Sample records for multi-scale modeling framework

  1. Modeling complex biological flows in multi-scale systems using the APDEC framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling complex biological flows in multi-scale systems using the APDEC framework David Trebotich methods are based on higher-order finite difference methods in complex geometry with adaptivity-mail: trebotich1@llnl.gov Abstract. We have developed advanced numerical algorithms to model biological fluids

  2. Evaluation of the Multi-scale Modeling Framework Using Data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ovtchinnikov, Mikhail; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Marchand, Roger T.; Khairoutdinov, Marat

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the goals of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program is to provide long-term observations for evaluating and improving cloud and radiation treatment in global climate models. Unfortunately, the traditional parametric approach of diagnosing cloud and radiation properties for gridcells that are tens to hundreds kilometers across from large-scale model fields is not well suited for comparison with time series of ground based observations at selected locations. A recently emerging approach called a multi-scale modeling framework (MMF) has shown promise to bridge the scale gap. The MMF consists of a two-dimensional or small three-dimensional cloud resolving model (CRM) embedded into each grid column of the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM), thereby computing cloud properties at a scale that is more consistent with observations. We present a comparison of data from two ARM sites, one at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) in Oklahoma and one at Nauru Island in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) region, with output from both the CAM and MMF. Two sets of one year long simulations are considered: one using climatological sea surface temperatures (SST) and another using 1999 SST. Each set includes a run with the MMF as well as the CAM run with traditional or standard cloud and radiation treatment. Time series of cloud fraction, precipitation intensity, and downwelling solar radiation flux at the surface are statistically analyzed. For the TWP site, nearly all parameters of frequency distributions of these variables from the MMF run are shown to be more consistent with observation than those from the CAM run. This change is attributed to the improved representation of convective clouds in the MMF compared to the conventional climate model. For the SGP, the MMF shows little to no improvement in predicting the same quantities. Possible causes of this lack of improvement are discussed.

  3. Evaluation of the Multi-Scale Modeling Framework using Data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Marchand, Roger T.; Khairoutdinov, Marat

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the goals of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program was to provide long-term observations for evaluation of cloud and radiation treatment in global climate models. Unfortunately, traditional parametric approach of diagnosing cloud and radiation properties from large-scale model fields is not well suited for comparison with observed time series at selected locations. A recently emerging approach called the multi-scale modeling framework (MMF) has shown promise to bridge the gap. MMF consists of a two-dimensional cloud system resolving model (CSRM) embedded into each CAM grid column of the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM), thereby computing cloud properties at a scale that is more consistent with observations. Because the approach is computationally expensive only limited simulations have been carried out. In this presentation, we will present a comparison of data from two ARM sites, one at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) in Oklahoma and one at Nauru island in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) region, with output from both CAM and MMF. Two sets of one year long simulations are considered: one using climatological sea surface temperatures (SST) and another using 1999 SST. Each set includes a run with MMF as well as CAM run with traditional or standard cloud and radiation treatment. Time series of cloud fraction, precipitation intensity, and downwelling solar radiation flux at the surface are statistically analyzed. For the TWP site, nearly all parameters of frequency distributions of these variables from MMF run are shown to be more consistent with observation than those from CAM run. For the SGP, the improvements are marginal.

  4. Sustainable Manufacturing via Multi-Scale, Physics-Based Process Modeling and Manufacturing-Informed Design, April 2013

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sustainable Manufacturing via Multi-Scale, Physics-Based Process Modeling and Manufacturing-Informed Design

  5. Multi-Scale Multi-Dimensional Model for Better Cell Design and Management (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, G.-H.; Smith, K.

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Describes NREL's R&D to develop a multi-scale model to assist in designing better, more reliable lithium-ion battery cells for advanced vehicles.

  6. Global and multi-scale features of solar wind-magnetosphere coupling: From modeling to forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sitnov, Mikhail I.

    and substorms; 2784 Magnetospheric Physics: Solar wind/magnetosphere interactions; 3210 Mathematical Geophysics in the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction, de- veloping first principles models that encompass allGlobal and multi-scale features of solar wind-magnetosphere coupling: From modeling to forecasting

  7. A dynamic multi-scale model for transient radiative transfer calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    on the radiative transfer equation (RTE) or the diffusion equation (DE). The RTE is a kinetic transport equation-scale model which couples the transient radiative transfer equation (RTE) and the diffusion equation (DE: transient radiative transfer, multi-scale model, finite volume method, diffusion equation, domain

  8. Continuum Level Formulation and Implementation of a Multi-scale Model for Vanadium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    2009-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-scale approach is used to construct a continuum strength model for vanadium. The model is formulated assuming plastic deformation by dislocation motion and strain hardening due to dislocation interactions. Dislocation density is adopted as the state variable in the model. Information from molecular statics, molecular dynamics and dislocation dynamics simulations is combined to create kinetic relations for dislocation motion, strain hardening relations and evolution equations for the dislocation density. Implicit time integration of the constitutive equations is described in the context of implementation in a finite element code. Results are provided illustrating the strain, strain rate, temperature and pressure dependence of the constitutive model.

  9. Multi-scale quantum point contact model for filamentary conduction in resistive random access memories devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lian, Xiaojuan, E-mail: xjlian2005@gmail.com; Cartoixà, Xavier; Miranda, Enrique; Suñé, Jordi [Departament d'Enginyeria Electrònica, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Perniola, Luca [CEA-LETI, MINATEC, Grenoble (France); Rurali, Riccardo [Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona (ICMAB-CSIC), Campus de Bellaterra, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Long, Shibing; Liu, Ming [Laboratory of Nanofabrication and Novel Device Integration, Institute of Microelectronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We depart from first-principle simulations of electron transport along paths of oxygen vacancies in HfO{sub 2} to reformulate the Quantum Point Contact (QPC) model in terms of a bundle of such vacancy paths. By doing this, the number of model parameters is reduced and a much clearer link between the microscopic structure of the conductive filament (CF) and its electrical properties can be provided. The new multi-scale QPC model is applied to two different HfO{sub 2}-based devices operated in the unipolar and bipolar resistive switching (RS) modes. Extraction of the QPC model parameters from a statistically significant number of CFs allows revealing significant structural differences in the CF of these two types of devices and RS modes.

  10. The North American Carbon Program Multi-scale synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project Part 1: Overview and experimental design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huntzinger, D.N. [Northern Arizona University] [Northern Arizona University; Schwalm, C. [Northern Arizona University] [Northern Arizona University; Michalak, A.M [Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford] [Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford; Schaefer, K. [National Snow and Ice Data Center] [National Snow and Ice Data Center; King, A.W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Wei, Y. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Jacobson, A. [National Snow and Ice Data Center] [National Snow and Ice Data Center; Liu, S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Cook, R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Post, W.M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Berthier, G. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE)] [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE); Hayes, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Huang, M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Ito, A. [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan] [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan; Lei, H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Lu, C. [International Center for Climate and Global Change Research and School of Forestry and Wildlife Sci.] [International Center for Climate and Global Change Research and School of Forestry and Wildlife Sci.; Mao, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Peng, C.H. [University of Quebec at Montreal, Institute of Environment Sciences] [University of Quebec at Montreal, Institute of Environment Sciences; Peng, S. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE)] [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE); Poulter, B. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE)] [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE); Riccuito, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Shi, X. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Tian, H. [International Center for Climate and Global Change Research and School of Forestry and Wildlife Sci.] [International Center for Climate and Global Change Research and School of Forestry and Wildlife Sci.; Wang, W. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Ames Research Center, Moffett Field] [National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Ames Research Center, Moffett Field; Zeng, N. [University of Maryland] [University of Maryland; Zhao, F. [University of Maryland] [University of Maryland; Zhu, Q. [Laboratory for Ecological Forecasting and Northwest Agriculture and Forestry University] [Laboratory for Ecological Forecasting and Northwest Agriculture and Forestry University

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) have become an integral tool for extrapolating local observations and understanding of land-atmosphere carbon exchange to larger regions. The North American Carbon Program (NACP) Multi-scale synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP) is a formal model intercomparison and evaluation effort focused on improving the diagnosis and attribution of carbon exchange at regional and global scales. MsTMIP builds upon current and past synthesis activities, and has a unique framework designed to isolate, interpret, and inform understanding of how model structural differences impact estimates of carbon uptake and release. Here we provide an overview of the MsTMIP effort and describe how the MsTMIP experimental design enables the assessment and quantification of TBM structural uncertainty. Model structure refers to the types of processes considered (e.g. nutrient cycling, disturbance, lateral transport of carbon), and how these processes are represented (e.g. photosynthetic formulation, temperature sensitivity, respiration) in the models. By prescribing a common experimental protocol with standard spin-up procedures and driver data sets, we isolate any biases and variability in TBM estimates of regional and global carbon budgets resulting from differences in the models themselves (i.e. model structure) and model-specific parameter values. An initial intercomparison of model structural differences is represented using hierarchical cluster diagrams (a.k.a. dendrograms), which highlight similarities and differences in how models account for carbon cycle, vegetation, energy, and nitrogen cycle dynamics. We show that, despite the standardized protocol used to derive initial conditions, models show a high degree of variation for GPP, total living biomass, and total soil carbon, underscoring the influence of differences in model structure and parameterization on model estimates.

  11. Implementation and Application of SAPRC07 and MCM Mechanisms in the Multi-scale Community Air Quality Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jingyi

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    mechanism. In this study, two state-of-the-science photochemical mechanisms, SAPRC07 and Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM) v3.1, were implemented in the Community Multi-scale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) version 4.6 developed by the US EPA to study a high ozone (O...

  12. A Unified Multi-Scale Model for Pore-Scale Flow Simulations in Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Xiaofan; Liu, Chongxuan; Shang, Jianying; Fang, Yilin; Bailey, Vanessa L.

    2014-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Pore-scale simulations have received increasing interest in subsurface sciences to provide mechanistic insights into the macroscopic phenomena of water flow and reactive transport processes. The application of the pore scale simulations to soils and sediments is, however, challenged because of the characterization limitation that often only allows partial resolution of pore structure and geometry. A significant proportion of the pore space in soils and sediments is below the spatial resolution, forming a mixed media of pore and porous domains. Here we reported a unified multi-scale model (UMSM) that can be used to simulate water flow and transport in mixed media of pore and porous domains under both saturated and unsaturated conditions. The approach modifies the classic Navier-Stokes equation by adding a Darcy term to describe fluid momentum and uses a generalized mass balance equation for saturated and unsaturated conditions. By properly defining physical parameters, the UMSM can be applied in both pore and porous domains. This paper describes the set of equations for the UMSM, a series of validation cases under saturated or unsaturated conditions, and a real soil case for the application of the approach.

  13. Sustainable Manufacturing via Multi-Scale, Physics-Based Process...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Manufacturing via Multi-Scale, Physics-Based Process Modeling and Manufacturing-Informed Design, April 2013 Sustainable Manufacturing via Multi-Scale, Physics-Based Process...

  14. Overview of Computer-Aided Engineering of Batteries and Introduction to Multi-Scale, Multi-Dimensional Modeling of Li-Ion Batteries (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pesaran, A.; Kim, G. H.; Smith, K.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Lee, K. J.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This 2012 Annual Merit Review presentation gives an overview of the Computer-Aided Engineering of Batteries (CAEBAT) project and introduces the Multi-Scale, Multi-Dimensional model for modeling lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles.

  15. Final Progress Report: FRACTURE AND SUBCRITICAL DEBONDING IN THIN LAYERED STRUCTURES: EXPERIMENTS AND MULTI-SCALE MODELING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reinhold H. Dauskardt

    2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Final technical report detailing unique experimental and multi-scale computational modeling capabilities developed to study fracture and subcritical cracking in thin-film structures. Our program to date at Stanford has studied the mechanisms of fracture and fatigue crack-growth in structural ceramics at high temperature, bulk and thin-film glasses in selected moist environments where we demonstrated the presence of a true mechanical fatigue effect in some glass compositions. We also reported on the effects of complex environments and fatigue loading on subcritical cracking that effects the reliability of MEMS and other micro-devices using novel micro-machined silicon specimens and nanomaterial layers.

  16. Multi-scale Modeling Approach to Acoustic Emission during Plastic Deformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jagadish Kumar; G. Ananthakrishna

    2011-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We address the long standing problem of the origin of acoustic emission commonly observed during plastic deformation. We propose a frame-work to deal with the widely separated time scales of collective dislocation dynamics and elastic degrees of freedom to explain the nature of acoustic emission observed during the Portevin-Le Chatelier effect. The Ananthakrishna model is used as it explains most generic features of the phenomenon. Our results show that while acoustic emission bursts correlated with stress drops are well separated for the type C serrations, these bursts merge to form nearly continuous acoustic signals with overriding bursts for the propagating type A bands.

  17. Local Estimation of Modeling Error in Multi-Scale Modeling of Heterogeneous Elastic Solids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moody, Tristan

    2008-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Global Enhancement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 3.3.3 The Adaptive Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Chapter 4. Modeling Error Estimation 30 4.1 Residual-Based Error Estimation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 4.2 Error... with effectivity indices . 80 ix 5.18 Average estimates of enhancement errors in quantity of interest Qx(u) using three enhancements with effectivity indices . . . . 80 x List of Figures 1.1 Examples of composite failure modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2...

  18. MULTI-SCALE MODELING AND APPROXIMATION ASSISTED OPTIMIZATION OF BARE TUBE HEAT EXCHANGERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bacellar, Daniel [University of Maryland, College Park; Ling, Jiazhen [University of Maryland, College Park; Aute, Vikrant [University of Maryland, College Park; Radermacher, Reinhard [University of Maryland, College Park; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Air-to-refrigerant heat exchangers are very common in air-conditioning, heat pump and refrigeration applications. In these heat exchangers, there is a great benefit in terms of size, weight, refrigerant charge and heat transfer coefficient, by moving from conventional channel sizes (~ 9mm) to smaller channel sizes (< 5mm). This work investigates new designs for air-to-refrigerant heat exchangers with tube outer diameter ranging from 0.5 to 2.0mm. The goal of this research is to develop and optimize the design of these heat exchangers and compare their performance with existing state of the art designs. The air-side performance of various tube bundle configurations are analyzed using a Parallel Parameterized CFD (PPCFD) technique. PPCFD allows for fast-parametric CFD analyses of various geometries with topology change. Approximation techniques drastically reduce the number of CFD evaluations required during optimization. Maximum Entropy Design method is used for sampling and Kriging method is used for metamodeling. Metamodels are developed for the air-side heat transfer coefficients and pressure drop as a function of tube-bundle dimensions and air velocity. The metamodels are then integrated with an air-to-refrigerant heat exchanger design code. This integration allows a multi-scale analysis of air-side performance heat exchangers including air-to-refrigerant heat transfer and phase change. Overall optimization is carried out using a multi-objective genetic algorithm. The optimal designs found can exhibit 50 percent size reduction, 75 percent decrease in air side pressure drop and doubled air heat transfer coefficients compared to a high performance compact micro channel heat exchanger with same capacity and flow rates.

  19. Modeling of damage in unidirectional ceramic matrix composites and multi-scale experimental validation on third generation SiC/SiC minicomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Modeling of damage in unidirectional ceramic matrix composites and multi-scale experimental to macroscopic tensile tests, the evolution of microscopic damage mechanisms - in the form of matrix cracks and computed tomography tensile tests. A complete model, including both matrix cracking and fiber breaking

  20. Simulated diurnal rainfall physics in a multi-scale global climate model with embedded explicit convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchard, Michael Stephen

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    their Community Earth System Model (Richard Neale, personaldevelopment of Earth system models capable of reproducing

  1. The Radiative Properties of Small Clouds: Multi-Scale Observations and Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feingold, Graham [NOAA ESRL; McComiskey, Allison [CIRES, University of Colorado

    2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Warm, liquid clouds and their representation in climate models continue to represent one of the most significant unknowns in climate sensitivity and climate change. Our project combines ARM observations, LES modeling, and satellite imagery to characterize shallow clouds and the role of aerosol in modifying their radiative effects.

  2. A multi-scale iterative approach for finite element modeling of thermal contact resistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Mary Kathryn, 1980-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface topography has long been considered a key factor in the performance of many contact applications including thermal contact resistance. However, essentially all analytical and numerical models of thermal contact ...

  3. Toward Multi-scale Modeling and simulation of conduction in heterogeneous materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lechman, Jeremy B.; Battaile, Corbett Chandler.; Bolintineanu, Dan; Cooper, Marcia A.; Erikson, William W.; Foiles, Stephen M.; Kay, Jeffrey J [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA; Phinney, Leslie M.; Piekos, Edward S.; Specht, Paul Elliott; Wixom, Ryan R.; Yarrington, Cole

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes a project in which the authors sought to develop and deploy: (i) experimental techniques to elucidate the complex, multiscale nature of thermal transport in particle-based materials; and (ii) modeling approaches to address current challenges in predicting performace variability of materials (e.g., identifying and characterizing physical- chemical processes and their couplings across multiple length and time scales, modeling infor- mation transfer between scales, and statically and dynamically resolving material structure and its evolution during manufacturing and device performance). Experimentally, several capabilities were sucessfully advanced. As discussed in Chapter 2 a flash diffusivity capabil- ity for measuring homogeneous thermal conductivity of pyrotechnic powders (and beyond) was advanced; leading to enhanced characterization of pyrotechnic materials and properties impacting component development. Chapter 4 describes sucess for the first time, although preliminary, in resolving thermal fields at speeds and spatial scales relevant to energetic components. Chapter 7 summarizes the first ever (as far as the authors know) application of TDTR to actual pyrotechnic materials. This is the first attempt to actually characterize these materials at the interfacial scale. On the modeling side, new capabilities in image processing of experimental microstructures and direct numerical simulation on complicated structures were advanced (see Chapters 3 and 5). In addition, modeling work described in Chapter 8 led to improved prediction of interface thermal conductance from first principles calculations. Toward the second point, for a model system of packed particles, significant headway was made in implementing numerical algorithms and collecting data to justify the approach in terms of highlighting the phenomena at play and pointing the way forward in de- veloping and informing the kind of modeling approach oringinally envisioned (see Chapter 6). In both cases much more remains to be accomplished.

  4. Study of Multi-Scale Cloud Processes Over the Tropical Western Pacific Using Cloud-Resolving Models Constrained by Satellite Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudhia, Jimy

    2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Clouds in the tropical western Pacific are an integral part of the large scale environment. An improved understanding of the multi-scale structure of clouds and their interactions with the environment is critical to the ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) program for developing and evaluating cloud parameterizations, understanding the consequences of model biases, and providing a context for interpreting the observational data collected over the ARM Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites. Three-dimensional cloud resolving models (CRMs) are powerful tools for developing and evaluating cloud parameterizations. However, a significant challenge in using CRMs in the TWP is that the region lacks conventional data, so large uncertainty exists in defining the large-scale environment for clouds. This project links several aspects of the ARM program, from measurements to providing improved analyses, and from cloud-resolving modeling to climate-scale modeling and parameterization development, with the overall objective to improve the representations of clouds in climate models and to simulate and quantify resolved cloud effects on the large-scale environment. Our objectives will be achieved through a series of tasks focusing on the use of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and ARM data. Our approach includes: -- Perform assimilation of COSMIC GPS radio occultation and other satellites products using the WRF Ensemble Kalman Filter assimilation system to represent the tropical large-scale environment at 36 km grid resolution. This high-resolution analysis can be used by the community to derive forcing products for single-column models or cloud-resolving models. -- Perform cloud-resolving simulations using WRF and its nesting capabilities, driven by the improved regional analysis and evaluate the simulations against ARM datasets such as from TWP-ICE to optimize the microphysics parameters for this region. A cirrus study (Mace and co-authors) already exists for TWP-ICE using satellite and ground-based observations. -- Perform numerical experiments using WRF to investigate how convection over tropical islands in the Maritime Continent interacts with large-scale circulation and affects convection in nearby regions. -- Evaluate and apply WRF as a testbed for GCM cloud parameterizations, utilizing the ability of WRF to run on multiple scales (from cloud resolving to global) to isolate resolution and physics issues from dynamical and model framework issues. Key products will be disseminated to the ARM and larger community through distribution of data archives, including model outputs from the data assimilation products and cloud resolving simulations, and publications.

  5. Viscoelastic Model for Lung Parenchyma for Multi-Scale Modeling of Respiratory System, Phase II: Dodecahedral Micro-Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freed, Alan D.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Carson, James P.; Jacob, Rick E.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the first year of this contractual effort a hypo-elastic constitutive model was developed and shown to have great potential in modeling the elastic response of parenchyma. This model resides at the macroscopic level of the continuum. In this, the second year of our support, an isotropic dodecahedron is employed as an alveolar model. This is a microscopic model for parenchyma. A hopeful outcome is that the linkage between these two scales of modeling will be a source of insight and inspiration that will aid us in the final year's activity: creating a viscoelastic model for parenchyma.

  6. On-line supplement to: SMART: A Stochastic Multi-scale Model for the Analysis of Energy Resources, Tech-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Warren B.

    turbine, photovoltaic or hydro-power. Age is typically in units of years. Location can be expressed programming model, and a stochastic optimization problem. System state variables We divide the state variable

  7. Multi-scale First-Principles Modeling of Three-Phase System of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunello, Giuseppe; Choi, Ji; Harvey, David; Jang, Seung

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The three-phase system consisting of Nafion, graphite and platinum in the presence of water is studied using molecule dynamics simulation. The force fields describing the molecular interaction between the components in the system are developed to reproduce the energies calculated from density functional theory modeling. The configuration of such complicated three-phase system is predicted through MD simulations. The nanophase-segregation and transport properties are investigated from the equilibrium state. The coverage of the electrolyte on the platinum surface and the dissolution of oxygen are analyzed.

  8. Multi-scale geospatial agroecosystem modeling: a case study on the influence of soil data resolution on carbon budget estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xuesong; Sahajpal, Ritvik; Manowitz, D.; Zhao, Kaiguang; LeDuc, Stephen D.; Xu, Min; Xiong, Wei; Zhang, Aiping; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Thomson, Allison M.; West, Tristram O.; Post, W. M.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of effective measures to stabilize atmospheric CO2 concentration and mitigate negative impacts of climate change requires accurate quantification of the spatial variation and magnitude of the terrestrial carbon (C) flux. However, the spatial pattern and strength of terrestrial C sinks and sources remain uncertain. In this study, we designed a spatially-explicit agroecosystem modeling system by integrating the Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) model with multiple sources of geospatial and surveyed datasets (including crop type map, elevation, climate forcing, fertilizer application, tillage type and distribution, and crop planting and harvesting date), and applied it to examine the sensitivity of cropland C flux simulations to two widely used soil databases (i.e. State Soil Geographic-STATSGO of a scale of 1:250,000 and Soil Survey Geographic-SSURGO of a scale of 1:24,000) in Iowa, USA. To efficiently execute numerous EPIC runs resulting from the use of high resolution spatial data (56m), we developed a parallelized version of EPIC. Both STATSGO and SSURGO led to similar simulations of crop yields and Net Ecosystem Production (NEP) estimates at the State level. However, substantial differences were observed at the county and sub-county (grid) levels. In general, the fine resolution SSURGO data outperformed the coarse resolution STATSGO data for county-scale crop-yield simulation, and within STATSGO, the area-weighted approach provided more accurate results. Further analysis showed that spatial distribution and magnitude of simulated NEP were more sensitive to the resolution difference between SSURGO and STATSGO at the county or grid scale. For over 60% of the cropland areas in Iowa, the deviations between STATSGO- and SSURGO-derived NEP were larger than 1MgCha(-1)yr(-1), or about half of the average cropland NEP, highlighting the significant uncertainty in spatial distribution and magnitude of simulated C fluxes resulting from differences in soil data resolution.

  9. Geologic Framework Model (GFM2000)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Vogt

    2004-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to document the geologic framework model, version GFM2000 with regard to input data, modeling methods, assumptions, uncertainties, limitations, and validation of the model results, and the differences between GFM2000 and previous versions. The version number of this model reflects the year during which the model was constructed. This model supersedes the previous model version, documented in Geologic Framework Model (GFM 3.1) (CRWMS M&O 2000 [DIRS 138860]). The geologic framework model represents a three-dimensional interpretation of the geology surrounding the location of the monitored geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain. The geologic framework model encompasses and is limited to an area of 65 square miles (168 square kilometers) and a volume of 185 cubic miles (771 cubic kilometers). The boundaries of the geologic framework model (shown in Figure 1-1) were chosen to encompass the exploratory boreholes and to provide a geologic framework over the area of interest for hydrologic flow and radionuclide transport modeling through the unsaturated zone (UZ). The upper surface of the model is made up of the surface topography and the depth of the model is constrained by the inferred depth of the Tertiary-Paleozoic unconformity. The geologic framework model was constructed from geologic map and borehole data. Additional information from measured stratigraphic sections, gravity profiles, and seismic profiles was also considered. The intended use of the geologic framework model is to provide a geologic framework over the area of interest consistent with the level of detailed needed for hydrologic flow and radionuclide transport modeling through the UZ and for repository design. The model is limited by the availability of data and relative amount of geologic complexity found in an area. The geologic framework model is inherently limited by scale and content. The grid spacing used in the geologic framework model (200 feet [61 meters]), discussed in Section 6.4.2, limits the size of features that can be resolved by the model but is appropriate for the distribution of data available and its intended use. Uncertainty and limitations are discussed in Section 6.6 and model validation is discussed in Section 7.

  10. Viscoelastic Model for Lung Parenchyma for Multi-Scale Modeling of Respiratory System Phase I: Hypo-Elastic Model for CFD Implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freed, Alan D.; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An isotropic constitutive model for the parenchyma of lung has been derived from the theory of hypo-elasticity. The intent is to use it to represent the mechanical response of this soft tissue in sophisticated, computational, fluid-dynamic models of the lung. This demands that the continuum model be accurate, yet simple and effcient. An objective algorithm for its numeric integration is provided. The response of the model is determined for several boundary-value problems whose experiments are used for material characterization. The effective elastic, bulk, and shear moduli, and Poisson’s ratio, as tangent functions, are also derived. The model is characterized against published experimental data for lung. A bridge between this continuum model and a dodecahedral model of alveolar geometry is investigated, with preliminary findings being reported.

  11. Multi-scale modeling of Puget Sound using an unstructured-grid coastal ocean model: from tide flats to estuaries and coastal waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang

    2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Water circulation in Puget Sound, a large complex estuary system in the Pacific Northwest coastal ocean of the United States, is governed by multiple spatially and temporally varying forcings from tides, atmosphere (wind, heating/cooling, precipitation/evaporation, pressure), and river inflows. In addition, the hydrodynamic response is affected strongly by geomorphic features, such as fjord-like bathymetry and complex shoreline features, resulting in many distinguishing characteristics in its main and sub-basins. To better understand the details of circulation features in Puget Sound and to assist with proposed nearshore restoration actions for improving water quality and the ecological health of Puget Sound, a high-resolution (around 50 m in estuaries and tide flats) hydrodynamic model for the entire Puget Sound was needed. Here, a threedimensional circulation model of Puget Sound using an unstructured-grid finite volume coastal ocean model is presented. The model was constructed with sufficient resolution in the nearshore region to address the complex coastline, multi-tidal channels, and tide flats. Model open boundaries were extended to the entrance of the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the northern end of the Strait of Georgia to account for the influences of ocean water intrusion from the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the Fraser River plume from the Strait of Georgia, respectively. Comparisons of model results, observed data, and associated error statistics for tidal elevation, velocity, temperature, and salinity indicate that the model is capable of simulating the general circulation patterns on the scale of a large estuarine system as well as detailed hydrodynamics in the nearshore tide flats. Tidal characteristics, temperature/salinity stratification, mean circulation, and river plumes in estuaries with tide flats are discussed.

  12. Multi-scale texture analysis of remote sensing images using gabor filter banks and wavelet transforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, Rahul

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    to texture information extraction and utilization. This research focuses on the use of multi-scale image texture analysis techniques using Gabor filter banks and Wavelet transformations. Gabor filter banks model texture as irradiance patterns in an image over...

  13. A multi-scale approach to statistical and model-based structural health monitoring with application to embedded sensing for wind energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Stuart Glynn

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simplified Models for Wind Turbine Blades," in 53rd AIAA/in composite wind turbine blades," Journal of IntelligentState estimate of wind turbine blades using geometrically

  14. A multi-scale approach to statistical and model-based structural health monitoring with application to embedded sensing for wind energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Stuart Glynn

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the LIST Wind Turbine," in 2002 ASME Wind Energy Symposium ,from the LIST turbine," in 2001 ASME Wind Energy Symposium ,wind energy production site in the Great Plains. The Micon 65/13 model turbine

  15. Hydraulic transmissivity and heat exchanges: aperture lowpass filtering model 1 Natural open joints in rocks commonly present multi-scale self-affine apertures. This

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hydraulic transmissivity and heat exchanges: aperture lowpass filtering model 1 SUMMARY Natural aperture that describes at best the macroscopic properties (hydraulic conductivity, heat exchange of the effective hydraulic and thermal properties (apertures). A detailed study of the influence of the bandwidth

  16. Geologic Framework Model Analysis Model Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Clayton

    2000-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to document the Geologic Framework Model (GFM), Version 3.1 (GFM3.1) with regard to data input, modeling methods, assumptions, uncertainties, limitations, and validation of the model results, qualification status of the model, and the differences between Version 3.1 and previous versions. The GFM represents a three-dimensional interpretation of the stratigraphy and structural features of the location of the potential Yucca Mountain radioactive waste repository. The GFM encompasses an area of 65 square miles (170 square kilometers) and a volume of 185 cubic miles (771 cubic kilometers). The boundaries of the GFM were chosen to encompass the most widely distributed set of exploratory boreholes (the Water Table or WT series) and to provide a geologic framework over the area of interest for hydrologic flow and radionuclide transport modeling through the unsaturated zone (UZ). The depth of the model is constrained by the inferred depth of the Tertiary-Paleozoic unconformity. The GFM was constructed from geologic map and borehole data. Additional information from measured stratigraphy sections, gravity profiles, and seismic profiles was also considered. This interim change notice (ICN) was prepared in accordance with the Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model Process Model Report Revision 01 (CRWMS M&O 2000). The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. The GFM is one component of the Integrated Site Model (ISM) (Figure l), which has been developed to provide a consistent volumetric portrayal of the rock layers, rock properties, and mineralogy of the Yucca Mountain site. The ISM consists of three components: (1) Geologic Framework Model (GFM); (2) Rock Properties Model (RPM); and (3) Mineralogic Model (MM). The ISM merges the detailed project stratigraphy into model stratigraphic units that are most useful for the primary downstream models and the repository design. These downstream models include the hydrologic flow models and the radionuclide transport models. All the models and the repository design, in turn, will be incorporated into the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) of the potential radioactive waste repository block and vicinity to determine the suitability of Yucca Mountain as a host for the repository. The interrelationship of the three components of the ISM and their interface with downstream uses are illustrated in Figure 2.

  17. Faculty Position in Multi-scale Manufacturing Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Psaltis, Demetri

    -precision additive manufacturing technologies; · multi-scale micro-precision manufacturing; · high throughput. Christian Enz Search Committee Chair E-mail: manufacturing-search@epfl.ch For additional information on EPFLFaculty Position in Multi-scale Manufacturing Technologies at the Ecole polytechnique fédérale de

  18. A modelling framework for Synthetic Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A modelling framework for Synthetic Biology Jakob Jakobsen Boysen Sune Mølgaard Laursen Kongens, 14-03-2014 Jakob Jakobsen Boysen & Sune Mølgaard Laursen #12;vi #12;Contents Summary (English) i

  19. Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day-Lewis, Frederick; Singha, Kamini; Haggerty, Roy; Johnson, Tim; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

    2014-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3-part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOE’s Hanford 300 Area. In a synergistic add-on to our workplan, we analyzed data from field experiments performed at the DOE Naturita Site under a separate DOE SBR grant, on which PI Day-Lewis served as co-PI. Techniques developed for application to Hanford datasets also were applied to data from Naturita. 1. Introduction The Department of Energy (DOE) faces enormous scientific and engineering challenges associated with the remediation of legacy contamination at former nuclear weapons production facilities. Selection, design and optimization of appropriate site remedies (e.g., pump-and-treat, biostimulation, or monitored natural attenuation) requires reliable predictive models of radionuclide fate and transport; however, our current modeling capabilities are limited by an incomplete understanding of multi-scale mass transfer—its rates, scales, and the heterogeneity of controlling parameters. At many DOE sites, long “tailing” behavior, concentration rebound, and slower-than-expected cleanup are observed; these observations are all consistent with multi-scale mass transfer [Haggerty and Gorelick, 1995; Haggerty et al., 2000; 2004], which renders pump-and-treat remediation and biotransformation inefficient and slow [Haggerty and Gorelick, 1994; Harvey et al., 1994; Wilson, 1997]. Despite the importance of mass transfer, there are significant uncertainties associated with controlling parameters, and the prevalence of mass transfer remains a point of debate [e.g., Hill et al., 2006; Molz et al., 2006] for lack of experimental methods to verify and measure it in situ or independently of tracer breakthrough. There is a critical need for new field-experimental techniques to measure mass transfer in-situ and estimate multi-scale and spatially variable mass-transfer parame

  20. Multi-Scale Multi-physics Methods Development for the Calculation of Hot-Spots in the NGNP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downar, Thomas; Seker, Volkan

    2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive gaseous fission products are released out of the fuel element at a significantly higher rate when the fuel temperature exceeds 1600°C in high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). Therefore, it is of paramount importance to accurately predict the peak fuel temperature during all operational and design-basis accident conditions. The current methods used to predict the peak fuel temperature in HTGRs, such as the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), estimate the average fuel temperature in a computational mesh modeling hundreds of fuel pebbles or a fuel assembly in a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) or prismatic block type reactor (PMR), respectively. Experiments conducted in operating HTGRs indicate considerable uncertainty in the current methods and correlations used to predict actual temperatures. The objective of this project is to improve the accuracy in the prediction of local "hot" spots by developing multi-scale, multi- physics methods and implementing them within the framework of established codes used for NGNP analysis. The multi-scale approach which this project will implement begins with defining suitable scales for a physical and mathematical model and then deriving and applying the appropriate boundary conditions between scales. The macro scale is the greatest length that describes the entire reactor, whereas the meso scale models only a fuel block in a prismatic reactor and ten to hundreds of pebbles in a pebble bed reactor. The smallest scale is the micro scale--the level of a fuel kernel of the pebble in a PBR and fuel compact in a PMR--which needs to be resolved in order to calculate the peak temperature in a fuel kernel.

  1. Investigating impacts of natural and human-induced environmental changes on hydrological processes and flood hazards using a GIS-based hydrological/hydraulic model and remote sensing data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lei

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    a GISbased hydrological and hydraulic modeling system, which incorporates state-of-the-art remote sensing data to simulate flood under various scenarios. The conceptual framework and technical issues of incorporating multi-scale remote sensing data...

  2. A framework for benchmarking land models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Yiqi; Randerson, J.; Abramowitz, G.; Bacour, C.; Blyth, E.; Carvalhais, N.; Ciais, Philippe; Dalmonech, D.; Fisher, J.B.; Fisher, R.; Friedlingstein, P.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Hoffman, F. M.; Huntzinger, Deborah; Jones, C.; Koven, C.; Lawrence, David M.; Li, D.J.; Mahecha, M.; Niu, S.L.; Norby, Richard J.; Piao, S.L.; Qi, X.; Peylin, P.; Prentice, I.C.; Riley, William; Reichstein, M.; Schwalm, C.; Wang, Y.; Xia, J. Y.; Zaehle, S.; Zhou, X. H.

    2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Land models, which have been developed by the modeling community in the past few decades to predict future states of ecosystems and climate, have to be critically evaluated for their performance skills of simulating ecosystem responses and feedback to climate change. Benchmarking is an emerging procedure to measure performance of models against a set of defined standards. This paper proposes a benchmarking framework for evaluation of land model performances and, meanwhile, highlights major challenges at this infant stage of benchmark analysis. The framework includes (1) targeted aspects of model performance to be evaluated, (2) a set of benchmarks as defined references to test model performance, (3) metrics to measure and compare performance skills among models so as to identify model strengths and deficiencies, and (4) model improvement. Land models are required to simulate exchange of water, energy, carbon and sometimes other trace gases between the atmosphere and land surface, and should be evaluated for their simulations of biophysical processes, biogeochemical cycles, and vegetation dynamics in response to climate change across broad temporal and spatial scales. Thus, one major challenge is to select and define a limited number of benchmarks to effectively evaluate land model performance. The second challenge is to develop metrics of measuring mismatches between models and benchmarks. The metrics may include (1) a priori thresholds of acceptable model performance and (2) a scoring system to combine data–model mismatches for various processes at different temporal and spatial scales. The benchmark analyses should identify clues of weak model performance to guide future development, thus enabling improved predictions of future states of ecosystems and climate. The near-future research effort should be on development of a set of widely acceptable benchmarks that can be used to objectively, effectively, and reliably evaluate fundamental properties of land models to improve their prediction performance skills.

  3. Identifying overlapping communities in social networks using multi-scale local information expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Hui-Jia; Liu, Zhi-Ping; Chen, Luonan; Zhang, Xiang-Sun

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most existing approaches for community detection require complete information of the graph in a specific scale, which is impractical for many social networks. We propose a novel algorithm that does not embrace the universal approach but instead of trying to focus on local social ties and modeling multi-scales of social interactions occurring in those networks. Our method for the first time optimizes the topological entropy of a network and uncovers communities through a novel dynamic system converging to a local minimum by simply updating the membership vector with very low computational complexity. It naturally supports overlapping communities through associating each node with a membership vector which describes node's involvement in each community. This way, in addition to uncover overlapping communities, we can also describe different multi-scale partitions by tuning the characteristic size of modules from the optimal partition. Because of the high efficiency and accuracy of the algorithm, it is feasible ...

  4. Collaborating for Multi-Scale Chemical Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William H. Green

    2006-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced model reduction methods were developed and integrated into the CMCS multiscale chemical science simulation software. The new technologies were used to simulate HCCI engines and burner flames with exceptional fidelity.

  5. Computational Science and Engineering On-line: an integrated web-based environment for multi-scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truong, Thanh N.

    Computational Science and Engineering On-line: an integrated web-based environment for multi November 2003) We present a development of an integrated extendable web-based environment called initial efforts are focusing on an integrated environment for multi-scale modelling of complex reacting

  6. Multi-scale coarse-graining of non-conservative interactions in molecular liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izvekov, Sergei, E-mail: sergiy.izvyekov.civ@mail.mil; Rice, Betsy M. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland 21005 (United States)] [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland 21005 (United States)

    2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A new bottom-up procedure for constructing non-conservative (dissipative and stochastic) interactions for dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) models is described and applied to perform hierarchical coarse-graining of a polar molecular liquid (nitromethane). The distant-dependent radial and shear frictions in functional-free form are derived consistently with a chosen form for conservative interactions by matching two-body force-velocity and three-body velocity-velocity correlations along the microscopic trajectories of the centroids of Voronoi cells (clusters), which represent the dissipative particles within the DPD description. The Voronoi tessellation is achieved by application of the K-means clustering algorithm at regular time intervals. Consistently with a notion of many-body DPD, the conservative interactions are determined through the multi-scale coarse-graining (MS-CG) method, which naturally implements a pairwise decomposition of the microscopic free energy. A hierarchy of MS-CG/DPD models starting with one molecule per Voronoi cell and up to 64 molecules per cell is derived. The radial contribution to the friction appears to be dominant for all models. As the Voronoi cell sizes increase, the dissipative forces rapidly become confined to the first coordination shell. For Voronoi cells of two and more molecules the time dependence of the velocity autocorrelation function becomes monotonic and well reproduced by the respective MS-CG/DPD models. A comparative analysis of force and velocity correlations in the atomistic and CG ensembles indicates Markovian behavior with as low as two molecules per dissipative particle. The models with one and two molecules per Voronoi cell yield transport properties (diffusion and shear viscosity) that are in good agreement with the atomistic data. The coarser models produce slower dynamics that can be appreciably attributed to unaccounted dissipation introduced by regular Voronoi re-partitioning as well as by larger numerical errors in mapping out the dissipative forces. The framework presented herein can be used to develop computational models of real liquids which are capable of bridging the atomistic and mesoscopic scales.

  7. COMMUNICATION TO THE EDITOR A Restructured Framework for Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daugulis, Andrew J.

    COMMUNICATION TO THE EDITOR A Restructured Framework for Modeling Oxygen Transfer in Two: This communication proposes a mechanistic modification to a recently published method for analyzing oxygen mass

  8. A Document Model Management Framework based on Core Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Document Model Management Framework based on Core Components Michael Strommer, Christian Pichler for a consistent framework for the management of electronic business documents, together with tool support rises. Tools, that foster the management of document models in a way to overcome interoperability issues

  9. Feedback Control RealTime Scheduling: Framework, Modeling, and Algorithms *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Son, Sang H.

    1 Feedback Control Real­Time Scheduling: Framework, Modeling, and Algorithms * Chenyang Lu John A}@virginia.edu Abstract This paper presents a feedback control real­time scheduling (FCS) framework for adaptive real. In particular, we establish a dynamic model and performance analysis of several feedback control scheduling

  10. Feedback Control Real-Time Scheduling: Framework, Modeling, and Algorithms*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Son, Sang H.

