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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-family residential systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

SCE - Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Programs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Programs Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Programs SCE - Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Programs < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Water Heating Home Weatherization Windows, Doors, & Skylights Other Program Info Funding Source System Benefits Charge Start Date 1/1/2012 Expiration Date 12/31/2012 State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount LED Pool/Spa Lighting: $75 - $100/unit Pool Pumps: $100 Energy Star Ceiling Fan (with Energy Star CFLs): $20/unit High Efficiency Clothes Washers: $50 - $100/unit Energy Star Refrigerators: $50/unit Dual Pane Windows: $0.75/sq. ft.

2

PG&E (Gas) - Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PG&E (Gas) - Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates PG&E (Gas) - Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates PG&E (Gas) - Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info Funding Source System Benefits Charge Expiration Date 12/31/2013 State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Clothes Washers (In-Unit): $50 Clothes Washers (Common Area): $150 Central System Water/Space Heating: $1,500/Unit Storage Water Heater: $200/Unit Boilers: $500/Unit Furnace: $150 - $300/Unit Provider Residential Programs Through the Rebates for Multi-Family Properties Program, PG&E offers prescriptive rebates for owners and managers of multi-family properties of

3

Energy Performance Comparison of Heating and Air Conditioning Systems for Multi-Family Residential Buildings  

SciTech Connect

The type of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system has a large impact on the heating and cooling energy consumption in multifamily residential buildings. This paper compares the energy performance of three HVAC systems: a direct expansion (DX) split system, a split air source heat pump (ASHP) system, and a closed-loop water source heat pump (WSHP) system with a boiler and an evaporative fluid cooler as the central heating and cooling source. All three systems use gas furnace for heating or heating backup. The comparison is made in a number of scenarios including different climate conditions, system operation schemes and applicable building codes. It is found that with the minimum code-compliant equipment efficiency, ASHP performs the best among all scenarios except in extremely code climates. WSHP tends to perform better than the split DX system in cold climates but worse in hot climates.

Wang, Weimin; Zhang, Jian; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Bing

2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

4

SoCalGas - Multi-Family Residential Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Multi-Family Residential Rebate Program Multi-Family Residential Rebate Program SoCalGas - Multi-Family Residential Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Construction Water Heating Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Dishwashers: $30 Insulation: 25% Natural Gas Storage Water Heaters: $30 Tankless Water Heaters: $300 Central Furnaces: $200 Central System Water Heaters: $500 Central System Boilers: $1,500 Central Demand Hot Water Controllers: $700 or $1400 Provider Southern California Gas Company Southern California Gas Company provides incentives to encourage the owners and managers of multi-family residential buildings to increase their energy

5

Seattle City Light - Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Seattle City Light - Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Seattle City Light - Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Seattle City Light - Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting: 85% discount on installation costs Insulation: 50% discount on installation costs Window Replacement: $3 - $5/sq. ft. Provider Seattle City Light Seattle City Light provides incentives for its multi-family housing customers to increase their energy efficiency. Rebates are offered for common area lighting and weatherization measures including the installation

6

SDG&E (Electric) - Multi-Family Residential Efficiency Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Multi-Family Residential Efficiency Program Multi-Family Residential Efficiency Program SDG&E (Electric) - Multi-Family Residential Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Clothes Washers: $75-$150 Room Air Conditioner: $50 Central Heat Pumps: $100 Insulation: $0.15/sq. ft. CFLs: $4-$10 Ceiling Fans with CFLs: $20 Interior Hardwired Fluorescent Fixtures: $32-$45 Exterior Hardwired Fluorescent Fixtures: $30 T12 De-lamping: $6/lamp Water Heaters: $30 Occupancy Sensors: $10 LED Exit Signs: $35 Photocells: $10/unit

7

PG&E - Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PG&E - Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates PG&E - Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates PG&E - Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Appliances & Electronics Other Manufacturing Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Design & Remodeling Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info Expiration Date 03/01/2013 State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Attic Insulation: $0.15/sq. ft. Wall Insulation: $0.50/sq. ft. Clothes Washers: $50 - $150/Unit Refrigerator: $75/unit High Performance Dual Pane Windows: $0.75/sq. ft. Refrigerator, Freezer and Room AC Recycling: $25 - $35

8

Design, development and testing of a solar-powered multi-family residential-size prototype turbocompressor heat pump  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimental program was conducted to further define, improve and demonstrate the performance characteristics and operational features of an existing 18-ton solar-powered prototype heat pump. The prototype heat pump is nominally sized for multi-family residential applications and provides both space heating and cooling. It incorporates a turbocompressor specially designed to operate at peak temperatures consistent with medium concentration collectors. The major efforts in this program phase included modification and improvement of the instrumentation sensors, the laboratory simulation equipment and selected heat pump components. After implementing these modifications, performance testing was conducted for a total operating time of approximately 250 hours. Experimental test results compared favorably with performance data calculated using the UTRC computer prediction program for the same boundary conditions. A series of tests was conducted continuously over a 12-h period to simulate operation (in the cooling mode) of the prototype heat pump under conditions typical of an actual installation. The test demonstrated that the heat pump could match the cooling load profile of a multi-family residential building. During the system performance testing, sufficient data were taken to identify the performance of each of the major components (e.g. turbine, compressor, heat exchangers, R11 pump). Component performance is compared with that calculated using the UTRC computer predict program and with data supplied by their manufacturers. The performance capabilities of the prototype heat pump system have been documented and recommendations are made for further design improvements which could be included in a MOD-2 configuration. The MOD-2 configuration would incorporate features that would improve system performance, reduce capital cost and most importantly improve system reliability.

Not Available

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Black Hills Power - Residential Customer Rebate Program (South...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Program Applicable Sector Multi-Family Residential, Residential Eligible Technologies Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Heat pumps, Water Heaters, Geothermal Heat Pumps,...

10

Black Hills Power - Residential Customer Rebate Program (Wyoming...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Program Applicable Sector Multi-Family Residential, Residential Eligible Technologies Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Heat pumps, Water Heaters, Geothermal Heat Pumps,...

11

Burlington Electric Department - Multi-Family Rental Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Savings For Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting...

12

Draft Environmental Assessment for Direct Final Rule, 10 CFR 434, "Energy Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise High-Rise Multi-FamilyResidential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Re  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

"Energy "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings" Baseline Standards Update (DOE/EA-1871) March 16, 2011 2 Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings" Baseline Standards Update

13

Austin Energy - Multi-Family Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Austin Energy - Multi-Family Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Austin Energy - Multi-Family Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Austin Energy - Multi-Family Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate $200,000 Program Info State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Split System Air Conditioning: $200 - $550 Packaged Unit Air Conditioning: $300 - $500 Split System Heat Pumps: $250 - $600 Packaged Unit Heat Pumps: $350 - $550 Solar Screens/Solar Film: $1.00 - $1.25/sq. ft. Low E Window Replacement: $2.00/sq. ft.

14

Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1918)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1918) June 28, 2013 1 Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1918) SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this environmental assessment (EA) for DOE's Final Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings". The Final Rule updates the baseline standard in 10 CFR 433 to the latest private sector standard based on cost-effectiveness and DOE's determination that energy efficiency has

15

Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1918)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1918) June 28, 2013 1 Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1918) SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this environmental assessment (EA) for DOE's Final Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings". The Final Rule updates the baseline standard in 10 CFR 433 to the latest private sector standard based on cost-effectiveness and DOE's determination that energy efficiency has

16

Burlington Electric Department - Multi-Family Rental Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Multi-Family Rental Energy Multi-Family Rental Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Burlington Electric Department - Multi-Family Rental Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Rebates totaling over 2,500 must be pre-approved by BED More than 15 free CFL's per apartment or 100 free CFL's per building requires pre-approval Program Info State Vermont Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount CFLs: Free Ventilation Systems: $110/unit Boilers: $2/MBh Furnaces: $2/MBh Electronically Commutated Motor: $100 Refrigerators: $150/unit Lighting: In-store discounts Provider Burlington Electric Department Burlington Electric Department offers an innovative rebate program geared

17

Environmental Assessment for Direct Final Rule, 10 CFR 434, Energy Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-FamilyResidential BuildingsŽ and 10 CFR 435, Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings"  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Proposed Rule, 10 CFR 433, Proposed Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1463) 2 SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE's Proposed Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low- Rise Residential Buildings". Section 305(a) of the Energy Conservation and Production

18

Environmental Assessment for Direct Final Rule, 10 CFR 434, Energy Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-FamilyResidential BuildingsŽ and 10 CFR 435, Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings"  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proposed Rule, 10 CFR 433, Proposed Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1463) 2 SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE's Proposed Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Sustainable Design and Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low- Rise Residential Buildings". Section 305(a) of the Energy Conservation and Production

19

Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Distribution System Recommendations for the 2008 Title- 24 Residential Building Energy Efficiency Standards .. 4 Multi-FamilyWater Distribution System Recommendations for the 2008 Title- 24 Residential Building Energy Efficiency Standards 11 Multi-FamilyWater Distribution System Recommendations for the 2008 Title- 24 Residential Building Energy Efficiency Standards 48 Multi-Family

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Draft Environmental Assessment for Direct Final Rule, 10 CFR 434, Energy Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise High-Rise Multi-FamilyResidential BuildingsŽ and 10 CFR 435, Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Re  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1463) Environmental Assessment for Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Commercial and High-Rise Multi-Family Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR 435, "Energy Efficiency Standards for New Federal Residential Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1463) SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE's Final Rule, 10 CFR 433, "Energy Efficiency Standards for

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-family residential systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Renewable Energy Systems Tax Credit (Personal) | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Personal) Renewable Energy Systems Tax Credit (Personal) Eligibility Commercial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings For Bioenergy Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating...

22

ConEd (Gas) - Multi-family Energy Efficiency Incentives Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ConEd (Gas) - Multi-family Energy Efficiency Incentives Program ConEd (Gas) - Multi-family Energy Efficiency Incentives Program ConEd (Gas) - Multi-family Energy Efficiency Incentives Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Construction Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Steam Boiler: $2500 Energy Management System: 70% of total cost Program Info Expiration Date 12/31/2015 State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Hot Water Gas Boilers (85%-89% TE): $1000-$3500/boiler Hot Water Gas Condensing Boilers (90%+ TE): $2000-$15,000/boiler Gas Steam Boilers: $700/boiler (300 MBH) Heating System Clean and Tune: $225/boiler

23

PPL Electric Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program PPL Electric Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings For Home...

24

Benton PUD - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Benton PUD - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings For Appliances &...

25

Retrofit wall system for insulation and lead encasement in older multi-family housing.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an approach to modernization or rehabilitation of buildings with uninsulated masonry walls that have lead-based paint hazards or deteriorated plaster walls. The approach provides a solution to lead contamination on the walls, increased energy efficiency and comfort improvements associated with better insulated building envelopes. The system sheaths or replaces damaged or contaminated walls with a tight, well-insulated, durable interior surface. The costs of this system are estimated to be less than those of other insulated wall systems. Modeling of the impact of this system shows significant improvement in energy performance. The energy savings over the life of this durable system contribute to significantly offset the often-times sizeable cost of lead hazard remediation.

Wendt, R. L.

1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

26

California Solar Initiative - Multi-Family Affordable Solar Housing (MASH)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

California Solar Initiative - Multi-Family Affordable Solar Housing California Solar Initiative - Multi-Family Affordable Solar Housing (MASH) Program California Solar Initiative - Multi-Family Affordable Solar Housing (MASH) Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State California Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Track 1: Fully Subscribed Track 2: Closed '''''Track 2 was closed in 2011. Track 1 incentives have been fully subscribed for all three program administrators and waitlists have been established. Contact the appropriate program administrator for up to date information on the status of Track 1. ''''' The California Solar Initiative (CSI) provides financial incentives to customers in investor-owned utility (IOU) territories of Pacific Gas and

27

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential BuildingsŽ  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR Part 435 "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1778) 2 SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE's Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential

28

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential BuildingsŽ  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR Part 435 "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1778) 2 SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE's Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential

29

Lane Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Loan Programs Lane Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Programs Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings For Home...

30

Renovating Residential HVAC Systems HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- 1 - LBNL 57406 Renovating Residential HVAC Systems HVAC Systems J.A. McWilliams and I.S. Walker and Air Conditioning), and Stacy Hunt and Ananda Harzell (IBACOS). #12;- 3 - Renovating Residential HVAC Guideline for Residential HVAC Retrofits (http

31

Puget Sound Energy - Multi-Family Efficiency Programs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Puget Sound Energy - Multi-Family Efficiency Programs Puget Sound Energy - Multi-Family Efficiency Programs < Back Eligibility Construction Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Manufacturing Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Solar Swimming Pool Heaters Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Multi-Family Retrofit CFLs: $20/fixture or FREE LEDs: $20- $30 Windows/Sliding Glass Doors: $6 - $8/sq. ft. Insulation: $0.75/sq. ft. In-Unit Water Heater: $50/unit Clothes Washer: $50 - $100 In-Unit Refrigerator: $20 Solar Pool Heater: Not Specified

32

Ameren Illinois (Electric) - Multi-Family Properties Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ameren Illinois (Electric) - Multi-Family Properties Energy Ameren Illinois (Electric) - Multi-Family Properties Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Ameren Illinois (Electric) - Multi-Family Properties Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Manufacturing Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate See rebate amounts listed above Program Info State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount '''Common Area Efficiency''' CFL's: $1.50 Modular CFL's: $23-$26 T8 Lamps: $7-$12, depending on ballast and wattage Occupancy Sensors: $25 LED Exit Sign: $22 In-Unit Efficiency Installations: CFLs, pipe insulation and water savings

33

NREL: Energy Systems Integration - Residential and Commercial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential and Commercial Integration Energy systems integration R&D at the small-scale, residential and commercial integration level encompasses diverse technologies such as...

34

Be SMART Multi-Family Efficiency Loan Program (Maryland) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Multi-Family Efficiency Loan Program (Maryland) Multi-Family Efficiency Loan Program (Maryland) Be SMART Multi-Family Efficiency Loan Program (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Other Ventilation Manufacturing Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Not specified Program Info Funding Source American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA); State Energy Program State Maryland Program Type State Loan Program Rebate Amount Varies Provider Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development Note: The eligible technologies listed above are only examples of some

35

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inResidentialSpaceConditioning Systems. Canadianin residential space conditioning systems. Keywords:in residential space conditioning systems. This standard

Walker, Iain S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Holyoke Gas and Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Holyoke Gas and Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program Holyoke Gas and Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program Eligibility Multi-Family Residential...

37

Columbia Water & Light - Residential Super Saver Loans | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Super Saver Loans Columbia Water & Light - Residential Super Saver Loans Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings For Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization...

38

Detroit Public Lighting Department - Residential Energy Wise...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Multi-Family Residential, Residential Eligible Technologies Ceiling Fan, Lighting, LED Lighting Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector Utility Energy Category Energy...

39

Residential Geothermal Systems Credit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A resident individual taxpayer of Montana who installs a geothermal heating or cooling system in their principal dwelling can claim a tax credit based on the installation costs of the system, not...

40

Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control of Ventilation Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rudd. 2007. Review of residential ventilation technologies.2009. EISG Final Report: Residential Integrated VentilationDesign and Operation of Residential Cooling Systems. Proc.

Sherman, Max H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-family residential systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

residential demand module (RDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for seven marketed energy sources plus solar and geothermal energy. RDM is a structural model and its forecasts are built up from projections of the residential housing stock and of the energy-consuming equipment contained therein. The components of RDM and its interactions with the NEMS system are shown in Figure 5. NEMS provides forecasts of residential energy prices, population, and housing starts, which are used by RDM to develop forecasts of energy consumption by fuel and Census division. residential demand module (RDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for seven marketed energy sources plus solar and geothermal energy. RDM is a structural model and its forecasts are built up from projections of the residential housing stock and of the energy-consuming equipment contained therein. The components of RDM and its interactions with the NEMS system are shown in Figure 5. NEMS provides forecasts of residential energy prices, population, and housing starts, which are used by RDM to develop forecasts of energy consumption by fuel and Census division. Figure 5. Residential Demand Module Structure RDM incorporates the effects of four broadly-defined determinants of energy consumption: economic and demographic effects, structural effects, technology turnover and advancement effects, and energy market effects. Economic and demographic effects include the number, dwelling type (single-family, multi-family or mobile homes), occupants per household, and location of housing units. Structural effects include increasing average dwelling size and changes in the mix of desired end-use services provided by energy (new end uses and/or increasing penetration of current end uses, such as the increasing popularity of electronic equipment and computers). Technology effects include changes in the stock of installed equipment caused by normal turnover of old, worn out equipment with newer versions which tend to be more energy efficient, the integrated effects of equipment and building shell (insulation level) in new construction, and in the projected availability of even more energy-efficient equipment in the future. Energy market effects include the short-run effects of energy prices on energy demands, the longer-run effects of energy prices on the efficiency of purchased equipment and the efficiency of building shells, and limitations on minimum levels of efficiency imposed by legislated efficiency standards.

42

Residential Building Renovations | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Building Renovations Residential Building Renovations Residential Building Renovations October 16, 2013 - 4:57pm Addthis Renewable Energy Options Residential Building Renovations Photovoltaics Daylighting Solar Water Heating Geothermal Heat Pumps (GHP) Biomass Heating In some circumstances, Federal agencies may face construction or renovation of residential units, whether single-family, multi-family, barracks, or prisons. Based on typical domestic energy needs, solar water heating and photovoltaic systems are both options, depending on the cost of offset utilities. These systems can be centralized for multi-family housing to improve system economics. Daylighting can reduce energy costs and increase livability of units. Geothermal heat pumps (GHP) are a particularly cost-effective option in

43

Laclede Gas Company - Residential High Efficiency Heating Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential High Efficiency Heating Rebate Residential High Efficiency Heating Rebate Program Laclede Gas Company - Residential High Efficiency Heating Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Heating System: 2 maximum Programmable Thermostats: 2 maximum Multi-Family Property Owners: 50 thermostat rebates, 50 furnace rebates over the life of the program Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Gas Furnace: $150 - $200 Gas Boiler: $150 Programmable Setback Thermostat: $25 Gas Water Heater: $50 - $200 Provider Laclede Gas Company Laclede Gas Company offers various rebates to residential customers for investing in energy efficient equipment and appliances. Residential

44

Lincoln Electric System (Residential)- Sustainable Energy Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Lincoln Electric System (LES) offers several rebates to residential customers who are interested in upgrading to energy efficient household equipment. The program includes rebates for insulation...

45

Metering Secondary Water in Residential Irrigation Systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The use of residential secondary or dual water systems for irrigation purposes is common in the western United States where water supplies are scarce. While (more)

Richards, Gregory L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Florida Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Florida Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Program Florida Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Program Florida Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Installer/Contractor Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Insulation Design & Remodeling Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Residential Home Energy Survey: Free A/C and Heat Pump: $140 - $1930, depending on system size and efficiency rating Reflective Roof (Metal or Tile): $325 Duct Test: Discounted Single Family Duct System Repair: up to $154 Multi-family and Manufactured Home Duct System Repair: $60/account Ceiling and Roof Insulation: varies based upon existing insulation levels

47

SIMULATION OF RESIDENTIAL HVAC SYSTEM PERFORMANCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 LBNL-47622 SIMULATION OF RESIDENTIAL HVAC SYSTEM PERFORMANCE Walker, I., Siegel, J ..................................................... 9 #12;3 ABSTRACT In many parts of North America residential HVAC systems are installed outside of the simulations is that they are dynamic - which accounts for cyclic losses from the HVAC system and the effect

48

Unitil - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unitil - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs Unitil - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs Unitil - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs < Back Eligibility Construction Installer/Contractor Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Commercial Lighting Lighting Cooling Maximum Rebate Home Performance with Energy Star: $4,000 Program Info State New Hampshire Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Home Performance with Energy Star: 50% Clothes Washer: $30 Refrigerator: $30 Room Air Conditioner: $20 Room Purifier: $15 CFLs: In-store discounts Provider Unitil Energy Systems

49

Energy Efficiency Fund (Electric and Gas) - Residential New Construction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Fund (Electric and Gas) - Residential New Energy Efficiency Fund (Electric and Gas) - Residential New Construction Program Energy Efficiency Fund (Electric and Gas) - Residential New Construction Program < Back Eligibility Construction Installer/Contractor Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heating Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Varies Program Info Funding Source Energy Efficiency Fund State Connecticut Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Varies by technology for prescriptive measures and whether the applicant is seeking ENERGY STAR Certification or Home Energy Rating System (HERS)

50

NYSEG (Electric) - Residential Efficiency Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NYSEG (Electric) - Residential Efficiency Program NYSEG (Electric) - Residential Efficiency Program NYSEG (Electric) - Residential Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info Funding Source System Benefits Charge Start Date 5/1/2011 State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerator Recycling: $50 rebate and free removal Multifamily Dwelling Units: 6 free CFLS and smart power strips Multifamily Common Area Ligting: 50% off custom lighting upgrades Provider NYSEG/RG&E NYSEG is offering residential electric customers rebates for recycling refrigerators, and its multifamily customers free CFLs, smart power strips and 50% off common area lighting equipment. All equipment requirements must

51

Measuring Residential Ventilation System Airflows: Part 2 - Field...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measuring Residential Ventilation System Airflows: Part 2 - Field Evaluation of Airflow Meter Devices and System Flow Verification Title Measuring Residential Ventilation System...

52

Residential Power Systems for Distributed Generation Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an update to "Technology Assessment of Residential Power Systems for Distributed Generation Markets" (EPRIsolutions report 1000772). That previous report dealt with fuel cells, stirling engine generators, and reciprocating engine generators; this current report focuses on polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) and solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power systems fueled with natural gas or propane and sized for residential loads.

2002-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

53

Troubleshooting the residential air conditioning system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to effectively diagnose problems in a residential air conditioning system, the technician should develop and follow a logical step-by-step troubleshooting procedure. A list of problems, along with possible causes and solutions, that a technician may encounter when servicing a residential air conditioner is presented.

Puzio, H. [Sussex County Vocational Technical School, Sparta, NJ (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems in California: The Effect...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems in California: The Effect on Home Sales Prices Title Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems in California: The Effect on Home Sales Prices...

55

Application analysis of solar total energy systems to the residential sector. Volume II, energy requirements. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project analyzed the application of solar total energy systems to appropriate segments of the residential sector and determined their market penetration potential. This volume covers the work done on energy requirements definition and includes the following: (1) identification of the single-family and multi-family market segments; (2) regionalization of the United States; (3) electrical and thermal load requirements, including time-dependent profiles; (4) effect of conservation measures on energy requirements; and (5) verification of simulated load data with real data.

Not Available

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Property Tax Exemption for Residential Solar Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

[http://www.nmlegis.gov/Sessions/10%20Regular/final/HB0233.pdf HB 233 of 2010] exempted residential solar energy systems from property tax assessments. According to state law, for the purposes of...

57

Peoples Gas - Residential Rebate Program (Illinois) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Peoples Gas - Residential Rebate Program (Illinois) Peoples Gas - Residential Rebate Program (Illinois) Peoples Gas - Residential Rebate Program (Illinois) < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate 100% of project cost Program Info Expiration Date 05/31/2013 State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Furnace: $300 -$500 Boiler: varies, depending on size and efficiency Boiler Controls: $100/unit Complete HVAC System Replacement: $650 - $1,000 Water Heater (Tankless): $450 Water Heater (Indirect): $275 Water Heater (Storage Tank): $100 Attic Insulation: $0.10/sq ft Programmable Thermostat: $50

58

FEASIBILITY OF WIND TO SERVE UPPER SKAGIT'S BOW HILL TRIBAL LANDS AND FEASIBILITY UPDATE FOR RESIDENTIAL RENEWABLE ENERGY.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two year wind resource assessment was conducted to determine the feasibility of developing a community scale wind generation system for the Upper Skagit Indian Tribe?s Bow Hill land base, and the project researched residential wind resource technologies to determine the feasibility of contributing renewable wind resource to the mix of energy options for our single and multi-family residential units.

RICH, LAUREN

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

59

City Utilities of Springfield - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

available for programmable thermostats, insulation upgrades, whole home upgrades and HVAC equipment. The HVAC rebates are available for single- and multi-family residential...

60

California Solar Initiative - Multi-Family Affordable Solar Housing...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

California Solar Initiative - Multi-Family Affordable Solar Housing (MASH) Program California Solar Initiative - Multi-Family Affordable Solar Housing (MASH) Program < Back...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-family residential systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Solar Leasing for Residential Photovoltaic Systems (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This publication examines the solar lease option for residential PV systems and describes two solar lease programs already in place.

Not Available

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Indoor Air Quality Impacts of Residential HVAC Systems ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. NISTIR 5559 Indoor Air Quality Impacts of Residential HVAC Systems Phase 11.AReport: Baseline and Preliminary Simulations ...

1997-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

63

Shared inverter residential photovoltaic system concept  

SciTech Connect

A residential photovoltaic system concept involving a number of separate roof-mounted arrays all connected to a single utility-interactive inverter is proposed and analyzed in comparison to systems employing one inverter for each array. The conclusion of significance is that such shared inverter systems offer a costs savings of approximately 10 percent. It is observed that other substantial benefits might derive from a reduction in the number of tie-in points between distributed generators and the electric utility grid.

Kern, E.C.; Solman, F.J.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

MICRO-CHP System for Residential Applications  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of progress under Phase I of a project to develop and commercialize a micro-CHP system for residential applications that provides electrical power, heating, and cooling for the home. This is the first phase of a three-phase effort in which the residential micro-CHP system will be designed (Phase I), developed and tested in the laboratory (Phase II); and further developed and field tested (Phase III). The project team consists of Advanced Mechanical Technology, Inc. (AMTI), responsible for system design and integration; Marathon Engine Systems, Inc. (MES), responsible for design of the engine-generator subsystem; AO Smith, responsible for design of the thermal storage and water heating subsystems; Trane, a business of American Standard Companies, responsible for design of the HVAC subsystem; and AirXchange, Inc., responsible for design of the mechanical ventilation and dehumidification subsystem.

Joseph Gerstmann

2009-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

65

Residential energy gateway system in smart grid.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This project discusses about the residential energy gateway in the Smart Grid. A residential energy gateway is a critical component in the Home Energy Management (more)

Thirumurthy, Vinod Govindswamy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Residential Solar Sales Tax Exemption | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Solar Sales Tax Exemption Residential Solar Sales Tax Exemption Residential Solar Sales Tax Exemption < Back Eligibility Commercial General Public/Consumer Industrial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Solar Heating Buying & Making Electricity Swimming Pool Heaters Water Heating Program Info Start Date 09/01/2005 State New York Program Type Sales Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% exemption from state sales tax Provider New York State Department of Taxation and Finance New York enacted legislation in July 2005 exempting the sale and installation of residential solar-energy systems from the state's sales and compensating use taxes. The exemption was extended to non-residential solar systems in August 2012 (S.B. 3203), effective beginning January 1, 2013.

67

Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and statewide average residential electricity rates below $Average statewide residential electricity rates were takenFor Residential Wind Systems state electricity rates, which

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Assessment of Residential GSHP System  

SciTech Connect

This report first briefly reviews geothermal heat pump (GHP) technology and the current status of the GHP industry in the United States. Then it assesses the potential national benefits, in terms of energy savings, reduced summer peak electrical demand, consumer energy cost savings, and reduced CO{sub 2} emissions from retrofitting the space heating, space cooling, and water heating systems in existing U.S. single-family homes with state-of-the-art GHP systems. The investment for retrofitting typical U.S. single-family homes with state-of-the-art GHP systems is also analyzed using the metrics of net present value and levelized cost.

Liu, Xiaobing [ORNL

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Entergy Arkansas - Residential Energy Efficiency Program (Arkansas) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Entergy Arkansas - Residential Energy Efficiency Program (Arkansas) Entergy Arkansas - Residential Energy Efficiency Program (Arkansas) Entergy Arkansas - Residential Energy Efficiency Program (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Installer/Contractor Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $175 incentive toward the cost of a high-performance AC tune-up of a system size 5 tons or less $200 incentive toward the cost of a high-performance AC tune-up of a system size over 5 tons Tier 1 Home Energy Survey --- Survey $75 discount

70

Home Energy Article: A Systems Approach to Retrofitting Residential HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Retrofitting a Residential HVAC System, Lawrence Berkeleyducts. New downsized ducts and HVAC equipment. The ducts areto Retrofitting Residential HVAC Systems J.A. McWilliams and

McWilliams, Jennifer A.; Walker, Iain S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Duquesne Light Company - Residential Solar Water Heating Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Duquesne Light Company - Residential Solar Water Heating Program Duquesne Light Company - Residential Solar Water Heating Program Duquesne Light Company - Residential Solar Water Heating Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Program Info Start Date 11/30/2009 Expiration Date 03/31/2013 State Pennsylvania Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount $286/system Provider Duquesne Light Company Duquesne Light provides rebates to its residential customers for purchasing and installing qualifying solar water heating systems. Eligible systems may receive a flat rebate of $286 per qualifying system. Various equipment, installation, contractor, and warranty requirements apply, as summarized above and described in more detail in program documents. Customers must

72

Making the most of residential photovoltaic systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Making the Most of Residential Photovoltaic Systems, was recently produced by NREL Communications and Public Affairs. It showcases a demonstration project in Florida that produced some remarkable results by incorporating both energy efficiency and photovoltaic systems into newly built housing. The brochure points up the benefits of making wise personal choices about energy use, and how large-scale use of advanced energy technologies can benefit the nation. This is one of a series of brochures that presents stimulating information about photovoltaics, with a goal of helping to push this technology into the power-generation mix in different utilities, communities, and states.

Moon, S.; Parker, D.; Hayter, S.

1999-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

73

Case study field evaluation of a systems approach to retrofitting a residential HVAC system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Practices for Residential HVAC Systems. Boston, MA. Jump,techniques for measuring HVAC grille air flows". ASHRAEPractices Guide for Residential HVAC Retrofits. LBNL 53592.

Walker, Iain S.; McWiliams, Jennifer A.; Konopacki, Steven J.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Kansas City Power and Light - Cool Homes Residential Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kansas City Power and Light - Cool Homes Residential Rebate Program Kansas City Power and Light - Cool Homes Residential Rebate Program Kansas City Power and Light - Cool Homes Residential Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount SEER 14/15: $650 SEER 16/Greater: $850 Provider Kansas City Power and Light Kansas City Power and Light (KCP&L) offers rebates to residential customers to help offset the cost of replacing inefficient central AC and heat pump systems with newer, more efficient models. In order to qualify for a rebate, the system being replaced must have an EER of 8.0 or less, as tested by a CheckMe!-trained HVAC contractor. The replacement of "dead"

75

Seattle City Light - Multi-Family Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting: 85% discount on installation costs Insulation: 50% discount on installation costs Window Replacement: 3 - 5sq. ft. Seattle City...

76

EIA - The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003-Residential  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Demand Module Residential Demand Module The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003 Residential Demand Module Figure 5. Residential Demand Module Structure. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Residential Demand Module Table. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. NEMS Residential Module Equipment Summary Table. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Characteristics of Selected Equipment Table. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. printer-friendly version The residential demand module (RDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for seven marketed energy sources plus solar and geothermal energy. RDM is a structural model and its forecasts are built up from

77

Residential Solar Tax Credit | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Tax Credit Solar Tax Credit Residential Solar Tax Credit < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Maximum Rebate 5,000 for solar-energy systems Program Info Start Date 01/01/1998 (solar electric); 01/01/2006 (solar thermal) State New York Program Type Personal Tax Credit Rebate Amount 25% for solar-electric (PV) and solar-thermal systems; for third-party owned systems this is in reference to the aggregate amount owed under the contract rather than the amount owed in any single year Provider New York State Department of Taxation and Finance Enacted in August 1997, this personal income tax credit originally applied to expenditures on solar-electric (PV) equipment used on residential

78

RG&E - Residential Efficiency Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Residential Efficiency Program - Residential Efficiency Program RG&E - Residential Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info Funding Source PSC-mandated System Benefits Charge (SBC) State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerator Recycling: $50 rebate and free removal Multifamily Dwelling Units: 6 free CFLS and smart power strips Multifamily Common Area Ligting: 50% off custom lighting upgrades RG&E is offering residential electric customers rebates for recycling refrigerators, and its multifamily customers free CFLs, smart power strips and 50% off common area lighting equipment. All equipment requirements must be met in order to receive rebates. See the program website for details.

79

Independence Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Independence Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Independence Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Independence Power and Light - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Central A/C: $109 - $384 Heat Pumps: $259 - $701 Heat Pumps Water Heaters: $300 Provider Independence Power and Light Independence Power and Light (IPL) offers rebates to residential customers for purchasing new, energy efficient appliances. Rebates are available on central air conditioning systems, heat pumps, and water heaters. Rebates on equipment vary based upon size, capacity, and efficiency of the unit. See

80

An Analysis of the Effects of Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Home Sales Prices in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems on HomeEffects of Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Homewith existing photovoltaic (PV) energy systems have sold in

Hoen, Ben

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-family residential systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Residential Hot Water Distribution Systems: Roundtable Session  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

David Springer, Davis Energy Group Bion D. Howard, Building Environmental Science & Technology ABSTRACT Residential building practice currently ignores the losses of energy...

82

Residential Alternative Energy System Tax Credit | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Alternative Energy System Tax Credit Residential Alternative Energy System Tax Credit Residential Alternative Energy System Tax Credit < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Solar Heating Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Water Water Heating Wind Maximum Rebate $500 per individual taxpayer; up to $1,000 per household Program Info Start Date 1/1/2002 Expiration Date none State Montana Program Type Personal Tax Credit Rebate Amount 100% Provider Montana Department of Environmental Quality Residential taxpayers who install an energy system using a recognized non-fossil form of energy on their home after December 31, 2001 are eligible for a tax credit equal to the amount of the cost of the system and

83

Commonwealth Solar Hot Water Residential Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commonwealth Solar Hot Water Residential Program Commonwealth Solar Hot Water Residential Program Commonwealth Solar Hot Water Residential Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Solar Heating Water Heating Maximum Rebate $3,500 per building or 25% of total installed costs Program Info Funding Source Massachusetts Renewable Energy Trust Fund Start Date 02/07/2011 Expiration Date 12/31/2016 State Massachusetts Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Base rate: $45 X SRCC rating in thousands btu/panel/day (Category D, Mildly Cloudy Day) Additional $200/system for systems with parts manufactured in Massachusetts Additional $1,500/system for metering installation Adder for natural disaster relief of twice the base rebate.

