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1

MULTI-AGENCY RADIATION SURVEY AND SITE INVESTIGATION MANUAL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MULTI-AGENCY MULTI-AGENCY RADIATION SURVEY AND SITE INVESTIGATION MANUAL (MARSSIM) NUREG-1575, Rev. 1 EPA 402-R-97-016, Rev. 1 Rev. 1 AUGUST 2000 REVISION 1 DOE/EH-0624, ABSTRACT The MARSSIM provides information on planning, conducting, evaluating, and documenting building surface and surface soil final status radiological surveys for demonstrating compliance with dose or risk-based regulations or standards. The MARSSIM is a multi-agency consensus document that was developed collaboratively by four Federal agencies having authority and control over radioactive materials: Department of Defense (DOD), Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The MARSSIM's objective is to describe a consistent approach for planning, performing, and

2

ORISE: Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM) Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM) As greater attention is being directed toward the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear facilities, the need for a standardized approach for implementing the necessary radiological surveys has become increasingly important. A multi-agency committee representing the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has addressed this need by producing a guidance document known as the Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM). Published in December 1997, MARSSIM provides detailed guidance for planning, implementing and evaluating environmental and facility radiological surveys to demonstrate compliance with a dose- or risk-based

3

ORISE: Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Assessment of Materials and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment of Materials and Equipment Assessment of Materials and Equipment (MARSAME) resources ORISE provides training and support for agencies required to use MARSAME for property clearance programs Decommissioned site The Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Assessment of Materials and Equipment manual (MARSAME) is a resource developed to help with the disposition of metals, concrete, tools, piping, furniture, solids, liquids, and gases in containers, and similar non-real property that were part of former nuclear sites that have undergone decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). The MARSAME manual was published in January 2009 as a supplement to the Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM 2002) and is a critical resource for federal agencies involved in property

4

Georgia Hosts Multi-Agency Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Georgia Hosts Multi-Agency Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Georgia Hosts Multi-Agency Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Exercise Georgia Hosts Multi-Agency Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Exercise May 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis A firefighter trained to respond to radiological events performs a radiological survey of the WIPP shipping package as part of a WIPP transportation exercise in Morgan County, Georgia. A firefighter trained to respond to radiological events performs a radiological survey of the WIPP shipping package as part of a WIPP transportation exercise in Morgan County, Georgia. The on-scene incident commander briefs a responder during an April 17 WIPP transportation exercise in Georgia. The on-scene incident commander briefs a responder during an April 17 WIPP transportation exercise in Georgia.

5

Georgia Hosts Multi-Agency Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Georgia Hosts Multi-Agency Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Georgia Hosts Multi-Agency Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Exercise Georgia Hosts Multi-Agency Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Exercise May 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis A firefighter trained to respond to radiological events performs a radiological survey of the WIPP shipping package as part of a WIPP transportation exercise in Morgan County, Georgia. A firefighter trained to respond to radiological events performs a radiological survey of the WIPP shipping package as part of a WIPP transportation exercise in Morgan County, Georgia. The on-scene incident commander briefs a responder during an April 17 WIPP transportation exercise in Georgia. The on-scene incident commander briefs a responder during an April 17 WIPP transportation exercise in Georgia.

6

Obama Administration Launches $26 Million Multi-Agency Competition to  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

$26 Million Multi-Agency Competition $26 Million Multi-Agency Competition to Strengthen Advanced Manufacturing Clusters Across the Nation Obama Administration Launches $26 Million Multi-Agency Competition to Strengthen Advanced Manufacturing Clusters Across the Nation May 29, 2012 - 10:20am Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - The Obama Administration today announced a $26 million multi-agency Advanced Manufacturing Jobs and Innovation Accelerator Challenge to foster innovation-fueled job creation through public-private partnerships. These coordinated investments will help catalyze and leverage private capital, build an entrepreneurial ecosystem, and promote cluster-based development in regions across the United States. This is the third round of the Jobs Accelerator competition, which is being funded by

7

2009 Canadian Radiation Oncology Resident Survey  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Statistics from the Canadian post-MD education registry show that numbers of Canadian radiation oncology (RO) trainees have risen from 62 in 1999 to approximately 150 per year between 2003 and 2009, contributing to the current perceived downturn in employment opportunities for radiation oncologists in Canada. When last surveyed in 2003, Canadian RO residents identified job availability as their main concern. Our objective was to survey current Canadian RO residents on their training and career plans. Methods and Materials: Trainees from the 13 Canadian residency programs using the national matching service were sought. Potential respondents were identified through individual program directors or chief resident and were e-mailed a secure link to an online survey. Descriptive statistics were used to report responses. Results: The eligible response rate was 53% (83/156). Similar to the 2003 survey, respondents generally expressed high satisfaction with their programs and specialty. The most frequently expressed perceived weakness in their training differed from 2003, with 46.5% of current respondents feeling unprepared to enter the job market. 72% plan on pursuing a postresidency fellowship. Most respondents intend to practice in Canada. Fewer than 20% of respondents believe that there is a strong demand for radiation oncologists in Canada. Conclusions: Respondents to the current survey expressed significant satisfaction with their career choice and training program. However, differences exist compared with the 2003 survey, including the current perceived lack of demand for radiation oncologists in Canada.

Debenham, Brock, E-mail: debenham@ualberta.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Banerjee, Robyn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Fairchild, Alysa; Dundas, George [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Trotter, Theresa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Yee, Don [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

8

Aerial radiation survey at a military range.  

SciTech Connect

Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG) is currently listed on the Superfund National Priorities List because of past waste handling practices at 13 'study areas.' Concern has been expressed that anthropogenic radioisotopes may have been released at some of the study areas, with the potential of posing health risks to human or ecological receptors. This concern was addressed by thoroughly searching archival records, sampling and analyzing environmental media, and performing an aerial radiation survey. The aerial radiation survey techniques employed have been used over all U.S. Department of Energy and commercial reactor sites. Use of the Aerial Measurement System (AMS) allowed investigators to safely survey areas where surveys using hand-held instruments would be difficult to perform. In addition, the AMS delivered a full spectrum of the measured gamma radiation, thereby providing a means of determining which radioisotopes were present at the surface. As a quality check on the aerial measurements, four ground truth measurements were made at selected locations and compared with the aerial data for the same locations. The results of the survey revealed no evidence of surface radioactive contamination. The measured background radiation, including the cosmic contribution, ranged from 4 to 11 {mu}R/h.

Williams, G. P.; Martino, L. E.; Wrobel, J.; Environmental Assessment; U.S. Army Aberdeen Proving Ground

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

NNSA to Conduct Aerial Radiation Monitoring Survey over Baltimore...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conduct Aerial Radiation Monitoring Survey over Baltimore Jan. 15-16 | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering...

10

MECHANISTIC FOAM FLOW SIMULATION IN HETEROGENEOUS AND MULTIDIMENSIONAL POROUS MEDIA fronts within Boise sandstone was tracked experimentally  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

guidance: · Radionuclides: The Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM), NUREG

11

RADIATION: A TOOL FOR INDUSTRY. A Survey of Current Technology  

SciTech Connect

This one-year survey of industrial applications of ionizing radiation is based on interviews with workers in the field and on analysis of selected literature. ionizing radiation at kilowatt power levels from electron accelerators and from radionuclides is finding a few special applications, notably sterilization and be in various stages of process development and tcsting. These are concentrated heavily in the plastics field, though examples are found in petrochemical synthesis, product sterilization, and portable energy sources such as batteries. Ionizing radiation is not yet a processing tool of major importance to industry generally, however, because it has not yet demonstrated sufficient advantages over established methods of achieving a similar result. Thus, though ionizing radiation produces free radicals under a wide variety of conditions, it has, with few exceptions, not proved superior to other agents, such as heat and chemicals, that also produce free radicals. Insufficient specificity of action, low yields, and costs higher than those of competitive processes are among the chief difficulties found. Possible unique features of radiation have not been fully explored. Optimization of enviromental variables has not been thoroughly studied. Indirect advantages associated with radiation, such as greater processing or packaging flexibility, have already proved significantly important but have not yet been thoroughly evaluated in most potential applications. Even radiation engineering is relatively undeveloped and radiation economics uncertain. Skillfully oriented research and development on such problems will improve the likelihood of radiation becoming a tool of major importance for U.S. industry. (auth)

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Survey of Radiation Effects in Titanium Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information on radiation effects in titanium alloys has been reviewed. Only sparse experimental data from fission reactor and charged particle irradiations is available, none of which is directly applicable to the SNS. Within this limited data it is found that although mechanical properties are substantially degraded, several Ti alloys may retain acceptable properties to low or moderate doses. Therefore, it is recommended that titanium alloys be examined further for application to the SNS target. Since information directly relevant to the SNS mercury target environment and irradiation conditions is not available, it is recommended that ORNL generate the necessary experimental data using a graded approach. The first testing would be for cavitation erosion resistance using two different test devices. If the material performs acceptably the next tests should be for long term mercury compatibility testing of the most promising alloys. Irradiation tests to anticipated SNS displacement doses followed by mechanical property measurements would be the last stage in determining whether the alloys should be considered for service in the SNS target module.

