type Ia started contributing to the abundance pattern ~1-3 Gyr after the start of star formation. Results for...

  6. Triggered Star Formation in the Environment of Young Massive Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Gritschneder; T. Naab; F. Heitsch; A. Burkert

    2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent observations with the Spitzer Space Telescope show clear evidence that star formation takes place in the surrounding of young massive O-type stars, which are shaping their environment due to their powerful radiation and stellar winds. In this work we investigate the effect of ionising radiation of massive stars on the ambient interstellar medium (ISM): In particular we want to examine whether the UV-radiation of O-type stars can lead to the observed pillar-like structures and can trigger star formation. We developed a new implementation, based on a parallel Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics code (called IVINE), that allows an efficient treatment of the effect of ionising radiation from massive stars on their turbulent gaseous environment. Here we present first results at very high resolution. We show that ionising radiation can trigger the collapse of an otherwise stable molecular cloud. The arising structures resemble observed structures (e.g. the pillars of creation in the Eagle Nebula (M16) or the Horsehead Nebula B33). Including the effect of gravitation we find small regions that can be identified as formation places of individual stars. We conclude that ionising radiation from massive stars alone can trigger substantial star formation in molecular clouds.

  7. SIMULATION OF THE FORMATION OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, M. C. M.; Title, A. M. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Rempel, M. [High Altitude Observatory, NCAR, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Schuessler, M. [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Katlenburg-Lindau, 37191 (Germany)

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a radiative magnetohydrodynamics simulation of the formation of an active region (AR) on the solar surface. The simulation models the rise of a buoyant magnetic flux bundle from a depth of 7.5 Mm in the convection zone up into the solar photosphere. The rise of the magnetic plasma in the convection zone is accompanied by predominantly horizontal expansion. Such an expansion leads to a scaling relation between the plasma density and the magnetic field strength such that B {proportional_to} rhov{sup 1/2}. The emergence of magnetic flux into the photosphere appears as a complex magnetic pattern, which results from the interaction of the rising magnetic field with the turbulent convective flows. Small-scale magnetic elements at the surface first appear, followed by their gradual coalescence into larger magnetic concentrations, which eventually results in the formation of a pair of opposite polarity spots. Although the mean flow pattern in the vicinity of the developing spots is directed radially outward, correlations between the magnetic field and velocity field fluctuations allow the spots to accumulate flux. Such correlations result from the Lorentz-force-driven, counterstreaming motion of opposite polarity fragments. The formation of the simulated AR is accompanied by transient light bridges between umbrae and umbral dots. Together with recent sunspot modeling, this work highlights the common magnetoconvective origin of umbral dots, light bridges, and penumbral filaments.

  8. Graphite formation in the Hiroshima fire storm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fields, D.E.; Crenshaw, M.; Yalcintas, M.G.; Strehlow, R.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Cole, L.L. (Prairie View A and M Univ., TX (USA))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to investigate what might be the composition and optical properties of particles that could lead to a nuclear winter, a search has been made for particles that had been generated in urban fire storms. Deposits containing small amounts of graphite have been found on an artifact from the Hiroshima fire storm. The fire storm was initiated on August 6, 1945, by the atomic bomb detonation. The particles were rained out of the atmosphere in the black rain that commenced following the urban fire storm. Initial studies using electron microscopy have revealed that the particles consist of a mixture of clay and amorphous sooty carbon. Scanning electron photomicrographs have suggested the presence of graphite. Its presence has been confirmed using laser Raman spectroscopy (LRS), surface ionization mass spectroscopy (SIMS), and electron scattering for chemical analysis (ESCA). Significant amounts of the sooty material consist of clay, and the graphite is probably present as short-range ordered structure in sooty microspheres. The results of this study are presented with a discussion of conditions that may lead to graphite formation.

  9. Plans, Implementation, and Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bioenergy Technologies Office carries out technology research, development, and deployment through an ongoing process of planning and analysis, implementation, and review. This Web page includes links to documents that support and document the program management process, and the results and public benefits that derive from it.

  10. Recent results from MAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MAC Collaboration

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some preliminary results from the MAC detector at PEP are presented. These include measurements of the angular distribution of ..gamma gamma.., ..mu mu.. and tau tau final states, a determination of the tau lifetime, a measurement of R, and a presentation of the inclusive muon p/sub perpendicular/ distribution for hadronic events.

  11. RESULTS OF SLICE MEASUREMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudolph, J

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The linear accelerator ELBE delivers high-brightness electron bunches to multiple user stations, including two IR-FEL oscillators [1], [2]. In the framework of an upgrade program the current thermionic injector is being replaced by a SRF-photoinjector [3], [4]. The SRF injector promises higher beam quality, especially required for future experiments with high power laser radiation. During the commissioning phase, the SRF-injector was running in parallel to the thermionic gun. After installation of a injection beamline (dogleg), beam from the SRF-injector can now be injected into the ELBE linac. Detailed characterization of the electron beam quality delivered by the new electron injector includes vertical slice emittance measurements in addition to measurements of projected emittance values. This report gives an overview of the status of the project and summarizes first measurement results as well as results of simulations performed with measurement settings.

  12. Tevatron Top Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christophe Clement

    2006-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    I present the latest results from the CDF and D0 collaborations on top quark production (single top and top quark pair production) at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider at sqrt(s) =1.96 TeV, measurements of the top quark decay properties such as the branching ratio B(t -> Wb), the W helicity in t -> Wb decays, and measurements of fundamental parameters such as the top quark charge and mass.

  13. The case against scaling defect models of cosmic structure formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Albrecht; Richard A. Battye; James Robinson

    1997-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate predictions from defect models of structure formation for both the matter and Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) over all observable scales. Our results point to a serious problem reconciling the observed large-scale galaxy distribution with the COBE normalization, a result which is robust for a wide range of defect parameters. We conclude that standard scaling defect models are in conflict with the data, and show how attempts to resolve the problem by considering non-scaling defects would require radical departures from the standard scaling picture.

  14. The Role of H2 Molecules in Cosmological Structure Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Abel; Zoltan Haiman

    2000-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the relevance of H2 molecules for structure formation in cosmology. Molecules are important at high redshifts, when the first collapsed structures appear with typical temperatures of a few hundred Kelvin. In these chemically pristine clouds, radiative cooling is dominated H2 molecules. As a result, H2 ``astro-chemistry'' is likely to determine the epoch when the first astrophysical objects appear. We summarize results of recent three-dimensional simulations. A discussion of the effects of feedback, and implications for the reionization of the universe is also given.

  15. Double Chooz: Latest results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. I. Crespo-Anadón; for the Double Chooz collaboration

    2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The latest results from the Double Chooz experiment on the neutrino mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ are presented. A detector located at an average distance of 1050 m from the two reactor cores of the Chooz nuclear power plant has accumulated a live time of 467.90 days, corresponding to an exposure of 66.5 GW-ton-year (reactor power $\\times$ detector mass $\\times$ live time). A revised analysis has boosted the signal efficiency and reduced the backgrounds and systematic uncertainties compared to previous publications, paving the way for the two detector phase. The measured $\\sin^2 2\\theta_{13} = 0.090^{+0.032}_{-0.029}$ is extracted from a fit to the energy spectrum. A deviation from the prediction above a visible energy of 4 MeV is found, being consistent with an unaccounted reactor flux effect, which does not affect the $\\theta_{13}$ result. A consistent value of $\\theta_{13}$ is measured in a rate-only fit to the number of observed candidates as a function of the reactor power, confirming the robustness of the result.