84

Application for State Land Use Lease: Commercial/Multi-Family...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Application for State Land Use Lease: CommercialMulti-Family Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0)...

85

Austin Energy - Multi-Family Energy Efficiency Rebate Program...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 - 4bulb Hardwire Retrofits: 9 Fixture Replacement 9 - 12 High Performance Ballast: 6 - 11 Occupancy Sensors: 5 - 32 The Austin Energy Multi-Family Program provides...

86

Optimizing Hydronic System Performance in Residential Applications  

SciTech Connect

Even though new homes constructed with hydronic heat comprise only 3% of the market (US Census Bureau 2009), of the 115 million existing homes in the United States, almost 14 million of those homes (11%) are heated with steam or hot water systems according to 2009 US Census data. Therefore, improvements in hydronic system performance could result in significant energy savings in the US. When operating properly, the combination of a gas-fired condensing boiler with baseboard convectors and an indirect water heater is a viable option for high-efficiency residential space heating in cold climates. Based on previous research efforts, however, it is apparent that these types of systems are typically not designed and installed to achieve maximum efficiency. Furthermore, guidance on proper design and commissioning for heating contractors and energy consultants is hard to find and is not comprehensive. Through modeling and monitoring, CARB sought to determine the optimal combination(s) of components - pumps, high efficiency heat sources, plumbing configurations and controls - that result in the highest overall efficiency for a hydronic system when baseboard convectors are used as the heat emitter. The impact of variable-speed pumps on energy use and system performance was also investigated along with the effects of various control strategies and the introduction of thermal mass.

Arena, L.; Faakye, O.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems in California: The Effect on Home Sales Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems in California: Themarginal impacts of photovoltaic (PV) energy systems on home

Hoen, Ben

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Residential hot water distribution systems: Roundtablesession  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residential building practice currently ignores the lossesof energy and water caused by the poor design of hot water systems. Theselosses include: combustion and standby losses from water heaters, thewaste of water (and energy) while waiting for hot water to get to thepoint of use; the wasted heat as water cools down in the distributionsystem after a draw; heat losses from recirculation systems and thediscarded warmth of waste water as it runs down the drain. Severaltechnologies are available that save energy (and water) by reducing theselosses or by passively recovering heat from wastewater streams and othersources. Energy savings from some individual technologies are reported tobe as much as 30 percent. Savings calculations of prototype systemsincluding bundles of technologies have been reported above 50 percent.This roundtable session will describe the current practices, summarizethe results of past and ongoing studies, discuss ways to think about hotwater system efficiency, and point to areas of future study. We will alsorecommend further steps to reduce unnecessary losses from hot waterdistribution systems.

Lutz, James D.; Klein, Gary; Springer, David; Howard, Bion D.

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Simulation of residential HVAC system performance  

SciTech Connect

In many parts of North America residential HVAC systems are installed outside conditioned space. This leads to significant energy losses and poor occupant comfort due to conduction and air leakage losses from the air distribution ducts. In addition, cooling equipment performance is sensitive to air flow and refrigerant charge that have been found to be far from manufacturers specifications in most systems. The simulation techniques discussed in this paper were developed in an effort to provide guidance on the savings potentials and comfort gains that can be achieved by improving ducts (sealing air leaks) and equipment (correct air-flow and refrigerant charge). The simulations include the complex air flow and thermal interactions between duct systems, their surroundings and the conditioned space. They also include cooling equipment response to air flow and refrigerant charge effects. Another key aspect of the simulations is that they are dynamic--which accounts for cyclic losses from the HVAC system and the effect of cycle length on energy and comfort performance.

Walker, I.S.; Siegel, J.A.; Degenetais, G.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Residential solar photovoltaic systems: Final report for the Northeast Residential Experiment Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers research and development work conducted by the MIT Energy Lab. from July 1982 through June 1986. This Energy Lab. work in the field of solar photovoltaic systems followed six years of similar work at the MIT Lincoln Lab. under the same contract with the US DOE. The final report from the Lincoln Lab. period was published by Lincoln Lab. in 1983. During the period of Energy Lab. involvement, the project focused on the refinement of residential scale, roof-mounted photovoltaic systems for application in the northeastern US. Concurrent with the conclusion of MIT`s involvement, the New England Electric Co. is building a major field test of residential photovoltaics in Gardner, Massachusetts to determine experimentally the effects of photovoltaics on electric power company operations. Using systems designs and technology developed at MIT, the long-term performance of these thirty residential systems in Gardner will provide a measure of our success.

Kern, E.C. Jr.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Micro-CHP Systems for Residential Applications  

SciTech Connect

Integrated micro-CHP (Cooling, Heating and Power) system solutions represent an opportunity to address all of the following requirements at once: conservation of scarce energy resources, moderation of pollutant release into our environment, and assured comfort for home-owners. The objective of this effort was to establish strategies for development, demonstration, and sustainable commercialization of cost-effective integrated CHP systems for residential applications. A unified approach to market and opportunity identification, technology assessment, specific system designs, adaptation to modular product platform component conceptual designs was employed. UTRC's recommendation to U.S. Department of Energy is to go ahead with the execution of the proposed product development and commercialization strategy plan under Phase II of this effort. Recent indicators show the emergence of micro-CHP. More than 12,000 micro-CHP systems have been sold worldwide so far, around 7,500 in 2004. Market projections predict a world-wide market growth over 35% per year. In 2004 the installations were mainly in Europe (73.5%) and in Japan (26.4%). The market in North-America is almost non-existent (0.1%). High energy consumption, high energy expenditure, large spark-spread (i.e., difference between electricity and fuel costs), big square footage, and high income are the key conditions for market acceptance. Today, these conditions are best found in the states of New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, New England states. A multiple stage development plan is proposed to address risk mitigation. These stages include concept development and supplier engagement, component development, system integration, system demonstration, and field trials. A two stage commercialization strategy is suggested based on two product versions. The first version--a heat and power system named Micro-Cogen, provides the heat and essential electrical power to the homeowner. In its proposed embodiment, the system has a 2kW prime mover integrated to a furnace platform. The second version is a Micro-Trigen system with heating, cooling and power. It has the same Micro-Cogen platform integrated with a 14kW thermally activated chiller. A Stirling engine is suggested as a promising path for the prime mover. A LiBr absorption chiller is today's best technology in term of readiness level. Paybacks are acceptable for the Micro-Cogen version. However, there is no clear economically viable path for a Micro-Trigen version with today's available technology. This illustrates the importance of financial incentives to home owners in the initial stage of micro-CHP commercialization. It will help create the necessary conditions of volume demand to start transitioning to mass-production and cost reduction. Incentives to the manufacturers will help improve efficiency, enhance reliability, and lower cost, making micro-CHP products more attractive. Successful development of a micro-CHP system for residential applications has the potential to provide significant benefits to users, customers, manufacturers, and suppliers of such systems and, in general, to the nation as a whole. The benefits to the ultimate user are a comfortable and healthy home environment at an affordable cost, potential utility savings, and a reliable supply of energy. Manufacturers, component suppliers, and system integrators will see growth of a new market segment for integrated energy products. The benefits to the nation include significantly increased energy efficiency, reduced consumption of fossil fuels, pollutant and CO{sub 2} emissions from power generation, enhanced security from power interruptions as well as enhanced economic activity and job creation. An integrated micro-CHP energy system provides advantages over conventional power generation, since the energy is used more efficiently by means of efficient heat recovery. Foreign companies are readily selling products, mostly in Europe, and it is urgent to react promptly to these offerings that will soon em

Timothy DeValve; Benoit Olsommer

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

92

Micro-CHP Systems for Residential Applications  

SciTech Connect

Integrated micro-CHP (Cooling, Heating and Power) system solutions represent an opportunity to address all of the following requirements at once: conservation of scarce energy resources, moderation of pollutant release into our environment, and assured comfort for home-owners. The objective of this effort was to establish strategies for development, demonstration, and sustainable commercialization of cost-effective integrated CHP systems for residential applications. A unified approach to market and opportunity identification, technology assessment, specific system designs, adaptation to modular product platform component conceptual designs was employed. UTRC's recommendation to U.S. Department of Energy is to go ahead with the execution of the proposed product development and commercialization strategy plan under Phase II of this effort. Recent indicators show the emergence of micro-CHP. More than 12,000 micro-CHP systems have been sold worldwide so far, around 7,500 in 2004. Market projections predict a world-wide market growth over 35% per year. In 2004 the installations were mainly in Europe (73.5%) and in Japan (26.4%). The market in North-America is almost non-existent (0.1%). High energy consumption, high energy expenditure, large spark-spread (i.e., difference between electricity and fuel costs), big square footage, and high income are the key conditions for market acceptance. Today, these conditions are best found in the states of New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, New England states. A multiple stage development plan is proposed to address risk mitigation. These stages include concept development and supplier engagement, component development, system integration, system demonstration, and field trials. A two stage commercialization strategy is suggested based on two product versions. The first version--a heat and power system named Micro-Cogen, provides the heat and essential electrical power to the homeowner. In its proposed embodiment, the system has a 2kW prime mover integrated to a furnace platform. The second version is a Micro-Trigen system with heating, cooling and power. It has the same Micro-Cogen platform integrated with a 14kW thermally activated chiller. A Stirling engine is suggested as a promising path for the prime mover. A LiBr absorption chiller is today's best technology in term of readiness level. Paybacks are acceptable for the Micro-Cogen version. However, there is no clear economically viable path for a Micro-Trigen version with today's available technology. This illustrates the importance of financial incentives to home owners in the initial stage of micro-CHP commercialization. It will help create the necessary conditions of volume demand to start transitioning to mass-production and cost reduction. Incentives to the manufacturers will help improve efficiency, enhance reliability, and lower cost, making micro-CHP products more attractive. Successful development of a micro-CHP system for residential applications has the potential to provide significant benefits to users, customers, manufacturers, and suppliers of such systems and, in general, to the nation as a whole. The benefits to the ultimate user are a comfortable and healthy home environment at an affordable cost, potential utility savings, and a reliable supply of energy. Manufacturers, component suppliers, and system integrators will see growth of a new market segment for integrated energy products. The benefits to the nation include significantly increased energy efficiency, reduced consumption of fossil fuels, pollutant and CO{sub 2} emissions from power generation, enhanced security from power interruptions as well as enhanced economic activity and job creation. An integrated micro-CHP energy system provides advantages over conventional power generation, since the energy is used more efficiently by means of efficient heat recovery. Foreign companies are readily selling products, mostly in Europe, and it is urgent to react promptly to these offerings that will soon emerge on the U.S

Timothy DeValve; Benoit Olsommer

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

93

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance Title Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-3383E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Walker, Iain S., Darryl J. Dickerhoff, and William W. Delp Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Keywords air flow measurement, air leakage, blower power measurement, blowers, energy performance of buildings group, forced air systems, furnaces, indoor environment department, other, public interest energy research (pier) program, residential hvac Abstract This project evaluated the air leakage and electric power consumption of Residential HVAC components, with a particular focus on air leakage of furnace cabinets. Laboratory testing of HVAC components indicated that air leakage can be significant and highly variable from unit to unit - indicating the need for a standard test method and specifying maximum allowable air leakage in California State energy codes. To further this effort, this project provided technical assistance for the development of a national standard for Residential HVAC equipment air leakage. This standard is being developed by ASHRAE and is called "ASHRAE Standard 193P - Method of test for Determining the Air Leakage Rate of HVAC Equipment". The final part of this project evaluated techniques for measurement of furnace blower power consumption. A draft test procedure for power consumption was developed in collaboration with the Canadian General Standards Board: CSA 823 "Performance Standard for air handlers in residential space conditioning systems".

94

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 1998 - Residential Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

RESIDENTIAL DEMAND MODULE RESIDENTIAL DEMAND MODULE blueball.gif (205 bytes) Housing Stock Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Appliance Stock Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Technology Choice Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Shell Integrity Submodule blueball.gif (205 bytes) Fuel Consumption Submodule The residential demand module (RDM) forecasts energy consumption by Census division for seven marketed energy sources plus solar thermal and geothermal energy. The RDM is a structural model and its forecasts are built up from projections of the residential housing stock and of the energy-consuming equipment contained therein. The components of the RDM and its interactions with the NEMS system are shown in Figure 5. NEMS provides forecasts of residential energy prices, population, and housing starts,

95

Assessment of Residential Energy Management Systems for Demand Response Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update provides a description of what a residential energy management system comprises, with a focus on demand response applications. It includes findings from a survey of residential energy management system technology vendors; system pricing and availability; an overview of technology components and features; customer load monitoring and control capabilities; utility demand response control functions; communications protocols and technologies supported; and options for demand response si...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

96

EWEB - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Programs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EWEB - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Programs EWEB - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Programs EWEB - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Programs < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Ductwork: not specified Thermostats: not specified Ductless Heat Pump: $4,000 Air Source Heat Pump: $7,000 Geothermal Heat Pump: $8,000 Air Sealing: up to $800 Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Loan Program Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount Windows and Insulation: not specified Ductwork: not specified

97

Experiences and Lessons Learned With Residential Photovoltaic Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents experiences with 86-grid-connected residential photovoltaic (PV) systems located at three sites. This information is valuable to utilities in planning their use of distributed PV generation.

1991-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

98

Residential Energy Management system for optimization of on-site...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Energy Management system for optimization of on-site generation with HVAC Speaker(s): Ram Narayanamurthy Date: October 29, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 As the...

99

Residential Air-Conditioning System with Smart-Grid Functionality.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis sets forth a novel intelligent residential air-conditioning (A/C) system controller that provides optimal thermal comfort and electricity cost trade-offs for a household resident (more)

Thomas, Auswin George

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Residential Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS+) Residential Model. It also catalogues and describes critical assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and model source code.

Brian Murphy

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-family residential systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Longevity of Duct Tape in Residential Air Distribution Systems...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Longevity of Duct Tape in Residential Air Distribution Systems: 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D Joints Speaker(s): Bass Abushakra Date: July 30, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host...

102

Residential Building Stockg Assessment (RBSA)for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9/4/2013 1 Residential Building Stockg Assessment (RBSA)for Multi-Family Housing Tom Eckman Objectives Characterize Residential Sector Building Stock ­ Single Family (Four-plex and below) l if il ( i Pacific Northwest Residential Energy Survey (PNWRES92)Survey (PNWRES92) NEEA Survey of Baseline

103

Technology Assessment of Residential Power Systems for Distributed Generation Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Significant research and development (R&D) investments in fuel cell technology have led to functioning prototypes of residential fuel power systems operating on natural gas. Efforts by at least four leading companies are expected to lead to early field trials of residential power systems in 2000 and early 2001, followed by pre-commercial prototypes during 2001-2002, and commercial introduction in the 2002-2005 time frame. Other technology companies are expected to follow suit.

2000-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

104

Advanced Controls and Sustainable Systems for Residential Ventilation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Controls and Sustainable Systems for Residential Ventilation Advanced Controls and Sustainable Systems for Residential Ventilation Title Advanced Controls and Sustainable Systems for Residential Ventilation Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5968E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Turner, William J. N., and Iain S. Walker Date Published 12/2012 Keywords ashrae standard 62,2, california title 24, passive ventilation, residential ventilation, ventilation controller Abstract Whole-house ventilation systems are becoming commonplace in new construction, remodeling/renovation, and weatherization projects, driven by combinations of specific requirements for indoor air quality (IAQ), health, and compliance with standards, such as ASHRAE 62.2. At the same time we wish to reduce the energy use in homes and therefore minimize the energy used to provide ventilation. This study examined several approaches to reducing the energy requirements of providing acceptable IAQ in residential buildings. Two approaches were taken. The first used RIVEC - the Residential Integrated VEntilation Controller - a prototype ventilation controller that aims to deliver whole-house ventilation rates that comply with ventilation standards, for the minimum use of energy. The second used passive and hybrid ventilation systems, rather than mechanical systems, to provide whole-house ventilation.

105

Procedures and Standards for Residential Ventilation System Commissioning:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Procedures and Standards for Residential Ventilation System Commissioning: Procedures and Standards for Residential Ventilation System Commissioning: An Annotated Bibliography Title Procedures and Standards for Residential Ventilation System Commissioning: An Annotated Bibliography Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6142E Year of Publication 2013 Authors J. Chris Stratton, and Craig P. Wray Keywords ASHRAE 62.2, commissioning, procedures, residential, standards, ventilation Abstract Beginning with the 2008 version of Title 24, new homes in California must comply with ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 62.2-2007 requirements for residential ventilation. Where installed, the limited data available indicate that mechanical ventilation systems do not always perform optimally or even as many codes and forecasts predict. Commissioning such systems when they are installed or during subsequent building retrofits is a step towards eliminating deficiencies and optimizing the tradeoff between energy use and acceptable IAQ. Work funded by the California Energy Commission about a decade ago at Berkeley Lab documented procedures for residential commissioning, but did not focus on ventilation systems. Since then, standards and approaches for commissioning ventilation systems have been an active area of work in Europe. This report describes our efforts to collect new literature on commissioning procedures and to identify information that can be used to support the future development of residential-ventilation-specific procedures and standards. We recommend that a standardized commissioning process and a commissioning guide for practitioners be developed, along with a combined energy and IAQ benefit assessment standard and tool, and a diagnostic guide for estimating continuous pollutant emission rates of concern in residences (including a database that lists emission test data for commercially-available labeled products).

106

PECO Energy (Electric) - Non-Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PECO Energy (Electric) - Non-Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate PECO Energy (Electric) - Non-Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Pennsylvania) PECO Energy (Electric) - Non-Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Program Info Expiration Date 5/31/2013 State Pennsylvania Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Unitary and Split Air Conditioning Systems and Air Source Heat Pumps: $25-$45/ton Chillers: $10-$40/ton Ground Source Heat Pumps: $40/ton Hotel Occupancy Sensors: $20-$40 Energy Management Control System: $0.10/sq. ft. or $0.21/sq. ft.

107

Residential Bulk-Fed Wood-Pellet Central Boilers and Furnace Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Bulk-Fed Wood-Pellet Central Boilers and Furnace Rebate Residential Bulk-Fed Wood-Pellet Central Boilers and Furnace Rebate Program Residential Bulk-Fed Wood-Pellet Central Boilers and Furnace Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Maximum Rebate $6,000 Program Info Funding Source New Hampshire Renewable Energy Fund (FY 2013) Start Date 04/14/2010 Expiration Date When progr State New Hampshire Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount 30% Provider New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission The New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission (PUC) is offering rebates of 30% of the installed cost of qualifying new residential bulk-fed, wood-pellet central heating boilers or furnaces. The maximum rebate is $6,000. To qualify, systems must (1) become operational on or after May 1,

108

Berkshire Gas - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Berkshire Gas - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Berkshire Gas - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Berkshire Gas - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Construction Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Weatherization: $2,000 Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Weatherization - Single Family: 75% of cost Weatherization - Multi-Family: 50% of cost Weatherization - Low-Income: 100% of cost Furnaces: $500 - $800 Boilers: $1,000 - $1,500 Combined Boiler/Water Heater: $1,200

109

Residential Bulk-Fed Wood-Pellet Central Boilers and Furnace...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bulk-Fed Wood-Pellet Central Boilers and Furnace Rebate Program Residential Bulk-Fed Wood-Pellet Central Boilers and Furnace Rebate Program Eligibility Multi-Family Residential...

110

Cost Estimates of Electricity from a TPV Residential Heating System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A thermophotovoltaic (TPV) system was built using a 12 to 20 kWth methane burner which should be integrated into a conventional residential heating system. The TPV system is cylindrical in shape and consists of a selective Yb2O3 emitter

Gnther Palfinger; Bernd Bitnar; Wilhelm Durisch; Jean?Claude Mayor; Detlev Grtzmacher; Jens Gobrecht

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CA. CEC(2008b). ResidentialAlternativeCalculationStandardforAirHandlersinResidentialSpaceConditioningofStandardsOptionsforResidentialAirHandlerFans.

Walker, Iain S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

System integration issues of residential solar photovoltaic systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to evaluate the economic effects of residential solar PV systems on the utility's revenue, capacity, and energy requirements from the electric utility's perspective and to estimate the price that it might pay for surplus energy compared to what it would charge for deficits. The power and energy generated by the solar PV systems reduce the capital and operating costs that would otherwise be incurred by the utility. These avoided costs suggest what the utility might pay for surplus solar PV energy. The avoided costs are evaluated under three integration hypotheses, namely: (1) the utility has no system storage, (2) the utility has system storage, and (3) the solar PV systems are supported by dedicated storage devices, the purpose of which is to minimize sales to and purchases from the utility. Findings are reported in detail. (WHK)

Yamayee, Z.A.; Peschon, J.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Large Scale Geothermal Exchange System for Residential, Office and Retail  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Exchange System for Residential, Office and Retail Geothermal Exchange System for Residential, Office and Retail Development Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Large Scale Geothermal Exchange System for Residential, Office and Retail Development Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act - Geothermal Technologies Program: Ground Source Heat Pumps Project Type / Topic 2 Topic Area 1: Technology Demonstration Projects Project Description RiverHeath will be a new neighborhood, with residences, shops, restaurants, and offices. The design incorporates walking trails, community gardens, green roofs, and innovative stormwater controls. A major component of the project is our reliance on renewable energy. One legacy of the land's industrial past is an onsite hydro-electric facility which formerly powered the paper factories. The onsite hydro is being refurbished and will furnish 100% of the project's electricity demand.

114

Commissioning Residential Ventilation Systems: A Combined Assessment of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commissioning Residential Ventilation Systems: A Combined Assessment of Commissioning Residential Ventilation Systems: A Combined Assessment of Energy and Air Quality Potential Values Title Commissioning Residential Ventilation Systems: A Combined Assessment of Energy and Air Quality Potential Values Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5969E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Turner, William J. N., Jennifer M. Logue, and Craig P. Wray Date Published 07/2012 Keywords commissioning, energy, health, indoor air quality, residential, valuation, ventilation Abstract Due to changes in building codes, whole-house mechanical ventilation systems are being installed in new California homes. Few measurements are available, but the limited data suggest that these systems don't always perform as code and forecasts predict. Such deficiencies occur because systems are usually field assembled without design specifications, and there is no consistent process to identify and correct problems. The value of such activities in terms of reducing energy use and improving indoor air quality (IAQ) is poorly understood. Commissioning such systems when they are installed or during subsequent building retrofits is a step towards eliminating deficiencies and optimizing the tradeoff between energy use and IAQ.

115

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance  

SciTech Connect

This project evaluated the air leakage and electric power consumption of Residential HVAC components, with a particular focus on air leakage of furnace cabinets. Laboratory testing of HVAC components indicated that air leakage can be significant and highly variable from unit to unit ? indicating the need for a standard test method and specifying maximum allowable air leakage in California State energy codes. To further this effort, this project provided technical assistance for the development of a national standard for Residential HVAC equipment air leakage. This standard is being developed by ASHRAE and is called"ASHRAE Standard 193P - Method of test for Determining the Air Leakage Rate of HVAC Equipment". The final part of this project evaluated techniques for measurement of furnace blower power consumption. A draft test procedure for power consumption was developed in collaboration with the Canadian General Standards Board: CSA 823"Performance Standard for air handlers in residential space conditioning systems".

Walker, Iain S.; Dickerhoff, Darryl J.; Delp, William W.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Solar heating and cooling system design and development (status summay through December 1977)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program scope is to develop, fabricate, install, and monitor the operation of prototype solar heating and cooling systems. Application studies have been completed for three application categories: single-family residential, multi-family residential, and commercial. The program currently consists of development of heating and cooling euipment for single-family residential and commercial applications and eight operational test sites (four heating and four heating and cooling). Four are single-family residences and four are commercial buildings.

Not Available

1978-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

117

Tax Credit for Solar Energy Systems on Residential Property (Personal) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Personal) Personal) Tax Credit for Solar Energy Systems on Residential Property (Personal) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Maximum Rebate $12,500 per installed system; 1 installed system per residence Program Info Start Date 1/1/2008 Expiration Date 12/31/2017 State Louisiana Program Type Personal Tax Credit Rebate Amount 50% of the first $25,000 of the cost of each system Leased systems installed after December 31, 2013: 38% of the first $25,000 of the cost of each system Provider LA Department of Revenue '''''Note: HB 705 of 2013 made several significant changes to this tax credit. Among other changes, wind energy systems are no longer eligible,

118

Tax Credit for Solar Energy Systems on Residential Property (Corporate) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Corporate) Corporate) Tax Credit for Solar Energy Systems on Residential Property (Corporate) < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Maximum Rebate $12,500 per installed system; 1 installed system per residence Program Info Start Date 1/1/2008 Expiration Date 12/31/2017 State Louisiana Program Type Corporate Tax Credit Rebate Amount 50% of the first $25,000 of the cost of each system Leased systems installed after December 31, 2013: 38% of the first $25,000 of the cost of each system Provider LA Department of Revenue '''''Note: HB 705 of 2013 made several significant changes to this tax credit. Among other changes, wind energy systems are no longer eligible,

119

Advanced Residential Buildings Research; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Factsheet describing the Advanced Residential Buildings Research group within NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Buildings Systems Integration Center.

Not Available

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Advanced Residential Buildings Research; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Factsheet describing the Advanced Residential Buildings Research group within NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Buildings Systems Integration Center.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-family residential systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Retrofit Installation of a Residential Photovoltaic Power System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Photovoltaic (PV) systems offer great potential for utility customers to supplement centrally supplied power. However, because these systems are still quite novel, the process of gaining approval for and installing them is unfamiliar and not standardized at most utility companies. Therefore, it can prove sufficiently challenging that it presents a barrier to would-be PV owners. This report looks at that process as it applied to a residential system in Phoenix, Arizona, and proposes ways that the process ...

2003-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

122

Alameda Municipal Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Program Residential Energy Efficiency Program Alameda Municipal Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Maximum Rebate Single family, duplex, or triplex: $960 per unit Multi-family dwelling (four or more units): $480 per unit. Program Info State California Program Type Utility Grant Program Rebate Amount Weatherization: 80% of the cost Do-It-Yourself Weatherization: 70% of the cost Provider Alameda Municipal Power Alameda Municipal Power (AMP) offers a grant to help its residential customers who have electric heat weatherize homes to increase efficiency.

123

Energy and cost analysis of residential heating systems  

SciTech Connect

Several energy-saving design changes in residential space-heating systems were examined to determine their energy-conservation potential and cost effectiveness. Changes in conventional and advanced systems (such as the gas heat pump) were considered. The energy and cost estimates were developed from current literature, conversations with heating and equipment manufacturers and dealers, and discussions with individuals doing research and testing on residential space-heating equipment. Energy savings as large as 26, 20, 57% were estimated for design changes in conventional gas, oil, and electric space-heating systems, respectively. These changes increased capital cost of the three systems by 27, 16, and 26%, respectively. For advanced gas and electric systems, energy savings up to 45 and 67%, respectively, were calculated. The design changes needed to produce these energy savings increased capital costs 80 and 35%. The energy use and cost relationships developed for the space heating systems were used as input to the ORNL residential energy-use simulation model to evaluate the effect of space-heating improvements on national energy use to the year 2000. Results indicated a large reduction in national energy use if improved conventional and advanced systems were made available to consumers and if consumers minimized life-cycle costs when purchasing these systems.

O' Neal, D.L.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Solar photovoltaic/thermal residential systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a conceptual design study using computer simulations to determine the physical and economic performance of combined photovoltaic/thermal collector heat-pump solar systems for a single-family residence are presented. Economic analyses are based upon projected costs for a 1986 system installation. The results show that PV/T collector systems can be economically competitive for a cold climate residence, that systems employing on-site electrical storage batteries are not economically competitive with utility-interactive systems, and that an ambient-air-source heat-pump system has a lower life-cycle cost than a solar-source heat-pump system.

Russell, M.C.

1979-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

125

Do Photovoltaic Energy Systems Effect Residential Selling Prices? Results from a California Statewide Investigation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DO PHOTOVOLTAIC ENERGY SYSTEMS AFFECT RESIDENTIAL SELLINGopportunity employer. DO PHOTOVOLTAIC ENERGY SYSTEMS AFFECThave sold with photovoltaic (PV) energy systems installed at

Hoen, Ben

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

An Analysis of the Effects of Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Residential Selling Prices in California.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Homewith existing photovoltaic (PV) energy systems have sold ingrid-connected solar photovoltaic (PV) energy systems were

Cappers, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Residential hot water distribution systems: Roundtable session  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

include: combustion and standby losses from water heaters,System Efficiency Losses Standby Loss Combustion LossBecause of their very low standby losses they can achieve

Lutz, James D.; Klein, Gary; Springer, David; Howard, Bion D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Consumers Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program Consumers Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Ventilation Manufacturing Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Home Performance Comprehensive Assessment and Installations: $3500 Insulation: $1,025 Windows: $250 Program Info State Michigan Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount CFL Lighting: Retailer Instant Discount Programmable Thermostat: $10 Central A/C and Heat Pumps: $150 - $250 Central A/C Tune up: $50 Ground Source Heat Pump: $200-$300

129

Electric utilities and residential solar systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The long-run incremental cost (LRIC) of providing electricity for solar heating and hot water systems is estimated for three utilities using a utility capacity expansion model and compared to the cost of providing electricity to electric-only systems. All investment, fuel and operating costs are accounted for. Hot water systems and combined heating and hot water systems are analyzed separately. It is found that the LRIC for solar backup is no more than the LRIC of electricity used for purely electric heating and hot water devices and also no more than the incremental cost of normal load growth. For the three utilities studied, there appears to be little basis for rate distinctions between solar devices using electric backup and electric-only heating and hot water devices. Off-peak storage heating and hot water devices have a much lower LRIC than the standard systems; again, there appears to be no basis for distinguishing between solar and electric off-peak devices. Compared to average cost pricing, incremental cost pricing offers considerable benefits to customers using solar and electric heat and hot water, especially if a separate lower rate is adopted for off-peak storage devices; these benefits can amount to several hundred dollars per year. Substantial savings in the use of oil and gas fuels can be achieved if residences using these fuels convert to solar systems, savings not necessarily achievable by a shift, instead, to electric systems.

Bright, R; Davitian, H

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Manufactured residential utility wall system (ResCore), overview  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides an overview of the design and development of a manufactured residential utility wall system referred to as ResCore. ResCore is a self-contained, manufactured, residential utility wall that provides complete rough-in of utilities (power, gas, water, and phone) and other functions (exhaust, combustion make-up air, refrigerant lines, etc.) to serve the residential kitchen, bath, utility, and laundry rooms. Auburn University, Department of Industrial Design faculty and students, supported by a team of graduate student researchers and the project`s advisory team, developed the ResCore. The project was accomplished through a research subcontract from the US Department of Energy administered by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The ResCore wall system features a ``layered`` manufacturing technique that allows each major component group--structural, cold water, hot water, drain, gas, electric, etc.--to be built as a separate subassembly and easily brought together for final assembly. The two structural layers are reinforced with bridging that adds strength and also permits firm attachment of plumbing pipes and other systems to the wall frame.

Wendt, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Lundell, C.; Lau, T.M. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Commissioning Residential Ventilation Systems: A Combined Assessment of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Commissioning Residential Ventilation Commissioning Residential Ventilation Systems: A Combined Assessment of Energy and Air Quality Potential Values William J.N. Turner, Jennifer M. Logue, Craig P. Wray Environmental Energy Technologies Division July 2012 LBNL-5969E Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor the Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein

132

Sustainability Assessment of Residential Building Energy System in Belgrade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a metropolitan city, Belgrade is a dwelling place for about 25% of total citizen number of Republic of Serbia, and at the same time regional cultural, educational, scientific and business center with its own energy production. Belgrade represents a significant consumer of final energy to support the living standard of the occupants. Energy production is based on domestic coal and imported fossil fuels such as oil and natural gas resulting in a high impact to the environment by emission of harmful substances. Multi-criteria method is a basic tool for the sustainability assessment in metropolitan cities. The design of potential options is the first step in the evaluation of buildings. The selection of a number of residential buildings is based on geographic position and type of heating. This paper presents the sustainable assessment of energy system for residential building sector in Belgrade. In order to present the energy system options for residential building sector, three sets of energy indicators: economical, social and environmental are taken into consideration.

Vucicevic, B.; Bakic, V.; Jovanovic, M.; Turanjanin, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Residential space heating cost: geothermal vs conventional systems  

SciTech Connect

The operating characteristics and economies of several representative space heating systems are analyzed. The analysis techniques used may be applied to a larger variety of systems than considered herein, thereby making this document more useful to the residential developer, heating and ventilating contractor, or homeowner considering geothermal space heating. These analyses are based on the use of geothermal water at temperatures as low as 120/sup 0/F in forced air systems and 140/sup 0/F in baseboard convection and radiant floor panel systems. This investigation indicates the baseboard convection system is likely to be the most economical type of geothermal space heating system when geothermal water of at least 140/sup 0/F is available. Heat pumps utilizing water near 70/sup 0/F, with negligible water costs, are economically feasible and they are particularly attractive when space cooling is included in system designs. Generally, procurement and installation costs for similar geothermal and conventional space heating systems are about equal, so geothermal space heating is cost competitive when the unit cost of geothermal energy is less than or equal to the unit cost of conventional energy. Guides are provided for estimating the unit cost of geothermal energy for cases where a geothermal resource is known to exist but has not been developed for use in residential space heating.