Mansur, Louis K [ORNL

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

INDEPENDENT CONFIRMATORY SURVEY OF THE NUCLEAR RESEARCH LABORATORY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS URBANA-CHAMPAIGN, ILLINOIS  

SciTech Connect

ORAU conducted confirmatory survey activities within the NRL at the University during the week of May 7, 2012. The survey activities included visual inspections/ assessments, surface activity measurements, and volumetric concrete sampling activities. During the course of the confirmatory activities, ORAU noted several issues with the survey-for-release activities performed at the University. Issues included inconsistencies with: survey unit classifications were not designated according to Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual guidance; survey instrument calibrations were not representative of the radionuclides of concern; calculations for instrumentation detection capabilities did not align with the release criteria discussed in the licensee’s survey guidance documents; total surface activity measurements were in excess of the release criteria; and Co-60 and Eu-152 concentrations in the confirmatory concrete samples were above their respective guidelines. Based on the significant programmatic issues identified, ORAU cannot independently conclude that the NRL satisfied the requirements and limits for release of materials without radiological restrictions.

EVAN M. HARPENAU

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

14

Research in radiation monitoring survey instrumentation. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Two low-power solid-state prototype readout units were developed, an LED display and a LCD display. This display output was in a bar-graph format, covering four-decades of information, with 10-segments per decade. The displays accept a frequency input, which is standardly available from several portable radiation-survey instruments. Both readout units will operate on two D-cell batteries (3.0 Volt), with a typical current drain requirement of 0.3 MA for the LED display and 30..mu..A for the LCD display. A wide-range electrometer circuit was also developed. The circuit covers an input current range from 10/sup -13/ A to 10/sup -8/ A. The output signal is a pulse whose frequency is directly proportional to input current. The circuit requires no high-megohm resistors, and is autoranging. Several candidate input amplifiers were analyzed and evaluated for use with the electrometer circuit.

Blalock, T.V.; Kennedy, E.J.; Phillips, R.G.; Walker, E.W. Jr.

1978-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

15

Compensated count-rate circuit for radiation survey meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A count-rate compensating circuit is provided which may be used in a portable Geiger-Mueller (G-M) survey meter to ideally compensate for couting loss errors in the G-M tube detector. In a G-M survey meter, wherein the pulse rate from the G-M tube is converted into a pulse rate current applied to a current meter calibrated to indicate dose rate, the compensation circuit generates and controls a reference voltage in response to the rate of pulses from the detector. This reference voltage is gated to the current-generating circuit at a rate identical to the rate of pulses coming from the detector so that the current flowing through the meter is varied in accordance with both the frequency and amplitude of the reference voltage pulses applied thereto so that the count rate is compensated ideally to indicate a true count rate within 1% up to a 50% duty cycle for the detector. A positive feedback circuit is used to control the reference voltage so that the meter output tracks true count rate indicative of the radiation dose rate.

Todd, R.A.

1980-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

16

NNSA to Conduct Aerial Radiation Assessment Survey in New Jersey...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

412 helicopter, operated by the Remote Sensing Laboratory Aerial Measuring System from Joint Base Andrews, will be equipped with radiation sensing technology. The helicopter will...

17

NNSA to Conduct Aerial Radiation Monitoring Survey over Baltimore...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

occurring background radiation. A twin-engine Bell 412 helicopter, operated by the Remote Sensing Laboratory Aerial Measuring System from Joint Base Andrews, will be...

18

[Wing 1 radiation survey and contamination report]. Final report  

SciTech Connect

We have completed the 5480.11 survey for Wing 1. All area(s)/item(s) requested by the 5480.11 committee have been thoroughly surveyed and documented. Decontamination/disposal of contaminated items has been accomplished. The wing 1 survey was started on 8/13/90 and completed 9/18/90. However, the follow-up surveys were not completed until 2/18/91. We received the final set of smear samples for wing 1 on 1/13/91. A total of 5,495 smears were taken from wing 1 and total of 465 smears were taken during the follow-up surveys. There were a total 122 items found to have fixed contamination and 4 items with smearable contamination in excess of the limits specified in DOE ORDER 5480.11 (AR 3-7). The following area(s)/item(s) were not included in the 5480.11 survey: Hallways, Access panels, Men`s and women`s change rooms, Janitor closets, Wall lockers and item(s) stored in wing 1 hallways and room 1116. If our contract is renewed, we will include those areas in our survey according to your request of April 15, 1991.

Olsen, K.

1991-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

19

Survey Talk--New Laser and Optical RadiationDiagnostics  

SciTech Connect

New techniques am reported for electron beam monitoring, that rely either on the analysis of the properties of wiggler radiation (from static magnetic fields as well as from laser "undulators", also referred to as Thomson scattering) or on the non-linear mixing of laser radiation with electron beam radiation. The different techniques reviewed are capable of providing information on femtosecond time scales and micron or even sub-micron spatial scales. The laser undulator is also proposed as a useful tool for non- destructive measurement of high power electron beams. An example is given of measuring electron beam energy and energy spread through spectral filtering of spontaneous wiggler radiation [1]. A novel technique based on fluctuational characteristics of radiation is described, for single shot, nondestructive measurement of the electron beam bunch length [2,3]. Thomson scattering based beam monitoring techniques are discussed which, through analysis of the radiated beam properties, allow non-destructive detailed measurement of transverse and longitudinal distributions of relativistic electron beams [4]. Two new techniques are discussed which rely on non-linear optical mixing of laser radiation with electron bunch emission: differential optical gating (DOG) [5] and electron bunch length measurement in a storage ring based on sum-frequency generation [6].

Leemans, W.P.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Results of the Association of Directors of Radiation Oncology Programs (ADROP) Survey of Radiation Oncology Residency Program Directors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To survey the radiation oncology residency program directors on the topics of departmental and institutional support systems, residency program structure, Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requirements, and challenges as program director. Methods: A survey was developed and distributed by the leadership of the Association of Directors of Radiation Oncology Programs to all radiation oncology program directors. Summary statistics, medians, and ranges were collated from responses. Results: Radiation oncology program directors had implemented all current required aspects of the ACGME Outcome Project into their training curriculum. Didactic curricula were similar across programs nationally, but research requirements and resources varied widely. Program directors responded that implementation of the ACGME Outcome Project and the external review process were among their greatest challenges. Protected time was the top priority for program directors. Conclusions: The Association of Directors of Radiation Oncology Programs recommends that all radiation oncology program directors have protected time and an administrative stipend to support their important administrative and educational role. Departments and institutions should provide adequate and equitable resources to the program directors and residents to meet increasingly demanding training program requirements.

Harris, Eleanor [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States)], E-mail: Eleanor.Harris@moffitt.org; Abdel-Wahab, May [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Spangler, Ann E. [Moncrief Radiation Oncology Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Lawton, Colleen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Amdur, Robert J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida Shands Cancer Center, Gainesville, FL (United States)

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-agency radiation survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Midnite mine radiation survey 1995. Report of investigations/1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the week of September 4, 1995, personnel from the U.S. Bureau of Mines conducted a Ra-226 survey at the Midnite Mine. One hundred thirty measurements were made on a rectangular grid with 150-m spacings. Concurrently, Shepherd Miller, Inc., took gross gamma readings in micro-R/h at the same grid points. In addition, the USBM collected 17 soil samples to be analyzed for radium, thorium, and potassium. The results of this study are summarized in this report.

Stroud, W.P.; Droullard, R.F.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Fort St. Vrain Decommissioning: Final Site Radiation Survey: Summary Report and Lessons Learned  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the final step in the decommissioning process at Public Service Company of Colorado's (PSCo) Fort St. Vrain nuclear power plant. The final site radiation survey documents that all nuclear facility surfaces meet the established release limits for unrestricted use. The survey formed the legal basis for the termination of the Fort St. Vrain nuclear license, which occurred in August 1997. The lessons learned in this process will be valuable to other utilities with permanently shutdown p...

1998-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

23

Results of the 2004 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO) Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The aim of this study was to document adequacy of training, career plans after residency, use of the in-service examination, and motivation for choice of radiation oncology as a specialty. Methods and Materials: In 2004, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO) conducted a nationwide survey of all radiation oncology residents in the United States. Results: The survey was returned by 297 residents (response rate, 54%). Of the respondents, 29% were female and 71% male. The most popular career choice was joining an established private practice (38%), followed by a permanent academic career (29%). Residents for whom a permanent academic career was not their first choice were asked whether improvements in certain areas would have led them to be more likely to pursue an academic career. The most commonly chosen factors that would have had a strong or moderate influence included higher salary (81%), choice of geographic location (76%), faculty encouragement (68%), and less time commitment (68%). Of respondents in the first 3 years of training, 78% believed that they had received adequate training to proceed to the next level of training. Of those in their fourth year of training, 75% believed that they had received adequate training to enter practice. Conclusions: Multiple factors affect the educational environment of physicians in training. Data describing concerns unique to resident physicians in radiation oncology are limited. The current survey was designed to explore a variety of issues confronting radiation oncology residents. Training programs and the Residency Review Committee should consider these results when developing new policies to improve the educational experiences of residents in radiation oncology.