  16. The Ratio of Retrograde to Prograde Orbits: A Test for Kuiper Belt Binary Formation Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilke E. Schlichting; Re'em Sari

    2008-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    With the discovery of Kuiper Belt binaries that have wide separations and roughly equal masses new theories were proposed to explain their formation. Two formation scenarios were suggested by Goldreich and collaborators: In the first, dynamical friction that is generated by a sea of small bodies enables a transient binary to become bound ($L^2s$ mechanism); in the second, a transient binary gets bound by an encounter with a third body ($L^3$ mechanism). We show that these different binary formation scenarios leave their own unique signatures in the relative abundance of prograde to retrograde binary orbits. This signature is due to stable retrograde orbits that exist much further out in the Hill sphere than prograde orbits. It provides an excellent opportunity to distinguish between the different binary formation scenarios observationally. We predict that if binary formation proceeded while sub-Hill velocities prevailed, the vast majority of all comparable mass ratio binaries have retrograde orbits. This dominance of retrograde binary orbits is a result of binary formation via the $L^2s$ mechanism, or any other mechanism that dissipates energy in a smooth and gradual manner. For super-Hill velocities binary formation proceeds via the $L^3$ mechanism which produces a roughly equal number of prograde and retrograde binaries. These predictions assume that subsequent orbital evolution due to dynamical friction and dynamical stirring of the Kuiper belt did not alter the sense of the binary orbit after formation.

  17. Recovery of heavy crude oil or tar sand oil or bitumen from underground formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKay, A.S.

    1989-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a method of producing heavy crude oil or tar sand oil or bitumen from an underground formation. The method consists of utilizing or establishing an aqueous fluid communication path within and through the formation between an injection well or conduit and a production well or conduit by introducing into the formation from the injection well or conduit hot water and/or low quality steam at a temperature in the range about 60{sup 0}-130{sup 0}C and at a substantially neutral or alkaline pH to establish or enlarge the aqueous fluid communication path within the formation from the injection well or conduit to the production well or conduit by movement of the introduced hot water or low quality steam through the formation, increasing the temperature of the injected hot water of low quality steam to a temperature in the range about 110{sup 0}-180{sup 0}C while increasing the pH of the injected hot water or low quality steam to a pH of about 10-13 so as to bring about the movement or migration or stripping of the heavy crude oil or tar sand oil or bitumen from the formation substantially into the hot aqueous fluid communication path with the formation and recovering the resulting produced heavy crude oil or tar sand oil or bitumen from the formation as an emulsion containing less than about 30% oil or bitumen from the production well or conduit.

  18. HYDROCARBON FORMATION ON POLYMER-SUPPORTED COBALT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benner, Linda S.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NV~ August 25-29, 1980 HYDROCARBON FORMATION ON POLYMER-catalyzed reduction of CO to hydrocarbons Tropscb. Among theof CO to saturated linear hydrocarbons and appears to retain

  19. Modeling deposit formation in diesel injector nozzle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudhiesh Kumar, Chintoo

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Formation of deposit in the diesel injector nozzle affects the injection behavior and hinders performance. Under running condition, deposit precursors are washed away by the ensuing injection. However, during the cool down ...

  20. Electromagnetic formation flight of satellite arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, Daniel W., 1980-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposed methods of actuating spacecraft in sparse aperture arrays use propellant as a reaction mass. For formation flying systems, propellant becomes a critical consumable which can be quickly exhausted while maintaining ...

  1. Soot formation in diesel combustion under high-EGR conditions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Idicheria, Cherian A.; Pickett, Lyle M.

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments were conducted in an optically accessible constant-volume combustion vessel to investigate soot formation at diesel combustion conditions - in a high exhaust-gas recirculation (EGR) environment. The ambient oxygen concentration was decreased systematically from 21% to 8% to simulate a wide range of EGR conditions. Quantitative measurements of in-situ soot in quasi-steady n-heptane and No.2 diesel fuel jets were made by using laser extinction and planar laser-induced incandescence (PLII) measurements. Flame lift-off length measurements were also made in support of the soot measurements. At constant ambient temperature, results show that the equivalence ratio estimated at the lift-off length does not vary with the use of EGR, implying an equal amount of fuel-air mixing prior to combustion. Soot measurements show that the soot volume fraction decreases with increasing EGR. The regions of soot formation are effectively 'stretched out' to longer axial and radial distances from the injector with increasing EGR, according to the dilution in ambient oxygen. However, the axial soot distribution and location of maximum soot collapses if plotted in terms of a 'flame coordinate', where the relative fuel-oxygen mixture is equivalent. The total soot in the jet cross-section at the maximum axial soot location initially increases and then decreases to zero as the oxygen concentration decreases from 21% to 8%. The trend is caused by competition between soot formation rates and increasing residence time. Soot formation rates decrease with decreasing oxygen concentration because of the lower combustion temperatures. At the same time, the residence time for soot formation increases, allowing more time for accumulation of soot. Increasing the ambient temperature above nominal diesel engine conditions leads to a rapid increase in soot for high-EGR conditions when compared to conditions with no EGR. This result emphasizes the importance of EGR cooling and its beneficial effect on mitigating soot formation. The effect of EGR is consistent for different fuels but soot levels depend on the sooting propensity of the fuel. Specifically, No.2 diesel fuel produces soot levels more than ten times higher than those of n-heptane.

  2. Role of nucleation sites on the formation of nanoporous Ge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yates, B. R.; Darby, B. L.; Jones, K. S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-6400 (United States); Elliman, R. G. [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory 0200 (Australia)

    2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of nucleation sites on the formation of nanoporous Ge was investigated. Three Ge films with different spherical or columnar pore morphologies to act as inherent nucleation sites were sputtered on (001) Ge. Samples were implanted 90 Degree-Sign from incidence at 300 keV with fluences ranging from 3.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} to 3.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} Ge{sup +}/cm{sup 2}. Electron microscopy investigations revealed varying thresholds for nanoporous Ge formation and exhibited a stark difference in the evolution of the Ge layers based on the microstructure of the initial film. The results suggest that the presence of inherent nucleation sites significantly alters the onset and evolution of nanoporous Ge.

  3. Modelling Pattern Formation in Dip-Coating Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Wilczek; Walter B. H. Tewes; Svetlana V. Gurevich; Michael H. Köpf; Lifeng Chi; Uwe Thiele

    2015-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly review selected mathematical models that describe the dynamics of pattern formation phenomena in dip-coating and Langmuir-Blodgett transfer experiments, where solutions or suspensions are transferred onto a substrate producing patterned deposit layers with structure length from hundreds of nanometres to tens of micrometres. The models are presented with a focus on their gradient dynamics formulations that clearly shows how the dynamics is governed by particular free energy functionals and facilitates the comparison of the models. In particular, we include a discussion of models based on long-wave hydrodynamics as well as of more phenomenological models that focus on the pattern formation processes in such systems. The models and their relations are elucidated and examples of resulting patterns are discussed before we conclude with a discussion of implications of the gradient dynamics formulation and of some related open issues.

  4. The Formation and Fragmentation of Primordial Molecular Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, T; Norman, M L; Abel, Tom; Bryan, Greg L.; Norman, Michael L.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many questions in physical cosmology regarding the thermal history of the intergalactic medium, chemical enrichment, reionization, etc. are thought to be intimately related to the nature and evolution of pregalactic structure. In particular the efficiency of primordial star formation and the primordial IMF are of special interest. We present results from high resolution three-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement simulations that follow the collapse of primordial molecular clouds and their subsequent fragmentation within a cosmologically representative volume. Comoving scales from 128 kpc down to 0.5 pc are followed accurately. Dark matter dynamics, hydrodynamics and all relevant chemical and radiative processes (cooling) are followed self-consistently for a cluster normalized CDM structure formation model. Primordial molecular clouds with ~100,000 solar masses are assembled by mergers of multiple objects that have formed hydrogen molecules in the gas phase with a fractional abundance of 11eV is very small.

  5. The Formation and Fragmentation of Primordial Molecular Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, T; Norman, M L; Abel, Tom; Bryan, Greg L.; Norman, Michael L.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many questions in physical cosmology regarding the thermal history of theintergalactic medium, chemical enrichment, reionization, etc. are thought to beintimately related to the nature and evolution of pregalactic structure. Inparticular the efficiency of primordial star formation and the primordial IMFare of special interest. We present results from high resolutionthree--dimensional adaptive mesh refinement simulations that follow thecollapse of primordial molecular clouds and their subsequent fragmentationwithin a cosmologically representative volume. Comoving scales from 128 kpcdown to 1 pc are followed accurately. Dark matter dynamics, hydrodynamics andall relevant chemical and radiative processes (cooling) are followedself-consistently for a cluster normalized CDM structure formation model.Primordial molecular clouds with ~10^5 solar masses are assembled by mergers ofmultiple objects that have formed hydrogen molecules in the gas phase with afractional abundance of ~10^-4. As the subclumps merge cooling ...