    1 Feedback Control Real-Time Scheduling: Framework, Modeling, and Algorithms* Chenyang Lu John A}@virginia.edu Abstract This paper presents a feedback control real-time scheduling (FCS) framework for adaptive real. In particular, we establish a dynamic model and performance analysis of several feedback control scheduling

  11. A NONLINEAR MODELING FRAMEWORK FOR AUTONOMOUS CRUISE CONTROL Gabor Orosz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daly, Samantha

    .) and allows optimization in the entire torque and engine speed range (e.g., for energy consumption). NONLINEARA NONLINEAR MODELING FRAMEWORK FOR AUTONOMOUS CRUISE CONTROL G´abor Orosz Department of Mechanical A nonlinear modeling framework is presented for au- tonomous cruise control (ACC) equipped vehicles which

  12. Maximization of permanent trapping of CO{sub 2} and co-contaminants in the highest-porosity formations of the Rock Springs Uplift (Southwest Wyoming): experimentation and multi-scale modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piri, Mohammad

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Under this project, a multidisciplinary team of researchers at the University of Wyoming combined state-of-the-art experimental studies, numerical pore- and reservoir-scale modeling, and high performance computing to investigate trapping mechanisms relevant to geologic storage of mixed scCO{sub 2} in deep saline aquifers. The research included investigations in three fundamental areas: (i) the experimental determination of two-­?phase flow relative permeability functions, relative permeability hysteresis, and residual trapping under reservoir conditions for mixed scCO{sub 2}-­?brine systems; (ii) improved understanding of permanent trapping mechanisms; (iii) scientifically correct, fine grid numerical simulations of CO{sub 2} storage in deep saline aquifers taking into account the underlying rock heterogeneity. The specific activities included: (1) Measurement of reservoir-­?conditions drainage and imbibition relative permeabilities, irreducible brine and residual mixed scCO{sub 2} saturations, and relative permeability scanning curves (hysteresis) in rock samples from RSU; (2) Characterization of wettability through measurements of contact angles and interfacial tensions under reservoir conditions; (3) Development of physically-­?based dynamic core-­?scale pore network model; (4) Development of new, improved high-­? performance modules for the UW-­?team simulator to provide new capabilities to the existing model to include hysteresis in the relative permeability functions, geomechanical deformation and an equilibrium calculation (Both pore-­? and core-­?scale models were rigorously validated against well-­?characterized core-­? flooding experiments); and (5) An analysis of long term permanent trapping of mixed scCO{sub 2} through high-­?resolution numerical experiments and analytical solutions. The analysis takes into account formation heterogeneity, capillary trapping, and relative permeability hysteresis.

  13. Multi-scale analysis and simulation of powder blending in pharmaceutical manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ngai, Samuel S. H

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Multi-Scale Analysis methodology was developed and carried out for gaining fundamental understanding of the pharmaceutical powder blending process. Through experiment, analysis and computer simulations, microscopic ...

  14. Multi-scale thermalhydraulic analyses performed in Nuresim and Nurisp projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bestion, D. [CEA-Grenoble, DEN-DANS-DM2S, Grenoble, (France); Lucas, D. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden, (Germany); Anglart, H. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, (Sweden); Niceno, B. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villingen, (Switzerland); Vyskocil, L. [Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc, Rez, (Czech Republic)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NURESIM and NURISP successive projects of the 6. and 7. European Framework Programs joined the efforts of 21 partners for developing and validating a reference multi-physics and multi-scale platform for reactor simulation. The platform includes system codes, component codes, and also CFD or CMFD simulation tools. Fine scale CFD simulations are useful for a better understanding of physical processes, for the prediction of small scale geometrical effects and for solving problems that require a fine space and/or time resolution. Many important safety issues usually treated at the system scale may now benefit from investigations at a CFD scale. The Pressurized Thermal Shock is investigated using several simulation scales including Direct Numerical Simulation, Large Eddy Simulation, Very Large Eddy Simulation and RANS approaches. At the end a coupling of system code and CFD is applied. Condensation Induced Water-Hammer was also investigated at both CFD and 1-D scale. Boiling flow in a reactor core up to Departure from Nucleate Boiling or Dry-Out is investigated at scales much smaller than the classical subchannel analysis codes. DNS was used to investigate very local processes whereas CFD in both RANS and LES was used to simulate bubbly flow and Euler-Lagrange simulations were used for annular mist flow investigations. Loss of Coolant Accidents are usually treated by system codes. Some related issues are now revisited at the CFD scale. In each case the progress of the analysis is summarized and the benefit of the multi-scale approach is shown. (authors)

  15. A Simulation and Modeling Framework for Space Situational Awareness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olivier, S S

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the development and initial demonstration of a new, integrated modeling and simulation framework, encompassing the space situational awareness enterprise, for quantitatively assessing the benefit of specific sensor systems, technologies and data analysis techniques. The framework is based on a flexible, scalable architecture to enable efficient, physics-based simulation of the current SSA enterprise, and to accommodate future advancements in SSA systems. In particular, the code is designed to take advantage of massively parallel computer systems available, for example, at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The details of the modeling and simulation framework are described, including hydrodynamic models of satellite intercept and debris generation, orbital propagation algorithms, radar cross section calculations, optical brightness calculations, generic radar system models, generic optical system models, specific Space Surveillance Network models, object detection algorithms, orbit determination algorithms, and visualization tools. The use of this integrated simulation and modeling framework on a specific scenario involving space debris is demonstrated.

  16. A framework for benchmarking land models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    their inclu- sion in Earth system models (ESMs). State-of-land models cou- pled to Earth system models should simulateland models within Earth system models, however, can help

  17. A Framework for Modeling Strategy, Business Processes and Information Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Framework for Modeling Strategy, Business Processes and Information Systems André Vasconcelos, an organization requires modeling its business processes. Business process modeling comprises the description is used not only in the business but also in the software domain. To represent the goal model, we propose

  18. Optimal Multi-scale Capacity Planning under Hourly Varying Electricity Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    1 Optimal Multi-scale Capacity Planning under Hourly Varying Electricity Prices Sumit Mitra Ignacio;2 Motivation of this work · Deregulation of the electricity markets caused electricity prices to be highly? (retrofit) · Challenge: Multi-scale nature of the problem! Hourly varying electricity prices vs. 10-15 years

  19. MULTI-SCALE ANALYSIS OF MULTIPARAMETER GEOPHYSICAL AND GEOCHEMICAL DATA FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams-Jones, Glyn

    MULTI-SCALE ANALYSIS OF MULTIPARAMETER GEOPHYSICAL AND GEOCHEMICAL DATA FROM ACTIVE VOLCANIC Name: MAURI Guillaume Degree: PhD of Science Title of Thesis: Multi-scale analysis of multiparameter geophysical and geochemical data from active volcanic systems Examining Committee: Chair: Dr John Clague

  20. High-resolution, multi-scale modeling of watershed hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vivoni, Enrique R.

    Enrique R. Vivoni An Opportunity to Integrate Remote Sensing Observations, Field Data Collection distribution of topography, rainfall, soils, vegetation, meteorology, soil moisture. Field Data and Remote's Hydrologic and Energetic System: Water and Heat Storages and Transports over Many Time and Space Scales P ET

  1. Multi-Scale Indentation Hardness Testing; A Correlation and Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Damon W.

    2010-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    . This test is performed by applying a steady load to an indenter (most commonly a diamond pyramid, diamond spheroconical, or a tungsten carbide ball) and then calculating the hardness from the area or depth of the 5 indentation. A dynamic indentation test... 6 variants are the indenter tip and the load applied. A tungsten carbide sphere or a diamond cone or pyramid is used to prevent the indenter tip from being damaged by the test piece. This consideration is made because test pieces have unique values...

  2. A Framework for Modeling Uncertainty in Regional Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monier, Erwan

    In this study, we present a new modeling framework and a large ensemble of climate projections to investigate the uncertainty in regional climate change over the US associated with four dimensions of uncertainty. The sources ...

  3. A poset framework to model decentralized control problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shah, Parikshit

    In a previous paper, these authors showed that posets provide a useful modeling framework for a reasonably large class of decentralized control problems. In this paper we show more connections between posets and decentralized ...

  4. MREG V1.1 : a multi-scale image registration algorithm for SAR applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eichel, Paul H.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MREG V1.1 is the sixth generation SAR image registration algorithm developed by the Signal Processing&Technology Department for Synthetic Aperture Radar applications. Like its predecessor algorithm REGI, it employs a powerful iterative multi-scale paradigm to achieve the competing goals of sub-pixel registration accuracy and the ability to handle large initial offsets. Since it is not model based, it allows for high fidelity tracking of spatially varying terrain-induced misregistration. Since it does not rely on image domain phase, it is equally adept at coherent and noncoherent image registration. This document provides a brief history of the registration processors developed by Dept. 5962 leading up to MREG V1.1, a full description of the signal processing steps involved in the algorithm, and a user's manual with application specific recommendations for CCD, TwoColor MultiView, and SAR stereoscopy.

  5. Multi-scale investigation of sheared flows in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, Jr., Dr. Edward

    2014-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Flows parallel and perpendicular to magnetic fields in a plasma are important phenomena in many areas of plasma science research. The presence of these spatially inhomogeneous flows is often associated with the stability of the plasma. In fusion plasmas, these sheared flows can be stabilizing while in space plasmas, these sheared flows can be destabilizing. Because of this, there is broad interest in understanding the coupling between plasma stability and plasma flows. This research project has engaged in a study of the plasma response to spatially inhomogeneous plasma flows using three different experimental devices: the Auburn Linear Experiment for Instability Studies (ALEXIS) and the Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH) stellarator devices at Auburn University, and the Space Plasma Simulation Chamber (SPSC) at the Naval Research Laboratory. This work has shown that there is a commonality of the plasma response to sheared flows across a wide range of plasma parameters and magnetic field geometries. The goal of this multi-device, multi-scale project is to understand how sheared flows established by the same underlying physical mechanisms lead to different plasma responses in fusion, laboratory, and space plasmas.

  6. An information modeling framework for process planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atreya, Dinesh S.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    69 69 CHAPTER Page F G H Structure of Infons . The Model G. l. Process Plan G. 2. Process Plan Set G. 3. Process Plan Activity G. 4. Recursive Nature G. 5. Process Plan Set Element G. 6. Serial Process Plan Set . G. 7. Parallel Process... Knowle D. Implications of Dimensions and Tolerances E. Set-Up Planning F. Tool Path Planning G. Activity Parameter Specification 3. Observations of Situation Theoretic Modelling 4. Interaction Between Models A. Interaction in Terms of Databases B...

  7. Next Generation Multi-Scale Quantum Simulation Software for Strongly Correlated Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarrell, Mark

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project was to develop a new formalism for the correlated electron problem, which we call, the Multi Scale Many Body formalism. This report will focus on the work done at the Louisiana State University (LSU) since the mid term report. The LSU group moved from the University of Cincinnati (UC) to LSU in the summer of 2008. In the last full year at UC, only half of the funds were received and it took nearly two years for the funds to be transferred from UC to LSU . This effectively shut down the research at LSU until the transfer was completed in 2011, there were also two no-cost extensions of the grant until August of this year. The grant ended for the other SciDAC partners at Davis and ORNL in 2011. Since the mid term report, the LSU group has published 19 papers [P1-P19] acknowledging this SciDAC, which are listed below. In addition, numerous invited talked acknowledged the SciDAC. Below, we will summarize the work at LSU since the mid-term report and mainly since funding resumed. The projects include the further development of multi-scale methods for correlated systems (1), the study of quantum criticality at finite doping in the Hubbard model (2), the description of a promising new method to study Anderson localization with a million-fold reduction of computational complexity!, the description of other projects (4), and (5) a workshop to close out the project that brought together exascale program developers (Stellar, MPI, OpenMP,...) with applications developers.

  8. Multi-Scale Initial Conditions For Cosmological Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hahn, Oliver; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Abel, Tom; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /ZAH, Heidelberg /HITS, Heidelberg

    2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a new algorithm to generate multi-scale initial conditions with multiple levels of refinements for cosmological 'zoom-in' simulations. The method uses an adaptive convolution of Gaussian white noise with a real-space transfer function kernel together with an adaptive multi-grid Poisson solver to generate displacements and velocities following first- (1LPT) or second-order Lagrangian perturbation theory (2LPT). The new algorithm achieves rms relative errors of the order of 10{sup -4} for displacements and velocities in the refinement region and thus improves in terms of errors by about two orders of magnitude over previous approaches. In addition, errors are localized at coarse-fine boundaries and do not suffer from Fourier-space-induced interference ringing. An optional hybrid multi-grid and Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) based scheme is introduced which has identical Fourier-space behaviour as traditional approaches. Using a suite of re-simulations of a galaxy cluster halo our real-space-based approach is found to reproduce correlation functions, density profiles, key halo properties and subhalo abundances with per cent level accuracy. Finally, we generalize our approach for two-component baryon and dark-matter simulations and demonstrate that the power spectrum evolution is in excellent agreement with linear perturbation theory. For initial baryon density fields, it is suggested to use the local Lagrangian approximation in order to generate a density field for mesh-based codes that is consistent with the Lagrangian perturbation theory instead of the current practice of using the Eulerian linearly scaled densities.

  9. Computational modeling of metal-organic frameworks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sung, Jeffrey Chuen-Fai; Sung, Jeffrey Chuen-Fai

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    listed in Table 2.1. The SPC (Single Point Charge) family ofvdW parameters. A ?exible variant of the SPC water modelis the SPC/Fw model of Voth,m which adds harmonic bond and

  10. Multi-scale theories for the MJO Andrew J. Majda and Samuel N. Stechmann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stechmann, Samuel N.

    Multi-scale theories for the MJO Andrew J. Majda and Samuel N. Stechmann November 24, 2010 1 MJO events (Lin and Johnson, 1996; Yanai et al., 2000; Houze et al., 2000). From these ob- servations

  11. Multi-scale problems, high performance computing and hybrid numerical methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cottet, Georges-Henri

    Multi-scale problems, high performance computing and hybrid numerical methods G. Balarac, G of High Performance Computing G. Balarac LEGI, CNRS and Universit´e de Grenoble, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble

  12. Multi-scale problems, high performance computing and hybrid numerical methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Multi-scale problems, high performance computing and hybrid numerical methods G. Balarac, G of High Performance Computing (HPC) is not anymore restricted to academia and scientific grand challenges

  13. Design, fabrication and mechanical optimization of multi-scale anisotropic feet for terrestrial locomotion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morin, Jeffrey W. (Jeffrey William)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-scale surface interaction methods have been studied to achieve optimal locomotion over surface features of differing length scales. It has been shown that anisotropy is a convenient way of transferring an undirected ...

  14. Constructal multi-scale package of vertical channels with natural convection and maximal heat transfer density. CONSTRUCTAL DESIGN: THE GENERATION OF MULTI-SCALE HEAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihm, IconKenneth David

    transfer density. CONSTRUCTAL DESIGN: THE GENERATION OF MULTI-SCALE HEAT AND FLUID FLOW STRUCTURES-scale structures in natural convection with the objective of maximizing the heat transfer density, or the heat transfer rate per unit of volume§ . The flow volume is filled with vertical equidistant heated blades

  15. Ontology Design and Development Framework Part I: Enhancing Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demurjian, Steven A.

    terminologies representing a semantic agreement between humans and knowledge systems. Numerous knowledge representational frameworks (e.g. KIF, DAML+OIL, OWL etc.), have been proposed in the research community, with limited adoption in the industry. One possible reason is a lack of a formal and rigorous model

  16. Extracting Business Rules from COBOL: A Model-Based Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Extracting Business Rules from COBOL: A Model-Based Framework Valerio Cosentino AtlanMod, INRIA in their Information Systems for their daily operations. This logic im- plements the business rules in place clear which business rules are enforced nor whether rules are still consistent with the current

  17. A Multi-scale Framework for Thermo-viscoelastic Analysis of Fiber Metal Laminates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sawant, Sourabh P.

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Fiber Metal Laminates (FML) are hybrid composites with alternate layers of orthotropic fiber reinforced polymers (FRP) and isotropic metal alloys. FML can exhibit a nonlinear thermo-viscoelastic behavior under the influence of external mechanical...

  18. A Scalable Multi-scale Framework for Parallel Simulation and Visualization of Microbial Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tagkopoulos, Ilias

    new strains with desired proprieties (e.g. resilient strains for recombinant protein or bio-fuels production). We present a microbial evolution simulator, a tool to study and analyze hypotheses regarding digital or hard copies of all or part of this work for personal or classroom use is granted without fee

  19. Multi-scale framework for the accelerated design of high-efficiency organic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource ProgramModification andinterface1JUN 2 5coreStöhr Research

  20. Sustainable Manufacturing via Multi-Scale, Physics-Based Process...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    modeling tools for enabling manufacturing-informed design. Graphic credit Third Wave Systems. accurate, easy-to-use, detailed physics- based process modeling tools to...

  1. Sustainable Manufacturing via Multi-Scale, Physics-Based Process...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    microstruc- Pasadena, CA tural modeling tools for metals that encounter severe plastic deformation. Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, GA * Enhancement of machining...

  2. Study of Multi-Scale Plant-Groundwater Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gou, Si

    2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    equations developed may be used, with only minor adaptations, in a range of Earth system models. We adapted our system dynamics model to simulate the water uptake of the blue oaks at the Tonzi Ranch site. The shallow soil layer was divided into three soil...

  3. Multi-scale mechanical improvement produced in carbon nanotube fibers by irradiation cross-linking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    Review Multi-scale mechanical improvement produced in carbon nanotube fibers by irradiation cross T Fibers and yarns based on carbon nanotubes (CNT) are emerging as a possible improve- ment over more traditional high strength carbon fibers used as reinforcement elements in composite materials. This is driven

  4. A multi-scale bone study to estimate the risk of fracture related to osteoporosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A multi-scale bone study to estimate the risk of fracture related to osteoporosis Abdelwahed' Orléans, 8, Rue Léonard de Vinci 45072 Orléans, France Objective: Osteoporosis is a disease marked. Bone fractures caused by the osteoporosis become increasingly important goal for both clinicians

  5. 3D multi-scale imaging of experimental fracture generation in shale gas reservoirs.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    in research and shale unconventional reservoirs that will provide you with the skills to enter the oil and gas3D multi-scale imaging of experimental fracture generation in shale gas reservoirs. Supervisory-grained organic carbon-rich rocks (shales) are increasingly being targeted as shale gas "reservoirs". Due

  6. Framework for Coupling Room Air Models to Heat Balance Model Load and Energy Calculations (RP-1222)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    1 Framework for Coupling Room Air Models to Heat Balance Model Load and Energy Calculations (RP in a program for hourly load calculations of a single thermal zone. The heat balance model for load and energy to heat balance model load and energy calculations," HVAC&R Research, 10(2), 91-111. #12;2 · Mixed

  7. CIMS: A FRAMEWORK FOR INFRASTRUCTURE INTERDEPENDENCY MODELING AND ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald D. Dudenhoeffer; May R. Permann; Milos Manic

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today’s society relies greatly upon an array of complex national and international infrastructure networks such as transportation, utilities, telecommunication, and even financial networks. While modeling and simulation tools have provided insight into the behavior of individual infrastructure networks, a far less understood area is that of the interrelationships among multiple infrastructure networks including the potential cascading effects that may result due to these interdependencies. This paper first describes infrastructure interdependencies as well as presenting a formalization of interdependency types. Next the paper describes a modeling and simulation framework called CIMS© and the work that is being conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to model and simulate infrastructure interdependencies and the complex behaviors that can result.

  8. SEME FRAMEWORK

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003284MLTPL00 Sequentially Executed Model Evaluation Framework  https://software.sandia.gov/svn/teva/canary 

  9. Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day-Lewis, Frederick David [U.S. Geological Survey; Singha, Kamini [Colorado School of Mines; Johnson, Timothy C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Haggerty, Roy [Oregon State; Binley, Andrew [Lancaster University; Lane, John W. [US Geological Survey

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3-part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOE’s Hanford 300 Area. In a synergistic add-on to our workplan, we analyzed data from field experiments performed at the DOE Naturita Site under a separate DOE SBR grant, on which PI Day-Lewis served as co-PI. Techniques developed for application to Hanford datasets also were applied to data from Naturita.

  10. AN INTEGRATED MODELING FRAMEWORK FOR CARBON MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anand B. Rao; Edward S. Rubin; Michael B. Berkenpas

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO{sub 2} capture and storage (CCS) is gaining widespread interest as a potential method to control greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel sources, especially electric power plants. Commercial applications of CO{sub 2} separation and capture technologies are found in a number of industrial process operations worldwide. Many of these capture technologies also are applicable to fossil fuel power plants, although applications to large-scale power generation remain to be demonstrated. This report describes the development of a generalized modeling framework to assess alternative CO{sub 2} capture and storage options in the context of multi-pollutant control requirements for fossil fuel power plants. The focus of the report is on post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture using amine-based absorption systems at pulverized coal-fired plants, which are the most prevalent technology used for power generation today. The modeling framework builds on the previously developed Integrated Environmental Control Model (IECM). The expanded version with carbon sequestration is designated as IECM-cs. The expanded modeling capability also includes natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plants and integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems as well as pulverized coal (PC) plants. This report presents details of the performance and cost models developed for an amine-based CO{sub 2} capture system, representing the baseline of current commercial technology. The key uncertainties and variability in process design, performance and cost parameters which influence the overall cost of carbon mitigation also are characterized. The new performance and cost models for CO{sub 2} capture systems have been integrated into the IECM-cs, along with models to estimate CO{sub 2} transport and storage costs. The CO{sub 2} control system also interacts with other emission control technologies such as flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems for SO{sub 2} control. The integrated model is applied to study the feasibility and cost of carbon capture and sequestration at both new and existing PC plants as well as new NGCC plants. The cost of CO{sub 2} avoidance using amine-based CO{sub 2} capture technology is found to be sensitive to assumptions about the reference plant design and operation, as well as assumptions about the CO{sub 2} capture system design. The case studies also reveal multi-pollutant interactions and potential tradeoffs in the capture of CO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}. The potential for targeted R&D to reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture also is explored using the IECM-cs in conjunction with expert elicitations regarding potential improvements in key performance and cost parameters of amine-based systems. The results indicate that the performance of amine-based CO{sub 2} capture systems can be improved significantly, and the cost of CO{sub 2} capture reduced substantially over the next decade or two, via innovations such as new or improved sorbents with lower regeneration heat requirements, and improvements in power plant heat integration to reduce the (currently large) energy penalty of CO{sub 2} capture. Future work will explore in more detail a broader set of advanced technology options to lower the costs of CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Volume 2 of this report presents a detailed User's Manual for the IECM-cs computer model as a companion to the technical documentation in Volume 1.

  11. Development of a Database to Support a Multi-Scale Analysis of the Distribution of Westslope Cutthroat Trout

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Development of a Database to Support a Multi-Scale Analysis of the Distribution of Westslope ....................................................................................................................................5 Database Development expression of life history, and no hybridization) comprise only 22% of this total (Thurow et al. 1997

  12. New Modularization Framework Transforms FAST Wind Turbine Modeling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    framework. In November 2013, NREL presented a full-day workshop on FAST in Frankfurt, Germany, hosted by the University of Stuttgart. The workshop was attended by 50 participants,...

  13. A Data Mining Framework for Building Intrusion Detection Models # Salvatore J. Stolfo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Wenke

    A Data Mining Framework for Building Intrusion Detection Models # Wenke Lee Salvatore J. Stolfo Kui. In this paper, we describe a data mining framework for adaptively building Intrusion Detection (ID) models each network connection or host ses­ sion, and apply data mining programs to learn rules

  14. Evaluation of multi-loop multi-scale integrals and phenomenological two-loop applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sophia Borowka

    2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, major developments in the publicly available program SecDec are presented, extending the numerical evaluation of multi-loop multi-scale integrals from Euclidean to physical kinematics. The power of this new feature is shown in two phenomenological applications. In the first, numerical results for several massive two-loop four-point functions are shown. In its second application within this thesis, the leading momentum-dependent two-loop corrections to the neutral $\\mathcal{CP}$-even MSSM Higgs-boson masses are calculated. The results are included in the code FeynHiggs.

  15. Simulating Nationwide Pandemics: Applying the Multi-scale Epidemiologic Simulation and Analysis System to Human Infectious Diseases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dombroski, M; Melius, C; Edmunds, T; Banks, L E; Bates, T; Wheeler, R

    2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This study uses the Multi-scale Epidemiologic Simulation and Analysis (MESA) system developed for foreign animal diseases to assess consequences of nationwide human infectious disease outbreaks. A literature review identified the state of the art in both small-scale regional models and large-scale nationwide models and characterized key aspects of a nationwide epidemiological model. The MESA system offers computational advantages over existing epidemiological models and enables a broader array of stochastic analyses of model runs to be conducted because of those computational advantages. However, it has only been demonstrated on foreign animal diseases. This paper applied the MESA modeling methodology to human epidemiology. The methodology divided 2000 US Census data at the census tract level into school-bound children, work-bound workers, elderly, and stay at home individuals. The model simulated mixing among these groups by incorporating schools, workplaces, households, and long-distance travel via airports. A baseline scenario with fixed input parameters was run for a nationwide influenza outbreak using relatively simple social distancing countermeasures. Analysis from the baseline scenario showed one of three possible results: (1) the outbreak burned itself out before it had a chance to spread regionally, (2) the outbreak spread regionally and lasted a relatively long time, although constrained geography enabled it to eventually be contained without affecting a disproportionately large number of people, or (3) the outbreak spread through air travel and lasted a long time with unconstrained geography, becoming a nationwide pandemic. These results are consistent with empirical influenza outbreak data. The results showed that simply scaling up a regional small-scale model is unlikely to account for all the complex variables and their interactions involved in a nationwide outbreak. There are several limitations of the methodology that should be explored in future work including validating the model against reliable historical disease data, improving contact rates, spread methods, and disease parameters through discussions with epidemiological experts, and incorporating realistic behavioral assumptions.

  16. Data-Adaptive Wavelets and Multi-Scale Singular Spectrum Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Yiou; D. Sornette; M. Ghil

    1998-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Using multi-scale ideas from wavelet analysis, we extend singular-spectrum analysis (SSA) to the study of nonstationary time series of length $N$ whose intermittency can give rise to the divergence of their variance. SSA relies on the construction of the lag-covariance matrix C on M lagged copies of the time series over a fixed window width W to detect the regular part of the variability in that window in terms of the minimal number of oscillatory components; here W = M Dt, with Dt the time step. The proposed multi-scale SSA is a local SSA analysis within a moving window of width M fractal or power-law behavior which mimic selected features of certain climatic and geophysical time series. A real application is to the Southern Oscillation index (SOI) monthly values for 1933-1996. Our methodology highlights an abrupt periodicity shift in the SOI near 1960. This abrupt shift between 4 and 3 years supports the Devil's staircase scenario for the El Nino/Southern Oscillation phenomenon.

  17. 17.1%-Efficient Multi-Scale-Textured Black Silicon Solar Cells without Dielectric Antireflection Coating: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toor, F.; Page, M. R.; Branz, H. M.; Yuan, H. C.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we present 17.1%-efficient p-type single crystal Si solar cells with a multi-scale-textured surface and no dielectric antireflection coating. Multi-scale texturing is achieved by a gold-nanoparticle-assisted nanoporous etch after conventional micron scale KOH-based pyramid texturing (pyramid black etching). By incorporating geometric enhancement of antireflection, this multi-scale texturing reduces the nanoporosity depth required to make silicon 'black' compared to nanoporous planar surfaces. As a result, it improves short-wavelength spectral response (blue response), previously one of the major limiting factors in 'black-Si' solar cells. With multi-scale texturing, the spectrum-weighted average reflectance from 350- to 1000-nm wavelength is below 2% with a 100-nm deep nanoporous layer. In comparison, roughly 250-nm deep nanopores are needed to achieve similar reflectance on planar surface. Here, we characterize surface morphology, reflectivity and solar cell performance of the multi-scale textured solar cells.

  18. Coupled numerical approach combining finite volume and lattice Boltzmann methods for multi-scale multi-physicochemical processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Li; He, Ya-Ling [Key Laboratory of Thermo-Fluid Science and Engineering of MOE, School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710049 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Thermo-Fluid Science and Engineering of MOE, School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Kang, Qinjun [Computational Earth Science Group (EES-16), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)] [Computational Earth Science Group (EES-16), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tao, Wen-Quan, E-mail: wqtao@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Thermo-Fluid Science and Engineering of MOE, School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710049 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Thermo-Fluid Science and Engineering of MOE, School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A coupled (hybrid) simulation strategy spatially combining the finite volume method (FVM) and the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), called CFVLBM, is developed to simulate coupled multi-scale multi-physicochemical processes. In the CFVLBM, computational domain of multi-scale problems is divided into two sub-domains, i.e., an open, free fluid region and a region filled with porous materials. The FVM and LBM are used for these two regions, respectively, with information exchanged at the interface between the two sub-domains. A general reconstruction operator (RO) is proposed to derive the distribution functions in the LBM from the corresponding macro scalar, the governing equation of which obeys the convection–diffusion equation. The CFVLBM and the RO are validated in several typical physicochemical problems and then are applied to simulate complex multi-scale coupled fluid flow, heat transfer, mass transport, and chemical reaction in a wall-coated micro reactor. The maximum ratio of the grid size between the FVM and LBM regions is explored and discussed. -- Highlights: •A coupled simulation strategy for simulating multi-scale phenomena is developed. •Finite volume method and lattice Boltzmann method are coupled. •A reconstruction operator is derived to transfer information at the sub-domains interface. •Coupled multi-scale multiple physicochemical processes in micro reactor are simulated. •Techniques to save computational resources and improve the efficiency are discussed.

  19. Using a scalable modeling and simulation framework to evaluate the benefits of intelligent transportation systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ewing, T.; Tentner, A.

    2000-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A scalable, distributed modeling and simulation framework has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory to study Intelligent Transportation Systems. The framework can run on a single-processor workstation, or run distributed on a multiprocessor computer or network of workstations. The framework is modular and supports plug-in models, hardware, and live data sources. The initial set of models currently includes road network and traffic flow, probe and smart vehicles, traffic management centers, communications between vehicles and centers, in-vehicle navigation systems, roadway traffic advisories. The modeling and simulation capability has been used to examine proposed ITS concepts. Results are presented from modeling scenarios from the Advanced Driver and Vehicle Advisory Navigation Concept (ADVANCE) experimental program to demonstrate how the framework can be used to evaluate the benefits of ITS and to plan future ITS operational tests and deployment initiatives.

  20. The Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFC Focused on Hanford’s 300 Area Uranium Plume Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the project is to conduct research at an Integrated Field-Scale Research Challenge Site in the Hanford Site 300 Area, CERCLA OU 300-FF-5 (Figure 1), to investigate multi-scale mass transfer processes associated with a subsurface uranium plume impacting both the vadose zone and groundwater. The project will investigate a series of science questions posed for research related to the effect of spatial heterogeneities, the importance of scale, coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes, and measurements/approaches needed to characterize a mass-transfer dominated system. The research will be conducted by evaluating three (3) different hypotheses focused on multi-scale mass transfer processes in the vadose zone and groundwater, their influence on field-scale U(VI) biogeochemistry and transport, and their implications to natural systems and remediation. The project also includes goals to 1) provide relevant materials and field experimental opportunities for other ERSD researchers and 2) generate a lasting, accessible, and high-quality field experimental database that can be used by the scientific community for testing and validation of new conceptual and numerical models of subsurface reactive transport.

  1. Integration of the DAYCENT Biogeochemical Model within a Multi-Model Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Muth

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Agricultural residues are the largest near term source of cellulosic 13 biomass for bioenergy production, but removing agricultural residues sustainably 14 requires considering the critical roles that residues play in the agronomic system. 15 Determining sustainable removal rates for agricultural residues has received 16 significant attention and integrated modeling strategies have been built to evaluate 17 sustainable removal rates considering soil erosion and organic matter constraints. 18 However the current integrated model does not quantitatively assess soil carbon 19 and long term crop yields impacts of residue removal. Furthermore the current 20 integrated model does not evaluate the greenhouse gas impacts of residue 21 removal, specifically N2O and CO2 gas fluxes from the soil surface. The DAYCENT 22 model simulates several important processes for determining agroecosystem 23 performance. These processes include daily Nitrogen-gas flux, daily carbon dioxide 24 flux from soil respiration, soil organic carbon and nitrogen, net primary productivity, 25 and daily water and nitrate leaching. Each of these processes is an indicator of 26 sustainability when evaluating emerging cellulosic biomass production systems for 27 bioenergy. A potentially vulnerable cellulosic biomass resource is agricultural 28 residues. This paper presents the integration of the DAYCENT model with the 29 existing integration framework modeling tool to investigate additional environment 30 impacts of agricultural residue removal. The integrated model is extended to 31 facilitate two-way coupling between DAYCENT and the existing framework. The 32 extended integrated model is applied to investigate additional environmental 33 impacts from a recent sustainable agricultural residue removal dataset. The 34 integrated model with DAYCENT finds some differences in sustainable removal 35 rates compared to previous results for a case study county in Iowa. The extended 36 integrated model with DAYCENT also predicts that long term yields will decrease.

  2. Multiscale Simulation Framework for Coupled Fluid Flow and Mechanical Deformation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tchelepi, Hamdi

    2014-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiscale linear-solver framework for the pressure equation associated with flow in highly heterogeneous porous formations was developed. The multiscale based approach is cast in a general algebraic form, which facilitates integration of the new scalable linear solver in existing flow simulators. The Algebraic Multiscale Solver (AMS) is employed as a preconditioner within a multi-stage strategy. The formulations investigated include the standard MultiScale Finite-Element (MSFE) andMultiScale Finite-Volume (MSFV) methods. The local-stage solvers include incomplete factorization and the so-called Correction Functions (CF) associated with the MSFV approach. Extensive testing of AMS, as an iterative linear solver, indicate excellent convergence rates and computational scalability. AMS compares favorably with advanced Algebraic MultiGrid (AMG) solvers for highly detailed three-dimensional heterogeneous models. Moreover, AMS is expected to be especially beneficial in solving time-dependent problems of coupled multiphase flow and transport in large-scale subsurface formations.

  3. A Business Model Framework for Dynamic Spectrum Access in Cognitive Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ha, Dong S.

    A Business Model Framework for Dynamic Spectrum Access in Cognitive Networks Nikhil Kelkar, Dr implement these technologies and still profit from them? III. FUNDAMENTAL MODEL The business model which we a multi-parameter approach by defining four levels on which everyday business models operate. Value

  4. RspSim A Simulation Model of the Reliable Server Pooling Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dreibholz, Thomas

    RspSim ­ A Simulation Model of the Reliable Server Pooling Framework Thomas Dreibholz, Martin Becke--This code contribution paper provides an overview of the RSPSIM model, which is a simulation model. Clearly, in order to evaluate RSerPool, an OMNET++-based simulation model ­ called RSPSIM ­ had been

  5. A Framework of Stochastic Power Management Using Hidden Markov Model Ying Tan, Qinru Qiu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Qinru

    A Framework of Stochastic Power Management Using Hidden Markov Model Ying Tan, Qinru Qiu Department 13902, USA {ying, qqiu}@binghamton.edu Abstract - The effectiveness of stochastic power management

  6. MANAGING AUSTRALIA'S PROTECTED AREAS a review of visitor management models, frameworks and processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Gregory G.

    MANAGING AUSTRALIA'S PROTECTED AREAS a review of visitor management models, frameworks and processes Greg Brown, Barbara Koth, Glenn Kreag & Delene Weber #12;MANAGING AUSTRALIA'S PROTECTED AREAS ii National Library of Australia Cataloguing in Publication Data Managing Australia's protected areas : review

  7. Adapting to a Changing Environment: Non-obvious Thresholds in Multi-Scale Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clare Perryman; Sebastian Wieczorek

    2014-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Many natural and technological systems fail to adapt to changing external conditions and move to a different state if the conditions vary too fast. Such "non-adiabatic" processes are ubiquitous, but little understood. We identify these processes with a new nonlinear phenomenon---an intricate threshold where a forced system fails to adiabatically follow a changing stable state. In systems with multiple time-scales such thresholds are generic, but non-obvious, meaning they cannot be captured by traditional stability theory. Rather, the phenomenon can be analysed using concepts from modern singular perturbation theory: folded singularities and canard trajectories, including composite canards. Thus, non-obvious thresholds should explain the failure to adapt to a changing environment in a wide range of multi-scale systems including: tipping points in the climate system, regime shifts in ecosystems, excitability in nerve cells, adaptation failure in regulatory genes, and adiabatic switching in technology.

  8. Multi-scale approach to invasion percolation of rock fracture networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali N. Ebrahimi; Falk K. Wittel; Nuno A. M. Araújo; Hans J. Herrmann

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-scale scheme for the invasion percolation of rock fracture networks with heterogeneous fracture aperture fields is proposed. Inside fractures, fluid transport is calculated on the finest scale and found to be localized in channels as a consequence of the aperture field. The channel network is characterized and reduced to a vectorized artificial channel network (ACN). Different realizations of ACNs are used to systematically calculate efficient apertures for fluid transport inside differently sized fractures as well as fracture intersection and entry properties. Typical situations in fracture networks are parameterized by fracture inclination, flow path length along the fracture and intersection lengths in the entrance and outlet zones of fractures. Using these scaling relations obtained from the finer scales, we simulate the invasion process of immiscible fluids into saturated discrete fracture networks, which were studied in previous works.

  9. The Brera Multi-scale Wavelet (BMW) ROSAT HRI source catalog; 1, the algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lazzati, D; Rosati, P; Panzera, M R; Tagliaferri, G; Lazzati, Davide; Campana, Sergio; Rosati, Piero; Panzera, Maria Rosa; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new detection algorithm based on the wavelet transform for the analysis of high energy astronomical images. The wavelet transform, due to its multi-scale structure, is suited for the optimal detection of point-like as well as extended sources, regardless of any loss of resolution with the off-axis angle. Sources are detected as significant enhancements in the wavelet space, after the subtraction of the non-flat components of the background. Detection thresholds are computed through Monte Carlo simulations in order to establish the expected number of spurious sources per field. The source characterization is performed through a multi-source fitting in the wavelet space. The procedure is designed to correctly deal with very crowded fields, allowing for the simultaneous characterization of nearby sources. To obtain a fast and reliable estimate of the source parameters and related errors, we apply a novel decimation technique which, taking into account the correlation properties of the wavelet transf...

  10. A Model Driven Reverse Engineering Framework for Extracting Business Rules out of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A Model Driven Reverse Engineering Framework for Extracting Business Rules out of a Java business rules out of Java source code. The use of modeling techniques facilitate the representation and justify the origin of the extracted business rules. In this sense, this paper describes a model

  11. A Role-Based Framework for Business Process Modeling Artur Caetano1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Role-Based Framework for Business Process Modeling Artur Caetano1,2 , Marielba Zacarias2 to business process modeling do not separate the collaborative aspects of a business object from its internal increasing the understandability and reusability of business process models. This approach makes use

  12. Creation of photo-modulated multi-state and multi-scale molecular assemblies via binary-state molecular switch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianbin

    Creation of photo-modulated multi-state and multi-scale molecular assemblies via binaryth January 2010 DOI: 10.1039/b916721h The creation of photo-modulated multi-state and multi location; this becomes especially valuable in nanoscience and nanotechnology applications, such as sensor

  13. CONTAM 01 Multi Scale Soil Sensor Network in Support of Groundwater Quality CONTAM 01.1 Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    Large soil columns were fabricated at the Civil & Environmental Engineering Lab at Loyola MarymountCONTAM 01 Multi Scale Soil Sensor Network in Support of Groundwater Quality Protection CONTAM 01.1 Overview This project has previously focused on moisture and chemical propagation in the soils undergoing

  14. Model Components of the Certification Framework for Geologic Carbon Sequestration Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Bryant, Steven L.; Nicot, Jean-Philippe; Kumar, Navanit; Zhang, Yingqi; Jordan, Preston; Pan, Lehua; Granvold, Patrick; Chow, Fotini K.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a framework for assessing the leakage risk of geologic carbon sequestration sites. This framework, known as the Certification Framework (CF), emphasizes wells and faults as the primary potential leakage conduits. Vulnerable resources are grouped into compartments, and impacts due to leakage are quantified by the leakage flux or concentrations that could potentially occur in compartments under various scenarios. The CF utilizes several model components to simulate leakage scenarios. One model component is a catalog of results of reservoir simulations that can be queried to estimate plume travel distances and times, rather than requiring CF users to run new reservoir simulations for each case. Other model components developed for the CF and described here include fault characterization using fault-population statistics; fault connection probability using fuzzy rules; well-flow modeling with a drift-flux model implemented in TOUGH2; and atmospheric dense-gas dispersion using a mesoscale weather prediction code.

  15. New Framework Transforms FAST Wind Turbine Modeling Tool (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent overhaul of the tool makes it a powerful, robust, and flexible modeling software to aid the development of innovative wind and water power technologies.