Engen, I.A.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Philadelphia Gas Works - Residential and Commercial Construction Incentives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Philadelphia Gas Works - Residential and Commercial Construction Philadelphia Gas Works - Residential and Commercial Construction Incentives Program (Pennsylvania) Philadelphia Gas Works - Residential and Commercial Construction Incentives Program (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Maximum Rebate Residential: $750 Commercial: $60,000 Program Info Start Date 9/1/2012 Expiration Date 8/31/2015 State Pennsylvania Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount '''Residential''' Residential Construction: $750 '''Commercial/Industrial''' 10% to 20% to 30% above code, $40/MMBtu first-year savings Philadelphia Gas Works (PGW) provides incentives to developers, home

135

Performance control strategies for oil-fired residential heating systems  

SciTech Connect

Results are reported of a study of control system options which can be used to improve the combustion performance of residential, oil-fired heating equipment. Two basic control modes were considered in this program. The first is service required'' signals in which an indication is provided when the flame quality or heat exchanger cleanliness have degraded to the point that a service call is required. The second control mode is excess-air trim'' in which the burner would essentially tune itself continuously for maximum efficiency. 35 refs., 67 figs., 2 tabs.

Butcher, T.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Residential Forced Air System Cabinet Leakage and Blower Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ResidentialACMManual,Section 3.12.5Duct/AirHandlerResidentialACMManual,Section3.12.5Duct/Air HandlerleakageofairhandlersforthepurposesoftheACM. Based

Walker, Iain S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Empire District Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Empire District Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Empire District Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Empire District Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate < Back Eligibility Construction Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Construction Design & Remodeling Other Ventilation Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount ENERGY STAR Home Performance Retrofit: 400 ENERGY STAR Qualified Home Designation: 800 Air Conditioner: 400 - 500; varies depending on SEER rating Provider Empire District Electric Company The Empire District Electric Company offers rebates for customers who

138

Energy Optimization (Electric) - Residential Efficiency Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Optimization (Electric) - Residential Efficiency Program Energy Optimization (Electric) - Residential Efficiency Program Energy Optimization (Electric) - Residential Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Ceiling Fans: 4 Smart Power Strip: 2 Pipe Wrap: 10 ln. ft. CFL Bulbs: 12 Refrigerator Recycling: 2 Program Info State Michigan Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount CFL Bulbs: Varies by retailer Ceiling Fan: $15 CFL Fixture: $15 LED Fixture/Downlight Kit: $20 LED Light Bulbs: $10 Smart Power Strip: $20 Room Air Conditioners: $20

139

Manufactured Residential Utility Wall System (ResCore),  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the design and development of a manufactured residential utility wall system referred to as ResCore. ResCore is a self contained, manufactured, residential utility wall that provides complete rough-in of utilities (power, gas, water, and phone) and other functions (exhaust, combustion make-up air, refrigerant lines, etc.) to serve the kitchen, bath, utility, and laundry rooms. Auburn University, Department of Industrial Design faculty, students, supported by a team of graduate student researchers and the project`s advisory team, developed the ResCore. The project was accomplished through a research subcontract from the U.S. Department of Energy administered by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The ResCore wall system features a layered manufacturing technique that allows each major component group: structural, cold water, hot water, drain, gas, electric, etc. to be built as a separate subassembly and easily brought together for final assembly. The two structural layers are reinforced with bridging that adds strength and also permits firm attachment of plumbing pipes and other systems to the wall frame.

Wendt, Robert [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Lundell, Clark; Lau, Tin Man [Auburn Univ., AL (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

140

Battery Power for Your Residential Solar Electric System: Better Buildings Series Solar Electric Fact Sheet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This consumer fact sheet provides an overview of battery power for residential solar electric systems, including sizing, estimating costs, purchasing, and performing maintenance.

Not Available

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-family residential systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

An Analysis of the Effects of Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Home Sales Prices in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Market Value of Residential Solar PV. Journal of SustainableConclusions The market for solar PV is expanding rapidly ingrid-connected solar photovoltaic (PV) energy systems were

Hoen, Ben

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Renewable Energy Systems Exemption | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Systems Exemption Systems Exemption Renewable Energy Systems Exemption < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Solar Heating Home Weatherization Water Swimming Pool Heaters Water Heating Wind Maximum Rebate Based on investment of $20,000 for single family, and on investment of $100,000 for multi-family, non-residential. Program Info State Montana Program Type Property Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% for 10 years. Provider Montana Department of Revenue Montana's property tax exemption for recognized non-fossil forms of energy generation or low emission wood or biomass combustion devices may be

143

National Grid (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Grid (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate National Grid (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Upstate New York) National Grid (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Upstate New York) < Back Eligibility Installer/Contractor Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Other Commercial Weatherization Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Program Info State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerator Recycling: $30 Multifamily Energy Evaluation: Free assessment, installation of up to ten CFLs/unit, water efficiency measures, hot water pipe and tank wrap, and a $300 rebate for refrigerator replacement costs. Provider National Grid Residential Upstate Efficiency Programs National Grid residential electric customers in Upstate New York are

144

New Mexico Gas Company - Residential Efficiency Programs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Efficiency Programs Residential Efficiency Programs New Mexico Gas Company - Residential Efficiency Programs < Back Eligibility Construction Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Insulation: $500 Program Info State New Mexico Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount ENERGY STAR Qualifying Home: $750 New Mexico Energy$mart Income Qualifying Weatherization: Free Tankless Water Heater: $300 Insulation: 25% of cost up to $500 The New Mexico Gas Company provides incentives for energy saving measures and improvements to residential homes. Rebates are available for adding

145

Residential end-use energy planning system (REEPS). Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Residential End-Use Energy Planning System (REEPS) is described. REEPS is a forecasting model of residential energy patterns that is capable of evaluating the impacts of a broad range of energy conservation measures. REEPS forecasts appliance installations, operating efficiencies, and utilization patterns for space heating, water heating, air conditioning, and cooking. Each of these decisions is sensitive to energy prices, mandatory policies, and household/dwelling and geographical characteristics. The parameters of these choice models have been estimated statistically from national household survey data. The structure of the choice models and the results of the statistical analysis are reported in detail. REEPS forecasts energy choices for a large number of market segments representing households with different socioeconomic, dwelling, and geographical characteristics. These segments reflect the joint distribution of characteristics in the population. Aggregate forecasts are generated by summing up the decisions for all population segments. This technique provides a consistent method of obtaining aggregate forecasts from disaggregate, nonlinear choice models. Moreover, it permits evaluation of the distributional impacts of prospective conservation policies. The results of simulation of REEPS are described. REEPS forecasts a moderate rise in electricity consumption per household and significant drops in other fuels. These are caused in part by high market penetrations of electric appliances which themselves reflect major shifts in relative energy prices.

Goett, A.; McFadden, D.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

A study of pressure losses in residential air distribution systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the pressure drop characteristics of residential duct system components that are either not available or not thoroughly (sometimes incorrectly) described in existing duct design literature. The tests were designed to imitate cases normally found in typical residential and light commercial installations. The study included three different sizes of flexible ducts, under different compression configurations, splitter boxes, supply boots, and a fresh air intake hood. The experimental tests conformed to ASHRAE Standard 120P--''Methods of Testing to Determine Flow Resistance of HVAC Air Ducts and Fittings''. The flexible duct study covered compressibility and bending effects on the total pressure drop, and the results showed that the available published references tend to underestimate the effects of compression in flexible ducts that can increase pressure drops by up to a factor of nine. The supply boots were tested under different configurations including a setup where a flexible duct elbow connection was considered as an integral part of the supply boot. The supply boots results showed that diffusers can increase the pressure drop by up to a factor of two in exit fittings, and the installation configuration can increase the pressure drop by up to a factor of five. The results showed that it is crucial for designers and contractors to be aware of the compressibility effects of the flexible duct, and the installation of supply boots and diffusers.

Abushakra, Bass; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Berkeley Program Offers New Option for Financing Residential PV Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Readily accessible credit has often been cited as a necessary ingredient to open up the market for residential photovoltaic (PV) systems. Though financing does not reduce the high up-front cost of PV, by spreading that cost over some portion of the system's life, financing can certainly make PV systems more affordable. As a result, a number of states have, in the past, set up special residential loan programs targeting the installation of renewable energy systems and/or energy-efficiency improvements and often featuring low interest rates, longer terms and no-hassle application requirements. Historically, these loan programs have had mixed success (particularly for PV), for a variety of reasons, including a historical lack of homeowner interest in PV, a lack of program awareness, a reduced appeal in a low-interest-rate environment, and a tendency for early PV adopters to be wealthy and not in need of financing. Some of these barriers have begun to fade. Most notably, homeowner interest in PV has grown in some states, particularly those that offer solar rebates. The passage of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005), however, introduced one additional roadblock to the success of low-interest PV loan programs: a residential solar investment tax credit (ITC), subject to the Federal government's 'anti-double-dipping' rules. Specifically, the residential solar ITC--equal to 30% of the system's tax basis, capped at $2000--will be reduced or offset if the system also benefits from what is known as 'subsidized energy financing', which is likely to include most government-sponsored low-interest loan programs. Within this context, it has been interesting to note the recent flurry of announcements from a number of U.S cities concerning a new type of PV financing program. Led by the city of Berkeley, Calif., these cities propose to offer their residents the ability to finance the installation of a PV system using increased property tax assessments, rather than a more-traditional credit vehicle, to recover both system and administrative costs. This approach has a number of features that should appeal to PV owners, including long-term, fixed-cost, attractive financing; loans that are tied to the tax capacity of the property rather than to the owner's credit standing; a repayment obligation that transfers along with the sale of the property; and a potential ability to deduct the repayment obligation from federal taxable income as part of the local property tax deduction. For these reasons, Berkeley's program, which was first announced on October 23, 2007, has received considerable nationwide attention in both the trade and general press. Since the announcement, cities from throughout California and the broader U.S. have expressed keen interest in the possibility of replicating this type of program. In California alone, the cities of Santa Cruz, Santa Monica and Palm Desert are all reportedly considering similar programs, while the city of San Francisco has recently announced its own program, portions of which closely parallel Berkeley's approach. In addition, a bill (AB 811) that would authorize all cities in California, not just charter cities like Berkeley, to create this type of program was approved by the California General Assembly on January 29 and is currently under consideration in the State Senate. A similar bill in Colorado (HB 1350) was signed into law on May 28. Elsewhere, the city of Tucson, Arizona has also considered this financing approach.

Bolinger, Mark A

2008-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

148

Reliability assessment of active residential solar energy systems, Phase I  

SciTech Connect

Experiences with active solar energy systems in the last few years have, in many cases, been less than encouraging. A quantification of the problem areas discovered in a sampling of the active residential solar energy systems in the state of Colorado is presented. While many problems were found, the potential for easy solution of the problems by design or installation refinement is great. Reported is a summary of the findings of the mechanical inspections of twelve systems during the 1978-79 winter. Only one system operated at its expected mechanical, thermal and economic performance level. Four other systems performed well mechanically, but only one of these had thermal performance meeting design expectations. The remaining seven systems did not work well mechanically or thermally. One significantly raised the utility bill of the residence on which it was installed. Poor system design was found to be the major cause of low performance. Also, installation quality was low and installation errors were frequent. Qualified solar system service was virtually unavailable. Nearly all the problems found were solvable using present technology. The greatest immediate need is for training of designers, installers and service people and support of off-market development of total systems.

Sharp, K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Intelligent Residential Air-Conditioning System with Smart-Grid Functionality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Intelligent Residential Air-Conditioning System with Smart-Grid Functionality Auswin George residential air-conditioning (A/C) system controller that has smart grid functionality. The qualifier, conditional on anticipated retail energy prices. The term "smart- grid functionality" means that retail energy

Tesfatsion, Leigh

150

Solar Leasing for Residential Photovoltaic Systems (Revised) (Fact Sheet)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In the past year, the residential solar lease has received In the past year, the residential solar lease has received significant attention in the solar marketplace, primarily for its ability to leverage two key commercial tax credits for the individual homeowner. However, on January 1, 2009, the $2,000 cap on the residential investment tax credit (ITC) was lifted. As a result, the expansion of the solar lease model across the United States may be slower than antici-

151

Review of Residential Low-Load HVAC Systems  

SciTech Connect

In support of the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) Building America Program, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted an investigation to inventory commercially available HVAC technologies that are being installed in low-load homes. The first step in this investigation was to conduct a review of published literature to identify low-load HVAC technologies available in the United States and abroad, and document the findings of existing case studies that have evaluated the performance of the identified technologies. This report presents the findings of the literature review, identifies gaps in the literature or technical understanding that must be addressed before low-load HVAC technologies can be fully evaluated, and introduces PNNLs planned research and analysis for this project to address identified gaps and potential future work on residential low-load HVAC systems.

Brown, Scott A.; Thornton, Brian; Widder, Sarah H.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Residential and commercial buildings data book. Second edition  

SciTech Connect

This Data Book updates and expands the previous Data Book originally published by the Department of Energy in October, 1984 (DOE/RL/01830/16). Energy-related information is provided under the following headings: Characteristics of Residential Buildings in the US; Characteristics of New Single Family Construction in the US; Characteristics of New Multi-Family Construction in the US; Household Appliances; Residential Sector Energy Consumption, Prices, and Expenditures; Characteristics of US Commercial Buildings; Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption, Prices, and Expenditures; Additional Buildings and Community Systems Information. This Data Book complements another Department of Energy document entitled ''Overview of Building Energy Use and Report of Analysis-1985'' October, 1985 (DOE/CE-0140). The Data Book provides supporting data and documentation to the report.

Crumb, L.W.; Bohn, A.A.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Safety of Gas Transmission and Distribution Systems (Maine) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety of Gas Transmission and Distribution Systems (Maine) Safety of Gas Transmission and Distribution Systems (Maine) Safety of Gas Transmission and Distribution Systems (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Maine Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Public Utilities Commission These regulations describe requirements for the participation of natural gas utilities in the Underground Utility Damage Prevention Program,

154

Protected Water Area System (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Protected Water Area System (Iowa) Protected Water Area System (Iowa) Protected Water Area System (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Department of Natural Resources The Natural Resource Commission maintains a state plan for the design and

155

Natural, Scenic, and Recreational River System (Indiana) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural, Scenic, and Recreational River System (Indiana) Natural, Scenic, and Recreational River System (Indiana) Natural, Scenic, and Recreational River System (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Indiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Indiana Department of Natural Resources

156

RESIDENTIAL ON SITE SOLAR HEATING SYSTEMS: A PROJECT EVALUATION USING THE CAPITAL ASSET PRICING MODEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

representation of an On Site Solar Heating System. CML w c6782 Residential On"Site Solar Heating Systems: A p-r~jectof an On Site Solar Heating System. Representation of

Schutz, Stephen Richard

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Cost goals for a residential photovoltaicthermal liquid collector system set in three northern locations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study compares the allowable costs for a residential PV/T liquid collector system with those of both PV-only and side-by-side PV and thermal collector systems. Four types of conventional energy systems provide backup: ...

Dinwoodie, Thomas L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Apartment building exterior and interior Apartment building exterior and interior Residential Buildings EETD's research in residential buildings addresses problems associated with whole-building integration involving modeling, measurement, design, and operation. Areas of research include the movement of air and associated penalties involving distribution of pollutants, energy and fresh air. Contacts Max Sherman MHSherman@lbl.gov (510) 486-4022 Iain Walker ISWalker@lbl.gov (510) 486-4692 Links Residential Building Systems Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends High Technology and Industrial Systems Lighting Systems Residential Buildings Simulation Tools Sustainable Federal Operations

159

Measured Air Distribution Effectiveness for Residential Mechanical Ventilation Systems  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of ventilation is dilute or remove indoor contaminants that an occupant is exposed to. In a multi-zone environment such as a house, there will be different dilution rates and different source strengths in every zone. Most US homes have central HVAC systems, which tend to mix the air thus the indoor conditions between zones. Different types of ventilation systems will provide different amounts of exposure depending on the effectiveness of their air distribution systems and the location of sources and occupants. This paper will report on field measurements using a unique multi-tracer measurement system that has the capacity to measure not only the flow of outdoor air to each zone, but zone-to-zone transport. The paper will derive seven different metrics for the evaluation of air distribution. Measured data from two homes with different levels of natural infiltration will be used to evaluate these metrics for three different ASHRAE Standard 62.2 compliant ventilation systems. Such information can be used to determine the effectiveness of different systems so that appropriate adjustments can be made in residential ventilation standards such as ASHRAE Standard 62.2.

Sherman, Max; Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Making It Happen: Achieving Energy Efficiency in Multi-Family Buildings Housing Low-Income Tenants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Saving energy in multi-family buildings is a comparatively easy task to accomplish in theory: engineering science has shown us how to reduce heatloss and air infiltration, how to balance systems and improve heating plant efficiency, and how to capture warmth from the air, the earth and the sea. But getting this knowledge into multi-family buildings and making them energy efficient in fact is very difficult, especially if those buildings house low-income and elderly tenants, the people for whom saving energy is most urgent. Energy practitioners have found that multifamily building owners are not buying energy efficiency because it is not being marketed intelligently; affordable financing is very difficult to obtain, and energy education tailored to the needs of owners, occupants and maintenance crews is practically unknown. This paper discusses how four non-profit energy companies, located in major cities, overcame these obstacles. It explains how they market energy conservation improvements, how they finance them, and how they involve tenants in energy education; i.e., how they make energy efficiency happen in multifamily buildings.

Haun, C. R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-family residential systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Residential duct system leakage; Magnitude, impacts, and potential for reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the issues associated with leakage in residential air distribution systems, touching on the prevalence of duct leakage, the impacts of duct leakage, and on the techniques available for sealing duct systems. The issues examined in detail are: present techniques for measuring the leakage area of ducts existing data bases of duct leakage area measurements, the impacts of duct leakage on space-conditioning energy consumption and peak demand, and the ventilation impacts of duct leakage. The paper also includes a brief discussion of techniques for sealing duct systems in the field. The results derived from duct leakage are and driving pressure measurements indicate that in regions in which distribution systems pass through unconditioned spaces, air infiltration rates will typically double when the distribution fan is turned on, and that the average annual air infiltration rate is increased by 30% to 70% due to the existence of the distribution system. Estimates based upon a simplified analysis of leakage-induced energy losses also indicate the peak electricity demands due to duct leakage can be as high as 4 kW in Sacramento, California, and West Palm Beach, Florida, and that peak loads on the order of 1 to 2 kW are highly likely in these locations. Both peak loads and annual energy impacts are found to be strongly dependent on the location of the return duct, and attic return costing approximately 1500 kWh more energy than a crawlspace return in the two climates examined.

Modera, M.P. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., Berkeley, CA (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control of Ventilation Systems  

SciTech Connect

Existing ventilation standards, including American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 62.2, specify continuous operation of a defined mechanical ventilation system to provide minimum ventilation, with time-based intermittent operation as an option. This requirement ignores several factors and concerns including: other equipment such as household exhaust fans that might incidentally provide ventilation, negative impacts of ventilation when outdoor pollutant levels are high, the importance of minimizing energy use particularly during times of peak electricity demand, and how the energy used to condition air as part of ventilation system operation changes with outdoor conditions. Dynamic control of ventilation systems can provide ventilation equivalent to or better than what is required by standards while minimizing energy costs and can also add value by shifting load during peak times and reducing intake of outdoor air contaminants. This article describes the logic that enables dynamic control of whole-house ventilation systems to meet the intent of ventilation standards and demonstrates the dynamic ventilation system control concept through simulations and field tests of the Residential Integrated Ventilation-Energy Controller (RIVEC).

Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Analysis of Residential System Strategies Targeting Least-Cost Solutions Leading to Net Zero Energy Homes  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy's Building America residential systems research project uses an analysis-based systems research approach to identify research priorities, identify technology gaps and opportunities, establish a consistent basis to track research progress, and identify system solutions that are most likely to succeed as the initial targets for residential system research projects. This report describes the analytical approach used by the program to determine the most cost-effective pathways to achieve whole-house energy-saving goals. This report also provides an overview of design/technology strategies leading to net zero energy buildings as the basis for analysis of future residential system performance.

Anderson, R.; Christensen, C.; Horowitz, S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Application of system dynamics, GIS and 3D visualization in a study of residential sustainability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Constructing and improving urban residential areas is an eternal critical subject in the process of the whole urban development which is connected with a series of challenges and problems. In this paper, firstly DPSIR (Driving Forces-Pressure-State-Impact-Response) ... Keywords: 3D visualization, GIS, cityengine, density map, residential areas, sustainability, system dynamics model

Zhao Xu; Volker Coors

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Burbank Water and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Burbank Water and Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Products purchased from a Burbank retailer are typically awarded higher rebates than those purchased outside Burbank. Inside Burbank: Ceiling Fans: $25 (maximum three) Clothes Washer: $50 Dishwasher: $35 Refrigerator/Freezer: $75 Room A/C: $35 Low E Windows/Doors: $2.00/sq ft

166

Efficiency United (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficiency United (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program Efficiency United (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program Efficiency United (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Appliances & Electronics Construction Design & Remodeling Other Ventilation Manufacturing Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Weatherization Measures: 50% of the cost Windows: $150 Water Heaters/Clothes Washers: 1 Pipe Wrap: Limit of 10 linear ft. Faucet Aerators: 2 High Efficiency Shower Head: 2 Program Info State Michigan Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Boiler: $200 Furnace: $100 - $200

167

Springfield Utility Board - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Springfield Utility Board - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Springfield Utility Board - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Springfield Utility Board - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Water Heating Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerators/Freezers: $25 Electric Water Heaters: $25 Clothes Washers: $30 - $80 Recycle Refrigerator/Freezer: $25 Duct Sealing/Testing: $150 - $400 Heat Pump: $500 Ductless Heat Pump: $1,000 Insulation: 50% (100% for qualified low income customers) Provider Springfield Utility Board

168

Anaheim Public Utilities - Residential Home Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Home Efficiency Rebate Residential Home Efficiency Rebate Program Anaheim Public Utilities - Residential Home Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Manufacturing Commercial Lighting Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Air Duct Repair: $300 Ceiling Fan: 3 fans Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerator: $50 Refrigerator Recycling: $50 Dishwasher: $50 Room A/C: $50 Central A/C: $100/ton High Performance windows: $1/sq ft Air Duct Repair: 50% of repair cost Ceiling Fan: $20 Whole House Fan: $100

169

WEATHER SEQUENCES FOR PREDICTING HVAC SYSTEM BEHAVIOUR IN RESIDENTIAL UNITS LOCATED IN TROPICAL CLIMATES.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WEATHER SEQUENCES FOR PREDICTING HVAC SYSTEM BEHAVIOUR IN RESIDENTIAL UNITS LOCATED IN TROPICAL on the energy needs of HVAC system. We'll apply the method on the tropical Reunion Island. The methodological

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

170

City of Madison - Green Madison Residential Revolving Loan Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City of Madison - Green Madison Residential Revolving Loan Program City of Madison - Green Madison Residential Revolving Loan Program City of Madison - Green Madison Residential Revolving Loan Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Other Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate $15,000 Program Info Start Date 2011 State Wisconsin Program Type Local Loan Program Rebate Amount $1,000-$15,000 Provider City of Madison Green Madison is a revolving loan program for residential energy efficiency improvements. Loans are available for owner-occupied single family residences or owner-occupied multi-family residences of up to three units. Property must be located within the City of Madison. To sign up for the program, interested residents should use the sign up form on the program

171

Wastewater Regulations for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wastewater Regulations for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination Wastewater Regulations for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permits, Underground Injection Control (UIC) Permits, State Permits, Water Quality Based Effluent Limitations and Water Quality Certification (Mississippi) Wastewater Regulations for National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permits, Underground Injection Control (UIC) Permits, State Permits, Water Quality Based Effluent Limitations and Water Quality Certification (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential

172

Maintenance and storage of fuel oil for residential heating systems: A guide for residential heating system maintenance personnel  

SciTech Connect

The quality of No. 2 fuel affects the performance of the heating system and is an important parameter in the proper and efficient operation of an oil-burning system. The physical and chemical characteristics of the fuel can affect the flow, atomization and combustion processes, all of which help to define and limit the overall performance of the heating system. The use of chemical additives by fuel oil marketershas become more common as a method of improving the quality of the fuel, especially for handling and storage. Numerous types of additives are available, but reliable information on their effectiveness and proper use is limited. This makes selecting an additive difficult in many situations. Common types of problems that contribute to poor fuel quality and how they affect residential heating equipment are identified inof this booklet. It covers the key items that are needed in an effective fuel quality monitoring program, such as what to look for when evaluating the quality of fuel as it is received from a supplier, or how to assess fuel problems associated with poor storage conditions. References to standard procedures and brief descriptions of the procedures also are given. Approaches for correcting a fuel-related problem, including the potential uses of chemical additives are discussed. Different types of additives are described to help users understand the functions and limitations of chemical treatment. Tips on how to select andeffectively use additives also are included. Finally, the importance of preventative maintenance in any fuel monitoring program is emphasized.

Litzke, Wai-Lin

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Residential Utility Core Wall System - ResCore  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes activities associated with the RESidential utility CORE wall system (ResCore) developed by students and faculty in the Department of Industrial Design at Auburn University between 1996 and 1998. These activities analyize three operational prototype units installed in Habitat for Humanity Houses. The paper contains two Parts: 1) analysis of the three operational prototype units, 2) exploration of alternative design solutions. ResCore is a manufactured construction component designed to expedite home building by decreasing the need for skilled labor at the work site. The unit concentrates untility elements into a wall unit(s), which is shipped to the construction site and installed in minimum time. The ResCore unit is intended to be built off-site in a manufacturing environment where the impact of vagaries of weather and work-crew coordination and scheduling are minimized. The controlled environment of the factory enhances efficient production of building components through material and labor throughput controls, enabling the production of components at a substantially reduced per-unit cost. The ResCore unit when compared to traditional "stick-built" utility wall components is in may ways analogous to the factory built roof truss compared to on-site "stick-Built" roof framing.

Boyd, G.; Lundell, C.; Wendt, R.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

An Analysis of the Effects of Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Home Sales Prices in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in residential selling prices as PV systems increase inhas an effect on the sale price of PV homes (i.e. , a fixedcomparable homes, sales prices of PV homes are compared

Hoen, Ben

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For Residential Wind Systems USDA Farm Bill Grant TheA-20. Taxable USDA Farm Grant (BTC & SP, Wind Classes 2-A-21. Tax-Exempt USDA Farm Grant (BTC & SP, Wind Classes 2-

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

''Rancho Hydro'': a low-head, high volume residential hydroelectric power system, Anahola, Kauai, Hawaii  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The site is a 1.75 acre residential site with two households. The Anahola stream intersects the property line. Design of the proposed hydroelectric system is described, along with the permit process. Construction is in progress. (DLC)

Harder, J.D.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

A systems approach to retrofitting residential HVAC systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HVAC System. LBNL 53444. Wendt, R.L. , Ternes, M.P. , Orealized. Other guides (e.g. , Wendt et al. (1997)) are more

McWilliams, J.A.; Walker, I.S.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Residential Solar and Wind Energy Systems Tax Credit | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Solar and Wind Energy Systems Tax Credit Residential Solar and Wind Energy Systems Tax Credit Residential Solar and Wind Energy Systems Tax Credit < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Buying & Making Electricity Swimming Pool Heaters Water Heating Wind Maximum Rebate 1,000 maximum credit per residence, regardless of number of energy devices installed Program Info Start Date 1/1/1995 State Arizona Program Type Personal Tax Credit Rebate Amount 25% Provider Arizona Department of Revenue Arizona's Solar Energy Credit is available to individual taxpayers who install a solar or wind energy device at the taxpayer's Arizona residence. The credit is allowed against the taxpayer's personal income tax in the

179

City Utilities of Springfield - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City Utilities of Springfield - Residential Energy Efficiency City Utilities of Springfield - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program City Utilities of Springfield - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Construction Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Heating Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Maximum Rebate Varies by equipment and type of residence Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Home Performance with Energy Star: $250 - $800 Energy Star Home Rating: 50% of certification cost, up to $400 Programmable Thermostat: $15 Insulation Upgrade: 20% of cost up $300 Natural Gas Furnace: $400 Natural Gas Furnace Tune-Up: $30

180

Ameren Missouri (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ameren Missouri (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Ameren Missouri (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Ameren Missouri (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Construction Design & Remodeling Appliances & Electronics Maximum Rebate Ceiling Insulation: $200 Program Info Start Date 1/1/2013 Expiration Date 12/31/2013 State Missouri Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Furnace: $200 (Owner Occupied); $300 (Landlord) Boiler: $100 - $150 (Owner Occupied); $150 - $300 (Landlord) Programmable Thermostat: $25 or 50% of cost Ceiling Insulation: $0.008 x sq ft Comprehensive Audit Measures: Varies widely

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-family residential systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Ames Electric Department - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ames Electric Department - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Ames Electric Department - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Ames Electric Department - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Appliances: 50% of the equipment cost Programmable Thermostats: 3 per household Room AC: 2 per household Program Info State Iowa Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Star New Home: $500 Energy Audit: FREE Lighting: $2 - $16 per fixture Lighting Sensors: $10 per unit Refrigerators: $25 - $100 Freezers: $50 Dishwashers: $50

182

Salem Electric - Residential, Commercial, and Industrial Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Salem Electric - Residential, Commercial, and Industrial Efficiency Salem Electric - Residential, Commercial, and Industrial Efficiency Rebate Program Salem Electric - Residential, Commercial, and Industrial Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential State Government Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Manufacturing Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate ENERGY Star Light Fixtures: Not to exceed 50% of the fixture cost Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Refrigerators: $60 Freezers: $60 Clothes Washers: $60

183

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Residential Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Residential Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Iowa) Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Other Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Iowa Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Central Air Conditioners: $100 - $200 Air Source Heat Pumps: $100 - $400 Geothermal Heat Pumps: $300/ton + $50/EER/ton Fan Motors: $50/unit Programmable Thermostats: $25 Tank Water Heater: $50

184

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas) - Residential Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas) - Residential Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Caulking/Weather Stripping: $200 Ceiling/Foundation/Wall Insulation: $750 Program Info State Iowa Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Boilers: $150 - $400 Furnaces: $250 - $400 Efficient Fan Motor: $50 Programmable Thermostats: $25 Furnace or Boiler Clean and Tune: $30

185

Gulf Power - Residential Energy Efficiency EarthCents Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gulf Power - Residential Energy Efficiency EarthCents Program Gulf Power - Residential Energy Efficiency EarthCents Program Gulf Power - Residential Energy Efficiency EarthCents Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Construction Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Manufacturing Insulation Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Audit: Free Energy Select Programmable Thermostat and Time of Use Control: Free HVAC Maintenance: $215 Duct Repair and Air Sealing: $150 - $300 Fan Motor Retrofit: $150 Heat Pump: $100 - $1000; varies by size and efficiency

186

Eau Claire Energy Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Eau Claire Energy Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Eau Claire Energy Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eau Claire Energy Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Manufacturing Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Clothes washer: $25 Dishwashers: $25 Refrigerators: $25 Room Air Conditioner: $25 Dehumidifier: $25 Refrigerator/Freezer/Room AC Recycling: $25 Central Air Conditioner/Mini Split: $40 - $80/Ton Air Source Heat Pump/Mini-Split Heat Pumps: $150/Ton Package Terminal Heat Pump: $150/Ton Geothermal Heat Pump: $300/Ton

187

Measure Guideline: Combination Forced-Air Space and Tankless Domestic Hot Water Heating Systems  

SciTech Connect

This document describes design and application guidance for combination space and tankless domestic hot water heating systems (combination systems) used in residential buildings, based on field evaluation, testing, and industry meetings conducted by Building Science Corporation. As residential building enclosure improvements continue to drive heating loads down, using the same water heating equipment for both space heating and domestic water heating becomes attractive from an initial cost and space-saving perspective. This topic is applicable to single- and multi-family residential buildings, both new and retrofitted.

Rudd, A.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Study of photovoltaic cost elements. Volume 4. Installation cost model for residential PV systems: users manual. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A quantitative methodology is presented for estimating installation costs of residential photovoltaic systems. The Installation Cost Model for Residential PV Systems is comprised of 144 estimating equations selectively exercised, based on user definition of the system. At the input stage, Residential PV systems can be fully described by 9 design option categories and 9 system specification categories. All assumptions have been validated with installers of solar thermal systems and with TB and A's Architects and Engineers Division. A discussion of the model is included as well as an example of its use with an 8 KW PV system for a Southwest All-Electric Residential design.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Columbia Rural Electric Association - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ft. Floor Insulation (Multi-Family): 0.07 - 0.43sq. ft. Floor Insulation (Manufactured Home): 0.24sq. ft. Window Replacement: 6sq. ft. Eligible System Size Refrigerator...

190

Residential Enhanced Rewards Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Enhanced Rewards Program Residential Enhanced Rewards Program Residential Enhanced Rewards Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Program Info Funding Source Focus on Energy Expiration Date 05/31/2013 State Wisconsin Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Natural Gas Furnace: $475 Furnace with ECM (natural gas, propane, or oil-fired): $850 Hot-Water Boiler ( Natural Gas Furnace with AC: $1,500 Provider Focus on Energy Focus on Energy offers incentives for income-qualifying customers for the purchase of high efficiency heating equipment. Owner-occupied single-family and multifamily residences of 3 units or less are eligible for the incentives. Applicants must be able to document a gross household income of

191

Alameda Municipal Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alameda Municipal Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Program Alameda Municipal Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Program Alameda Municipal Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State California Program Type Utility Grant Program Rebate Amount Refrigerator Replacement: Up to $100 Second Refrigerator Pickup: $35 CFLs: 3 free replacement bulbs Motors: $0.18/per kWh saved Lighting: $0.20/per kWh saved HVAC: $0.22/per kWh saved Refrigeration: $0.22/per kWh saved Provider Alameda Municipal Power Alameda Municipal Power (AMP) has multiple program in place to help

192

Fuzzy rule-based methodology for residential load behaviour forecasting during power systems restoration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inadequate load pickup during power system restoration can lead to overload and underfrequency conditions, and even restart the blackout process, due to thermal energy losses. Thus, load behaviour estimation during restoration is desirable to avoid inadequate ... Keywords: artificial intelligence, energy management systems, fuzzy logic, load behaviour estimation, power system distribution, power system restoration, residential load forecasting, thermostatically controlled loads

Lia Toledo Moreira Mota; Alexandre Assis Mota; Andre Luiz Morelato Franca

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

All Green Residential Solar Energy to Heat Absorption Cooling / Heating Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An all-green residential solar to heat absorption cooling / heating system system is designed. It describes the components of the system and working principle, and analyze the prospects of the system and academic value. Finally, To Changsha, for example, ... Keywords: solar, ground-source heat pump, absorption, heat tube

Xu Feng

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Front/back/side : design of outdoor spaces for multi-family residences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis begins with the critique of the current situation of detached, privately owned, multi-family residences and seeks alternative solutions at both the broad scale of the block, and at the scale of the spaces ...