  6. Cyclic Imide Dioxime: Formation and Hydrolytic Stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, S.O. [University of Kansas; Vukovic, Sinisa [ORNL; Custelcean, Radu [ORNL; Hay, Benjamin [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Poly(acrylamidoximes) play an important role in the uranium extraction from seawater. The present work reports solution studies of simple analogs to address the formation and stability of two binding sites present in these polymers, open-chain amidoximes and cyclic imide dioximes, including: 1) conditions that maximize the formation of the cyclic form, 2) existence of a base-induced conversion from open-chain to cyclic form, and 3) degradation under acid and base conditions.

  7. Situ microbial plugging process for subterranean formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McInerney, Michael J. (Norman, OK); Jenneman, Gary E. (Norman, OK); Knapp, Roy M. (Norman, OK); Menzie, Donald E. (Norman, OK)

    1985-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Subterranean paths of water flow are impeded or changed by the facilitation of microbial growth therein. Either indigenous bacterial growth may be stimulated with nutrients or the formation may be first seeded with bacteria or their spores which inhibit fluid flow after proliferation. These methods and bacteria are usable to alter the flow of water in a waterflooded oil formation and to impede the outflow of contaminated water.

  8. Formation evaluation MWD enters new capability realm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hearn, F. (Baker Hughes INTEQ, Houston, TX (United States))

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent industry advances in formation evaluation measurement-while-drilling (FEMWD) have been achieved in well log data acquisition quality and in geosteering drilling applications. This paper presents new technology as applied by Baker Hughes INTEQ which includes: geosteering techniques which help navigate through horizontally drilled reservoirs including improved quality dual propagation resistivity, neutron-porosity and formation-density measurements; predictive modeling of tool responses in reservoir geosteering applications; environmental computer modeling which aids interpretation, including tool eccentering; and new measurement enhancements.

  9. Triggered star formation in the Magellanic Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. G. Elmegreen; J. Palous; Kenji Bekki

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract. We discuss how tidal interaction between the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), and the Galaxy triggers galaxy-wide star formation in the Clouds for the last ? 0.2 Gyr based on our chemodynamical simulations on the Clouds. Our simulations demonstrate that the tidal interaction induces the formation of asymmetric spiral arms with high gas densities and consequently triggers star formation within the arms in the LMC. Star formation rate in the present LMC is significantly enhanced just above the eastern edge of the LMC’s stellar bar owing to the tidal interaction. The location of the enhanced star formation is very similar to the observed location of 30 Doradus, which suggests that the formation of 30 Doradus is closely associated with the last Magellanic collision about 0.2 Gyr ago. The tidal interaction can dramatically compress gas initially within the outer part of the SMC so that new stars can be formed from the gas to become intergalactic young stars in the inter-Cloud region (e.g., the Magellanic Bridge). The metallicity distribution function of the newly formed stars in the Magellanic Bridge has a peak of [Fe/H] ? ?0.8, which is significantly lower than the stellar metallicity of the SMC.

  10. Recent Results from HAPPEX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Michaels

    2006-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    New measurements of the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic scattering of 3GeV electrons off hydrogen and helium-4 targets at theta{sub lab} = 6 degrees are reported. The helium-4 result is A = (+6.40 {+-} 0.23 (stat) {+-} 0.12 (syst)) * 10{sup -6}. The hydrogen result is A = (-1.58 {+-} 0.12 (stat) {+-} 0.04 (syst)) * 10{sup -6}. The asymmetry for hydrogen is a function of a linear combination of G{sub E}{sup s} and G{sub M}{sup s}, the strange quark contributions to the electric and magnetic form factors of the nucleon respectively, and that for helium-4 is a function solely of G{sub E}{sup s}. The combination of the two measurements separates G{sub E}{sup s} and G{sub M}{sup s} and provide new limits on the role of strange quarks in the nucleon charge and magnetization distributions. We extract G{sub E}{sup s} = 0.002 {+-} 0.014 {+-} 0.007 at Q{sup 2} = 0.077 GeV{sup 2} and G{sub E}{sup s} + 0.09 G{sub M}{sup s} = 0.007 {+-} 0.011 {+-} 0.006 at Q{sup 2} = 0.109 GeV{sup 2}.

  11. Organic Separation Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2014-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Separable organics have been defined as “those organic compounds of very limited solubility in the bulk waste and that can form a separate liquid phase or layer” (Smalley and Nguyen 2013), and result from three main solvent extraction processes: U Plant Uranium Recovery Process, B Plant Waste Fractionation Process, and Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Process. The primary organic solvents associated with tank solids are TBP, D2EHPA, and NPH. There is concern that, while this organic material is bound to the sludge particles as it is stored in the tanks, waste feed delivery activities, specifically transfer pump and mixer pump operations, could cause the organics to form a separated layer in the tank farms feed tank. Therefore, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is experimentally evaluating the potential of organic solvents separating from the tank solids (sludge) during waste feed delivery activities, specifically the waste mixing and transfer processes. Given the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste acceptance criteria per the Waste Feed Acceptance Criteria document (24590-WTP-RPT-MGT-11-014) that there is to be “no visible layer” of separable organics in the waste feed, this would result in the batch being unacceptable to transfer to WTP. This study is of particular importance to WRPS because of these WTP requirements.

  12. Characterization of Most Promising Sequestration Formations in the Rocky Mountain Region (RMCCS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McPherson, Brian; Matthews, Vince

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of the “Characterization of Most Promising Carbon Capture and Sequestration Formations in the Central Rocky Mountain Region” project, or RMCCS project, is to characterize the storage potential of the most promising geologic sequestration formations within the southwestern U.S. and the Central Rocky Mountain region in particular. The approach included an analysis of geologic sequestration formations under the Craig Power Station in northwestern Colorado, and application or extrapolation of those local-scale results to the broader region. A ten-step protocol for geologic carbon storage site characterization was a primary outcome of this project.

  13. Star Formation in Isolated Disk Galaxies. II. Schmidt Laws and Efficiency of Gravitational Collapse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuexing Li; Mordecai-Mark Mac Low; Ralf S. Klessen

    2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    (Abridged). We model gravitational instability in a wide range of isolated disk galaxies, using GADGET, a three-dimensional, smoothed particle hydrodynamics code. The model galaxies include a dark matter halo and a disk of stars and isothermal gas. The global Schmidt law observed in disk galaxies is quantitatively reproduced by our models. We find that the surface density of star formation rate directly correlates with the strength of local gravitational instability. The local Schmidt laws of individual galaxies in our models show clear evidence of star formation thresholds. Our results suggest that the non-linear development of gravitational instability determines the local and global Schmidt laws, and the star formation thresholds.

  14. Results from NEMO 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. L. Flack; for the NEMO 3 collaboration

    2008-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The NEMO 3 experiment is located in the Modane Underground Laboratory and has been taking data since 2003 with seven isotopes. It is searching for the double beta decay process with two or zero neutrinos emitted in the final state. Precision measurements of the half-life of the isotopes due to two neutrino double beta decay have been performed and new results for 96Zr, 48Ca and 150Nd are presented here. Measurements of this process are important for reducing the uncertainties on the nuclear matrix elements. No evidence for zero neutrino double beta decay has been found and a 90% Confidence Level lower limit on the half-life of this process is derived. From this an upper limit can be set on the effective Majorana neutrino mass using the most recent nuclear matrix elements calculations.

  15. MELCOR validation results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh, C.D.; Byers, R.K.; Shaffer, C.J.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent comparisons of MELCOR predictions to three sets of experiments, the ABCOVE Aerosol Experiments, the HDR-V44 Steam Blowdown Experiments, and the Battelle-Frankfurt Gas Mixing Experiments are presentd. All three comparisons involve conditions that are of concern in an LWR containment during a severe accident. MELCOR results are compared to the experimental data and the predictions of at least one other state-of-the-art code for each test. In the ABCOVE comparisons, the MELCOR aerosol modeling is demonstrated. In comparisons to the HDR-V44 Steam Blowdown Experiments, MELCOR predictions of the response of the containment to the release of steam from the primary system are shown, and in the Battelle-Frankfurt comparisons, MELCOR predictions of the diffusion in a containment of an injected hydrogen-nitrogen gas are studied. These comparisons provide critical testing of the MELCOR control volume hydrodynamics package, the radionuclide package, and the flow path package.