  16. Industrial Sector Energy Efficiency Modeling (ISEEM) Framework Documentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karali, Nihan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Model Part I, Energy Technology Systems Analysis Programme,A Report of the Energy Technology Systems Analysis Project,Energy Efficiency Technologies in Integrated Assessment

  17. Steady-State Gyrokinetics Transport Code (SSGKT), A Scientific Application Partnership with the Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations, Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fahey, Mark R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Candy, Jeff [General Atomics] [General Atomics

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This project initiated the development of TGYRO ? a steady-state Gyrokinetic transport code (SSGKT) that integrates micro-scale GYRO turbulence simulations into a framework for practical multi-scale simulation of conventional tokamaks as well as future reactors. Using a lightweight master transport code, multiple independent (each massively parallel) gyrokinetic simulations are coordinated. The capability to evolve profiles using the TGLF model was also added to TGYRO and represents a more typical use-case for TGYRO. The goal of the project was to develop a steady-state Gyrokinetic transport code (SSGKT) that integrates micro-scale gyrokinetic turbulence simulations into a framework for practical multi-scale simulation of a burning plasma core ? the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) in particular. This multi-scale simulation capability will be used to predict the performance (the fusion energy gain, Q) given the H-mode pedestal temperature and density. At present, projections of this type rely on transport models like GLF23, which are based on rather approximate fits to the results of linear and nonlinear simulations. Our goal is to make these performance projections with precise nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. The method of approach is to use a lightweight master transport code to coordinate multiple independent (each massively parallel) gyrokinetic simulations using the GYRO code. This project targets the practical multi-scale simulation of a reactor core plasma in order to predict the core temperature and density profiles given the H-mode pedestal temperature and density. A master transport code will provide feedback to O(16) independent gyrokinetic simulations (each massively parallel). A successful feedback scheme offers a novel approach to predictive modeling of an important national and international problem. Success in this area of fusion simulations will allow US scientists to direct the research path of ITER over the next two decades. The design of an efficient feedback algorithm is a serious numerical challenge. Although the power source and transport balance coding in the master are standard, it is nontrivial to design a feedback loop that can cope with outputs that are both intermittent and extremely expensive. A prototypical feedback scheme has already been successfully demonstrated for a single global GYRO simulation, although the robustness and efficiency are likely far from optimal. Once the transport feedback scheme is perfected, it could, in principle, be embedded into any of the more elaborate transport codes (ONETWO, TRANSP, and CORSICA), or adopted by other FSP-related multi-scale projects.

  18. Transport Phenomena in Polymer Electrolyte Membranes I. Modeling Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Struchtrup, Henning

    and optimization of fuel cells in a design and development environment. Kreuer et al.19 recently presented of ongoing efforts to develop more comprehensive compu- tational fuel cell model14-18 that allow analysis of the fundamental transport mechanisms. In the context of multidimensional fuel cell modeling, practical

  19. The Community Earth System Model: A Framework for Collaborative Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurrell, Jim; Holland, Marika M.; Gent, Peter R.; Ghan, Steven J.; Kay, Jennifer; Kushner, P.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Large, William G.; Lawrence, David M.; Lindsay, Keith; Lipscomb, William; Long , Matthew; Mahowald, N.; Marsh, D.; Neale, Richard; Rasch, Philip J.; Vavrus, Steven J.; Vertenstein, Mariana; Bader, David C.; Collins, William D.; Hack, James; Kiehl, J. T.; Marshall, Shawn

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Community Earth System Model (CESM) is a flexible and extensible community tool used to investigate a diverse set of earth system interactions across multiple time and space scales. This global coupled model is a natural evolution from its predecessor, the Community Climate System Model, following the incorporation of new earth system capabilities. These include the ability to simulate biogeochemical cycles, atmospheric chemistry, ice sheets, and a high-top atmosphere. These and other new model capabilities are enabling investigations into a wide range of pressing scientific questions, providing new predictive capabilities and increasing our collective knowledge about the behavior and interactions of the earth system. Simulations with numerous configurations of the CESM have been provided to the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) and are being analyzed by the broader community of scientists. Additionally, the model source code and associated documentation are freely available to the scientific community to use for earth system studies, making it a true community tool. Here we describe this earth modeling system, its various possible configurations, and illustrate its capabilities with a few science highlights.

  20. Design theoretic analysis of three system modeling frameworks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, Michael James

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper analyzes three simulation architectures from the context of modeling scalability to address System of System (SoS) and Complex System problems. The paper first provides an overview of the SoS problem domain and reviews past work in analyzing model and general system complexity issues. It then identifies and explores the issues of vertical and horizontal integration as well as coupling and hierarchical decomposition as the system characteristics and metrics against which the tools are evaluated. In addition, it applies Nam Suh's Axiomatic Design theory as a construct for understanding coupling and its relationship to system feasibility. Next it describes the application of MATLAB, Swarm, and Umbra (three modeling and simulation approaches) to modeling swarms of Unmanned Flying Vehicle (UAV) agents in relation to the chosen characteristics and metrics. Finally, it draws general conclusions for analyzing model architectures that go beyond those analyzed. In particular, it identifies decomposition along phenomena of interaction and modular system composition as enabling features for modeling large heterogeneous complex systems.

  1. A Distributed Multi-User Role-Based Model Integration Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorow, Kevin E.; Gorton, Ian; Thurman, David A.

    2004-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated computational modeling can be very useful in making quick, yet informed decisions related to environmental issues including Brownfield assessments. Unfortunately, the process of creating meaningful information using this methodology is fraught with difficulties, particularly when multiple computational models are required. Common problems include the inability to seamlessly transfer information between models, the difficulty of incorporating new models and integrating heterogeneous data sources, executing large numbers of model runs in a reasonable time frame, and adequately capturing pedigree information that describes the specific computational steps and data required to reproduce results. While current model integration frameworks have successfully addressed some of these problems, none have addressed all of them. Building on existing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), we have created an extensible software architecture for the next generation of model integration frameworks that addresses these issues. This paper describes this architecture that is being developed to support integrated water resource modeling in a metropolitan area.

  2. A Model and Numerical Framework for the Simulation of Solid-Solid Phase Transformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee, Sanjay

    A Model and Numerical Framework for the Simulation of Solid-Solid Phase Transformations Garrett J computational realization for the simulation of solid-solid phase transformations of the type observed in shape physical experiments and is indicative of the power of the proposed modelling methodology. In particular

  3. c Copyright by Daniel Duane Deavours, 2001 FORMAL SPECIFICATION OF THE MOBIUS MODELING FRAMEWORK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    c Copyright by Daniel Duane Deavours, 2001 #12;FORMAL SPECIFICATION OF THE M¨OBIUS MODELING of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001 William H. Sanders to create a general framework that supports a large variety of modeling formalisms. iii #12;In this thesis

  4. A Cognitive Dysfunction Modeling Framework James K. Peterson (petersj@clemson.edu)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, James K

    A Cognitive Dysfunction Modeling Framework James K. Peterson (petersj@clemson.edu) Department-0975 USA October 17, 2013 Abstract We are interested in developing a small scale model of cognitive dysfunction which provides insight into how cognitive function arises and how cognitive dysfunction might

  5. Integration of Physical Models in the ORQA Framework for Electric Vehicle Energy Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Integration of Physical Models in the ORQA Framework for Electric Vehicle Energy Management Borjan Brest, France ABSTRACT The energy management of electric vehicles is located in the storage system Systems]: Consumer Products--electric vehicle Keywords model driven architecture; energy consumption

  6. A Model Reduction Framework for Efficient Simulation of Li-Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of degradation processes in lithium-ion batteries, the modelling of cell dynamics at the mircometer scale lithium-ion batteries is the deposition of metallic lithium at the negative battery electrode (LiA Model Reduction Framework for Efficient Simulation of Li-Ion Batteries Mario Ohlberger Stephan

  7. Development of Frameworks for Robust Regional Climate Modeling PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Moetasim Ashfaq

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    goals of climate modeling. Water supports the ecosystems as well as a wide range of human activities to improve region- al predictions of the hydrologic cycle to address climate change impacts, adaptationDevelopment of Frameworks for Robust Regional Climate Modeling PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Moetasim

  8. 3D/4D MODELLING, VISUALIZATION AND INFORMATION FRAMEWORKS: CURRENT U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY PRACTICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    33 3D/4D MODELLING, VISUALIZATION AND INFORMATION FRAMEWORKS: CURRENT U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY to visualize and model geologic data and information in 3 spatial dimensions (3D) and sometimes adding time in visualizing and coupling geologic, hydrologic, atmospheric, and biologic processes together into 3D/4D

  9. A framework for modeling the consequences of the propagation of automation degradation: application to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A framework for modeling the consequences of the propagation of automation degradation: application of automation degradation in the context of a socio-technical network. This modelling approach involves two integrating these two views for describing the evolution of system performances under automation degradation

  10. A Flexible Atmospheric Modeling Framework for the CESM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randall, David [Colorado State University; Heikes, Ross [Colorado State University; Konor, Celal [Colorado State University

    2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We have created two global dynamical cores based on the unified system of equations and Z-grid staggering on an icosahedral grid, which are collectively called UZIM (Unified Z-grid Icosahedral Model). The z-coordinate version (UZIM-height) can be run in hydrostatic and nonhydrostatic modes. The sigma-coordinate version (UZIM-sigma) runs in only hydrostatic mode. The super-parameterization has been included as a physics option in both models. The UZIM versions with the super-parameterization are called SUZI. With SUZI-height, we have completed aquaplanet runs. With SUZI-sigma, we are making aquaplanet runs and realistic climate simulations. SUZI-sigma includes realistic topography and a SiB3 model to parameterize the land-surface processes.

  11. The Brera Multi-scale Wavelet ROSAT HRI source catalogue (BMW-HRI)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panzera, M R; Covino, S; Lazzati, D; Mignani, R P; Moretti, A; Tagliaferri, G

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the Brera Multi-scale Wavelet ROSAT HRI source catalogue (BMW-HRI) derived from all ROSAT HRI pointed observations with exposure time longer than 100 s available in the ROSAT public archives. The data were analyzed automatically using a wavelet detection algorithm suited to the detection and characterization of both point-like and extended sources. This algorithm is able to detect and disentangle sources in very crowded fields and/or in presence of extended or bright sources. Images have been also visually inspected after the analysis to ensure verification. The final catalogue, derived from 4,303 observations, consists of 29,089 sources detected with a detection probability of greater or equal 4.2 sigma. For each source, the primary catalogue entries provide name, position, count rate, flux and extension along with the relative errors. In addition, results of cross-correlations with existing catalogues at different wavelengths (FIRST, IRAS, 2MASS and GSC2) are also reported. All these information ...

  12. A modeling framework for investment planning in interdependent infrastructures in multi-hazard environments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Nathanael J. K.; Gearhart, Jared Lee; Jones, Dean A.; Nozick, Linda Karen; Prince, Michael

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, much of protection planning is conducted separately for each infrastructure and hazard. Limited funding requires a balance of expenditures between terrorism and natural hazards based on potential impacts. This report documents the results of a Laboratory Directed Research&Development (LDRD) project that created a modeling framework for investment planning in interdependent infrastructures focused on multiple hazards, including terrorism. To develop this framework, three modeling elements were integrated: natural hazards, terrorism, and interdependent infrastructures. For natural hazards, a methodology was created for specifying events consistent with regional hazards. For terrorism, we modeled the terrorist's actions based on assumptions regarding their knowledge, goals, and target identification strategy. For infrastructures, we focused on predicting post-event performance due to specific terrorist attacks and natural hazard events, tempered by appropriate infrastructure investments. We demonstrate the utility of this framework with various examples, including protection of electric power, roadway, and hospital networks.

  13. Evaluation of Hydrometeor Occurrence Profiles in the Multiscale Modeling Framework Climate Model using Atmospheric Classification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchand, Roger T.; Beagley, Nathaniel; Ackerman, Thomas P.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vertical profiles of hydrometeor occurrence from the Multiscale Modeling Framework (MMF) climate model are compared with profiles observed by a vertically pointing millimeter wavelength cloud-radar (located in the U.S. Southern Great Plains) as a function of the largescale atmospheric state. The atmospheric state is determined by classifying (or clustering) the large-scale (synoptic) fields produced by the MMF and a numerical weather prediction model using a neural network approach. The comparison shows that for cold frontal and post-cold frontal conditions the MMF produces profiles of hydrometeor occurrence that compare favorably with radar observations, while for warm frontal conditions the model tends to produce hydrometeor fractions that are too large with too much cloud (non-precipitating hydrometeors) above 7 km and too much precipitating hydrometeor coverage below 7 km. We also find that the MMF has difficulty capturing the formation of low clouds and that for all atmospheric states that occur during June, July, and August, the MMF produces too much high and thin cloud, especially above 10 km.

  14. The Brera Multi-scale Wavelet ROSAT HRI source catalogue (BMW-HRI)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. R. Panzera; S. Campana; S. Covino; D. Lazzati; R. P. Mignani; A. Moretti; G. Tagliaferri

    2002-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the Brera Multi-scale Wavelet ROSAT HRI source catalogue (BMW-HRI) derived from all ROSAT HRI pointed observations with exposure time longer than 100 s available in the ROSAT public archives. The data were analyzed automatically using a wavelet detection algorithm suited to the detection and characterization of both point-like and extended sources. This algorithm is able to detect and disentangle sources in very crowded fields and/or in presence of extended or bright sources. Images have been also visually inspected after the analysis to ensure verification. The final catalogue, derived from 4,303 observations, consists of 29,089 sources detected with a detection probability of greater or equal 4.2 sigma. For each source, the primary catalogue entries provide name, position, count rate, flux and extension along with the relative errors. In addition, results of cross-correlations with existing catalogues at different wavelengths (FIRST, IRAS, 2MASS and GSC2) are also reported. All these information are available on the web via the DIANA Interface. As an external check, we compared our catalogue with the previously available ROSHRICAT catalogue (both in its short and long versions) and we were able to recover, for the short version, \\~90% of the entries. We computed the sky coverage of the entire HRI data set by means of simulations. The complete BMW-HRI catalogue provides a sky coverage of 732 square degrees down to a limiting flux of ~1E-12 erg/s/cm2 and of 10 square degrees down to ~1E-14 erg/s/cm2. We were able to compute the cosmological log(N)-log(S) distribution down to a flux of about 1.2x1E-14 erg/s/cm2.

  15. The Brera Multi-scale Wavelet (BMW) ROSAT HRI source catalog. I: the algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davide Lazzati; Sergio Campana; Piero Rosati; Maria Rosa Panzera; Gianpiero Tagliaferri

    1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new detection algorithm based on the wavelet transform for the analysis of high energy astronomical images. The wavelet transform, due to its multi-scale structure, is suited for the optimal detection of point-like as well as extended sources, regardless of any loss of resolution with the off-axis angle. Sources are detected as significant enhancements in the wavelet space, after the subtraction of the non-flat components of the background. Detection thresholds are computed through Monte Carlo simulations in order to establish the expected number of spurious sources per field. The source characterization is performed through a multi-source fitting in the wavelet space. The procedure is designed to correctly deal with very crowded fields, allowing for the simultaneous characterization of nearby sources. To obtain a fast and reliable estimate of the source parameters and related errors, we apply a novel decimation technique which, taking into account the correlation properties of the wavelet transform, extracts a subset of almost independent coefficients. We test the performance of this algorithm on synthetic fields, analyzing with particular care the characterization of sources in poor background situations, where the assumption of Gaussian statistics does not hold. For these cases, where standard wavelet algorithms generally provide underestimated errors, we infer errors through a procedure which relies on robust basic statistics. Our algorithm is well suited for the analysis of images taken with the new generation of X-ray instruments equipped with CCD technology which will produce images with very low background and/or high source density.

  16. Simulated diurnal rainfall physics in a multi-scale global climate model with embedded explicit convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchard, Michael Stephen

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    radiation-convection feedbacks are usually invoked to explain the open oceanocean] diurnal [rainfall] cycle can be qualita- tively accounted for by direct radiation-ocean is often maximized in the early morning hours, colloquially called the “Dynamic-Radiation-

  17. Simulated diurnal rainfall physics in a multi-scale global climate model with embedded explicit convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchard, Michael Stephen

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review, 131 (5), 830–844. Marchand, R. and T. Ackerman,M. , T. Ackerman, R. Marchand, and M. Khairoutdinov, 2006:process. ” Adapted from Marchand et al. (2009b) Figure

  18. Multi-scale Modeling Consortium -Working Group 5 Minutes of the WG activities in December 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taufer, Michela

    -scale simulations among volunteers' computers. Projects such as Folding@Home, Rosetta@Home, and Predictor

  19. Sustainable Manufacturing via Multi-Scale, Physics-Based Process Modeling and Manufacturing- Informed Design

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy Strain Rate4SuperhardSuspect andCoaches Aim forManufacturing

  20. ANL/ALCF/ESP-13/8 Using Multi-scale Dynamic Rupture Models to

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01) (See95TI07)Operations2 Print258Department of3 Ab-initio458

  1. A Unified Multi-Scale Model for Pore-Scale Flow Simulations in Soils. |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies |November 2011A FirstEMSL ShellACalmodulin inU T H O

  2. Assessment of Multi-Scale T/H Codes and Models for DNB CP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2ArgonneAssembly of aB -Future Vehicle

  3. Multi-Scale Modeling Tools to Enable Manufacturing-Informed Design |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy HealthCommentsAugust 2012 Monthly ProjectEnterprisesRepair0,Department of

  4. Multi-scale modelling of III-nitrides: from dislocations to the electronic structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holec, David

    or public lighting nowadays use GaN-based LEDs. Significant effort is being invested in development of efficient and reliable LEDs which emit comfort- able white light, as there is a huge market potential for replacing bulbs and fluorescent tubes currently... of wurtzite forms of the III-nitrides. The range of the visible spectrum is shown on the wavelength axis. GaN and its alloys with aluminium or indium are in their stable form, wurtzite direct band gap semicon- ductors that have become the most important since...

  5. Reliability Modeling of Cyber-Physical Electric Power Systems: A System-Theoretic Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liberzon, Daniel

    1 Reliability Modeling of Cyber-Physical Electric Power Systems: A System-Theoretic Framework systematic reliability analysis tools to address planning and operation challenges of future electric power and the introduction of new sources of uncertainty in systems already inherently complex. Current reliability analysis

  6. A practical framework for eliciting and modeling system dependability requirements: Experience from the NASA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basili, Victor R.

    A practical framework for eliciting and modeling system dependability requirements: Experience from of Computer Science, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA b Fraunhofer Center for Experimental March 2005; accepted 21 March 2005 Available online 29 April 2005 Abstract The dependability of a system

  7. Information Theoretic Framework of Trust Modeling and Evaluation for Ad Hoc Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yan Lindsay

    1 Information Theoretic Framework of Trust Modeling and Evaluation for Ad Hoc Networks Yan Lindsay-- The performance of ad hoc networks depends on co- operation and trust among distributed nodes. To enhance security in ad hoc networks, it is important to evaluate trustworthiness of other nodes without centralized

  8. Chemical enterprise model and decision-making framework for sustainable chemical product design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Chemical enterprise model and decision-making framework for sustainable chemical product design, LGC (Laboratoire de Ge´nie Chimique), F-31432 Toulouse Cedex 04, France 1. Introduction The chemical often strongly impact the environment and people's health and safety. Indeed chemical industries

  9. Function Test Framework for Testing IO-Blocks in a Model-Based Rapid Prototyping Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Function Test Framework for Testing IO-Blocks in a Model-Based Rapid Prototyping Development -- Testing and verification are important methods for gaining confidence in the reliability of a software changing development cycles or that is tar- geted at many platforms. In this paper we present a test

  10. Mauve: a Component-based Modeling Framework for Real-time Analysis of Robotic Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauve: a Component-based Modeling Framework for Real-time Analysis of Robotic Applications Charles paradigm for robotic software devel- opment [2], applied in many applications [3], [4], [5], [6]. Resulting validation of the robotic application, by directly analysing the architecture specification, and limiting

  11. A network-based modeling framework for stakeholder analysis of China's energy conservation campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    A network-based modeling framework for stakeholder analysis of China's energy conservation campaign Available online 13 July 2011 Keywords: Energy conservation Policy-making Stakeholder analysis Network, the stakeholder analysis of China's energy conservation campaign still has been under-developed. This paper

  12. A Graphical Framework for Spectrum Modeling and Decision Making in Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Robert Caiming

    1 A Graphical Framework for Spectrum Modeling and Decision Making in Cognitive Radio Networks occupancies in cognitive radio networks. It is known that there exist correlations of spectrum occupancies for the inference and decision problems related to spectrum ac- tivities in cognitive radio networks. Bayesian

  13. A Data Mining Framework for Building Intrusion Detection Models Salvatore J. Stolfo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Junfeng

    A Data Mining Framework for Building Intrusion Detection Models Wenke Lee Salvatore J. Stolfo Kui W of expert knowledge, changes to IDSs are expensive and slow. In this paper, we describe a data mining, and apply data mining programs to learn rules that accurately capture the behavior of intrusions and normal

  14. Uncertainty Analysis Framework - Hanford Site-Wide Groundwater Flow and Transport Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, Charles R.; Bergeron, Marcel P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Thorne, Paul D.; Wurstner, Signe K.; Rogers, Phillip M.

    2001-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) embarked on a new initiative to strengthen the technical defensibility of the predictions being made with a site-wide groundwater flow and transport model at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. In FY 2000, the focus of the initiative was on the characterization of major uncertainties in the current conceptual model that would affect model predictions. The long-term goals of the initiative are the development and implementation of an uncertainty estimation methodology in future assessments and analyses using the site-wide model. This report focuses on the development and implementation of an uncertainty analysis framework.

  15. Development of a multi-scale projection method with immersed boundaries for chemically reactive flows and its application to examine flame stabilization and blow-off mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kedia, Kushal Sharad

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-fidelity multi-scale simulation tools are critically important for examining energy conversion processes in which the coupling of complex chemical kinetics, molecular transport, continuum mixing and acoustics play ...

  16. Implementations of a Flexible Framework for Managing Geologic Sequestration Modeling Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Signe K.; Gosink, Luke J.; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; Black, Gary D.; Purohit, Sumit; Bacon, Diana H.; Hou, Zhangshuan; Lin, Guang; Gorton, Ian; Bonneville, Alain

    2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical simulation is a standard practice used to support designing, operating, and monitoring CO2 injection projects. Although a variety of computational tools have been developed that support the numerical simulation process, many are single-purpose or platform specific and have a prescribed workflow that may or may not be suitable for a particular project. We are developing an open-source, flexible framework named Velo that provides a knowledge management infrastructure and tools to support modeling and simulation for various types of projects in a number of scientific domains. The Geologic Sequestration Software Suite (GS3) is a version of this framework with features and tools specifically tailored for geologic sequestration studies. Because of its general nature, GS3 is being employed in a variety of ways on projects with differing goals. GS3 is being used to support the Sim-SEQ international model comparison study, by providing a collaborative framework for the modeling teams and providing tools for model comparison. Another customized deployment of GS3 has been made to support the permit application process. In this case, GS3 is being used to manage data in support of conceptual model development and provide documentation and provenance for numerical simulations. An additional customized deployment of GS3 is being created for use by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US-EPA) to aid in the CO2 injection permit application review process in one of its regions. These use cases demonstrate GS3’s flexibility, utility, and broad applicability

  17. 1 MODELING THE PERFORMANCE OF ULTRAVIOLET REACTOR IN EULERIAN AND LAGRANGIAN FRAMEWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angelo Sozzi; Fariborz Taghipour

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CFD models for simulating the performance of ultraviolet (UV) reactors for micro-organism inactivation were developed in Eulerian and Lagrangian frameworks, taking into account hydrodynamics, kinetics, and radiation field within UV reactor. In the Lagrangian framework, micro-organisms were treated as discrete particles where the trajectory was predicted by integrating the force balance on the particle. In the Eulerian framework, the conservation equation of species (microorganisms) was solved along with the transport equations. The fluid flow was characterized experimentally using particle image velocimetry (PIV) flow visualization techniques and modeled using CFD for a UV reactor prototype model. The performance of annular UV reactors with an inlet parallel and perpendicular to the reactor axis were investigated. The results indicated that the fluid flow distribution within the reactor volume can significantly affect the reactor performance. Both the Eulerian and Lagrangian models were used to obtain complimentary information on the reactors; while the Lagrangian method provided an estimation of the UV-fluence distribution and the trajectory of species, the Eulerian approach showed the concentration distribution and local photo-reaction rates. The combined information can be used to predict and monitor reactor performance and to improve the reactor design.

  18. A modern solver framework to manage solution algorithms in the Community Earth System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Katherine J [ORNL; Worley, Patrick H [ORNL; Nichols, Dr Jeff A [ORNL; WhiteIII, James B [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Salinger, Andy [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Price, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lemieux, Jean-Francois [New York University; Lipscomb, William [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Perego, Mauro [Florida State University; Vertenstein, Mariana [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Edwards, Jim [IBM and National Center for Atmospheric Research

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global Earth-system models (ESM) can now produce simulations that resolve ~50 km features and include finer-scale, interacting physical processes. In order to achieve these scale-length solutions, ESMs require smaller time steps, which limits parallel performance. Solution methods that overcome these bottlenecks can be quite intricate, and there is no single set of algorithms that perform well across the range of problems of interest. This creates significant implementation challenges, which is further compounded by complexity of ESMs. Therefore, prototyping and evaluating new algorithms in these models requires a software framework that is flexible, extensible, and easily introduced into the existing software. We describe our efforts to create a parallel solver framework that links the Trilinos library of solvers to Glimmer-CISM, a continental ice sheet model used in the Community Earth System Model (CESM). We demonstrate this framework within both current and developmental versions of Glimmer-CISM and provide strategies for its integration into the rest of the CESM.

  19. Natural Tracers and Multi-Scale Assessment of Caprock Sealing Behavior: A Case Study of the Kirtland Formation, San Juan Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason Heath; Brian McPherson; Thomas Dewers

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The assessment of caprocks for geologic CO{sub 2} storage is a multi-scale endeavor. Investigation of a regional caprock - the Kirtland Formation, San Juan Basin, USA - at the pore-network scale indicates high capillary sealing capacity and low permeabilities. Core and wellscale data, however, indicate a potential seal bypass system as evidenced by multiple mineralized fractures and methane gas saturations within the caprock. Our interpretation of {sup 4}He concentrations, measured at the top and bottom of the caprock, suggests low fluid fluxes through the caprock: (1) Of the total {sup 4}He produced in situ (i.e., at the locations of sampling) by uranium and thorium decay since deposition of the Kirtland Formation, a large portion still resides in the pore fluids. (2) Simple advection-only and advection-diffusion models, using the measured {sup 4}He concentrations, indicate low permeability ({approx}10-20 m{sup 2} or lower) for the thickness of the Kirtland Formation. These findings, however, do not guarantee the lack of a large-scale bypass system. The measured data, located near the boundary conditions of the models (i.e., the overlying and underlying aquifers), limit our testing of conceptual models and the sensitivity of model parameterization. Thus, we suggest approaches for future studies to better assess the presence or lack of a seal bypass system at this particular site and for other sites in general.

  20. Integrating Empirical Measures of Energy Efficiency into an Energy Modeling Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, G.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrating Empirical Measures of Energy Efficiency Into An Energy Modeling Framework Gale Boyd, Argonne National Laboratory Tools such as Data Envelopment Analysis and Stochastic Frontier Regressions provide a basis for empirical measures... of efficiency. The definition of efficiency these tools encompass can be as broadly defined as total factor productivity, or narrowly defined in terms of single inputs like energy. Given the ability to generate empirical measures of energy efficiency...

  1. A Subbasin-based framework to represent land surface processes in an Earth System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tesfa, Teklu K.; Li, Hongyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Ke, Yinghai; Sun, Yu; Liu, Ying

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Realistically representing spatial heterogeneity and lateral land surface processes within and between modeling units in earth system models is important because of their implications to surface energy and water exchange. The traditional approach of using regular grids as computational units in land surface models and earth system models may lead to inadequate representation of lateral movements of water, energy and carbon fluxes, especially when the grid resolution increases. Here a new subbasin-based framework is introduced in the Community Land Model (CLM), which is the land component of the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Local processes are represented assuming each subbasin as a grid cell on a pseudo grid matrix with no significant modifications to the existing CLM modeling structure. Lateral routing of water within and between subbasins is simulated with the subbasin version of a recently-developed physically based routing model, Model for Scale Adaptive River Routing (MOSART). As an illustration, this new framework is implemented in the topographically diverse region of the U.S. Pacific Northwest. The modeling units (subbasins) are delineated from high-resolution Digital Elevation Model while atmospheric forcing and surface parameters are remapped from the corresponding high resolution datasets. The impacts of this representation on simulating hydrologic processes are explored by comparing it with the default (grid-based) CLM representation. In addition, the effects of DEM resolution on parameterizing topography and the subsequent effects on runoff processes are investigated. Limited model evaluation and comparison showed that small difference between the averaged forcing can lead to more significant difference in the simulated runoff and streamflow because of nonlinear horizontal processes. Topographic indices derived from high resolution DEM may not improve the overall water balance, but affect the partitioning between surface and subsurface runoff. More systematic analyses are needed to determine the relative merits of the subbasin representation compared to the commonly used grid-based representation, especially when land surface models are approaching higher resolutions.

  2. A second gradient theoretical framework for hierarchical multiscale modeling of materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luscher, Darby J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bronkhorst, Curt A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mc Dowell, David L [GEORGIA TECH

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A theoretical framework for the hierarchical multiscale modeling of inelastic response of heterogeneous materials has been presented. Within this multiscale framework, the second gradient is used as a non local kinematic link between the response of a material point at the coarse scale and the response of a neighborhood of material points at the fine scale. Kinematic consistency between these scales results in specific requirements for constraints on the fluctuation field. The wryness tensor serves as a second-order measure of strain. The nature of the second-order strain induces anti-symmetry in the first order stress at the coarse scale. The multiscale ISV constitutive theory is couched in the coarse scale intermediate configuration, from which an important new concept in scale transitions emerges, namely scale invariance of dissipation. Finally, a strategy for developing meaningful kinematic ISVs and the proper free energy functions and evolution kinetics is presented.

  3. Multi-scale Detection of Organic and Inorganic Signatures Provides Insights into Gas Shale Properties and Evolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernard, S.; Horsfield, B; Schultz, H; Schreiber, A; Wirth, R; Thi AnhVu, T; Perssen, F; Konitzer, S; Volk, H; et. al.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic geochemical analyses, including solvent extraction or pyrolysis, followed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry, are generally conducted on bulk gas shale samples to evaluate their source and reservoir properties. While organic petrology has been directed at unravelling the matrix composition and textures of these economically important unconventional resources, their spatial variability in chemistry and structure is still poorly documented at the sub-micrometre scale. Here, a combination of techniques including transmission electron microscopy and a synchrotron-based microscopy tool, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, have been used to characterize at a multiple length scale an overmature organic-rich calcareous mudstone from northern Germany. We document multi-scale chemical and mineralogical heterogeneities within the sample, from the millimetre down to the nanometre-scale. From the detection of different types of bitumen and authigenic minerals associated with the organic matter, we show that the multi-scale approach used in this study may provide new insights into gaseous hydrocarbon generation/retention processes occurring within gas shales and may shed new light on their thermal history.

  4. EFFECTS OF PORE STRUCTURE CHANGE AND MULTI-SCALE HETEROGENEITY ON CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT AND REACTION RATE UPSCALING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindquist, W. Brent; Jones, Keith W.; Um, Wooyong; Rockhold, mark; Peters, Catherine A.; Celia, Michael A.

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This project addressed the scaling of geochemical reactions to core and field scales, and the interrelationship between reaction rates and flow in porous media. We targeted reactive transport problems relevant to the Hanford site ? specifically the reaction of highly caustic, radioactive waste solutions with subsurface sediments, and the immobilization of 90Sr and 129I through mineral incorporation and passive flow blockage, respectively. We addressed the correlation of results for pore-scale fluid-soil interaction with field-scale fluid flow, with the specific goals of (i) predicting attenuation of radionuclide concentration; (ii) estimating changes in flow rates through changes of soil permeabilities; and (iii) estimating effective reaction rates. In supplemental work, we also simulated reactive transport systems relevant to geologic carbon sequestration. As a whole, this research generated a better understanding of reactive transport in porous media, and resulted in more accurate methods for reaction rate upscaling and improved prediction of permeability evolution. These scientific advancements will ultimately lead to better tools for management and remediation of DOE’s legacy waste problems. We established three key issues of reactive flow upscaling, and organized this project in three corresponding thrust areas. 1) Reactive flow experiments. The combination of mineral dissolution and precipitation alters pore network structure and the subsequent flow velocities, thereby creating a complex interaction between reaction and transport. To examine this phenomenon, we conducted controlled laboratory experimentation using reactive flow-through columns. ? Results and Key Findings: Four reactive column experiments (S1, S3, S4, S5) have been completed in which simulated tank waste leachage (STWL) was reacted with pure quartz sand, with and without Aluminum. The STWL is a caustic solution that dissolves quartz. Because Al is a necessary element in the formation of secondary mineral precipitates (cancrinite), conducting experiments under conditions with and without Al allowed us to experimentally separate the conditions that lead to quartz dissolution from the conditions that lead to quartz dissolution plus cancrinite precipitation. Consistent with our expectations, in the experiments without Al, there was a substantial reduction in volume of the solid matrix. With Al there was a net increase in the volume of the solid matrix. The rate and extent of reaction was found to increase with temperature. These results demonstrate a successful effort to identify conditions that lead to increases and conditions that lead to decreases in solid matrix volume due to reactions of caustic tank wastes with quartz sands. In addition, we have begun to work with slightly larger, intermediate-scale columns packed with Hanford natural sediments and quartz. Similar dissolution and precipitation were observed in these colums. The measurements are being interpreted with reactive transport modeling using STOMP; preliminary observations are reported here. 2) Multi-Scale Imaging and Analysis. Mineral dissolution and precipitation rates within a porous medium will be different in different pores due to natural heterogeneity and the heterogeneity that is created from the reactions themselves. We used a combination of X-ray computed microtomography, backscattered electron and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy combined with computational image analysis to quantify pore structure, mineral distribution, structure changes and fluid-air and fluid-grain interfaces. ? Results and Key Findings: Three of the columns from the reactive flow experiments at PNNL (S1, S3, S4) were imaged using 3D X-ray computed microtomography (XCMT) at BNL and analyzed using 3DMA-rock at SUNY Stony Brook. The imaging results support the mass balance findings reported by Dr. Um’s group, regarding the substantial dissolution of quartz in column S1. An important observation is that of grain movement accompanying dissolution in the unconsolidated media. The resultant movement

  5. Modeling Framework and Validation of a Smart Grid and Demand Response System for Wind Power Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broeer, Torsten; Fuller, Jason C.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Chassin, David P.; Djilali, Ned

    2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity generation from wind power and other renewable energy sources is increasing, and their variability introduces new challenges to the power system. The emergence of smart grid technologies in recent years has seen a paradigm shift in redefining the electrical system of the future, in which controlled response of the demand side is used to balance fluctuations and intermittencies from the generation side. This paper presents a modeling framework for an integrated electricity system where loads become an additional resource. The agent-based model represents a smart grid power system integrating generators, transmission, distribution, loads and market. The model incorporates generator and load controllers, allowing suppliers and demanders to bid into a Real-Time Pricing (RTP) electricity market. The modeling framework is applied to represent a physical demonstration project conducted on the Olympic Peninsula, Washington, USA, and validation simulations are performed using actual dynamic data. Wind power is then introduced into the power generation mix illustrating the potential of demand response to mitigate the impact of wind power variability, primarily through thermostatically controlled loads. The results also indicate that effective implementation of Demand Response (DR) to assist integration of variable renewable energy resources requires a diversity of loads to ensure functionality of the overall system.

  6. The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature version 2.1 (MEGAN2.1): an extended and updated framework for modeling biogenic emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guenther, A. B.

    The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature version 2.1 (MEGAN2.1) is a modeling framework for estimating fluxes of biogenic compounds between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere using simple mechanistic ...

  7. Casimir force for absorbing media in an open quantum system framework: Scalar model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lombardo, Fernando C.; Rubio Lopez, Adrian E. [Departamento de Fisica Juan Jose Giambiagi, FCEyN UBA and IFIBA CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Mazzitelli, Francisco D. [Departamento de Fisica Juan Jose Giambiagi, FCEyN UBA and IFIBA CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Centro Atomico Bariloche Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, R8402AGP Bariloche (Argentina)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we compute the Casimir force between two finite-width mirrors at finite temperature, working in a simplified model in 1+1 dimensions. The mirrors, considered as dissipative media, are modeled by a continuous set of harmonic oscillators which in turn are coupled to an external environment at thermal equilibrium. The calculation of the Casimir force is performed in the framework of the theory of open quantum systems. It is shown that the Casimir interaction has two different contributions: the usual radiation pressure from the vacuum, which is obtained for ideal mirrors without dissipation or losses, and a Langevin force associated with the noise induced by the interaction between dielectric atoms in the slabs and the thermal bath. Both contributions to the Casimir force are needed in order to reproduce the analogous Lifshitz formula in 1+1 dimensions. We also discuss the relationship between the electromagnetic properties of the mirrors and the spectral density of the environment.

  8. Fragments' internal and kinetic temperatures in the framework of a Nuclear Statistical Multifragmentation Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. R. Souza; B. V. Carlson; R. Donangelo; W. G. Lynch; M. B. Tsang

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The agreement between the fragments' internal and kinetic temperatures with the breakup temperature is investigated using a Statistical Multifragmentation Model which makes no a priori as- sumption on the relationship between them. We thus examine the conditions for obtaining such agreement and find that, in the framework of our model, this holds only in a relatively narrow range of excitation energy. The role played by the qualitative shape of the fragments' state densities is also examined. Our results suggest that the internal temperature of the light fragments may be affected by this quantity, whose behavior may lead to constant internal temperatures over a wide excitation energy range. It thus suggests that the nuclear thermometry may provide valuable information on the nuclear state density.

  9. Wetland model in an earth systems modeling framework for regional environmental policy analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awadalla, Sirein Salah

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to investigate incorporating a wetland component into a land energy and water fluxes model, the Community Land Model (CLM). CLM is the land fluxes component of the Integrated Global Systems ...

  10. An integrated assessment modeling framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change: the MIT IGSM-CAM (version 1.0)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monier, Erwan

    This paper describes a computationally efficient framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change. In this framework, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Integrated Global System Model ...

  11. Reservoir Modeling by Data Integration via Intermediate Spaces and Artificial Intelligence Tools in MPS Simulation Frameworks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmadi, Rouhollah, E-mail: rouhollahahmadi@yahoo.com [Amirkabir University of Technology, PhD Student at Reservoir Engineering, Department of Petroleum Engineering (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Amirkabir University of Technology, PhD Student at Reservoir Engineering, Department of Petroleum Engineering (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khamehchi, Ehsan [Amirkabir University of Technology, Faculty of Petroleum Engineering (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Amirkabir University of Technology, Faculty of Petroleum Engineering (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Conditioning stochastic simulations are very important in many geostatistical applications that call for the introduction of nonlinear and multiple-point data in reservoir modeling. Here, a new methodology is proposed for the incorporation of different data types into multiple-point statistics (MPS) simulation frameworks. Unlike the previous techniques that call for an approximate forward model (filter) for integration of secondary data into geologically constructed models, the proposed approach develops an intermediate space where all the primary and secondary data are easily mapped onto. Definition of the intermediate space, as may be achieved via application of artificial intelligence tools like neural networks and fuzzy inference systems, eliminates the need for using filters as in previous techniques. The applicability of the proposed approach in conditioning MPS simulations to static and geologic data is verified by modeling a real example of discrete fracture networks using conventional well-log data. The training patterns are well reproduced in the realizations, while the model is also consistent with the map of secondary data.

  12. A multi-scale approach to address environmental impacts of small hydropower development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL; Samu, Nicole M [ORNL; Kao, Shih-Chieh [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL; Hetrick, Shelaine L [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydropower development continues to grow worldwide in developed and developing countries. While the ecological and physical responses to dam construction have been well documented, translating this information into planning for hydropower development is extremely difficult. Very few studies have conducted environmental assessments to guide site-specific or widespread hydropower development. Herein, we propose a spatial approach for estimating environmental effects of hydropower development at multiple scales, as opposed to individual site-by-site assessments (e.g., environmental impact assessment). Because the complex, process-driven effects of future hydropower development may be uncertain or, at best, limited by available information, we invested considerable effort in describing novel approaches to represent environmental concerns using spatial data and in developing the spatial footprint of hydropower infrastructure. We then use two case studies in the US, one at the scale of the conterminous US and another within two adjoining rivers basins, to examine how environmental concerns can be identified and related to areas of varying energy capacity. We use combinations of reserve-design planning and multi-metric ranking to visualize tradeoffs among environmental concerns and potential energy capacity. Spatial frameworks, like the one presented, are not meant to replace more in-depth environmental assessments, but to identify information gaps and measure the sustainability of multi-development scenarios as to inform policy decisions at the basin or national level. Most importantly, the approach should foster discussions among environmental scientists and stakeholders regarding solutions to optimize energy development and environmental sustainability.

  13. Access Framework: Model Text (November 2011): An Act to Establish a Framework for Development of Offshore Wind Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeremy Firestone; Dawn Kurtz Crompton

    2011-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The model offshore wind power legislation focused on two aspects: compensation for use of ocean space and environmental assessment. In particular, the model legislation recommends the adoption of a rent and royalty scheme that is premised on high rent and low royalties in order to stimulate qualified bids from developers who are motivated to begin production as early as possible and to discourage sham bidding. The model legislation also includes a provision that sets royalties at a lower rate in the early years of project operation, and that provides states with the discretion to waive or defer rent and/or royalties for a period of time to meet the goals and objectives of energy independence, job creation, reduced emissions of conventional pollutants and greenhouse gases and increased state requirements for electricity from renewable sources. The environmental impact assessment (EIA) is structured to provide a systematic and interdisciplinary evaluation of the potential positive and negative life-cycle effects of a proposed offshore wind project on the physical, biological, cultural and socio-economic attributes of the project.