Darden, Gwynne

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Property Tax Exemption for Renewable Energy Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Property Tax Exemption for Renewable Energy Systems Property Tax Exemption for Renewable Energy Systems Property Tax Exemption for Renewable Energy Systems < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Solar Heating Water Heating Wind Manufacturing Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Property Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% exemption for renewable energy property; municipalities are authorized to exempt certain CHP systems Provider Connecticut Office of Policy and Management Connecticut provides a property tax exemption for "Class I" renewable energy systems* and hydropower facilities** that generate electricity for

196

The Potential Impact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetrations on Electricity Bill Savings from Residential Photovoltaic Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

penetrations on residential retail electricity rates andpresent the residential electricity retail rates resultingelectricity rates. Since G h,resPV , the residential PV

Barbose, Galen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Preliminary design package for residential heating/cooling system--Rankine air conditioner redesign  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains a summary of the preliminary redesign and development of a marketable single-family heating and cooling system. The objectives discussed are the interim design and schedule status of the Residential (3-ton) redesign, problem areas and solutions, and the definition of plans for future design and development activities. The proposed system for a single-family residential heating and cooling system is a single-loop, solar-assisted, hydronic-to-warm-air heating subsystem with solar-assisted domestic water heating and a Rankine-driven expansion air-conditioning subsystem.

Not Available

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Renewable Energy Systems Connecticut Agricultural Commercial Industrial Multi-Family Residential Residential Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying &...

199

Residential Energy Management system for optimization of on-site generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Energy Management system for optimization of on-site generation Residential Energy Management system for optimization of on-site generation with HVAC Speaker(s): Ram Narayanamurthy Date: October 29, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 As the individual movements towards Net Zero Energy Homes (NZEH) and the SmartGrid converge on residential buildings, three major challenges need to be addressed: Flatten the highly peaked electric load profile of low energy homes Provide easy integration of energy efficiency into existing homes Provide builders and consumers with visibility into building operation, and ease of management. A Home Energy Management System (HEMS) owned by the consumer, capable of two way communications with Utility DR/SmartGrid/AMI is required to resolve these challenges. The HEMS will need to increase energy efficiency of building operations, provide consumers feedback and

200

Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control of Ventilation Systems Title Meeting Residential Ventilation Standards Through Dynamic Control of Ventilation...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-family residential systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Designing a Residential Hybrid Electrical Energy Storage System Based on the Energy Buffering Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the electricity price is low and supply energy for usage when the electricity price is high [6], and thereby energy buffering. Figure 3 shows the structure of a typical grid-connected HEES system. Without loss the proposed energy management system is targeting residential usage, we must limit its overall form factor

Pedram, Massoud

202

Building-Integrated Photovoltaics (BIPV) in the Residential Sector: An Analysis of Installed Rooftop System Prices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For more than 30 years, there have been strong efforts to accelerate the deployment of solar-electric systems by developing photovoltaic (PV) products that are fully integrated with building materials. This report examines the status of building-integrated PV (BIPV), with a focus on the cost drivers of residential rooftop systems, and explores key opportunities and challenges in the marketplace.

James, T.; Goodrich, A.; Woodhouse, M.; Margolis, R.; Ong, S.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

City of Austin - Commercial and Residential Green Building Requirements |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » City of Austin - Commercial and Residential Green Building Requirements City of Austin - Commercial and Residential Green Building Requirements < Back Eligibility Commercial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Water Heating Wind Program Info State Texas Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Austin Energy '''''Note: The requirements listed below are current only up to the date of last review (see the top of this page). The City of Austin may also make additional requirements depending on the circumstances of a given project.

204

Progress Energy Carolinas - Residential New Construction Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

North Carolina) North Carolina) Progress Energy Carolinas - Residential New Construction Rebate Program (North Carolina) < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount New homes can qualify for either equipment incentives or whole house incentives, not both Equipment Incentives Heat Pump Water Heaters: $350 High Efficiency HVAC; air-to-air heat pumps: $300 High Efficiency HVAC; central air conditioning: $300 Whole House Incentives $1,000 - $4,000 Provider Progress Energy Progress Energy's residential new construction program provides cash

205

MassSAVE (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency Programs Energy Efficiency Programs MassSAVE (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate Weatherization: $2,000 Program Info Start Date 1/1/2013 Expiration Date 12/31/2013 State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Weatherization: 75% Heat Pump Water Heater: $750 Income Eligible Customers: free home energy consultation Mulitifamily Incentives: comprehensive energy analysis, lighting upgrades, insulation, air sealing and other energy saving measures.

206

Progress Energy Carolinas - Residential New Construction Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

South Carolina) South Carolina) Progress Energy Carolinas - Residential New Construction Rebate Program (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Design & Remodeling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount New homes can qualify for either equipment incentives or whole house incentives, not both Equipment Incentives Heat Pump Water Heaters: $350 High Efficiency HVAC; air-to-air heat pumps: $300 High Efficiency HVAC; central air conditioning: $300 Whole House Incentives $1,000 - $4,000 Provider Progress Energy Progress Energy's residential new construction program provides cash

207

MassSAVE (Electric) - Residential Retrofit Programs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Retrofit Programs Retrofit Programs MassSAVE (Electric) - Residential Retrofit Programs < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Maximum Rebate Weatherization: $2000 Program Info Expiration Date 12/31/2012 State Massachusetts Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Weatherization: 75% Heat Pump Water Heater: $1,000 Income Eligible Customers: free home energy consultation Mulitifamily Incentives: comprehensive energy analysis, lighting upgrades, insulation, air sealing and other energy saving measures.

208

NIPSCO (Gas and Electric) - Residential Natural Gas Efficiency Rebates |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NIPSCO (Gas and Electric) - Residential Natural Gas Efficiency NIPSCO (Gas and Electric) - Residential Natural Gas Efficiency Rebates NIPSCO (Gas and Electric) - Residential Natural Gas Efficiency Rebates < Back Eligibility Construction Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Cooling Program Info State Indiana Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Varies Provider Energy Efficiency Programs Group Northern Indiana Public Service Corporation (NIPSCO) offers rebates to residential customers that install energy efficient gas and electric measures in homes through the NIPSCO Energy Efficiency Rebate Program. The program is available to all residential NIPSCO natural gas and electric customers. Flat rebates are offered for natural gas boilers, natural gas

209

Detroit Public Lighting Department - Residential Energy Wise Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Detroit Public Lighting Department - Residential Energy Wise Detroit Public Lighting Department - Residential Energy Wise Program Detroit Public Lighting Department - Residential Energy Wise Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State Michigan Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount CFLs: $2-$10 LED Task Light: $10.00 LED Night light: $1.25 Energy Star Ceiling Fan: $10 Provider Detroit Public Lighting Department The Detroit Public Lighting Department (PLD) offers residential customers rebates for energy efficient lights. In addition, low-income residential customers may qualify for free compact fluorescent lights (CFLs). Specific rebate amounts, equipment requirements, and applications are available on

210

Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Buildings Residential Buildings to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Residential Buildings on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner With DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Residential Links Success Stories Previous Next Warming Up to Pump Heat. Lighten Energy Loads with System Design. Cut Refrigerator Energy Use to Save Money. Tools EnergyPlus Whole Building Simulation Program

211

Feasibility study and roadmap to improve residential hot water distribution systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Residential building practice currently ignores the losses of energy and water caused by the poor design of hot water systems. These losses include: the waste of water while waiting for hot water to get to the point of use; the wasted heat as water cools down in the distribution system after a draw; and the energy to reheat water that was already heated once before. A feasibility study and an action plan for a proposed research project involving residential hot water distribution systems is being developed. The feasibility study will use past work to estimate of hot water and energy loses caused by current hot water distribution systems in residences. Proposed research project, or roadmap, will develop recommendations for improvements to residential hot water distribution systems. The roadmap addresses the technical obstacles and gaps in our knowledge that prevent water and energy reductions and market adoption of water- and energy-efficient technologies. The initial results of the feasibility study are presented here along with a discussion of a roadmap to improve the efficiency of residential hot water distribution systems.

Lutz, James D.

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

212

Model documentation report: Residential sector demand module of the national energy modeling system  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code. This reference document provides a detailed description for energy analysts, other users, and the public. The NEMS Residential Sector Demand Module is currently used for mid-term forecasting purposes and energy policy analysis over the forecast horizon of 1993 through 2020. The model generates forecasts of energy demand for the residential sector by service, fuel, and Census Division. Policy impacts resulting from new technologies, market incentives, and regulatory changes can be estimated using the module. 26 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Advanced Heat Pump Water Heating Technology: Testing Commercial and Residential Systems in the Laboratory and Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) provide electric water heating at a much greater overall efficiency than conventional electric resistance systems. In the residential market, approximately half of all water heaters are electric resistance; these systems can be replaced by HPWHs in most applications with expected savings of 30%60%. In commercial applications, most systems presently use natural gas or another fuel in direct combustion. Emerging HPWH systems are now able to provide water heating ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

214

Solar heating and cooling of residential buildings: sizing, installation and operation of systems. 1980 edition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This manual was prepared as a text for a training course on solar heating and cooling of residential buildings. The course and text are directed toward sizing, installation, operation, and maintenance of solar systems for space heating and hot water supply, and solar cooling is treated only briefly. (MHR)

None

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Assessment of Residential Combined Heat and Power Systems: Application Benefits and Vendors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an analysis of the benefits of installing a residential combined heat and power (RCHP) plant in several U.S. geographies and under a number of dispatch scenarios. The report also provides an assessment of 14 companies developing or selling RCHP systems in North American, Europe, and Japan.

2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

216

The Technical and Economical Analysis of the Air-conditioning System Usage in Residential Buildings in Beijing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we show that the air-conditioning usage in residential buildings in Beijing grows rapidly in relation to the development of civil construction. More and more people are not satisfied with the current style of only using split air-conditioning units in residential buildings, and are using the central air-conditioning system in residential buildings. To determine the best air conditioning mode, a residential tower building with 22 layers was chosen for analysis. The advantages and disadvantages of the central air-conditioning system and the residential multi-unit air-conditioning equipment system and the LiBr absorption chiller were compared based on calculating the first-cost and the annual cost (according to providing cooling 90 days annually). The predicted results show the economical feasibility of using the refrigerating units in air-conditioning systems in Beijing region, and point out the developing directions for the future.

Sheng, G.; Xie, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Simulations of sizing and comfort improvements for residential forced-air heating and cooling systems  

SciTech Connect

In many parts of North America residential HVAC systems are installed outside conditioned space. This leads to significant energy losses and poor occupant comfort due to conduction and air leakage losses from the air distribution ducts. In addition, cooling equipment performance is sensitive to air flow and refrigerant charge that have been found to be far from manufacturers specifications in most systems. The simulation techniques discussed in this report were developed in an effort to provide guidance on the savings potentials and comfort gains that can be achieved by improving ducts (sealing air leaks) and equipment (correct air-flow and refrigerant charge). The simulations include the complex air flow and thermal interactions between duct systems, their surroundings and the conditioned space. They also include cooling equipment response to air flow and refrigerant charge effects. Another key aspect of the simulations is that they are dynamic to account for cyclic losses from the HVAC system and the effect of cycle length on energy and comfort performance. To field test the effect of changes to residential HVAC systems requires extensive measurements to be made for several months for each condition tested. This level of testing is often impractical due to cost and time limitations. Therefore the Energy Performance of Buildings Group at LBNL developed a computer simulation tool that models residential HVAC system performance. This simulation tool has been used to answer questions about equipment downsizing, duct improvements, control strategies and climate variation so that recommendations can be made for changes in residential construction and HVAC installation techniques that would save energy, reduce peak demand and result in more comfortable homes. Although this study focuses on California climates, the simulation tool could easily be applied to other climates. This report summarizes the simulation tool and discusses the significant developments that allow the use of this tool to perform detailed residential HVAC system simulations. The simulations have been verified by comparison to measured results in several houses over a wide range of weather conditions and HVAC system performance. After the verification was completed, more than 350 cooling and 450 heating simulations were performed. These simulations covered a range of HVAC system performance parameters and California climate conditions (that range from hot dry deserts to cold mountain regions). The results of the simulations were used to show the large increases in HVAC system performance that can be attained by improving the HVAC duct distribution systems and by better sizing of residential HVAC equipment. The simulations demonstrated that improved systems can deliver improved heating or cooling to the conditioned space, maintain equal or better comfort while reducing peak demand and the installed equipment capacity (and therefore capital costs).

Walker, I.S.; Degenetais, G.; Siegel, J.A.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Analysis of Residential System Strategies Targeting Least-Cost Solutions Leading to Net Zero Energy Homes: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U. S. Department of Energy's Building America residential systems research project uses an analysis-based system research approach to identify research priorities, identify technology gaps and opportunities, establish a consistent basis to track research progress, and identify system solutions that are most likely to succeed as the initial targets for residential system research projects. This report describes the analysis approach used by the program to determine the most cost-effective pathways to achieve whole-house energy-savings goals. This report also provides an overview of design/technology strategies leading to net zero energy buildings as the basis for analysis of future residential system performance.

Anderson, R.; Christensen, C.; Horowitz, S.

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

ConEd (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Incentives Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ConEd (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Incentives Program ConEd (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Incentives Program ConEd (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Incentives Program < Back Eligibility Installer/Contractor Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heating Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Central A/C: $400 or $600 Central Air Source Heat Pump: $400 or $600 Electric Heat Pump Water Heater: $400 Energy Star Thermostats: up to $25 Duct Sealing: $100/hr Air Sealing: $75/hr Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $50 Con Edison is offering the Residential HVAC Electric Rebate Program.

220

City of Cleveland - Residential Property Tax Abatement for Green Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City of Cleveland - Residential Property Tax Abatement for Green City of Cleveland - Residential Property Tax Abatement for Green Buildings City of Cleveland - Residential Property Tax Abatement for Green Buildings < Back Eligibility Construction Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Wind Program Info Start Date 01/01/2010 State Ohio Program Type Property Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% for 10-15 years Provider City of Cleveland Department of Community Development The City of Cleveland, in cooperation with the Cuyahoga County Auditor's Office, provides a 100% tax abatement for residential properties built to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-family residential systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Southwest Gas Corporation - Residential and Builder Efficiency Rebate  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southwest Gas Corporation - Residential and Builder Efficiency Southwest Gas Corporation - Residential and Builder Efficiency Rebate Program (Arizona) Southwest Gas Corporation - Residential and Builder Efficiency Rebate Program (Arizona) < Back Eligibility Construction Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Residential: 2 per household Program Info State Arizona Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Residential Natural Gas Tankless Water Heater: $450 Natural Gas Clothes Dryer: $30 Windows: $0.95/sq ft Attic Insulation: $0.15/sq ft Floor Insulation: $0.30/sq ft Builders Energy Star Certified Home: $450 Natural Gas Tankless Water Heater: $450 Attic Insulation: $0.15/sq ft

222

The use of linear systems analysis to identify the residential/utility relationship  

SciTech Connect

There is little doubt that there will be significant changes to future residential electric loads and these changes will have a significant impact on the efficiency with which a utility meets its overall load demand. Changes to the residential load will come about, in part, due to residential growth and increased market penetration of alternate energy sources such as solar space heating. In view of these inevitable changes, it is imperative to develop analytical tools to assess their impact. To date, effective analytical tools include computer simulations and load duration analysis. Computer simulation methods are generally very powerful but require substantial computer, personnel, and financial resources which may put this method of analysis out of the reach of many utilities and systems analysts. In addition, detailed computer simulations have a tendency to obscure insight into the problem. Load duration analysis does provide good insight into the problem, but oftentimes must resort to simulation results if correlations exist between utility load curves and the modified residential curve. One analytical method which has not been exploited to its fullest potential is the use of linear systems analysis to solve this type of problem.

Baer, C.A.; Winn, C.B.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

SMUD - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rebate Program Rebate Program SMUD - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Installer/Contractor Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Sealing Your Home Ventilation Water Heating Maximum Rebate Contact SMUD for individual program or equipment maximum amounts Program Info Expiration Date 12/31/2013 State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Home Performance Program: up to $5,000 Multi-Family Housing Program: $500 for 10% energy savings plus $40 for each additional percentage Central A/C and/or Heat Pump: $400 - $1,100

224

Test and Evaluation of a High Efficiency Residential Fuel Cell System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A confluence of industry drivers, including the availability of low-cost natural gas, is creating new market opportunities for natural gas-based distributed generation. Solid oxide fuel cell systems (SOFC) are a potentially attractive option because of their high electrical efficiency (5060% lower heating value (LHV)). This report documents two years of testing and evaluation of a 1.5 kW SOFC residential system provided by Ceramics Fuel Cell Limited. Tests were conducted in collaboration with ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

225

Battery Power for Your Residential Solar Electric System: Better Buildings Series Solar Electric Fact Sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ELECTRIC ELECTRIC Battery Power for Your Residential Solar Electric System A Winning Combination-Design, Efficiency, and Solar Technology A battery bank stores electricity produced by a solar electric system. If your house is not connected to the utility grid, or if you antici- pate long power outages from the grid, you will need a battery bank. This fact sheet pro- vides an overview of battery basics, including information to help you select and maintain your battery bank. Types of Batteries There are many types of batteries avail- able, and each type is designed for specific applications. Lead-acid batteries have been used for residential solar electric systems for many years and are still the best choice for this application because of their low mainte- nance requirements and cost. You may

226

IMPACTS OF REFRIGERANTLINE LENGTH ON SYSTEM EFFICIENCY IN RESIDENTIAL HEATING AND COOLING SYSTEMS USING REFRIGERANT DISTRIBUTION.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects on system efficiency of excess refrigerant line length are calculated for an idealized residential heating and cooling system. By excess line length is meant refrigerant tubing in excess of the 25 R provided for in standard equipment efficiency test methods. The purpose of the calculation is to provide input for a proposed method for evaluating refrigerant distribution system efficiency. A refrigerant distribution system uses refrigerant (instead of ducts or pipes) to carry heat and/or cooling effect from the equipment to the spaces in the building in which it is used. Such systems would include so-called mini-splits as well as more conventional split systems that for one reason or another have the indoor and outdoor coils separated by more than 25 ft. This report performs first-order calculations of the effects on system efficiency, in both the heating and cooling modes, of pressure drops within the refrigerant lines and of heat transfer between the refrigerant lines and the space surrounding them.

ANDREWS, J.W.

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Questar Gas - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Idaho) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Programs (Idaho) Programs (Idaho) Questar Gas - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Idaho) < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Limit of one rebate per appliance type Duct Sealing/Insulation: $450 (Single Family); $250 (Multifamily) Program Info State Idaho Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Furnace: $200-$400 Solar Assisted Water Heater: $750 Storage Water Heater: $50-$100 Gas Condensing/Hybrid Water Heater: $350 Tankless Water Heater: $300-$350 Boiler: $400 - $600 Solar Hot Water Heater: $750 Gas Clothes Washer: $50

228

Focus on Energy - Incentives for Existing Multi-Family Buildings...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lighting, Lighting ControlsSensors, Furnaces, Boilers, Heat pumps, Heat recovery, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, DuctAir sealing, Building Insulation, Geothermal...

229

Impact of Different Glazing Systems on Cooling Load of a Detached Residential Building at Bhubaneswar, India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For detached residential buildings located in the tropics, it is more challenging and difficult to deal with the space cooling load due to hot and humid climates. In this paper, daily and monthly computer simulations of solar heat gain and cooling load for a detached residential building are carried out using Design Builder software. Different glazing systems ranging from single glazed clear glass to double glaze with electro chromic reflective colored have been analyzed in terms of their impact on solar heat gain and cooling load. The simulation results show reductions in solar heat gain, cooling load and better thermal comfort can be achieved using proper glazing systems for a specific orientation of the building. The significance of these results stems from the fact that they are obtained under local weather conditions, a matter of importance to building architects, designers, contractors, and builders as well as air conditioning equipment manufacturers.

Sahoo, P. K.; Sahoo, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

A discussion on life-cycle costs of residential photovoltaic systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses the characteristics and needed improvements/enhancements required for the expansion of the grid-tied residential power systems market. The purpose of the paper is to help establish a common understanding, between the technical community and the customers of the technology, of value and costs and what is required in the longer term for reaching the full potential of this application.

THOMAS,MICHAEL G.; CAMERON,CHRISTOPHER P.

2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

231

Cooling-load implications for residential passive-solar-heating systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ongoing research on quantifying the cooling loads in residential buildings, particularly buildings with passive solar heating systems, is described, along with the computer simulation model used for calculating cooling loads. A sample of interim results is also presented. The objective of the research is to develop a simple analysis method, useful early in design, to estimate the annual cooling energy requirement of a given building.

Jones, R.W.; McFarland, R.D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Field Testing of Energy-Efficient Flood-Damage-Resistant Residential Envelope Systems Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of the project was to identify materials and methods that will make the envelope of a house flood damage resistant. Flood damage resistant materials and systems are intended to be used to repair houses subsequent to flooding. This project was also intended to develop methods of restoring the envelopes of houses that have been flooded but are repairable and may be subject to future flooding. Then if the house floods again, damage will not be as extensive as in previous flood events and restoration costs and efforts will be minimized. The purpose of the first pair of field tests was to establish a baseline for typical current residential construction practice. The first test modules used materials and systems that were commonly found in residential envelopes throughout the U.S. The purpose of the second pair of field tests was to begin evaluating potential residential envelope materials and systems that were projected to be more flood-damage resistant and restorable than the conventional materials and systems tested in the first pair of tests. The purpose of testing the third slab-on-grade module was to attempt to dry flood proof the module (no floodwater within the structure). If the module could be sealed well enough to prevent water from entering, then this would be an effective method of making the interior materials and systems flood damage resistant. The third crawl space module was tested in the same manner as the previous modules and provided an opportunity to do flood tests of additional residential materials and systems. Another purpose of the project was to develop the methodology to collect representative, measured, reproducible (i.e. scientific) data on how various residential materials and systems respond to flooding conditions so that future recommendations for repairing flood damaged houses could be based on scientific data. An additional benefit of collecting this data is that it will be used in the development of a standard test procedure which could lead to the certification of building materials and systems as flood damage resistant.

Aglan, H.

2005-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

233

Performance comparison between air and liquid residential solar heating systems  

SciTech Connect

Comparisons of system performance for the flat plate liquid-heating system in CSU Solar House I, the evacuated-tube collector system in Solar House I, and the flat plate air-heating system in CSU Solar House II are described for selected months of the 1976 and 1977 heating seasons. Only space and domestic water heating data are compared. The flat plate air- and liquid-heating collectors operating with complete heating systems have nearly equal efficiencies when based upon solar flux while the collector fluids are flowing, but approximately 40% more energy is collected during a heating season with the air-heating system because the air system operates over a longer period of the day. On the basis of short-term data, the evacuated tube collector array on Solar House I is about 27% more efficient than the flat plate air-heating collector array on Solar House II based on gross roof area occupied by the collectors and manifolds.

Karaki, S.; Duff, W.S.; Loef, G.O.G.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Residential Vertical Geothermal Heat Pump System Models: Calibration to Data:  

SciTech Connect

A detailed component-based simulation model of a geothermal heat pump system has been calibrated to monitored data taken from a family housing unit located at Fort Polk, Louisiana. The simulation model represents the housing unit, geothermal heat pump, ground heat exchanger, thermostat, blower, and ground-loop pump. Each of these component models was 'tuned' to better match the measured data from the site. These tuned models were then interconnect to form the system model. The system model was then exercised in order to demonatrate its capabilities.

Thornton, Jeff W. [Thermal Energy Systems Specialists, Inc.; McDowell, T. P. [Thermal Energy Systems Specialists, Inc.; Shonder, John A [ORNL; Hughes, Patrick [ORNL; Pahud, D. [University of Applied Sciences of Southern Switzerland; Hellstrom, G. [Lund University

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Grid-Competitive Residential and Commercial Fully Automated PV Systems Technology: Final technical Report, August 2011  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under DOE's Technology Pathway Partnership program, SunPower Corporation developed turn-key, high-efficiency residential and commercial systems that are cost effective. Key program objectives include a reduction in LCOE values to 9-12 cents/kWh and 13-18 cents/kWh respectively for the commercial and residential markets. Target LCOE values for the commercial ground, commercial roof, and residential markets are 10, 11, and 13 cents/kWh. For this effort, SunPower collaborated with a variety of suppliers and partners to complete the tasks below. Subcontractors included: Solaicx, SiGen, Ribbon Technology, Dow Corning, Xantrex, Tigo Energy, and Solar Bridge. SunPower's TPP addressed nearly the complete PV value chain: from ingot growth through system deployment. Throughout the award period of performance, SunPower has made progress toward achieving these reduced costs through the development of 20%+ efficient modules, increased cell efficiency through the understanding of loss mechanisms and improved manufacturing technologies, novel module development, automated design tools and techniques, and reduced system development and installation time. Based on an LCOE assessment using NREL's Solar Advisor Model, SunPower achieved the 2010 target range, as well as progress toward 2015 targets.

Brown, Katie E.; Cousins, Peter; Culligan, Matt; Jonathan Botkin; DeGraaff, David; Bunea, Gabriella; Rose, Douglas; Bourne, Ben; Koehler, Oliver

2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

236

Residential commissioning to assess envelope and HVAC system performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

qualitatively during air-sealing work to assess progresssealing or for separation of the supply and return systems at the airby poor sealing or seal failure during the test. Air leakage

Wray, Craig P.; Sherman, Max H.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Cowlitz County PUD - Residential Weatherization Plus Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cowlitz County PUD - Residential Weatherization Plus Program Cowlitz County PUD - Residential Weatherization Plus Program Cowlitz County PUD - Residential Weatherization Plus Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Site-Built Home Attic Insulation, existing below R-19: $0.70/sq. ft. Attic Insulation, existing R-19 or above: $0.40/sq. ft. Floor Insulation: $0.40/sq. ft. Wall Insulation (blown in): $0.70/sq. ft. Knee Wall Insulation (batts): $0.25/sq. ft. Replacement Windows: $6.00/sq. ft.

238

Austin Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Austin Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program Austin Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program Austin Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Ventilation Heat Pumps Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Option One: $15,000 Option Two: $15,000 Option Three: $20,000 Program Info State Texas Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount Minimum Loan: $1,500 Provider Austin Energy Austin Energy offers three types of loans to residential customers to finance energy efficient improvements in eligible homes. The "Home Energy Improvements Loan" (Option One) can be used to complete suggested

239

CPS Energy - New Residential Construction Incentives | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CPS Energy - New Residential Construction Incentives CPS Energy - New Residential Construction Incentives CPS Energy - New Residential Construction Incentives < Back Eligibility Construction Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info Start Date 01/01/2010 State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Star Compliant (HERS Rating 75-58): $800/structure Energy Star Compliant (HERS rating 57 or less): $1,500/structure Other Rating Methods(15% to 30% above code): $800/structure Other Rating Methods(31% or greater above code): $1,500/structure Provider CPS Energy CPS Energy offers incentives for new residential construction that is at least 15% more efficient than required by the

240

Colorado Springs Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Colorado Springs Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Windows, Doors, & Skylights Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Maximum Rebate Visit website for details Program Info State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Duct Sealing: 40% of job up to $100 Dishwasher: $50 Gas Boiler: $250 Gas Furnace: $250 Gas Water Heater: $50 Insulation and Air Sealing: 40% of job up to $200 Irrigation: varies Refrigerator: $50 + $50 recycle bonus Toilets: up to $75 (max 2) Windows: $4.67/sq ft, up to $200 Provider Residential Efficiency Incentives Colorado Springs Utilities offers a variety of energy and water efficiency

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-family residential systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

National Fuel (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Fuel (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates National Fuel (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates National Fuel (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Rebate amount cannot exceed the purchase price Program Info Start Date 1/1/2013 Expiration Date 3/31/2014 State New York Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Furnace: $250 Forced Air Furnace with ECM: $350 Hot Water Boiler: $350 Steam Boiler: $200 Programmable Thermostat: $25 Indirect Water Heater: $250 Provider Energy Federation Incorporated (EFI) National Fuel offers pre-qualified equipment rebates for the installation of certain energy efficiency measures to residential customers in Western

242

City of Frisco - Residential and Commercial Green Building Codes |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City of Frisco - Residential and Commercial Green Building Codes City of Frisco - Residential and Commercial Green Building Codes City of Frisco - Residential and Commercial Green Building Codes < Back Eligibility Commercial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Insulation Program Info State Texas Program Type Building Energy Code Provider Frisco Department of Planning and Development '''''Note: In the spring on 2012, the city of Frisco was working to update the residential requirements. No official city council action had been taken at the time this summary was updated. Check program web site for current status of updates.''''' The city of Frisco administers a green building program with separate rules

243

Xcel Energy - Residential and Low Income Home Energy Service | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Xcel Energy - Residential and Low Income Home Energy Service Xcel Energy - Residential and Low Income Home Energy Service Xcel Energy - Residential and Low Income Home Energy Service < Back Eligibility Installer/Contractor Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info Start Date 1/1/2011 Expiration Date 12/31/2012 State New Mexico Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Evaporative Cooling: $200-$1000/unit Saver's Switch A/C Cycling: $20/ton of enrolled air conditioning Refrigerator Recycling: $75 CFLs: $1/bulb LED's: $10/bulb

244

Penelec - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Penelec - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs Penelec - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs Penelec - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs < Back Eligibility Construction Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Other Ventilation Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Whole House Program: $900 Program Info Funding Source Pennsylvania Electric Company (Penelec), Metropolitan Edison Company (Met-Ed), and Pennsylvania Power Company (PennPower) Start Date 10/29/2009 Expiration Date 5/31/2013 State Pennsylvania Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount PA Energy Efficient New Homes Program: $1000 - $10,000 based on % savings

245

Consumers Energy (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program Consumers Energy (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Commercial Weatherization Manufacturing Maximum Rebate Home Performance Comprehensive Assessment and Installations: $3500 Insulation: $1,025 Program Info State Michigan Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount CFL Lighting: Retailer Instant Discount Programmable Thermostat: $10 Central A/C and Heat Pumps: $150 - $250 Central A/C Tune up: $50 Ground Source Heat Pump: $200-$300 Room A/C: $25 Dehumidifier: $25 ECM Blower: $100 Refrigerator Recycling: $30 Clothes Washer: $25-$50

246

Unitil (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unitil (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs Unitil (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs Unitil (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Construction Design & Remodeling Other Ventilation Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Home Performance with Energy Star: 50% Utility Rebate up to $4,000 Home Energy Assistance (Low-income residents): $5,000 Program Info Start Date 1/1/2011 Expiration Date 12/31/2011 State New Hampshire Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Natural Gas Warm Air Furnace: $500 or $800 Natural Gas Boiler: $1,000 or $1,500

247

Measured Performance of California Buydown Program Residential PV Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, on average, 62 percent of nominal DC module size. For non-tracking systems, average annual energy production annual energy production per unit of nominal DC module size is approximately 1,100 kWh/year. Both Economic Research, Inc. Sanford Miller, California Energy Commission ABSTRACT More than two thousand small

248

Utilities offer photovoltaic systems to remote residential customers  

SciTech Connect

From Idaho to Arizona and Nevada to Colorado, utilities across the U.S. are beginning to offer remote homeowners an option that may seem unusual today, but might be commonplace in the future. Would-be customers who do not live close to the electric grid may choose the option of photovoltaic (PV) systems to supply their electricity as an alternative to expensive line extension. These customers typically live and/or farm in rural sections of the country. Others own vacation homes far from towns or cities. Solar-powered energy systems have already proven successful for powering pumps to water livestock, and for lights and communications devices in locations far from established sources of electricity. Rather than receiving the customary electric bill for metered service, customers will pay a set rate to use the PV system, which the utility will own and maintain. The initial cost of purchasing the system can be much lower than extending the utility line (which can cost $20,000 a mile). From the utility's standpoint, it saves on investing in lines that stand to generate small profits because of the small load and resultant energy sales.

Van Arsdall, A.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Optimal Dispatch of Photovoltaic Inverters in Residential Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- fined limit. The premise for these active power curtailment (APC) strategies is that the resistance method for determining the active- and reactive-power set points for PV inverters in resi- dential. Index Terms--Distribution networks, inverter control, photo- voltaic systems, optimal power flow

Giannakis, Georgios

250

Method and system for regulating peak residential power demand  

SciTech Connect

A temperature monitoring system that monitors temperature outside the residence and a supply system responsive to the monitoring system that controls the supply of electrical power to major home appliances such as air conditioning devices, food preparation devices, clothes drying devices, and water heating devices is described. The major home appliances are arranged in pairs and connected to a main power distribution system in these pair arrangements through a load dispatcher including continuity sensitive switches. The appliances are continuously connected to the electrical power distribution system when the outdoor temperature is below a predetermined value. However, when the outdoor temperature exceeds the predetermined value, the continuity switches then control the supply of power to the appliances by supplying power to one of the appliances to the exclusion of the other in each pair arrangement. Whenever electrical power is not being supplied to one of the appliances in the pair arrangement requiring power, the other of the appliances is supplied with electrical power. In accordance with another aspect of the invention, the outdoor temperature is monitored and controls the operation of an air conditioning unit. When the outdoor temperature exceeds a predetermined value, the air conditioner is cycled between on and off conditions on a timed, periodic basis without regard to the temperature inside the residence at least until the temperature outside the residence drops below the predetermined value. The air conditioner may be cycled between on and off conditions on the periodic basis until the outdoor temperature drops a predetermined amount below the predetermined value, for example, drops at least 5/sup 0/ or 6/sup 0/ below the predetermined value. 12 Claims, 5 Drawing Figures.