Patel, Shilpen [University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States)]. E-mail: spatel@umm.edu; Jagsi, Reshma [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Wilson, John [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Frank, Steven [University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Thakkar, Vipul V. [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Hansen, Eric K. [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

Community Surveys: Low Dose Radiation. Fernald, Ohio and Rocky Flats, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

This report is intended to present a basic description of the data from the two community surveys and to document the text of the questions; the methods used for the survey data collection; and a brief overview of the results. Completed surveys were conducted at local communities near the Rocky Flats, Colorado and the Fernald, Ohio sites; no survey was conducted for the Brookhaven, New York site. Fernald. The Fernald sample was randomly selected from 98% of all potential residential telephones in the townships of Ross, Morgan, and Crosby. The only telephone exchanges not used for the Fernald study had 4%, or fewer, of the holders of the telephone numbers actually living in either of the three target townships. Surveying started on July 24, 2001 and finished on August 30, 2001. A total of 399 completed interviews were obtained resulting in a CASRO response rate of 41.8%. The average length of an interview was 16.5 minutes. Rocky Flats. The sample was randomly selected from all potential residential telephones in Arvada and from 99% of the potential telephones in Westminster. Surveying started on August 10, 2001 and finished on September 25, 2001. A total of 401 completed interviews were obtained with a CASRO response rate of 32.5%. The average length of an interview was 15.7 minutes. Overall, respondents hold favorable views of science. They indicate an interest in developments in science and technology, feel that the world is better off because of science, and that science makes our lives healthier, easier, and more comfortable. However, respondents are divided on whether science should decide what is safe or not safe for themselves and their families. The majority of the respondents think that standards for exposure to radiation should be based on what science knows about health effects of radiation and on what is possible with today's technology. Although few respondents had visited the sites, most had heard or read something about Fernald or Rocky Flat s in the media. Impressions of the sites tend to be negative. Most respondents feel that overall their community would be better off without the site. However, when asked about the economic future of their community after cleanup and closure of the site, only 31-43% thought that it will be better, 47-56% thought their local economy will be about the same.

C. K. Mertz; James Flynn; Donald G. MacGregor; Theresa Satterfield; Stephen M. Johnson; Seth Tuler; Thomas Webler

2002-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

25

The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: SCUBA-2 observations of radiative feedback in NGC1333  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present observations of NGC1333 from SCUBA-2 on JCMT, observed as a JCMT Gould Belt Survey pilot project during the shared risk campaign when the first of four arrays was installed at each of 450 and 850 microns. Temperature maps are derived from 450 micron and 850 micron ratios under the assumption of constant dust opacity spectral index beta=1.8. Temperatures indicate that the dust in the northern (IRAS 6/8) region of NGC1333 is hot, 20-40 K, due to heating by the B star SVS3, other young stars in the IR/optically visible cluster, and embedded protostars. Other luminous protostars are also identified by temperature rises at the 17" resolution of the ratio maps (0.02 pc assuming a distance of 250 pc for Perseus). The extensive heating raises the possibility that the radiative feedback may lead to increased masses for the next generation of stars.

Hatchell, J; Drabek, E; Curtis, E; Richer, J; Nutter, D; Di Francesco, J

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Background Radiation Survey of the Radiological/Nuclear Countermeasures Test and Evaluation Center  

SciTech Connect

In preparation for operations at the Radiological/Nuclear Countermeasures Test and Evaluation Complex (Rad/NucCTEC), the Department of Homeland Security Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DHS/DNDO) requested that personnel from the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) conduct a survey of the present radiological conditions at the facility. The measurements consist of the exposure rate from a high-pressure ion chamber (HPIC), high-resolution spectra from a high-purity germanium (HPGe) system in an in situ configuration, and low-resolution spectra from a sodium iodide (NaI) detector in a radiation detection backpack. Measurements with these systems were collected at discrete locations within the facility. Measurements were also collected by carrying the VECTOR backpack throughout the complex to generate a map of the entire area. The area was also to be surveyed with the Kiwi (an array of eight-2-inch x 4-inch x 16-inch NaI detectors) from the Aerial Measuring Systems; however, conflicts with test preparation activities at the site prevented this from being accomplished.

Colin Okada

2010-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

27

How to Detect Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How to Detect Radiation How to Survey Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Detection How...

28

Patterns of Radiotherapy Practice for Pancreatic Cancer in Japan: Results of the Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG) Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the patterns of radiotherapy practice for pancreatic cancer in Japan. Methods and Materials: A questionnaire-based national survey of radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer treated between 2000 and 2006 was conducted by the Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG). Detailed information on 870 patients from 34 radiation oncology institutions was accumulated. Results: The median age of all patients was 64 years (range, 36-88), and 80.2% of the patients had good performance status. More than 85% of patients had clinical Stage T3-T4 disease, and 68.9% of patients had unresectable disease at diagnosis. Concerning radiotherapy (RT), 49.8% of patients were treated with radical external beam RT (EBRT) (median dose, 50.4 Gy), 44.4% of patients were treated with intraoperative RT (median dose, 25 Gy) with or without EBRT (median dose, 45 Gy), and 5.9% of patients were treated with postoperative radiotherapy (median dose, 50 Gy). The treatment field consisted of the primary tumor (bed) only in 55.6% of the patients. Computed tomography-based treatment planning and conformal RT was used in 93.1% and 83.1% of the patients treated with EBRT, respectively. Chemotherapy was used for 691 patients (79.4%; before RT for 66 patients; during RT for 531; and after RT for 364). Gemcitabine was the most frequently used drug, followed by 5-fluorouracil. Conclusion: This study describes the general patterns of RT practice for pancreatic cancer in Japan. Most patients had advanced unresectable disease, and radical EBRT, as well as intraoperative RT with or without EBRT, was frequently used. Chemotherapy with gemcitabine was commonly used in conjunction with RT during the survey period.

Ogawa, Kazuhiko, E-mail: kogawa@med.u-ryukyu.ac.j [Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Ito, Yoshinori [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center, Tokyo (Japan); Karasawa, Katsuyuki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Ogawa, Yoshihiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology, Yamanashi University, Yamanashi (Japan); Kazumoto, Tomoko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan); Shibuya, Keiko [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Shibuya, Hitoshi [Department of Radiology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Okuno, Yoshishige [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, Kobe (Japan); Nishino, Shigeo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sapporo Kosei General Hospital, Sapporo (Japan); Ogo, Etsuyo [Department of Radiology, Kurume University, Kurume (Japan); Uchida, Nobue [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shimane Medical University, Shimane (Japan); Karasawa, Kumiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Juntendo University, Tokyo (Japan); Nemoto, Kenji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yamagata University, Yamagata (Japan); Nishimura, Yasumasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan)

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Radiation tolerance survey of selected silicon photomultipliers to high energy neutron irradiation  

SciTech Connect

A key feature of silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) that can hinder their wider use in medium and high energy physics applications is their relatively high sensitivity to high energy background radiation, with particular regard to high energy neutrons. Dosages of 1010 neq/cm2 can damage them severely. In this study, some standard versions along with some new formulations are irradiated with a high intensity 241AmBe source up to a total dose of 5 × 109 neq/cm2. Key parameters monitored include dark noise, photon detection efficiency (PDE), gain, and voltage breakdown. Only dark noise was found to change significantly for this range of dosage. Analysis of the data indicates that within each vendor's product line, the change in dark noise is very similar as a function of increasing dose. At present, the best strategy for alleviating the effects of radiation damage is to cool the devices to minimize the effects of increased dark noise with accumulated dose.

Barbosa, Fernando J. [JLAB; McKisson, John E. [JLAB; Qiang, Yi [JLAB; Steinberger, William [JLAB; Xi, Wenze [JLAB; Zorn, Carl J. [JLAB

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

A. R. Piooot, Radiation Section ~SIDT.JAI, COXTfGlI:~TIOI~ SURVEY AT JOSLY: STF:L $0.  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

it it ! ( , . /' / c 4!!i!b *. Jhl.l-G The Flies August 22, 1949 A. R. Piooot, Radiation Section ~SIDT.JAI, COXTfGlI:~TIOI~ SURVEY AT JOSLY: STF:L $0. - REFER TO SYw3OL; iXrARP I , c3 ' tz On August I, 1919 the writor visited the Jos lyn Kfg. L: Supply Co. rolling m ill8 at Fort 3'n~qe 1~djan.a. Radlntion zaesxromsnts YICIYJ made with an IDL and a Zouto on contaniqatod floors and xwzhinory involved in previous uranium rolling, Crindiny: 2~ mchininr; oForations. All work on uranium had coasod oxoop~'c for tho ronov-al of drums con- taining scraps and clean up nlatorinl vrhi&h v;ero to bo shippd out the following day. Nost of' thu machiros vroro back in opration on other lmtmiRl8. All AX por8onnal oxpoctod to loavo the following day. Hsoeivinp; and Storup;o Ai?oat

31

Radiators  

SciTech Connect

A heat-exchange radiator is connected to a fluid flow circuit by a connector which provides one member of an interengageable spigot and socket pair for push-fit, fluid-tight, engagement between the connector and the radiator, with latching formations at least one of which is resilient. Preferably the connector carries the spigot which tapers and engages with a socket of corresponding shape, the spigot carrying an O-ring seal and either latching fingers or a resilient latching circlip.

Webster, D. M.

1985-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

32

Results of the 2003 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO) surveys of residents and chief residents in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To document demographic characteristics of current residents, career motivations and aspirations, and training program policies and resources. Methods: In 2003, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO) conducted two nationwide surveys: one of all U.S. radiation oncology residents and one of chief residents. Results: The Chief Residents' Survey was completed by representatives from all 77 programs (response rate, 100%). The Residents' Survey was returned by 229 respondents (response rate, 44%). In each, 32% of respondents were female. The most popular career after residency was private practice (46%), followed by permanent academic practice (28%). Changes that would entice those choosing private practice to consider an academic career included more research experience as a resident (76%), higher likelihood of tenure (69%), lesser time commitment (66%), and higher salary (54%). Although the majority of respondents were satisfied with educational experience overall, a number of programs were reported to provide fewer resources than required. Conclusions: Median program resources and numbers of outliers are documented to allow residents and program directors to assess the relative adequacy of experience in their own programs. Policy-making bodies and individual programs should consider these results when developing interventions to improve educational experiences of residents and to increase retention of radiation oncologists in academic practice.