  14. Multi-scale Stroke-based Rendering by Evolutionary Algorithm Hyung W. Kang, Uday K. Chakraborty, Charles K. Chui, Wenjie He

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Wenjie

    Multi-scale Stroke-based Rendering by Evolutionary Algorithm Hyung W. Kang, Uday K. Chakraborty-scale stroke-based non-photorealistic rendering. The proposed method produces better results than previously: Non-photorealistic rendering, Stroke-based rendering, Computer graphics, Evolutionary algorithm 1

  15. Tracking and Analysis Framework (TAF) model documentation and user`s guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloyd, C.; Camp, J.; Conzelmann, G. [and others

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With passage of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, the United States embarked on a policy for controlling acid deposition that has been estimated to cost at least $2 billion. Title IV of the Act created a major innovation in environmental regulation by introducing market-based incentives - specifically, by allowing electric utility companies to trade allowances to emit sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}). The National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) has been tasked by Congress to assess what Senator Moynihan has termed this {open_quotes}grand experiment.{close_quotes} Such a comprehensive assessment of the economic and environmental effects of this legislation has been a major challenge. To help NAPAP face this challenge, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has sponsored development of an integrated assessment model, known as the Tracking and Analysis Framework (TAF). This section summarizes TAF`s objectives and its overall design.

  16. Impact of Not Fully Addressing Cross-Classified Multilevel Structure in Testing Measurement Invariance and Conducting Multilevel Mixture Modeling within Structural Equation Modeling Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Im, Myung

    2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    data as hierarchical structure data in two different analytical settings under the structural equation modeling (SEM) framework. Study 1 evaluated the performance of conventional multilevel confirmatory factor analysis (MCFA) which assumes hierarchical...

  17. An integrative modeling framework to evaluate the productivity and sustainability of biofuel crop production systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, X [University of Maryland; Izaurralde, R. C. [University of Maryland; Manowitz, D. [University of Maryland; West, T. O. [University of Maryland; Thomson, A. M. [University of Maryland; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Bandaru, Vara Prasad [ORNL; Nichols, Jeff [ORNL; Williams, J. [AgriLIFE, Temple, TX

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential expansion of biofuel production raises food, energy, and environmental challenges that require careful assessment of the impact of biofuel production on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, soil erosion, nutrient loading, and water quality. In this study, we describe a spatially explicit integrative modeling framework (SEIMF) to understand and quantify the environmental impacts of different biomass cropping systems. This SEIMF consists of three major components: (1) a geographic information system (GIS)-based data analysis system to define spatial modeling units with resolution of 56 m to address spatial variability, (2) the biophysical and biogeochemical model Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) applied in a spatially-explicit way to predict biomass yield, GHG emissions, and other environmental impacts of different biofuel crops production systems, and (3) an evolutionary multiobjective optimization algorithm for exploring the trade-offs between biofuel energy production and unintended ecosystem-service responses. Simple examples illustrate the major functions of the SEIMF when applied to a nine-county Regional Intensive Modeling Area (RIMA) in SW Michigan to (1) simulate biofuel crop production, (2) compare impacts of management practices and local ecosystem settings, and (3) optimize the spatial configuration of different biofuel production systems by balancing energy production and other ecosystem-service variables. Potential applications of the SEIMF to support life cycle analysis and provide information on biodiversity evaluation and marginal-land identification are also discussed. The SEIMF developed in this study is expected to provide a useful tool for scientists and decision makers to understand sustainability issues associated with the production of biofuels at local, regional, and national scales.

  18. An Integrative Modeling Framework to Evaluate the Productivity and Sustainability of Biofuel Crop Production Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xuesong; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Manowitz, David H.; West, T. O.; Post, W. M.; Thomson, Allison M.; Bandaru, V. P.; Nichols, J.; Williams, J.R.

    2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential expansion of biofuel production raises food, energy, and environmental challenges that require careful assessment of the impact of biofuel production on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, soil erosion, nutrient loading, and water quality. In this study, we describe a spatially-explicit integrative modeling framework (SEIMF) to understand and quantify the environmental impacts of different biomass cropping systems. This SEIMF consists of three major components: 1) a geographic information system (GIS)-based data analysis system to define spatial modeling units with resolution of 56 m to address spatial variability, 2) the biophysical and biogeochemical model EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) applied in a spatially-explicit way to predict biomass yield, GHG emissions, and other environmental impacts of different biofuel crops production systems, and 3) an evolutionary multi-objective optimization algorithm for exploring the trade-offs between biofuel energy production and unintended ecosystem-service responses. Simple examples illustrate the major functions of the SEIMF when applied to a 9-county Regional Intensive Modeling Area (RIMA) in SW Michigan to 1) simulate biofuel crop production, 2) compare impacts of management practices and local ecosystem settings, and 3) optimize the spatial configuration of different biofuel production systems by balancing energy production and other ecosystem-service variables. Potential applications of the SEIMF to support life cycle analysis and provide information on biodiversity evaluation and marginal-land identification are also discussed. The SEIMF developed in this study is expected to provide a useful tool for scientists and decision makers to understand sustainability issues associated with the production of biofuels at local, regional, and national scales.

  19. ADVANCED INTEGRATION OF MULTI-SCALE MECHANICS AND WELDING PROCESS SIMULATION IN WELD INTEGRITY ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkowski, Gery M.; Rudland, David L.; Shim, Do-Jun; Brust, Frederick W.; Babu, Sundarsanam

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential to save trillions of BTU’s in energy usage and billions of dollars in cost on an annual basis based on use of higher strength steel in major oil and gas transmission pipeline construction is a compelling opportunity recognized by both the US Department of Energy (DOE). The use of high-strength steels (X100) is expected to result in energy savings across the spectrum, from manufacturing the pipe to transportation and fabrication, including welding of line pipe. Elementary examples of energy savings include more the 25 trillion BTUs saved annually based on lower energy costs to produce the thinner-walled high-strength steel pipe, with the potential for the US part of the Alaskan pipeline alone saving more than 7 trillion BTU in production and much more in transportation and assembling. Annual production, maintenance and installation of just US domestic transmission pipeline is likely to save 5 to 10 times this amount based on current planned and anticipated expansions of oil and gas lines in North America. Among the most important conclusions from these studies were: • While computational weld models to predict residual stress and distortions are well-established and accurate, related microstructure models need improvement. • Fracture Initiation Transition Temperature (FITT) Master Curve properly predicts surface-cracked pipe brittle-to-ductile initiation temperature. It has value in developing Codes and Standards to better correlate full-scale behavior from either CTOD or Charpy test results with the proper temperature shifts from the FITT master curve method. • For stress-based flaw evaluation criteria, the new circumferentially cracked pipe limit-load solution in the 2007 API 1104 Appendix A approach is overly conservative by a factor of 4/?, which has additional implications. . • For strain-based design of girth weld defects, the hoop stress effect is the most significant parameter impacting CTOD-driving force and can increase the crack-driving force by a factor of 2 depending on strain-hardening, pressure level as a % of SMYS, and flaw size. • From years of experience in circumferential fracture analyses and experimentation, there has not been sufficient integration of work performed for other industries into analogous problems facing the oil and gas pipeline markets. Some very basic concepts and problems solved previously in these fields could have circumvented inconsistencies seen in the stress-based and strain-based analysis efforts. For example, in nuclear utility piping work, more detailed elastic-plastic fracture analyses were always validated in their ability to predict loads and displacements (stresses and strains). The eventual implementation of these methodologies will result in acceleration of the industry adoption of higher-strength line-pipe steels.

  20. PHYSICAL AND MECHANICAL METALLURGY OF ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS FOR NUCLEAR APPLICATIONS: A MULTI-SCALE COMPUTATIONAL STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glazoff, Michael Vasily [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the post-Fukushima world, the stability of materials under extreme conditions is an important issue for the safety of nuclear reactors. Because the nuclear industry is going to continue using advanced zirconium cladding materials in the foreseeable future, it become critical to gain fundamental understanding of the several interconnected problems. First, what are the thermodynamic and kinetic factors affecting the oxidation and hydrogen pick-up by these materials at normal, off-normal conditions, and in long-term storage? Secondly, what protective coatings (if any) could be used in order to gain extremely valuable time at off-normal conditions, e.g., when temperature exceeds the critical value of 2200°F? Thirdly, the kinetics of oxidation of such protective coating or braiding needs to be quantified. Lastly, even if some degree of success is achieved along this path, it is absolutely critical to have automated inspection algorithms allowing identifying defects of cladding as soon as possible. This work strives to explore these interconnected factors from the most advanced computational perspective, utilizing such modern techniques as first-principles atomistic simulations, computational thermodynamics of materials, diffusion modeling, and the morphological algorithms of image processing for defect identification. Consequently, it consists of the four parts dealing with these four problem areas preceded by the introduction and formulation of the studied problems. In the 1st part an effort was made to employ computational thermodynamics and ab initio calculations to shed light upon the different stages of oxidation of ziraloys (2 and 4), the role of microstructure optimization in increasing their thermal stability, and the process of hydrogen pick-up, both in normal working conditions and in long-term storage. The 2nd part deals with the need to understand the influence and respective roles of the two different plasticity mechanisms in Zr nuclear alloys: twinning (at low T) and crystallographic slip (higher T’s). For that goal, a description of the advanced plasticity model is outlined featuring the non-associated flow rule in hcp materials including Zr. The 3rd part describes the kinetic theory of oxidation of the several materials considered to be perspective coating materials for Zr alloys: SiC and ZrSiO4. In the 4th part novel and advanced projectional algorithms for defect identification in zircaloy coatings are described. In so doing, the author capitalized on some 12 years of his applied industrial research in this area. Our conclusions and recommendations are presented in the 5th part of this work, along with the list of used literature and the scripts for atomistic, thermodynamic, kinetic, and morphological computations.

  1. Multi-Scale Monitoring and Prediction of System Responses to Biostimulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubbard, Susan; Williams, Ken; Steefel, Carl; Long, Phil; Kinsong Chen, Slater, Lee; Banfield, Jill

    2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    To advance solutions needed for remediation of DOE contaminated sites, approaches are needed that can elucidate and predict reactions associated with coupled biological, geochemical, and hydrological processes over a variety of spatial scales and in heterogeneous environments. Our laboratory experimental experiments, which were conducted under controlled conditions, suggest that geophysical methods have the potential for elucidating system transformations that often occur during remediation, such as the generation of gases and precipitates. In this new ERSP project, we will Integrate hydrological, biogeochemical, and geophysical expertise and approaches to: (1) Explore the potential of geophysical methods for detecting changes in physical, chemical, and biological properties at the field scale; and (2) Explore the joint use of reactive transport modeling and geophysical monitoring information for improvements in both methods. A brief review of our previously-conducted laboratory results are given in Section II. Section III describes the approach for our new project, which will have both laboratory and field-scale components. The field scale component will be conducted at the Rifle, CO. site, which is described in Section IV.

  2. Final Report: Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haggerty, Roy; Day-Lewis, Fred; Singha, Kamini; Johnson, Timothy; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

    2014-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3-part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOE’s Hanford 300 Area. In a synergistic add-on to our workplan, we analyzed data from field experiments performed at the DOE Naturita Site under a separate DOE SBR grant, on which PI Day-Lewis served as co-PI. Techniques developed for application to Hanford datasets also were applied to data from Naturita.

  3. Towards a Model-based Application Integration Framework for Smart Oilfields Cong Zhang, Amol Bakshi, Viktor Prasanna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasanna, Viktor K.

    Towards a Model-based Application Integration Framework for Smart Oilfields Cong Zhang, Amol Bakshi- duction has led to an industry-wide push to develop smart oilfields for the future. Applications for smart oilfields are characterized with heterogeneous data and resources, com- plicated business processes

  4. The Brera Multi-scale Wavelet (BMW) ROSAT HRI source catalog. II: application to the HRI and first results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergio Campana; Davide Lazzati; Maria Rosa Panzera; Gianpiero Tagliaferri

    1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The wavelet detection algorithm (WDA) described in the accompanying paper by Lazzati et al. is made suited for a fast and efficient analysis of images taken with the High Resolution Imager (HRI) instrument on board the ROSAT satellite. An extensive testing is carried out on the detection pipeline: HRI fields with different exposure times are simulated and analysed in the same fashion as the real data. Positions are recovered with few arcsecond errors, whereas fluxes are within a factor of two from their input values in more than 90% of the cases in the deepest images. At variance with the ``sliding-box'' detection algorithms, the WDA provides also a reliable description of the source extension, allowing for a complete search of e.g. supernova remnant or cluster of galaxies in the HRI fields. A completeness analysis on simulated fields shows that for the deepest exposures considered (~120 ks) a limiting flux of \\~3x10^{-15} erg/cm2/s can be reached over the entire field of view. We test the algorithm on real HRI fields selected for their crowding and/or presence of extended or bright sources (e.g. cluster of galaxies and of stars, supernova remnants). We show that our algorithm compares favorably with other X-ray detection algorithms such as XIMAGE and EXSAS. A complete catalog will result from our analysis: it will consist of the Brera Multi-scale Wavelet Bright Source Catalog (BMW-BSC) with sources detected with a significance >4.5 sigma and of the Faint Source Catalog (BMW-FSC) with sources at >3.5 sigma. A conservative estimate based on the extragalactic log(N)-log(S) indicates that at least 16000 sources will be revealed in the complete analysis of the whole HRI dataset.

  5. Model-based Estimation of Flexibility and Optionability in an Integrated Real Options Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikaelian, Tsoline

    Uncertainties can be managed through real options that provide a decision maker the right, but not the obligation, to exercise actions at a later time. In previous work we introduced an integrated real options framework ...

  6. Roadmap Document for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Contribution to the Open Modeling Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, Jason C.; Fisher, Andrew R.; Ciraci, Selim; Hammerstrom, Janelle L.; Hauer, Matthew L.; Schneider, Kevin P.

    2013-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cooperative Research Network (CRN) of the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) has identified GridLAB-D as a tool that would provide significant benefit to its member utilities. However, they have also noted that the complexity of the tool would be a significant barrier for adoption. As can often happen in complex simulation environments, as the available capabilities and flexibility increases, the usability of the software decreases except for a few “power” users; this is not unique to GridLAB-D. While GridLAB-D has expanded to a considerable user base, with a few notable exceptions (e.g., American Electric Power) most users are focused on research and development. As a result, NRECA/CRN has proposed an Open Modeling Framework (OMF) designed to make the capabilities of GridLAB-D, and other advanced grid tools, available via a web interface. This will allow utility users to access many of the capabilities of GridLAB-D, with little to no knowledge of the tool itself. Other components will be layered over the simulation engines to provide the user with business support functions, allowing full business case scenarios to be created from the technical data generated within the simulations. Because of the open availability and potential national benefit of the OMF, PNNL has been tasked with supporting NRECA/CRN’s development of the tool, with a focus on incorporating GridLAB-D within the OMF structure and expanding GridLAB-D capabilities to support OMF functions. The GridLAB-D enhancements will be provided first to the OMF developers, but will also be delivered to the wider GridLAB-D community after validation via the community repository. This report is intended to provide a roadmap for the intended enhancements to be delivered by PNNL. Seven tasks were identified in cooperation with NRECA/CRN – each is briefly discussed, including potential outcomes and deadlines.

  7. A Framework for the Real-Time Walkthrough of Massive Models 1 A Framework for the Real-Time Walkthrough of Massive Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    techniques. We demonstrate the system on a model of a coal-fired power plant composed of more than 15 million such techniques. Choosing a 15-million-triangle model of a coal-fired electric power plant (Image 1) as our (Graphics data structures), I.3.7 ­ Three-Dimensional Graphics and Realism (Virtual reality), J.2 ­ Physical

  8. Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFRC Focused on Hanford’s 300 Area Uranium Plume January 2011 to January 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachara, John M.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Christensen, John N.; Conrad, Mark S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Freshley, Mark D.; Haggerty, Roy; Hammond, Glenn E.; Kent, Douglas B.; Konopka, Allan; Lichtner, Peter C.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Rubin, Yoram; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Versteeg, Roelof J.; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2012-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) at the Hanford Site 300 Area uranium (U) plume addresses multi-scale mass transfer processes in a complex subsurface biogeochemical setting where groundwater and riverwater interact. A series of forefront science questions on reactive mass transfer motivates research. These questions relate to the effect of spatial heterogeneities; the importance of scale; coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes; and measurements and approaches needed to characterize and model a mass-transfer dominated biogeochemical system. The project was initiated in February 2007, with CY 2007, CY 2008, CY 2009, and CY 2010 progress summarized in preceding reports. A project peer review was held in March 2010, and the IFRC project acted upon all suggestions and recommendations made in consequence by reviewers and SBR/DOE. These responses have included the development of 'Modeling' and 'Well-Field Mitigation' plans that are now posted on the Hanford IFRC web-site, and modifications to the IFRC well-field completed in CY 2011. The site has 35 instrumented wells, and an extensive monitoring system. It includes a deep borehole for microbiologic and biogeochemical research that sampled the entire thickness of the unconfined 300 A aquifer. Significant, impactful progress has been made in CY 2011 including: (i) well modifications to eliminate well-bore flows, (ii) hydrologic testing of the modified well-field and upper aquifer, (iii) geophysical monitoring of winter precipitation infiltration through the U-contaminated vadose zone and spring river water intrusion to the IFRC, (iv) injection experimentation to probe the lower vadose zone and to evaluate the transport behavior of high U concentrations, (v) extended passive monitoring during the period of water table rise and fall, and (vi) collaborative down-hole experimentation with the PNNL SFA on the biogeochemistry of the 300 A Hanford-Ringold contact and the underlying redox transition zone. The modified well-field has functioned superbly without any evidence for well-bore flows. Beyond these experimental efforts, our site-wide reactive transport models (PFLOTRAN and eSTOMP) have been updated to include site geostatistical models of both hydrologic properties and adsorbed U distribution; and new hydrologic characterization measurements of the upper aquifer. These increasingly robust models are being used to simulate past and recent U desorption-adsorption experiments performed under different hydrologic conditions, and heuristic modeling to understand the complex functioning of the smear zone. We continued efforts to assimilate geophysical logging and 3D ERT characterization data into our site wide geophysical model, with significant and positive progress in 2011 that will enable publication in 2012. Our increasingly comprehensive field experimental results and robust reactive transport simulators, along with the field and laboratory characterization, are leading to a new conceptual model of U(VI) flow and transport in the IFRC footprint and the 300 Area in general, and insights on the microbiological community and associated biogeochemical processes influencing N, S, C, Mn, and Fe. Collectively these findings and higher scale models are providing a unique and unparalleled system-scale understanding of the biogeochemical function of the groundwater-river interaction zone.

  9. A multi-scale model for piston ring dynamics, lubrication and oil transport in internal combustion engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baelden, Camille

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel consumption reduction of more than 20% can be achieved through engine friction reduction. Piston and piston rings contribute approximately half of the total engine friction and are therefore central to friction reduction ...

  10. Research Statement Di Liu My research effort has been focused on Multi-scale and Stochastic Modeling, Anal-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Di "Richard"

    with applications in solar energy harvesting, molecular sensing and non-invasive regulation of intra of the matter reaches nano scale, the energy level for the electron excita- tion becomes comparable to the wave photon energy to mechanical energy. The efficiency of the conversion can be significantly enhanced

  11. Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFRC Focused on Hanford’s 300 Area Uranium Plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachara, John M.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Christensen, John N.; Conrad, Mark E.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Freshley, Mark D.; Haggerty, Roy; Hammon, Glenn; Kent, Douglas B.; Konopka, Allan; Lichtner, Peter C.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Rubin, Yoram; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Versteeg, Roelof J.; Ward, Anderson L.; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFRC) at the Hanford Site 300 Area uranium (U) plume addresses multi-scale mass transfer processes in a complex hydrogeologic setting where groundwater and riverwater interact. A series of forefront science questions on mass transfer are posed for research which relate to the effect of spatial heterogeneities; the importance of scale; coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes; and measurements and approaches needed to characterize and model a mass-transfer dominated system. The project was initiated in February 2007, with CY 2007 and CY 2008 progress summarized in preceding reports. The site has 35 instrumented wells, and an extensive monitoring system. It includes a deep borehole for microbiologic and biogeochemical research that sampled the entire thickness of the unconfined 300 A aquifer. Significant, impactful progress has been made in CY 2009 with completion of extensive laboratory measurements on field sediments, field hydrologic and geophysical characterization, four field experiments, and modeling. The laboratory characterization results are being subjected to geostatistical analyses to develop spatial heterogeneity models of U concentration and chemical, physical, and hydrologic properties needed for reactive transport modeling. The field experiments focused on: (1) physical characterization of the groundwater flow field during a period of stable hydrologic conditions in early spring, (2) comprehensive groundwater monitoring during spring to characterize the release of U(VI) from the lower vadose zone to the aquifer during water table rise and fall, (3) dynamic geophysical monitoring of salt-plume migration during summer, and (4) a U reactive tracer experiment (desorption) during the fall. Geophysical characterization of the well field was completed using the down-well Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) array, with results subjected to robust, geostatistically constrained inversion analyses. These measurements along with hydrologic characterization have yielded 3D distributions of hydraulic properties that have been incorporated into an updated and increasingly robust hydrologic model. Based on significant findings from the microbiologic characterization of deep borehole sediments in CY 2008, down-hole biogeochemistry studies were initiated where colonization substrates and spatially discrete water and gas samplers were deployed to select wells. The increasingly comprehensive field experimental results, along with the field and laboratory characterization, are leading to a new conceptual model of U(VI) flow and transport in the IFRC footprint and the 300 Area in general, and insights on the microbiological community and associated biogeochemical processes. A significant issue related to vertical flow in the IFRC wells was identified and evaluated during the spring and fall field experimental campaigns. Both upward and downward flows were observed in response to dynamic Columbia River stage. The vertical flows are caused by the interaction of pressure gradients with our heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity field. These impacts are being evaluated with additional modeling and field activities to facilitate interpretation and mitigation. The project moves into CY 2010 with ambitious plans for a drilling additional wells for the IFRC well field, additional experiments, and modeling. This research is part of the ERSP Hanford IFRC at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  12. Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFRC Focused on Hanford’s 300 Area Uranium Plume January 2010 to January 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachara, John M.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Christensen, John N.; Conrad, Mark S.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Freshley, Mark D.; Haggerty, Roy; Hammond, Glenn E.; Kent, Douglas B.; Konopka, Allan; Lichtner, Peter C.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Rubin, Yoram; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Versteeg, Roelof J.; Ward, Anderson L.; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) at the Hanford Site 300 Area uranium (U) plume addresses multi-scale mass transfer processes in a complex subsurface hydrogeologic setting where groundwater and riverwater interact. A series of forefront science questions on reactive mass transfer focus research. These questions relate to the effect of spatial heterogeneities; the importance of scale; coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes; and measurements and approaches needed to characterize and model a mass-transfer dominated system. The project was initiated in February 2007, with CY 2007, CY 2008, and CY 2009 progress summarized in preceding reports. A project peer review was held in March 2010, and the IFRC project has responded to all suggestions and recommendations made in consequence by reviewers and SBR/DOE. These responses have included the development of “Modeling” and “Well-Field Mitigation” plans that are now posted on the Hanford IFRC web-site. The site has 35 instrumented wells, and an extensive monitoring system. It includes a deep borehole for microbiologic and biogeochemical research that sampled the entire thickness of the unconfined 300 A aquifer. Significant, impactful progress has been made in CY 2010 including the quantification of well-bore flows in the fully screened wells and the testing of means to mitigate them; the development of site geostatistical models of hydrologic and geochemical properties including the distribution of U; developing and parameterizing a reactive transport model of the smear zone that supplies contaminant U to the groundwater plume; performance of a second passive experiment of the spring water table rise and fall event with a associated multi-point tracer test; performance of downhole biogeochemical experiments where colonization substrates and discrete water and gas samplers were deployed to the lower aquifer zone; and modeling of past injection experiments for model parameterization, deconvolution of well-bore flow effects, system understanding, and publication. We continued efforts to assimilate geophysical logging and 3D ERT characterization data into our site wide geophysical model, and have now implemented a new strategy for this activity to bypass an approach that was found unworkable. An important focus of CY 2010 activities has been infrastructure modification to the IFRC site to eliminate vertical well bore flows in the fully screened wells. The mitigation procedure was carefully evaluated and is now being implementated. A new experimental campaign is planned for early spring 2011 that will utilize the modified well-field for a U reactive transport experiment in the upper aquifer zone. Preliminary geophysical monitoring experiments of rainwater recharge in the vadose zone have been initiated with promising results, and a controlled infiltration experiment to evaluate U mobilization from the vadose zone is now under planning for the September 2011. The increasingly comprehensive field experimental results, along with the field and laboratory characterization, are leading to a new conceptual model of U(VI) flow and transport in the IFRC footprint and the 300 Area in general, and insights on the microbiological community and associated biogeochemical processes.

  13. Modeling Hot Mix Asphalt Compaction Using a Thermodynamics Based Compressible Viscoelastic Model within the Framework of Multiple Natural Configurations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koneru, Saradhi

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    asphalt (HMA) using the notion of multiple natural configurations. A thermodynamic framework is employed to study the non-linear dissipative response associated with HMA by specifying the forms for the stored energy and the rate of dissipation function...

  14. Toward a Unified Framework for Quality and Consistency Verification of UML Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comini, Marco

    the advantages of both static and dynamic verification methods in order to increase the proficiency of the MDD to identify the key features for developing a unified framework suitable to tailor the development process the development team to exercising that vocabulary in all communi- cations using diagrams, writing, and especially

  15. Multi-scale and Integrated Characterization of the Marcellus Shale in the Appalachian Basin: From Microscopes to Mapping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crandall, Dustin; Soeder, Daniel J; McDannell, Kalin T.; Mroz, Thomas

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historic data from the Department of Energy Eastern Gas Shale Project (ESGP) were compiled to develop a database of geochemical analyses, well logs, lithological and natural fracture descriptions from oriented core, and reservoir parameters. The nine EGSP wells were located throughout the Appalachian Basin and intercepted the Marcellus Shale from depths of 750 meters (2500 ft) to 2500 meters (8200 ft). A primary goal of this research is to use these existing data to help construct a geologic framework model of the Marcellus Shale across the basin and link rock properties to gas productivity. In addition to the historic data, x-ray computerized tomography (CT) of entire cores with a voxel resolution of 240mm and optical microscopy to quantify mineral and organic volumes was performed. Porosity and permeability measurements in a high resolution, steady-state flow apparatus are also planned. Earth Vision software was utilized to display and perform volumetric calculations on individual wells, small areas with several horizontal wells, and on a regional basis. The results indicate that the lithologic character of the Marcellus Shale changes across the basin. Gas productivity appears to be influenced by the properties of the organic material and the mineral composition of the rock, local and regional structural features, the current state of in-situ stress, and lithologic controls on the geometry of induced fractures during stimulations. The recoverable gas volume from the Marcellus Shale is variable over the vertical stratigraphic section, as well as laterally across the basin. The results from this study are expected to help improve the assessment of the resource, and help optimize the recovery of natural gas.

  16. A Hydrostratigraphic Framework Model and Alternatives for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Clark, Lincoln and Nye Counties, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new, revised three-dimensional (3-D) hydrostratigraphic framework model for Frenchman Flat was completed in 2004. The area of interest includes Frenchman Flat, a former nuclear testing area at the Nevada Test Site, and proximal areas. Internal and external reviews of an earlier (Phase I) Frenchman Flat model recommended additional data collection to address uncertainties. Subsequently, additional data were collected for this Phase II initiative, including five new drill holes and a 3-D seismic survey.

  17. Sensitivity of Surface Flux Simulations to Hydrologic Parameters Based on an Uncertainty Quantification Framework Applied to the Community Land Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, Zhangshuan; Huang, Maoyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Lin, Guang; Ricciuto, Daniel M.

    2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Uncertainties in hydrologic parameters could have significant impacts on the simulated water and energy fluxes and land surface states, which will in turn affect atmospheric processes and the carbon cycle. Quantifying such uncertainties is an important step toward better understanding and quantification of uncertainty of integrated earth system models. In this paper, we introduce an uncertainty quantification (UQ) framework to analyze sensitivity of simulated surface fluxes to selected hydrologic parameters in the Community Land Model (CLM4) through forward modeling. Thirteen flux tower footprints spanning a wide range of climate and site conditions were selected to perform sensitivity analyses by perturbing the parameters identified. In the UQ framework, prior information about the parameters was used to quantify the input uncertainty using the Minimum-Relative-Entropy approach. The quasi-Monte Carlo approach was applied to generate samples of parameters on the basis of the prior pdfs. Simulations corresponding to sampled parameter sets were used to generate response curves and response surfaces and statistical tests were used to rank the significance of the parameters for output responses including latent (LH) and sensible heat (SH) fluxes. Overall, the CLM4 simulated LH and SH show the largest sensitivity to subsurface runoff generation parameters. However, study sites with deep root vegetation are also affected by surface runoff parameters, while sites with shallow root zones are also sensitive to the vadose zone soil water parameters. Generally, sites with finer soil texture and shallower rooting systems tend to have larger sensitivity of outputs to the parameters. Our results suggest the necessity of and possible ways for parameter inversion/calibration using available measurements of latent/sensible heat fluxes to obtain the optimal parameter set for CLM4. This study also provided guidance on reduction of parameter set dimensionality and parameter calibration framework design for CLM4 and other land surface models under different hydrologic and climatic regimes.

  18. RIS-M-2409 A SYSTEMS MODELLING FRAMEWORK FOR THE DESIGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is outlined. INIS Descriptors. AUTOMATION; CONTROL SYSTEMS; CONSERVATION LAWS; ENERGY BALANCE; FLOW MODELS

  19. A Modeling and Filtering Framework for Linear Differential-Algebraic Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schön, Thomas

    , Dymola, the SimMechanics toolbox for MATLAB, and Modelica [14], [20]. Such modeling software makes

  20. A Physically Based Framework for Modelling the Organic Fractionation of Sea Spray Aerosol from Bubble Film Langmuir Equilibria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burrows, Susannah M.; Ogunro, O.; Frossard, Amanda; Russell, Lynn M.; Rasch, Philip J.; Elliott, S.

    2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of a large fraction of organic matter in primary sea spray aerosol (SSA) can strongly affect its cloud condensation nuclei activity and interactions with marine clouds. Global climate models require new parameterizations of the SSA composition in order to improve the representation of these processes. Existing proposals for such a parameterization use remotely-sensed chlorophyll-a concentrations as a proxy for the biogenic contribution to the aerosol. However, both observations and theoretical considerations suggest that existing relationships with chlorophyll-a, derived from observations at only a few locations, may not be representative for all ocean regions. We introduce a novel framework for parameterizing the fractionation of marine organic matter into SSA based on a competitive Langmuir adsorption equilibrium at bubble surfaces. Marine organic matter is partitioned into classes with differing molecular weights, surface excesses, and Langmuir adsorption parameters. The classes include a lipid-like mixture associated with labile dissolved organic carbon (DOC), a polysaccharide-like mixture associated primarily with semi-labile DOC, a protein-like mixture with concentrations intermediate between lipids and polysaccharides, a processed mixture associated with recalcitrant surface DOC, and a deep abyssal humic-like mixture. Box model calculations have been performed for several cases of organic adsorption to illustrate the underlying concepts. We then apply the framework to output from a global marine biogeochemistry model, by partitioning total dissolved organic carbon into several classes of macromolecule. Each class is represented by model compounds with physical and chemical properties based on existing laboratory data. This allows us to globally map the predicted organic mass fraction of the nascent submicron sea spray aerosol. Predicted relationships between chlorophyll-\\textit{a} and organic fraction are similar to existing empirical parameterizations, but can vary between biologically productive and non-productive regions, and seasonally within a given region. Major uncertainties include the bubble film thickness at bursting and the variability of organic surfactant activity in the ocean, which is poorly constrained. In addition, marine colloids and cooperative adsorption of polysaccharides may make important contributions to the aerosol, but are not included here. This organic fractionation framework is an initial step towards a closer linking of ocean biogeochemistry and aerosol chemical composition in Earth system models. Future work should focus on improving constraints on model parameters through new laboratory experiments or through empirical fitting to observed relationships in the real ocean and atmosphere, as well as on atmospheric implications of the variable composition of organic matter in sea spray.

  1. A quantitative framework For large-scale model estimation and discrimination In systems biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eydgahi, Hoda

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using models to simulate and analyze biological networks requires principled approaches to parameter estimation and model discrimination. We use Bayesian and Monte Carlo methods to recover the full probability distributions ...

  2. Supporting Agile Modeling through Experimentation in an Integrated Urban Simulation Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Richard

    Decisions regarding major urban transportation projects and land use policies are frequently politicalSim is a disaggregate, behaviorally-realistic modeling environment that planning agencies can use to simulate the long agile modeling through experimentation: itera- tive development of models, providing appropriate domain

  3. Developing an Integrated Model Framework for the Assessment of Sustainable Agricultural Residue Removal Limits for Bioenergy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Muth, Jr.; Jared Abodeely; Richard Nelson; Douglas McCorkle; Joshua Koch; Kenneth Bryden

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Agricultural residues have significant potential as a feedstock for bioenergy production, but removing these residues can have negative impacts on soil health. Models and datasets that can support decisions about sustainable agricultural residue removal are available; however, no tools currently exist capable of simultaneously addressing all environmental factors that can limit availability of residue. The VE-Suite model integration framework has been used to couple a set of environmental process models to support agricultural residue removal decisions. The RUSLE2, WEPS, and Soil Conditioning Index models have been integrated. A disparate set of databases providing the soils, climate, and management practice data required to run these models have also been integrated. The integrated system has been demonstrated for two example cases. First, an assessment using high spatial fidelity crop yield data has been run for a single farm. This analysis shows the significant variance in sustainably accessible residue across a single farm and crop year. A second example is an aggregate assessment of agricultural residues available in the state of Iowa. This implementation of the integrated systems model demonstrates the capability to run a vast range of scenarios required to represent a large geographic region.

  4. Substrate and environmental controls on microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon: a framework for Earth System Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Xiaofeng [ORNL] [ORNL; Schimel, Joshua [University of California, Santa Barbara] [University of California, Santa Barbara; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL] [ORNL; Song, Xia [ORNL] [ORNL; Yuan, Fengming [ORNL] [ORNL; Goswami, Santonu [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon is one of the fundamental processes of global carbon cycling and it determines the magnitude of microbial biomass in soils. Mechanistic understanding of microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon and its controls is important for to improve Earth system models ability to simulate carbon-climate feedbacks. Although microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon is broadly considered to be an important parameter, it really comprises two separate physiological processes: one-time assimilation efficiency and time-dependent microbial maintenance energy. Representing of these two mechanisms is crucial to more accurately simulate carbon cycling in soils. In this study, a simple modeling framework was developed to evaluate the substrate and environmental controls on microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon using a new term: microbial annual active period (the length of microbes remaining active in one year). Substrate quality has a positive effect on microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon: higher substrate quality (lower C:N ratio) leads to higher ratio of microbial carbon to soil organic carbon and vice versa. Increases in microbial annual active period from zero stimulate microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon; however, when microbial annual active period is longer than an optimal threshold, increasing this period decreases microbial biomass. The simulated ratios of soil microbial biomass to soil organic carbon are reasonably consistent with a recently compiled global dataset at the biome-level. The modeling framework of microbial assimilation of soil organic carbon and its controls developed in this study offers an applicable ways to incorporate microbial contributions to the carbon cycling into Earth system models for simulating carbon-climate feedbacks and to explain global patterns of microbial biomass.

  5. The Partnership Evaluation Framework

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: The Partnership Evaluation Framework: How to evaluate a potential partner’s business model and identify areas for collaboration.

  6. Modeling Frameworks for Representing the Mechanical Behavior of Tissues with a Specific Look at Vasculature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andersohn, Alexander

    2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Many mechanicstic models aimed at predicting tissue behavior attempt to connect constitutive factors (such as effects due to collagen or fibrin concentrations) with the overall tissue behavior. Such a link between constitutive and material behaviors...

  7. A framework for the language and logic of computer-aided phenomena-based process modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bieszczad, Jerry, 1971-

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical process engineering activities such as design, optimization, analysis, control, scheduling, diagnosis, and training all rely on mathematical models for solution of some engineering problem. Likewise, most of the ...

  8. Smart finite state devices: A modeling framework for demand response technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turitsyn, Konstantin

    We introduce and analyze Markov Decision Process (MDP) machines to model individual devices which are expected to participate in future demand-response markets on distribution grids. We differentiate devices into the ...

  9. A PHYSICS-BASED SOFTWARE FRAMEWORK FOR SUN-EARTH CONNECTION MODELING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stout, Quentin F.

    . The SWMF is a structured collection of software building blocks to develop components for Sun-Earth system modeling, to couple them, and to assemble them into applications. A component is created from the user

  10. Understanding the Multi-Scale and Multi-fractal Dynamics of Space Plasmas Through Tsallis Non-Extensive Statistical Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. P. Pavlos

    2012-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study it is shown that the Tsallis q-extended statistical theory was found efficient to describe faithfully the space plasmas statistics in every case, from the planetic magnetospheres, to solar corona and solar dynamics, as well as cosmic rays and cosmic stars. Moreover, new theoretical concepts and experimental results are presented concerning the space plasma complex dynamics. The significant message of theoretical and experimental issues presented here is the necessity of generalized statistical and dynamical theory for understanding the non-equilibrium dynamics and the complex character of space plasmas. The q-extension of statistics coupled to the fractal extension of dynamics are the novel and appropriate theoretical framework for the description of space plasma complexity.

  11. Assessing the Effects of Anthropogenic Aerosols on Pacific Storm Track Using a Multiscale Global Climate Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yuan; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Renyi; Ghan, Steven J.; Lin, Yun; Hu, Jiaxi; Pan, Bowen; Levy, Misti; Jiang, Jonathan; Molina, Mario J.

    2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric aerosols impact weather and global general circulation by modifying cloud and precipitation processes, but the magnitude of cloud adjustment by aerosols remains poorly quantified and represents the largest uncertainty in estimated forcing of climate change. Here we assess the impacts of anthropogenic aerosols on the Pacific storm track using a multi-scale global aerosol-climate model (GCM). Simulations of two aerosol scenarios corresponding to the present day and pre-industrial conditions reveal long-range transport of anthropogenic aerosols across the north Pacific and large resulting changes in the aerosol optical depth, cloud droplet number concentration, and cloud and ice water paths. Shortwave and longwave cloud radiative forcing at the top of atmosphere are changed by - 2.5 and + 1.3 W m-2, respectively, by emission changes from pre-industrial to present day, and an increased cloud-top height indicates invigorated mid-latitude cyclones. The overall increased precipitation and poleward heat transport reflect intensification of the Pacific storm track by anthropogenic aerosols. Hence, this work provides for the first time a global perspective of the impacts of Asian pollution outflows from GCMs. Furthermore, our results suggest that the multi-scale modeling framework is essential in producing the aerosol invigoration effect of deep convective clouds on the global scale.

  12. FRAMEWORK AND APPLICATION FOR MODELING CONTROL ROOM CREW PERFORMANCE AT NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald L Boring; David I Gertman; Tuan Q Tran; Brian F Gore

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes an emerging project regarding the utilization of high-fidelity MIDAS simulations for visualizing and modeling control room crew performance at nuclear power plants. The key envisioned uses for MIDAS-based control room simulations are: (i) the estimation of human error associated with advanced control room equipment and configurations, (ii) the investigative determination of contributory cognitive factors for risk significant scenarios involving control room operating crews, and (iii) the certification of reduced staffing levels in advanced control rooms. It is proposed that MIDAS serves as a key component for the effective modeling of cognition, elements of situation awareness, and risk associated with human performance in next generation control rooms.

  13. An Interaction Model and a Framework Dedicated to Web-based Geographic Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Allée du Parc Montaury, 64600 Anglet, France {thenhan.luong, patrick.etcheverry, christophe, Languages. Keywords Interaction model, code generation, geographic application design, visual authoring environment supporting the whole design approach, since the specification steps un- til code generation

  14. A framework for interpreting climate model outputs Nadja A. Leith and Richard E. Chandler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillas, Serge

    to illustrate the methodology. Some key words: Climate change; Climate model uncertainty; Contemporaneous ARMA acknowledged that human activities have caused changes in the Earth's climate (Solomon et al., 2007). Indeed #12;the hydrological cycle (Solomon et al., 2007). To accommodate this possibility therefore, planners

  15. Smart Finite State Devices: A Modeling Framework for Demand Response Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turitsyn, Konstantin; Ananyev, Maxim; Chertkov, Michael

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce and analyze Markov Decision Process (MDP) machines to model individual devices which are expected to participate in future demand-response markets on distribution grids. We differentiate devices into the following four types: (a) optional loads that can be shed, e.g. light dimming; (b) deferrable loads that can be delayed, e.g. dishwashers; (c) controllable loads with inertia, e.g. thermostatically-controlled loads, whose task is to maintain an auxiliary characteristic (temperature) within pre-defined margins; and (d) storage devices that can alternate between charging and generating. Our analysis of the devices seeks to find their optimal price-taking control strategy under a given stochastic model of the distribution market.

  16. Nuclear modification factors of pion and light nuclei in a framework of thermal model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, C S; Zhang, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The particle yields and the nuclear modification factor ($R_{cp}$) for $\\pi^\\pm$, $p(\\bar p)$, $d(\\bar d)$, $t(\\bar t)$ and $^3He(\\bar{^3He})$ are studied in Au + Au collisions at $\\sqrt{S_{NN}}$ = 200 GeV/c based on the blast-wave model and nucleonic coalescence model. The influences of resonance decay on $p(\\bar p)$ and $\\pi$ yields, $p/\\pi$-ratio and nuclear modification factors have been discussed. An apparent number-of-constituent-quark scaling of $R_{cp}$ for $p(\\bar p)$ and $\\pi$ is presented. Similarly, the number-of-nucleon scaling of $R_{cp}$ for $p(\\bar p)$, $d(\\bar d)$, $t(\\bar t)$ and $^3He(\\bar{^3He})$ is also addressed.