  16. Results from NA49

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Hoehne

    2005-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of results from the CERN experiment NA49 is presented with emphasis on most recent measurements. NA49 has systematically studied the dependence of hadron production on energy and system size or centrality. At top-SPS energy the detailed investigation of hadron production, now also extending to elliptic flow of Lambda-baryons and to identified particle yields at high p_t, shows that the created matter behaves in a similar manner as at RHIC energies. In the lower SPS energy range a distinct structure is observed in the energy dependence of the rate of strangeness production and in the slopes of p_t-spectra suggesting the onset of the creation of a deconfined phase of matter.

  17. Creating and maintaining a gas cap in tar sands formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Dinkoruk, Deniz Sumnu (Houston, TX); Wellington, Scott Lee (Bellaire, TX)

    2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are disclosed herein. Methods for treating a tar sands formation may include providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the formation. Pressure may be allowed to increase in an upper portion of the formation to provide a gas cap in the upper portion. At least some hydrocarbons are produced from a lower portion of the formation.

  18. Hydrogen Bubbles and Formation of Nanoporous Silicon during Electroche...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bubbles and Formation of Nanoporous Silicon during Electrochemical Etching. Hydrogen Bubbles and Formation of Nanoporous Silicon during Electrochemical Etching. Abstract: Many...

  19. NO Adsorption on Ultrathin O Films: Formation of Nitrite and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Adsorption on Ultrathin O Films: Formation of Nitrite and Nitrate Species. NO Adsorption on Ultrathin O Films: Formation of Nitrite and Nitrate Species. Abstract: Interaction of...

  20. Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Publications Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion Batteries Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion Batteries...

  1. Atomistic Model for the Polyamide Formation from ?-Lactam...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Model for the Polyamide Formation from ?-Lactam Catalyzed by Candida Antarctica Lipase B. Atomistic Model for the Polyamide Formation from ?-Lactam Catalyzed by Candida...

  2. Fayalite Dissolution and Siderite Formation in Water-Saturated...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fayalite Dissolution and Siderite Formation in Water-Saturated Supercritical CO2. Fayalite Dissolution and Siderite Formation in Water-Saturated Supercritical CO2. Abstract:...

  3. Cryogenic CO2 Formation on Oxidized Gold Clusters Synthesized...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cryogenic CO2 Formation on Oxidized Gold Clusters Synthesized via Reactive Layer Assisted Deposition. Cryogenic CO2 Formation on Oxidized Gold Clusters Synthesized via Reactive...

  4. Predicting Nickel Precipitate Formation in Contaminated Soils. (3717)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Predicting Nickel Precipitate Formation in Contaminated Soils. (3717) Authors: E. Peltier* - Univ controlling precipitate formation is still needed. In this study, we have combined experimental data on nickel

  5. ash formation deposition: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    deep-water depositional systems : the upper Miocene Upper Mount messenger formation, Taranaki Basin, New Zealand and Pliocene Repetto and Pico formations, Ventura Basin,...

  6. ash deposit formation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    deep-water depositional systems : the upper Miocene Upper Mount messenger formation, Taranaki Basin, New Zealand and Pliocene Repetto and Pico formations, Ventura Basin,...

  7. Brown carbon formation from ketoaldehydes of biogenic monoterpenes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brown carbon formation from ketoaldehydes of biogenic monoterpenes. Brown carbon formation from ketoaldehydes of biogenic monoterpenes. Abstract: Sources and chemical composition...

  8. Effects of Ambient Density and Temperature on Soot Formation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Density and Temperature on Soot Formation under High-EGR Conditions Effects of Ambient Density and Temperature on Soot Formation under High-EGR Conditions Presentation given at...

  9. EXFOR BASICS A SHORT GUIDE TO THE NEUTRON REACTION DATA EXCHANGE FORMAT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCLANE,V.; NUCLEAR DATA CENTER NETWORK

    2000-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual is intended as a guide to users of nuclear reaction data compiled in the EXFOR format, and is not intended as a complete guide to the EXFOR System. EXFOR is the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the Nuclear Reaction Data Centers. In addition to storing the data and its' bibliographic information, experimental information is also compiled. The status (e.g., the source of the data) and history (e.g., date of last update) of the data set is also included. EXFOR is designed for flexibility in order to meet the diverse needs of the nuclear reaction data centers. It was originally conceived for the exchange of neutron data and was developed through discussions among personnel from centers situated in Saclay, Vienna, Livermore and Brookhaven. It was accepted as the official exchange format of the neutron data centers at Saclay, Vienna, Brookhaven and Obninsk, at a meeting held in November 1969.3 As a result of two meetings held in 1975 and 1976 and attended by several charged-particle data centers, the format was further developed and adapted to cover all nuclear reaction data. The exchange format should not be confused with a center-to-user format. Although users may obtain data from the centers in the EXFOR format, other center-to-user formats have been developed to meet the needs of the users within each center's own sphere of responsibility. The EXFOR format, as outlined, allows a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in a format: l that is machine-readable (for checking and indicating possible errors); l that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting errors). The data presently included in the EXFOR exchange file include: a complete compilation of experimental neutron-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of charged-particle-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of photon-induced reaction data.

  10. EXFOR BASICS A SHORT GUIDE TO THE NEUTRON REACTION DATA EXCHANGE FORMAT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCLANE,V.; NUCLEAR DATA CENTER NETWORK

    2000-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual is intended as a guide to users of nuclear reaction data compiled in the EXFOR format, and is not intended as a complete guide to the EXFOR System. EXFOR is the exchange format designed to allow transmission of nuclear reaction data between the Nuclear Reaction Data Centers. In addition to storing the data and its' bibliographic information, experimental information is also compiled. The status (e.g., the source of the data) and history (e.g., date of last update) of the data set is also included. EXFOR is designed for flexibility in order to meet the diverse needs of the nuclear reaction data centers. It was originally conceived for the exchange of neutron data and was developed through discussions among personnel from centers situated in Saclay, Vienna, Livermore and Brookhaven. It was accepted as the official exchange format of the neutron data centers at Saclay, Vienna, Brookhaven and Obninsk, at a meeting held in November 1969. As a result of two meetings held in 1975 and 1976 and attended by several charged-particle data centers, the format was further developed and adapted to cover all nuclear reaction data. The exchange format should not be confused with a center-to-user format. Although users may obtain data from the centers in the EXFOR format, other center-to-user formats have been developed to meet the needs of the users within each center's own sphere of responsibility. The EXFOR format, as outlined, allows a large variety of numerical data tables with explanatory and bibliographic information to be transmitted in a format: that is machine-readable (for checking and indicating possible errors); that can be read by personnel (for passing judgment on and correcting errors). The data presently included in the EXFOR exchange file include: a complete compilation of experimental neutron-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of charged-particle-induced reaction data, a selected compilation of photon-induced reaction data.