Jagsi, Reshma [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Buck, David A. [Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, VA (United States); Singh, Anurag K. [Washington University, Seattle, WA (United States); Engleman, Mark [Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Thakkar, Vipul [Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Frank, Steven J. [University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Flynn, Daniel [Holy Family Hospital, Methuen, MA (United States)

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Final Status Survey Report for Corrective Action Unit 117 - Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This document contains the process knowledge, radiological data and subsequent statistical methodology and analysis to support approval for the radiological release of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 117 – Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201 located in Area 26 of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Preparations for release of the building began in 2009 and followed the methodology described in the Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM). MARSSIM is the DOE approved process for release of Real Property (buildings and landmasses) to a set of established criteria or authorized limits. The pre-approved authorized limits for surface contamination values and corresponding assumptions were established by DOE O 5400.5. The release criteria coincide with the acceptance criteria of the U10C landfill permit. The U10C landfill is the proposed location to dispose of the radiologically non-impacted, or “clean,” building rubble following demolition. However, other disposition options that include the building and/or waste remaining at the NNSS may be considered providing that the same release limits apply. The Final Status Survey was designed following MARSSIM guidance by reviewing historical documentation and radiological survey data. Following this review a formal radiological characterization survey was performed in two phases. The characterization revealed multiple areas of residual radioactivity above the release criteria. These locations were remediated (decontaminated) and then the surface activity was verified to be less than the release criteria. Once remediation efforts had been successfully completed, a Final Status Survey Plan (10-015, “Final Status Survey Plan for Corrective Action Unit 117 – Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201”) was developed and implemented to complete the final step in the MARSSIM process, the Final Status Survey. The Final Status Survey Plan consisted of categorizing each individual room into one of three categories: Class 1, Class 2 or Class 3 (a fourth category is a “Non-Impacted Class” which in the case of Building 2201 only pertained to exterior surfaces of the building.) The majority of the rooms were determined to fall in the less restrictive Class 3 category, however, Rooms 102, 104, 106, and 107 were identified as containing Class 1 and 2 areas. Building 2201 was divided into “survey units” and surveyed following the requirements of the Final Status Survey Plan for each particular class. As each survey unit was completed and documented, the survey results were evaluated. Each sample (static measurement) with units of counts per minute (cpm) was corrected for the appropriate background and converted to a value with units of dpm/100 cm2. With a surface contamination value in the appropriate units, it was compared to the surface contamination limits, or in this case the derived concentration guideline level (DCGLw). The appropriate statistical test (sign test) was then performed. If the survey unit was statistically determined to be below the DCGLw, then the survey unit passed and the null hypothesis (that the survey unit is above limits) was rejected. If the survey unit was equal to or below the critical value in the sign test, the null hypothesis was not rejected. This process was performed for all survey units within Building 2201. A total of thirty-three “Class 1,” four “Class 2,” and one “Class 3” survey units were developed, surveyed, and evaluated. All survey units successfully passed the statistical test. Building 2201 meets the release criteria commensurate with the Waste Acceptance Criteria (for radiological purposes) of the U10C landfill permit residing within NNSS boundaries. Based on the thorough statistical sampling and scanning of the building’s interior, Building 2201 may be considered radiologically “clean,” or free of contamination.

Jeremy Gwin and Douglas Frenette

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

34

Radiological Habits Survey: Winfrith, 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.7 Internal exposure 26 4.8 External exposure 30 4.9 Water based activities 31 5 TERRESTRIAL RADIATION exposure 37 6 DIRECT RADIATION PATHWAYS 40 6.1 Direct radiation survey area 40 6.2 Residential activities analysis 19 4 AQUATIC RADIATION PATHWAYS 21 4.1 Aquatic survey area 21 4.2 Commercial fisheries 23 4

35

Results of the 2005-2008 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology Survey of Chief Residents in the United States: Clinical Training and Resident Working Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To document clinical training and resident working conditions reported by chief residents during their residency. Methods and Materials: During the academic years 2005 to 2006, 2006 to 2007, and 2007 to 2008, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology conducted a nationwide survey of all radiation oncology chief residents in the United States. Chi-square statistics were used to assess changes in clinical training and resident working conditions over time. Results: Surveys were completed by representatives from 55 programs (response rate, 71.4%) in 2005 to 2006, 60 programs (75.9%) in 2006 to 2007, and 74 programs (93.7%) in 2007 to 2008. Nearly all chief residents reported receiving adequate clinical experience in commonly treated disease sites, such as breast and genitourinary malignancies; and commonly performed procedures, such as three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Clinical experience in extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy increased over time (p capital costs, such as particle beam therapy and intraoperative radiotherapy, and infrequent clinical use, such as head and neck brachytherapy, were limited to a minority of institutions. Most residency programs associated with at least one satellite facility have incorporated resident rotations into their clinical training, and the majority of residents at these programs find them valuable experiences. The majority of residents reported working 60 or fewer hours per week on required clinical duties. Conclusions: Trends in clinical training and resident working conditions over 3 years are documented to allow residents and program directors to assess their residency training.

Gondi, Vinai, E-mail: gondi@humonc.wisc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wisconsin Comprehensive Cancer Center, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Bernard, Johnny Ray [Mayo Clinic Jacksonville, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Jabbari, Siavash [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Keam, Jennifer [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Amorim Bernstein, Karen L. de [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Dad, Luqman K. [SUNY Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York (United States); Li, Linna [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Poppe, Matthew M. [University of Utah Huntsman Cancer Hospital (United States); Strauss, Jonathan B. [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Chollet, Casey T. [Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Illinois (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

Internet-Based Survey Evaluating Use of Pain Medications and Attitudes of Radiation Oncology Patients Toward Pain Intervention  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Pain is a common symptom among cancer patients, yet many patients do not receive adequate pain management. Few data exist quantifying analgesic use by radiation oncology patients. This study evaluated the causes of pain in cancer patients and investigated the reasons patients fail to receive optimal analgesic therapy. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved, Internet-based questionnaire assessing analgesic use and pain control was posted on the OncoLink (available at (www.oncolink.org)) Website. Between November 2005 and April 2006, 243 patients responded. They were predominantly women (73%), white (71%), and educated beyond high school (67%) and had breast (38%), lung (6%), or ovarian (6%) cancer. This analysis evaluated the 106 patients (44%) who underwent radiotherapy. Results: Of the 106 patients, 58% reported pain from their cancer treatment, and 46% reported pain directly from their cancer. The pain was chronic in 51% and intermittent in 33%. Most (80%) did not use medication to manage their pain. Analgesic use was significantly less in patients with greater education levels (11% vs. 36%, p = 0.002), with a trend toward lower use by whites (16% vs. 32%, p 0.082) and women (17% vs. 29%, p = 0.178). The reasons for not taking analgesics included healthcare provider not recommending medication (87%), fear of addiction or dependence (79%), and inability to pay (79%). Participants experiencing pain, but not taking analgesics, pursued alternative therapies for relief. Conclusions: Many radiation oncology patients experience pain from their disease and cancer treatment. Most study participants did not use analgesics because of concerns of addiction, cost, or failure of the radiation oncologist to recommend medication. Healthcare providers should have open discussions with their patients regarding pain symptoms and treatment.

Simone, Charles B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Radiation Oncology Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)], E-mail: simonec@mail.nih.gov; Vapiwala, Neha; Hampshire, Margaret K.; Metz, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Phase 1 Final status survey plan for the West Valley demonstration project.  

SciTech Connect

This plan provides the technical basis and associated protocols to support Phase 1 final status survey (FSS) data collection and interpretation as part of the West Valley Demonstration Project Phase 1 Decommissioning Plan process. This plan is consistent with the Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM). The Phase 1 Decommissioning Plan provides the relevant derived concentration guideline levels (DCGLs) for the Phase 1 radionuclides of interest. This plan includes protocols that will be applied to the deep excavations planned for Waste Management Area (WMA) 1 and WMA 2, for surface soils outside the WMA 1 and WMA 2 excavations that do not have contamination impacts at depths greater than one meter, and for areas that are used for Phase 1 contaminated soil lay-down purposes. All excavated and lay-down areas will be classified as MARSSIM Class 1 areas. Surface soils that have not been excavated, are not expected to exceed DCGLs, and do not have contamination impacts at depths greater than one meter will be divided into either Class 1 or Class 2 areas depending on the expected potential for surface soil contamination in those areas. The plan uses gamma scans combined with biased soil samples to address DCGLemc concerns. The plan uses systematic soil sampling combined with area factors to address DCGLw and DCGLemc concerns. The Sign test will be used to statistically evaluate DCGLw compliance. If the results from the characterization sampling and analysis plan (CSAP) data collection indicate that background may be a significant issue for Sign test implementation, the Wilcoxon rank sum (WRS) test will be used instead to demonstrate DCGLw compliance. A reference area will be selected on the basis of CSAP data results if the WRS test becomes a necessity. The WMA 1 excavation footprint includes approximately 476 foundation pilings that will be trimmed and left in place. Piling-specific systematic and biased sampling will be conducted to address concerns that these pilings may have served as preferential flow pathways into the underlying Lavery till. Phase 1 FSS data collection results will be summarized, presented, and interpreted in one or more FSS reports.