  17. Multi-Scale Studies of Transport and Adsorption Phenomena of Cement-based Materials in Aqueous and Saline Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoon, Se Yoon

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2006). [4] F.P. Glasser, J. Marchand, E. Samson, Durability18] E. Samson, J. Marchand, J.L. Robert, J.P. Bournazel,E. Samson, G. Lemaire, J. Marchand, J.J. Beaudoin, Modeling

  18. M. Toubin, C. Dumont, E. P. Verrechia, O. Lalligant, A. Diou, F. Truchetet, and M. A. Abidi, "A Multi-scale Analysis of shell growth increments using wavelet transform," Computers & Geosciences, Journal of the International Association for Mathematical Ge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abidi, Mongi A.

    Multi-scale Analysis of shell growth increments using wavelet transform," Computers & Geosciences been tried (Dolman, 1975) using a Fourier transform. This method, based on power spectra analysis scales of resolution. As an example, the wavelet transform is used here to rank shell growth increments

  19. The Umbra Simulation Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GOTTLIEB,ERIC; HARRIGAN,RAYMOND W.; MCDONALD,MICHAEL J.; OPPEL III,FRED J.; XAVIER,PATRICK G.

    2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Umbra is a new Sandia-developed modeling and simulation framework. The Umbra framework allows users to quickly build models and simulations for intelligent system development, analysis, experimentation, and control and supports tradeoff analyses of complex robotic systems, device, and component concepts. Umbra links together heterogeneous collections of modeling tools. The models in Umbra include 3D geometry and physics models of robots, devices and their environments. Model components can be built with varying levels of fidelity and readily switched to allow models built with low fidelity for conceptual analysis to be gradually converted to high fidelity models for later phase detailed analysis. Within control environments, the models can be readily replaced with actual control elements. This paper describes Umbra at a functional level and describes issues that Sandia uses Umbra to address.

  20. Computer Aided Multi-scale Design of SiC-Si3N4 Nanoceramic Composites for High-Temperature Structural Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vikas Tomer; John Renaud

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    It is estimated that by using better and improved high temperature structural materials, the power generation efficiency of the power plants can be increased by 15% resulting in significant cost savings. One such promising material system for future high-temperature structural applications in power plants is Silicon Carbide-Silicon Nitride (SiC-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) nanoceramic matrix composites. The described research work focuses on multiscale simulation-based design of these SiC-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanoceramic matrix composites. There were two primary objectives of the research: (1) Development of a multiscale simulation tool and corresponding multiscale analyses of the high-temperature creep and fracture resistance properties of the SiC-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanocomposites at nano-, meso- and continuum length- and timescales; and (2) Development of a simulation-based robust design optimization methodology for application to the multiscale simulations to predict the range of the most suitable phase morphologies for the desired high-temperature properties of the SiC-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanocomposites. The multiscale simulation tool is based on a combination of molecular dynamics (MD), cohesive finite element method (CFEM), and continuum level modeling for characterizing time-dependent material deformation behavior. The material simulation tool is incorporated in a variable fidelity model management based design optimization framework. Material modeling includes development of an experimental verification framework. Using material models based on multiscaling, it was found using molecular simulations that clustering of the SiC particles near Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} grain boundaries leads to significant nanocomposite strengthening and significant rise in fracture resistance. It was found that a control of grain boundary thicknesses by dispersing non-stoichiometric carbide or nitride phases can lead to reduction in strength however significant rise in fracture strength. The temperature dependent strength and microstructural stability was also significantly depended upon the dispersion of new phases at grain boundaries. The material design framework incorporates high temperature creep and mechanical strength data in order to develop a collaborative multiscale framework of morphology optimization. The work also incorporates a computer aided material design dataset development procedure where a systematic dataset on material properties and morphology correlation could be obtained depending upon a material processing scientist's requirements. Two different aspects covered under this requirement are: (1) performing morphology related analyses at the nanoscale and at the microscale to develop a multiscale material design and analyses capability; (2) linking material behavior analyses with the developed design tool to form a set of material design problems that illustrate the range of material design dataset development that could be performed. Overall, a software based methodology to design microstructure of particle based ceramic nanocomposites has been developed. This methodology has been shown to predict changes in phase morphologies required for achieving optimal balance of conflicting properties such as minimal creep strain rate and high fracture strength at high temperatures. The methodology incorporates complex material models including atomistic approaches. The methodology will be useful to design materials for high temperature applications including those of interest to DoE while significantly reducing cost of expensive experiments.

  1. Multi-Scale Conservation in an Altered Landscape: The Case of the Endangered Arroyo Toad in Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treglia, Michael Louis

    2014-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    and Maxie Richmond, Adam Siade, Colleen Wisinski, and Dustin Wood also became good friends during my time in California. My doctoral work would not have been possible without extensive financial support. I owe great thanks to the Applied Biodiversity.../pseudoabsence data (e.g., Hernandez et al. 2008, Senay et al. 2013). Pseudoabsences are used when true absence data are unavailable, and they are acquired by sampling locations from the study region that lack locality records (Peterson et al. 2011). In my models I...

  2. Modeling dust as component minerals in the Community Atmosphere Model: development of framework and impact on radiative forcing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scanza, Rachel; Mahowald, N.; Ghan, Steven J.; Zender, C. S.; Kok, J. F.; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Y.; Albani, Samuel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mineralogy of desert dust is important due to its effect on radiation, clouds and biogeochemical cycling of trace nutrients. This study presents the simulation of dust radiative forcing as a function of both mineral composition and size at the global scale using mineral soil maps for estimating emissions. Externally mixed mineral aerosols in the bulk aerosol module in the Community Atmosphere Model version 4 (CAM4) and internally mixed mineral aerosols in the modal aerosol module in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5) embedded in the Community Earth System Model version 1.0.5 (CESM) are speciated into common mineral components in place of total dust. The simulations with mineralogy are compared to available observations of mineral atmospheric distribution and deposition along with observations of clear-sky radiative forcing efficiency. Based on these simulations, we estimate the all-sky direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere as +0.05Wm?2 for both CAM4 and CAM5 simulations with mineralogy and compare this both with simulations of dust in release versions of CAM4 and CAM5 (+0.08 and +0.17Wm?2) and of dust with optimized optical properties, wet scavenging and particle size distribution in CAM4 and CAM5, ?0.05 and ?0.17Wm?2, respectively. The ability to correctly include the mineralogy of dust in climate models is hindered by its spatial and temporal variability as well as insufficient global in-situ observations, incomplete and uncertain source mineralogies and the uncertainties associated with data retrieved from remote sensing methods.

  3. Integrated, Multi-Scale Characterization of Imbibition and Wettability Phenomena Using Magnetic Resonance and Wide-Band Dielectric Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukul M. Sharma; Steven L. Bryant; Carlos Torres-Verdin; George Hirasaki

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The petrophysical properties of rocks, particularly their relative permeability and wettability, strongly influence the efficiency and the time-scale of all hydrocarbon recovery processes. However, the quantitative relationships needed to account for the influence of wettability and pore structure on multi-phase flow are not yet available, largely due to the complexity of the phenomena controlling wettability and the difficulty of characterizing rock properties at the relevant length scales. This project brings together several advanced technologies to characterize pore structure and wettability. Grain-scale models are developed that help to better interpret the electric and dielectric response of rocks. These studies allow the computation of realistic configurations of two immiscible fluids as a function of wettability and geologic characteristics. These fluid configurations form a basis for predicting and explaining macroscopic behavior, including the relationship between relative permeability, wettability and laboratory and wireline log measurements of NMR and dielectric response. Dielectric and NMR measurements have been made show that the response of the rocks depends on the wetting and flow properties of the rock. The theoretical models can be used for a better interpretation and inversion of standard well logs to obtain accurate and reliable estimates of fluid saturation and of their producibility. The ultimate benefit of this combined theoretical/empirical approach for reservoir characterization is that rather than reproducing the behavior of any particular sample or set of samples, it can explain and predict trends in behavior that can be applied at a range of length scales, including correlation with wireline logs, seismic, and geologic units and strata. This approach can substantially enhance wireline log interpretation for reservoir characterization and provide better descriptions, at several scales, of crucial reservoir flow properties that govern oil recovery.

  4. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Extremely Low Probability of Rupture pilot study : xLPR framework model user's guide.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalinich, Donald A.; Sallaberry, Cedric M.; Mattie, Patrick D.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Extremely Low Probability of Rupture (xLPR) pilot study, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) was tasked to develop and evaluate a probabilistic framework using a commercial software package for Version 1.0 of the xLPR Code. Version 1.0 of the xLPR code is focused assessing the probability of rupture due to primary water stress corrosion cracking in dissimilar metal welds in pressurizer surge nozzles. Future versions of this framework will expand the capabilities to other cracking mechanisms, and other piping systems for both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. The goal of the pilot study project is to plan the xLPR framework transition from Version 1.0 to Version 2.0; hence the initial Version 1.0 framework and code development will be used to define the requirements for Version 2.0. The software documented in this report has been developed and tested solely for this purpose. This framework and demonstration problem will be used to evaluate the commercial software's capabilities and applicability for use in creating the final version of the xLPR framework. This report details the design, system requirements, and the steps necessary to use the commercial-code based xLPR framework developed by SNL.

  5. Toward an ontology framework supporting the integration of geographic information with modeling and simulation for critical infrastructure protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ambrosiano, John J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bent, Russell W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Linger, Steve P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Protecting the nation's infrastructure from natural disasters, inadvertent failures, or intentional attacks is a major national security concern. Gauging the fragility of infrastructure assets, and understanding how interdependencies across critical infrastructures affect their behavior, is essential to predicting and mitigating cascading failures, as well as to planning for response and recovery. Modeling and simulation (M&S) is an indispensable part of characterizing this complex system of systems and anticipating its response to disruptions. Bringing together the necessary components to perform such analyses produces a wide-ranging and coarse-grained computational workflow that must be integrated with other analysis workflow elements. There are many points in both types of work flows in which geographic information (GI) services are required. The GIS community recognizes the essential contribution of GI in this problem domain as evidenced by past OGC initiatives. Typically such initiatives focus on the broader aspects of GI analysis workflows, leaving concepts crucial to integrating simulations within analysis workflows to that community. Our experience with large-scale modeling of interdependent critical infrastructures, and our recent participation in a DRS initiative concerning interoperability for this M&S domain, has led to high-level ontological concepts that we have begun to assemble into an architecture that spans both computational and 'world' views of the problem, and further recognizes the special requirements of simulations that go beyond common workflow ontologies. In this paper we present these ideas, and offer a high-level ontological framework that includes key geospatial concepts as special cases of a broader view.

  6. Nonaqueous Phase Liquid Dissolution in Porous Media: Multi-Scale Effects of Multi-Component Dissolution Kinetics on Cleanup Time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNab, W; Ezzedine, S; Detwiler, R

    2007-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial organic solvents such as trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) constitute a principal class of groundwater contaminants. Cleanup of groundwater plume source areas associated with these compounds is problematic, in part, because the compounds often exist in the subsurface as dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). Ganglia (or 'blobs') of DNAPL serve as persistent sources of contaminants that are difficult to locate and remediate (e.g. Fenwick and Blunt, 1998). Current understanding of the physical and chemical processes associated with dissolution of DNAPLs in the subsurface is incomplete and yet is critical for evaluating long-term behavior of contaminant migration, groundwater cleanup, and the efficacy of source area cleanup technologies. As such, a goal of this project has been to contribute to this critical understanding by investigating the multi-phase, multi-component physics of DNAPL dissolution using state-of-the-art experimental and computational techniques. Through this research, we have explored efficient and accurate conceptual and numerical models for source area contaminant transport that can be used to better inform the modeling of source area contaminants, including those at the LLNL Superfund sites, to re-evaluate existing remediation technologies, and to inspire or develop new remediation strategies. The problem of DNAPL dissolution in natural porous media must be viewed in the context of several scales (Khachikian and Harmon, 2000), including the microscopic level at which capillary forces, viscous forces, and gravity/buoyancy forces are manifested at the scale of individual pores (Wilson and Conrad, 1984; Chatzis et al., 1988), the mesoscale where dissolution rates are strongly influenced by the local hydrodynamics, and the field-scale. Historically, the physico-chemical processes associated with DNAPL dissolution have been addressed through the use of lumped mass transfer coefficients which attempt to quantify the dissolution rate in response to local dissolved-phase concentrations distributed across the source area using a volume-averaging approach (Figure 1). The fundamental problem with the lumped mass transfer parameter is that its value is typically derived empirically through column-scale experiments that combine the effects of pore-scale flow, diffusion, and pore-scale geometry in a manner that does not provide a robust theoretical basis for upscaling. In our view, upscaling processes from the pore-scale to the field-scale requires new computational approaches (Held and Celia, 2001) that are directly linked to experimental studies of dissolution at the pore scale. As such, our investigation has been multi-pronged, combining theory, experiments, numerical modeling, new data analysis approaches, and a synthesis of previous studies (e.g. Glass et al, 2001; Keller et al., 2002) aimed at quantifying how the mechanisms controlling dissolution at the pore-scale control the long-term dissolution of source areas at larger scales.

  7. Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters Final Report to the Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day-Lewis, Frederick; Singha, Kamini; Haggerty, Roy; Johnson, Timothy; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

    2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    . In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Our study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3-part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOE’s Hanford 300 Area.

  8. A Comparison of Simulated Cloud Radar Output from the Multiscale Modeling Framework Global Climate Model with CloudSat Cloud Radar Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchand, Roger T.; Haynes, J. M.; Mace, Gerald G.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Stephens, Graeme L.

    2009-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last few years a new type of global climate model (GCM) has emerged in which a cloud-resolving model is embedded into each grid cell of a GCM. This new approach is frequently called a multiscale modeling framework (MMF) or superparameterization. In this article we present a comparison of MMF output with radar observations from the NASA CloudSat mission, which uses a near-nadir-pointing millimeter-wavelength radar to probe the vertical structure of clouds and precipitation. We account for radar detection limits by simulating the 94 GHz radar reflectivity that CloudSat would observe from the high-resolution cloud-resolving model output produced by the MMF. Overall, the MMF does a good job of reproducing the broad pattern of tropical convergence zones, subtropical belts, and midlatitude storm tracks, as well as their changes in position with the annual solar cycle. Nonetheless, the comparison also reveals a number of model shortfalls including (1) excessive hydrometeor coverage at all altitudes over many convectively active regions, (2) a lack of low-level hydrometeors over all subtropical oceanic basins, (3) excessive low-level hydrometeor coverage (principally precipitating hydrometeors) in the midlatitude storm tracks of both hemispheres during the summer season (in each hemisphere), and (4) a thin band of low-level hydrometeors in the Southern Hemisphere of the central (and at times eastern and western) Pacific in the MMF, which is not observed by CloudSat. This band resembles a second much weaker ITCZ but is restricted to low levels.

  9. A Predictive Model of Fragmentation using Adaptive Mesh Refinement and a Hierarchical Material Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koniges, A E; Masters, N D; Fisher, A C; Anderson, R W; Eder, D C; Benson, D; Kaiser, T B; Gunney, B T; Wang, P; Maddox, B R; Hansen, J F; Kalantar, D H; Dixit, P; Jarmakani, H; Meyers, M A

    2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Fragmentation is a fundamental material process that naturally spans spatial scales from microscopic to macroscopic. We developed a mathematical framework using an innovative combination of hierarchical material modeling (HMM) and adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to connect the continuum to microstructural regimes. This framework has been implemented in a new multi-physics, multi-scale, 3D simulation code, NIF ALE-AMR. New multi-material volume fraction and interface reconstruction algorithms were developed for this new code, which is leading the world effort in hydrodynamic simulations that combine AMR with ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) techniques. The interface reconstruction algorithm is also used to produce fragments following material failure. In general, the material strength and failure models have history vector components that must be advected along with other properties of the mesh during remap stage of the ALE hydrodynamics. The fragmentation models are validated against an electromagnetically driven expanding ring experiment and dedicated laser-based fragmentation experiments conducted at the Jupiter Laser Facility. As part of the exit plan, the NIF ALE-AMR code was applied to a number of fragmentation problems of interest to the National Ignition Facility (NIF). One example shows the added benefit of multi-material ALE-AMR that relaxes the requirement that material boundaries must be along mesh boundaries.

  10. Information percolation for the Ising model: cutoff in three dimensions up to criticality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eyal Lubetzky; Allan Sly

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a new framework for analyzing Glauber dynamics for the Ising model. The traditional approach for obtaining sharp mixing results has been to appeal to estimates on spatial properties of the stationary measure from within a multi-scale analysis of the dynamics. Here we propose to study these simultaneously by examining "information percolation" clusters in the space-time slab. Using this framework, we obtain new results for the Ising model on $(\\mathbb{Z}/n\\mathbb{Z})^d$ throughout the high temperature regime: total-variation mixing exhibits cutoff with an $O(1)$-window around the time at which the magnetization is the square-root of the volume. (Previously, cutoff in the full high temperature regime was only known for $d\\leq 2$, and only with an $O(\\log\\log n)$-window.) Furthermore, the new framework opens the door to understanding the effect of the initial state on the mixing time. We demonstrate this on the 1D Ising model, showing that starting from the uniform ("disordered") initial distribution asymptotically halves the mixing time, whereas almost every deterministic starting state is asymptotically as bad as starting from the ("ordered") all-plus state.

  11. Comparison of analytical models for zonal flow generation in ion-temperature-gradient mode turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, J.; Miki, K.; Uzawa, K.; Li, J.; Kishimoto, Y. [Dept. Fundamental Energy Science, School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto, 611-0011 (Japan)

    2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past years the understanding of the multi scale interaction problems have increased significantly. However, at present there exists a flora of different analytical models for investigating multi scale interactions and hardly any specific comparisons have been performed among these models. In this work two different models for the generation of zonal flows from ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) background turbulence are discussed and compared. The methods used are the coherent mode coupling model and the wave kinetic equation model (WKE). It is shown that the two models give qualitatively the same results even though the assumption on the spectral difference is used in the (WKE) approach.

  12. A multi-scale approach to statistical and model-based structural health monitoring with application to embedded sensing for wind energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Stuart Glynn

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in composite wind turbine blades," Journal of IntelligentState estimate of wind turbine blades using geometricallytests of CX-100 wind turbine blades. Part II: analysis," in

  13. A multi-scale approach to statistical and model-based structural health monitoring with application to embedded sensing for wind energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Stuart Glynn

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    comparison in a composite wind turbine rotor blade." Thecrack detection in composite wind turbine blades." Thecomparison in a composite wind turbine rotor blade,"

  14. A multi-scale approach to statistical and model-based structural health monitoring with application to embedded sensing for wind energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Stuart Glynn

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    resonant excitation (UREX) system, which hydraulicallyis shown in Figure 8. The UREX system, which had a mass ofFlapwise Fixed-Free with UREX [21] 2.5.2. Instrumentation

  15. Hierarchical modeling of multi-scale dynamical systems using adaptive radial basis function neural networks: application to synthetic jet actuator wing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hee Eun

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    is best. More importantly, one might infer that ?it would be nice?, if the approximation approach was inherently adaptive in the sense that the mathematical structure of the approximation method was learned from the data, rather than merely estimating...

  16. A multi-scale approach to statistical and model-based structural health monitoring with application to embedded sensing for wind energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Stuart Glynn

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 ? 10 9 N/m 2 ) GRB Gamma-Ray Bursts HP High-Pressure Itransients, namely, gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) [18]. Although

  17. A multi-scale approach to statistical and model-based structural health monitoring with application to embedded sensing for wind energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Stuart Glynn

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a tripod- supported wind turbine tower. White, et al. [35,load input to a wind turbine tower. This chapter develops

  18. Understanding the complexity of the Lvy-walk nature of human mobility with a multi-scale cost/benefit model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scafetta, Nicola

    are searched in the urban area of the city of residence or in the urban area of specific nearby cities. We also by the American Institute of Physics. Related Articles A theory of energy cost and speed of climbing AIP Advances Stokesian Dynamics to swim Phys. Fluids 23, 071901 (2011) Stride-to-stride energy regulation for robust self

  19. A multi-scale approach to statistical and model-based structural health monitoring with application to embedded sensing for wind energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Stuart Glynn

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Test Program," in ASME Wind Energy Symposium , 2004. H. J.Turbine," in 2002 ASME Wind Energy Symposium , 2002, pp.turbine," in 2001 ASME Wind Energy Symposium , 2001, pp.

  20. Economic Impact Reporting Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economic Impact Reporting Framework 2007/08 November 2008 #12;#12;Economic Impact Reporting Framework 2007/08 #12;STFC Economic Impact Reporting Framework 2007/08 Contents: Introduction..............................................................................................................................................2 1: Overall Economic Impacts

  1. Economic Impact Reporting Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economic Impact Reporting Framework 2008/09 #12;#12;Economic Impact Reporting Framework 2008/09 #12;STFC Economic Impact Reporting Framework 2008/09 Contents: Introduction..............................................................................................................................................2 1: Overall Economic Impacts

  2. Development and Demonstration of a Modeling Framework for Assessing the Efficacy of Using Mine Water for Thermoelectric Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermoelectric power plants use large volumes of water for condenser cooling and other plant operations. Traditionally, this water has been withdrawn from the cleanest water available in streams and rivers. However, as demand for electrical power increases it places increasing demands on freshwater resources resulting in conflicts with other off stream water users. In July 2002, NETL and the Governor of Pennsylvania called for the use of water from abandoned mines to replace our reliance on the diminishing and sometimes over allocated surface water resource. In previous studies the National Mine Land Reclamation Center (NMLRC) at West Virginia University has demonstrated that mine water has the potential to reduce the capital cost of acquiring cooling water while at the same time improving the efficiency of the cooling process due to the constant water temperatures associated with deep mine discharges. The objectives of this project were to develop and demonstrate a user-friendly computer based design aid for assessing the costs, technical and regulatory aspects and potential environmental benefits for using mine water for thermoelectric generation. The framework provides a systematic process for evaluating the hydrologic, chemical, engineering and environmental factors to be considered in using mine water as an alternative to traditional freshwater supply. A field investigation and case study was conducted for the proposed 300 MW Beech Hollow Power Plant located in Champion, Pennsylvania. The field study based on previous research conducted by NMLRC identified mine water sources sufficient to reliably supply the 2-3,000gpm water supply requirement of Beech Hollow. A water collection, transportation and treatment system was designed around this facility. Using this case study a computer based design aid applicable to large industrial water users was developed utilizing water collection and handling principals derived in the field investigation and during previous studies of mine water and power plant cooling. Visual basic software was used to create general information/evaluation modules for a range of power plant water needs that were tested/verified against the Beech Hollow project. The program allows for consideration of blending mine water as needed as well as considering potential thermal and environmental benefits that can be derived from using constant temperature mine water. Users input mine water flow, quality, distance to source, elevations to determine collection, transport and treatment system design criteria. The program also evaluates low flow volumes and sustainable yields for various sources. All modules have been integrated into a seamless user friendly computer design aid and user's manual for evaluating the capital and operating costs of mine water use. The framework will facilitate the use of mine water for thermoelectric generation, reduce demand on freshwater resources and result in environmental benefits from reduced emissions and abated mine discharges.

  3. Enterprise Risk Management Framework

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Framework The Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) framework includes four steps: identify the risks, determine the probability and impact of each one, identify controls that are...

  4. An Integrated Electric Power Supply Chain and Fuel Market Network Framework: Theoretical Modeling with Empirical Analysis for New England

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Abstract: In this paper, we develop a novel electric power supply chain network model with fuel supply markets that captures both the economic network transactions in energy supply markets and the physical that the regional electric power prices simulated by the proposed model very well match the actual electricity

  5. Sustainability Framework 1 Queen's University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abolmaesumi, Purang

    Sustainability Framework 1 Queen's University Sustainability Strategic Framework #12;Sustainability Framework 2 Contents Introduction .................................................................................................................................................. 2 Queen's Sustainability Mission

  6. Variable Density Flow Modeling for Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO{sub 2} Storage Along Arches Province of Midwestern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Sminchak

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arches Province in the Midwestern U.S. has been identified as a major area for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage applications because of the intersection of Mt. Simon sandstone reservoir thickness and permeability. To better understand large-scale CO{sub 2} storage infrastructure requirements in the Arches Province, variable density scoping level modeling was completed. Three main tasks were completed for the variable density modeling: Single-phase, variable density groundwater flow modeling; Scoping level multi-phase simulations; and Preliminary basin-scale multi-phase simulations. The variable density modeling task was successful in evaluating appropriate input data for the Arches Province numerical simulations. Data from the geocellular model developed earlier in the project were translated into preliminary numerical models. These models were calibrated to observed conditions in the Mt. Simon, suggesting a suitable geologic depiction of the system. The initial models were used to assess boundary conditions, calibrate to reservoir conditions, examine grid dimensions, evaluate upscaling items, and develop regional storage field scenarios. The task also provided practical information on items related to CO{sub 2} storage applications in the Arches Province such as pressure buildup estimates, well spacing limitations, and injection field arrangements. The Arches Simulation project is a three-year effort and part of the United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE)/National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) program on innovative and advanced technologies and protocols for monitoring/verification/accounting (MVA), simulation, and risk assessment of CO{sub 2} sequestration in geologic formations. The overall objective of the project is to develop a simulation framework for regional geologic CO{sub 2} storage infrastructure along the Arches Province of the Midwestern U.S.

  7. Physics-Based Stress Corrosion Cracking Component Reliability Model cast in an R7-Compatible Cumulative Damage Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unwin, Stephen D.; Lowry, Peter P.; Layton, Robert F.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Sanborn, Scott E.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a working report drafted under the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization pathway of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program, describing statistical models of passives component reliabilities.

  8. A Risk-based Optimization Modeling Framework for Mitigating Fire Events for Water and Fire Response Infrastructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanta, Lufthansa Rahman

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Generalized Barrois Model Fitted to Observations in Finland (Tillander and Keski-Rahkonen 2002)???????? ? 85 4.2 Annual Frequency Distribution of Wind Direction ??????? . 95 4.3 Highest Risk Scenarios for Micropolis Generated from Monte Carlo...

  9. Radial flow has little effect on clusterization at intermediate energies in the framework of the Lattice Gas Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. B. Das; L. Shi; S. Das Gupta

    2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lattice Gas Model was extended to incorporate the effect of radial flow. Contrary to popular belief, radial flow has little effect on the clusterization process in intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions except adding an ordered motion to the particles in the fragmentation source. We compared the results from the lattice gas model with and without radial flow to experimental data. We found that charge yields from central collisions are not significantly affected by inclusion of any reasonable radial flow.

  10. Modeling the effect of climate change on U.S. state-level buildings energy demands in an integrated assessment framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Yuyu; Clarke, Leon E.; Eom, Jiyong; Kyle, G. Page; Patel, Pralit L.; Kim, Son H.; Dirks, James A.; Jensen, Erik A.; Liu, Ying; Rice, Jennie S.; Schmidt, Laurel C.; Seiple, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As long-term socioeconomic transformation and energy service expansion show large spatial heterogeneity, advanced understanding of climate impact on building energy use at the sub-national level will offer useful insights into climate policy and regional energy system planning. In this study, we presented a detailed building energy model with a U.S. state-level representation, nested in the GCAM integrated assessment framework. We projected state-level building energy demand and its spatial pattern over the century, considering the impact of climate change based on the estimates of heating and cooling degree days derived from downscaled USGS CASCaDE temperature data. The result indicates that climate change has a large impact on heating and cooling building energy and fuel use at the state level, exhibiting large spatial heterogeneity across states (ranges from -10% to +10%). The sensitivity analysis reveals that the building energy demand is subject to multiple key factors, such as the magnitude of climate change, the choice of climate models, and the growth of population and GDP, and that their relative contributions vary greatly across the space. The scale impact in building energy use modeling highlights the importance of constructing a building energy model with the spatially-explicit representation of socioeconomics, energy system development, and climate change. These findings will help the climate-based policy decision and energy system, especially utility planning related to building sector at the U.S. state and regional level facing the potential climate change.

  11. Role of Modeling When Designing for Absolute Energy Use Intensity Requirements in a Design-Build Framework: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirsch, A.; Pless, S.; Guglielmetti, R.; Torcellini, P. A.; Okada, D.; Antia, P.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Research Support Facility was designed to use half the energy of an equivalent minimally code-compliant building, and to produce as much renewable energy as it consumes on an annual basis. These energy goals and their substantiation through simulation were explicitly included in the project's fixed firm price design-build contract. The energy model had to be continuously updated during the design process and to match the final building as-built to the greatest degree possible. Computer modeling played a key role throughout the design process and in verifying that the contractual energy goals would be met within the specified budget. The main tool was a whole building energy simulation program. Other models were used to provide more detail or to complement the whole building simulation tool. Results from these specialized models were fed back into the main whole building simulation tool to provide the most accurate possible inputs for annual simulations. This paper will detail the models used in the design process and how they informed important program and design decisions on the path from preliminary design to the completed building.

  12. Framework for Measuring Sustainable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    Knight Foundation will use this sustainability framework for internal organizational purposes with the possibility

  13. Draft of M2 Report on Integration of the Hybrid Hydride Model into INL’s MBM Framework for Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tikare, Veena; Weck, Philippe F.; Schultz, Peter A.; Clark, Blythe; Michael Glazoff; Eric Homer

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the development, demonstration and validation of a mesoscale, microstructural evolution model for simulation of zirconium hydride {delta}-ZrH{sub 1.5} precipitation in the cladding of used nuclear fuels that may occur during long-term dry storage. While the Zr-based claddings are manufactured free of any hydrogen, they absorb hydrogen during service, in the reactor by a process commonly termed ‘hydrogen pick-up’. The precipitation and growth of zirconium hydrides during dry storage is one of the most likely fuel rod integrity failure mechanisms either by embrittlement or delayed hydride cracking of the cladding (Hanson et al., 2011). While the phenomenon is well documented and identified as a potential key failure mechanism during long-term dry storage (Birk et al., 2012 and NUREG/CR-7116), the ability to actually predict the formation of hydrides is poor. The model being documented in this work is a computational capability for the prediction of hydride formation in different claddings of used nuclear fuels. This work supports the Used Fuel Disposition Research and Development Campaign in assessing the structural engineering performance of the cladding during and after long-term dry storage. This document demonstrates a basic hydride precipitation model that is built on a recently developed hybrid Potts-phase field model that combines elements of Potts-Monte Carlo and the phase-field models (Homer et al., 2013; Tikare and Schultz, 2012). The model capabilities are demonstrated along with the incorporation of the starting microstructure, thermodynamics of the Zr-H system and the hydride formation mechanism.

  14. Evaluation of the Simulated Interannual and Subseasonal Variability in an AMIP-Style Simulation Using the CSU Multiscale Modeling Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    parameterizations of convection, clouds, and boundary layer with a cloud-resolving model (CRM) embedded into each­style simulation using the 1985­ 2004 sea surface temperature (SST) and sea ice distributions as prescribed a robust MJO and Kelvin and Rossby waves with phase speeds similar to those observed. The geographical

  15. A study of sand-asphalt mixtures: a constitutive model based on a thermomechanical framework and experimental corroboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravindran, Parag

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    and modeling of asphalt from ancient to modern times. An account of the history of roads can be found in [2],[3]. From tool making to mummification to storing nuclear waste, asphalt hasserved asa versatile engineering material. The Shell bitumen handbooklists...

  16. FIDUCIAL POINTS EXTRACTION AND CHARACTERISTIC WAVES DETECTION IN ECG SIGNAL USING A MODEL-BASED BAYESIAN FRAMEWORK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    FIDUCIAL POINTS EXTRACTION AND CHARACTERISTIC WAVES DETECTION IN ECG SIGNAL USING A MODEL.Jutten@inpg.fr ABSTRACT The automatic detection of Electrocardiogram (ECG) waves is important to cardiac disease diagnosis. A good perfor- mance of an automatic ECG analyzing system depends heav- ily upon the accurate

  17. Cognitive decision errors and organization vulnerabilities in nuclear power plant safety management: Modeling using the TOGA meta-theory framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappelli, M. [UTFISST, ENEA Casaccia, via Anguillarese 301, Rome (Italy); Gadomski, A. M. [ECONA, Centro Interuniversitario Elaborazione Cognitiva Sistemi Naturali e Artificiali, via dei Marsi 47, Rome (Italy); Sepiellis, M. [UTFISST, ENEA Casaccia, via Anguillarese 301, Rome (Italy); Wronikowska, M. W. [UTFISST, ENEA Casaccia, via Anguillarese 301, Rome (Italy); Poznan School of Social Sciences (Poland)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the field of nuclear power plant (NPP) safety modeling, the perception of the role of socio-cognitive engineering (SCE) is continuously increasing. Today, the focus is especially on the identification of human and organization decisional errors caused by operators and managers under high-risk conditions, as evident by analyzing reports on nuclear incidents occurred in the past. At present, the engineering and social safety requirements need to enlarge their domain of interest in such a way to include all possible losses generating events that could be the consequences of an abnormal state of a NPP. Socio-cognitive modeling of Integrated Nuclear Safety Management (INSM) using the TOGA meta-theory has been discussed during the ICCAP 2011 Conference. In this paper, more detailed aspects of the cognitive decision-making and its possible human errors and organizational vulnerability are presented. The formal TOGA-based network model for cognitive decision-making enables to indicate and analyze nodes and arcs in which plant operators and managers errors may appear. The TOGA's multi-level IPK (Information, Preferences, Knowledge) model of abstract intelligent agents (AIAs) is applied. In the NPP context, super-safety approach is also discussed, by taking under consideration unexpected events and managing them from a systemic perspective. As the nature of human errors depends on the specific properties of the decision-maker and the decisional context of operation, a classification of decision-making using IPK is suggested. Several types of initial situations of decision-making useful for the diagnosis of NPP operators and managers errors are considered. The developed models can be used as a basis for applications to NPP educational or engineering simulators to be used for training the NPP executive staff. (authors)

  18. The Non-Autonomous Chiral Model and the Ernst Equation of General Relativity in the Bidifferential Calculus Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aristophanes Dimakis; Nils Kanning; Folkert Müller-Hoissen

    2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The non-autonomous chiral model equation for an $m \\times m$ matrix function on a two-dimensional space appears in particular in general relativity, where for $m=2$ a certain reduction of it determines stationary, axially symmetric solutions of Einstein's vacuum equations, and for $m=3$ solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell equations. Using a very simple and general result of the bidifferential calculus approach to integrable partial differential and difference equations, we generate a large class of exact solutions of this chiral model. The solutions are parametrized by a set of matrices, the size of which can be arbitrarily large. The matrices are subject to a Sylvester equation that has to be solved and generically admits a unique solution. By imposing the aforementioned reductions on the matrix data, we recover the Ernst potentials of multi-Kerr-NUT and multi-Demianski-Newman metrics.

  19. LONG-TERM GLOBAL WATER USE PROJECTIONS USING SIX SOCIOECONOMIC SCENARIOS IN AN INTEGRATED ASSESSMENT MODELING FRAMEWORK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Wise, Marshall A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.; Moss, Richard H.; Kim, Son H.

    2014-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we assess future water demands for the agricultural (irrigation and livestock), energy (electricity generation, primary energy production and processing), industrial (manufacturing and mining), and municipal sectors, by incorporating water demands into a technologically-detailed global integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, and climate change – the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). Base-year water demands—both gross withdrawals and net consumptive use—are assigned to specific modeled activities in a way that maximizes consistency between bottom-up estimates of water demand intensities of specific technologies and practices, and top-down regional and sectoral estimates of water use. The energy, industrial, and municipal sectors are represented in fourteen geopolitical regions, with the agricultural sector further disaggregated into as many as eighteen agro-ecological zones (AEZs) within each region. We assess future water demands representing six socioeconomic scenarios, with no constraints imposed by future water supplies. The scenarios observe increases in global water withdrawals from 3,578 km3 year-1 in 2005 to 5,987 – 8,374 km3 year-1 in 2050, and to 4,719 – 12,290 km3 year-1 in 2095. Comparing the projected total regional water withdrawals to the historical supply of renewable freshwater, the Middle East exhibits the highest levels of water scarcity throughout the century, followed by India; water scarcity increases over time in both of these regions. In contrast, water scarcity improves in some regions with large base-year electric sector withdrawals, such as the USA and Canada, due to capital stock turnover and the almost complete phase-out of once-through flow cooling systems. The scenarios indicate that: 1) water is likely a limiting factor in climate change mitigation policies, 2) many regions can be expected to increase reliance on non-renewable groundwater, water reuse, and desalinated water, but they also highlight an important role for development and deployment of water conservation technologies and practices.

  20. On the Diurnal Cycle of Deep Convection, High-Level Cloud, and Upper Troposphere Water Vapor in the Multiscale Modeling Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yunyan; Klein, Stephen A.; Liu, Chuntao; Tian, Baijun; Marchand, Roger T.; Haynes, J. M.; McCoy, Renata; Zhang, Yuying; Ackerman, Thomas P.

    2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Multiscale Modeling Framework (MMF), also called ‘‘superparameterization’’, embeds a cloud-resolving model (CRM) at each grid column of a general circulation model to replace traditional parameterizations of moist convection and large-scale condensation. This study evaluates the diurnal cycle of deep convection, high-level clouds, and upper troposphere water vapor by applying an infrared (IR) brightness temperature (Tb) and a precipitation radar (PR) simulator to the CRM column data. Simulator results are then compared with IR radiances from geostationary satellites and PR reflectivities from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). While the actual surface precipitation rate in the MMF has a reasonable diurnal phase and amplitude when compared with TRMM observations, the IR simulator results indicate an inconsistency in the diurnal anomalies of high-level clouds between the model and the geostationary satellite data. Primarily because of its excessive high-level clouds, the MMF overestimates the simulated precipitation index (PI) and fails to reproduce the observed diurnal cycle phase relationships among PI, high-level clouds, and upper troposphere relative humidity. The PR simulator results show that over the tropical oceans, the occurrence fraction of reflectivity in excess of 20 dBZ is almost 1 order of magnitude larger than the TRMM data especially at altitudes above 6 km. Both results suggest that the MMF oceanic convection is overactive and possible reasons for this bias are discussed. However, the joint distribution of simulated IR Tb and PR reflectivity indicates that the most intense deep convection is found more often over tropical land than ocean, in agreement with previous observational studies.

  1. Real-Time Systems, Special Issue on Control-theoretical Approaches to Real-Time Computing, 23(1/2): 85-126, 2002 Feedback Control Real-Time Scheduling: Framework, Modeling, and Algorithms*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Chenyang

    (1/2): 85-126, 2002 Feedback Control Real-Time Scheduling: Framework, Modeling, and Algorithms* Chenyang Lu}@cs.virginia.edu gt9s@ee.virginia.edu Abstract This paper presents a Feedback Control real-time Scheduling (FCS. These admission-control-based algorithms represent the third major paradigm for real-time scheduling. However

  2. SC COLLABORATOR: A SERVICE ORIENTED FRAMEWORK FOR CONSTRUCTION SUPPLY CHAIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    , service oriented architecture (SOA) with open source technologies is a desirable computing modelSC COLLABORATOR: A SERVICE ORIENTED FRAMEWORK FOR CONSTRUCTION SUPPLY CHAIN COLLABORATION for construction supply chain collaboration and management, through a prototype service oriented system framework

  3. A framework for delay emulation of large-scale internetworks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venkata, Shravan Rangaraju

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The framework models and dynamically adapts the test traffic according to the network delay characteristics observed on the Internet in real-time. The proposed framework consists of three main modules: Virtual Host Configuration Module, Delay Estimator...

  4. Managing by passion, professionalism and performance : the MBP³ model : an alternative management framework developed for the Instituto de Ciencias Terra-Mar (ICTM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coelho, Alexandre C. (Alexandre Costa)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this thesis is to develop a new, tailor-made and innovative managerial framework for the Instituto de Ciencias Terra-Mar (ICTM). The ICTM is a multi-functional science and technology institute dedicated ...

  5. BI (XML) Publisher Conversion from Third Party Software in E-Business Suite: An ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) Reporting Framework Conversion Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Shuai

    2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    by internal users for data analysis purposes such as monthly sales reports and ledger consolidation reports. These reports, such as the packing list report and purchase order report, which are sent to the external customers for communication purposes, need.... 2012) Some companies have decided to implement their own ERP framework because they want to have full control of the ERP system and make sure that the ERP framework is 100 percent tailored to the business process. Other companies prefer to purchase...