  11. Market Microstructure: A Survey of Microfoundations, Empirical Results, and Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kearns, Michael

    on transactions costs and price impact. Building on these results, we proceed to an equilibrium analysis of policy Bruno Biais, Larry Glosten and Chester Spatt* Abstract We survey the literature analyzing the price formation and trading process, and the conse- quences of market organization for price discovery and welfare

  12. LSND neutrino oscillation results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louis, W.C.; LSND Collaboration

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LSND (Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector) experiment at Los Alamos has conducted a search for muon antineutrino {r_arrow} electron antineutrino oscillations using muon neutrinos from antimuon decay at rest. The electron antineutrinos are detected via the reaction electron antineutrino + proton {r_arrow} positron + neutron, correlated with the 2.2-MeV gamma from neutron + proton {r_arrow} deuteron + gamma. The use of tight cuts to identify positron events with correlated gamma rays yields 22 events with positron energy between 36 and 60 MeV and only 4.6 {+-} 0.6 background events. The probability that this excess is due entirely to a statistical fluctuation is 4.1 {times} 10{sup -8}. A chi-squared fit to the entire positron sample results in a total excess of 51.8 {sup +18.7}{sub -16.9} {+-} 8.0 events with positron energy between 20 and 60 MeV. If attributed to muon antineutrino {r_arrow} electron antineutrino oscillations, this corresponds to an oscillation probability (averaged over the experimental energy and spatial acceptance) of (0.31 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.05){percent}. 10 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  13. LSND neutrino oscillation results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, D.H.; LSND Collaboration

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LSND experiment at Los Alamos has conducted a search for {anti v}{sub {mu}} {yields} {anti v}{sub e} oscillations using {anti v}{sub {mu}} from {mu}{sup +} decay at rest. The {anti v}{sub e} are detected via the reaction {anti v}{sub e} p {yields} e{sup +}n, correlated with the 2.2 MeV {gamma} from n p {yields} d {gamma}. The use of tight cuts to identify e{sup +} events with correlated {gamma} rays yielded 22 events with e{sup +} energy between 36 and 60 MeV and only 4.6 {+-} 0.6 background events. The probability that this excess is due entirely to a statistical fluctuation is 4.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}8}. A {chi}{sup 2} fit to the entire e{sup +} sample results in a total excess of 51.8{sub {minus}16.9}{sup +18.7} {+-} 8.0 events with e{sup +} energy between 20 and 60 MeV. If attributed to {anti v}{sub {mu}} {yields} {anti v}{sub e} oscillations, this corresponds to an oscillation probability (averaged over the experimental energy and spatial acceptance) of 0.31 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.05%.

  14. Subtask 1.8 - Investigation of Improved Conductivity and Proppant Applications in the Bakken Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bethany Kurz; Darren Schmidt; Steven Smith Christopher Beddoe; Corey Lindeman; Blaise Mibeck

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Given the importance of hydraulic fracturing and proppant performance for development of the Bakken and Three Forks Formations within the Williston Basin, a study was conducted to evaluate the key factors that may result in conductivity loss within the reservoirs. Various proppants and reservoir rock cores were exposed to several different fracturing and formation fluids at reservoir conditions. The hardness of the rock cores and the strength of the proppants were evaluated prior to and following fluid exposure. In addition, the conductivity of various proppants, as well as formation embedment and spalling, was evaluated at reservoir temperatures and pressures using actual reservoir rock cores. The results of this work suggest that certain fluids may affect both rock and proppant strength, and therefore, fluid exposure needs to be considered in the field. In addition, conductivity decreases within the Bakken Formation appear to be a function of a variety of factors, including proppant and rock strength, as well as formation embedment and spalling. The results of this study highlight the need for advanced conductivity testing, coupled with quantification of formation embedment and spalling. Given the importance of proppant performance on conductivity loss and, ultimately, oil recovery, better understanding the effects of these various factors on proppant and rock strength in the field is vital for more efficient production within unconventional oil and gas reservoirs.

  15. Efficiencies of Low-Mass Star and Star Cluster Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher D. Matzner; Christopher F. McKee

    2000-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a quantitative model for bipolar outflows driven by hydromagnetic protostellar winds, we calculate the efficiency of star formation assuming that available gas is either converted into stars or ejected in outflows. We estimate the efficiency of a single star formation event in a protostellar core, finding 25%-70% for cores with various possible degrees of flattening. The core mass function and the stellar initial mass function have similar slopes, because the efficiency is not sensitive to its parameters. We then consider the disruption of gas from a dense molecular clump in which a cluster of young stars is being born. In both cases, we present analytical formulae for the efficiencies that compare favorably against observations and, for clusters, against numerical simulations. We predict efficiencies in the range 30%-50% for the regions that form clusters of low-mass stars. In our model, star formation and gas dispersal happen concurrently. We neglect the destructive effects of massive stars: our results are therefore upper limits to the efficiency in regions more massive than about 3000 Msun.

  16. The Formation and Fragmentation of Primordial Molecular Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Abel; Greg L. Bryan; Michael L. Norman

    2000-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Many questions in physical cosmology regarding the thermal history of the intergalactic medium, chemical enrichment, reionization, etc. are thought to be intimately related to the nature and evolution of pregalactic structure. In particular the efficiency of primordial star formation and the primordial IMF are of special interest. We present results from high resolution three--dimensional adaptive mesh refinement simulations that follow the collapse of primordial molecular clouds and their subsequent fragmentation within a cosmologically representative volume. Comoving scales from 128 kpc down to 1 pc are followed accurately. Dark matter dynamics, hydrodynamics and all relevant chemical and radiative processes (cooling) are followed self-consistently for a cluster normalized CDM structure formation model. Primordial molecular clouds with ~10^5 solar masses are assembled by mergers of multiple objects that have formed hydrogen molecules in the gas phase with a fractional abundance of ~10^-4. As the subclumps merge cooling lowers the temperature to ~200 Kelvin in a `cold pocket' at the center of the halo. Within this cold pocket, a quasi-hydrostatically contracting core with ~200 solar mass and number densities > 10^5 cm^-3 is found. We find that less than 1% of the primordial gas in such small scale structures cools and collapses to sufficiently high densities to be available for primordial star formation. Furthermore, it is worthwhile to note that this study achieved the highest dynamic range covered by structured adaptive mesh techniques in cosmological hydrodynamics to date.

  17. Primordial Black Hole Formation during First-Order Phase Transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Jedamzik; J. C. Niemeyer

    1999-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Primordial black holes (PBHs) may form in the early universe when pre-existing adiabatic density fluctuations enter into the cosmological horizon and recollapse. It has been suggested that PBH formation may be facilitated when fluctuations enter into the horizon during a strongly first-order phase transition which proceeds in approximate equilibrium. We employ general-relativistic hydrodynamics numerical simulations in order to follow the collapse of density fluctuations during first-order phase transitions. We find that during late stages of the collapse fluctuations separate into two regimes, an inner part existing exclusively in the high-energy density phase with energy density $\\epsilon_{\\rm h}$, surrounded by an outer part which exists exclusively in the low-energy density phase with energy density $\\epsilon_{\\rm h}-L$, where $L$ is the latent heat of the transition. We confirm that the fluctuation density threshold $\\delta\\epsilon /\\epsilon$ required for the formation of PBHs during first-order transitions decreases with increasing $L$ and falls below that for PBH formation during ordinary radiation dominated epochs. Our results imply that, in case PBHs form at all in the early universe, their mass spectrum is likely dominated by the approximate horizon masses during epochs when the universe undergoes phase transitions.

  18. Gravitational Waves from Direct Collapse Black Holes Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacucci, Fabio; Marassi, Stefania

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The possible formation of Direct Collapse Black Holes (DCBHs) in the first metal-free atomic cooling halos at high redshifts ($z > 10$) is nowadays object of intense study and several methods to prove their existence are currently under development. The abrupt collapse of a massive ($\\sim 10^4 - 10^5 \\, \\mathrm{M_{\\odot}}$) and rotating object is a powerful source of gravitational waves emission. In this work, we employ modern waveforms and the improved knowledge on the DCBHs formation rate to estimate the gravitational signal emitted by these sources at cosmological distances. Their formation rate is very high ($\\sim 10^4 \\, \\mathrm{yr^{-1}}$ up to $z\\sim20$), but due to a short duration of the collapse event ($\\sim 2-30\\, \\mathrm{s}$, depending on the DCBH mass) the integrated signal from these sources is characterized by a very low duty-cycle (${\\cal D}\\sim 10^{-3}$), i.e. a shot-noise signal. Our results show that the estimated signal lies above the foreseen sensitivity of the Ultimate-DECIGO observatory ...