Johnson, R. L. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

38

A Radiation Badge Survey for Family Members Living With Patients Treated With a {sup 103}Pd Permanent Breast Seed Implant  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Sixty-seven patients with early-stage breast cancer were treated in a Phase I/II clinical trial using a {sup 103}Pd permanent breast seed implant as adjuvant radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery. We report the dose received by family members living with these patients and compare measured doses with theoretical worst-case scenario estimates. Methods and Materials: Exposure-rate measurements were taken at 1 m from the patient by using a calibrated low-energy survey meter. Landauer (Landauer Inc., Glenwood, IL) Luxel badges, with sensitivity of 0.01 mSv, were given to family members to wear after the implantation. Badge readings for 33 spouses and 28 other family members were used to estimate effective doses, and these were compared with theory. Results: Average preimplantation planning target volume from computed tomography was 50.3 ml (range, 18.0-96.7 ml), and average preimplantation distance between the skin and the most anterior planning target volume margin was 0.57 cm. The average maximum exposure rate was measured to be 2.4 {+-} 1.1 mR/h, and average measured dose to a spouse was 0.99 {+-} 1.0 mSv. The calculated exposure rates and spousal doses using preimplantation computed tomography scan data overestimated those measured. Average measured family member dose (excluding spouses) was 0.20 {+-} 0.58 mSv. Conclusions: Based on measured and calculated spousal doses, a permanent breast seed implant using {sup 103}Pd is safe for the public. However, it is recommended that extra precautions in the way of a breast patch be used when patients with an implant will be in the vicinity of toddlers or pregnant women.

Keller, Brian M. [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: brian.keller@sunnybrook.ca; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Rakovitch, Eileen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sankreacha, Raxa; O'Brien, Peter [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

A survey of monitoring and assay systems for release of metals from radiation controlled areas at LANL.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), a recent effort in waste minimization has focused on scrap metal from radiological controlled areas (RCAs). In particular, scrap metal from RCAs needs to be dispositioned in a reasonable and cost effective manner. Recycling of DOE scrap metals from RCAs is currently under a self-imposed moratorium. Since recycling is not available and reuse is difficult, often metal waste from RCAs, which could otherwise be recycled, is disposed of as low-level waste. Estimates at LANL put the cost of low-level waste disposal at $550 to $4000 per cubic meter, depending on the type of waste and the disposal site. If the waste is mixed, the cost for treatment and disposal can be as high as $50,000 per cubic meter. Disposal of scrap metal as low-level waste uses up valuable space in the low-level waste disposal areas and requires transportation to the disposal site under Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations for low-level waste. In contrast, disposal as non-radioactive waste costs as little as $2 per cubic meter. While recycling is unavailable, disposing of the metal at an industrial waste site could be the best solution for this waste stream. A Green Is Clean (GIC) type verification program needs to be in place to provide the greatest assurance that the waste does not contain DOE added radioactivity. This paper is a review of available and emerging radiation monitoring and assay systems that could be used for scrap metal as part of the LANL GIC program.

Gruetzmacher, K. M. (Kathleen M.); MacArthur, D. W. (Duncan W.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Independent Verification Survey of the Clean Coral Storage Pile at the Johnston Atoll Plutonium-Contaminated Soil Remediation Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Technology Section conducted an independent verification (IV) survey of the clean storage pile at the Johnston Atoll Plutonium Contaminated Soil Remediation Project (JAPCSRP) from January 18-25, 1999. The goal of the JAPCSRP is to restore a 24-acre area that was contaminated with plutonium oxide particles during nuclear testing in the 1960s. The selected remedy was a soil sorting operation that combined radiological measurements and mining processes to identify and sequester plutonium-contaminated soil. The soil sorter operated from about 1990 to 1998. The remaining clean soil is stored on-site for planned beneficial use on Johnston Island. The clean storage pile currently consists of approximately 120,000 m{sup 3} of coral. ORNL conducted the survey according to a Sampling and Analysis Plan, which proposed to provide an IV of the clean pile by collecting a minimum number (99) of samples. The goal was to ascertain with 95% confidence whether 97% of the processed soil is less than or equal to the accepted guideline (500-Bq/kg or 13.5-pCi/g) total transuranic (TRU) activity. In previous IV tasks, ORNL has (1) evaluated and tested the soil sorter system software and hardware and (2) evaluated the quality control (QC) program used at the soil sorter plant. The IV has found that the soil sorter decontamination was effective and significantly reduced plutonium contamination in the soil processed at the JA site. The Field Command Defense Threat Reduction Agency currently plans to re-use soil from the clean pile as a cover to remaining contamination in portions of the radiological control area. Therefore, ORNL was requested to provide an IV. The survey team collected samples from 103 random locations within the top 4 ft of the clean storage pile. The samples were analyzed in the on-site radioanalytical counting laboratory with an American Nuclear Systems (ANS) field instrument used for the detection of low-energy radiation. Nine results exceeded the JA soil screening guideline for distributed contamination of 13.5 pCi/g for total TRUs, ranging from 13.7 to 125.9 pCi/g. Because of these results, the goal of showing with 95% confidence that 97% of the processed soil is less than or equal to 13.5 pCi/g-TRU activity cannot be met. The value of 13.5 pCi/g represents the 88th percentile rather than the 95th percentile in a nonparametric one-sided upper 90% confidence limit. Therefore, at the 95% confidence level, 88% of the clean pile is projected to be below the 13.5-pCi/g goal. The Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual recommends use of a nonparametric statistical ''Sign Test'' to demonstrate compliance with release criteria for TRU. Although this survey was not designed to use the sign test, the data herein would demonstrate that the median (50%) of the clean storage pile is below the l3.5-pCi/g derived concentration guideline level. In other words, with the caveat that additional investigation of elevated concentrations was not performed, the data pass the sign test at the 13.5-pCi/g level. Additionally, the lateral extent of the pile was gridded, and 10% of the grid blocks was scanned with field instruments for the detection of low-energy radiation coupled to ratemeter/scalers to screen for the presence of hot particles. No hot particles were detected in the top 1 cm of the grid blocks surveyed.

Wilson-Nichols, M.J.

2000-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-agency radiation survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Radiological Habits Survey: Bradwell, 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.2 Comparisons with previous surveys 55 Table A Comparison between 1999 and 2007 aquatic internal exposure 56 3. METHODS FOR DATA ANALYSIS 19 3.1 Data recording 19 3.2 Data analysis 21 4. AQUATIC RADIATION RADIATION PATHWAYS 41 5.1 Terrestrial survey area 41 5.2 Unusual pathways 42 5.3 Retailers 43 5.4 Food

42

Radiological Habits Survey: Wylfa, 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.7 Internal exposure 28 4.8 External exposure 31 4.9 Water based activities 33 5. TERRESTRIAL RADIATION PATHWAYS 34 5.1 Terrestrial survey area 34 5.2 Wholesalers and retailers 36 5.3 Internal exposure 36 6 analysis 21 4. AQUATIC RADIATION PATHWAYS 23 4.1 Aquatic survey area 23 4.2 Commercial fisheries 25 4

43

Radiation Inspection System Lab (RISL) | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Inspection System Lab May 30, 2013 This team has the background and experience to test and optimize radiation detection systems from handheld background survey meters to...

44

Radiological Habits Survey: Amersham, 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.4 Wholesalers and retailers 29 4.5 Internal exposure 29 4.6 External exposure 30 4.7 Water based activities 32 5. TERRESTRIAL RADIATION PATHWAYS 35 5.1 Terrestrial survey area 35 5.2 Wholesalers and retailers 39 5.3 Internal exposure 39 6. DIRECT RADIATION PATHWAYS 43 6.1 Direct radiation survey area 43 6.2 Residential activities

45

Radiological Habits Survey, Dounreay, 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.5 Internal exposure 25 4.6 External exposure 28 5. TERRESTRIAL RADIATION PATHWAYS 32 5.1 Terrestrial survey area and local produce 32 5.2 Novel radiation pathways 33 5.3 Land cover 33 5.4 Internal exposure 34 5 conversion 14 3.2 Determination of critical groups 14 4. AQUATIC RADIATION PATHWAYS 18 4.1 Aquatic survey

46

Obama Administration Launches $26 Million Multi-Agency Competition...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

grant competitions. More than a dozen federal agencies have participated in TARIC-led grant competitions by providing grant funding or other forms of support to the winners...

47

AERIAL RADIOLOGICAL SURVEYS  

SciTech Connect

Measuring terrestrial gamma radiation from airborne platforms has proved to be a useful method for characterizing radiation levels over large areas. Over 300 aerial radiological surveys have been carried out over the past 25 years including U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites, commercial nuclear power plants, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program/Uranium Mine Tailing Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP/UMTRAP) sites, nuclear weapons test sites, contaminated industrial areas, and nuclear accident sites. This paper describes the aerial measurement technology currently in use by the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) for routine environmental surveys and emergency response activities. Equipment, data-collection and -analysis methods, and examples of survey results are described.

Proctor, A.E.

1997-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

48

Radiological Habits Survey: Berkeley and Oldbury, 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aquatic internal exposure 63 pathways at Berkeley and Oldbury Table B Comparison between 2001 and 2007 of the survey 18 3. METHODS FOR DATA ANALYSIS 22 3.1 Data recording 22 3.2 Data analysis 24 4. AQUATIC RADIATION. TERRESTRIAL RADIATION PATHWAYS 45 5.1 Terrestrial survey area 45 5.2 Unusual pathways 48 5.3 Wholesalers

49

September 2007 Visual Sample Plan Version 5.08.1 8.0 References  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory, Richland, Washington. Gilbert, R. O. 2003. Results of QA Testing of the Visual Sample Plan (VSP) Collaborative Sampling (CS) Module PNNL Milestone Report to EPA Quality Staff, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington. EPA. 1997. Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual

50

September 2004 7.1 Visual Sample Plan Version 3.0 7.0 References  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Results of QA Testing of the Visual Sample Plan (VSP) Collaborative Sampling (CS) Module PNNL Milestone Report to EPA Quality Staff, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington EPA. 1997. Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM). EPA 402-R-97-016, NUREG-1575, U.S. Environmental

51

Radiological Habits Survey: Hunterston, 2007 This page has been intentionally left blank  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

..................................................................................................23 4.7 Internal exposure..... .................................................................15 Figure 2 The Hunterston terrestrial (outer ring) and direct radiation (inner ring) survey areas AQUATIC RADIATION PATHWAYS ...........................................................................21 4

52

Survey Expectations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Michigan and is known as the Michigan survey, with many other similar surveys conducted across OECD countries so as to provide up to date information on consumer expectations. Questions on expectations are also sometimes included in panel surveys... be formed, do of course make it possible to assess whether, or how far, such expectations are well-founded by comparing the experiences of individual households with their prior expectations. A key aspect of the Michigan survey, and of many other more recent...