  6. IBRD Operational Decision Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenwalt, R; Hibbard, W; Raber, E; Carlsen, T; Folks, K; MacQueen, D; Mancieri, S; Bunt, T; Richards, J; Hirabayashi-Dethier, J

    2010-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The IBRD Operational Decision Framework in this document is an expansion of an emerging general risk management framework under development by an interagency working group. It provides the level of detail necessary to develop a general Consequence Management Guidance Document for biological contamination remediation and restoration. It is the intent of this document to support both wide area and individual site remediation and restoration activities. This product was initiated as a portion of the IBRD Task 1 Systems Analysis to aid in identification of wide area remediation and restoration shortcomings and gaps. The draft interagency general risk management framework was used as the basis for the analysis. The initial Task 1 analysis document expanded the draft interagency framework to a higher level of resolution, building on both the logic structure and the accompanying text explanations. It was then employed in a qualitative manner to identify responsible agencies, data requirements, tool requirements, and current capabilities for each decision and task. This resulted in identifying shortcomings and gaps needing resolution. Several meetings of a joint LLNL/SNL working group reviewed and approved the initial content of this analysis. At the conclusion of Task 1, work continued on the expanded framework to generate this Operational Decision Framework which is consistent with the existing interagency general risk management framework. A large LLNL task group met repeatedly over a three-month period to develop the expanded framework, coordinate the framework with the biological remediation checklist, and synchronize the logic with the Consequence Management Plan table of contents. The expanded framework was briefed at a large table top exercise reviewing the interagency risk management framework. This exercise had representation from major US metropolitan areas as well as national agencies. This product received positive comments from the participants. Upon completion of the Operational Decision Framework, another joint LLNL/SNL working group conducted a day-long review. Identified modifications were made to the document, resulting in the included product.

  7. Demonstration of a Novel, Integrated, Multi-Scale Procedure for High-Resolution 3D Reservoir Characterization and Improved CO2-EOR/Sequestration Management, SACROC Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott R. Reeves

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of this project was to demonstrate a new and novel approach for high resolution, 3D reservoir characterization that can enable better management of CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects and, looking to the future, carbon sequestration projects. The approach adopted has been the subject of previous research by the DOE and others, and relies primarily upon data-mining and advanced pattern recognition approaches. This approach honors all reservoir characterization data collected, but accepts that our understanding of how these measurements relate to the information of most interest, such as how porosity and permeability vary over a reservoir volume, is imperfect. Ideally the data needed for such an approach includes surface seismic to provide the greatest amount of data over the entire reservoir volume of interest, crosswell seismic to fill the resolution gap between surface seismic and wellbore-scale measurements, geophysical well logs to provide the vertical resolution sought, and core data to provide the tie to the information of most interest. These data are combined via a series of one or more relational models to enable, in its most successful application, the prediction of porosity and permeability on a vertical resolution similar to logs at each surface seismic trace location. In this project, the procedure was applied to the giant (and highly complex) SACROC unit of the Permian basin in West Texas, one of the world's largest CO{sub 2}-EOR projects and a potentially world-class geologic sequestration site. Due to operational scheduling considerations on the part of the operator of the field, the crosswell data was not obtained during the period of project performance (it is currently being collected however as part of another DOE project). This compromised the utility of the surface seismic data for the project due to the resolution gap between it and the geophysical well logs. An alternative approach was adopted that utilized a relational model to predict porosity and permeability profiles from well logs at each well location, and a 3D geostatistical variogram to generate the reservoir characterization over the reservoir volume of interest. A reservoir simulation model was built based upon this characterization and history-matched without making significant changes to it, thus validating the procedure. While not the same procedure as originally planned, the procedure ultimately employed proved successful and demonstrated that the general concepts proposed (i.e., data mining and advanced pattern recognition methods) have the flexibility to achieve the reservoir characterization objectives sought even with imperfect or incomplete data.

  8. Multi-scale comparative spectral analysis of satellite total solar irradiance measurements from 2003 to 2013 reveals a planetary modulation of solar activity and its non-linear dependence on the 11-year solar cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicola Scafetta; Richard C. Willson

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Herein we adopt a multi-scale dynamical spectral analysis technique to compare and study the dynamical evolution of the harmonic components of the overlapping ACRIMSAT/ACRIM3, SOHO/VIRGO and SORCE/TIM total solar irradiance (TSI) records during 2003.15 to 2013.16 in solar cycles 23 and 24. The three TSI time series present highly correlated patterns. Significant power spectral peaks are common to these records and are observed at the following periods: 0.070 year, 0.097 year, 0.20 year, 0.25 year, 0.30-0.34 year, 0.39 year. Less certain spectral peaks occur at about 0.55 year, 0.60-0.65 year and 0.7-0.9 year. Four main frequency periods at 24.8 days (0.068 year), 27.3 days (0.075 year), at 34-35 days (0.093-0.096 year) and 36-38 days (0.099-0.104 year) characterize the solar rotation cycle. The amplitude of these oscillations, in particular of those with periods larger than 0.5 year, appears to be modulated by the 11-year solar cycle. Similar harmonics have been found in other solar indices. The observed periodicities are found highly coherent with the spring, orbital and synodic periods of Mercury, Venus, Earth and Jupiter. We conclude that solar activity is likely modulated by planetary gravitational and electromagnetic forces acting on the sun. The strength of the sun's response to planetary forcing depends non-linearly on the state of internal solar dynamics: planetary-sun coupling effects are enhanced during solar activity maxima and attenuated during minima.

  9. Multi-Scale Reinforced Carbon Fiber Nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VanRooyen, Ainsley

    2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    of epoxy-based polymer composites and the dielectric breakdown of the epoxy, catastrophic failure may occur when subjected to high voltages (as in a lightning strike). The addition of carbon nanofibers and carbon nanotubes to the epoxy resin has...

  10. Multi-scale analysis of cardiac myoarchitecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Teresa T

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The distribution and generation of force within the myocardium during normal contractility is dictated by the tissue's underlying 3D myoarchitecture. The presence of disordered myoarchitecture may in turn constitute the ...

  11. Spark Distributed Analytic Framework

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analytic Framework Description and Overview Apache Spark(tm) is a fast and general engine for large-scale data processing. Availibility Spark is Available on Edison in CCM...

  12. Cybersecurity Framework Development Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentz, Dale P.

    Cybersecurity Framework Development Overview NIST's Role in Implementing Executive Order 13636 "Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity" #12;Executive Order 13636: Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity - February 12, 2013 "The cyber threat to critical infrastructure continues to grow

  13. Cybersecurity Framework Development Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cybersecurity Framework Development Overview NIST's Role in Implementing Executive Order 13636 "Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity" #12;Executive Order 13636: Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity February 12, 2013 · "The cyber threat to critical infrastructure continues to grow

  14. Conceptual Framework Presentation, 2006, Slide 1 The Conceptual Framework for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Conceptual Framework Presentation, 2006, Slide 1 The Conceptual Framework for Programs that Prepare Professionals Who Work in Schools What - Why - and Why You? #12;Conceptual Framework Presentation, 2006, Slide 2 on and develop your philosophy as a professional. . . WHY YOU? #12;Conceptual Framework Presentation, 2006, Slide

  15. Framework for Physics Computation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwan, Karsten [Georgia Institute of Technology

    2012-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Georgia Tech team has been working in collaboration with ORNL and Rutgers on improved I/O for petascale fusion codes, specifically, to integrate staging methods into the ADIOS framework. As part of this on-going work, we have released the DataTap server as part of the ADIOS release, and we have been working on improving the ‘in situ’ processing capabilities of the ADIOS framework. In particular, we have been moving forward with a design that adds additional metadata to describe the data layout and structure of data that is being moved for I/O purposes, building on the FFS type system developed in our past research

  16. Flexible Framework for Building Energy Analysis: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hale, E.; Macumber, D.; Weaver, E.; Shekhar, D.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the building energy research and advanced practitioner communities, building models are perturbed across large parameter spaces to assess energy and cost performance in the face of programmatic and economic constraints. This paper describes the OpenStudio software framework for performing such analyses.

  17. Preparation of functionalized zeolitic frameworks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Wang, Bo

    2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure provides zeolitic frameworks for gas separation, gas storage, catalysis and sensors. More particularly the disclosure provides zeolitic frameworks (ZIFs). The ZIF of the disclosure comprises any number of transition metals or a homogenous transition metal composition.

  18. An urban intervention : enabling frameworks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrigan, Neil Patrick

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between design and the idea of a framework is essentially an attitude about ordering. A framework is an Intellectual proposition which can support a variety ideas, and in doing so, it provides a resolution ...

  19. Preparation of functionalized zeolitic frameworks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M; Hayashi, Hideki; Banerjee, Rahul; Park, Kyo Sung; Wang, Bo; Cote, Adrien P

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure provides zeolitic frameworks for gas separation, gas storage, catalysis and sensors. More particularly the disclosure provides zeolitic frameworks (ZIFs). The ZIF of the disclosure comprises any number of transition metals or a homogenous transition metal composition.

  20. A framework for digital watercolor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, Patrick Michael

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This research develops an extendible framework for reproducing watercolor in a digital environment, with a focus on interactivity using the GPU. The framework uses the lattice Boltzmann method, a relatively new approach to fluid dynamics...

  1. Preparation of functionalized zeolitic frameworks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.; Hayashi, Hideki; Banerjee, Rahul; Park, Kyo Sung; Wang, Bo; Cote, Adrien P.

    2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure provides zeolitic frameworks for gas separation, gas storage, catalysis and sensors. More particularly the disclosure provides zeolitic frameworks (ZIFs). The ZIF of the disclosure comprises any number of transition metals or a homogenous transition metal composition.

  2. The National Transport Data Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landshoff, Peter Vincent; Polak, John

    2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    ................................................................................................................ 14 NTDF PROTOTYPE ............................................................................................................................... 14 NTDF ARCHITECTURE... ................................................................................................................................. 27 RESOURCING .......................................................................................................................................... 27 ? The National Transport Data Framework March 2008 ? Page 2 SUSTAINABILITY...

  3. Conceptual Model Summary Report Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO{sub 2} Storage Along Arches Province of Midwestern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A conceptual model was developed for the Arches Province that integrates geologic and hydrologic information on the Eau Claire and Mt. Simon formations into a geocellular model. The conceptual model describes the geologic setting, stratigraphy, geologic structures, hydrologic features, and distribution of key hydraulic parameters. The conceptual model is focused on the Mt. Simon sandstone and Eau Claire formations. The geocellular model depicts the parameters and conditions in a numerical array that may be imported into the numerical simulations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage. Geophysical well logs, rock samples, drilling logs, geotechnical test results, and reservoir tests were evaluated for a 500,000 km{sup 2} study area centered on the Arches Province. The geologic and hydraulic data were integrated into a three-dimensional (3D) grid of porosity and permeability, which are key parameters regarding fluid flow and pressure buildup due to CO{sub 2} injection. Permeability data were corrected in locations where reservoir tests have been performed in Mt. Simon injection wells. The final geocellular model covers an area of 600 km by 600 km centered on the Arches Province. The geocellular model includes a total of 24,500,000 cells representing estimated porosity and permeability distribution. CO{sub 2} injection scenarios were developed for on-site and regional injection fields at rates of 70 to 140 million metric tons per year.

  4. Modeling and analysis framework for core damage propagation during flow-blockage-initiated accidents in the Advanced Neutron Source reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Navarro-Valenti, S.; Georgevich, V.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes modeling and analysis to evaluate the extent of core damage during flow blockage events in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor planned to be built at ORNL. Damage propagation is postulated to occur from thermal conduction between dmaged and undamaged plates due to direct thermal contact. Such direct thermal contact may occur beause of fuel plate swelling during fission product vapor release or plate buckling. Complex phenomena of damage propagation were modeled using a one-dimensional heat transfer model. A parametric study was done for several uncertain variables. The study included investigating effects of plate contact area, convective heat transfer coefficient, thermal conductivity on fuel swelling, and initial temperature of the plate being contacted by the damaged plate. Also, the side support plates were modeled to account for their effects of damage propagation. Results provide useful insights into how variouss uncertain parameters affect damage propagation.

  5. An Estimation and Simulation Framework for Energy Efficient Design using Platform FPGAs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasanna, Viktor K.

    An Estimation and Simulation Framework for Energy Efficient Design using Platform FPGAs Sumit modeling technique, domain specific modeling, and a methodology for energy-efficient design of application

  6. A Process Reference Model for Reuse in Industrial Engineering: Enhancing the ISO/IEC 15504 Framework to Cope with Organizational Reuse Maturity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mössenböck, Hanspeter

    A Process Reference Model for Reuse in Industrial Engineering: Enhancing the ISO/IEC 15504 in industrial engineering for solution providers is more and more recognized as a key to economic success for reuse in industrial engineering. Based on an overview and the background of the GDES-Reuse improvement

  7. Modeling and analysis framework for core damage propagation during flow-blockage-initiated accidents in the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Navarro-Valenti, S.; Georgevich, V.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes modeling and analysis to evaluate the extent of core damage during flow blockage events in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor planned to be built at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Damage propagation is postulated to occur from thermal conduction between damaged and undamaged plates due to direct thermal contact. Such direct thermal contact may occur because of fuel plate swelling during fission product vapor release or plate buckling. Complex phenomena of damage propagation were modeled using a one-dimensional heat transfer model. A scoping study was conducted to learn what parameters are important for core damage propagation, and to obtain initial estimates of core melt mass for addressing recriticality and steam explosion events. The study included investigating the effects of the plate contact area, the convective heat transfer coefficient, thermal conductivity upon fuel swelling, and the initial temperature of the plate being contacted by the damaged plate. Also, the side support plates were modeled to account for their effects on damage propagation. The results provide useful insights into how various uncertain parameters affect damage propagation.

  8. Global parameter optimization of Mather type plasma focus in the framework of the Gratton-Vargas two-dimensional snowplow model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auluck, S K H

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) is known to produce highly energetic ions, electrons and plasma environment which can be used for breeding of short-lived isotopes, plasma nanotechnology and other material processing applications. Commercial utilization of DPF in such areas would need a design tool which can be deployed in an automatic search for the best possible device configuration for a given application. The recently revisited [S K H Auluck, Physics of Plasmas 20, 112501 (2013)] Gratton-Vargas (GV) two-dimensional analytical snowplow model of plasma focus provides a numerical formula for dynamic inductance of a Mather type plasma focus fitted to thousands of automated computations, which enables construction of such design tool. This inductance formula is utilized in the present work to explore global optimization, based on first-principles optimality criteria, in a 4-dimensional parameter-subspace of the zero-resistance GV model. The optimization process is shown to reproduce the empirically observed constancy ...

  9. Application of linear multiple model predictive control (MMPC) framework towards dynamic maximazation of oxygen yield in an elevated-pressure air separation unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahapatra, P.; Zitney, S.; Bequette, B. Wayne

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a typical air separation unit (ASU) utilizing either a simple gaseous oxygen (GOX) cycle or a pumped liquid oxygen (PLOX) cycle, the flowrate of liquid nitrogen (LN2) stream connecting high-pressure and low-pressure ASU columns plays an important role in the total oxygen yield. It has been observed that this yield reaches a maximum at a certain optimal flowrate of LN2 stream. At nominal full-load operation, the flowrate of LN2 stream is maintained near this optimum value, whereas at part-load conditions this flowrate is typically modified in proportion with the load-change (oxygen demand) through a ratio/feed-forward controller. Due to nonlinearity in the entire ASU process, the ratio-modified LN2 flowrate does not guarantee an optimal oxygen yield at part-load conditions. This is further exacerbated when process disturbances in form of “cold-box” heat-leaks enter the system. To address this problem of dynamically maximizing the oxygen yield while the ASU undergoes a load-change and/or a process disturbance, a multiple model predictive control (MMPC) algorithm is proposed. This approach has been used in previous studies to handle large ramp-rates of oxygen demand posed by the gasifier in an IGCC plant. In this study, the proposed algorithm uses linear step-response “blackbox” models surrounding the operating points corresponding to maximum oxygen yield points at different loads. It has been shown that at any operating point of the ASU, the MMPC algorithm, through model-weight calculation based on plant measurements, naturally and continuously selects the dominant model(s) corresponding to the current plant state, while making control-move decisions that approach the maximum oxygen yield point. This dynamically facilitates less energy consumption in form of compressed feed-air compared to a simple ratio control during load-swings. In addition, since a linear optimization problem is solved at each time step, the approach involves much less computational cost compared to a firstprinciple based nonlinear MPC. Introduction

  10. Preparation of metal-triazolate frameworks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M; Uribe-Romo, Fernando J; Gandara-Barragan, Felipe; Britt, David K

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure provides for novel metal-triazolate frameworks, methods of use thereof, and devices comprising the frameworks thereof.

  11. Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DRAFT FOR PUBLIC COMMENT SEPTEMBER, 2014 ENERGY SECTOR CYBERSECURITY FRAMEWORK IMPLEMENTATION GUIDANCE Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance Table of...

  12. Sensitivity of North American agriculture to ENSO-based climate scenarios and their socio-economic consequences: Modeling in an integrated assessment framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, N.J.; Izaurralde, R.C.; Brown, R.A.; Sands, R.D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Legler, D. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Center for Ocean Atmosphere Prediction Studies; Srinivasan, R. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Blacklands Research Center; Tiscareno-Lopez, M.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A group of Canadian, US and Mexican natural resource specialists, organized by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under its North American Energy, Environment and Economy (NA3E) Program, has applied a simulation modeling approach to estimating the impact of ENSO-driven climatic variations on the productivity of major crops grown in the three countries. Methodological development is described and results of the simulations presented in this report. EPIC (the Erosion Productivity Impact Calculator) was the agro-ecosystem model selected-for this study. EPIC uses a daily time step to simulate crop growth and yield, water use, runoff and soil erosion among other variables. The model was applied to a set of so-called representative farms parameterized through a specially-assembled Geographic Information System (GIS) to reflect the soils, topography, crop management and weather typical of the regions represented. Fifty one representative farms were developed for Canada, 66 for the US and 23 for Mexico. El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) scenarios for the EPIC simulations were created using the historic record of sea-surface temperature (SST) prevailing in the eastern tropical Pacific for the period October 1--September 30. Each year between 1960 and 1989 was thus assigned to an ENSO category or state. The ENSO states were defined as El Nino (EN, SST warmer than the long-term mean), Strong El Nino (SEN, much warmer), El Viejo (EV, cooler) and Neutral (within {+-}0.5 C of the long-term mean). Monthly means of temperature and precipitation were then calculated at each farm for the period 1960--1989 and the differences (or anomalies) between the means in Neutral years and EN, SEN and EV years determined. The average monthly anomalies for each ENSO state were then used to create new monthly statistics for each farm and ENSO-state combination. The adjusted monthly statistics characteristic of each ENSO state were then used to drive a stochastic-weather simulator that provided 30 years of daily-weather data needed to run EPIC. Maps and tables of the climate anomalies by farm show climatic conditions that differ considerably by region, season and ENSO state.

  13. Nuclear Safety Regulatory Framework

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    overall Nuclear Safety Policy & ESH Goals Safety Basis Review and Approval In the DOE governance model, contractors responsible for the facility develop the safety basis and...

  14. Sodium loop framework structural analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, P.M.

    1995-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the structural analysis of the Sodium Loop framework in a drop condition. The drop is similar to the US Department of Transportation non-bulk, performance-oriented packaging (Packaging Group I) drop test. The drop height evaluated for the Sodium Loop framework is 5.9 ft.

  15. Homogenization of a catalyst layer model for periodically distributed pore geometries in PEM fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmuck, Markus

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We formally derive an effective catalyst layer model comprising the reduction of oxygen for periodically distributed pore geometries. By assumption, the pores are completely filled with water and the surrounding walls consist of catalyst particles which are attached to an electron conducting microstructure. The macroscopic transport equations are established by a multi-scale approach, based on microscopic phenomena at the pore level, and serve as a first step toward future optimization of catalyst layer designs.

  16. Homogenization of a catalyst layer model for periodically distributed pore geometries in PEM fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Schmuck; Peter Berg

    2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We formally derive an effective catalyst layer model comprising the reduction of oxygen for periodically distributed pore geometries. By assumption, the pores are completely filled with water and the surrounding walls consist of catalyst particles which are attached to an electron conducting microstructure. The macroscopic transport equations are established by a multi-scale approach, based on microscopic phenomena at the pore level, and serve as a first step toward future optimization of catalyst layer designs.

  17. Radiation Damage in Nuclear Fuel for Advanced Burner Reactors: Modeling and Experimental Validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Niels Gronbech; Asta, Mark; Ozolins, Nigel Browning'Vidvuds; de Walle, Axel van; Wolverton, Christopher

    2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The consortium has completed its existence and we are here highlighting work and accomplishments. As outlined in the proposal, the objective of the work was to advance the theoretical understanding of advanced nuclear fuel materials (oxides) toward a comprehensive modeling strategy that incorporates the different relevant scales involved in radiation damage in oxide fuels. Approaching this we set out to investigate and develop a set of directions: 1) Fission fragment and ion trajectory studies through advanced molecular dynamics methods that allow for statistical multi-scale simulations. This work also includes an investigation of appropriate interatomic force fields useful for the energetic multi-scale phenomena of high energy collisions; 2) Studies of defect and gas bubble formation through electronic structure and Monte Carlo simulations; and 3) an experimental component for the characterization of materials such that comparisons can be obtained between theory and experiment.

  18. Assessment of Molecular Modeling & Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2002-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This report reviews the development and applications of molecular and materials modeling in Europe and Japan in comparison to those in the United States. Topics covered include computational quantum chemistry, molecular simulations by molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo methods, mesoscale modeling of material domains, molecular-structure/macroscale property correlations like QSARs and QSPRs, and related information technologies like informatics and special-purpose molecular-modeling computers. The panel's findings include the following: The United States leads this field in many scientific areas. However, Canada has particular strengths in DFT methods and homogeneous catalysis; Europe in heterogeneous catalysis, mesoscale, and materials modeling; and Japan in materials modeling and special-purpose computing. Major government-industry initiatives are underway in Europe and Japan, notably in multi-scale materials modeling and in development of chemistry-capable ab-initio molecular dynamics codes.

  19. A Framework for Defining Logics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Gordon; Honsell, Furio; Harper, Robert

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Edinburgh Logical Framework (LF) provides a means to define (or present) logics. It is based on a general treatment of syntax, rules, and proofs by means of a typed ?-calculus with dependent types. Syntax is treated ...

  20. Sample Business Plan Framework 3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Sample Business Plan Framework 1: A program seeking to continue operations in the post-grant period as a not-for-profit (NGO) entity.

  1. Sample Business Plan Framework 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Sample Business Plan Framework 1: A program seeking to continue operations in the post-grant period as a not-for-profit (NGO) entity.

  2. Sample Business Plan Framework 4

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Sample Business Plan Framework 1: A program seeking to continue operations in the post-grant period as a not-for-profit (NGO) entity.

  3. Sample Business Plan Framework 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Sample Business Plan Framework 1: A program seeking to continue operations in the post-grant period as a not-for-profit (NGO) entity.

  4. Computational modeling of metal-organic frameworks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sung, Jeffrey Chuen-Fai; Sung, Jeffrey Chuen-Fai

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Orbital Ibu: Ibuprofen IPA: Isopropyl alcohol IUPAC:and isopropyl alcohol (IPA).63'64 Some of the most-NP) state. During adsorption of IPA, the adsorption of 3 IPA

  5. A framework for benchmarking land models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil Carbon and Nitro- gen Data, NDP-018, Oak Ridge NationalLaboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee USA, 146, 1986.at: http://daac.ornl.gov/ from Oak Ridge National Laboratory

  6. Thermoelectric Activities of European Community within Framework...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of European Community within Framework Programme 7 and additional activities in Germany Thermoelectric Activities of European Community within Framework Programme 7 and...

  7. International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation (IFNEC...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation (IFNEC) Expert meetings in Romania International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation (IFNEC) Expert meetings in Romania...

  8. Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance - Notice of Public Comment: Federal Register Notice, Volume 79, No. 177, September 12, 2014 Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework...

  9. Knowledge Framework Implementation with Multiple Architectures - 13090

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Upadhyay, H.; Lagos, L.; Quintero, W.; Shoffner, P. [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33174 (United States)] [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33174 (United States); DeGregory, J. [Office of D and D and Facility Engineering, Environmental Management, Department of Energy (United States)] [Office of D and D and Facility Engineering, Environmental Management, Department of Energy (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiple kinds of knowledge management systems are operational in public and private enterprises, large and small organizations with a variety of business models that make the design, implementation and operation of integrated knowledge systems very difficult. In recent days, there has been a sweeping advancement in the information technology area, leading to the development of sophisticated frameworks and architectures. These platforms need to be used for the development of integrated knowledge management systems which provides a common platform for sharing knowledge across the enterprise, thereby reducing the operational inefficiencies and delivering cost savings. This paper discusses the knowledge framework and architecture that can be used for the system development and its application to real life need of nuclear industry. A case study of deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) is discussed with the Knowledge Management Information Tool platform and framework. D and D work is a high priority activity across the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Subject matter specialists (SMS) associated with DOE sites, the Energy Facility Contractors Group (EFCOG) and the D and D community have gained extensive knowledge and experience over the years in the cleanup of the legacy waste from the Manhattan Project. To prevent the D and D knowledge and expertise from being lost over time from the evolving and aging workforce, DOE and the Applied Research Center (ARC) at Florida International University (FIU) proposed to capture and maintain this valuable information in a universally available and easily usable system. (authors)

  10. An Integrated Assessment Framework for Uncertainty Studies in Global and Regional Climate Change: The IGSM-CAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monier, Erwan

    2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an integrated assessment framework for uncertainty studies in global and regional climate change. In this framework, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Integrated Global System Model (IGSM), ...

  11. UC DAVIS PHYSICAL DESIGN FRAMEWORK PHYSICAL DESIGN FRAMEWORK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Campus Framework Strengthen the civic core 3.1 Amplify the bus/bike boulevard 3.2 Connect to the arboretum 3.3 Create identity for district centers 3.4 Connect campus entries to the greater community 3.5 4.2 Appendices 1 West Village Neighborhood Master Plan www.ormp.ucdavis.edu/environreview/lrdp.html#NMP 2 Bike

  12. State of Advancement of the International REVE Project: Computational Modelling of Irradiation-Induced Hardening in Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels and Relevant Experimental Validation Programme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malerba, Lorenzo; Van Walle, Eric [SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Domain, Christophe; Jumel, Stephanie; Van Duysen, Jean-Claude [EDR R and D (France)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The REVE (Reactor for Virtual Experiments) project is an international joint effort aimed at developing multi-scale modelling computational toolboxes capable of simulating the behaviour of materials under irradiation at different time and length scales. Well grounded numerical techniques such as molecular dynamics (MD) and Monte Carlo (MC) algorithms, as well as rate equation (RE) and dislocation-defect interaction theory, form the basis on which the project is built. The goal is to put together a suite of integrated codes capable of deducing the changes in macroscopic properties starting from a detailed simulation of the microstructural changes produced by irradiation in materials. To achieve this objective, several European laboratories are closely collaborating, while exchanging data with American and Japanese laboratories currently pursuing similar approaches. The material chosen for the first phase of this project is reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel, the target macroscopic magnitude to be predicted being the yield strength increase ({delta}{sigma}y) due, essentially, to irradiation-enhanced formation of intragranular solute atom precipitates or clouds, as well as irradiation induced defects in the matrix, such as point defect clusters and dislocation loops. A description of the methodological approach used in the project and its current state is given in the paper. The development of the simulation tools requires a continuous feedback from ad hoc experimental data. In the framework of the REVE project SCK EN has therefore performed a neutron irradiation campaign of model alloys of growing complexity (from pure Fe to binary and ternary systems and a real RPV steel) in the Belgian test reactor BR2 and is currently carrying on the subsequent materials characterisation using its hot cell facilities. The paper gives the details of this experimental programme - probably the first large-scale one devoted to the validation of numerical simulation tools - and presents and discusses the first available results, with a view to their use as feedback for the improvement of the computational modelling. (authors)

  13. Exact entanglement renormalization for string-net models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Koenig; Ben W. Reichardt; Guifre Vidal

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct an explicit renormalization group (RG) transformation for Levin and Wen's string-net models on a hexagonal lattice. The transformation leaves invariant the ground-state "fixed-point" wave function of the string-net condensed phase. Our construction also produces an exact representation of the wave function in terms of the multi-scale entanglement renormalization ansatz (MERA). This sets the stage for efficient numerical simulations of string-net models using MERA algorithms. It also provides an explicit quantum circuit to prepare the string-net ground-state wave function using a quantum computer.

  14. Analysis, Design and Development of a Generic Framework for Power Trading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in their producing plans (e.g. wind power plant). The bid model is the best model for clients with units havingAnalysis, Design and Development of a Generic Framework for Power Trading Rasmus Skovmark, s001509 analysis, design and development of a generic framework for automatic real- time trading of power among

  15. Developing a Regional Recovery Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesperance, Ann M.; Olson, Jarrod; Stein, Steven L.; Clark, Rebecca; Kelly, Heather; Sheline, Jim; Tietje, Grant; Williamson, Mark; Woodcock, Jody

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract A biological attack would present an unprecedented challenge for local, state, and federal agencies; the military; the private sector; and individuals on many fronts ranging from vaccination and treatment to prioritization of cleanup actions to waste disposal. To prepare the Seattle region to recover from a biological attack, the Seattle Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI) partners collaborated with military and federal agencies to develop a Regional Recovery Framework for a Biological Attack in the Seattle Urban Area. The goal was to reduce the time and resources required to recover and restore wide urban areas, military installations, and other critical infrastructure following a biological incident by providing a coordinated systems approach. Based on discussions in small workshops, tabletop exercises, and interviews with emergency response agency staff, the partners identified concepts of operation for various areas to address critical issues the region will face as recovery progresses. Key to this recovery is the recovery of the economy. Although the Framework is specific to a catastrophic, wide-area biological attack using anthrax, it was designed to be flexible and scalable so it could also serve as the recovery framework for an all-hazards approach. The Framework also served to coalesce policy questions that must be addressed for long-term recovery. These questions cover such areas as safety and health, security, financial management, waste management, legal issues, and economic development.

  16. UTS Policy Framework: Introduction 11.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Technology, Sydney

    UTS Policy Framework: user guide Contents Introduction 11. TheroleofpolicywithintheUniversity 12 Policytemplate 64kbWord Directivetemplate 64kbWord Coversheets Coversheet--policies 48kbWord Coversheet--academicpolicies 48kbWord Coversheet--directives 48kbWord Policy Tools PolicyTool1:IssuesLog 60kbWord PolicyTool2

  17. Mapping the energy and diffusion landscapes of membrane proteins at the cell surface using high-density single-molecule imaging and Bayesian inference: application to the multi-scale dynamics of glycine receptors in the neuronal membrane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masson, Jean-Baptiste; Salvatico, Charlotte; Renner, Marianne; Specht, Christian G; Triller, Antoine; Dahan, Maxime

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Protein mobility is conventionally analyzed in terms of an effective diffusion. Yet, this description often fails to properly distinguish and evaluate the physical parameters (such as the membrane friction) and the biochemical interactions governing the motion. Here, we present a method combining high-density single-molecule imaging and statistical inference to separately map the diffusion and energy landscapes of membrane proteins across the cell surface at ~100 nm resolution (with acquisition of a few minutes). When applying these analytical tools to glycine neurotransmitter receptors (GlyRs) at inhibitory synapses, we find that gephyrin scaffolds act as shallow energy traps (~3 kBT) for GlyRs, with a depth modulated by the biochemical properties of the receptor-gephyrin interaction loop. In turn, the inferred maps can be used to simulate the dynamics of proteins in the membrane, from the level of individual receptors to that of the population, and thereby, to model the stochastic fluctuations of physiologi...

  18. The impact of including water constraints on food production within a CGE framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Jonathan (Jonathan Early)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research explores the long-term relationship between water resources, irrigated land use change and crop production within a computable general equilibrium modeling framework. The modeling approach is developed on a ...

  19. Framework for SCADA Security Policy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Electrical Resistivity Structure | Department ofFramework for

  20. Multiscale modeling for fluid transport in nanosystems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Jonathan W.; Jones, Reese E.; Mandadapu, Kranthi Kiran; Templeton, Jeremy Alan; Zimmerman, Jonathan A.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomistic-scale behavior drives performance in many micro- and nano-fluidic systems, such as mircrofludic mixers and electrical energy storage devices. Bringing this information into the traditionally continuum models used for engineering analysis has proved challenging. This work describes one such approach to address this issue by developing atomistic-to-continuum multi scale and multi physics methods to enable molecular dynamics (MD) representations of atoms to incorporated into continuum simulations. Coupling is achieved by imposing constraints based on fluxes of conserved quantities between the two regions described by one of these models. The impact of electric fields and surface charges are also critical, hence, methodologies to extend finite-element (FE) MD electric field solvers have been derived to account for these effects. Finally, the continuum description can have inconsistencies with the coarse-grained MD dynamics, so FE equations based on MD statistics were derived to facilitate the multi scale coupling. Examples are shown relevant to nanofluidic systems, such as pore flow, Couette flow, and electric double layer.

  1. A Generic Auto-Provisioning Framework for Cloud Databases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's operational cost, estimated based on the IaaS provider's pricing model, while sat- isfying QoS expectations to avoid up-front capital expenses and reduce cost of ownership over time. DBMSs are good candidates framework that identifies a collection of minimum-cost infrastructure resources (i.e., a set of po

  2. A FRAMEWORK TO DESIGN AND OPTIMIZE CHEMICAL FLOODING PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mojdeh Delshad; Gary A. Pope; Kamy Sepehrnoori

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this proposed research is to provide an efficient and user friendly simulation framework for screening and optimizing chemical/microbial enhanced oil recovery processes. The framework will include (1) a user friendly interface to identify the variables that have the most impact on oil recovery using the concept of experimental design and response surface maps, (2) UTCHEM reservoir simulator to perform the numerical simulations, and (3) an economic model that automatically imports the simulation production data to evaluate the profitability of a particular design. Such a reservoir simulation framework is not currently available to the oil industry. The objectives of Task 1 are to develop three primary modules representing reservoir, chemical, and well data. The modules will be interfaced with an already available experimental design model. The objective of the Task 2 is to incorporate UTCHEM reservoir simulator and the modules with the strategic variables and developing the response surface maps to identify the significant variables from each module. The objective of the Task 3 is to develop the economic model designed specifically for the chemical processes targeted in this proposal and interface the economic model with UTCHEM production output. Task 4 is on the validation of the framework and performing simulations of oil reservoirs to screen, design and optimize the chemical processes.

  3. A Framework to Design and Optimize Chemical Flooding Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mojdeh Delshad; Gary A. Pope; Kamy Sepehrnoori

    2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this proposed research is to provide an efficient and user friendly simulation framework for screening and optimizing chemical/microbial enhanced oil recovery processes. The framework will include (1) a user friendly interface to identify the variables that have the most impact on oil recovery using the concept of experimental design and response surface maps, (2) UTCHEM reservoir simulator to perform the numerical simulations, and (3) an economic model that automatically imports the simulation production data to evaluate the profitability of a particular design. Such a reservoir simulation framework is not currently available to the oil industry. The objectives of Task 1 are to develop three primary modules representing reservoir, chemical, and well data. The modules will be interfaced with an already available experimental design model. The objective of the Task 2 is to incorporate UTCHEM reservoir simulator and the modules with the strategic variables and developing the response surface maps to identify the significant variables from each module. The objective of the Task 3 is to develop the economic model designed specifically for the chemical processes targeted in this proposal and interface the economic model with UTCHEM production output. Task 4 is on the validation of the framework and performing simulations of oil reservoirs to screen, design and optimize the chemical processes.

  4. A FRAMEWORK TO DESIGN AND OPTIMIZE CHEMICAL FLOODING PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mojdeh Delshad; Gary A. Pope; Kamy Sepehrnoori

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this proposed research is to provide an efficient and user friendly simulation framework for screening and optimizing chemical/microbial enhanced oil recovery processes. The framework will include (1) a user friendly interface to identify the variables that have the most impact on oil recovery using the concept of experimental design and response surface maps, (2) UTCHEM reservoir simulator to perform the numerical simulations, and (3) an economic model that automatically imports the simulation production data to evaluate the profitability of a particular design. Such a reservoir simulation framework is not currently available to the oil industry. The objectives of Task 1 are to develop three primary modules representing reservoir, chemical, and well data. The modules will be interfaced with an already available experimental design model. The objective of the Task 2 is to incorporate UTCHEM reservoir simulator and the modules with the strategic variables and developing the response surface maps to identify the significant variables from each module. The objective of the Task 3 is to develop the economic model designed specifically for the chemical processes targeted in this proposal and interface the economic model with UTCHEM production output. Task 4 is on the validation of the framework and performing simulations of oil reservoirs to screen, design and optimize the chemical processes.

  5. Feature identification framework and applications (FIFA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Audenaert, Michael Neal

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    collections that provides a general framework for applications while allowing decisions about the details of document representation and features identification to be deferred to domain specific implementations of that framework. These deferred decisions...

  6. Gas adsorption on metal-organic frameworks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Willis, Richard R. (Cary, IL); Low, John J. (Schaumburg, IL), Faheem, Syed A. (Huntley, IL); Benin, Annabelle I. (Oak Forest, IL); Snurr, Randall Q. (Evanston, IL); Yazaydin, Ahmet Ozgur (Evanston, IL)

    2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention involves the use of certain metal organic frameworks that have been treated with water or another metal titrant in the storage of carbon dioxide. The capacity of these frameworks is significantly increased through this treatment.

  7. Technology Enhanced Interaction Framework Kewalin Angkananon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technology Enhanced Interaction Framework Kewalin Angkananon ECS University of Southampton interaction framework to help design technology to support communication between people and improve interactions between people, technology and objects, particularly in complex situations. A review of existing

  8. Framework for Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Framework for Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity Version 1.0 National Institute of Standards and Technology February 12, 2014 #12;February 12, 2014 Cybersecurity Framework Version 1.0 Table............................................................................................................. 20 ii #12;February 12, 2014 Cybersecurity Framework Version 1.0 Executive Summary The national

  9. ANDREA BRAIDES Multi-scale Problems for Lattice Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braides, Andrea

    : derive E(u) = X ij f ij(ui, uj) indexed on a scaled lattice (e.g., Zd ) Identification: identify u.g., Zd ) Identification: identify u with some continuous parameter (e.g., its piecewise: Continuous limits of ferromagnetic energies Bulk scaling: (mixtures of ground states) E(u) = - X d uiuj - Z

  10. Integrating Learning in a Multi-Scale Agent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Ben

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Keywords Context Conditions and Success Tests . Managers inpreconditions, context conditions, and success tests. Inthat specify conditions for success and context conditions

  11. Multi-scale scratching in chemical-mechanical polishing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eusner, Thor

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the fabrication of ultra-large-scale integrated (ULSI) semiconductor devices, the chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) process is extensively employed. During the CMP process, undesirable scratches are produced on Cu ...

  12. Multi-Scale, Sustainable Reaction Engineering - A New Departmental Initiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennis, John

    2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    chemical looping combustion would be comparable with a conventional IGCC plant Departmental Research: Combining in situ gasification of SOLID fuels with CuO based oxygen carrier for clean coal utilisation J. Dennis, S. Scott Suitable for range of scales...

  13. 6, 11111163, 2009 A multi-scale "soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Recherche Ile de France, 93143, Bondy, France 2 Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Purdue University, the physical interaction between the water film surrounding the solid particles of the soil structure

  14. Fast Decentralized Averaging via Multi-Scale Gossip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 McGill University, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Montreal, QC, Canada, konstantinos.tsianos@gmail.com 2 McGill University, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Montreal often demand that nodes cooperatively accom- plish a task without centralized coordination. Autonomy

  15. Cryptic Faulting and Multi-Scale Geothermal Fluid Connections...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to provide high temperatures at the Dixie Valley field, includinga component of magmatic fluids consistent with recent He isotope studies and the existence of hot springs...

  16. 111:20141023.1435 Magnetospheric MultiScale Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    impact modern technological systems such as communications networks, GPS navigation, and electrical power velocities, as well as electric and magnetic fields, with the unprecedented time resolution and accuracy organizations involved: ·NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) ·Southwest Research Institute (Sw

  17. Multi-Scale Characterization of Improved Algae Strains

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F S i DOEToward a Peaceful Nuclear FutureSlide 1 DOE Bioenergy

  18. A Multiobjective Performance Evaluation Framework for Routing in Wireless Ad Hoc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A Multiobjective Performance Evaluation Framework for Routing in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks Katia.runser, jean-marie.gorce@insa-lyon.fr Abstract--Wireless ad hoc networks are seldom characterized by one single. Instead, we address this problem by proposing a new modeling framework for routing in ad hoc networks

  19. Money and risk aversion in a DSGE framework: a bayesian application to the Euro zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Money and risk aversion in a DSGE framework: a bayesian application to the Euro zone Jonathan zone, with a spe- cial emphasis on the role of money. The model follows the New Keynesian DSGE framework, money being introduced in the utility function with a non-separability assumption. By using

  20. Synthesis and Properties of Nano Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Properties of Nano Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks. Synthesis and Properties of Nano Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks. Abstract: Nano sized zeolitic imidazolate frameworks nZIF-8...

  1. Kevoree Modeling Framework (KMF): Efficient modeling techniques for runtime use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ´ez´equel3 1 University of Luxembourg Interdisciplinary Center for Security, Reliability and Trust (Sn with a specific DSML for cloud are extensively exchanged, cloned and compared in order to manage the maintenance

  2. Simulation framework for intelligent transportation systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ewing, T.; Doss, E.; Hanebutte, U.; Tentner, A.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simulation framework has been developed for a large-scale, comprehensive, scaleable simulation of an Intelligent Transportation System (ITS). The simulator is designed for running on parallel computers and distributed (networked) computer systems, but can run on standalone workstations for smaller simulations. The simulator currently models instrumented smart vehicles with in-vehicle navigation units capable of optimal route planning and Traffic Management Centers (TMC). The TMC has probe vehicle tracking capabilities (display position and attributes of instrumented vehicles), and can provide two-way interaction with traffic to provide advisories and link times. Both the in-vehicle navigation module and the TMC feature detailed graphical user interfaces to support human-factors studies. Realistic modeling of variations of the posted driving speed are based on human factors studies that take into consideration weather, road conditions, driver personality and behavior, and vehicle type. The prototype has been developed on a distributed system of networked UNIX computers but is designed to run on parallel computers, such as ANL`s IBM SP-2, for large-scale problems. A novel feature of the approach is that vehicles are represented by autonomous computer processes which exchange messages with other processes. The vehicles have a behavior model which governs route selection and driving behavior, and can react to external traffic events much like real vehicles. With this approach, the simulation is scaleable to take advantage of emerging massively parallel processor (MPP) systems.