Dixon, W.A.

1975-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

251

Inverter control systems in the residential heat pump air conditioner  

SciTech Connect

A compressor capacity control with an inverter has been considered from the viewpoint of high energy saving in a refrigerating cycle. However, the system has not been put into practical use because of high initial cost, technical problems of electronic parts, and complexity of system control. In this connection, we developed the new inverter-controlled heat-pump air conditioner by using the latest electronics and refrigeration technology. This paper discusses the trend of energy saving in air conditioners in Japan and the objectives of developing the inverter controlled air conditioner. It also discusses the following items with respect to the inverter controlled air conditioner and the effects of employing an inverter: 1. Inverter for air conditioning; 2. Refrigeration cycle; 3. Air conditioner control with inverter.

Shimma, Y.; Tateuchi, T.; Suglura, H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Thermal performance of residential duct systems in basements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many unanswered questions about the typical effects of duct system operation on the infiltration rates and energy usage of single- family residences with HVAC systems in their basements. In this paper, results from preliminary field studies and computer simulations are used to examine the potential for improvements in efficiency of air distribution systems in such houses. The field studies comprise thermal and flow measurements on four houses in Maryland. The houses were found to have significant envelope leakage, duct leakage, and duct conduction losses. Simulations of a basement house, the characteristics of which were chosen from the measured houses, were performed to assess the energy savings potential for basement house. The simulations estimate that a nine percent reduction in space conditioning energy use is obtained by sealing eighty percent of the duct leaks and insulating ducts to an R-value of 0.88 {degree}C{center_dot}m{sup 2}/W (5{degree}F{center_dot}ft{sup 2}{center_dot}h/BTU) where they are exposed in the basement. To determine the maximum possible reduction m energy use, simulations were run with all ducts insulated to 17.6 {degree}C{center_dot}m{sup 2}/W (100 {degree}F{center_dot}ft{sup 2}{center_dot}h/BTU) and with no duct leakage. A reduction of energy use by 14% is obtained by using perfect ducts instead of nominal ducts.

Treidler, B.; Modera, M.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Residential Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residential Performance: guidelines, analysis and measurements of window and skylight performance Windows in residential buildings consume approximately 2% of all the energy used...

254

Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The market for small wind systems in the United States, often defined as systems less than or equal to 100 kW that produce power on the customer side of the meter, is small but growing steadily. The installed capacity of domestic small wind systems in 2002 was reportedly 15-18 MW, though the market is estimated to be growing by as much as 40 percent annually (AWEA, 2002). This growth is driven in part by recent technology advancements and cost improvements and, perhaps more importantly, by favorable policy incentives targeted at small wind systems that are offered in several states. Currently, over half of all states have incentive policies for which residential small wind installations are eligible. These incentives range from low-interest loan programs and various forms of tax advantages to cash rebates that cover as much as 60 percent of the total system cost for turbines 10 kW or smaller installed in residential applications. Most of these incentives were developed to support a ran ge of emerging renewable technologies (most notably photovoltaic systems), and were therefore not specifically designed with small wind systems in mind. As such, the question remains as to which incentive types provide the greatest benefit to small wind systems, and how states might appropriately set the level and type of incentives in the future. Furthermore, given differences in incentive types and levels across states, as well as variations in retail electricity rates and other relevant factors, it is not immediately obvious which states offer the most promising markets for small wind turbine manufacturers and installers, as well as potential residential system owners. This paper presents results from a Berkeley Lab analysis of the impact of existing and proposed state and federal incentives on the economics of grid-connected, residential small wind systems. Berkeley Lab has designed the Small Wind Analysis Tool (SWAT) to compare system economics under current incentive structures a cross all 50 states. SWAT reports three metrics to characterize residential wind economics in each state and wind resource class: (1) Break-Even Turnkey Cost (BTC): The BTC is defined as the aggregate installed system cost that would balance total customer payments and revenue over the life of the system, allowing the customer to ''break-even'' while earning a specified rate of return on the small wind ''investment.'' (2) Simple Payback (SP): The SP is the number of years it takes a customer to recoup a cash payment for a wind system and all associated costs, assuming zero discount on future revenue and payments (i.e., ignoring the time value of money). (3) Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE): The LCOE is the levelized cost of generating a kWh of electricity over the lifetime of the system, and is calculated assuming a cash purchase for the small wind system and a 5.5 percent real discount rate. This paper presents SWAT results for a 10 kW wind turbine and turbine power production is based on a Bergey Excel system. These results are not directly applicable to turbines with different power curves and rated outputs, especially given the fact that many state incentives are set as a fixed dollar amount, and the dollar per Watt amount will vary based on the total rated turbine capacity.

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Market Assessment of Residential Grid-Tied PV Systems in Colorado  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents research done in response to a decision by the Colorado Governor's Office of Energy Conservation and Management (OEC) and Colorado utility companies to consider making residential grid-tied photovoltaic (PV) systems available in Colorado. The idea was to locate homeowners willing to pay the costs of grid-tied PV (GPV) systems without batteries-$8,000 or $12,000 for a 2- or 3-kilowatt (kW) system, respectively, in 1996. These costs represented two-thirds of the actual installed cost of $6 per watt at that time and assumed the remainder would be subsidized. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and OEC partnered to conduct a market assessment for GPV technology in Colorado. The study encompassed both qualitative and quantitative phases. The market assessment concluded that a market for residential GPV systems exists in Colorado today. That market is substantial enough for companies to successfully market PV systems to Colorado homeowners. These homeo wners appear ready to learn more, inform themselves, and actively purchase GPV systems. The present situation is highly advantageous to Colorado's institutions-primarily its state government and its utility companies, and also its homebuilders-if they are ready to move forward on GPV technology.

Farhar, B.; Coburn, T.

2000-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

256

A Market Assessment of Residential Grid-Tied PV Systems in Colorado: Executive Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the Executive Summary of a report that presents research done in response to a decision by the Colorado Governor's Office of Energy Conservation and Management (OEC) and Colorado utility companies to consider making residential grid-tied photovoltaic (PV) systems available in Colorado. The idea was to locate homeowners willing to pay the costs of grid-tied PV (GPV) systems without batteries--$8,000 or $12,000 for a 2- or 3-kilowatt (kW) system, respectively, in 1996. These costs represented two-thirds of the actual installed cost of $6 per watt at that time and assumed the remainder would be subsidized. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and OEC partnered to conduct a market assessment for GPV technology in Colorado. The study encompassed both qualitative and quantitative phases. The market assessment concluded that a market for residential GPV systems exists in Colorado today. That market is substantial enough for companies to successfully market PV systems to Colorado homeowners. These homeowners appear ready to learn more, inform themselves, and actively purchase GPV systems. The present situation is highly advantageous to Colorado's institutions--primarily its state government and its utility companies, and also its homebuilders--if they are ready to move forward on GPV technology.

Farhar, B.; Coburn, T.

2000-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

257

Market Assessment of Residential Grid-Tied PV Systems in Colorado  

SciTech Connect

This report presents research done in response to a decision by the Colorado Governor's Office of Energy Conservation and Management (OEC) and Colorado utility companies to consider making residential grid-tied photovoltaic (PV) systems available in Colorado. The idea was to locate homeowners willing to pay the costs of grid-tied PV (GPV) systems without batteries-$8,000 or $12,000 for a 2- or 3-kilowatt (kW) system, respectively, in 1996. These costs represented two-thirds of the actual installed cost of $6 per watt at that time and assumed the remainder would be subsidized. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and OEC partnered to conduct a market assessment for GPV technology in Colorado. The study encompassed both qualitative and quantitative phases. The market assessment concluded that a market for residential GPV systems exists in Colorado today. That market is substantial enough for companies to successfully market PV systems to Colorado homeowners. These homeo wners appear ready to learn more, inform themselves, and actively purchase GPV systems. The present situation is highly advantageous to Colorado's institutions-primarily its state government and its utility companies, and also its homebuilders-if they are ready to move forward on GPV technology.

Farhar, B.; Coburn, T.

2000-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

258

Wind Energy Conversion Systems (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Energy Conversion Systems (Minnesota) Wind Energy Conversion Systems (Minnesota) Wind Energy Conversion Systems (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting This section distinguishes between large (capacity 5,000 kW or more) and small (capacity of less than 5,000 kW) wind energy conversion systems (WECS), and regulates the siting of large conversion systems. The statute

259

Leakage diagnostics, sealant longevity, sizing and technologytransfer in residential thermal distribution systems: Part II.Residential thermal Distribution Systesm, Phase VI FinalReport  

SciTech Connect

This report builds on and extends our previous efforts as described in "Leakage Diagnostics, Sealant Longevity, Sizing and Technology Transfer in Residential Thermal Distribution Systems- CIEE Residential Thermal Distribution Systems Phase V Final Report, October 1997". New developments include defining combined duct and equipment efficiencies in a concept called "Tons At the Register" and on performance issues related to field use of the aerosol sealant technology. Some of the key results discussed in this report include: o Register, boot and air handler cabinet leakage can often represent a significant fraction of the total duct leakage in new construction. Because of the large range of pressures in duct systems an accurate characterization may require separating these components through improved leakage testing. o Conventional duct tape failed our accelerated longevity testing and is not, therefore, considered generally acceptable for use in sealing duct systems. Many other tapes and sealing approaches are available and practical and have passed our longevity tests. o Simulations of summer temperature pull-down time have shown that duct system improvements can be combined with equipment downsizing to save first cost, energy consumption, and peak power and still provide equivalent or superior comfort. o Air conditioner name plate capacity ratings alone are a poor indicator of how much cooling will actually be delivered to the conditioned space. Duct system efficiency can have as large an impact on performance as variations in SEER. o Mechanical duct cleaning techniques do not have an adverse impact on the ducts sealed with the Aerosol sealant. The material typically used in Aerosol sealing techniques does not appear to present a health or safety hazard. Results from this study were used by the California Energy Commission in the formation of the current Energy Efficiency Standards for Low-Rise Residential Buildings (CEC, (1998)), often referred to as Title 24. Current information on ducts and thermal distribution research can be found at http://ducts.lbl.gov

Buchanan, C.; Modera, M.; Sherman, M.; Siegel, J.; Walker, I.; Wang, D.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Residential Rewards Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rewards Program Rewards Program Residential Rewards Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info Funding Source Focus On Energy Program Expiration Date 12/31/2013 State Wisconsin Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Furnace (90% AFUE with ECM): $125 Furnace (95% AFUE with ECM): $275 Furnace (95% AFUE with ECM) and AC (16 SEER): $400 Air Source Heat Pump (16 SEER): $300 Natural gas space heating boiler (90% AFUE): $300 Natural gas space heating boiler (95% AFUE): $400 Indirect Water Heater (with high efficiency space heating boiler): $100 Tankless Water Heater (0.82 EF or higher): $100 Storage Water Heater (0.67 EF or higher): $50

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-family residential systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

An Analysis of the Effects of Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Analysis of the Effects of Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems on An Analysis of the Effects of Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Home Sales Prices in California Title An Analysis of the Effects of Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Home Sales Prices in California Publication Type Report Refereed Designation Unknown Year of Publication 2011 Authors Hoen, Ben, Ryan H. Wiser, Peter Cappers, and Mark Thayer Pagination 60 Date Published 04/2011 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, photovoltaics, property values, public acceptance Abstract The Working Group III Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation (SRREN) presents an assessment of the literature on the scientific, technological, environmental, economic and social aspects of the contribution of six renewable energy (RE) sources to the mitigation of climate change. It is intended to provide policy relevant information to governments, intergovernmental processes and other interested parties. This Summary for Policymakers provides an overview of the SRREN, summarizing the essential findings. The SRREN consists of 11 chapters. Chapter 1 sets the context for RE and climate change; Chapters 2 through 7 provide information on six RE technologies, and Chapters 8 through 11 address integrative issues. References to chapters and sections are indicated with corresponding chapter and section numbers in square brackets. An explanation of terms, acronyms and chemical symbols used in this SPM can be found in the glossary of the SRREN (Annex I).Conventions and methodologies for determining costs, primary energy and other topics of analysis can be found in Annex II and Annex III. This report communicates uncertainty where relevant.

262

Water Distribution and Wastewater Systems Operators (North Dakota) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Distribution and Wastewater Systems Operators (North Dakota) Water Distribution and Wastewater Systems Operators (North Dakota) Water Distribution and Wastewater Systems Operators (North Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting All public water supply and wastewater disposal systems are subject to classification and regulation by the State of North Dakota, and must obtain certification from the State Department of Health

263

An Analysis of the Effects of Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Home Sales Prices in California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Markets and Policy Group * Energy Analysis Department Energy Markets and Policy Group * Energy Analysis Department An Analysis of the Effects of Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Home Sales Prices in California Ben Hoen, Peter Cappers, Mark Thayer, Ryan Wiser Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory LBNL Webinar June 9 th , 2011 This work was supported by the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (Solar Energy Technologies Program) of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory under Contract No. DEK-8883050, and by the Clean Energy States Alliance.

264

Solar heating and cooling of residential buildings: design of systems, 1980 edition  

SciTech Connect

This manual was prepared primarily for use in conducting a practical training course on the design of solar heating and cooling systems for residential and small office buildings, but may also be useful as a general reference text. The content level is appropriate for persons with different and varied backgrounds, although it is assumed that readers possess a basic understanding of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems of conventional (non-solar) types. This edition is a revision of the manual with the same title, first printed and distributed by the US Government Printing Office in October 1977. The manual has been reorganized, new material has been added, and outdated information has been deleted. Only active solar systems are described. Liquid and air-heating solar systems for combined space and service water heating or service water heating are included. Furthermore, only systems with proven experience are discussed to any extent.

None

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Columbia Water and Light - Residential Super Saver Loans | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Super Saver Loans Residential Super Saver Loans Columbia Water and Light - Residential Super Saver Loans < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Sealing Your Home Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Heating Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Solar Maximum Rebate $15,000 Program Info State Missouri Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount Home Performance Super Saver Loan: up to $15,000 Provider Columbia Water and Light The Columbia Water and Light (CWL) Home Performance Super Saver Loan allows Columbia residents to finance energy improvements to homes with affordable, low interest loans with five to ten year terms. If a Water and Light

266

City of San Francisco - Residential Efficiency Rebates | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Francisco - Residential Efficiency Rebates Francisco - Residential Efficiency Rebates City of San Francisco - Residential Efficiency Rebates < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Other Sealing Your Home Ventilation Maximum Rebate $5,000 Program Info Funding Source PG&E, ARRA State California Program Type Local Rebate Program Rebate Amount Home Energy Upgrade: 15% energy reduction: $1,500 20% energy reduction: $2,000 25% energy reduction: $2,500 30% energy reduction: $3,000 35% energy reduction: $3,500 40% energy reduction: $4,000 Lower Income Households: Bonus $1,000 Single family homeowners in San Francisco's PG&E territory can receive

267

New York - Residential Energy Efficient Appliance Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New York - Residential Energy Efficient Appliance Rebate Program New York - Residential Energy Efficient Appliance Rebate Program New York - Residential Energy Efficient Appliance Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Maximum Rebate $4,999 per item $20,000 per government entity Program Info Funding Source U.S. DOE Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) Start Date 09/25/2012 Expiration Date 3/12/2013 State New York Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount 75% of purchase price '''''Note: Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is providing a total of $300 million to U.S. states, U.S. territories and the District of Columbia to establish

268

Rocky Mountain Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rocky Mountain Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Rocky Mountain Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Rocky Mountain Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Installer/Contractor Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info State Utah Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Clothes Washers: up to $50 Dishwashers: $20 Refrigerator: $40 Freezer: $20 Electric Water Heaters: $50 CFL/LED Light Fixtures: $20/fixture Insulation: $0.15 - $0.65/sq. ft., plus potential bonus Windows: $0.50 - $2/sq. ft. Room Air Conditioners: $30 Duct Sealing/Insulation/Weatherization (Electric): up to $300

269

City of Madison - Green Madison Residential Incentives | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Madison - Green Madison Residential Incentives of Madison - Green Madison Residential Incentives City of Madison - Green Madison Residential Incentives < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Other Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Local Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Audit: $200 15-24% energy savings: $1,000 25-34% energy savings: $1,500 35% or more energy savings: $2,000 Provider City of Madison Green Madison offers homeowners in the City of Madison incentives for installing recommended energy-efficiency improvements. In order to qualify, residents must have a comprehensive home energy assessment by an approved consultant. Incentives vary by the amount of energy savings achieved

270

Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric) - Residential Energy Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info State Wyoming Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Home Energy Audit: Contact Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power CFL Bulbs: Up to 10 CFL bulbs at reduced cost Water Heater: $75 Refrigerator Recycling: $30 Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power offers incentives to electric customers who wish to install energy efficient equipment in participating homes. Incentives are available for home energy audits, CFL light bulbs, tank water heaters and refrigerator recycling. Water heater purchases and

271

Benton PUD - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Benton PUD - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Appliances & Electronics Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Insulation: Contact Benton PUD Program Info Expiration Date 9/30/2015 State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Clothes Washers: $30 (electric); $20 (gas) Refrigerators: $15 Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $15 Water Heaters: $25 Windows: $6 per sq ft Insulation: $0.05 to $0.85 per sq ft depending on location Duct Sealing: $400 Heat Pumps: $500 - $1,000

272

AEP (SWEPCO) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs (Texas) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AEP (SWEPCO) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs (Texas) AEP (SWEPCO) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs (Texas) AEP (SWEPCO) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs (Texas) < Back Eligibility Construction Installer/Contractor Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Other Ventilation Maximum Rebate Project Sponsor Limits (Large Projects): $125,000 Project Sponsor Limits (Small Projects): $30,000 Program Info State Texas Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Tier 1: $245/kW; $0.08/kWh Tier 2: $270/kW; $0.09/kWh Tier 3: $300/kW; $0.10/kWh Tier 4: $350/kW; $0.11/kWh Provider Southwestern Electric Power Company The SWEPCO Residential Standard Offer Program provides incentives to

273

PECO Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PECO Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate PECO Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program PECO Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heat Pumps Water Heating Program Info Expiration Date 12/31/2012 State Pennsylvania Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Effective June 1, 2013: Central A/C: $400 Air-Source Heat Pump: $300-$400 Geothermal Heat Pump: $200/ton Heat Pump Water Heater: $400 Storage Tank Electric Water Heater: $25 Room Air Conditioner: $25 Refrigerator: $50 Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $35 PECO electric service customers are eligible for rebates on ENERGY STAR qualified appliances and HVAC equipment. Whether eligible technologies are

274

JEA - ShopSmart Residential Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

JEA - ShopSmart Residential Rebate Program JEA - ShopSmart Residential Rebate Program JEA - ShopSmart Residential Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Limit one rebate per appliance type per customer Insulation: $250 Program Info Start Date 12/01/2009 State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount CFLs: Up to a $1.25 markdown per product in stores Refrigerators: $25 Clothes Washers: $25 Window Film/Solar Screens: $30/window - South, east, and west exposures only - up to $300 Insulation: $0.30/square foot

275

Duquesne Light Company - Residential Energy Efficiency Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Duquesne Light Company - Residential Energy Efficiency Program Duquesne Light Company - Residential Energy Efficiency Program Duquesne Light Company - Residential Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Heating Commercial Lighting Lighting Heat Pumps Water Heating Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Star Dehumidifier: $24 Energy Star Freezer: $10 Energy Star Refrigerator: $24 Energy Star Room A/C: $24 Energy Star Dishwasher with Electric Water Heater: $24 Energy Star Clothes Washer - (Electric Water Heating Only): $24 Electric Clothes Dryer with Moisture Sensor: $24 Swimming Pool Pump, Two-Speed or Variable Speed: $57

276

Port Angeles Public Works and Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Port Angeles Public Works and Utilities - Residential Energy Port Angeles Public Works and Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Port Angeles Public Works and Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info Expiration Date 08/31/2013 State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Heat Pump $300 - $1,900 Ductless Heat Pump: $1,500 Duct Sealing: $400 - $500 Windows: $6.00 per square foot Wall Insulation: $0.60 per square foot Attic Insulation: $0.18 - $0.85 per square foot, depending on starting

277

Energy Smart - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (20  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Smart - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (20 Smart - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (20 Municipalities) Energy Smart - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (20 Municipalities) < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Other Appliances & Electronics Heating Commercial Lighting Lighting Program Info State Michigan Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Central Air Conditioners: $75-$150 Furnace with ECM: $150 Heat Pump Water Heater: $150 Electric Hot Water Heater: $25 Electric Clothes Dryer: $25 Programmable Thermostat: $15 Energy Star® Room Air Conditioner: $15 Energy Star® Refrigerator: $25 Energy Star® Dehumidifier: $15 Intelligent Surge Protector: $10 Energy Star® Personal Computer: $15

278

Integrated emissions control system for residential CWS furnace. Final report, September 20, 1989--March 20, 1993  

SciTech Connect

One of the major obstacles to the successful development and commercialization of a coal-fired residential furnace is the need for a reliable, cost-effective emission control system. Tecogen is developing a novel, integrated control system to control NO{sub x}SO{sub 2}, and particulate emissions. At the heart of this system is a unique emissions control reactor for the control of SO{sub 2}. This reactor provides high sorbent particle residence time within the reactor while doing so in a very compact geometry. Final cleanup of any fine particulates exiting the reactor including respirable-sized particulates, is completed with the use of high efficiency bag filters. Under a previous contract with PETC (Contract No. DE-AC22-87PC79650), Tecogen developed a residential-scale Coal Water Slurry (CWS) combustor to control NO{sub x}emission. This combustor makes use of centrifugal forces, set up by a predominantly tangential flow field, to separate and confine larger unburned coal particles in the furnace upper chamber. Various partitions are used to retard the axial, downward flow of these particles, and thus maximize their residence time in the hottest section of the combustor. By operating this combustor under staged conditions, the local stoichiometry in the primary zone can be controlled in such a manner as to minimize NO{sub x} emission.

Breault, R.W.; McLarnon, C.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Efficiency and Emissions Study of a Residential Microcogeneration System Based on a Stirling Engine and Fuelled by Diesel and Ethanol.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examined the performance of a residential microcogeneration system based on a Stirling engine and fuelled by diesel and ethanol. An extensive number of (more)

Farra, Nicolas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Estimating Energy and Water Losses in Residential Hot WaterDistribution Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Residential single family building practice currently ignores the losses of energy and water caused by the poor design of hot water systems. These losses include; the waste of water while waiting for hot water to get to the point of use; the wasted heat as water cools down in the distribution system after a draw; and the energy needed to reheat water that was already heated once before. Average losses of water are estimated to be 6.35 gallons (24.0 L) per day. (This is water that is rundown the drain without being used while waiting for hot water.) The amount of wasted hot water has been calculated to be 10.9 gallons (41.3L) per day. (This is water that was heated, but either is not used or issued after it has cooled off.) A check on the reasonableness of this estimate is made by showing that total residential hot water use averages about 52.6 gallons (199 L) per day. This indicates about 20 percent of average daily hot water is wasted.

Lutz, James

2005-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-family residential systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Performance of a grid connected residential photovoltaic system with energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1995, Salt River Project (SRP), a public power utility located in Phoenix, Arizona, collaborated with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) to initiate a photovoltaic (PV) power system with battery energy storage to match PV output with residential customer peak energy demand periods. The PV power system, a 2.4kW PV array with 25.2kWh of energy storage, was designed and installed by Southwest Technology Development Institute (SWTDI) at an SRP-owned facility, known as the Chandler Research House during August 1995. This paper presents an overview of the system design, operation and performance. 3 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Palomino, G.E. [SRP, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Wiles, J. [Southwest Technology Development Institute, Las Cruces, NM (United States); Stevens, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Goodman, F. [EPRI, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Irrigation Districts: Establishment of Electric Light and Power Systems:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Irrigation Districts: Establishment of Electric Light and Power Irrigation Districts: Establishment of Electric Light and Power Systems: Powers (Nebraska) Irrigation Districts: Establishment of Electric Light and Power Systems: Powers (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Natural Resources Irrigation districts, created in section 46-1xx, are encouraged to

283

Overview of existing residential energy-efficiency rating systems and measuring tools  

SciTech Connect

Three categories of rating systems/tools were identified: prescriptive, calculational, and performance. Prescriptive systems include rating systems that assign points to various conservation features. Most systems that have been implemented to date have been prescriptive systems. The vast majority of these are investor-owned utility programs affiliated with the National Energy Watch program of the Edison Electric Institute. The calculational category includes computational tools that can be used to estimate energy consumption. This estimate could then be transformed, probably by indexing, into a rating. The available computational tools range from very simple to complex tools requiring use of a main-frame computer. Performance systems refer to residential energy-efficiency ratings that are based on past fuel consumption of a home. There are few of these systems. For each identified system/tool, the name, address, and telephone number of the developer is included. In addition, relevant publications discussing the system/tool are cited. The extent of field validation/verification of individual systems and tools is discussed. In general, there has been little validation/verification done. A bibliography of literature relevant to the use and implementation of a home energy rating system is also included.

Hendrickson, P.L.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Williams, T.A.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Utility-impacts assessment of residential passive-solar systems. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes a project undertaken to provide the electric-utility industry with a tool to use in analyzing the advantages and disadvantages for themselves and their customers of passive-solar residential construction within their service areas. A methodology to accomplish this was created and then tested in cooperation with seven participating utilities. Results indicate that passive solar homes and well-insulated homes are more economic to both utilities and homeowners than conventional homes insulated to ASHRAE 90-75 standards, still the norm for building construction in many parts of the country. Further indications are that passive-solar homes may have lower life-cycle costs for heating and cooling than well-insulated homes in areas of the country where the annual heating load predominates over the annual cooling load, and where there is an adequate amount of sunshine during the heating season. The methodology developed also has the capability of simulating and comparing the performance of a wide variety of non-solar electrical heating and cooling systems. As a result, it can be adapted by utilities for a broad range of residential energy analyses.

Wood, R.A.; Siegel, M.D.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Building America Residential System Research Results: Achieving 30% Whole House Energy Savings Level in Cold Climates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Building America program conducts the system research required to reduce risks associated with the design and construction of homes that use an average of 30% to 90% less total energy for all residential energy uses than the Building America Research Benchmark, including research on homes that will use zero net energy on annual basis. To measure the program's progress, annual research milestones have been established for five major climate regions in the United States. The system research activities required to reach each milestone take from 3 to 5 years to complete and include research in individual test houses, studies in pre-production prototypes, and research studies with lead builders that provide early examples that the specified energy savings level can be successfully achieved on a production basis. This report summarizes research results for the 30% energy savings level and demonstrates that lead builders can successfully provide 30% homes in Cold Climates on a cost-neutral basis.

Building Industry Research Alliance (BIRA); Building Science Consortium (BSC); Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB); Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC); IBACOS; National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Public Response to Residential Grid-Tied PV Systems in Colorado: A Qualitative Market Assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The early adopters of residential grid-tied photovoltaics (PV) have complex motivations to pay today's costs, including altruistic, environmental, and financial reasons. Focused interviews were conducted with a self-selected purposive sample interested in purchasing 2-kW or 3-kW PV systems with an installed cost of $8,000 to $12,000. The sample tended to be men or married couples ranging in age from their early thirties to their mid-eighties; professionals, managers, or small business owners; relatively financially secure, with experience with energy efficiency and renewable energy. Product attributes they preferred were net metering, warranties, guarantees, utility financing, maintenance, an option to own or lease, a battery option, and an aesthetically pleasing system. Potential PV customers needed more information before making a purchase decision.

Farhar, B. C.; Buhrmann, J.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

The Potential Impact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetrations on Electricity Bill Savings from Residential Photovoltaic Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at wholesale prices), the residential PV generation2: Wholesale prices and TOU periods for 15% PV scenario (seeerodes wholesale prices at times when PV generates

Barbose, Galen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

The Potential Impact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetrations on Electricity Bill Savings from Residential Photovoltaic Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Penetrations on Electricity Bill Savings from ResidentialPENETRATIONS ON ELECTRICITY BILL SAVINGS FROM RESIDENTIALBill Savings In this paper, we have chosen two compensation mechanisms for electricity

Barbose, Galen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

An Analysis of the Effects of Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Home Sales Prices in California  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4476E 4476E An Analysis of the Effects of Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Home Sales Prices in California Ben Hoen, Ryan Wiser, Peter Cappers and Mark Thayer Environmental Energy Technologies Division April 2011 Download from http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/emp/reports/lbnl-4476e.pdf This work was supported by the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (Solar Energy Technologies Program) of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory under Contract No. DEK-8883050, and by the Clean Energy States Alliance. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government.

290

Meeting Summary for Diagnostic and Performance Feedback for Residential Space Conditioning System Equipment Expert Meeting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Report on the Expert Meeting for Final Report on the Expert Meeting for DIAGNOSTIC AND PERFORMANCE FEEDBACK FOR RESIDENTIAL SPACE CONDITIONING SYSTEM EQUIPMENT Building Science Corporation Industry Team 15 July 2010 Work Performed Under Funding Opportunity Number: DE-FC26-08NT00601 Submitted By: Building Science Corporation 30 Forest Street Somerville, MA 02143 Principal Investigators: Joseph W. Lstiburek, Ph.D., P.Eng. ASHRAE Fellow Betsy Pettit, FAIA Phone Number: 978-589-5100 Fax Number: 978-589-5103 E-Mail: joe@buildingscience.com E-Mail: betsy@buildingscience.com Submitted To: U. S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory PM: Rob Martinez E-Mail: Rob.Martinez@NETL.DOE.GOV EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1. Title: Final Report on the Expert Meeting for Diagnostic and Performance Feedback for

291

Model documentation report: Residential sector demand module of the National Energy Modeling System  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document providing a detailed description for energy analysts, other users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports according to Public Law 93-275, section 57(b)(1). Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Model documentation report: Residential sector demand module of the National Energy Modeling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code. This document serves three purposes. First, it is a reference document that provides a detailed description for energy analysts, other users, and the public. Second, this report meets the legal requirement of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide adequate documentation in support of its statistical and forecast reports according to Public Law 93-275, section 57(b)(1). Third, it facilitates continuity in model development by providing documentation from which energy analysts can undertake model enhancements, data updates, and parameter refinements.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Residential Buildings  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Residential Residential Buildings Residential buildings-such as single family homes, townhomes, condominiums, and apartment buildings-are all covered by the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). See the RECS home page for further information. However, buildings that offer multiple accomodations such as hotels, motels, inns, dormitories, fraternities, sororities, convents, monasteries, and nursing homes, residential care facilities are considered commercial buildings and are categorized in the CBECS as lodging. Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels joelle.michaels@eia.doe.gov CBECS Manager Release date: January 21, 2003 Page last modified: May 5, 2009 10:18 AM http://www.eia.gov/consumption/commercial/data/archive/cbecs/pba99/residential.html

294

Cape Light Compact - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cape Light Compact - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Cape Light Compact - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Cape Light Compact - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Windows, Doors, & Skylights Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate Home Energy Assessment/Weatherization: $2,000 Income Eligible Weatherization Measures: $2,000 - $3,000 Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Local Rebate Program Rebate Amount Home Energy Assessment/Weatherization: 75% Single Family Energy Star Home: $750 - $8,000 Multi-Family Energy Star Home: $350 - $4,000/unit Income Eligible Weatherization Measures: 100% of cost

295

Residential Wood Heating Fuel Exemption (New York) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wood Heating Fuel Exemption (New York) Wood Heating Fuel Exemption (New York) Residential Wood Heating Fuel Exemption (New York) < Back Eligibility Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Maximum Rebate None Program Info State New York Program Type Sales Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% exemption Provider New York State Department of Taxation and Finance New York exempts retail sales of wood used for residential heating purposes from the state sales tax. The law also permits local governments (municipalities and counties) to grant an exemption from local sales taxes. If a city with a population of 1 million or more chooses to grant the local exemption, it must enact a specific resolution that appears in the state law. Local sales tax rates in New York range from 1.5% to more than 4% in

296

AEP (Central and North) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs (Texas) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AEP (Central and North) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs AEP (Central and North) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs (Texas) AEP (Central and North) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs (Texas) < Back Eligibility Construction Installer/Contractor Multi-Family Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Other Ventilation Maximum Rebate SOP TCC: $150,000 (Large Projects); $150,000 (Small Projects); $25,000 (Small Projects Monthly Reservation Limit) SOP TNC: $40,000 (Large Projects); $20,000 (Small Projects); $5,000 (Small Projects Monthly Reservation Limit) SOP TCC (Hard to Reach): $75,000/sponsor SOP TNC (Hard to Reach): $50,000/sponsor Program Info State Texas Program Type

297

Application analysis of solar total energy systems to the residential sector. Volume IV, market penetration. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume first describes the residential consumption of energy in each of the 11 STES regions by fuel type and end-use category. The current and projected costs and availability of fossil fuels and electricity for the STES regions are reported. Projections are made concerning residential building construction and the potential market for residential STES. The effects of STES ownership options, institutional constraints, and possible government actions on market penetration potential were considered. Capital costs for two types of STES were determined, those based on organic Rankine cycle (ORC) heat engines and those based on flat plate, water-cooled photovoltaic arrays. Both types of systems utilized parabolic trough collectors. The capital cost differential between conventional and STE systems was calculated on an incremental cost per dwelling unit for comparison with projected fuel savings in the market penetration analysis. The market penetration analysis was planned in two phases, a preliminary analysis of each of the geographical regions for each of the STE systems considered; and a final, more precise analysis of those regions and systems showing promise of significant market penetration. However, the preliminary analysis revealed no geographical regions in which any of the STES considered promised to be competitive with conventional energy systems using utility services at the prices projected for future energy supplies in the residential market. Because no promising situations were found, the analysis was directed toward an examination of the parameters involved in an effort to identify those factors which make a residential STES less attractive than similar systems in the commercial and industrial areas. Results are reported. (WHK)

Not Available

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Residential Humidity Control Strategies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Humidity Control Strategies Residential Humidity Control Strategies Armin Rudd Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting 2/29 - 3/2/2012 Austin, Texas 2 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting 2/29 - 3/2/2012 Austin, Texas Humidity control goals  Comfort, and Indoor Air Quality  Control indoor humidity year-around, just like we do temperature  Durability and customer satisfaction  Reduce builder risk and warranty/service costs 2 3 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting 2/29 - 3/2/2012 Austin, Texas Humidity control challenges 1. In humid cooling climates, there will always be times of the year when there is little sensible cooling load to create thermostat demand but humidity remains high * Cooling systems that modify fan speed and temperature set point based on humidity can help but are still limited

299

Output Performance and Payback Analysis of a Residential Photovoltaic System in Colorado: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Cost of installation and ownership of a 9.66-kilowatt (kW) residential photovoltaic system is described, and the performance of this system over the past 3 years is shown. The system is located in Colorado at 40 degrees latitude and consists of arrays on two structures. Two arrays are installed on a detached garage, and these are each composed of 18 Kyocera 130-W modules strung in series facing south at an angle of 40 degrees above horizontal. Each 18-panel array feeds into a Xantrex/Schneider Electric 2.8-kW inverter. The other two arrays are installed on the house and face south at an angle of 30 degrees. One of these arrays has twelve 205-W Kyocera panels in series, and the other is made up of twelve 210-Kyocera panels. Each of these arrays feeds into Xantrex/Schneider Electric 3.3-kW inverters. Although there are various shading issues from trees and utility poles and lines, the overall output resembles that which is expected from PVWatts, a solar estimate program. The array cost, which was offset by rebates from the utility company and federal tax credits, was $1.17 per watt. Considering measured system performance, the estimated payback time of the system is 9 years.