Pesaran, M Hashem; Weale, Martin

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

53

Measuring Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement Activity SI Units and Prefixes Conversions Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration...

54

Fundamentals of health physics for the radiation-protection officer  

SciTech Connect

The contents of this book on health physics include chapters on properties of radioactive materials, radiation instrumentation, radiation protection programs, radiation survey programs, internal exposure, external exposure, decontamination, selection and design of radiation facilities, transportation of radioactive materials, radioactive waste management, radiation accidents and emergency preparedness, training, record keeping, quality assurance, and appraisal of radiation protection programs. (ACR)

Murphy, B.L.; Traub, R.J.; Gilchrist, R.L.; Mann, J.C.; Munson, L.H.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Baer, J.L.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Survey Statisticians  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Survey Statisticians Survey Statisticians The U.S.Energy Information Administration (EIA) within the Department of Energy has forged a world-class information program that stresses quality, teamwork, and employee growth. In support of our program, we offer a variety of profes- sional positions, including the Survey Statistician, who measures the amounts of energy produced and consumed in the United States. Responsibilities: Survey Statisticians perform or participate in one or more of the following important functions: * Design energy surveys by writing questions, creating layouts and testing questions for clarity and accuracy. * Conduct energy surveys to include sending out and tracking survey responses, editing and analyzing data submis- sions and communicating with respondents to verify data.

56

Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists Author Directional Surveying Specialists Published Publisher Not Provided, 2012 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists Citation Directional Surveying Specialists. Digital Surveying Directional Surveying Specialists [Internet]. 2012. [cited 2013/10/08]. Available from: http://www.digitalsurveying.co.za/services/geophysical-borehole-surveying/overview/optical-televiewer/ Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Digital_Surveying_Directional_Surveying_Specialists&oldid=690244"

57

SCO Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Survey on Future of NIST's Standards Information Services. June 5, 2013. *. Bookmark and Share. Contact: Clare Allocca 301-975-4359. ...

2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

58

Radiological Habits Survey, Faslane, 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.3 Land cover 24 5.4 Internal exposure 25 6. DIRECT RADIATION 26 7. COMBINED PATHWAYS 28 8. CONCLUSIONS.5 Wildfowling 18 4.6 Internal exposure 19 4.7 External exposure 21 4.8 Water based activities 22 5. TERRESTRIAL.2 Determination of critical groups 11 3.3 Data analysis 11 4. AQUATIC RADIATION PATHWAYS 15 4.1 Aquatic survey

59

Radiological Habits Survey: Devonport, 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

36 5.2 Wholesalers and retailers 38 5.3 Internal exposure 38 6. DIRECT RADIATION PATHWAYS 42 6.4 Wholesalers and retailers 28 4.5 Wildfowl 28 4.6 Other pathways 28 4.7 Internal exposure 29 4.8 External exposure 31 4.9 Water based activities 34 5. TERRESTRIAL RADIATION PATHWAYS 36 5.1 Terrestrial survey area

60

Radiological Habits Survey: Dungeness, 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

44 5.2 Wholesalers and retailers 47 5.3 Internal exposure 47 6. DIRECT RADIATION PATHWAYS 50 6.4 Wholesalers and retailers 34 4.5 Wildfowl 35 4.6 Other pathways 35 4.7 Internal exposure 36 4.8 External exposure 39 4.9 Water based activities 42 5. TERRESTRIAL RADIATION PATHWAYS 44 5.1 Terrestrial survey area

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-agency radiation survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Radiological Habits Survey: Trawsfynydd, 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5.2 Wholesalers and retailers 36 5.3 Internal exposure 36 6. DIRECT RADIATION PATHWAYS 40 6.1 Direct.3 Angling 28 4.4 Wholesalers and retailers 28 4.5 Wildfowl 28 4.6 Internal exposure 29 4.7 External exposure analysis 22 4. AQUATIC RADIATION PATHWAYS 25 4.1 Aquatic survey area 25 4.2 Commercial fisheries 27 4

62

Radiological Habits Survey, Chapelcross, 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and local produce 25 5.2 Novel radiation pathways 26 5.3 Land cover 26 5.4 Internal exposure 27 6. DIRECT fisheries 18 4.3 Angling 19 4.4 Seafood wholesalers and retailers 19 4.5 Internal exposure 20 4.6 External exposure 22 4.7 Water based activities 23 5. TERRESTRIAL RADIATION PATHWAYS 25 5.1 Terrestrial survey area

63

Radiological Habits Survey, Hunterston 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and local produce 25 5.2 Novel radiation pathways 26 5.3 Land cover 26 5.4 Internal exposure 27 5.5 External fisheries 18 4.3 Angling and hobby fishing 19 4.4 Seafood wholesalers and retailers 19 4.5 Internal exposure 19 4.6 External exposure 23 5. TERRESTRIAL RADIATION PATHWAYS 25 5.1 Terrestrial survey area

64

Radiological Habits Survey: Sizewell, 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.1 Terrestrial survey area 38 5.2 Wholesalers and retailers 40 5.3 Internal exposure 40 6. DIRECT RADIATION fishing 29 4.4 Wholesalers and retailers 30 4.5 Wildfowl 30 4.6 Other pathways 30 4.7 Internal exposure 31 4.8 External exposure 34 4.9 Water based activities 36 5. TERRESTRIAL RADIATION PATHWAYS 38 5

65

Robotic Surveying  

SciTech Connect

ZAPATA ENGINEERING challenged our engineers and scientists, which included robotics expertise from Carnegie Mellon University, to design a solution to meet our client's requirements for rapid digital geophysical and radiological data collection of a munitions test range with no down-range personnel. A prime concern of the project was to minimize exposure of personnel to unexploded ordnance and radiation. The field season was limited by extreme heat, cold and snow. Geographical Information System (GIS) tools were used throughout this project to accurately define the limits of mapped areas, build a common mapping platform from various client products, track production progress, allocate resources and relate subsurface geophysical information to geographical features for use in rapidly reacquiring targets for investigation. We were hopeful that our platform could meet the proposed 35 acres per day, towing both a geophysical package and a radiological monitoring trailer. We held our breath and crossed our fingers as the autonomous Speedrower began to crawl across the playa lakebed. We met our proposed production rate, and we averaged just less than 50 acres per 12-hour day using the autonomous platform with a path tracking error of less than +/- 4 inches. Our project team mapped over 1,800 acres in an 8-week (4 days per week) timeframe. The expertise of our partner, Carnegie Mellon University, was recently demonstrated when their two autonomous vehicle entries finished second and third at the 2005 Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Grand Challenge. 'The Grand Challenge program was established to help foster the development of autonomous vehicle technology that will some day help save the lives of Americans who are protecting our country on the battlefield', said DARPA Grand Challenge Program Manager, Ron Kurjanowicz. Our autonomous remote-controlled vehicle (ARCV) was a modified New Holland 2550 Speedrower retrofitted to allow the machine-actuated functions to be controlled by an onboard computer. The computer-controlled Speedrower was developed at Carnegie Mellon University to automate agricultural harvesting. Harvesting tasks require the vehicle to cover a field using minimally overlapping rows at slow speeds in a similar manner to geophysical data acquisition. The Speedrower had demonstrated its ability to perform as it had already logged hundreds of acres of autonomous harvesting. This project is the first use of autonomous robotic technology on a large-scale for geophysical surveying.

Suzy Cantor-McKinney; Michael Kruzic

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Survey Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

fsidentoi fsidentoi Survey Consumption and 'Expenditures, April 1981 March 1982 Energy Information Administration Wasningtoa D '" N """"*"""*"Nlwr. . *'.;***** -. Mik>. I This publication is available from ihe your COr : 20585 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consum ption and Expendi tures, April 1981 Through March 1982 Part 2: Regional Data Prepared by: Bruce Egan This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administra tion, the independent statistical

67

Climate Survey  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations Employee Operations Employee Climate Survey March 2009 Acknowledgements The Berkeley Lab Survey Team consisted of the following: Jim Krupnick, Sponsor Vera Potapenko, Project Lead Karen Ramorino, Project Manager Chris Paquette, MOR Associates Alexis Bywater, MOR Associates MOR Associates, an external consulting firm, acted as project manager for this effort, analyzing the data and preparing this report. MOR Associates specializes in continuous improve- ment, strategic thinking and leadership development. MOR Associates has conducted a number of large-scale surveys for organizations in higher education, including MIT, Stanford, the University of Chicago, and others. MOR Associates, Inc. 462 Main Street, Suite 300 Watertown, MA 02472 tel: 617.924.4501

68

VLBI surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Systematic surveys of astronomical objects often lead to discoveries, but always provide invaluable information for statistical studies of well-defined samples. They also promote follow-up investigations of individual objects or classes. Surveys using a yet unexplored observing wavelength, a novel technique or a new instrument are of special importance. Significantly improved observing parameters (e.g. sensitivity, angular resolution, monitoring capability) provide new insight into the morphological and physical properties of the objects studied. I give a brief overview of the important Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) imaging surveys conducted in the past. A list of surveys guides us through the developments up until the present days. I also attempt to show directions for the near future.