  19. The Formation and Evolution of Prestellar Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philippe André; Shantanu Basu; Shu-ichiro Inutsuka

    2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Improving our understanding of the initial conditions and earliest stages of star formation is crucial to gain insight into the origin of stellar masses, multiple systems, and protoplanetary disks. We review the properties of low-mass dense cores as derived from recent millimeter/submillimeter observations of nearby molecular clouds and discuss them in the context of various contemporary scenarios for cloud core formation and evolution. None of the extreme scenarios can explain all observations. Pure laminar ambipolar diffusion has relatively long growth times for typical ionization levels and has difficulty satisfying core lifetime constraints. Purely hydrodynamic pictures have trouble accounting for the inefficiency of core formation and the detailed velocity structure of individual cores. A possible favorable scenario is a mixed model involving gravitational fragmentation of turbulent molecular clouds close to magnetic criticality. The evolution of the magnetic field and angular momentum in individual cloud cores after the onset of gravitational collapse is also discussed. In particular, we stress the importance of radiation-magnetohydrodynamical processes and resistive MHD effects during the protostellar phase. We also emphasize the role of the formation of the short-lived first (protostellar) core in providing a chance for sub-fragmentation into binary systems and triggering MHD outflows. Future submillimeter facilities such as Herschel and ALMA will soon provide major new observational constraints in this field. On the theoretical side, an important challenge for the future will be to link the formation of molecular clouds and prestellar cores in a coherent picture.

  20. Data from selected Almond Formation outcrops -- Sweetwater County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, S.R.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this research program are to: (1) determine the reservoir characteristics and production problems of shoreline barrier reservoirs; and (2) develop methods and methodologies to effectively characterize shoreline barrier reservoirs to predict flow patterns of injected and produced fluids. Two reservoirs were selected for detailed reservoir characterization studies -- Bell Creek field, Carter County, Montana, that produces from the Lower Cretaceous (Albian-Cenomanian) Muddy Formation, and Patrick Draw field, Sweetwater County, Wyoming that produces from the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) Almond Formation of the Mesaverde Group. An important component of the research project was to use information from outcrop exposures of the producing formations to study the spatial variations of reservoir properties and the degree to which outcrop information can be used in the construction of reservoir models. A report similar to this one presents the Muddy Formation outcrop data and analyses performed in the course of this study (Rawn-Schatzinger, 1993). Two outcrop localities, RG and RH, previously described by Roehler (1988) provided good exposures of the Upper Almond shoreline barrier facies and were studied during 1990--1991. Core from core well No. 2 drilled approximately 0.3 miles downdip of outcrop RG was obtained for study. The results of the core study will be reported in a separate volume. Outcrops RH and RG, located about 2 miles apart were selected for detailed description and drilling of core plugs. One 257-ft-thick section was measured at outcrop RG, and three sections {approximately}145 ft thick located 490 and 655 feet apart were measured at the outcrop RH. Cross-sections of these described profiles were constructed to determine lateral facies continuity and changes. This report contains the data and analyses from the studied outcrops.

  1. Factors of paleosol formation in a Late Cretaceous eolian sand sheet paleoenvironment, Marlia Formation, Southeastern Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Formation, Southeastern Brazil Patrick Francisco Führ Dal' Bó a, , Giorgio Basilici a , Rômulo Simões), Brazil b IG ­ Universidade Federal do Pará, 66075-110, Belém (PA), Brazil a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i Late Cretaceous The Marília Formation, which crops out in southeastern Brazil, is interpreted as a Late

  2. In situ oxidation of subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beer, Gary Lee (Houston, TX); Mo, Weijian (Sugar Land, TX); Li, Busheng (Houston, TX); Shen, Chonghui (Calgary, CA)

    2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and systems for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation described herein include providing heat to a first portion of the formation from a plurality of heaters in the first portion, producing produced through one or more production wells in a second portion of the formation, reducing or turning off heat provided to the first portion after a selected time, providing an oxidizing fluid through one or more of the heater wells in the first portion, providing heat to the first portion and the second portion through oxidation of at least some hydrocarbons in the first portion, and producing fluids through at least one of the production wells in the second portion. The produced fluids may include at least some oxidized hydrocarbons produced in the first portion.

  3. Unveiling the Formation of Massive Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher J. Conselice

    2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Massive galaxies, such as nearby ellipticals, have relatively low number densities, yet they host the majority of the stellar mass in the universe. Understanding their origin is a central problem of galaxy formation. Age dating of stellar populations found in modern ellipticals, and observations of star formation in high redshift galaxies, allow us to determine roughly when these systems formed. These age diagnostics however do not tell us what triggered star formation, or how galaxies form as opposed to simply when. Recent analyses of the structures of z > 2 ultraviolet selected galaxies reveal that major galaxy mergers are a likely method for forming some massive galaxies. There are however galaxy populations at high redshift (z > 2), namely infrared and sub-millimeter bright systems, whose evolutionary relationship to modern ellipticals is still uncertain. An improved characterization of these and other high redshift galaxy populations is achievable with large infrared imaging and spectroscopic surveys.

  4. Formation of Cyanoformaldehyde in the interstellar space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sandip K; Saha, Rajdeep; Chakrabarti, Sonali

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cyanoformaldehyde (HCOCN) molecule has recently been suspected towards the Sagittarius B2(N) by the Green Bank telescope, though a confirmation of this observation has not yet been made. In and around a star forming region, this molecule could be formed by the exothermic reaction between two abundant interstellar species, H$_2$CO and CN. Till date, the reaction rate coefficient for the formation of this molecule is unknown. Educated guesses were used to explain the abundance of this molecule by chemical modeling. In this paper, we carried out quantum chemical calculations to find out empirical rate coefficients for the formation of HCOCN and different chemical properties during the formation of HCOCN molecules. Though HCOCN is stable against unimolecular decomposition, this gas phase molecule could be destroyed by many other means, like: ion-molecular reactions or by the effect of cosmic rays. Ion-molecular reaction rates are computed by using the capture theories. We have also included the obtained rate coef...

  5. STAR FORMATION IN TWO LUMINOUS SPIRAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, Deidre A.; Ashburn, Allison; Wright, Teresa [Lowell Observatory, 1400 West Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Elmegreen, Bruce G. [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, P.O. Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Rubin, Vera C. [Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5241 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Józsa, Gyula I. G.; Struve, Christian [ASTRON (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research NWO), Oude Hoogeveensedijk 4, 7991-PD Dwingeloo (Netherlands)

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We examined star formation in two very luminous (M{sub V} = –22 to –23) Sc-type spiral galaxies, NGC 801 and UGC 2885, using ultra-deep H? images. We combine these H? images with UBV and Two-Micron All-Sky Survey JHK images and H I maps to explore the star formation characteristics of disk galaxies at high luminosity. H? traces star formation in these galaxies to 4-6 disk scale lengths, but the lack of detection of H? further out is likely due to the loss of Lyman continuum photons. Considering gravitational instabilities alone, we find that the gas and stars in the outer regions are marginally stable in an average sense, but considering dissipative gas and radial and azimuthal forcing, the outer regions are marginally unstable to forming spiral arms. Star formation is taking place in spiral arms, which are regions of locally higher gas densities. Furthermore, we have traced smooth exponential stellar disks over four magnitudes in V-band surface brightness and 4-6 disk scale lengths, in spite of a highly variable gravitational instability parameter. Thus, gravitational instability thresholds do not seem relevant to the stellar disk. One possibility for creating an exponential disk is that the molecular cloud densities and star formation rates have exponential profiles and this fact forces the stellar disk to build up such a profile. Another possibility is that the stellar disk is continuously adjusted to an exponential shape regardless of the star formation profile, for example, through global dynamical processes that scatter stars. However, such scattering processes are only known to operate in spiral systems, in which case they cannot explain the same dilemma of smooth exponential disks observed in dwarf irregular galaxies.

  6. Analyze of the star formation modeling algorithm in SPH code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Berczik

    2001-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The chemical and photometric evolution of star forming disk galaxies is investigated. Numerical simulations of the complex gasdynamical flows are based on our own coding of the Chemo - Dynamical Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamical (CD - SPH) approach, which incorporates the effects of star formation. The presented model describes well the time evolution of the basic dynamical, chemical and photometric parameters of a disk galaxy similar to the Milky Way. The metallicity, luminosity and colors obtained are typical for such disk galaxies. During the calculations we made an extended test of the proposed SF criteria. We find that the obtained results with different "gas" and "star" particle numbers are not only qualitatively but also quantitatively similar.