  3. Development of long-term performance models for radioactive waste forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bacon, Diana H.; Pierce, Eric M.

    2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The long-term performance of solid radioactive waste is measured by the release rate of radionuclides into the environment, which depends on corrosion or weathering rates of the solid waste form. The reactions involved depend on the characteristics of the solid matrix containing the radioactive waste, the radionuclides of interest, and their interaction with surrounding geologic materials. This chapter describes thermo-hydro-mechanical and reactive transport models related to the long-term performance of solid radioactive waste forms, including metal, ceramic, glass, steam reformer and cement. Future trends involving Monte-Carlo simulations and coupled/multi-scale process modeling are also discussed.

  4. A surety engineering framework to reduce cognitive systems risks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caudell, Thomas P. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Peercy, David Eugene; Caldera, Eva O. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Shaneyfelt, Wendy L.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cognitive science research investigates the advancement of human cognition and neuroscience capabilities. Addressing risks associated with these advancements can counter potential program failures, legal and ethical issues, constraints to scientific research, and product vulnerabilities. Survey results, focus group discussions, cognitive science experts, and surety researchers concur technical risks exist that could impact cognitive science research in areas such as medicine, privacy, human enhancement, law and policy, military applications, and national security (SAND2006-6895). This SAND report documents a surety engineering framework and a process for identifying cognitive system technical, ethical, legal and societal risks and applying appropriate surety methods to reduce such risks. The framework consists of several models: Specification, Design, Evaluation, Risk, and Maturity. Two detailed case studies are included to illustrate the use of the process and framework. Several Appendices provide detailed information on existing cognitive system architectures; ethical, legal, and societal risk research; surety methods and technologies; and educing information research with a case study vignette. The process and framework provide a model for how cognitive systems research and full-scale product development can apply surety engineering to reduce perceived and actual risks.

  5. ITL BULLETIN FOR NOVEMBER 2013 ITL RELEASES PRELIMINARY CYBERSECURITY FRAMEWORK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ITL BULLETIN FOR NOVEMBER 2013 ITL RELEASES PRELIMINARY CYBERSECURITY FRAMEWORK The Information a Preliminary Cybersecurity Framework for public review and comment. ITL developed the framework based is developing the framework under Executive Order 13636, Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity, which

  6. Developpement WebFrameworks AJAX Developpement Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richer, Jean-Michel

    D´eveloppement WebFrameworks AJAX D´eveloppement Web Frameworks AJAX Jean-Michel Richer jean-michel.richer@univ-angers.fr http://www.info.univ-angers.fr/pub/richer 2009 1 / 27 #12;D´eveloppement WebFrameworks AJAX Objectif d´eveloppement Web et augmenter l'interactivit´e avec l'utilisateur 2 / 27 #12;D´eveloppement Web

  7. A Framework for Comparative Assessments of Energy Efficiency Policy Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blum, Helcio; Atkinson, Barbara; Lekov, Alex

    2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    When policy makers propose new policies, there is a need to assess the costs and benefits of the proposed policy measures, to compare them to existing and alternative policies, and to rank them according to their effectiveness. In the case of equipment energy efficiency regulations, comparing the effects of a range of alternative policy measures requires evaluating their effects on consumers’ budgets, on national energy consumption and economics, and on the environment. Such an approach should be able to represent in a single framework the particularities of each policy measure and provide comparable results. This report presents an integrated methodological framework to assess prospectively the energy, economic, and environmental impacts of energy efficiency policy measures. The framework builds on the premise that the comparative assessment of energy efficiency policy measures should (a) rely on a common set of primary data and parameters, (b) follow a single functional approach to estimate the energy, economic, and emissions savings resulting from each assessed measure, and (c) present results through a set of comparable indicators. This framework elaborates on models that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has used in support of its rulemakings on mandatory energy efficiency standards. In addition to a rigorous analysis of the impacts of mandatory standards, DOE compares the projected results of alternative policy measures to those projected to be achieved by the standards. The framework extends such an approach to provide a broad, generic methodology, with no geographic or sectoral limitations, that is useful for evaluating any type of equipment energy efficiency market intervention. The report concludes with a demonstration of how to use the framework to compare the impacts estimated for twelve policy measures focusing on increasing the energy efficiency of gas furnaces in the United States.

  8. Power transmission investment analysis: a new financial Evaluation framework for South Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maboke, Silky Ntombifuthi; Kachienga, Michael Ogembo

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A proposed framework for power transmission expansion projects in South Africa incorporates the modeling of project options and uncertainties, Monte Carlo simulations, real option analysis, and decision analysis, based on a foundation of strategic analysis. (author)

  9. Initial Risk Analysis and Decision Making Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, David W.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercialization of new carbon capture simulation initiative (CCSI) technology will include two key elements of risk management, namely, technical risk (will process and plant performance be effective, safe, and reliable) and enterprise risk (can project losses and costs be controlled within the constraints of market demand to maintain profitability and investor confidence). Both of these elements of risk are incorporated into the risk analysis subtask of Task 7. Thus far, this subtask has developed a prototype demonstration tool that quantifies risk based on the expected profitability of expenditures when retrofitting carbon capture technology on a stylized 650 MW pulverized coal electric power generator. The prototype is based on the selection of specific technical and financial factors believed to be important determinants of the expected profitability of carbon capture, subject to uncertainty. The uncertainty surrounding the technical performance and financial variables selected thus far is propagated in a model that calculates the expected profitability of investments in carbon capture and measures risk in terms of variability in expected net returns from these investments. Given the preliminary nature of the results of this prototype, additional work is required to expand the scope of the model to include additional risk factors, additional information on extant and proposed risk factors, the results of a qualitative risk factor elicitation process, and feedback from utilities and other interested parties involved in the carbon capture project. Additional information on proposed distributions of these risk factors will be integrated into a commercial implementation framework for the purpose of a comparative technology investment analysis.

  10. A Conceptual Framework for Progressing Towards Sustainability...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Progressing Towards Sustainability in the Agriculture and Food Sector Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: A Conceptual Framework for Progressing Towards...

  11. Appropriate use of Green Manufacturing Frameworks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Vijayaraghavan, Athulan; Dornfeld, David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Implementing Green Manufacturing,” Trans. North AmericanAppropriate use of Green Manufacturing Frameworks C. Reich-for sustainable or green manufacturing systems and products,

  12. Draft Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Technology (NIST) released a Cybersecurity Framework. DOE has collaborated with private sector stakeholders through the Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council (ESCC)...

  13. A Surrogate Management Framework Using Rigorous Trust ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 24, 2011 ... gate management frameworks, both in algorithmic design and in the ... Part of this work was developed while this author was visiting.

  14. Gas sensor incorporating a porous framework

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M; Czaja, Alexander U; Wang, Bo; Galatsis, Kosmas; Wang, Kang L; Furukawa, Hiroyasu

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure provides sensor for gas sensing including CO.sub.2 gas sensors comprising a porous framework sensing area for binding an analyte gas.

  15. Preparation of metal-catecholate frameworks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaghi, Omar M.; Gandara-Barragan, Felipe; Lu, Zheng; Wan, Shun

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure provides for metal catecholate frameworks, and methods of use thereof, including gas separation, gas storage, catalysis, tunable conductors, supercapacitors, and sensors.

  16. Gas sensor incorporating a porous framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaghi, Omar M.; Czaja, Alexander U.; Wang, Bo; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Galatsis, Kosmas; Wang, Kang L.

    2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure provides sensor for gas sensing including CO.sub.2 gas sensors comprising a porous framework sensing area for binding an analyte gas.

  17. Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework Recognized at National...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF) is bringing together the bioenergy community through Web-based tools, and was presented by Bioenergy KDF team members from Oak Ridge National...

  18. Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    JANUARY 2015 ENERGY SECTOR CYBERSECURITY FRAMEWORK IMPLEMENTATION GUIDANCE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF ELECTRICITY DELIVERY AND ENERGY RELIABILITY Energy Sector...

  19. Energy Sector Cybersecurity Framework Implementation Guidance...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technology (NIST) released a Cybersecurity Framework. DOE has collaborated with private sector stakeholders through the Electricity Subsector Coordinating Council (ESCC) and the...

  20. Demand Response Valuation Frameworks Paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heffner, Grayson

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While there is general agreement that demand response (DR) is a valued component in a utility resource plan, there is a lack of consensus regarding how to value DR. Establishing the value of DR is a prerequisite to determining how much and what types of DR should be implemented, to which customers DR should be targeted, and a key determinant that drives the development of economically viable DR consumer technology. Most approaches for quantifying the value of DR focus on changes in utility system revenue requirements based on resource plans with and without DR. This ''utility centric'' approach does not assign any value to DR impacts that lower energy and capacity prices, improve reliability, lower system and network operating costs, produce better air quality, and provide improved customer choice and control. Proper valuation of these benefits requires a different basis for monetization. The review concludes that no single methodology today adequately captures the wide range of benefits and value potentially attributed to DR. To provide a more comprehensive valuation approach, current methods such as the Standard Practice Method (SPM) will most likely have to be supplemented with one or more alternative benefit-valuation approaches. This report provides an updated perspective on the DR valuation framework. It includes an introduction and four chapters that address the key elements of demand response valuation, a comprehensive literature review, and specific research recommendations.

  1. Data Assimilation Tools for CO2 Reservoir Model Development – A Review of Key Data Types, Analyses, and Selected Software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rockhold, Mark L.; Sullivan, E. C.; Murray, Christopher J.; Last, George V.; Black, Gary D.

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has embarked on an initiative to develop world-class capabilities for performing experimental and computational analyses associated with geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide. The ultimate goal of this initiative is to provide science-based solutions for helping to mitigate the adverse effects of greenhouse gas emissions. This Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) initiative currently has two primary focus areas—advanced experimental methods and computational analysis. The experimental methods focus area involves the development of new experimental capabilities, supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory (EMSL) housed at PNNL, for quantifying mineral reaction kinetics with CO2 under high temperature and pressure (supercritical) conditions. The computational analysis focus area involves numerical simulation of coupled, multi-scale processes associated with CO2 sequestration in geologic media, and the development of software to facilitate building and parameterizing conceptual and numerical models of subsurface reservoirs that represent geologic repositories for injected CO2. This report describes work in support of the computational analysis focus area. The computational analysis focus area currently consists of several collaborative research projects. These are all geared towards the development and application of conceptual and numerical models for geologic sequestration of CO2. The software being developed for this focus area is referred to as the Geologic Sequestration Software Suite or GS3. A wiki-based software framework is being developed to support GS3. This report summarizes work performed in FY09 on one of the LDRD projects in the computational analysis focus area. The title of this project is Data Assimilation Tools for CO2 Reservoir Model Development. Some key objectives of this project in FY09 were to assess the current state-of-the-art in reservoir model development, the data types and analyses that need to be performed in order to develop and parameterize credible and robust reservoir simulation models, and to review existing software that is applicable to these analyses. This report describes this effort and highlights areas in which additional software development, wiki application extensions, or related GS3 infrastructure development may be warranted.

  2. Cellular Energy Efficiency Evaluation Framework (Invited Paper)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Paul

    Cellular Energy Efficiency Evaluation Framework (Invited Paper) Gunther Auer, Vito Giannini, Istv, the power consumption of the entire system needs to be captured and an appropriate energy efficiency evaluation frameworks are discussed, such that the energy efficiency of the entire network comprising

  3. Freight Analysis Framework version 3 (FAF3)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freight Analysis Framework version 3 (FAF3) Oak Ridge National Laboratory managed by UT Technologies Research Brief T he Freight Analysis Framework version 3 (FAF3) database is a Federal Highway data to enable users to perform train analysis. FAF3 Geography Figure 1 shows the analysis regions

  4. A FRAMEWORK FOR MEASURING SUPERCOMPUTER PRODUCTIVITY1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bader, David A.

    A FRAMEWORK FOR MEASURING SUPERCOMPUTER PRODUCTIVITY1 10/30/2003 Marc Snir2 and David A. Bader3 Abstract We propose a framework for measuring the productivity of High Performance Computing (HPC) systems, based on common economic definitions of productivity and on Utility Theory. We discuss how

  5. UNITED NATIONS FRAMEWORK CONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    UNITED NATIONS FRAMEWORK CONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE UNITED NATIONS 1992 FCCC/INFORMAL/84 GE.05-62220 (E) 200705 #12;UNITED NATIONS FRAMEWORK CONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE The Parties to this Convention in predictions of climate change, particularly with regard to the timing, magnitude and regional patterns thereof

  6. Bibliography on Logical Frameworks Frank Pfenning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfenning, Frank

    is a formal meta-language for deductive systems. The pri* *mary tasks sup- ported in logical frameworks, New Jersey, Jul* *y 1996. IEEE Computer Society Press. [7]Penny Anderson. Program Derivation as Technical Report CMU-CS-93-206. [8]Penny Anderson. Program extraction in a logical framework setting

  7. Argonne simulation framework for intelligent transportation systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ewing, T.; Doss, E.; Hanebutte, U.; Canfield, T.; Brown-VanHoozer, A.; Tentner, A.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simulation framework has been developed which defines a high-level architecture for a large-scale, comprehensive, scalable simulation of an Intelligent Transportation System (ITS). The simulator is designed to run on parallel computers and distributed (networked) computer systems; however, a version for a stand alone workstation is also available. The ITS simulator includes an Expert Driver Model (EDM) of instrumented ``smart`` vehicles with in-vehicle navigation units. The EDM is capable of performing optimal route planning and communicating with Traffic Management Centers (TMC). A dynamic road map data base is sued for optimum route planning, where the data is updated periodically to reflect any changes in road or weather conditions. The TMC has probe vehicle tracking capabilities (display position and attributes of instrumented vehicles), and can provide 2-way interaction with traffic to provide advisories and link times. Both the in-vehicle navigation module and the TMC feature detailed graphical user interfaces that includes human-factors studies to support safety and operational research. Realistic modeling of variations of the posted driving speed are based on human factor studies that take into consideration weather, road conditions, driver`s personality and behavior and vehicle type. The simulator has been developed on a distributed system of networked UNIX computers, but is designed to run on ANL`s IBM SP-X parallel computer system for large scale problems. A novel feature of the developed simulator is that vehicles will be represented by autonomous computer processes, each with a behavior model which performs independent route selection and reacts to external traffic events much like real vehicles. Vehicle processes interact with each other and with ITS components by exchanging messages. With this approach, one will be able to take advantage of emerging massively parallel processor (MPP) systems.

  8. Use of ARM observations and numerical models to determine radiative and latent heating profiles of mesoscale convective systems for general circulation models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Houze, Robert, A., Jr.; Zeng, Xiping

    2013-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This three-year project, in cooperation with Professor Bob Houze at University of Washington, has been successfully finished as planned. Both ARM (the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program) data and cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations were used to identify the water budgets of clouds observed in two international field campaigns. The research results achieved shed light on several key processes of clouds in climate change (or general circulation models), which are summarized below. 1. Revealed the effect of mineral dust on mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) Two international field campaigns near a desert and a tropical coast provided unique data to drive and evaluate CRM simulations, which are TWP-ICE (the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment) and AMMA (the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis). Studies of the two campaign data were contrasted, revealing that much mineral dust can bring about large MCSs via ice nucleation and clouds. This result was reported as a PI presentation in the 3rd ASR Science Team meeting held in Arlington, Virginia in March 2012. A paper on the studies was published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences (Zeng et al. 2013). 2. Identified the effect of convective downdrafts on ice crystal concentration Using the large-scale forcing data from TWP-ICE, ARM-SGP (the Southern Great Plains) and other field campaigns, Goddard CRM simulations were carried out in comparison with radar and satellite observations. The comparison between model and observations revealed that convective downdrafts could increase ice crystal concentration by up to three or four orders, which is a key to quantitatively represent the indirect effects of ice nuclei, a kind of aerosol, on clouds and radiation in the Tropics. This result was published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences (Zeng et al. 2011) and summarized in the DOE/ASR Research Highlights Summaries (see http://www.arm.gov/science/highlights/RMjY5/view). 3. Used radar observations to evaluate model simulations In cooperation with Profs. Bob Houze at University of Washington and Steven Rutledge at Colorado State University, numerical model results were evaluated with observations from W- and C-band radars and CloudSat/TRMM satellites. These studies exhibited some shortcomings of current numerical models, such as too little of thin anvil clouds, directing the future improvement of cloud microphysics parameterization in CRMs. Two papers of Powell et al (2012) and Zeng et al. (2013), summarizing these studies, were published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences. 4. Analyzed the water budgets of MCSs Using ARM data from TWP-ICE, ARM-SGP and other field campaigns, the Goddard CRM simulations were carried out to analyze the water budgets of clouds from TWP-ICE and AMMA. The simulations generated a set of datasets on clouds and radiation, which are available http://cloud.gsfc.nasa.gov/. The cloud datasets were available for modelers and other researchers aiming to improve the representation of cloud processes in multi-scale modeling frameworks, GCMs and climate models. Special datasets, such as 3D cloud distributions every six minutes for TWP-ICE, were requested and generated for ARM/ASR investigators. Data server records show that 86,206 datasets were downloaded by 120 users between April of 2010 and January of 2012. 5. MMF simulations The Goddard MMF (multi-scale modeling framework) has been improved by coupling with the Goddard Land Information System (LIS) and the Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 (GOES5). It has also been optimized on NASA HEC supercomputers and can be run over 4000 CPUs. The improved MMF with high horizontal resolution (1 x 1 degree) is currently being applied to cases covering 2005 and 2006. The results show that the spatial distribution pattern of precipitation rate is well simulated by the MMF through comparisons with satellite retrievals from the CMOPRH and GPCP data sets. In addition, the MMF results were compared with three reanalyses (MERRA, ERA-Interim and CFSR). Although the MMF tends

  9. Exponential scaling limit of the single-particle Anderson model via adaptive feedback scaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor Chulaevsky

    2015-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a reformulation of the bootstrap version of the Multi-Scale Analysis (BMSA), developed by Germinet and Klein, to make explicit the fact that BMSA implies asymptotically exponential decay of eigenfunctions (EFs) and of EF correlators (EFCs), in the lattice Anderson models with diagonal disorder, viz. with an IID random potential. We also show that the exponential scaling limit of EFs and EFCs holds true for a class of marginal distributions of the random potential with regularity lower than H\\"older continuity of any positive order.

  10. STFC Economic Impact Reporting Framework 2009/10 Economic Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STFC Economic Impact Reporting Framework 2009/10 Economic Impact Reporting Framework 2009/10 #12;STFC Economic Impact Reporting Framework 2009/10 Economic Impact Reporting Framework 2009/10 #12;STFC Economic Impact Reporting Framework 2009/10 1 Contents: Introduction

  11. HistFitter software framework for statistical data analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Baak; G. J. Besjes; D. Cote; A. Koutsman; J. Lorenz; D. Short

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a software framework for statistical data analysis, called HistFitter, that has been used extensively by the ATLAS Collaboration to analyze big datasets originating from proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. Since 2012 HistFitter has been the standard statistical tool in searches for supersymmetric particles performed by ATLAS. HistFitter is a programmable and flexible framework to build, book-keep, fit, interpret and present results of data models of nearly arbitrary complexity. Starting from an object-oriented configuration, defined by users, the framework builds probability density functions that are automatically fitted to data and interpreted with statistical tests. A key innovation of HistFitter is its design, which is rooted in core analysis strategies of particle physics. The concepts of control, signal and validation regions are woven into its very fabric. These are progressively treated with statistically rigorous built-in methods. Being capable of working with multiple data models at once, HistFitter introduces an additional level of abstraction that allows for easy bookkeeping, manipulation and testing of large collections of signal hypotheses. Finally, HistFitter provides a collection of tools to present results with publication-quality style through a simple command-line interface.

  12. A framework for the assessment of severe accident management strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kastenberg, W.E. [ed.; Apostolakis, G.; Dhir, V.K. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering] [and others

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Severe accident management can be defined as the use of existing and/or altemative resources, systems and actors to prevent or mitigate a core-melt accident. For each accident sequence and each combination of severe accident management strategies, there may be several options available to the operator, and each involves phenomenological and operational considerations regarding uncertainty. Operational uncertainties include operator, system and instrumentation behavior during an accident. A framework based on decision trees and influence diagrams has been developed which incorporates such criteria as feasibility, effectiveness, and adverse effects, for evaluating potential severe accident management strategies. The framework is also capable of propagating both data and model uncertainty. It is applied to several potential strategies including PWR cavity flooding, BWR drywell flooding, PWR depressurization and PWR feed and bleed.

  13. Framework Application for Core Edge Transport Simulation (FACETS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Allen D. Malony; Dr. Sameer S. Shende; Dr. Kevin A. Huck; Mr. Alan Morris, and Mr. Wyatt Spear

    2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the FACETS project (Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations) was to provide a multiphysics, parallel framework application (FACETS) that will enable whole-device modeling for the U.S. fusion program, to provide the modeling infrastructure needed for ITER, the next step fusion confinement device. Through use of modern computational methods, including component technology and object oriented design, FACETS is able to switch from one model to another for a given aspect of the physics in a flexible manner. This enables use of simplified models for rapid turnaround or high-fidelity models that can take advantage of the largest supercomputer hardware. FACETS does so in a heterogeneous parallel context, where different parts of the application execute in parallel by utilizing task farming, domain decomposition, and/or pipelining as needed and applicable. ParaTools, Inc. was tasked with supporting the performance analysis and tuning of the FACETS components and framework in order to achieve the parallel scaling goals of the project. The TAU Performance System�������������������������������® was used for instrumentation, measurement, archiving, and profile / tracing analysis. ParaTools, Inc. also assisted in FACETS performance engineering efforts. Through the use of the TAU Performance System, ParaTools provided instrumentation, measurement, analysis and archival support for the FACETS project. Performance optimization of key components has yielded significant performance speedups. TAU was integrated into the FACETS build for both the full coupled application and the UEDGE component. The performance database provided archival storage of the performance regression testing data generated by the project, and helped to track improvements in the software development.

  14. Constructibility review process framework for transportation facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liman, Majed

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Constructibility is the optimum use of construction knowledge and experience in planning, design, procurement, and field operations in order to achieve overall project objectives ("Constructibility: a primer" 1986). This Thesis presents a framework...

  15. Thiophene-based covalent organic frameworks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertrand, Guillaume

    We report the synthesis and characterization of covalent organic frameworks (COFs) incorporating thiophene-based building blocks. We show that these are amenable to reticular synthesis, and that bent ditopic monomers, such ...

  16. A flexible design framework for autonomous mowing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Justin (Justin A.)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work outlines the creation of a flexible design framework for autonomous mowing to meet changing customer needs and functionality across a spectrum of applications from residential areas to sport complexes. The thesis ...

  17. A global framework for scene gist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greene, Michelle R

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human observers are able to rapidly and accurately categorize natural scenes, but the representation mediating this feat is still unknown. Here we propose a framework of rapid scene categorization that does not segment a ...

  18. A Risk-Based System Analysis Framework for Geological Carbon Sequestration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobos, Peter H.; Klotz, Richard

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project was to characterize existing carbon capture and sequestration technologies at a high level, develop an analytical framework to help assess the technologies, and implement the framework in a system dynamics model. The first year of this project succeeded in characterizing existing technologies to help focus the analysis on power plants. The assessment also helped determine which technologies are largely accepted by the carbon capture research community as relatively proven technologies, discuss the salient performance metrics, and assess the associated economics. With this information, an analytical framework was developed to assess the technologies from a systems view perspective. With this framework, the Carbon Sequestration and Risk Model (CSR) was developed to assess performance and economic risk issues as they relate to global atmospheric CO2 concentration goals and single plant scale projects to characterize the economics of these systems.

  19. Collaborative study of GENIEfy Earth System Models using scripted database workflows in a Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. R. Price; Z. Jiao; I. I. Voutchkov; T. M. Lenton; G. Williams; D. J. Lunt; R. Marsh; P. J. Valdes; S. J. Cox; The Genie Team

    algorithms complement the component framework to provide a comprehensive toolset for Earth system modelling

  20. 1 of 9Submitted to IEEE Design & Test of Computers (22 March 2000 4:59 pm) Abstract: We propose a conceptual framework, called the Rugby Model, in which designs, design processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jantsch, Axel

    in 1983, the complexity in terms of transistor count has increased more than two orders of magnitude be studied. The model has similar objectives as the well known Y chart [1] but its scope is extended and Time. The behavioural domain of the Y chart is replaced with more restricted computation domain

  1. Conceptual Framework for Developing Resilience Metrics for the...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Conceptual Framework for Developing Resilience Metrics for the Electricity, Oil, and Gas Sectors in the United States (September 2014) Conceptual Framework for Developing...

  2. assessment framework: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Approach & Implementation Basically, the NAVTAG framework consist of three Hammerton, James 17 COMMENT Addressing a critique of the TEASI framework for invasive species risk...

  3. Deputy Secretary Poneman to Attend International Framework for...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to Attend International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation Meeting in Jordan Deputy Secretary Poneman to Attend International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation Meeting...

  4. International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation to Hold...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation to Hold Ministerial-Level Meeting Sept. 29 in Warsaw, Poland International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation to Hold...

  5. SciTech Connect: Metal-Organic Framework Templated Inorganic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Metal-Organic Framework Templated Inorganic Sorbents for Rapid and Efficient Extraction of Heavy Metals Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Metal-Organic Framework Templated...

  6. Recovery Act: Smart Grid Interoperability Standards and Framework...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Act: Smart Grid Interoperability Standards and Framework Recovery Act: Smart Grid Interoperability Standards and Framework May 18, 2009 Locke, Chu Announce Significant Steps in...

  7. A Holistic Framework for Environmental Flows Determination in Hydropower Contexts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Among the ecological science community, the consensus view is that the natural flow regime sustains the ecological integrity of river systems. This prevailing viewpoint by many environmental stakeholders has progressively led to increased pressure on hydropower dam owners to change plant operations to affect downstream river flows with the intention of providing better conditions for aquatic biological communities. Identifying the neccessary magnitude, frequency, duration, timing, or rate of change of stream flows to meet ecological needs in a hydropower context is challenging because the ecological responses to changes in flows may not be fully known, there are usually a multitude of competing users of flow, and implementing environmental flows usually comes at a price to energy production. Realistically, hydropower managers must develop a reduced set of goals that provide the most benefit to the identified ecological needs. As a part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Water Power Program, the Instream Flow Project (IFP) was carried out by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and Argon National Laboratory (ANL) as an attempt to develop tools aimed at defining environmental flow needs for hydropower operations. The application of these tools ranges from national to site-specific scales; thus, the utility of each tool will depend on various phases of the environmental flow process. Given the complexity and sheer volume of applications used to determine environmentally acceptable flows for hydropower, a framework is needed to organize efforts into a staged process dependent upon spatial, temporal, and functional attributes. By far, the predominant domain for determining environmental flows related to hydropower is within the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) relicensing process. This process can take multiple years and can be very expensive depending on the scale of each hydropower project. The utility of such a framework is that it can expedite the environmental flow process by 1) organizing data and applications to identify predictable relationships between flows and ecology, and 2) suggesting when and where tools should be used in the environmental flow process. In addition to regulatory procedures, a framework should also provide the coordination for a comprehensive research agenda to guide the science of environmental flows. This research program has further reaching benefits than just environmental flow determination by providing modeling applications, data, and geospatial layers to inform potential hydropower development. We address several objectives within this document that highlight the limitations of existing environmental flow paradigms and their applications to hydropower while presenting a new framework catered towards hydropower needs. Herein, we address the following objectives: 1) Provide a brief overview of the Natural Flow Regime paradigm and existing environmental flow frameworks that have been used to determine ecologically sensitive stream flows for hydropower operations. 2) Describe a new conceptual framework to aid in determining flows needed to meet ecological objectives with regard to hydropower operations. The framework is centralized around determining predictable relationships between flow and ecological responses. 3) Provide evidence of how efforts from ORNL, PNNL, and ANL have filled some of the gaps in this broader framework, and suggest how the framework can be used to set the stage for a research agenda for environmental flow.

  8. A flexible framework for secure and efficient program obfuscation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solis, John Hector

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we present a modular framework for constructing a secure and efficient program obfuscation scheme. Our approach, inspired by the obfuscation with respect to oracle machines model of [4], retains an interactive online protocol with an oracle, but relaxes the original computational and storage restrictions. We argue this is reasonable given the computational resources of modern personal devices. Furthermore, we relax the information-theoretic security requirement for computational security to utilize established cryptographic primitives. With this additional flexibility we are free to explore different cryptographic buildingblocks. Our approach combines authenticated encryption with private information retrieval to construct a secure program obfuscation framework. We give a formal specification of our framework, based on desired functionality and security properties, and provide an example instantiation. In particular, we implement AES in Galois/Counter Mode for authenticated encryption and the Gentry-Ramzan [13]constant communication-rate private information retrieval scheme. We present our implementation results and show that non-trivial sized programs can be realized, but scalability is quickly limited by computational overhead. Finally, we include a discussion on security considerations when instantiating specific modules.

  9. A Hierarchical Framework for Demand-Side Frequency Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moya, Christian; Zhang, Wei; Lian, Jianming; Kalsi, Karanjit

    2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    With large-scale plans to integrate renewable generation, more resources will be needed to compensate for the uncertainty associated with intermittent generation resources. Under such conditions, performing frequency control using only supply-side resources become not only prohibitively expensive but also technically difficult. It is therefore important to explore how a sufficient proportion of the loads could assume a routine role in frequency control to maintain the stability of the system at an acceptable cost. In this paper, a novel hierarchical decentralized framework for frequency based load control is proposed. The framework involves two decision layers. The top decision layer determines the optimal droop gain required from the aggregated load response on each bus using a robust decentralized control approach. The second layer consists of a large number of devices, which switch probabilistically during contingencies so that the aggregated power change matches the desired droop amount according to the updated gains. The proposed framework is based on the classical nonlinear multi-machine power system model, and can deal with timevarying system operating conditions while respecting the physical constraints of individual devices. Realistic simulation results based on a 68-bus system are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed strategy.

  10. An Economic Evaluation Framework for Assessing Renewable Energy Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL; Badiru, Adedeji B [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is becoming increasingly imperative to integrate renewable energy, such as solar and wind, into electricity generation due to increased regulations on air and water pollution and a sociopolitical desire to develop more clean energy sources. This increased spotlight on renewable energy requires evaluating competing projects using either conventional economic analysis techniques or other economics-based models and approaches in order to select a subset of the projects to be funded. Even then, there are reasons to suspect that techniques applied to renewable energy projects may result in decisions that will reject viable projects due to the use of a limited number of quantifiable and tangible attributes about the projects. This paper presents a framework for economic evaluation of renewable energy projects. The framework is based on a systems approach in which the processes within the entire network of the system, from generation to consumption, are accounted for. Furthermore, the framework uses the concept of fuzzy system to calculate the value of information under conditions of uncertainty.

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - artificial wetland modelling Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ecology 42 A simple hydrologic framework for simulating wetlands in climate and earth system models Summary: A simple hydrologic framework for simulating wetlands in climate and...

  12. EUROGRAPHICS 2011/ K. Bhler, A. Vilanova Medical Prize FEMONUM: A Framework for Whole Body Pregnant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boubekeur, Tamy

    and detailed models of human be- ings. This paper describes FEMONUM, a complete methodological framework computer graph- ics methods, such as surface reconstruction and physics-based computer animation to model which the phenomenon happens. For instance, in the particular case of digital dosimetry in human tissues

  13. Coordination on the MISO Interference Channel Using the Virtual SINR Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gesbert, David

    Coordination on the MISO Interference Channel Using the Virtual SINR Framework Randa Zakhour David;Outline Motivation Cooperation in multi-cell/link systems MISO IC System Model and Performance Measures Motivation Cooperation in multi-cell/link systems MISO IC System Model and Performance Measures Virtual SINR

  14. Part I. Ecological Sites and Soil Part II. A Framework for Soil and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on management (states) (1) (2) (3) (4) (6) (5) #12;State and transition models, by definition, include soil #12;Part II. Ecological sites and state and transition models: A framework for soil and vegetation dynamics and management #12;The soil survey is the foundation of the ecological site inventory process

  15. Quantum Matter-Photonics Framework: Analyses of Chemical Conversion Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Tapia

    2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A quantum Matter-Photonics framework is adapted to help scrutinize chemical reaction mechanisms and used to explore a process mapped from chemical tree topological model. The chemical concept of bond knitting/breaking is reformulated via partitioned base sets leading to an abstract and general quantum presentation. Pivotal roles are assigned to entanglement, coherence,de-coherence and Feshbach resonance quantum states that permit apprehend gating states in conversion processes. A view from above in the state energy eigenvalue ladder, belonging to full system spectra complement the standard view from ground state. A full quantum physical view supporting chemical change obtains.

  16. Framework Application for Core Edge Transport Simulation (FACETS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasheninnikov, Sergei; Pigarov, Alexander

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The FACETS (Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations) project of Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Program was aimed at providing a high-fidelity whole-tokamak modeling for the U.S. magnetic fusion energy program and ITER through coupling separate components for each of the core region, edge region, and wall, with realistic plasma particles and power sources and turbulent transport simulation. The project also aimed at developing advanced numerical algorithms, efficient implicit coupling methods, and software tools utilizing the leadership class computing facilities under Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR). The FACETS project was conducted by a multi-discipline, multi-institutional teams, the Lead PI was J.R. Cary (Tech-X Corp.). In the FACETS project, the Applied Plasma Theory Group at the MAE Department of UCSD developed the Wall and Plasma-Surface Interaction (WALLPSI) module, performed its validation against experimental data, and integrated it into the developed framework. WALLPSI is a one-dimensional, coarse grained, reaction/advection/diffusion code applied to each material boundary cell in the common modeling domain for a tokamak. It incorporates an advanced model for plasma particle transport and retention in the solid matter of plasma facing components, simulation of plasma heat power load handling, calculation of erosion/deposition, and simulation of synergistic effects in strong plasma-wall coupling.

  17. Multichannel framework for singular quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camblong, Horacio E., E-mail: camblong@usfca.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94117-1080 (United States); Epele, Luis N., E-mail: epele@fisica.unlp.edu.ar [Laboratorio de Física Teórica, Departamento de Física, IFLP, CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C.C. 67–1900 La Plata (Argentina); Fanchiotti, Huner, E-mail: huner@fisica.unlp.edu.ar [Laboratorio de Física Teórica, Departamento de Física, IFLP, CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C.C. 67–1900 La Plata (Argentina)] [Laboratorio de Física Teórica, Departamento de Física, IFLP, CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C.C. 67–1900 La Plata (Argentina); García Canal, Carlos A., E-mail: garcia@fisica.unlp.edu.ar [Laboratorio de Física Teórica, Departamento de Física, IFLP, CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C.C. 67–1900 La Plata (Argentina); Ordóñez, Carlos R., E-mail: ordonez@uh.edu [Department of Physics, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5506 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A multichannel S-matrix framework for singular quantum mechanics (SQM) subsumes the renormalization and self-adjoint extension methods and resolves its boundary-condition ambiguities. In addition to the standard channel accessible to a distant (“asymptotic”) observer, one supplementary channel opens up at each coordinate singularity, where local outgoing and ingoing singularity waves coexist. The channels are linked by a fully unitary S-matrix, which governs all possible scenarios, including cases with an apparent nonunitary behavior as viewed from asymptotic distances. -- Highlights: •A multichannel framework is proposed for singular quantum mechanics and analogues. •The framework unifies several established approaches for singular potentials. •Singular points are treated as new scattering channels. •Nonunitary asymptotic behavior is subsumed in a unitary multichannel S-matrix. •Conformal quantum mechanics and the inverse quartic potential are highlighted.

  18. Robust diffusion imaging framework for clinical studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maximov, Ivan I; Neuner, Irene; Shah, N Jon

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clinical diffusion imaging requires short acquisition times and good image quality to permit its use in various medical applications. In turn, these demands require the development of a robust and efficient post-processing framework in order to guarantee useful and reliable results. However, multiple artefacts abound in in vivo measurements; from either subject such as cardiac pulsation, bulk head motion, respiratory motion and involuntary tics and tremor, or imaging hardware related problems, such as table vibrations, etc. These artefacts can severely degrade the resulting images and render diffusion analysis difficult or impossible. In order to overcome these problems, we developed a robust and efficient framework enabling the use of initially corrupted images from a clinical study. At the heart of this framework is an improved least trimmed squares diffusion tensor estimation algorithm that works well with severely degraded datasets with low signal-to-noise ratio. This approach has been compared with other...

  19. ANTS: a new Collaborative Learning Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedro García Lopez; Robert Rallo Moya; Merce Gisbert; Antonio Gómez Skarmeta

    CSCW and MOO environments have played an important role in CSCL research. These multi-user community-ware frameworks enhance social interactions and shared experience and thus enabling new CSCL research. We however find some limitations in existing platforms: technology limitations and a lack of solid collaborative services. We present ANTS: a collaborative framework that aims to provide a solid foundation for CSCL applications. In one side, the framework is constructed on top of cutting-edge technologies like J2EE (EJB, JSP, Servlets), Notification services (Elvin, JMS) and XML. In the other side, ANTS provides solid CSCW services that make the system robust and extensible. We also present a concrete ANTS extension: JLE, a collaborative learning environment including services like course management, assessment management, collaboration, progress tracking and tutorware.

  20. Coupling Multi-Component Models with MPH on Distributed Memory Computer Architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Yun; Ding, Chris

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Among these, NASA’s Earth System Models Framework (ESMF) [to facilitate coupling earth system model components and to

  1. A Bayesian Framework for Combining Valuation Estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenton K. Yee

    2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Obtaining more accurate equity value estimates is the starting point for stock selection, value-based indexing in a noisy market, and beating benchmark indices through tactical style rotation. Unfortunately, discounted cash flow, method of comparables, and fundamental analysis typically yield discrepant valuation estimates. Moreover, the valuation estimates typically disagree with market price. Can one form a superior valuation estimate by averaging over the individual estimates, including market price? This article suggests a Bayesian framework for combining two or more estimates into a superior valuation estimate. The framework justifies the common practice of averaging over several estimates to arrive at a final point estimate.

  2. A Bayesian Framework for Combining Valuation Estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yee, Kenton K

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Obtaining more accurate equity value estimates is the starting point for stock selection, value-based indexing in a noisy market, and beating benchmark indices through tactical style rotation. Unfortunately, discounted cash flow, method of comparables, and fundamental analysis typically yield discrepant valuation estimates. Moreover, the valuation estimates typically disagree with market price. Can one form a superior valuation estimate by averaging over the individual estimates, including market price? This article suggests a Bayesian framework for combining two or more estimates into a superior valuation estimate. The framework justifies the common practice of averaging over several estimates to arrive at a final point estimate.

  3. A distributed requirements management framework for legal compliance and accountability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Breaux, Travis D.

    lifecycle. We illustrate the framework within the context of a concrete healthcare scenario in which

  4. Integrated Compliance Framework for Data Processing Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vil, Jé an

    2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Framework for Data Processing Applications? that leverages industry best practices like the Control Objectives for Information and related Technology (COBIT), the Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL), the International Organization.... Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL) ITIL provides a systematic approach to the management of information technology service provision. It is the only consistent and comprehensive documentation of best practice for information technology...