Johnston, S.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Field measurement of the interactions between heat pumps and attic duct systems in residential buildings  

SciTech Connect

Research efforts to improve residential heat-pump performance have tended to focus on laboratory and theoretical studies of the machine itself, with some limited field research having been focused on in-situ performance and installation issues. One issue that has received surprisingly little attention is the interaction between the heat pump and the duct system to which it is connected. This paper presents the results of a field study that addresses this interaction. Field performance measurements before and after sealing and insulating the duct systems were made on three heat pumps. From the pre-retrofit data it was found that reductions in heat-pump capacity due to low outdoor temperatures and/or coil frosting are accompanied by lower duct-system energy delivery efficiencies. The conduction loss reductions, and thus the delivery temperature improvements, due to adding duct insulation were found to vary widely depending on the length of the particular duct section, the thermal mass of that duct section, and the cycling characteristics of the heat-pump. In addition, it was found that the use of strip-heat back-up decreased after the retrofits, and that heat-pump cycling increased dramatically after the retrofits, which respectively increase and decrease savings due to the retrofits. Finally, normalized energy use for the three systems which were operated consistently pre- and post-retrofit showed an average reduction of 19% after retrofit, which corresponds to a chance in overall distribution-system efficiency of 24%.

Modera, M.P.; Jump, D.A. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-family residential systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Research, Development and Demonstration of Micro-CHP System for Residential Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ECR International and its joint venture company, Climate Energy, are at the forefront of the effort to deliver residential-scale combined heat and power (Micro-CHP) products to the USA market. Part of this substantial program is focused on the development of a new class of steam expanders that offers the potential for significantly lower costs for small-scale power generation technology. The heart of this technology is the scroll expander, a machine that has revolutionized the HVAC refrigerant compressor industry in the last 15 years. The liquid injected cogeneration (LIC) technology is at the core of the efforts described in this report, and remains an excellent option for low cost Micro-CHP systems. ECR has demonstrated in several prototype appliances that the concept for LIC can be made into a practical product. The continuing challenge is to identify economical scroll machine designs that will meet the performance and endurance requirements needed for a long life appliance application. This report describes the numerous advances made in this endeavor by ECR International. Several important advances are described in this report. Section 4 describes a marketing and economics study that integrates the technical performance of the LIC system with real-world climatic data and economic analysis to assess the practical impact that different factors have on the economic application of Micro-CHP in residential applications. Advances in the development of a working scroll steam expander are discussed in Section 5. A rigorous analytical assessment of the performance of scroll expanders, including the difficult to characterize impact of pocket to pocket flank leakage, is presented in Section 5.1. This is followed with an FEA study of the thermal and pressure induced deflections that would result from the normal operation of an advanced scroll expander. Section 6 describes the different scroll expanders and test fixtures developed during this effort. Another key technical challenge to the development of a long life LIC system is the development of a reliable and efficient steam generator. The steam generator and support equipment development is described in Section 7. Just one year ago, ECR International announced through its joint venture company, Climate Energy, that it was introducing to the USA market a new class of Micro-CHP product using the state-of-the-art Honda MCHP gas fired internal combustion (IC) engine platform. We now have installed Climate Energy Micro-CHP systems in 20 pilot demonstration sites for the 2005/2006 heating season. This breakthrough success with IC engine based systems paves the way for future advanced steam cycle Micro-CHP systems to be introduced.

Karl Mayer

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

302

Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings, Chicago, Illinois (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Steam System Balancing Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings Chicago, Illinois PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings Location: Chicago, IL Partners: Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit www.gastechnology.org Building Component: Steam heating distribution system and controls Application: Retrofit; Multifamily Year Tested: 2011-2012 Applicable Climate Zone(s): Cold humid continental PERFORMANCE DATA Cost of Energy Efficiency Measure (including labor): $9,000 on average Projected Energy Savings: 10.2% heating savings Chicago's older multifamily housing stock is primarily heated by centrally metered steam or hydronic systems. Often, significant temperature differentials

303

Research, Development and Demonstration of Micro-CHP Systems for Residential Applications - Phase I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the Micro-CHP Phase I effort was to develop a conceptual design for a Micro-CHP system including: Defining market potential; Assessing proposed technology; Developing a proof-of-principle design; and Developing a commercialization strategy. TIAX LLC assembled a team to develop a Micro-CHP system that will provide electricity and heating. TIAX, the contractor and major cost-share provider, provided proven expertise in project management, prime-mover design and development, appliance development and commercialization, analysis of residential energy loads, technology assessment, and market analysis. Kohler Company, the manufacturing partner, is a highly regarded manufacturer of standby power systems and other residential products. Kohler provides a compellingly strong brand, along with the capabilities in product development, design, manufacture, distribution, sales, support, service, and marketing that only a manufacturer of Kohler's status can provide. GAMA, an association of appliance and equipment manufacturers, provided a critical understanding of appliance commercialization issues, including regulatory requirements, large-scale market acceptance issues, and commercialization strategies. The Propane Education & Research Council, a cost-share partner, provided cost share and aided in ensuring the fuel flexibility of the conceptual design. Micro-CHP systems being commercialized in Europe and Japan are generally designed to follow the household thermal load, and generate electricity opportunistically. In many cases, any excess electricity can be sold back to the grid (net metering). These products, however, are unlikely to meet the demands of the U.S. market. First, these products generally cannot provide emergency power when grid power is lost--a critical feature to market success in the U.S. Even those that can may have insufficient electric generation capacities to meet emergency needs for many U.S. homes. Second, the extent to which net metering will be available in the U.S. is unclear. Third, these products are typically not designed for use in households having forced hot-air heating, which is the dominant heating system in the U.S. The U.S. market will also require a major manufacturer that has the reputation and brand recognition, low-cost manufacturing capability, distribution, sales, and service infrastructure, and marketing power to achieve significant market size with a previously unknown and unproven product. History has proven time and time again that small-to-medium-size manufacturers do not have the resources and capabilities to achieve significant markets with such products. During the Phase I effort, the Team developed a conceptual design for a Micro-CHP system that addresses key DOE and U.S. market needs: (1) Provides emergency power adequate for critical household loads, with none of the key drawbacks associated with typical, low-cost emergency generators, such as liquid fuel storage, inability to power ''hard-wired'' loads, need to run temporary extension cords for plug loads, manual set up required, susceptibility to overload, and risk of failure due to lack of maintenance and infrequent operation; (2) Requires no special skills to install--plumbers, electricians and HVAC technicians will typically have all necessary skills; (3) Can be used with the major residential fuels in the U.S., including natural gas and propane, and can be easily adapted to fuel oil as well as emerging fuels as they become available; and (4) Significantly reduces household energy consumption and energy costs.

Robert A. Zogg

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

304

Residential Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

Owen Comstock

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

305

Residential Sector Demand Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Model Documentation - Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Residential Sector Demand Module. The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and FORTRAN source code.

Owen Comstock

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

306

Residential on site solar heating systems: a project evaluation using the capital asset pricing model  

SciTech Connect

An energy source ready for immediate use on a commercial scale is solar energy in the form of On Site Solar Heating (OSSH) systems. These systems collect solar energy with rooftop panels, store excess energy in water storage tanks and can, in certain circumstances, provide 100% of the space heating and hot water required by the occupants of the residential or commercial structure on which the system is located. Such systems would take advantage of a free and inexhaustible energy source--sunlight. The principal drawback of such systems is the high initial capital cost. The solution would normally be a carefully worked out corporate financing plan. However, at the moment it is individual homeowners and not corporations who are attempting to finance these systems. As a result, the terms of finance are excessively stringent and constitute the main obstacle to the large scale market penetration of OSSH. This study analyzes the feasibility of OSSH as a private utility investment. Such systems would be installed and owned by private utilities and would displace other investment projects, principally electric generating plants. The return on OSSH is calculated on the basis of the cost to the consumer of the equivalent amount of electrical energy that is displaced by the OSSH system. The hurdle rate for investment in OSSH is calculated using the Sharpe--Lintner Capital Asset Pricing Model. The results of this study indicate that OSSH is a low risk investment having an appropriate hurdle rate of 7.9%. At this rate, OSSH investment appears marginally acceptable in northern California and unambiguously acceptable in southern California. The results also suggest that utility investment in OSSH should lead to a higher degree of financial leverage for utility companies without a concurrent deterioration in the risk class of utility equity.

Schutz, S.R.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Design of a tube bank waste heat reclaimer for residential heating systems  

SciTech Connect

Forced convection tube bank heat reclaimers are analyzed in detail for residential natural gas and oil-fired furnaces that are controlled by natural draft. Optimum reclaimer designs are obtained based on improved system efficiency, and considerations regarding manufacturing costs. Each reclaimer meets safety restrictions regarding allowable system pressure losses and minimum chimney gas temperatures. Reclaimer size and overall weight are also considered. Computer-generated solutions aid in determining heat recovery as a function of furnace fuel, furnace efficiency, ambient temperature, flue pipe size, and chimney height. The analysis considers a range of furnace efficiencies from 50 to 80%, and ambient temperatures from 0 to 60/sup 0/F, which are values considered typical for most domestic combustion heating equipment. Flue pipe sizes range from 4 to 6 inches in diameter and are 2 to 4 feet long. Chimney sizes range from 5 to 7 inches in equivalent diameter and include draft heights from 15 to 35 feet. The piping sizes correspond to furnace input capacities ranging from 50,000 to 170,000 Btu/h. For many domestic heating systems, the potential exists to recover the lost heat by as much as 30%, and to reduce fuel costs by as much as 15% by installing a flue pipe heat reclaimer.

Gretsinger, K.M.; Elias, T.I.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Projected Benefits of New Residential Evaporative Cooling Systems: Progress Report #2  

SciTech Connect

The use of conventional evaporative cooling has rapidly declined in the United States despite the fact that it has high potential for energy savings in dry climates. Evaporative systems are very competitive in terms of first cost and provide significant reductions in operating energy use, as well as peak-load reduction benefits. Significant market barriers still remain and can be addressed through improved systems integration. This report investigates the first of these approaches, exploring innovative components. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building America research teams are investigating the use of two promising new pieces of residential cooling equipment that employ evaporative cooling as a part of their system design. The OASys unit, which is a combination of direct and indirect evaporative cooling stages developed by Davis Energy Group (DEG) and manufactured by Speakman CRS, is used to ultimately provide outside air to the living space. The outdoor air provided is indirectly and directly evaporatively cooled in two stages to a condition that can be below the wet-bulb (wb) temperature of the outside air, thus outperforming a conventional single-stage direct evaporative cooler.

Kutscher, C.; Eastment, M.; Hancock, E.; Reeves, P.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Developing Innovative Wall Systems that Improve Hygrothermal Performance of Residential Buildings  

SciTech Connect

This document serves as the Topical Report documenting the first year of work completed by Washington State University (WSU) under US Department of Energy Grant, Developing Innovative Wall Systems that Improve Hygrothermal Performance of Residential Buildings. This project is being conducted in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and includes the participation of several industry partners including Weyerhaeuser Company, APA - The Engineered Wood Association, CertainTeed Corporation and Fortifiber. This document summarizes work completed by Washington State University August, 2002 through October, 2003. WSU's primary experimental role is the design and implementation of a field testing protocol that will monitor long term changes in the hygrothermal response of wall systems. In the first year WSU constructed a test facility, developed a matrix of test wall designs, constructed and installed test walls in the test facility, and installed instrumentation in the test walls. By the end of the contract period described in this document, WSU was recording data from the test wall specimens. The experiment described in this report will continue through December, 2005. Each year a number of reports will be published documenting the hygrothermal response of the test wall systems. Public presentation of the results will be made available to the building industry by industry partners and the University cooperators.

Robert Tichy; Chuck Murray

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Regional Residential  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

upward pressure from crude oil markets, magnified by a regional shortfall of heating oil supplies, residential prices rose rapidly to peak February 7. The problem was...

311

Residential mobility and location choice: a nested logit model with sampling of alternatives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waddell, P. : Modeling residential location in UrbanSim. In:D. (eds. ) Modelling Residential Location Choice. Springer,based model system and a residential location model. Urban

Lee, Brian H.; Waddell, Paul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Shaking Up the Residential PV Market: Implications of Recent Changes to the ITC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E NERGY Shaking Up the Residential PV Market: Implicationsthe Revised Residential Credit ..ITC (capped at $2,000) for residential solar systems. Both

Bolinger, Mark

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Pollutant Emission Factors from Residential Natural Gas Appliances: A Literature Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ng/J) distributions from residential natural gas appliances.ng/J) distribution from residential natural gas appliances.Pollutant Emissions from Residential Heating Systems, EPA-

Traynor, G.W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Improving the efficiency of residential air-distribution systems in California, Phase 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of the first phase of a multiyear research project. The project`s goal is to investigate ways to improve the efficiency of air-distribution systems in detached, single-family residences in California. First-year efforts included: A survey of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) contractors in California. A 31-house field study of distribution-system performance based on diagnostic measurements. Development of an integrated air-flow and thermal-simulation tool for investigating residential air-distribution system performance. Highlights of the field results include the following: Building envelopes for houses built after 1979 appear to be approximately 30% tighter. Duct-system tightness showed no apparent improvement in post-1979 houses. Distribution-fan operation added an average of 0.45 air changes per hour (ACH) to the average measured rate of 0.24 ACH. The simulation tool developed is based on DOE-2 for the thermal simulations and on MOVECOMP, an air-flow network simulation model, for the duct/house leakage and flow interactions. The first complete set of simulations performed (for a ranch house in Sacramento) indicated that the overall heating-season efficiency of the duct systems was approximately 65% to 70% and that the overall cooling-season efficiency was between 60% and 75%. The wide range in cooling-season efficiency reflects the difference between systems with attic return ducts and those with crawl-space return ducts, the former being less efficient. The simulations also indicated that the building envelope`s UA-value, a measurement of thermoconductivity, did not have a significant impact on the overall efficiency of the air-distribution system.

Modera, M.; Dickerhoff, D.; Jansky, R.; Smith, B.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Pilot Phase of a Field Study to Determine Waste of Water and Energy in Residential Hot-Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

understanding the waste of energy and water in residentialStudy to Determine Waste of Water and Energy in ResidentialStudy to Determine Waste of Water and Energy in Residential

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

An economic analysis of grid-connected residential solar photovoltaic power systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The question of the utility grid-connected residential market for photovoltaics is examined from a user-ownership perspective. The price is calculated at which the user would be economically indifferent between

Carpenter, Paul R.

317

Delivering tons to the register: Energy efficient design and operation of residential cooling systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and sealing the attic. Introduction Residential central airsealing, refrigerant charge addition, and correction of reduced airsealing the attic and insulating the roof) is a practical way to improve air

Siegel, Jeffrey; Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

The Potential Impact of Increased Renewable Energy Penetrations on Electricity Bill Savings from Residential Photovoltaic Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

concentrated solar power (CSP), and wind penetrations in thePV from residential Other RE CSP + storage PV Wind Referencesolar PV, wind, and solar CSP, respectively (all costs are

Barbose, Galen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Policy Office of Drinking Water Title: Two-connection Residential Water System Number: P A.13 Administration References: WAC 246-291-030(3) Supersedes: P A.13 Two Connection Residential Public Water Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Drinking Water policies are written descriptions of the approach taken by the Office to implement a statute, regulation, court order, or other agency order, and may include the Offices current practice, procedure, or method of action based on that approach. Any generally applicable directives or criteria that provide the basis for imposing penalties or sanctions, or for granting or denying Office approvals, must either be in statute or established in a rule. PURPOSE The Office of Drinking Water will waive all water system requirements for water systems with only two-residential connections, where each connection is a single family home. NOTE: This policy does not prevent a local health jurisdiction from regulating two-connection residential water systems. DIRECTION When individuals propose a water system with only two residential connections, where each connection is only a single family home, the Office of Drinking Water will provide a copy of this policy and notice which states the Office of Drinking Water has waived the requirements of chapter 246-291 WAC. The Office of Drinking Water will direct individuals to check with their local

Contact Karen Valenzuela; Denise A. Clifford; Office Of Drinking Water

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Carteret County - Wind Energy System Ordinance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carteret County - Wind Energy System Ordinance Carteret County - Wind Energy System Ordinance Carteret County - Wind Energy System Ordinance < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial General Public/Consumer Industrial Institutional Local Government Multi-Family Residential Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Solar/Wind Permitting Standards Provider Carteret County Carteret County passed an ordinance to specify the permitting process and establish siting requirements for wind energy systems. There are different rules and a different permitting process depending on the size and location of a system. Small systems up to 25 kilowatts (kW) are considered to be an accessory use and do not require the approval of a Wind Energy Permit

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-family residential systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Development of A Fully Integrated PV System for Residential Applications: PVMaT5a Final Report, 18 December 2001  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes both the Utility Power Group (UPG), a wholly owned subsidiary of Kyocera Solar, Inc., and Xantrex Technology Inc., have designed, assembled, and tested a new photovoltaic (PV) power system for residential rooftops to meet the goal of a readily manufacturable product that will increase US domestic PV power system production and installed capacity, by reducing the total installed cost and increasing the reliability of residential rooftop mounted PV power systems. A new factory pre-fabricated PV array system was developed, and 80 have been installed on the residential rooftops using standard metal parts. The direct material and labor cost of the array installation has been reduced to $3.79 per square foot for a 2400W installation. A modular, maintenance free, battery-based Power Unit and Energy Storage Unit (power conditioning and control) have also been developed. The design, fabrication, and testing have been completed for two prototypes of this system. These products have been evaluated for their structural integrity, electrical performance, reliability, cost, and manufacturability. The direct material and labor cost of the Power Unit has been reduced to $0.34 per watt. The 13 kW-hr Energy Storage Unit (ESU) has been UL listed.

Oatman, J.; West, R.

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Building a market for small wind: The break-even turnkey cost of residential wind systems in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Although small wind turbine technology and economics have improved in recent years, the small wind market in the United States continues to be driven in large part by state incentives, such as cash rebates, favorable loan programs, and tax credits. This paper examines the state-by-state economic attractiveness of small residential wind systems. Economic attractiveness is evaluated primarily using the break-even turnkey cost (BTC) of a residential wind system as the figure of merit. The BTC is defined here as the aggregate installed cost of a small wind system that could be supported such that the system owner would break even (and receive a specified return on investment) over the life of the turbine, taking into account current available incentives, the wind resource, and the retail electricity rate offset by on-site generation. Based on the analysis presented in this paper, we conclude that: (1) the economics of residential, grid-connected small wind systems is highly variable by state and wind resource class, (2) significant cost reductions will be necessary to stimulate widespread market acceptance absent significant changes in the level of policy support, and (3) a number of policies could help stimulate the market, but state cash incentives currently have the most significant impact, and will be a critical element of continued growth in this market.

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY 1997  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY 1997. OVERVIEW: MOST POPULOUS STATES ... Homes with air-conditioning: 95%... with a central air-conditioning system: 83%

324

Building a market for small wind: The break-even turnkey cost of residential wind systems in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Average statewide residential electricity rates were takenElectricity price escalation rates for the residentialelectricity rate that is 20% higher than the average statewide residential

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Integrated window systems: An advanced energy-efficient residential fenestration product  

SciTech Connect

The last several years have produced a wide variety of new window products aimed at reducing the energy impacts associated with residential windows. Improvements have focused on reducing the rate at which heat flows through the total window product by conduction/convection and thermal radiation (quantified by the U-factor) as well as in controlling solar heat gain (measured by the Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC) or Shading Coefficient (SC)). Significant improvements in window performance have been made with low-E coated glazings, gas fills in multiple pane windows and with changes in spacer and frame materials and designs. These improvements have been changes to existing design concepts. They have pushed the limits of the individual features and revealed weaknesses. The next generation of windows will have to incorporate new materials and ideas, like recessed night insulation, seasonal sun shades and structural window frames, into the design, manufacturing and construction process, to produce an integrated window system that will be an energy and comfort asset.

Arasteh, D.; Griffith, B.; LaBerge, P.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

AN ANALYSIS OF RESIDENTIAL RADON MEASUREMENTS IN KANSAS UTILIZING GRAPHICAL INFORMATION SYSTEM (GIs) TOOLS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beginning January 1, 1987, the state of Kansas began collecting and recording data from residential radon tests. This data was collected based entirely upon voluntary home testing, performed by 1) the home owner (using a store-purchased radon test kit), 2) a professional radon testing laboratory or 3) by technicians from the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) state laboratory. The majority of test results arc from tests conducted by homeowners. The radon database was analyzed using Arc Info 8.2. Three primary graphical information system (GIs) analyses were performed: 1) a comparison of the Kansas database to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)l Unites States Geographical Service (USGS) radon threat map for Kansas, 2) a data density analysis of statewide testing patterns and 3) an analysis of average radon values across clustered zip code districts in Sedgwick County, Shawnee County and the Kansas City metropolitan area (including Johnson, Wyandottc, Leavenworth and Douglas Counties). Comparison of the Kansas radon database to the EPAIUSGS threat asscssmcnt map showed similar but not identical trends. The data density analysis identified the zip code districts for which no test results had been collected and identified the areas of

Hanscn Brian

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

The future market for residential photovoltaic systems: New perspectives on the rooftop resource base  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The resource base of one-family houses with roofs suitable for photovoltaic applications can be estimated using a new and efficient sampling strategy combined with a statistical model. Levels of residential housing density are good predictors of rooftop suitability and can be used to make out-of-sample forecasts for a variety of geographic areas. The model is particularly useful for making forecasts for census tracts within large metropolitan areas. A large-scale field survey of rooftops in southeastern Pennsylvania indicates that a much higher proportion of roofs are suitable for rooftop systems than previously thought (in the Northeast). The survey suggests important differences from previous assumptions for such roof characteristics as area, slope, aspect, and the frequency of roof obstructions. Overall, the rooftop resource base; this paradigm rests on the dramatic difference between the central city and the suburbs in the proportion of houses with suitable roofs. The survey also demonstrates the critical role played by landscaping practices within a single urban area.

Miller, K.R.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Ashe County - Wind Energy System Ordinance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ashe County - Wind Energy System Ordinance Ashe County - Wind Energy System Ordinance Ashe County - Wind Energy System Ordinance < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Multi-Family Residential Municipal Utility Nonprofit Residential Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State Government Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Solar/Wind Permitting Standards Provider Ashe County Planning Department In 2007 Ashe County adopted a wind ordinance to regulate the use of wind-energy systems in unincorporated areas of the county and to describe the conditions by which a permit for installing such a system may be obtained. This policy was adopted in the context of an ongoing debate over

329

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General PublicConsumer...

330

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Renewable Energy Systems Connecticut Agricultural Commercial Industrial Multi-Family Residential Residential Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water...

331

Local Option - Property Tax Exemption for Renewable Energy Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Property Tax Exemption for Renewable Energy Systems Property Tax Exemption for Renewable Energy Systems (Connecticut) Local Option - Property Tax Exemption for Renewable Energy Systems (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Solar Heating & Cooling Water Heating Wind Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Property Tax Incentive Rebate Amount Local Option Provider Connecticut Office of Policy and Management Connecticut municipalities are authorized, but not required, to offer a property tax exemption lasting up to 15 years for qualifying cogeneration systems installed on or after July 1, 2007 (see Conn. Gen. Stat. § 12-81

332

Technology assessment of solar energy systems: residential use of fuelwood in the Pacific Northwest  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The evidence of impacts associated with the use of fuelwood for residential space heating in the region including the states of Washington, Oregon, and Idaho is identified and evaluated. The use of fuelwood for space heating was projected into the future, and then the potential size of the impacts that had been identified and estimated was evaluated. These projections are provided in five year increments beginning in 1980 and proceeding to the year 2000. Policy options are suggested which may mitigate the adverse impacts identified, while preserving the positive effect of reducing residential demand for energy derived from nonrenewable sources.

Petty, P.N.; Hopp, W.J.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Water and Energy Wasted During Residential Shower Events: Findings...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wasted During Residential Shower Events: Findings from a Pilot Field Study of Hot Water Distribution Systems Title Water and Energy Wasted During Residential Shower Events:...

334

Lansing Board of Water and Light - Hometown Energy Savers® Residential  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savers® Savers® Residential Rebates Lansing Board of Water and Light - Hometown Energy Savers® Residential Rebates < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Manufacturing Appliances & Electronics Construction Heating Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Other Program Info State Michigan Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Small Business Direct Install Program: No cost or purchase necessary for participation Custom $0.08/kWh Commercial Cooking Equipment: Varies Commercial Refrigeration Equipment: Varies Lighting Compact Fluorescent Lamps: $1.50-$8 Compact Fluorescent Lamp Fixtures: $20 LED Lamps: $5-$15 LED Fixtures: $20 LED Exit Signs: $12.50

335

Sustainable management fund system for high rise residential management, Kuala Lumpur Malaysia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Urbanisation begin in early 60's in Kuala Lumpur, city centre of Malaysia. More job opportunities increase employee and indicate the needs of living. Since population parallel with job opportunities, implies to escalate land area. The escalating of land ... Keywords: facilities management, high-rise residential, management corporation, self funded, sustainable

N. M. Tawil; A. I. Che-Ani; N. A. G. Abdullah; A. Zaharim; I. M. S. Usman

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

City of San Jose - Solar Hot Water Heaters and Photovoltaic Systems Permit  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

San Jose - Solar Hot Water Heaters and Photovoltaic Systems San Jose - Solar Hot Water Heaters and Photovoltaic Systems Permit Requirements City of San Jose - Solar Hot Water Heaters and Photovoltaic Systems Permit Requirements < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Installer/Contractor Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State California Program Type Solar/Wind Permitting Standards Provider City of San Jose Building, Planning and Electrical Permits are required for Photovoltiac (PV) systems installed in San Jose. In most cases, PV systems must also undergo a Building Plan Review and an Electrical Plan Review. Building Plan Reviews are not required for installations that meet all of the following criteria: 1. Total panel weight (including frame) is not greater than 5 lbs. per

337

Residential passive solar systems: regional sensitivity to system performance costs, and alternative prices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economic potential of two passive space heating configurations are analyzed. These are a masonry thermal storage wall (Trombe) and a direct gain system - both with night insulation. A standard tract home design for each of the two passive systems is being used throughout the analysis to allow interregional comparisons. The economic performance of these two systems is evaluated on a regional basis (223 locations) throughout the United States. For each of the two conventional energy types considered (electricity and natural gas), sensitivity analysis is conducted to determine the impact of alternative fuel price escalation rates and solar costs upon feasibility of the two solar systems. Cost goals for solar system prices are established under one set of future fuel prices and stated economic conditions. (MOW)

Kirschner, C.; Ben-David, S.; Roach, F.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Photovoltaics for residential applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information is given about the parts of a residential photovoltaic system and considerations relevant to photovoltaic power use in homes that are also tied to utility lines. In addition, factors are discussed that influence implementation, including legal and environmental factors such as solar access and building codes, insurance, utility buyback, and system longevity. (LEW)

Not Available

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Measuring Residential Ventilation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measuring Residential Ventilation Measuring Residential Ventilation System Airflows: Part 2 - Field Evaluation of Airflow Meter Devices and System Flow Verification J. Chris Stratton, Iain S. Walker, Craig P. Wray Environmental Energy Technologies Division October 2012 LBNL-5982E 2 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor the Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

340

Residential Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exterior and interior of apartment building Exterior and interior of apartment building Residential Buildings The study of ventilation in residential buildings is aimed at understanding the role that air leakage, infiltration, mechanical ventilation, natural ventilation and building use have on providing acceptable indoor air quality so that energy and related costs can be minimized without negatively impacting indoor air quality. Risks to human health and safety caused by inappropriate changes to ventilation and air tightness can be a major barrier to achieving high performance buildings and must be considered.This research area focuses primarily on residential and other small buildings where the interaction of the envelope is important and energy costs are dominated by space conditioning energy rather than air

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-family residential systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Solarize Guidebook: A Community Guide to Collective Purchasing of Residential PV Systems (Book)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guidebook is intended as a road map for project planners and solar advocates who want to convert 'interest' into 'action,' to break through market barriers and permanently transform the market for residential solar installations in their communities. It describes the key elements of the Solarize campaigns in Portland, and offers several program refinements from projects beyond Portland. The guidebook provides lessons, considerations, and step-by-step plans for project organizers to replicate the success of Solarize Portland.

Not Available

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Effects of Temporary Overvoltage on Residential Products: System Compatibility Research Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Temporary overvoltage can have deleterious effects on electronic equipment. It is possible for the effects to be either immediate, as in the case of stress beyond a component's ability to withstand the voltage, or long-term, such as slow degradation brought on by long-term heating. This report contains results of three complementary areas of research conducted in 2004 concerning effects of temporary overvoltage (TOV) on common residential electrical and electronic devices. Research included a study of th...

2005-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

343

Solarize Guidebook: A Community Guide to Collective Purchasing of Residential PV Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This handbook is intended as a road map for project planners and solar advocates who want to convert interest into action, to break through market barriers and permanently transform the market for residential solar installations in their communities. It describes the key elements of the Solarize campaigns in Portland, and offers several program refinements from projects beyond Portland. The handbook provides lessons, considerations, and step-by-step plans for project organizers to replicate the success of Solarize Portland.

Irvine, L.; Sawyer, A.; Grove, J.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Guidelines for residential commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential Benefits of Commissioning California Homes.Delp. 2000. Residential Commissioning: A Review of Relatedfor Evaluating Residential Commissioning Metrics Lawrence

Wray, Craig P.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Effects of system cycling, evaporator airflow, and condenser coil fouling on the performance of residential split-system air conditioners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three experimental studies were conducted to quantify the effects of system cycling, evaporator airflow, and condenser coil fouling on the performance of residential air conditioners. For all studies, the indoor dry-bulb (db) temperature was 80F (26.7C) db. The cycling study consisted of twelve transient tests conducted with an outdoor temperature of 95F (35C) db for cycle times of 6, 10, 15, and 24 minutes. Indoor relative humidities of 40%, 50%, and 60% were also considered. The evaporator airflow study consisted of twenty-four steady-state tests conducted with an indoor condition of 67F (19.4C) wet-bulb (wb) for evaporator airflows ranging from 50% below to 37.5% above rated airflow. Outdoor temperatures of 85F (29.4C) db, 95F (35C) db, and 105F (40.6C) db were also considered. The coil fouling study used a total of six condensers that were exposed to an outdoor environment for predetermined amounts of time and tested periodically. Three of the condensers were cleaned and retested during the periodic testing cycles. Testing consisted of thirty-three steady-state tests conducted with an indoor condition of 67F (19.4C) wb for outdoor exposure times of 0, 2000, 4000, and 8000 hours. Outdoor temperatures of 82F (27.8C) db and 95F (35C) db were also considered.

Dooley, Jeffrey Brandon

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Financing, Overhead, and Profit: An In-Depth Discussion of Costs Associated with Third-Party Financing of Residential and Commercial Photovoltaic Systems  

SciTech Connect

Previous work quantifying the non-hardware balance-of-system costs -- or soft costs -- associated with building a residential or commercial photovoltaic (PV) system has left a significant portion unsegmented in an 'other soft costs' category. This report attempts to better quantify the 'other soft costs' by focusing on the financing, overhead, and profit of residential and commercial PV installations for a specific business model. This report presents results from a bottom-up data-collection and analysis of the upfront costs associated with developing, constructing, and arranging third-party-financed residential and commercial PV systems. It quantifies the indirect corporate costs required to install distributed PV systems as well as the transactional costs associated with arranging third-party financing.