  7. Target Plasma Formation for Magnetic Compression/Magnetized Target Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindemuth, I.R.; Reinovsky, R.E.; Chrien, R.E.; Christian, J.M.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Goforth, J.H.; Haight, R.C.; Idzorek, G.; King, N.S.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Larson, R.E.; Morgan, G.L.; Olinger, B.W.; Oona, H.; Sheehey, P.T.; Shlachter, J.S.; Smith, R.C.; Veeser, L.R.; Warthen, B.J.; Younger, S.M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Chernyshev, V.K.; Mokhov, V.N.; Demin, A.N.; Dolin, Y.N.; Garanin, S.F.; Ivanov, V.A.; Korchagin, V.P.; Mikhailov, O.D.; Morozov, I.V.; Pak, S.V.; Pavlovskii, E.S.; Seleznev, N.Y.; Skobelev, A.N.; Volkov, G.I.; Yakubov, V.A. [All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics, Arzamas-16 (Russian Federation)] [All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics, Arzamas-16 (Russian Federation)

    1995-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental observations of plasma behavior in a novel plasma formation chamber are reported. Experimental results are in reasonable agreement with two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic computations suggesting that the plasma could subsequently be adiabatically compressed by a magnetically driven pusher to yield 1 GJ of fusion energy. An explosively driven helical flux compression generator mated with a unique closing switch/opening switch combination delivered a 2.7 MA, 347 {mu}s magnetization current and an additional 5 MA, 2.5 {mu}s electrical pulse to the chamber. A hot plasma was produced and 10{sup 13} D-T fusion reactions were observed.

  8. Parallel heater system for subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Christopher Kelvin (Houston, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX)

    2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A heating system for a subsurface formation is disclosed. The system includes a plurality of substantially horizontally oriented or inclined heater sections located in a hydrocarbon containing layer in the formation. At least a portion of two of the heater sections are substantially parallel to each other. The ends of at least two of the heater sections in the layer are electrically coupled to a substantially horizontal, or inclined, electrical conductor oriented substantially perpendicular to the ends of the at least two heater sections.

  9. Creating fluid injectivity in tar sands formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stegemeier, George Leo; Beer, Gary Lee; Zhang, Etuan

    2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods for treating a tar sands may include heating a portion of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the portion. The heat may be controlled to increase the permeability of at least part of the portion to create an injection zone in the portion with an average permeability sufficient to allow injection of a fluid through the injection zone. A drive fluid and/or an oxidizing fluid may be provided into the injection zone. At least some hydrocarbons including mobilized hydrocarbons are produced from the portion.

  10. Induction heaters used to heat subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Bass, Ronald M. (Houston, TX)

    2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A heating system for a subsurface formation includes an elongated electrical conductor located in the subsurface formation. The electrical conductor extends between at least a first electrical contact and a second electrical contact. A ferromagnetic conductor at least partially surrounds and at least partially extends lengthwise around the electrical conductor. The electrical conductor, when energized with time-varying electrical current, induces sufficient electrical current flow in the ferromagnetic conductor such that the ferromagnetic conductor resistively heats to a temperature of at least about 300.degree. C.

  11. Effects of photochemical formation of mercuric oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granite, E.J.; Pennline, H.W.; Hoffman, J.S.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The photochemistry of elemental mercury and oxygen was examined using quartz flow reactors. Germicidal bulbs were used as the source of 253.7-nm ultraviolet radiation. The formation of mercuric oxide, as visually detected by yellow-brown stains on the quartz walls, was confirmed by both ICP-AES and SEM-EDX analyses. In addition, a high surface area calcium silicate sorbent was used to capture the mercuric oxide in one of the experiments. The implications of mercuric oxide formation with respect to analysis of gases for mercury content, atmospheric reactions, and direct ultraviolet irradiation of flue gas for mercury sequestration are discussed.

  12. Aromatics oxidation and soot formation in flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, J.B.; Pope, C.J.; Shandross, R.A.; Yadav, T. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The scope includes detailed measurements of profiles of stable and radical species concentrations in low-pressure one-dimensional premixed flames. Intermediate species identifications and mole fractions, fluxes, and net reaction rates calculated from the measured profiles are used to test postulated reaction mechanisms. Particular objectives are to identify and to determine or confirm rate constants for the main benzene oxidation reactions in flames, and to characterize fullerenes and their formation mechanisms and kinetics.

  13. Creating fluid injectivity in tar sands formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stegemeier, George Leo; Beer, Gary Lee; Zhang, Etuan

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods for treating a tar sands may include heating a portion of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the portion. The heat may be controlled to increase the permeability of at least part of the portion to create an injection zone in the portion with an average permeability sufficient to allow injection of a fluid through the injection zone. A drive fluid and/or an oxidizing fluid may be provided into the injection zone. At least some hydrocarbons are produced from the portion.

  14. On star formation rate and turbulent dissipation in galactic models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. P. Kurbatov

    2007-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The models of star formation function and of dissipation of turbulent energy of interstellar medium are proposed. In star formation model the feedback of supernovae is taken into account. It is shown that hierarchical scenario of galaxy formation with proposed models is able to explain the observable star formation pause in the Galaxy.

  15. Power systems utilizing the heat of produced formation fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lambirth, Gene Richard (Houston, TX)

    2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method includes treating a hydrocarbon containing formation. The method may include providing heat to the formation; producing heated fluid from the formation; and generating electricity from at least a portion of the heated fluid using a Kalina cycle.

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    Technology Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 8 of 8 results. Download Exploring Hydroelectricity (9 activities) Integrated and inquiry-based...

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    Science & Technology Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 10 of 10 results. Download Exploring Hydroelectricity (9 activities) Integrated and...

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    & Technology Science Education Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Download Energy in Today's Global Society Energy is an abstract...

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    Technology Download Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 5 of 5 results. Download Energy Expos Students work in groups to create hands-on exhibits...

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    Technology Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 2 of 2 results. Download An Exploration of Wind Energy & Wind Turbines This unit, which includes both a...

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    Technology Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 10 of 10 results. Download Exploring Hydroelectricity (9 activities) Integrated and inquiry-based...

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    Technology Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 3 of 3 results. Download An Exploration of Wind Energy & Wind Turbines This unit, which includes both a...

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    Technology Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 7 of 7 results. Download Exploring Hydroelectricity (9 activities) Integrated and inquiry-based...

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    Technology Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 4 of 4 results. Download Energy from The Wind (9 activities) Hands-on activities that provide a...

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    & Technology Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 3 of 3 results. Download An Exploration of Wind Energy & Wind Turbines This unit, which includes both a...

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Download Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 10 of 10 results. Download Exploring Hydroelectricity (9 activities) Integrated and...

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    Technology Download Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 3 of 3 results. Download An Exploration of Wind Energy & Wind Turbines This unit, which...

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    Science & Technology Download Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 10 of 10 results. Download Exploring Hydroelectricity (9 activities) Integrated and...

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    Science Education Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Download Energy Transfer 1. Identify a closed system with consevative forces. 2....

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    Education Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Article Energy Literacy in Action: Nevada Teachers Helping Students Learn About Energy...

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    Science Education Energy Efficiency Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 2 of 2 results. Download Alternative Fuels Used in Transportation (5...

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    Science Education Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 2 of 2 results. Download Alternative Fuels Used in Transportation (5 Activities) Gasoline is the...

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    Education Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Download Energy Transfer 1. Identify a closed system with consevative forces. 2. Identify...

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    Education Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Download Green Fuel This activity allows students the opportunity to explore different...

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    Education Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 2 of 2 results. Download Energy in Today's Global Society Energy is an abstract concept that is very...

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    Education Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 3 of 3 results. Download Energy in Today's Global Society Energy is an abstract concept that is very...

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    Energy Efficiency Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 10 of 27 results. Download Protect Your Climate Curriculum and Training Request projects here....

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    Energy Efficiency Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 11 - 20 of 27 results. Download Learning and Conserving (10 activities) These activities explore...

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    Middle School (6-8) Teachers Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 10 of 27 results. Download Protect Your Climate Curriculum and Training Request...

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    Middle School (6-8) Teachers Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 11 - 20 of 27 results. Download Learning and Conserving (10 activities) These activities...

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    Download Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 10 of 27 results. Download Protect Your Climate Curriculum and Training Request projects here. Upon request...

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    7 Biofuels Bioenergy Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Video A New Biofuels Technology Blooms in Iowa Cellulosic biofuels made...