S. Frey

2006-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

69

Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield Review, 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2. Survey area 3 3. Conduct of survey 3 4. Data analysis 4 4.1 Internal exposure 4 Figure 2 Critical;3 1. Introduction This report describes a review of public radiation exposure pathways due to liquid 1996-2005 5 4.2 External exposure 6 5. Conclusions 7 6. Recommendations 7 7. References 7 Figure 1

70

About Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation What is radiation? Radiation is a form of energy that is a part of our everyday lives. All of us receive a "dose" of radiation each day. Most of the dose comes from...

71

Radiological Habits Survey: Aldermaston/Burghfield, 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.3 Internal exposure 30 6 ALDERMASTON DIRECT RADIATION 33 6.1 Direct radiation survey area 33 6.2 Residential pathways 22 4.5 Internal exposure 23 4.6 External exposure 25 4.7 Water based activities 26 5 TERRESTRIAL 3 METHODS FOR DATA ANALYSIS 16 3.1 Data recording 16 3.2 Data analysis 18 4 AQUATIC RADIATION

72

Alpha Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics of Radiation Basics of Radiation Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Basics of Radiation Characteristics of Alpha Radiation 1. Alpha radiation is not able to penetrate skin. 2. Alpha-emitting materials can be harmful to humans if the materials are inhaled, swallowed, or absorbed through open wounds. 3. A variety of instruments have been designed to measure alpha radiation. Special training in use of these instruments is essential for making accurate measurements. 4. A civil defense instrument (CD V-700) cannot detect the presence of radioactive materials that produce alpha radiation unless the radioactive materials also produce beta and/or gamma radiation.

73

Radiation: Radiation Control (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

It is the policy of the state to encourage the constructive uses of radiation and to control its harmful effects. This section contains regulations pertaining to the manufacture, use,...

74

Protection Against Ionizing Radiation in Extreme Radiation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Protection Against Ionizing Radiation in Extreme Radiation-resistant Microorganisms. ... Elucidated radiation protection by intracellular halides. ...

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Radiological Habits Survey, HM Naval Base Clyde, Faslane 2000  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wholesalers and retailers 17 4.5 Internal exposure 17 4.6 External exposure 19 5. TERRESTRIAL RADIATION pathways 22 5.3 Land cover 22 5.4 Internal exposure 23 5.5 External radiation 25 6. COMBINED PATHWAYS 26 7 conversion 10 3.2 Determination of critical groups 11 4. AQUATIC RADIATION PATHWAYS 14 4.1 Aquatic survey

76

Beta Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beta Radiation 1. Beta radiation may travel meters in air and is moderately penetrating. 2. Beta radiation can penetrate human skin to the "germinal layer," where new skin cells...

77

RADIATION MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Monitoring for Radiation Protection of Workers" in ICRPNo. 9, in "Advances in Radiation Protection and Dosimetry inDosimetry f o r Stray Radiation Monitoring on the CERN S i t

Thomas, R.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

USE OF THE AERIAL MEASUREMENT SYSTEM HELICOPTER EMERGENCY RESPONSE ACQUISITION SYSTEMS WITH GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM FOR RADIOACTIVE SOIL REMEDIATION - [11504  

SciTech Connect

The Aerial Measurement System (AMS) Helicopter Emergency Response Acquisition System provides a thorough and economical means to identify and characterize the contaminants for large area radiological surveys. The helicopter system can provide a 100-percent survey of an area that qualifies as a scoping survey under the Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM) methodology. If the sensitivity is adequate when compared to the clean up values, it may also be used for the characterization survey. The data from the helicopter survey can be displayed and manipulated to provide invaluable data during remediation activities.

BROCK CT

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

79

JOM Salary Survey - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

JOM Salary Survey. This survey is currently closed. Please contact the author of this survey for further assistance. Javascript is required for this site to function, ...

80

Radiological Habits Survey: Hartlepool, 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.4 Seafood wholesalers and retailers 27 4.5 Wildfowl 28 4.6 Other food pathways 28 4.7 Internal exposure 29 4.8 External exposure 32 4.9 Water based activities 35 5. TERRESTRIAL RADIATION PATHWAYS 36 5.1 Terrestrial survey area 36 5.2 Terrestrial food wholesalers and retailers 38 5.3 Internal exposure 38 6. DIRECT

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-agency radiation survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Radiological Habits Survey: Cardiff, 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.4 Seafood wholesalers and retailers 26 4.5 Wildfowl 26 4.6 Internal exposure 27 4.7 External exposure 29 4.2 Terrestrial food wholesalers and retailers 37 5.3 Internal exposure 37 6. COMBINED PATHWAYS 41 7. CONCLUSIONS of the survey 15 3. METHODS FOR DATA ANALYSIS 18 3.1 Data recording 18 3.2 Data analysis 20 4. AQUATIC RADIATION

82

Radiological Habits Survey: Sellafield, 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.4 Seafood wholesalers and retailers 28 4.5 Wildfowl 28 4.6 Other pathways 29 4.7 Internal exposure 29 4.8 External exposure 33 4.9 Water based activities 36 5. TERRESTRIAL RADIATION PATHWAYS 38 5.1 Terrestrial survey area 38 5.2 Terrestrial food wholesalers and retailers 41 5.3 Internal exposure 41 6. DIRECT

83

2012 NERSC User Survey  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Results 2012 User Survey Text 2012 NERSC User Survey Text The 2012 NERSC User Survey is closed. The following is the text of the survey. Section 1: Overall Satisfaction with...

84

Optical Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Optical Radiation Measurements. Fees for services are located directly below the technical contacts ...

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

85

Ionizing Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Ionizing Radiation Measurements. Fees for services are located directly below the technical contacts ...

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

86

Definition: Near Infrared Surveys | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Near Infrared Surveys Near Infrared Surveys Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Near Infrared Surveys Near infrared surveys refer to multi- and hyperspectral data collected in the region just outside wavelengths detectable by the human eye. Near infrared wavelengths are generally considered to be between approximately 0.75-1.4 micrometers. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Infrared (IR) light is electromagnetic radiation with longer wavelengths than those of visible light, extending from the nominal red edge of the visible spectrum at 700 nanometres (nm) to 1 mm. This range of wavelengths corresponds to a frequency range of approximately 430 THz down to 300 GHz, and includes most of the thermal radiation emitted by objects near room temperature. Infrared light is emitted or absorbed by molecules

87

Radiological Habits Survey, Rosyth Business Park, 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.3 Land cover 17 5.4 Internal exposure 17 6. DIRECT RADIATION 18 7. COMBINED PATHWAYS 19 8. CONCLUSIONS.5 Wildfowling 14 4.6 Internal exposure 14 4.7 External exposure 15 4.8 Water based activities 16 5. TERRESTRIAL 3.2 Determination of critical groups 8 4. AQUATIC RADIATION PATHWAYS 9 4.1 Aquatic survey area 9 4

88

Radiation Physics Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Radiation Physics Portal. Radiation Physics Portal. ... more. >> see all Radiation Physics programs and projects ... ...

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

89

About Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Radiation What is radiation? Radiation is a form of energy that is a part of our everyday lives. All of us receive a "dose" of radiation each day. Most of the dose comes from naturally occurring radioactive materials such as uranium, thorium, radon, and certain forms of potassium and carbon. The air we breathe contains radon, the food we eat contains uranium and thorium from the soil, and our bodies contain radioactive forms of potassium and carbon. Cosmic radiation from the sun also contributes to our natural radiation dose. We also receive radiation doses from man-made sources such as X-rays, nuclear medical procedures, power plants, smoke detectors and older television sets. Some people, such as nuclear plant operators, flight crews, and nuclear medicine staff may also receive an occupational radiation dose.

90

Radiation Cataract  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

radiation including patients undergoing diagnostic CT scans or radiotherapy, atomic bomb survivors, residents of radioactively contaminated buildings, victims of the...

91

Industry Survey of Radioactive Material Control Practices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Workers and materials entering and exiting the radiation control areas (RCAs) of nuclear power plants are carefully monitored for radioactivity. This report documents a survey developed to evaluate the range of instrumentation and practices used by the industry for performing such measurements.

2003-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

92

1998 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 User Survey Results 1998 User Survey Results Respondent Summary NERSC has completed its first user survey since its move to Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The survey is...

93

Autonomous mobile robot for radiologic surveys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is described for conducting radiologic surveys. The apparatus comprises in the main a robot capable of following a preprogrammed path through an area, a radiation monitor adapted to receive input from a radiation detector assembly, ultrasonic transducers for navigation and collision avoidance, and an on-board computer system including an integrator for interfacing the radiation monitor and the robot. Front and rear bumpers are attached to the robot by bumper mounts. The robot may be equipped with memory boards for the collection and storage of radiation survey information. The on-board computer system is connected to a remote host computer via a UHF radio link. The apparatus is powered by a rechargeable 24-volt DC battery, and is stored at a docking station when not in use and/or for recharging. A remote host computer contains a stored database defining paths between points in the area where the robot is to operate, including but not limited to the locations of walls, doors, stationary furniture and equipment, and sonic markers if used. When a program consisting of a series of paths is downloaded to the on-board computer system, the robot conducts a floor survey autonomously at any preselected rate. When the radiation monitor detects contamination, the robot resurveys the area at reduced speed and resumes its preprogrammed path if the contamination is not confirmed. If the contamination is confirmed, the robot stops and sounds an alarm. 5 figures.

Dudar, A.M.; Wagner, D.G.; Teese, G.D.