Feldman, D.; Friedman, B.; Margolis, R.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Uncertainties in the Value of Bill Savings from Behind-the-Meter, Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Roles of Electricity Market Conditions, Retail Rate Design, and Net Metering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2.2.1.1 Current Residential Electricity Rates PG&E and SCEhave total residential electricity rates that are similar toElectricity Rates .. 164 Residential

Darghouth, Naim Richard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 1 2005 Energy Expenditures per Household, by Housing Type and Square Footage ($2010) Per Household Single-Family 1.16 Detached 1.16 Attached 1.20 Multi-Family 1.66 2 to 4 units 1.90 5 or more units 1.53 Mobile Home 1.76 All Homes 1.12 Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy expenditures per square foot were calculated using estimates of average heated floor space per household. According to the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the average heated floor space per household in the U.S. was 1,618 square feet. Average total floor space, which includes garages, attics and unfinished basements, equaled 2,309 square feet. EIA, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey, Oct. 2008, Table US-1 part1; and EIA, Annual Energy Review 2010, Oct. 2011, Appendix D, p. 353 for

349

Field comparison of conventional HVAC systems with a residential gas-engine-driven heat pump  

SciTech Connect

Through its Office of Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), the US Department of Energy (DOE) provides technical and administrative support to federal agency programs directed at reducing energy consumption and cost in federal buildings and facilities. One such program is the New Technology Demonstration Program (NTDP). In this context, NTDP is a demonstration of a US energy-related technology at a federal site. Through a partnership with a federal site, the utility serving the site, a manufacturer of an energy-related technology, and other organizations associated with these interests, DOE can evaluate new technologies. The partnership of these interests is secured through a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA). The Fort Sam Houston (San Antonio, Texas) NTDP is a field evaluation of a 3-ton gas-engine-driven residential heat pump. Details of the technical approach used in the evaluation, including instrumentation and methodology, are presented. Dynamic performance maps, based on field data, are developed for the existing residential furnaces and air conditioners at Fort Sam Houston. These maps are the basis for comparisons between the candidate and current equipment. The approach offers advantages over pre/post-measure evaluations by decoupling the measured equipment performance from the effects of different envelope characteristics, occupant behavior, and weather.

Miller, J.D.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Evaluation of Gas, Oil and Wood Pellet Fueled Residential Heating System Emissions Characteristics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study has measured the emissions from a wide range of heating equipment burning different fuels including several liquid fuel options, utility supplied natural gas and wood pellet resources. The major effort was placed on generating a database for the mass emission rate of fine particulates (PM 2.5) for the various fuel types studied. The fine particulates or PM 2.5 (less than 2.5 microns in size) were measured using a dilution tunnel technique following the method described in US EPA CTM-039. The PM 2.5 emission results are expressed in several units for the benefit of scientists, engineers and administrators. The measurements of gaseous emissions of O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CO, NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} were made using a combustion analyzer based on electrochemical cells These measurements are presented for each of the residential heating systems tested. This analyzer also provides a steady state efficiency based on stack gas and temperature measurements and these values are included in the report. The gaseous results are within the ranges expected from prior emission studies with the enhancement of expanding these measurements to fuels not available to earlier researchers. Based on measured excess air levels and ultimate analysis of the fuel's chemical composition the gaseous emission results are as expected and fall within the range provided for emission factors contained in the US-EPA AP 42, Emission Factors Volume I, Fifth Edition. Since there were no unexpected findings in these gaseous measurements, the bulk of the report is centered on the emissions of fine particulates, or PM 2.5. The fine particulate (PM 2.5) results for the liquid fuel fired heating systems indicate a very strong linear relationship between the fine particulate emissions and the sulfur content of the liquid fuels being studied. This is illustrated by the plot contained in the first figure on the next page which clearly illustrates the linear relationship between the measured mass of fine particulate per unit of energy, expressed as milligrams per Mega-Joule (mg/MJ) versus the different sulfur contents of four different heating fuels. These were tested in a conventional cast iron boiler equipped with a flame retention head burner. The fuels included a typical ASTM No. 2 fuel oil with sulfur below 0.5 percent (1520 average ppm S), an ASTM No. 2 fuel oil with very high sulfur content (5780 ppm S), low sulfur heating oil (322 ppm S) and an ultra low sulfur diesel fuel (11 ppm S). Three additional oil-fired heating system types were also tested with normal heating fuel, low sulfur and ultralow sulfur fuel. They included an oil-fired warm air furnace of conventional design, a high efficiency condensing warm air furnace, a condensing hydronic boiler and the conventional hydronic boiler as discussed above. The linearity in the results was observed with all of the different oil-fired equipment types (as shown in the second figure on the next page). A linear regression of the data resulted in an Rsquared value of 0.99 indicating that a very good linear relationship exits. This means that as sulfur decreases the PM 2.5 emissions are reduced in a linear manner within the sulfur content range tested. At the ultra low sulfur level (15 ppm S) the amount of PM 2.5 had been reduced dramatically to an average of 0.043 mg/MJ. Three different gas-fired heating systems were tested. These included a conventional in-shot induced draft warm air furnace, an atmospheric fired hydronic boiler and a high efficiency hydronic boiler. The particulate (PM 2.5) measured ranged from 0.011 to 0.036 mg/MJ. depending on the raw material source used in their manufacture. All three stoves tested were fueled with premium (low ash) wood pellets obtained in a single batch to provide for uniformity in the test fuel. Unlike the oil and gas fired systems, the wood pellet stoves had measurable amounts of particulates sized above the 2.5-micron size that defines fine particulates (less than 2.5 microns). The fine particulate emissions rates ranged from 22 to 30 mg/ MJ with an average value

McDonald, R.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Building America Residential System Research Results: Achieving 30% Whole House Energy Savings Level in Marine Climates; January 2006 - December 2006  

SciTech Connect

The Building America program conducts the system research required to reduce risks associated with the design and construction of homes that use an average of 30% to 90% less total energy for all residential energy uses than the Building America Research Benchmark, including research on homes that will use zero net energy on annual basis. To measure the program's progress, annual research milestones have been established for five major climate regions in the United States. The system research activities required to reach each milestone take from 3 to 5 years to complete and include research in individual test houses, studies in pre-production prototypes, and research studies with lead builders that provide early examples that the specified energy savings level can be successfully achieved on a production basis. This report summarizes research results for the 30% energy savings level and demonstrates that lead builders can successfully provide 30% homes in the Marine Climate Region on a cost neutral basis.

Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership (BAIHP); Building Industry Research Alliance (BIRA); Building Science Consortium (BSC); Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB); Davis Energy Group (DEG); IBACOS; National Association of Home Builders Research Center (NAHBRC); National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Field Test of High Efficiency Residential Buildings with Ground-source and Air-source Heat Pump Systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the field performance of space conditioning and water heating equipment in four single-family residential structures with advanced thermal envelopes. Each structure features a different, advanced thermal envelope design: structural insulated panel (SIP); optimum value framing (OVF); insulation with embedded phase change materials (PCM) for thermal storage; and exterior insulation finish system (EIFS). Three of the homes feature ground-source heat pumps (GSHPs) for space conditioning and water heating while the fourth has a two-capacity air-source heat pump (ASHP) and a heat pump water heater (HPWH). Two of the GCHP-equipped homes feature horizontal ground heat exchange (GHX) loops that utillize the existing foundation and utility service trenches while the third features a vertical borehole with vertical u-tube GHX. All of the houses were operated under the same simulated occupancy conditions. Operational data on the house HVAC/Water heating (WH) systems are presented and factors influencing overall performance are summarized.

Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Building America Residential System Research Results: Achieving 30% Whole House Energy Savings Level in Marine Climates; January 2006 - December 2006  

SciTech Connect

The Building America program conducts the system research required to reduce risks associated with the design and construction of homes that use an average of 30% to 90% less total energy for all residential energy uses than the Building America Research Benchmark, including research on homes that will use zero net energy on annual basis. To measure the program's progress, annual research milestones have been established for five major climate regions in the United States. The system research activities required to reach each milestone take from 3 to 5 years to complete and include research in individual test houses, studies in pre-production prototypes, and research studies with lead builders that provide early examples that the specified energy savings level can be successfully achieved on a production basis. This report summarizes research results for the 30% energy savings level and demonstrates that lead builders can successfully provide 30% homes in the Marine Climate Region on a cost neutral basis.

Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership (BAIHP); Building Industry Research Alliance (BIRA); Building Science Consortium (BSC); Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB); Davis Energy Group (DEG); IBACOS; National Association of Home Builders Research Center (NAHBRC); National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Projected cost-effectiveness of alternative residential space cooling systems in the Sacramento area  

SciTech Connect

Electric utilities around the country are seeking to evaluate new demand-side management (DSM) programs and technologies on an equal basis with supply-side resources. In evaluating future demand and supply resources, utilities need to consider uncertainties inherent in prediction. In this paper, five residential space cooling technologies (high efficiency heat pumps, some coupled with utility direct load control or with thermal energy storage), are defined and computer simulation of their performance are described. Cost-effectiveness of the five alternatives are then evaluated, and the relative uncertainty of the data inputs are tested by using the Monte Carlo technique of probability analysis. This comparative analysis comprises an initial screening of potential DSM technologies, and provides a framework and direction for more detailed analysis of these technologies in the future.

Kallett, R.H. (Sacramento Municipal Utility District, Box 15830, Sacramento, CA (US))

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Application analysis of solar total energy systems to the residential sector. Volume III, conceptual design. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the work described in this volume was to conceptualize suitable designs for solar total energy systems for the following residential market segments: single-family detached homes, single-family attached units (townhouses), low-rise apartments, and high-rise apartments. Conceptual designs for the total energy systems are based on parabolic trough collectors in conjunction with a 100 kWe organic Rankine cycle heat engine or a flat-plate, water-cooled photovoltaic array. The ORC-based systems are designed to operate as either independent (stand alone) systems that burn fossil fuel for backup electricity or as systems that purchase electricity from a utility grid for electrical backup. The ORC designs are classified as (1) a high temperature system designed to operate at 600/sup 0/F and (2) a low temperature system designed to operate at 300/sup 0/F. The 600/sup 0/F ORC system that purchases grid electricity as backup utilizes the thermal tracking principle and the 300/sup 0/F ORC system tracks the combined thermal and electrical loads. Reject heat from the condenser supplies thermal energy for heating and cooling. All of the ORC systems utilize fossil fuel boilers to supply backup thermal energy to both the primary (electrical generating) cycle and the secondary (thermal) cycle. Space heating is supplied by a central hot water (hydronic) system and a central absorption chiller supplies the space cooling loads. A central hot water system supplies domestic hot water. The photovoltaic system uses a central electrical vapor compression air conditioning system for space cooling, with space heating and domestic hot water provided by reject heat from the water-cooled array. All of the systems incorporate low temperature thermal storage (based on water as the storage medium) and lead--acid battery storage for electricity; in addition, the 600/sup 0/F ORC system uses a therminol-rock high temperature storage for the primary cycle. (WHK)

Not Available

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Cogeneration and community design: performance based model for optimization of the design of U.S. residential communities utilizing cogeneration systems in cold climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The integration of cogeneration technologies in residential communities has the potential of reducing energy demand and harmful emissions. This study investigated the impact of selected design parameters on the environmental and economic performances of cogeneration systems integrated into residential communities in cold U.S. climates following a centralized or a decentralized integration approach. Parameters investigated include: 1) density, 2) use mix, 3) street configuration, 4) housing typology, 5) envelope and building systems' efficiencies, 6) renewable energy utilization, 7) cogeneration system type, 8) size, and 9) operation strategy. Based on this, combinations of design characteristics achieving an optimum system performance were identified. The study followed a two-phased mixed research model: first, studies of residential community design and three case studies of sustainable residential communities were analyzed to identify key design parameters; subsequently, simulation tools were utilized to assess the impact of each parameter on cogeneration system performance and to optimize the community design to improve that performance. Assessment procedures included: developing a base-line model representing typical design characteristics of U.S. residential communities; assessing the system performance within this model, for each integration approach, using three performance indicators: reduction in primary energy use, reduction in CO2 emissions; and internal rate of return; assessing the impact of each parameter on the system performance through developing 46 design variations of the base-line model representing changes in these parameters and calculating the three indicators for each variation; using a multi-attribute decision analysis methodology to evaluate the relative impact of each parameter on the system performance; and finally, developing two design optimization scenarios for each integration approach. Results show that, through design optimization, existing cogeneration technologies can be economically feasible and cause reductions of up to 18% in primary energy use and up to 42% in CO2 emissions, with the centralized approach offering a higher potential for performance improvements. A significant correlation also existed between design characteristics identified as favorable for cogeneration system performance and those of sustainable residential communities. These include high densities, high mix of uses, interconnected street networks, and mixing of housing typologies. This indicates the higher potential for integrating cogeneration systems in sustainable residential communities.

Rashed Ali Atta, Hazem Mohamed

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

DEVELOPMENT OF SELF-TUNING RESIDENTIAL OIL/BURNER - OXYGEN SENSOR ASSESSMENT AND EARLY PROTOTYPE SYSTEM OPERATING EXPERIENCE  

SciTech Connect

This document is the first topical report dealing with a new project leading towards the development of a self-tuning residential oil burner. It was initiated under the Statement of Work for the Oil Heat Research and Development Program, for Fiscal Year 1997 as defined in the Combustion Equipment Technology Program, under the management of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). In part, this work is based on research reported by BNL in 1990, suggesting various options for developing control strategies in oil heat technology leading to the enhanced efficiency of oil-fired heating systems. BNL has been addressing these concepts in order of priority and technology readiness. The research described in this report is part of an ongoing project and additional work is planned for the future assuming adequate program funding is made available.

MCDONALD,R.J.; BUTCHER,T.A.; KRAJEWSKI,R.F.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Empire District Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

rebates to residential customers for energy audits, weatherization measures, central air conditioning systems, and energy efficient home appliances. Eligible air conditioning...

359

Baltimore Gas & Electric Company (Electric) - Residential Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

freezers, CFLs, HVAC systems, and Building Insulation. The Home Performance with Energy Star Incentive Program also provides residential incentives including envelope and...

360

Columbia Water & Light- Residential HVAC Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Columbia Water & Light (CWL) provides an HVAC incentive for residential customers that are replacing an older heating and cooling system. Customers should submit the mechanical permit from a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-family residential systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

RESIDENTIAL INTEGRATED VENTILATION ENERGY CONTROLLER - Energy ...  

A residential controller is described which is used to manage the mechanical ventilation systems of a home, installed to meet whole-house ventilation requirements, at ...

362

RESIDENTIAL ON SITE SOLAR HEATING SYSTEMS: A PROJECT EVALUATION USING THE CAPITAL ASSET PRICING MODEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas system requires the construction of pipeline networks; electrical heating systems require power generation

Schutz, Stephen Richard

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Ota City : characterizing output variability from 553 homes with residential PV systems on a distribution feeder.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes in-depth analysis of photovoltaic (PV) output variability in a high-penetration residential PV installation in the Pal Town neighborhood of Ota City, Japan. Pal Town is a unique test bed of high-penetration PV deployment. A total of 553 homes (approximately 80% of the neighborhood) have grid-connected PV totaling over 2 MW, and all are on a common distribution line. Power output at each house and irradiance at several locations were measured once per second in 2006 and 2007. Analysis of the Ota City data allowed for detailed characterization of distributed PV output variability and a better understanding of how variability scales spatially and temporally. For a highly variable test day, extreme power ramp rates (defined as the 99th percentile) were found to initially decrease with an increase in the number of houses at all timescales, but the reduction became negligible after a certain number of houses. Wavelet analysis resolved the variability reduction due to geographic diversity at various timescales, and the effect of geographic smoothing was found to be much more significant at shorter timescales.

Stein, Joshua S.; Miyamoto, Yusuke (Kandenko, Ibaraki, Japan); Nakashima, Eichi (Kandenko, Ibaraki, Japan); Lave, Matthew

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Do PV Systems Increase Residential Selling Prices If So, How Can Practitioners Estimate This Increase?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Effects of Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Residentialmarginal impacts of photovoltaic (PV) energy systems on homeThe market for photovoltaic (PV) energy systems is expanding

Hoen, Ben

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

A computer simulation appraisal of non-residential low energy cooling systems in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

evaporative pre-cool on a vapor compression system. H eatingventilation with vapor compression system. Heating Coilschematic of the baseline vapor compression built-up system.

Bourassa, Norman; Haves, Philip; Huang, Joe

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

System design and dynamic signature identification for intelligent energy management in residential buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of commercial energy management systems, IEEE Transactionsfor intelligent energy management systems of resi- dentialin an intelligent energy management system, three approaches

Jang, Jaehwi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Experimental and analytical systems studies of a combined thermal-photovoltaic residential solar system. Technical status report No. 5, April 1-May 31, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Photovoltaic-Thermal research program schedule is diagrammed. Specifications are given for the combined concentrator Thermal-Photovoltaic Collector Array. The specifications are such as to make the array compatible with a test facility being constructed. Preliminary system checks, manual operation tests, and computer operation tests are described for evaluating the performance of a cooling load simulator. A paper entitled Transient Effects on the Performance of a Residential Solar Absorption Chiller is appended which is concerned with the transient performance of a 3-ton lithium-bromide/water absorption chiller. (LEW)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Detailed residential electric determination  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Data on residential loads has been collected from four residences in real time. The data, measured at 5-second intervals for 53 days of continuous operation, were statistically characterized. An algorithm was developed and incorporated into the modeling code SOLCEL. Performance simulations with SOLCEL using these data as well as previous data collected over longer time intervals indicate that no significant errors in system value are introduced through the use of long-term average data.

Not Available

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Residential Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Residential Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling System: Model Documentation 2013 November 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis ...

370

Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wind system. The incentive amount proposed as part of the 2004 Energy Policywind system. The incentive amount proposed as part of the 2004 Energy Policy

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Effect of radiant barriers and attic ventilation on residential attics and attic duct systems: New tools for measuring and modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple duct system was installed in an attic test module for a large scale climate simulator at a US national laboratory. The goal of the tests and subsequent modeling was to develop an accurate method of assessing duct system performance in the laboratory, enabling limiting conditions to be imposed at will and results to be applied to residential attics with attic duct systems. Steady-state tests were done at a severe summer and a mild winter condition. In all tests the roof surface was heated above ambient air temperatures by infrared lights. The attic test module first included then did not include the duct system. Attic ventilation from eave vents to a ridge vent was varied from none to values achievable by a high level of power ventilation. A radiant barrier was attached to the underside of the roof deck, both with and without the duct system in place. Tests were also done without the radiant barrier, both with and without the duct system. When installed, the insulated ducts ran along the floor of the attic, just above the attic insulation and along the edge of the attic near the eaves and one gable. These tests in a climate simulator achieved careful control and reproducibility of conditions. This elucidated dependencies that would otherwise be hidden by variations in uncontrolled variables. Based on the comparisons with the results of the tests at the mild winter condition and the severe summer condition, model predictions for attic air and insulation temperatures should be accurate within {+-} 10 F ({+-} 6 C). This is judged adequate for design purposes and could be better when exploring the effect of changes in attic and duct parameters at fixed climatic conditions.

Petrie, T.W.; Childs, P.W.; Christian, J.E.; Wilkes, K.E.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Genesis and legacy : a study of traditional, contemporary and proposed systems of control over residential developments in Cairo, Egypt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis deals with contemporary residential developments presently being carried out by the formal private sector in Cairo. These developments are typical of many other cities in Egypt, and indeed throughout the ...

El-Husseiny, Mohamed A. (Mohamed Ahmed)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Water and Energy Wasted During Residential Shower Events: Findings from a Pilot Field Study of Hot Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the shower only. The wasted energy is the difference betweenLBNL-5115E Water and Energy Wasted During Residential Showercalculate the water and energy wasted during shower events

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

CWS-fired residential warm-air heating system. Quarterly report, January 22, 1987--April 30, 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is the development of a coal water slurry burning residential furnace. A literature survey has been performed. Also, the preliminary testing of prototype components was carried out. Design criteria and specifications are discussed.

Becker, F.E.; Smolensky, L.A.; McPeak, M.A.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Water and Energy Wasted During Residential Shower Events: Findings from a Pilot Field Study of Hot Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

study to determine waste of water and energy in residential30 percent. The average waste of energy in the hot water ispaper examines the waste of water and energy associated with

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CT Solar Loan Connecticut Multi-Family Residential Residential Solar Buying & Making Electricity Sungage, Inc. CT Solar Loan Connecticut Multi-Family Residential Residential Solar...

377

Comparative performance of two types of evacuated tubular solar collectors in a residential heating and cooling system. Final report, October 1, 1977-September 30, 1978. [CSU Solar House 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar House I, the first residential solar system test facility at the Colorado State University, is described. Provision was made for the removal and replacement of the various subsystems so that the facility could be utilized to evaluate other residential size solar components and systems. Two evacuated tube collectors and one flat plate collector were evaluated. The operations history, system performance, performance assessment, and comparison with model are included. (MHR)

Loef, G.O.G.; Duff, W.S.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Measure Guideline: Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings  

SciTech Connect

This report was written as a resource for professionals involved in multifamily audits, retrofit delivery, and program design, as well as for building owners and contractors. It is intended to serve as a guide for those looking to evaluate and improve the efficiency and operation of one-pipe steam heating systems. In centrally heated multifamily buildings with steam or hydronic systems, the cost of heat for tenants is typically absorbed into the owner's operating costs. Highly variable and rising energy costs have placed a heavy burden on landlords. In the absence of well-designed and relevant efficiency efforts, increased operating costs would be passed on to tenants who often cannot afford those increases. Misinvestment is a common problem with older heating systems -- multiple contractors may inadequately or inappropriately upgrade parts of systems and reduce system functionality and efficiency, or the system has not been properly maintained.

Choi, J.; Ludwig, P.; Brand, L.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Consumer thermal energy storage costs for residential hot water, space heating and space cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The cost of household thermal energy storage (TES) in four utility service areas that are representative for hot water, space heating, and space cooling systems in the United States is presented. There are two major sections of the report: Section 2.0 is a technology characterization of commercially available and developmental/conceptual TES systems; Section 3.0 is an evaluation of the consumer cost of the three TES systems based on typical designs in four utility service areas.

None

1976-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

380

ConEd (Gas) - Multi-family Energy Efficiency Incentives Program...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Boilers, Building Insulation, CaulkingWeather-stripping, DuctAir sealing, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Equipment Insulation, Furnaces, Programmable...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-family residential systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Direct current distribution systems for residential areas powered by distributed generation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Power system began its journey with DC power as pioneered by Edison. However, this was soon rivalled by AC power and ultimately DC paradigm found (more)

Dastgeer, Faizan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Field Measurements of Efficiency and Duct Effectiveness in Residential Forced Air Distributions Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sealing and insulating the duct system. ABSTRACT Forced airair conditioning, gas furnaces, electric furnaces and heat pumps. The retrofits consisted of sealing

Jump, D.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

state retail electricity rates, state sales and property taxWind Systems state electricity rates, which increase thethe average state retail electricity rate, meaning that

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Do PV Systems Increase Residential Selling Prices If So, How Can Practitioners Estimate This Increase?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and federal policymakers. Solar PV investments are sizable,investment in PV and thereby slow solar deployment. Statenew home solar homes, the been sufficient to the PV systems.

Hoen, Ben

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

The dubuque electricity portal: evaluation of a city-scale residential electricity consumption feedback system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the Dubuque Electricity Portal, a city-scale system aimed at supporting voluntary reductions of electricity consumption. The Portal provided each household with fine-grained feedback on its electricity use, as well as using incentives, ... Keywords: behavior change, consumption feedback systems, ecf, electricity, smart meters, social comparison, sustainability

Thomas Erickson; Ming Li; Younghun Kim; Ajay Deshpande; Sambit Sahu; Tian Chao; Piyawadee Sukaviriya; Milind Naphade

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Feasibility study and roadmap to improve residential hot water distribution systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dishwashers, not only is the energy wasted by the hot waterwasted heat as water cools down in the distribution system after a draw; and the energywasted heat as water cools down in the distribution system after a draw; and the energy

Lutz, James D.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Design and thermal modeling of a residential building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent trends of green energy upgrade in commercial buildings show promise for application to residential houses as well, where there are potential energy-saving benefits of retrofitting the residential heating system from ...

Yeh, Alice Su-Chin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Development of an Integrated Residential Heating, Ventilation, Cooling, and Dehumidification System for Residences  

SciTech Connect

The Need and the Opportunity Codes such as ASHRAE 90.2 and IECC, and programs such as Energy Star and Builders Challenge, are causing new homes to be built to higher performance standards. As a result sensible cooling loads in new homes are going down, but indoor air quality prerogatives are causing ventilation rates and moisture loads to increase in humid climates. Conventional air conditioners are unable to provide the low sensible heat ratios that are needed to efficiently cool and dehumidify homes since dehumidification potential is strongly correlated with cooling system operating hours. The project team saw an opportunity to develop a system that is at least as effective as a conventional air conditioner plus dehumidifier, removes moisture without increasing the sensible load, reduces equipment cost by integrating components, and simplifies installation. Project Overview Prime contractor Davis Energy Group led a team in developing an Integrated Heating, Ventilation, Cooling, and Dehumidification (I-HVCD) system under the DOE SBIR program. Phase I and II SBIR project activities ran from July 2003 through December 2007. Tasks included: (1) Mechanical Design and Prototyping; (2) Controls Development; (3) Laboratory and Field Testing; and (4) Commercialization Activities Technology Description. Key components of the prototype I-HVCD system include an evaporator coil assembly, return and outdoor air damper, and controls. These are used in conjunction with conventional components that include a variable speed air handler or furnace, and a two-stage condensing unit. I-HVCD controls enable the system to operate in three distinct cooling modes to respond to indoor temperature and relative humidity (RH) levels. When sensible cooling loads are high, the system operates similar to a conventional system but varies supply airflow in response to indoor RH. In the second mode airflow is further reduced, and the reheat coil adds heat to the supply air. In the third mode, the reheat coil adds additional heat to maintain the supply air temperature close to the return air temperature (100% latent cooling). Project Outcomes Key Phase II objectives were to develop a pre-production version of the system and to demonstrate its performance in an actual house. The system was first tested in the laboratory and subsequently underwent field-testing at a new house in Gainesville, Florida. Field testing began in 2006 with monitoring of a 'conventional best practices' system that included a two stage air conditioner and Energy Star dehumidifier. In September 2007, the I-HVCD components were installed for testing. Both systems maintained uniform indoor temperatures, but indoor RH control was considerably better with the I-HVCD system. The daily variation from average indoor humidity conditions was less than 2% for the I-HVCD vs. 5-7% for the base case system. Data showed that the energy use of the two systems was comparable. Preliminary installed cost estimates suggest that production costs for the current I-HVCD integrated design would likely be lower than for competing systems that include a high efficiency air conditioner, dehumidifier, and fresh air ventilation system. Project Benefits This project verified that the I-HVCD refrigeration compacts are compact (for easy installation and retrofit) and can be installed with air conditioning equipment from a variety of manufacturers. Project results confirmed that the system can provide precise indoor temperature and RH control under a variety of climate conditions. The I-HVCD integrated approach offers numerous benefits including integrated control, easier installation, and reduced equipment maintenance needs. Work completed under this project represents a significant step towards product commercialization. Improved indoor RH control and fresh air ventilation are system attributes that will become increasingly important in the years ahead as building envelopes improve and sensible cooling loads continue to fall. Technologies like I-HVCD will be instrumental in meeting goals set by Building America

Hoeschele, M.A.; D.A. Springer

2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

389

Development of an Integrated Residential Heating, Ventilation, Cooling, and Dehumidification System for Residences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Need and the Opportunity Codes such as ASHRAE 90.2 and IECC, and programs such as Energy Star and Builders Challenge, are causing new homes to be built to higher performance standards. As a result sensible cooling loads in new homes are going down, but indoor air quality prerogatives are causing ventilation rates and moisture loads to increase in humid climates. Conventional air conditioners are unable to provide the low sensible heat ratios that are needed to efficiently cool and dehumidify homes since dehumidification potential is strongly correlated with cooling system operating hours. The project team saw an opportunity to develop a system that is at least as effective as a conventional air conditioner plus dehumidifier, removes moisture without increasing the sensible load, reduces equipment cost by integrating components, and simplifies installation. Project Overview Prime contractor Davis Energy Group led a team in developing an Integrated Heating, Ventilation, Cooling, and Dehumidification (I-HVCD) system under the DOE SBIR program. Phase I and II SBIR project activities ran from July 2003 through December 2007. Tasks included: (1) Mechanical Design and Prototyping; (2) Controls Development; (3) Laboratory and Field Testing; and (4) Commercialization Activities Technology Description. Key components of the prototype I-HVCD system include an evaporator coil assembly, return and outdoor air damper, and controls. These are used in conjunction with conventional components that include a variable speed air handler or furnace, and a two-stage condensing unit. I-HVCD controls enable the system to operate in three distinct cooling modes to respond to indoor temperature and relative humidity (RH) levels. When sensible cooling loads are high, the system operates similar to a conventional system but varies supply airflow in response to indoor RH. In the second mode airflow is further reduced, and the reheat coil adds heat to the supply air. In the third mode, the reheat coil adds additional heat to maintain the supply air temperature close to the return air temperature (100% latent cooling). Project Outcomes Key Phase II objectives were to develop a pre-production version of the system and to demonstrate its performance in an actual house. The system was first tested in the laboratory and subsequently underwent field-testing at a new house in Gainesville, Florida. Field testing began in 2006 with monitoring of a 'conventional best practices' system that included a two stage air conditioner and Energy Star dehumidifier. In September 2007, the I-HVCD components were installed for testing. Both systems maintained uniform indoor temperatures, but indoor RH control was considerably better with the I-HVCD system. The daily variation from average indoor humidity conditions was less than 2% for the I-HVCD vs. 5-7% for the base case system. Data showed that the energy use of the two systems was comparable. Preliminary installed cost estimates suggest that production costs for the current I-HVCD integrated design would likely be lower than for competing systems that include a high efficiency air conditioner, dehumidifier, and fresh air ventilation system. Project Benefits This project verified that the I-HVCD refrigeration compacts are compact (for easy installation and retrofit) and can be installed with air conditioning equipment from a variety of manufacturers. Project results confirmed that the system can provide precise indoor temperature and RH control under a variety of climate conditions. The I-HVCD integrated approach offers numerous benefits including integrated control, easier installation, and reduced equipment maintenance needs. Work completed under this project represents a significant step towards product commercialization. Improved indoor RH control and fresh air ventilation are system attributes that will become increasingly important in the years ahead as building envelopes improve and sensible cooling loads continue to fall. Technologies like I-HVCD will be instrumental in meeting goals set by Building America

Hoeschele, M.A.; D.A. Springer

2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

390

Development of self-tuning residential oil-burner. Oxygen sensor assessment and early prototype system operating experience  

SciTech Connect

This document is the first topical report dealing with a new project leading towards the development of a self-tuning residential oil burner. It was initiated under the Statement of Work for the Oil Heat Research and Development Program, for Fiscal Year 1997 as defined in the Combustion Equipment Technology Program, under the management of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). In part, this work is based on research reported by BNL in 1990, suggesting various options for developing control strategies in oil heat technology leading to the enhanced efficiency of oil-fired heating systems. BNL has been addressing these concepts in order of priority and technology readiness. The research described in this report is part of an ongoing project and additional work is planned for the future assuming adequate program funding is made available. BNL has continued to investigate all types of sensor technologies associated with combustion systems including all forms of oxygen measurement techniques. In these studies the development of zirconium oxide oxygen sensors has been considered over the last decade. The development of these sensors for the automotive industry has allowed for cost reductions based on quantity of production that might not have occurred otherwise. This report relates BNL`s experience in testing various zirconium oxide sensors, and the results of tests intended to provide evaluation of the various designs with regard to performance in oil-fired systems. These tests included accuracy when installed on oil-fired heating appliances and response time in cyclic operating mode. An evaluation based on performance criteria and cost factors was performed. Cost factors in the oil heat industry are one of the most critical issues in introducing new technology.

McDonald, R.J.; Butcher, T.A.; Krajewski, R.F.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

An Analysis of the Effects of Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Residential Selling Prices in California.  

SciTech Connect

An increasing number of homes with existing photovoltaic (PV) energy systems have sold in the U.S., yet relatively little research exists that estimates the marginal impacts of those PV systems on the sales price. A clearer understanding of these effects might influence the decisions of homeowners, home buyers and PV home builders. This research analyzes a large dataset of California homes that sold from 2000 through mid-2009 with PV installed. Across a large number of hedonic and repeat sales model specifications and robustness tests, the analysis finds strong evidence that homes with PV systems sold for a premium over comparable homes without. The effects range, on average, from approximately $3.9 to $6.4 per installed watt (DC), with most models coalescing near $5.5/watt, which corresponds to a premium of approximately $17,000 for a 3,100 watt system. The research also shows that, as PV systems age, the premium enjoyed at the time of home sale decreases. Additionally, existing homes with PV systems are found to have commanded a larger sales price premium than new homes with similarly sized PV systems. Reasons for this discrepancy are suggested, yet further research is warranted in this area as well as a number of other areas that are highlighted.

Cappers, Peter; Wiser, Ryan; Thayer, Mark; Hoen, Ben

2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

392

Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a total annual cost (National Renewable Energy Laboratory,credit levelized cost of energy National Renewable EnergyRenewable Energy Resources Program Grants. g The valuation of the wind energy system is 0 percent of cost

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Simulations of sizing and comfort improvements for residential forced-air heating and cooling systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heating system given by ACCA R-J for different climate zonesClimate Zone Capacity, kW (kBtu/h ) Climate Zone Capacity, kW ( kBtu/h )

Walker, I.S.; Degenetais, G.; Siegel, J.A.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Do Photovoltaic Energy Systems Effect Residential Selling Prices? Results from a California Statewide Investigation.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An increasing number of homes in the U.S. have sold with photovoltaic (PV) energy systems installed at the time of sale, yet relatively little research exists that provides estimates of the marginal impacts of those PV systems on home sale prices. This research analyzes a large dataset of California homes that sold from 2000 through mid-2009 with PV installed. We find strong evidence that homes with PV systems sold for a premium over comparable homes without PV systems during this time frame. Estimates for this premium expressed in dollars per watt of installed PV range, from roughly $4 to $6.4/watt across the full dataset, to approximately $2.3/watt for new homes, to more than $6/watt for existing homes. A number of ideas for further research are suggested.