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    4 Biofuels Video Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Video A New Biofuels Technology Blooms in Iowa Cellulosic biofuels made from...

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    results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 11 - 20 of 15 results. Download Energy Conservation Contract (4 activities) Students learn about saving energy and encourage...

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    results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 11 - 20 of 16 results. Download Energy Conservation Contract (4 activities) Students learn about saving energy and encourage...

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    Consumption Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 2 of 2 results. Download Energy Management Students will review energy basics and what they have learned...

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    Consumption Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 4 of 4 results. Download Energy Management Students will review energy basics and what they have learned...

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    Consumption Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 2 of 2 results. Download Energy Transmission Students will learn about everyday energy usage by...

  1. Search results | Department of Energy

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    Consumption Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Download Energy Management Students will review energy basics and what they have learned...

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    Consumption Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 3 of 3 results. Download Energy Management Students will review energy basics and what they have learned...

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    Education & Training Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Download Energy Transfer 1. Identify a closed system with consevative forces. 2....

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    Education & Training Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 2 of 2 results. Download Getting Energized Students will be able to describe the forms and...

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    Education & Training Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 2 of 2 results. Download Energy Transfer 1. Identify a closed system with consevative forces....

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    Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 10 of 31 results. Download Energy Literacy Video Analysis Guide A guide for discussion related to the information and...

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    Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 10 of 12 results. Download Energy Literacy Video Analysis Guide A guide for discussion related to the information and...

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 10 of 10 results. Download Energy Literacy Video Analysis Guide A guide for discussion related to the information and...

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    Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 10 of 42 results. Download Energy Literacy Video Analysis Guide A guide for discussion related to the information and...

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    Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 9 of 9 results. Download Energy Literacy Video Analysis Guide A guide for discussion related to the information and...

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 10 of 32 results. Download Energy Literacy Video Analysis Guide A guide for discussion related to the information and...

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 10 of 25 results. Download Energy Literacy Video Analysis Guide A guide for discussion related to the information and...

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 10 of 43 results. Download Energy Literacy Video Analysis Guide A guide for discussion related to the information and...

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    Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 10 of 24 results. Download Energy Literacy Video Analysis Guide A guide for discussion related to the information and...

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    Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 10 of 11 results. Download Energy Literacy Video Analysis Guide A guide for discussion related to the information and...

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    Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 10 of 53 results. Download Energy Literacy Video Analysis Guide A guide for discussion related to the information and...

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    Alternative Fuel Vehicles Energy Efficiency Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 3 of 3 results. Download Alternative Fuels Used in Transportation (5...

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    Alternative Fuel Vehicles Energy Efficiency Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 4 of 4 results. Download Alternative Fuels Used in Transportation (5...

  1. Search results | Department of Energy

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    Alternative Fuel Vehicles Energy Efficiency Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Download Alternative Fuels Used in Transportation (5...

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    Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 7 of 7 results. Download Learning and Conserving (10 activities) These activities explore energy use and...

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    Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 9 of 9 results. Download Learning and Conserving (10 activities) These activities explore energy use and...

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    Geothermal Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 3 of 3 results. Download Energy Production Students will compare and contrast renewable and nonrenewable...

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    Geothermal Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 2 of 2 results. Download Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption, and...

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    Geothermal Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 4 of 4 results. Download Energy Production Students will compare and contrast renewable and nonrenewable...

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    Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 7 of 7 results. Download Plants in Your Gas Tank: From Photosynthesis to Ethanol With ethanol becoming more prevalent...

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 4 of 4 results. Download Plants in Your Gas Tank: From Photosynthesis to Ethanol With ethanol becoming more prevalent...

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    results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 11 - 20 of 12 results. Download Photosynthesis and Biomass Growth (7 Activities) Introduce your students to the power of plants...

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    results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 11 - 20 of 13 results. Download Photosynthesis and Biomass Growth (7 Activities) Introduce your students to the power of plants...

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    Solar Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 2 of 2 results. Download Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption, and...

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    Solar Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 5 of 5 results. Download Energy Production Students will compare and contrast renewable and nonrenewable...

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    Solar Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 2 of 2 results. Download Energy Production Students will compare and contrast renewable and nonrenewable...

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solar Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 4 of 4 results. Download Energy Production Students will compare and contrast renewable and nonrenewable...

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solar Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 3 of 3 results. Download Energy Production Students will compare and contrast renewable and nonrenewable...

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    Science & Technology Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Download Energy in Today's Global Society Energy is an abstract concept that is...

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    Science Education Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Download Energy in Today's Global Society Energy is an abstract concept that is...

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    Science & Innovation Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Download Energy in Today's Global Society Energy is an abstract concept that is...

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    4 Science Education Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Download Energy in Today's Global Society Energy is an abstract concept that...

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    4 Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 7 of 7 results. Download Energy Literacy Videos New video series, Energy Literacy highlights the 7 Essential...

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    7 Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 3 of 3 results. Download Get Current: Switch on Clean Energy Activity Book Switching on clean energy technologies...

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    4 Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 6 of 6 results. Download Get Current: Switch on Clean Energy Activity Book Switching on clean energy technologies...

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    High School (9-12) Teachers Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 8 of 8 results. Download Energy Literacy Videos New video series, Energy Literacy...

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    Elementary (K-5) Teachers Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 11 - 20 of 17 results. Download Get Current: Switch on Clean Energy Activity Book Switching on...

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    Energy Efficiency Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 6 of 6 results. Download Get Current: Switch on Clean Energy Activity Book Switching on clean...

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    Energy Efficiency Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 10 of 10 results. Download Get Current: Switch on Clean Energy Activity Book Switching on clean...

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    Energy Sources Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 10 of 18 results. Download Build a Pizza Box Solar Oven Check out this staightforward lesson, that...

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    Energy Sources Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 7 of 7 results. Download Get Current: Switch on Clean Energy Activity Book Switching on clean energy...

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    Energy Sources Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 3 of 3 results. Download Get Current: Switch on Clean Energy Activity Book Switching on clean energy...

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    7 Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 2 of 2 results. Download Get Current: Switch on Clean Energy Activity Book Switching on clean energy technologies...

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    Energy Sources Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 2 of 2 results. Download Get Current: Switch on Clean Energy Activity Book Switching on clean energy...

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    Download Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 8 of 8 results. Download Energy Literacy Videos New video series, Energy Literacy highlights the 7...

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    Middle School (6-8) Teachers Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 3 of 3 results. Download Powering the Future Using the Environmental Protection...

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    Elementary (K-5) Teachers Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 21 - 30 of 31 results. Download Get Current: Switch on Clean Energy Activity Book Switching on...

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    6 Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 10 of 10 results. Download Get Current: Switch on Clean Energy Activity Book Switching on clean energy...

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    High School (9-12) Teachers Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 7 of 7 results. Download Energy Literacy Videos New video series, Energy Literacy...

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    Energy Efficiency Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 3 of 3 results. Download Powering the Future Using the Environmental Protection Agency's climate...

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    Energy Sources Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 11 - 20 of 17 results. Download Get Current: Switch on Clean Energy Activity Book Switching on clean...

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    7 Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 8 of 8 results. Download Energy Literacy Videos New video series, Energy Literacy highlights the 7 Essential...

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    4 Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 10 of 13 results. Download Energy Literacy Videos New video series, Energy Literacy highlights the 7 Essential...

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    7 Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 7 of 7 results. Download Energy Literacy Videos New video series, Energy Literacy highlights the 7 Essential...

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    6 Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 7 of 7 results. Download Get Current: Switch on Clean Energy Activity Book Switching on clean energy technologies...

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    Download Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 21 - 30 of 31 results. Download Get Current: Switch on Clean Energy Activity Book Switching on clean energy...

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    7 Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 3 of 3 results. Download Powering the Future Using the Environmental Protection Agency's climate change website,...

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    Consumption Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Download Monitoring and Mentoring These activities explore energy use and conservation...

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    2 Energy Efficiency Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 4 of 4 results. Download Understanding Earth's Energy Sources In Part 1, students will know...

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    Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 1 of 1 result. Video Energy 101: Fuel Cell Technology This video illustrates the fundamentals of fuel cell technology...

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    Wind Search results Search results Enter terms Search Showing 1 - 2 of 2 results. Page How Distributed Wind Works Wind generator http:energy.goveerewind...

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