  5. A Statistical Framework for Spatial Comparative Genomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Statistical Framework for Spatial Comparative Genomics Rose Hoberman May 2007 CMU-CS-07, or the U.S. Government. #12;Keywords: spatial comparative genomics, comparative genomics, gene clusters, max-gap clusters, gene teams, whole genome duplication, paralogons, synteny, ortholog detection #12

  6. The Reactor An ObjectOriented Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Douglas C.

    The Reactor An Object­Oriented Framework for Event Demultiplexing and Event Handler Dispatching Douglas C. Schmidt 1 Overview ffl The Reactor is an object­oriented frame­ work that encapsulates OS event demul­ tiplexing mechanisms -- e.g., the Reactor API runs transparently atop both Wait

  7. CSE394: Security Policy Frameworks Scott Stoller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoller, Scott

    , and it can provide good practice in public speaking. Printouts of final versions of all documents (i.eCSE394: Security Policy Frameworks Scott Stoller Project. Version: 18oct2005a. An initial proposal project. I will provide feedback on the proposals (on the topic and the size of the project) within a week

  8. A Theoretical Framework for Chimera Domain Decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeling, Stephen L.

    A Theoretical Framework for Chimera Domain Decomposition S. L. Keeling Sverdrup Technology, Inc. Steger, UC Davis, May 2-4, 1997. 1 Introduction. The Chimera scheme is a domain decomposition method- ometry is divided into simply shaped regions. Unlike other approaches [5], the Chimera method simplifies

  9. Free Parameters and Frameworks in Minimal Supersymmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    405 Appendix A Free Parameters and Frameworks in Minimal Supersymmetry It is useful to discuss what the various schemes that exist for reducing the set of free parameters to a manageable number. The information, and so is fixed by experiment. The free parameters consist mainly of the coe#cients of the ``soft

  10. Free Parameters and Frameworks in Minimal Supersymmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    405 Appendix A Free Parameters and Frameworks in Minimal Supersymmetry It is useful to discuss what the various schemes that exist for reducing the set of free parameters to a manageable number. The information, and so is fixed by experiment. The free parameters consist mainly of the coefficients of the "soft

  11. A Homogenized Energy Framework for Ferromagnetic Hysteresis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy relations at the mesoscopic or lattice level based on the assumption that magnetic momentsA Homogenized Energy Framework for Ferromagnetic Hysteresis Ralph C. Smith Marcelo J. Dapino Center or spins are restricted to two orientations. Direct minimization of the Gibbs energy yields local average

  12. Alignment vs N framework for active matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamasundar, R.K.

    /Coffee at 11:15 AM) Seminar Hall, TCIS trivial Commission for Atomic Energy and Alternative propelled particlesAlignment vs N framework for active matter and collective motion Commission for Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies (CEA), Franc The collective properties of self interacting solely via some kind

  13. TIUPAM: A Framework for Trustworthiness-centric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandhu, Ravi

    at San Antonio Joint work with Qun Ni and Elisa Bertino (Purdue Univ.) Ravi Sandhu (Univ. Texas at San, Usage, Provenance, and Attack Management (TIUPAM) Four supporting components: Identity management Usage management Provenance management Attack management The framework is centered at the need

  14. RESEARCH Open Access Probabilistic framework for opportunistic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perkins, Dmitri

    approaches. Keywords: Cognitive radio networks, Opportunistic spectrum management, Medium access control 1 that the licensed spectrum is underutilized for 15 to 85% of the time depending on the spatial location [1]. ThusRESEARCH Open Access Probabilistic framework for opportunistic spectrum management in cognitive ad

  15. Component Framework for Coupled Integrated Fusion Plasma Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elwasif, Wael R [ORNL; Bernholdt, David E [ORNL; Berry, Lee A [ORNL; Batchelor, Donald B [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fusion Successful simulation of the complex physics that affect magnetically confined fusion plasma remains an important target milestone towards the development of viable fusion energy. Major advances in the underlying physics formulations, mathematical modeling, and computational tools and techniques are needed to enable a complete fusion simulation on the emerging class of large scale capability parallel computers that are coming on-line in the next few years. Several pilot projects are currently being undertaken to explore different (partial) code integration and coupling problems, and possible solutions that may guide the larger integration endeavor. In this paper, we present the design and implementation details of one such project, a component based approach to couple existing codes to model the interaction between high power radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic waves, and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) aspects of the burning plasma. The framework and component design utilize a light coupling approach based on high level view of constituent codes that facilitates rapid incorporation of new components into the integrated simulation framework. The work illustrates the viability of the light coupling approach to better understand physics and stand-alone computer code dependencies and interactions, as a precursor to a more tightly coupled integrated simulation environment.

  16. Catalyzed Nano-Framework Stablized High Density Reversible Hydrogen Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia Tang , Susanne M. Opalka , Daniel A. Mosher, Bruce L. Laube, Ronald J. Brown, Thomas H. Vanderspurt, Sarah Arsenault, Robert Wu, Jamie Strickler, Ewa. Ronnebro, Tim. Boyle and Joseph Cordaro

    2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A wide range of high capacity on-board rechargeable material candidates have exhibited non-ideal behavior related to irreversible hydrogen discharge / recharge behavior, and kinetic instability or retardation. This project addresses these issues by incorporating solvated and other forms of complex metal hydrides, with an emphasis on borohydrides, into nano-scale frameworks of low density, high surface area skeleton materials to stabilize, catalyze, and control desorption product formation associated with such complex metal hydrides. A variety of framework chemistries and hydride / framework combinations were investigated to make a relatively broad assessment of the method'Â?s potential. In this project, the hydride / framework interactions were tuned to decrease desorption temperatures for highly stable compounds or increase desorption temperatures for unstable high capacity compounds, and to influence desorption product formation for improved reversibility. First principle modeling was used to explore heterogeneous catalysis of hydride reversibility by modeling H{sub 2} dissociation, hydrogen migration, and rehydrogenation. Atomic modeling also demonstrated enhanced NaTi(BH{sub 4}){sub 4} stabilization at nano-framework surfaces modified with multi-functional agents. Amine multi-functional agents were found to have more balanced interactions with nano-framework and hydride clusters than other functional groups investigated. Experimentation demonstrated that incorporation of Ca(BH{sub 4}){sub 2} and Mg(BH{sub 4}){sub 2} in aerogels enhanced hydride desorption kinetics. Carbon aerogels were identified as the most suitable nano-frameworks for hydride kinetic enhancement and high hydride loading. High loading of NaTi(BH{sub 4}){sub 4} ligand complex in SiO{sub 2} aerogel was achieved and hydride stability was improved with the aerogel. Although improvements of desorption kinetics was observed, the incorporation of Ca(BH{sub 4}){sub 2} and Mg(BH{sub 4}){sub 2} in nano-frameworks did not improve their H{sub 2} absorption due to the formation of stable alkaline earth B12H12 intermediates upon rehydrogenation. This project primarily investigated the effect of nano-framework surface chemistry on hydride properties, while the effect of pore size is the focus area of other efforts (e.g., HRL, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) etc.) within the Metal Hydride Center of Excellence (MHCoE). The projects were complementary in gaining an overall understanding of the influence of nano-frameworks on hydride behavior.

  17. Restricted Complexity Framework for Nonlinear Adaptive Control in Complex Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Rube B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS K575, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2004-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Control law adaptation that includes implicit or explicit adaptive state estimation, can be a fundamental underpinning for the success of intelligent control in complex systems, particularly during subsystem failures, where vital system states and parameters can be impractical or impossible to measure directly. A practical algorithm is proposed for adaptive state filtering and control in nonlinear dynamic systems when the state equations are unknown or are too complex to model analytically. The state equations and inverse plant model are approximated by using neural networks. A framework for a neural network based nonlinear dynamic inversion control law is proposed, as an extrapolation of prior developed restricted complexity methodology used to formulate the adaptive state filter. Examples of adaptive filter performance are presented for an SSME simulation with high pressure turbine failure to support extrapolations to adaptive control problems.

  18. & MetalOrganic Frameworks Enhancing CO2 Separation Ability of a MetalOrganic Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paik Suh, Myunghyun

    that it is a promising material for sequestering CO2 from landfill gas. Introduction Metal­organic frameworks have been considered as promising materials for separating CO2 from landfill gas and industrial flue gas due

  19. A software framework for image processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garren, D.A. [Raytheon E-Systems, Garland Operations, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    There exists a great potential for the development of customizable image processing software that accommodates a wide variety of customers and applications. Such software would be able to read and process the many common image file formats, in addition to allowing the incorporation of those that have been custom made. Furthermore, the software would have the ability to handle the infinite variety of accompanying support files, which can contain quite different information for various applications and customers. A software framework designed to read and process this wide variety of input image files and support files would be extremely valuable. This paper develops the foundation of this proposed software architecture by using a composite of several common design patterns. Any similar software framework required to process input information and corresponding algorithms can benefit from the exposition of these composite design structures.

  20. A BAYESIAN NONPARAMETRIC MODELING FRAMEWORK FOR EXTREME VALUE ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Ziwei

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the bursting of the dot-com bubble on March 10, 2000,the bursting of the dot-com bubble (03/10/2000), the 09/11and the bursting of the dot-com bubble on March 10, 2000. We

  1. Industrial Sector Energy Efficiency Modeling (ISEEM) Framework Documentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karali, Nihan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INVESTMENT COST . anninvcost Annualized investment cost of a technology bound_Total of discounted investment costs discinvcost Discounted

  2. Interoperability constraints and requirements formal modelling and checking framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    an actor involved in a process (engineering, decision, control) focusing on complex system. These paradigms requirements having to be respected all along collaborative (private or public) processes. Keywords: System and stability (safety, security, etc.) and second, the process environment, resources and context. Various

  3. Multiphase Models of Tumor Growth: General Framework and Particular Cases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preziosi, Luigi

    and triphasic case including the presence of extracellular liquid and extracellular matrix. 1 Introduction is approached using a description that splits growth and mechanical response into two separate contributions

  4. Analytic framework for TRL-based cost and schedule models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Khoury, Bernard

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many government agencies have adopted the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) scale to help improve technology development management under ever increasing cost, schedule, and complexity constraints. Many TRL-based cost and ...

  5. New Modularization Framework Transforms FAST Wind Turbine Modeling Tool |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy HealthCommentsAugustNationalMarkets withCohen |Departmentof

  6. A Mixed Finite Element Framework for Modeling Coupled Fluid Flow ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birendra Jha

    2005-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    such as recovery from compaction drive, waterflooding, surface subsidence, seal in- tegrity ...... and for rocks and concrete it is in the range of 0.4-0.6. ...... incorporate into the programs an automatic, self-adaptive, procedure which adjusts.

  7. Integrated Global System Modeling Framework | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place: Eden Prairie,InfieldInstalledResearch

  8. Site Transition Framework | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energyof the Americas |DOE FormerEnergy Data Access|DepartmentFramework

  9. A Compiler Framework for Optimization of Affine Loop Nests for General Purpose Computations on GPUs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramanujam, J. "Ram"

    ]. Until very recently, GPGPU computations were performed by transforming matrix operations. Although the polyhedral model of dependence abstraction and program transformation is much more powerfulA Compiler Framework for Optimization of Affine Loop Nests for General Purpose Computations on GPUs

  10. A Finite Element Framework for Multiscale/Multiphysics Analysis of Structures with Complex Microstructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varghese, Julian

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    . In addition to implementing an oxidation model, the framework was also used to implement strategies that expedited the simulation of oxidation in textile composites so that it would take only a few hours. The simulation showed that the tow architecture played...

  11. A Framework to Determine the Probability Density Function for the Output Power of Wind Farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liberzon, Daniel

    A Framework to Determine the Probability Density Function for the Output Power of Wind Farms Sairaj to the power output of a wind farm while factoring in the availability of the wind turbines in the farm availability model for the wind turbines, we propose a method to determine the wind-farm power output pdf

  12. Lessons Learned in Framework-Based Software Process Improvement Pankaj Jalote

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jalote, Pankaj

    frameworks for SPI are the Capability Maturity Model (CMM) for software [18] and ISO9001 [12, 13]. Currently description of an implementation of the CMM in an organization is given in [14]. Though the CMM and ISO have are based on the experience of the author in implementing a CMM-based SPI program in a large software

  13. State Regulatory Framework Will Most Likely Result in Robust CO2 Pipeline System, New Study Says

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A private sector model with a state rather than Federal-based regulatory framework is the approach that will "most likely result in a robust CO2 pipeline system" in the United States, according to a new report developed with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory.

  14. An XML Security Framework that Integrates NIST RBAC, MAC and DAC Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demurjian, Steven A.

    is to integrate the local security (existing systems) and their associated access control models into a global is to ensure that local security policies (of constituent systems) and access control mechanisms are satisfied. As a result, the XML security framework requires the inclusion of a secure information engineering process

  15. 2013 Faculty Publications A Cloud-Based Framework for Automating MODFLOW Simulations for Aquifer Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen Jr., Dan R.

    2013 Faculty Publications A Cloud-Based Framework for Automating MODFLOW Simulations for Aquifer Performance-Based Liquefaction Triggering Models for the SPT. Seismological Society of America 2013 Annual. A Simplified Uniform Hazard Liquefaction Analysis Procedure for Bridges. Transportation Research Record. Kevin

  16. A STATISTICAL FRAMEWORK FOR FUSING MID-LEVEL PERCEPTUAL FEATURES IN NEWS STORY SEGMENTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Shih-Fu

    to a Hidden Markov Model (HMM) to locate the story boundary. Most news story systems use ad hoc algorithmsA STATISTICAL FRAMEWORK FOR FUSING MID-LEVEL PERCEPTUAL FEATURES IN NEWS STORY SEGMENTATION Winston H.-M. Hsu, Shih-Fu Chang Department of Electrical Engineering, Columbia University {winston, sfchang

  17. Organizational functions and enterprise self-maintenance: a framework for integrating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , monitoring and learning David Aveiro1 , José Tribolet1,2 1 Organizational Engineering Center, INESC. 2Organizational functions and enterprise self-maintenance: a framework for integrating modelling and facilitate organizational operation and evolution. However, organizational functions like logistics, quality

  18. Towards an Automatic Metadata Management Framework for Smart Oil Charalampos Chelmis1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasanna, Viktor K.

    of the oil exploration process in the oil industry. Our system is capable of annotating models and images. Introduction Oil and gas organizations are in continuous pressure to investigate and employ innovativeTowards an Automatic Metadata Management Framework for Smart Oil Fields Charalampos Chelmis1 , Jing

  19. Towards a Framework for Cyber Attack Impact Analysis of the Electric Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundur, Deepa

    Towards a Framework for Cyber Attack Impact Analysis of the Electric Smart Grid Deepa Kundur analysis of a smart grid. We focus on the model synthesis stage in which both cyber and physical grid-effect relationships can be conveniently expressed for both analysis and extension to large-scale smart grid systems. I

  20. A Formal Framework for Trust Policy Negotiation in Autonomic Systems: Abduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A Formal Framework for Trust Policy Negotiation in Autonomic Systems: Abduction with Soft show that soft constraints can be used to model logical reasoning, that is deduction and abduction (and induction). In partic- ular, we focus on the abduction process and we show how it can be implemented

  1. An Interactive Visual Analytics Framework for Multi-Field Data...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interactive Visual Analytics Framework for Multi-Field Data in a Geo-Spatial Context. An Interactive Visual Analytics Framework for Multi-Field Data in a Geo-Spatial Context....

  2. A framework for sustainable buildings : an application to China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ospelt, Christoph, 1970-

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A framework has been established to discuss the different topics of Sustainability in the context of buildings. The framework includes the dimensions of time and space and the dimensions of ecology, society, and economy. ...

  3. A Framework for Dynamizing Succinct Data Structures (Extended Abstract)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Ankur; Hon, Wing-Kai; Shah, Rahul; Vitter, Jeffrey Scott

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a framework to dynamize succinct data structures, to encourage their use over non-succinct versions in a wide variety of important application areas. Our framework can dynamize most stateof- the-art succinct ...

  4. Development of Conceptual Framework Renewable Energy Certificate Mechanism for India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Advisory Private Limited June 2009 (Final Report for circulation) #12;Report on `Conceptual Framework of ABPS Infrastructure Advisory Private Limited. #12;Report on `Conceptual Framework for REC Mechanism Electricity Authority CERC Central Electricity Regulatory Commission CUF Capacity Utilisation Factor DERC

  5. Enterprise Security Planning using Zachman Framework: Designer's Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ertaull, Levent

    Enterprise Security Planning using Zachman Framework: Designer's Perspective Abstract planning point of view. Index Terms - Enterprise Architecture, Zachman Framework, Enterprise Security security planning. This paper has been organized as follows. Section 2, describes the enterprise

  6. Enterprise Security Planning with Department of Defense Architecture Framework (DODAF)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ertaull, Levent

    Enterprise Security Planning with Department of Defense Architecture Framework (DODAF) L. Ertaul1 as its application in dealing with enterprise security planning related issues. Keywords: Enterprise Architecture Frameworks, DoDAF, Enterprise Security Planning 1 . Introduction The Department of Defense

  7. A decision making framework for cruise ship design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katsoufis, George P. (George Paraskevas)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis develops a new decision making framework for initial cruise ship design. Through review of effectiveness analysis and multi-criteria decision making, a uniform philosophy is created to articulate a framework ...

  8. Drive-access transit : a regional analytical framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorensen, James B

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A framework for analyzing drive-access transit at a regional level is developed in this research. This framework is intended primarily for in-house use by regional transit agencies, yet has implications for the regional ...

  9. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    an implementation of a single-fluid inter- face model in the ALE-AMR code to simulate surface tension effects. The model does not require explicit information on the physical...

  10. The CLEANLE project within HOMOFABER framework The CLEANLE project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The CLEANLE project within HOMOFABER framework The CLEANLE project within HOMOFABER framework Presentation for students involvement during spring semester 2011 #12;The CLEANLE project within HOMOFABER framework The Interdisciplinary Aerodynamics Group (IAG) · Cost group within EPFL-STI ­ Administrated

  11. Component-based Situational Methods A framework for understanding SME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Draft copy Component-based Situational Methods A framework for understanding SME Yves-Roger Nehan Engineering (SME) which focuses on project-specific method construction. We propose a faceted framework to understand and classify issues in system development SME. The framework identifies four different

  12. Enterprise Security Planning using the Zachman Framework Builder's Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ertaull, Levent

    Enterprise Security Planning using the Zachman Framework ­ Builder's Perspective L. Ertaul1 , S that can be used for enterprise security planning .This paper gives an overview of how Zachman's Framework's perspective of the Zachman Framework Keywords: Enterprise Architecture, Enterprise Security Planning, Zachman

  13. Policy Framework Policy Commencement Date: 14 March 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Policy Framework Policy Commencement Date: 14 March 2012 Category: Strategic Management 1. PURPOSE To manage the development and maintenance of a robust and responsive policy framework that aligns the University's practices with its strategic objectives. 2. POLICY STATEMENT The Policy Framework consists

  14. A QUALITY CONTROL FRAMEWORK FOR BUS SCHEDULE RELIABILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    A QUALITY CONTROL FRAMEWORK FOR BUS SCHEDULE RELIABILITY JIE LIN*, University of Illinois Institute A QUALITY CONTROL FRAMEWORK FOR BUS SCHEDULE RELIABILITY Abstract This paper develops and demonstrates a quality control framework for bus schedule reliability. Automatic Vehicle Location (AVL) devices

  15. SUSTAINABLE HERITAGE TOURISM PLANNING IN ETHIOPIA: AN ASSESSMENT FRAMEWORK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SUSTAINABLE HERITAGE TOURISM PLANNING IN ETHIOPIA: AN ASSESSMENT FRAMEWORK by Stefanie Jones B Management Project No.: 532 Title: Sustainable Heritage Tourism Planning in Ethiopia: An Assessment Framework, and tested the utility of that framework in determining the potential for sustainable heritage tourism

  16. Porting the .NET Micro Framework A Microsoft Technical White Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Galen

    Porting the .NET Micro Framework A Microsoft Technical White Paper December 10, 2007 AbstractShow-capable devices to port the .NET Micro Framework to new hardware platforms. This white paper introduces the .NET Micro Framework architecture with a view toward porting it to a new hardware platform. It then discusses

  17. Records Management Framework Policy Version 1.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aickelin, Uwe

    and guidance materials provided to them by the Records Manager and for acting as the first point of contactRecords Management Framework Policy Version 1.0 Last amended: 01 September 2014 1. Introduction The Records Management Framework, or `RM Framework', is a network of Records Officers who will support

  18. Multiscale Thermohydrologic Model Supporting the Licence Application for the Yucca Mountain Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.A> Buscheck; Y. Sun; Y. Hao

    2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The MultiScale ThermoHydrologic Model (MSTHM) predicts thermal-hydrologic (TH) conditions within emplacement tunnels (drifts) and in the adjoining host rock at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, which is the proposed site for a radioactive waste repository in the US. Because these predictions are used in the performance assessment of the Yucca Mountain repository, they must address the influence of variability and uncertainty of the engineered- and natural-system parameters that significantly influence those predictions. Parameter-sensitivity studies show that the MSTHM predictions adequately propagate the influence of parametric variability and uncertainty. Model-validation studies show that the influence of conceptual-model uncertainty on the MSTHM predictions is insignificant compared to that of parametric uncertainty, which is propagated through the MSTHM.

  19. A connectionist framework for reasoning: Reasoning with examples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roth, D. [Weizmann Inst. of Science (Israel)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a connectionist architecture that supports almost instantaneous deductive and abductive reasoning. The deduction algorithm responds in few steps for single rule queries and in general, takes time that is linear with the number of rules in the query. The abduction algorithm produces an explanation in few steps and the best explanation in time linear with the size of the assumption set. The size of the network is polynomially related to the size of other representations of the domain, and may even be smaller. We base our connectionist model on Valiant`s Neuroidal model (Val94) and thus make minimal assumptions about the computing elements, which are assumed to be classical threshold elements with states. Within this model we develop a reasoning framework that utilizes a model-based approach to reasoning (KKS93; KR94b). In particular, we suggest to interpret the connectionist architecture as encoding examples of the domain we reason about and show how to perform various reasoning tasks with this interpretation. We then show that the representations used can be acquired efficiently from interactions with the environment and discuss how this learning process influences the reasoning performance of the network.

  20. Smart Meter Privacy: A Utility-Privacy Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopalan, S Raj; Mohajer, Soheil; Poor, H Vincent

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    End-user privacy in smart meter measurements is a well-known challenge in the smart grid. The solutions offered thus far have been tied to specific technologies such as batteries or assumptions on data usage. Existing solutions have also not quantified the loss of benefit (utility) that results from any such privacy-preserving approach. Using tools from information theory, a new framework is presented that abstracts both the privacy and the utility requirements of smart meter data. This leads to a novel privacy-utility tradeoff problem with minimal assumptions that is tractable. Specifically for a stationary Gaussian Markov model of the electricity load, it is shown that the optimal utility-and-privacy preserving solution requires filtering out frequency components that are low in power, and this approach appears to encompass most of the proposed privacy approaches.

  1. Biofuel Distribution Datasets from the Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework invites users to discover the power of bioenergy through an interface that provides extensive access to research data and literature, GIS mapping tools, and collaborative networks. The Bioenergy KDF supports efforts to develop a robust and sustainable bioenergy industry. The KDF facilitates informed decision making by providing a means to synthesize, analyze, and visualize vast amounts of information in a relevant and succinct manner. It harnesses Web 2.0 and social networking technologies to build a collective knowledge system that can better examine the economic and environmental impacts of development options for biomass feedstock production, biorefineries, and related infrastructure. [copied from https://www.bioenergykdf.net/content/about] Holdings include datasets, models, and maps and the collections are growing due to both DOE contributions and individuals' data uploads.

  2. Biofuel Production Datasets from DOE's Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework invites users to discover the power of bioenergy through an interface that provides extensive access to research data and literature, GIS mapping tools, and collaborative networks. The Bioenergy KDF supports efforts to develop a robust and sustainable bioenergy industry. The KDF facilitates informed decision making by providing a means to synthesize, analyze, and visualize vast amounts of information in a relevant and succinct manner. It harnesses Web 2.0 and social networking technologies to build a collective knowledge system that can better examine the economic and environmental impacts of development options for biomass feedstock production, biorefineries, and related infrastructure. [copied from https://www.bioenergykdf.net/content/about]

    Holdings include datasets, models, and maps and the collections arel growing due to both DOE contributions and data uploads from individuals.

  3. Feedstock Production Datasets from the Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework invites users to discover the power of bioenergy through an interface that provides extensive access to research data and literature, GIS mapping tools, and collaborative networks. The Bioenergy KDF supports efforts to develop a robust and sustainable bioenergy industry. The KDF facilitates informed decision making by providing a means to synthesize, analyze, and visualize vast amounts of information in a relevant and succinct manner. It harnesses Web 2.0 and social networking technologies to build a collective knowledge system that can better examine the economic and environmental impacts of development options for biomass feedstock production, biorefineries, and related infrastructure. [copied from https://www.bioenergykdf.net/content/about] Holdings include datasets, models, and maps and the collections are growing due to both DOE contributions and data uploads from individuals.

  4. Feedstock Logistics Datasets from DOE's Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework invites users to discover the power of bioenergy through an interface that provides extensive access to research data and literature, GIS mapping tools, and collaborative networks. The Bioenergy KDF supports efforts to develop a robust and sustainable bioenergy industry. The KDF facilitates informed decision making by providing a means to synthesize, analyze, and visualize vast amounts of information in a relevant and succinct manner. It harnesses Web 2.0 and social networking technologies to build a collective knowledge system that can better examine the economic and environmental impacts of development options for biomass feedstock production, biorefineries, and related infrastructure. Holdings include datasets, models, and maps. [from https://www.bioenergykdf.net/content/about

  5. A Strategic Framework for SMR Deployment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment(October-DecemberBasedToward a MoreA RisingA1 A Strategic Framework

  6. Introduction to Framework | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place: EdenOverview Of TheIntevac Jump to:Framework (Redirected

  7. Fuel Cycle Analysis Framework Base Cases for the IAEA/INPRO GAINS Collaborative Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brent Dixon

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thirteen countries participated in the Collaborative Project GAINS “Global Architecture of Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems Based on Thermal and Fast Reactors Including a Closed Fuel Cycle”, which was the primary activity within the IAEA/INPRO Program Area B: “Global Vision on Sustainable Nuclear Energy” for the last three years. The overall objective of GAINS was to develop a standard framework for assessing future nuclear energy systems taking into account sustainable development, and to validate results through sample analyses. This paper details the eight scenarios that constitute the GAINS framework base cases for analysis of the transition to future innovative nuclear energy systems. The framework base cases provide a reference for users of the framework to start from in developing and assessing their own alternate systems. Each base case is described along with performance results against the GAINS sustainability evaluation metrics. The eight cases include four using a moderate growth projection and four using a high growth projection for global nuclear electricity generation through 2100. The cases are divided into two sets, addressing homogeneous and heterogeneous scenarios developed by GAINS to model global fuel cycle strategies. The heterogeneous world scenario considers three separate nuclear groups based on their fuel cycle strategies, with non-synergistic and synergistic cases. The framework base case analyses results show the impact of these different fuel cycle strategies while providing references for future users of the GAINS framework. A large number of scenario alterations are possible and can be used to assess different strategies, different technologies, and different assumptions about possible futures of nuclear power. Results can be compared to the framework base cases to assess where these alternate cases perform differently versus the sustainability indicators.

  8. Evaluation Framework and Analyses for Thermal Energy Storage Integrated with Packaged Air Conditioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kung, F.; Deru, M.; Bonnema, E.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Few third-party guidance documents or tools are available for evaluating thermal energy storage (TES) integrated with packaged air conditioning (AC), as this type of TES is relatively new compared to TES integrated with chillers or hot water systems. To address this gap, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory conducted a project to improve the ability of potential technology adopters to evaluate TES technologies. Major project outcomes included: development of an evaluation framework to describe key metrics, methodologies, and issues to consider when assessing the performance of TES systems integrated with packaged AC; application of multiple concepts from the evaluation framework to analyze performance data from four demonstration sites; and production of a new simulation capability that enables modeling of TES integrated with packaged AC in EnergyPlus. This report includes the evaluation framework and analysis results from the project.

  9. Scientific Final Report: COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William J. Gutowski; Joseph M. Prusa, Piotr K. Smolarkiewicz

    2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG's advanced dynamics core with the 'physics' of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer-reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited.

  10. A Virtual Engineering Framework for Simulating Advanced Power System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Bockelie; Dave Swensen; Martin Denison; Stanislav Borodai

    2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report is described the work effort performed to provide NETL with VE-Suite based Virtual Engineering software and enhanced equipment models to support NETL's Advanced Process Engineering Co-simulation (APECS) framework for advanced power generation systems. Enhancements to the software framework facilitated an important link between APECS and the virtual engineering capabilities provided by VE-Suite (e.g., equipment and process visualization, information assimilation). Model enhancements focused on improving predictions for the performance of entrained flow coal gasifiers and important auxiliary equipment (e.g., Air Separation Units) used in coal gasification systems. In addition, a Reduced Order Model generation tool and software to provide a coupling between APECS/AspenPlus and the GE GateCycle simulation system were developed. CAPE-Open model interfaces were employed where needed. The improved simulation capability is demonstrated on selected test problems. As part of the project an Advisory Panel was formed to provide guidance on the issues on which to focus the work effort. The Advisory Panel included experts from industry and academics in gasification, CO2 capture issues, process simulation and representatives from technology developers and the electric utility industry. To optimize the benefit to NETL, REI coordinated its efforts with NETL and NETL funded projects at Iowa State University, Carnegie Mellon University and ANSYS/Fluent, Inc. The improved simulation capabilities incorporated into APECS will enable researchers and engineers to better understand the interactions of different equipment components, identify weaknesses and processes needing improvement and thereby allow more efficient, less expensive plants to be developed and brought on-line faster and in a more cost-effective manner. These enhancements to APECS represent an important step toward having a fully integrated environment for performing plant simulation and engineering. Furthermore, with little effort the modeling capabilities described in this report can be extended to support other DOE programs, such as ultra super critical boiler development, oxy-combustion boiler development or modifications to existing plants to include CO2 capture and sequestration.

  11. Webcast of the 'Energy 101' Course Framework

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy 101: A Model Interdisciplinary Higher Education Course for Teaching the Fundamentals of Energy

  12. SDS: A Framework for Scientific Data Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Bin; Byna, Surendra; Wu, Kesheng

    2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Large-scale scientific applications typically write their data to parallel file systems with organizations designed to achieve fast write speeds. Analysis tasks frequently read the data in a pattern that is different from the write pattern, and therefore experience poor I/O performance. In this paper, we introduce a prototype framework for bridging the performance gap between write and read stages of data access from parallel file systems. We call this framework Scientific Data Services, or SDS for short. This initial implementation of SDS focuses on reorganizing previously written files into data layouts that benefit read patterns, and transparently directs read calls to the reorganized data. SDS follows a client-server architecture. The SDS Server manages partial or full replicas of reorganized datasets and serves SDS Clients' requests for data. The current version of the SDS client library supports HDF5 programming interface for reading data. The client library intercepts HDF5 calls and transparently redirects them to the reorganized data. The SDS client library also provides a querying interface for reading part of the data based on user-specified selective criteria. We describe the design and implementation of the SDS client-server architecture, and evaluate the response time of the SDS Server and the performance benefits of SDS.

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: models of various levels of fidelity...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia received funding for its "Mechanistic Modeling Framework for Predicting Extreme Battery Response: Coupled Hierarchical Models for Thermal, Mechanical, Electrical and...

  14. Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) Model - DOE Directives, Delegations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) Model by Website Administrator The Enterprise Risk Management Model is a new standardized framework that the Department will be using to develop,...

  15. Causes and implications of persistent atmospheric carbon dioxide biases in Earth System Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2013), The Community Earth System Model: A framework forsimu- lations from 15 Earth System Models (ESMs) • Most ESMsdioxide biases in Earth System Models, J. Geophys. Res.

  16. A framework for optimization and quantification of uncertainty and sensitivity for developing carbon capture systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John C Eslick, John C; Ng, Brenda Ng; Gao, Qianwen; Tong, Charles H.; Sahinidis, Nikolaos V.; Miller, David C.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI), a Framework for Optimization and Quantification of Uncertainty and Sensitivity (FOQUS) has been developed. This tool enables carbon capture systems to be rapidly synthesized and rigorously optimized, in an environment that accounts for and propagates uncertainties in parameters and models. FOQUS currently enables (1) the development of surrogate algebraic models utilizing the ALAMO algorithm, which can be used for superstructure optimization to identify optimal process configurations, (2) simulation-based optimization utilizing derivative free optimization (DFO) algorithms with detailed black-box process models, and (3) rigorous uncertainty quantification through PSUADE. FOQUS utilizes another CCSI technology, the Turbine Science Gateway, to manage the thousands of simulated runs necessary for optimization and UQ. This computational framework has been demonstrated for the design and analysis of a solid sorbent based carbon capture system.

  17. Fuel Performance Experiments and Modeling: Fission Gas Bubble Nucleation and Growth in Alloy Nuclear Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDeavitt, Sean; Shao, Lin; Tsvetkov, Pavel; Wirth, Brian; Kennedy, Rory

    2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced fast reactor systems being developed under the DOE's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative are designed to destroy TRU isotopes generated in existing and future nuclear energy systems. Over the past 40 years, multiple experiments and demonstrations have been completed using U-Zr, U-Pu-Zr, U-Mo and other metal alloys. As a result, multiple empirical and semi-empirical relationships have been established to develop empirical performance modeling codes. many mechamistic questions about fission as mobility, bubble coalescience, and gas release have been answered through industrial experience, reearch, and empirical understanding. The advent of modern computational materials science, however, opens new doors of development such that physics-based multi-scale models may be developed to enable a new generation of predictive fuel performance codes that are not limited by empiricism.

  18. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a single-fluid diffuse interface model in the ALE-AMR hydrodynamics code to simulate surface tension effects. We show simula- tions and compare them to other surface tension...

  19. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sion effects. We show the result of a test case, and compare it to the result without surface tension. The model describes droplet formation nicely. Application The ARRA-funded...

  20. Lagrangian Variational Framework for Boundary Value Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Figotin; Guillermo Reyes

    2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A boundary value problem is commonly associated with constraints imposed on a system at its boundary. We advance here an alternative point of view treating the system as interacting "boundary" and "interior" subsystems. This view is implemented through a Lagrangian framework that allows to account for (i) a variety of forces including dissipative acting at the boundary; (ii) a multitude of features of interactions between the boundary and the interior fields when the boundary fields may differ from the boundary limit of the interior fields; (iii) detailed pictures of the energy distribution and its flow; (iv) linear and nonlinear effects. We provide a number of elucidating examples of the structured boundary and its interactions with the system interior. We also show that the proposed approach covers the well known boundary value problems.

  1. Risk assessment as a framework for decisions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rechard, Robert Paul; McKenna, Sean Andrew; Borns, David James

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The risk assessment approach has been applied to support numerous radioactive waste management activities over the last 30 years. A risk assessment methodology provides a solid and readily adaptable framework for evaluating the risks of CO2 sequestration in geologic formations to prioritize research, data collection, and monitoring schemes. This paper reviews the tasks of a risk assessment, and provides a few examples related to each task. This paper then describes an application of sensitivity analysis to identify important parameters to reduce the uncertainty in the performance of a geologic repository for radioactive waste repository, which because of importance of the geologic barrier, is similar to CO2 sequestration. The paper ends with a simple stochastic analysis of idealized CO2 sequestration site with a leaking abandoned well and a set of monitoring wells in an aquifer above the CO2 sequestration unit in order to evaluate the efficacy of monitoring wells to detect adverse leakage.

  2. CORBA-Based Distributed Software Framework for the NIF Integrated Computer Control System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stout, E A; Carey, R W; Estes, C M; Fisher, J M; Lagin, L J; Mathisen, D G; Reynolds, C A; Sanchez, R J

    2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), currently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is a stadium-sized facility containing a 192-beam, 1.8 Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultra-violet laser system together with a 10-meter diameter target chamber with room for nearly 100 experimental diagnostics. The NIF is operated by the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) which is a scalable, framework-based control system distributed over 800 computers throughout the NIF. The framework provides templates and services at multiple levels of abstraction for the construction of software applications that communicate via CORBA (Common Object Request Broker Architecture). Object-oriented software design patterns are implemented as templates and extended by application software. Developers extend the framework base classes to model the numerous physical control points and implement specializations of common application behaviors. An estimated 140 thousand software objects, each individually addressable through CORBA, will be active at full scale. Many of these objects have persistent configuration information stored in a database. The configuration data is used to initialize the objects at system start-up. Centralized server programs that implement events, alerts, reservations, data archival, name service, data access, and process management provide common system wide services. At the highest level, a model-driven, distributed shot automation system provides a flexible and scalable framework for automatic sequencing of work-flow for control and monitoring of NIF shots. The shot model, in conjunction with data defining the parameters and goals of an experiment, describes the steps to be performed by each subsystem in order to prepare for and fire a NIF shot. Status and usage of this distributed framework are described.

  3. THERMODYNAMICS Unified Model for Nonideal Multicomponent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    THERMODYNAMICS Unified Model for Nonideal Multicomponent Molecular Diffusion Coefficients Alana and a rigorous descrip- tion of mixture nonideality in the framework of irreversible thermodynamics. Molecular

  4. Cooperative Modeling and Design History Tracking Using Design Tracking Matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jonghyun

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis suggests a new framework for cooperative modeling which supports concurrency design protocol with a design history tracking function. The proposed framework allows designers to work together while eliminating design conflicts...

  5. Modeling Water, Climate, Agriculture, and the Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Winston

    Describes two models used in the integrated modeling framework designed to study water, climate, agriculture and the economy in Pakistan's Indus Basin: (1) the Indus Basin Model Revised (IBMR-1012), a hydro-economic ...

  6. Modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spädtke, P

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling of technical machines became a standard technique since computer became powerful enough to handle the amount of data relevant to the specific system. Simulation of an existing physical device requires the knowledge of all relevant quantities. Electric fields given by the surrounding boundary as well as magnetic fields caused by coils or permanent magnets have to be known. Internal sources for both fields are sometimes taken into account, such as space charge forces or the internal magnetic field of a moving bunch of charged particles. Used solver routines are briefly described and some bench-marking is shown to estimate necessary computing times for different problems. Different types of charged particle sources will be shown together with a suitable model to describe the physical model. Electron guns are covered as well as different ion sources (volume ion sources, laser ion sources, Penning ion sources, electron resonance ion sources, and H$^-$-sources) together with some remarks on beam transport.

  7. Biofuel Enduse Datasets from the Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework (KDF)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Bioenergy Knowledge Discovery Framework invites users to discover the power of bioenergy through an interface that provides extensive access to research data and literature, GIS mapping tools, and collaborative networks. The Bioenergy KDF supports efforts to develop a robust and sustainable bioenergy industry. The KDF facilitates informed decision making by providing a means to synthesize, analyze, and visualize vast amounts of information in a relevant and succinct manner. It harnesses Web 2.0 and social networking technologies to build a collective knowledge system that can better examine the economic and environmental impacts of development options for biomass feedstock production, biorefineries, and related infrastructure. [copied from https://www.bioenergykdf.net/content/about]

    Holdings include datasets, models, and maps. This is a very new resource, but the collections will grow due to both DOE contributions and individualsÆ data uploads. Currently the Biofuel Enduse collection includes 133 items. Most of these are categorized as literature, but 36 are listed as datasets and ten as models.

  8. Software Framework for Advanced Power Plant Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Widmann; Sorin Munteanu; Aseem Jain; Pankaj Gupta; Mark Moales; Erik Ferguson; Lewis Collins; David Sloan; Woodrow Fiveland; Yi-dong Lang; Larry Biegler; Michael Locke; Simon Lingard; Jay Yun

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the work accomplished during the Phase II development effort of the Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS). The objective of the project is to develop the tools to efficiently combine high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models with process modeling software. During the course of the project, a robust integration controller was developed that can be used in any CAPE-OPEN compliant process modeling environment. The controller mediates the exchange of information between the process modeling software and the CFD software. Several approaches to reducing the time disparity between CFD simulations and process modeling have been investigated and implemented. These include enabling the CFD models to be run on a remote cluster and enabling multiple CFD models to be run simultaneously. Furthermore, computationally fast reduced-order models (ROMs) have been developed that can be 'trained' using the results from CFD simulations and then used directly within flowsheets. Unit operation models (both CFD and ROMs) can be uploaded to a model database and shared between multiple users.

  9. Model uncertainty and its impact on the pricing of derivative instruments.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was done in the framework of a research project on model uncertainty at HSBC-CCF, Division of Market

  10. Transaction-Based Building Controls Framework, Volume 1: Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somasundaram, Sriram; Pratt, Robert G.; Akyol, Bora A.; Fernandez, Nicholas; Foster, Nikolas AF; Katipamula, Srinivas; Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Somani, Abhishek; Steckley, Andrew C.; Taylor, Zachary T.

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This document proposes a framework concept to achieve the objectives of raising buildings’ efficiency and energy savings potential benefitting building owners and operators. We call it a transaction-based framework, wherein mutually-beneficial and cost-effective market-based transactions can be enabled between multiple players across different domains. Transaction-based building controls are one part of the transactional energy framework. While these controls realize benefits by enabling automatic, market-based intra-building efficiency optimizations, the transactional energy framework provides similar benefits using the same market -based structure, yet on a larger scale and beyond just buildings, to the society at large.

  11. A Synthetic Biology Framework for Programming Eukaryotic Transcription Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khalil, Ahmad S.

    Eukaryotic transcription factors (TFs) perform complex and combinatorial functions within transcriptional networks. Here, we present a synthetic framework for systematically constructing eukaryotic transcription functions ...

  12. A Valuation-Based Framework for Considering Distributed Generation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Valuation-Based Framework for Considering Distributed Generation Photovoltaic Tariff Design Preprint Owen R. Zinaman National Renewable Energy Laboratory Nam R. Darghouth...

  13. AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Germany) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability identification, dEfense and Restoration Country Germany Coordinates...

  14. Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP), as posted on the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program website.

  15. adaptive bin framework: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lin, Lin; Ying, Lexing; E, Weinan 2011-01-01 163 Multifractal Diffusion Entropy Analysis: Optimal Bin Width of Probability Histograms CERN Preprints Summary: In the framework...

  16. AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Norway) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability identification, dEfense and Restoration Country Norway Coordinates...

  17. A Scalable Framework for Cyber Attack Discovery and Situational...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scalable Framework for Cyber Attack Discovery and Situational Understanding (SITU) May 15, 2013 Problem Statement: Cyber attacks cost commercial and governmental organizations vast...

  18. Application of SALSSA Framework to the Validation of Smoothed...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrodynamics Simulations of Low Reynolds Number Flows. Abstract: The Support Architecture for Large-Scale Subsurface Analysis (SALSSA) provides an extensible framework,...

  19. A Framework for the Optimization of Integrated Energy Systems...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Framework for the Optimization of Integrated Energy Systems(Jain and Alleyne 2012) Home > Groups > Energy Systems Integration Qinsun's picture Submitted by Qinsun(35) Member 15...

  20. Risk assessment framework for geologic carbon sequestration sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Framework for geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment,for geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment, Energyfor Geologic Carbon Sequestration, Int. J. of Greenhouse Gas