Hoen, Ben; Cappers, Pete; Wiser, Ryan; Thayer, Mark

2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

395

System design and dynamic signature identification for intelligent energy management in residential buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hvac (t) (1 for on Then the system identication process boils down to optimizationHVAC switch are briey explained. The rest of this chapter is fo- cused on optimization

Jang, Jaehwi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Estimating Energy and Water Losses in Residential Hot Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For dishwashers, not only is energy wasted as the hot waterhas the energy used to heat this water been wasted, but thewasted heat as water cools down in the distribution system after a draw; and the energy

Lutz, James

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

A computer simulation appraisal of non-residential low energy cooling systems in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

greater direct use of cooling towers to reduce the use ofcoil, chiller and cooling tower in the baseline system wereoption is to use cooling tower water directly, without the

Bourassa, Norman; Haves, Philip; Huang, Joe

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Residential | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Residential Residential Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (7 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (5 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

399

Analysis of photovoltaic total energy systems for single family residential applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance and cost-effectiveness of three photovoltaic total energy system concepts designed to meet the thermal and electrical demands of a typical single family house are compared. The three photovoltaic total energy system concepts considered are: (1) All-photovoltaic systems. Passively air-cooled photovoltaic panels provide electricity to meet both electrical and thermal demands. (2) Separate-panel systems. Solar thermal panels provide thermal energy, while passively air-cooled photovoltaic panels serve the purely electric demand. (3) Combined thermal/electric panel systems. Water-cooled photovoltaic panels provide both thermal energy (transported by cooling water) and electrical energy to meet the separate thermal and electrical demands. Additional passively air-cooled photovoltaic panels are added, as required, to meet the electrical demand. The thermal demand is assumed to consist of the energy required for domestic hot water and space heating, while the electrical demand includes the energy required for baseload power (lights, appliances, etc.) plus air conditioning. An analysis procedure has been developed that permits definition of the panel area, electrical and/or thermal storage capacity, and utility backup energy level that, in combination, provide the lowest annual energy cost to the homeowner for each system concept for specified assumptions about costs and system operations. The procedure appears capable of being used to approximately any size system using solar collectors, as well as in any application where the thermal and/or electrical demand is being provided by solar energy, with utility or other conventional backup. This procedure has been used to provide results for homes located in Phoenix, Arizona, and Madison, Wisconsin, and to evaluate the effects of array and backup power costs and the desirability of selling excess electrical energy back to the utility. (WHK)

Chobotov, V.; Siegel, B.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Design, construction, and testing of a residential solar heating and cooling system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The NSF/CSU Solar House I solar heating and cooling system became operational on 1 July 1974. During the first months of operation the emphasis was placed on adjustment, ''tuning,'' and fault correction in the solar collection and the solar/fuel/cooling subsystems. Following this initial check out period, analysis and testing of the system utilizing a full year of data were accomplished. This report discusses the results of this analysis of the full year of operation. (WDM)

Ward, D.S.; Loef, G.O.G.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-family residential systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

The effect of hardware configuration on the performance of residential air conditioning systems at high outdoor ambient temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study was performed which investigated the effect of hardware configuration on air conditioning cooling system performance at high outdoor temperatures. The initial phase of the investigation involved the testing of ten residential air conditioning units in psychrometric rooms at Texas A&M University. All units were tested using ARI Standard 210/240 (1989) test procedures. Tests were conducted at indoor conditions of 80'F (26.7'C) db and 67'F (19.4'C) wb, and outdoor db temperatures of 82'F (27.8'C), 95-F (35-C), 100-F (37.8-C), 105-F (40.6-C), 1 10-F (43.3-C), and 120-F (48.90C). The second phase of the research involved the analysis of manufacturers' published cooling performance data for various hardware configurations. For the experimental work, measurements were taken to determine total capacity, system power, EER, and power factor. These results were then compared to manufacturers' predicted values. For the capacity, the experimental results were an average of 2.6% below the manufacturers' published values for outdoor temperatures from 85'F (29.4'C) to 115'F (46.l'C). Experimental power measurements were on average 0.4% above manufacturers' listed results. For the EER, experimental results were an average of 2.9% less than the manufacturers' predicted values. The power factors of all units were above 0.95 for the tested outdoor temperatures. In the analysis of manufacturers' published data, relationships between steady-state performance, cyclic performance, and hardware configuration were investigated for a variety of air conditioning units. A statistical relationship was found between the SEER of a unit and its corresponding EER. The split-system units possessed greater increases in EER for a given increase in SEER than the package or two-speed units. Averages values of EER/SEER for EER's at 95F (350C) were highest for the split-system units, followed by the package and two-speed units, respectively. Normalized capacity, power, and EER curves were investigated at outdoor temperatures from 85F (29.40C) to 115OF (46.1"C). On average, the two-speed units showed the smallest decrease in capacity with an increase in outdoor temperature, followed by the split-system and package-system units. The smallest power increase and smallest EER decrease with an increase in outdoor temperature were exhibited by the split-system units, followed by the two-speed and package-system units.

Bain, Joel Alan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Efficiency and Emissions Study of a Residential Micro-cogeneration System based on a Modified Stirling Engine and Fuelled by a Wood Derived Fas Pyrolysis Liquid-ethanol Blend.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A residential micro-cogeneration system based on a Stirling engine unit was modified to operate with wood derived fast pyrolysis liquid (bio-oil)-ethanol blend. A pilot stabilized (more)

Khan, Umer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Designing, selecting and installing a residential ground-source heat pump system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It's a compelling proposition: Use the near-constant-temperature heat underground to heat and cool your home and heat domestic water, slashing your energy bills. Yet despite studies demonstrating significant energy savings from ground-source heat pump (GSHP) systems, their adoption has been hindered by high upfront costs. Fewer than 1% of US homes use a GSHP system. However, compared to a minimum-code-compliant conventional space-conditioning system, when properly designed and installed, a GSHP retrofit at current market prices offers simple payback of 4.3 years on national average, considering existing federal tax credits. Most people understand how air-source heat pumps work: they move heat from indoor air to outdoor air when cooling and from outdoor air to indoor air when heating. The ground-source heat pump operates on the same principle, except that it moves heat to or from the ground source instead of outdoor air. The ground source is usually a vertical or horiontal ground heat exchanger. Because the ground usually has a more favorable temperature than ambient air for the heating and cooling operation of the vapor-compression refrigeration cycle, GSHP sysems can operate with much higher energy efficiencies than air-source heat pump systems when properly designed and installed. A GSHP system used in a residual building typically provides space conditioning and hot water and comprises three major components: a water-source heat pump unit designed to operate at a wider range of entering fluid temperatures (typically from 30 F to 110 F, or 1 C to 43 C) than a conventional water-source heat pump unit; a ground heat exchanger (GHX); and distribution systems to deliver hot water to the storage tank and heating or cooling to the conditioned rooms. In most residual GSHP systems, the circulation pumps and associated valves are integrated with the heat pump to circulate the heat-carrier fluid (water or aqueous antifreeze solution) through the heat pump and the GHX. A recent assessment indicates that if 20% of US homes replaced their existing space-conditioning and water-heating systems with properly designed, installed and operated state-of-the-art GSHP systems, it would yield significant benefits each year. These include 0.8 quad British thermal units (Btu) of primary energy savings, 54.3 million metric tons of CO{sub 2} emission reductions, $10.4 billion in energy cost savings and 43.2 gigawatts of reduction in summer peak electrical demand.

Hughes, Patrick [ORNL; Liu, Xiaobing [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Residential Dehumidification Systems Research for Hot-Humid Climates: September 1, 2001 -- December 30, 2003  

SciTech Connect

Twenty homes were tested and monitored in the hot-humid climate of Houston, Texas, U.S.A., to evaluate the humidity control performance and operating cost of six different integrated dehumidification and ventilation systems that could be applied by production homebuilders. Temperature and relative humidity were monitored at four living-space locations and in the conditioned attic where the space-conditioning equipment and air-distribution ducts were located. Equipment operational time was monitored for heating, cooling, dehumidification, and ventilation. Results showed that energy efficiency measures, combined with controlled mechanical ventilation, change the sensible and latent cooling load fractions such that dehumidification separate from the cooling system is required to maintain indoor relative humidity below 60% throughout the year. The system providing the best overall value, including humidity control, first cost, and operating cost, involved a standard dehumidifier located in a hall closet with a louvered door and central-fan-integrated supply ventilation with fan cycling.

Rudd, A. F.; Lstiburek, J. W.; Eng, P.; Ueno, K.

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

An Analysis of the Effects of Residential Photovoltaic Energy Systems on Home Sales Prices in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An increasing number of homes in the U.S. have sold with photovoltaic (PV) energy systems installed at the time of sale, yet relatively little research exists that estimates the marginal impacts of those PV systems on home sale prices. A clearer understanding of these possible impacts might influence the decisions of homeowners considering the installation of a PV system, homebuyers considering the purchase of a home with PV already installed, and new home builders considering including PV as an optional or standard product on their homes. This research analyzes a large dataset of California homes that sold from 2000 through mid-2009 with PV installed. It finds strong evidence that homes with PV systems sold for a premium over comparable homes without PV systems during this time frame. Estimates for this premium expressed in dollars per watt of installed PV range, on average, from roughly $4 to $5.5/watt across a large number of hedonic and repeat sales model specifications and robustness tests. When expressed as a ratio of the sales price premium of PV to estimated annual energy cost savings associated with PV, an average ratio of 14:1 to 19:1 can be calculated; these results are consistent with those of the more-extensive existing literature on the impact of energy efficiency on sales prices. When the data are split among new and existing homes, however, PV system premiums are markedly affected. New homes with PV show premiums of $2.3-2.6/watt, while existing homes with PV show premiums of more than $6/watt. Reasons for this discrepancy are suggested, yet further research is warranted. A number of other areas where future research would be useful are also highlighted.

Hoen, Ben; Cappers, Peter; Wiser, Ryan; Thayer, Mark

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

406

Design, construction, and testing of a residential solar heating and cooling system  

SciTech Connect

The NSF/CSU Solar House I solar heating and cooling system became operational on 1 July 1974. During the first months of operation the emphasis was placed on adjustment, ''tuning,'' and fault correction in the solar collection and the solar/fuel/cooling subsystems. Following this initial check out period, analysis and testing of the system utilizing a full year of data were accomplished. This report discusses the results of this analysis of the full year of operation. (WDM)

Ward, D.S.; Loef, G.O.G.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

A computer simulation appraisal of non-residential low energy cooling systems in California  

SciTech Connect

An appraisal of the potential performance of different Low Energy Cooling (LEC) systems in nonresidential buildings in California is being conducted using computer simulation. The paper presents results from the first phase of the study, which addressed the systems that can be modeled, with the DOE-2.1E simulation program. The following LEC technologies were simulated as variants of a conventional variable-air-volume system with vapor compression cooling and mixing ventilation in the occupied spaces: Air-side indirect and indirect/direct evaporative pre-cooling. Cool beams. Displacement ventilation. Results are presented for four populous climates, represented by Oakland, Sacramento, Pasadena and San Diego. The greatest energy savings are obtained from a combination of displacement ventilation and air-side indirect/direct evaporative pre-cooling. Cool beam systems have the lowest peak demand but do not reduce energy consumption significantly because the reduction in fan energy is offse t by a reduction in air-side free cooling. Overall, the results indicate significant opportunities for LEC technologies to reduce energy consumption and demand in nonresidential new construction and retrofit.

Bourassa, Norman; Haves, Philip; Huang, Joe

2002-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

408

Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings in Chicagoland - Second Year of Data Collection  

SciTech Connect

Steam heated buildings often suffer from uneven heating as a result of poor control of the amount of steam entering each radiator. In order to satisfy the heating load to the coldest units, other units are overheated. As a result, some tenants complain of being too hot and open their windows in the middle of winter, while others complain of being too cold and are compelled to use supplemental heat sources. Building on previous research, CNT Energy identified 10 test buildings in Chicago and conducted a study to identify best practices for the methodology, typical costs, and energy savings associated with steam system balancing. A package of common steam balancing measures was assembled and data were collected on the buildings before and after these retrofits were installed to investigate the process, challenges, and the cost effectiveness of improving steam systems through improved venting and control systems. The test buildings that received venting upgrades and new control systems showed 10.2% savings on their natural gas heating load, with a simple payback of 5.1 years. The methodologies for and findings from this study are presented in detail in this report. This report has been updated from a version published in August 2012 to include natural gas usage information from the 2012 heating season and updated natural gas savings calculations.

Choi, J.; Ludwig, P.; Brand, L.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the wind energy system is 0 percent of cost for year oneWind Energy Association Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory break-even turnkey costLCOE for Wind Classes 2-4 Levelized Cost of Energy ($/kWh)

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Optimizing Hydronic System Performance in Residential Applications, Ithaca, New York (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Optimizing Hydronic Optimizing Hydronic System Performance in Residential Applications Ithaca, New York PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Condensing Boiler Optimization Location: Ithaca, NY Partners: Ithaca Neighborhood Housing Services, www.ithacanhs.org; Appropriate Designs, www.hydronicpros.com; HTP, www.htproducts.com; Peerless, www.peerlessboilers.com; Grundfos, us.grundfos.com; Bell & Gossett, www.bell-gossett.com; Emerson Swan, www.emersonswan.com. Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings, www.carb-swa.com Building Component: Space heating, water heating Application: New; single and multifamily Year Tested: 2012-2013 Applicable Climate Zone(s): 4,5,6,7 PERFORMANCE DATA Cost of Energy Efficiency Measure (including labor): $6,100-$8,200 Projected Energy Savings:

411

The Technical and Economical Analysis of a Centralized Air-Conditioning System with Cold Storage Refrigeration in High-Rise Residential Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, the application of a centralized air-conditioning system (CACS) with cold storage refrigeration in high-rise residential buildings has gradually increased. Due to the large difference between civil residential buildings and commercial buildings, characteristics such as the cooling load in summer and the storey height must be considered in the design of the air-conditioning system, and the cold storage equipment and the cold supplying means must be properly selected. The option of establishing centralized air-conditioning equipment with cold storage and supplying unified cold in high-rise residential buildings is analyzed objectively with technical and economical methods in this paper. It is not true that the option of supplying unified cold can save energy all the time. CACS with cold storage will not always be economical. Based on a 27-floor building, the running costs in summer and the first costs are both compared between CACS with and without cold storage refrigeration. The cold storage method selected will significantly impact the residents.

Xiang, C.; Xie, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Analysis of space heating and domestic hot water systems for energy-efficient residential buildings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An analysis of the best ways of meeting the space heating and domestic hot water (DHW) needs of new energy-efficient houses with very low requirements for space heat is provided. The DHW load is about equal to the space heating load in such houses in northern climates. The equipment options which should be considered are discussed, including new equipment recently introduced in the market. It is concluded that the first consideration in selecting systems for energy-efficient houses should be identification of the air moving needs of the house for heat distribution, heat storage, ventilation, and ventilative cooling. This is followed, in order, by selection of the most appropriate distribution system, the heating appliances and controls, and the preferred energy source, gas, oil, or electricity.

Dennehy, G

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

A natural-gas fuel processor for a residential fuel cell system.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system model was used to develop an autothermal reforming fuel processor to meet the targets of 80% efficiency (higher heating value) and start-up energy consumption of less than 500 kJ when operated as part of a 1-kWe natural-gas fueled fuel cell system for cogeneration of heat and power. The key catalytic reactors of the fuel processor--namely the autothermal reformer, a two-stage water gas shift reactor and a preferential oxidation reactor--were configured and tested in a breadboard apparatus. Experimental results demonstrated a reformate containing {approx} 48% hydrogen (on a dry basis and with pure methane as fuel) and less than 5 ppm CO. The effects of steam-to-carbon and part load operations were explored.

Adachi, H.; Ahmed, S.; Lee, S. H. D.; Papadias, D.; Ahluwalia, R. K.; Bendert, J. C.; Kanner, S. A.; Yamazaki, Y.; Japan Institute of Energy

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Assessment of Advanced Air Purification Technologies: Filtration and Hybrid Systems for Residential and Commercial Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Indoor air contaminants, such as microorganisms, allergens, environmental tobacco smoke, and volatile organic compounds, can cause health- and productivity-related problems for the occupants of the indoor space. Children, elderly adults, and people with deficient immune systems are especially likely to be affected by contaminated air. There are three primary measures to control indoor air contamination. The first is to eliminate the contaminant source. The second is to control ventilation within the spac...

2003-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

415

Comparative economics of passive and active systems: residential space heating applications  

SciTech Connect

The economic performance of alternative designs are evaluated. One passive design is emphasized, the thermal mass storage wall. The economic performance of this design is examined and subsequently contrasted with one active design, the air collector/rock storage system. Architectural design criteria, solar performance characteristics, and the incremental solar cost of each design is briefly reviewed. Projections of conventional energy prices are discussed, along with the optimal sizing/feasibility criterion employed in the economic performance analysis. In addition, the effects of two incentive proposals, income tax credits and low interest loans, upon each design are examined. Results are reported on a state-by-state basis, with major conclusions summarized for each design. It is generally the case that incentives greatly enhance the economics of both system designs, although the contrast is greater for the passive design. Also, against the less expensive conventional fuels (natural gas and heating oil) the passive design was shown to offer a more cost effective alternative than the active system for most states.

Roach, F.; Noll, S.; Ben-David, S.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

The impact of thermostat performance on energy consumption and occupant comfort in residential electric heating systems  

SciTech Connect

A digital computer simulation was used to compare the energy consumption and comfort of an electric baseboard heating system using high performance thermostats (low droop, fast cycling) to that of the same system using poorer performing thermostats (high droop, slow cycling, such as many line voltage types). Since a thermostat which allows the controlled temperature to fall below the setpoint will obviously cause less energy consumption than a thermostat which maintains the controlled temperature closer to the setpoint, the key hypothesis of this study was that the user will reset the thermostat setpoint in some fashion during the heating season to obtain acceptable conditions for all heating loads. The major assumption of this study, therefore, was the mode of this ''user-thermostat interaction''. For every case in which the simulated ''user'' could intervene, the energy consumption using high performance thermostats was found to be less, while a greater degree of comfort was maintained, than systems using poorer performing thermostats. Energy savings ranged from 2% to 18% depending upon the mode of user interaction simulated. Where energy savings were small, the ''user'' was resetting the poorly performing thermostat as often as twice a day; i.e., the ''user'' was performing the function of a better performing thermostat.

Benton, R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Experimental Evaluation of a Downsized Residential Air Distribution System: Comfort and Ventilation Effectiveness  

SciTech Connect

Good air mixing not only improves thermal comfort Human thermal comfort is the state of mind that expresses satisfaction with the surrounding environment, according to ASHRAE Standard 55. Achieving thermal comfort for most occupants of buildings or other enclosures is a goal of HVAC design engineers. but also enhances ventilation effectiveness by inducing uniform supply-air diffusion. In general, the performance of an air distribution system in terms of comfort and ventilation effectiveness is influenced by the supply air temperature, velocity, and flow rate, all of which are in part dictated by the HVAC (Heating Ventilation Air Conditioning) In the home or small office with a handful of computers, HVAC is more for human comfort than the machines. In large datacenters, a humidity-free room with a steady, cool temperature is essential for the trouble-free system as well as the thermal load attributes. Any potential deficiencies associated with these design variables can be further exacerbated by an improper proximity of the supply and return outlets with respect to the thermal and geometrical characteristics of the indoor space. For high-performance houses, the factors influencing air distribution performance take on an even greater significance because of a reduced supply-air design flow rate resulting from downsized HVAC systems.

Jalalzadeh-Azar, A. A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Review of Residential Ventilation Technologies.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Review of Residential Ventilation Technologies. Review of Residential Ventilation Technologies. Title Review of Residential Ventilation Technologies. Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-57730 Year of Publication 2007 Authors Russell, Marion L., Max H. Sherman, and Armin F. Rudd Journal HVAC&R Research Volume 13 Start Page Chapter Pagination 325-348 Abstract This paper reviews current and potential ventilation technologies for residential buildings in North America and a few in Europe. The major technologies reviewed include a variety of mechanical systems, natural ventilation, and passive ventilation. Key parameters that are related to each system include operating costs, installation costs, ventilation rates, heat recovery potential. It also examines related issues such as infiltration, duct systems, filtration options, noise, and construction issues. This report describes a wide variety of systems currently on the market that can be used to meet ASHRAE Standard 62.2. While these systems generally fall into the categories of supply, exhaust or balanced, the specifics of each system are driven by concerns that extend beyond those in the standard and are discussed. Some of these systems go beyond the current standard by providing additional features (such as air distribution or pressurization control). The market will decide the immediate value of such features, but ASHRAE may wish to consider modifications to the standard in the future.

419

EPA's Recommended Residential Radon Mitigation Standard of Practice EPA recommends the Standard Practice for Installing Radon Mitigation Systems in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Existing Low-Rise Residential Buildings * for residential radon mitigation. This voluntary, consensus-based standard was developed and issued by the American Society for Testing and Materials International, and is identified as ASTM E-2121. The Agency first cited ASTM E-2121 in 2003 as a national consensus standard appropriate for reducing radon in homes as far as practicable below the national action level of 4 picocuries per liter (pCi/L) in indoor air. As of May 2006, EPA no longer recommends, and will no longer distribute its own, superseded Radon Mitigation Standards (EPA 402-R-93-

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Residential Wood Residential wood combustion (RWC) is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Residential Wood Combustion Residential wood combustion (RWC) is increasing in Europe because PM2.5. Furthermore, other combustion- related sources of OA in Europe may need to be reassessed. Will it affect global OA emission estimates? Combustion of biofuels is globally one of the major OA sources

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-family residential systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Optimizing Hydronic System Performance in Residential Applications, Ithaca, New York (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Condensing boiler technology has been around for many years and has proven to be a durable, reliable method of heating. Based on previous research efforts, however, it is apparent that these types of systems are not designed and installed to achieve maximum efficiency. For example, in order to protect their equipment in the field, manufacturers of low-mass condensing boilers typically recommend design strategies and components that ensure steady, high flow rates through the heat exchangers, such as primary-secondary piping, which ultimately result in decreased efficiency.

Not Available

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Austin Energy - Value of Solar Residential Rate (Texas) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Austin Energy - Value of Solar Residential Rate (Texas) Austin Energy - Value of Solar Residential Rate (Texas) Austin Energy - Value of Solar Residential Rate (Texas) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Program Info Start Date 10/01/2012 State Texas Austin Energy, the municipal utility of Austin Texas, offers the Value of Solar rate for residential solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. The Value of Solar tariff, designed by Austin Energy and approved by Austin City Council in June 2012, will be available for all past, present and future residential solar customers beginning October 1, 2012. This tariff replaces net billing for residential solar PV systems no larger than 20 kilowatts (kW). Under this new tariff, residential customers will be credited monthly for their solar generation based on the Value of Solar energy generated from

423

Foundation heat exchangers for residential ground source heat pump systems Numerical modeling and experimental validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new type of ground heat exchanger that utilizes the excavation often made for basements or foundations has been proposed as an alternative to conventional ground heat exchangers. This article describes a numerical model that can be used to size these foundation heat exchanger (FHX) systems. The numerical model is a two-dimensional finite-volume model that considers a wide variety of factors, such as soil freezing and evapotranspiration. The FHX numerical model is validated with one year of experimental data collected at an experimental house located near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The model shows good agreement with the experimental data-heat pump entering fluid temperatures typically within 1 C (1.8 F) - with minor discrepancies due to approximations, such as constant moisture content throughout the year, uniform evapotranspiration over the seasons, and lack of ground shading in the model.

Xing, Lu [Oklahoma State University; Cullin, James [Oklahoma State University; Spitler, Jeffery [Oklahoma State University; Im, Piljae [ORNL; Fisher, Daniel [Oklahoma State University

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Advanced phase change materials and systems for solar passive heating and cooling of residential buildings  

SciTech Connect

During the last three years under the sponsorship of the DOE Solar Passive Division, the University of Dayton Research Institute (UDRI) has investigated four phase change material (PCM) systems for utility in thermal energy storage for solar passive heating and cooling applications. From this research on the basis of cost, performance, containment, and environmental acceptability, we have selected as our current and most promising series of candidate phase change materials, C-15 to C-24 linear crystalline alkyl hydrocarbons. The major part of the research during this contract period was directed toward the following three objectives. Find, test, and develop low-cost effective phase change materials (PCM) that melt and freeze sharply in the comfort temperature range of 73--77{degree}F for use in solar passive heating and cooling of buildings. Define practical materials and processes for fire retarding plasterboard/PCM building products. Develop cost-effective methods for incorporating PCM into building construction materials (concrete, plasterboard, etc.) which will lead to the commercial manufacture and sale of PCM-containing products resulting in significant energy conservation.

Salyer, I.O.; Sircar, A.K.; Dantiki, S.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Model Code for the Control of Residential HVAC Distribution System Leakage and HVAC-Induced Building Leakage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modifications to local and state codes are seen as an appropriate strategy for the prevention of residential air distribution system leakage and its impacts. A model code element has been developed to assist this strategy. Recent field studies of Florida residences by Cummings, Tooley and Moyer have revealed a mean leakage of 11 percent for the air distribution systems of central, fan-force heating and air conditioning systems. Such leakage may cause an estimated 20 percent increase in energy consumption for air conditioning, as well as a 50 percent increase in peak cooling load and an 80 percent increase in peak heating load. In addition, building air leakage may be expected to be several times greater when duct leakage is present or when avenues of air egress from closeable rooms are absent. The model duct construction element presented here contains all of the standards, definitions and code language needed to replace the current duct construction element of the local or state code. The content of this paper was used as a principal source for language adopted for the 1991 Florida Energy Efficiency Code For Building Construction. Addressed are the most appropriate standards required for the closure and sealing of metal duct, rigid fibrous glass duct, and nonmetallic flexible duct. Also addressed are (1) detailed requirements for the sealing of mechanical closets when they function as plenum chambers, (2) detailed requirements for the sealing of enclosed support platforms or air handlers and furnaces when they function as return duct, (3) detailed requirements for the sealing of uninhabitable cavities of the building structure, when they function as duct, and (4) detailed requirements for the egress of air from enclosed rooms which receive supply air. Where necessary, commentary is provided to explain the options available for implementing the model code provision as well as its ramifications. All provisions of this model code are compatible with the requirements, standards and guidelines contained in related documents published by the following organizations: the Southern Building Code Congress International, Inc., the Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors National Association, the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air conditioning Engineers, Underwriters Laboratories, Inc., the Air Conditioning Contractors Of America, the Thermal Insulation Manufacturers Association, the National Fire Protection Association, and the Gypsum Association.

Wemhoff, P.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Port Angeles Public Works and Utilities - Residential Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

single-family, multi-family and manufactured homes, with the exception of heat pump and air sealing rebates, which are not offered to multi-family homes. Some measures vary by...

427

Residential Energy Consumption Survey:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

E/EIA-0262/2 E/EIA-0262/2 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: 1978-1980 Consumption and Expenditures Part II: Regional Data May 1981 U.S. Department of Energy Energy Information Administration Assistant Administrator for Program Development Office of the Consumption Data System Residential and Commercial Data Systems Division -T8-aa * N uojssaooy 'SOS^-m (£03) ao£ 5925 'uofSfAfQ s^onpojj aa^ndmoo - aojAaag T BU T3gN am rcoj? aig^IT^^ '(adBx Q-naugBH) TOO/T8-JQ/30Q 30^703 OQ ' d jo :moaj ajqBfT^A^ 3J^ sjaodaa aAoqe aqa jo 's-TZTOO-eoo-Tgo 'ON ^ois odo 'g^zo-via/aoQ 'TBST Sujpjjng rXaAang uojidmnsuoo XSaaug sSu-ppjprig ON ^oo^s OdO '^/ZOZO-Via/aOQ *086T aunr '6L6I ?sn§ny og aunf ' jo suja^Bd uoj^dmnsuoo :XaAjng uo^^dmnsuoQ XSaaug OS '9$ '6-ieTOO- 00-T90 OdD 'S/ZOZO-Via/aOa C

428

City of Concord Electric Department - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

an incentive program encouraging its residential customers to replace their existing HVAC system with a more energy efficient heat pump system. Heat pumps between one and five...

429

SoCalGas - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rebate Programs Rebate Programs SoCalGas - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Program Info Start Date 1/1/2010 Expiration Date 12/31/2012 State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Clothes Washer: $35 Dishwasher: $30 Storage Water Heater: $30 or $75 (.62 EF) Gas Furnace: $200 Attic and Wall Insulation: $0.15/sq. ft. Tankless Water Heater: $300 or $400 Provider Southern California Gas Company The Southern California Gas Company (SoCalGas) Home Energy Efficiency Rebate Program offers cash rebates on qualifying energy-efficiency upgrades or improvements made to single family homes, multi-family apartments, or

430

SoCalGas - Non-Residential On-Bill Financing Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

On-Bill Financing Program On-Bill Financing Program SoCalGas - Non-Residential On-Bill Financing Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Other Program Info State California Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount General Minimum Loan Amount: $5,000/meter minimum Non-Institutional Customers: up to $100,000/meter with 5 year max payback Taxpayer Funded Institutions: up to $250,000/meter with 10 year max payback State of California: up to $1,000,000 with 10 year max payback Provider Southern California Gas Company The SoCalGas On-Bill Financing (OBF) program offers qualified business customers 0% financing from $5,000 to $100,000 per meter for qualifying

431

SCE - Non-Residential On-Bill Financing Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

On-Bill Financing Program On-Bill Financing Program SCE - Non-Residential On-Bill Financing Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Other Maximum Rebate Taxpayer Funded Institutions: up to $250,000/meter with 5 year max payback Non-Institutional Customers: up to $100,000/meter with 5 year max payback State of California: up to $1,000,000 with 10 year max payback Program Info Start Date 8/2/2010 State California Program Type Utility Loan Program Rebate Amount 5,000 minimum Provider Business Programs The SoCalGas On-Bill Financing (OBF) program offers qualified business customers 0% financing from $5,000 to $100,000 per meter for qualifying

432

Burlington Electric Department - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Burlington Electric Department - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential Savings For Appliances &...

433

Columbia Rural Electric Association - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Columbia Rural Electric Association - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential Savings For Home...

434

Ozarks Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ozarks Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program Ozarks Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Program Eligibility Residential Savings...

435

Kootenai Electric Cooperative - Residential Efficiency Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kootenai Electric Cooperative - Residential Efficiency Rebate Program Kootenai Electric Cooperative - Residential Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential Savings For Home...

436

Southwest Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Southwest Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Southwest Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential...

437

Kirkwood Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kirkwood Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Kirkwood Electric - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential Savings For Heating &...

438

Central Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Central Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Eligibility Construction Residential Savings For Other...

439

Cherokee Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cherokee Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Programs Cherokee Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Programs Eligibility Residential...

440

Marietta Power & Water - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marietta Power & Water - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Marietta Power & Water - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential Savings For...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-family residential systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

SRP - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SRP - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program SRP - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential Savings For Home Weatherization Commercial...

442

Barron Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Resource Conservation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Resource Conservation Loan Program Barron Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Resource Conservation Loan Program Eligibility Residential Savings For Home...

443

Cedar Falls Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Cedar Falls Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential Savings For Heating & Cooling Commercial...

444

TOPIC Brief BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Lighting: Residential...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting: Residential and Commercial Requirements TOPIC BRIEF 1 Lighting: Residential and Commercial Requirements Residential Lighting Requirements The 2009 International Energy...

445

Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative -Residential Energy Resource...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Resource Conservation Loan Program Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative -Residential Energy Resource Conservation Loan Program Eligibility Residential Savings...

446

Lake Region Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Region Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Lake Region Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Eligibility Residential...

447

Mississippi Power - EarthCents Residential Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mississippi Power - EarthCents Residential Efficiency Rebate Mississippi Power - EarthCents Residential Efficiency Rebate Program Mississippi Power - EarthCents Residential Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Heat Pump Conversion: $150 - $200 Ductless HVAC System (Whole House): $250 Geothermal Heat Pump: $500 Water Heater Conversions: $150 Heat Pump Water Heater: $300 Provider Efficiency Programs Mississippi Power offers rebates to its residential customers to help offset the cost of conversions from gas equipment to energy efficient electric equipment. Rebates are eligible for heat pumps, HVAC systems,

448

Groton Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Groton Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Groton Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Groton Utilities - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Commercial Lighting Lighting Water Heating Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Compact Fluorescent Bulbs: Free While Supplies Last Insulation: $0.50/sq ft Heat Pump Water Heater: Up to $500 HVAC Controls: $250/unit Single Package/Split System Unitary AC: $250/ton Air-Source Heat Pump: $250/ton Water-Source Heat Pump: $150/ton Home Energy Savings Program: Free for Electric Customers

449

Packaged residential active-solar space-conditioning system. Appendix E. System performance monitoring. Final subcontract report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the testing of four solar space heating systems that had cost and performance characteristics equalling or exceeding competing conventional heating systems. Design concepts for these systems were solicited from the solar industry and field tested by Vitro Corporation. The designers of the four prototype systems were: Calmac Manufacturing Corporation, Contemporary Systems, Inc., Honeywell Inc., and Trident Energy Systems. Vitro Corporation reports the results of field test performance for the four packaged space heating systems. Their review presents the primary performance factors for all systems, comparing them to the best National Solar Data Network (NSDN) space heating systems. Performance factors evaluated and reported on were: collection subsystem efficiency, collector array operational efficiency, percentage of incident solar delivered to loads, collector coefficients of performance, system coefficients of performance, percent collected solar to load, and solar energy to loads/ft/sup 2/ collector/day. The data indicate that these packaged space heating systems compare well with the most recent National Solar Data Network systems.

Not Available

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Distillate Fuel Oil Sales for Residential Use  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

End Use Product: Residential - Distillate Fuel Oil Residential - No. 1 Residential - No. 2 Residential - Kerosene Commercial - Distillate Fuel Oil Commercial - No. 1 Distillate...

451

Atmos Energy (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Atmos Energy (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program Atmos Energy (Gas) - Residential Efficiency Program Eligibility Low-Income Residential Residential Savings For Heating & Cooling...

452

Chicopee Electric Light- Residential Solar Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Chicopee Electric Light offered rebates to residential customers who install solar photovoltaic systems on their homes. Customer rebates are $0.50 per watt for a maximum of $2,500 per installation.

453

Austin Energy- Residential Solar PV Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Austin Energy's Solar Rebate Program offers a $1.50 per watt incentive to eligible residential who install photovoltaic (PV) systems on their homes. Rebates are limited to $15,000 per home...