1994-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

94

Autonomous mobile robot for radiologic surveys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for conducting radiologic surveys. The apparatus comprises in the main a robot capable of following a preprogrammed path through an area, a radiation monitor adapted to receive input from a radiation detector assembly, ultrasonic transducers for navigation and collision avoidance, and an on-board computer system including an integrator for interfacing the radiation monitor and the robot. Front and rear bumpers are attached to the robot by bumper mounts. The robot may be equipped with memory boards for the collection and storage of radiation survey information. The on-board computer system is connected to a remote host computer via a UHF radio link. The apparatus is powered by a rechargeable 24-volt DC battery, and is stored at a docking station when not in use and/or for recharging. A remote host computer contains a stored database defining paths between points in the area where the robot is to operate, including but not limited to the locations of walls, doors, stationary furniture and equipment, and sonic markers if used. When a program consisting of a series of paths is downloaded to the on-board computer system, the robot conducts a floor survey autonomously at any preselected rate. When the radiation monitor detects contamination, the robot resurveys the area at reduced speed and resumes its preprogrammed path if the contamination is not confirmed. If the contamination is confirmed, the robot stops and sounds an alarm.

Dudar, Aed M. (Augusta, GA); Wagner, David G. (Augusta, GA); Teese, Gregory D. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Radiation Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

should be worn when working with all liquid radioisotopes. Before leaving the lab, wash your hands thoroughly then check for possible contamination with a survey instrument....

96

Radiation Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Information << Timeline >> Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player. Get Adobe Flash player July 31, 1942 The Army Corp of Engineers leases...

97

MULTI-POINT RADIATION MONITOR  

SciTech Connect

A unique radiation monitor has been developed for performing wide-area field surveys for radiation sources. This device integrates the real-time output of multiple radiation detectors into a hand-held personal computer (e.g., a PDA) containing an intuitive graphical user interface. An independent hardware module supplies high voltage to the detectors and contains a rapid sampling system for transferring the detector count rates through an interface to the PDA. The imbedded firmware can be changed for various applications using a programmable memory card. As presently configured, the instrument contains a series of Geiger-Mueller (GM) tubes in a flexible detector string. This linear array of multiple sensors can be used by US Coast Guard and Customs container inspection personnel to measure radiation intensity in stacks of transport containers where physical access is impeded.

Hofstetter, K; Donna Beals, D; Ken Odell, K; Robert Eakle, R; Russell Huffman, R; Larry Harpring, L

2006-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

98

Medical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Ever since the first diagnostic x-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of x-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatic needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved.

Thomlinson, W.

1991-10-00T23:59:59.000Z

99

Medical applications of synchrotron radiation  

SciTech Connect

Ever since the first diagnostic x-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of x-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatic needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved.

Thomlinson, W.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Definition of Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-agency radiation survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

User_LaunchSurvey  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Completing Assigned Survey and Completing Assigned Survey © 2011 SuccessFactors, Inc. - 1 - SuccessFactors Learning Confidential. All rights reserved. Job Aid: Launching and Completing Assigned Survey Purpose The purpose of this job aid is to guide users through the step-by-step process of launching and completing assigned surveys. Task A. Launch and Complete Assigned Survey From the Home page, filter the To-Do List to show only Surveys. Hover over the course evaluation title. Click Open. 1 2 3 3 2 1 Launch and Complete Assigned Survey 6 Steps Task A SuccessFactors Learning v 6.4 User Job Aid Launching and Completing Assigned Survey © 2011 SuccessFactors, Inc. - 2 - SuccessFactors Learning Complete the survey by selecting the radio button for the appropriate rating

102

ENERGY MEASUREMENTS GROUP EG&G Survey Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

kL2' kL2' . ",- - &j EGG0 ENERGY MEASUREMENTS GROUP EG&G Survey Report NRC-81 09 April 1981 . AN AERIAL RADIOLOGIC SURVEY OF THE STEPAN CHEMCIAL COMPANY AND SURROUNDING AREA MAYWOOD, N E W JERSEY DATE OF SURVEY: 26 JANUARY 1981 J.R. Mueller Project Director S.A. Gunn Project Scientist APPROVED FOR DISTRIBUTION W . John Tipton, Head Radiation Sciences Section This Document is UNCLASSIFIED G. P. Stobie Classification Officer This work was performed by EG&G for the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission through an EAO transfer of funds to Contract No. DE-AC08-76NV01183 with the United States Department of Energy. 3 ABSTRACT An aerial radiologic survey to measure terrestrial gamma radiation was performed in Maywood, New Jersey over the Stepan Chemical Company and thesurrounding area. This survey was conducted by EG&G for the

103

ORISE: Characterization surveys  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization surveys Characterization surveys An ORISE technicians performs a characterization survey The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) performs independent, objective characterization surveys to define the extent of radiological contamination at sites scheduled for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). A fundamental aspect of all D&D projects, characterization surveys provide guidance to determine the best remediation procedures and are a cost-effective method of ensuring a site meets preliminary regulatory standards. ORISE designs characterization surveys using the data quality objectives process. This approach focuses on the particular objective of characterization, and ensures that only the data needed to address the characterization decisions are collected. Data collection efforts are

104

BWR radiation control: plant demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first year's progress is presented for a four-year program intended to implement and evaluate BRAC radiation reduction operational guidelines at the Vermont Yankee BWR and to document the results in sufficient detail to provide guidance to other BWR owners. Past operational, chemistry and radiation level data have been reviewed to provide a historical base of reference. Extensive sampling and chemistry monitoring systems have been installed to evaluate plant chemistry status and the effects of program implemented changes. Radiation surveys and piping gamma scans are being performed at targeted locations to quantify radiation level trends and to identify and quantify piping isotopics. Contact radiation levels on the recirculation line at Vermont Yankee have been increasing at a rate of 175 mR/h-EFPY since 1978. A materials survey of feedwater and reactor components in contact with the process liquid has been performed to identify sources of corrosion product release, particularly cobalt and nickel. A feedwater oxygen injection system has been installed to evaluate the effects of oxygen control on feedwater materials corrosion product releases. A baseline performance evaluation of the condensate treatment and reactor water cleanup systems has been completed. Data on organics and ionics at Vermont Yankee have been obtained. A methodology of BWR feedwater system layup during extended outages was developed, and an evaluation performed of layup and startup practices utilized at Vermont Yankee during the fall 1980 and 1981 refueling outages.

Palino, G.F.; Hobart, R.L.; Wall, P.S.; Sawochka, S.G.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even though the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even through the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, R.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Radiation Hydrodynamics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The discipline of radiation hydrodynamics is the branch of hydrodynamics in which the moving fluid absorbs and emits electromagnetic radiation, and in so doing modifies its dynamical behavior. That is, the net gain or loss of energy by parcels of the fluid material through absorption or emission of radiation are sufficient to change the pressure of the material, and therefore change its motion; alternatively, the net momentum exchange between radiation and matter may alter the motion of the matter directly. Ignoring the radiation contributions to energy and momentum will give a wrong prediction of the hydrodynamic motion when the correct description is radiation hydrodynamics. Of course, there are circumstances when a large quantity of radiation is present, yet can be ignored without causing the model to be in error. This happens when radiation from an exterior source streams through the problem, but the latter is so transparent that the energy and momentum coupling is negligible. Everything we say about radiation hydrodynamics applies equally well to neutrinos and photons (apart from the Einstein relations, specific to bosons), but in almost every area of astrophysics neutrino hydrodynamics is ignored, simply because the systems are exceedingly transparent to neutrinos, even though the energy flux in neutrinos may be substantial. Another place where we can do ''radiation hydrodynamics'' without using any sophisticated theory is deep within stars or other bodies, where the material is so opaque to the radiation that the mean free path of photons is entirely negligible compared with the size of the system, the distance over which any fluid quantity varies, and so on. In this case we can suppose that the radiation is in equilibrium with the matter locally, and its energy, pressure and momentum can be lumped in with those of the rest of the fluid. That is, it is no more necessary to distinguish photons from atoms, nuclei and electrons, than it is to distinguish hydrogen atoms from helium atoms, for instance. There are all just components of a mixed fluid in this case. So why do we have a special subject called ''radiation hydrodynamics'', when photons are just one of the many kinds of particles that comprise our fluid? The reason is that photons couple rather weakly to the atoms, ions and electrons, much more weakly than those particles couple with each other. Nor is the matter-radiation coupling negligible in many problems, since the star or nebula may be millions of mean free paths in extent. Radiation hydrodynamics exists as a discipline to treat those problems for which the energy and momentum coupling terms between matter and radiation are important, and for which, since the photon mean free path is neither extremely large nor extremely small compared with the size of the system, the radiation field is not very easy to calculate. In the theoretical development of this subject, many of the relations are presented in a form that is described as approximate, and perhaps accurate only to order of {nu}/c. This makes the discussion cumbersome. Why are we required to do this? It is because we are using Newtonian mechanics to treat our fluid, yet its photon component is intrinsically relativistic; the particles travel at the speed of light. There is a perfectly consistent relativistic kinetic theory, and a corresponding relativistic theory of fluid mechanics, which is perfectly suited to describing the photon gas. But it is cumbersome to use this for the fluid in general, and we prefer to avoid it for cases in which the flow velocity satisfies {nu} << c. The price we pay is to spend extra effort making sure that the source-sink terms relating to our relativistic gas component are included in the equations of motion in a form that preserves overall conservation of energy and momentum, something that would be automatic if the relativistic equations were used throughout.

Castor, J I

2003-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

108

INFRASTRUCTURE SURVEY 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10 Appendices Appendix 1. Glossary of Terminology and Definitions 11 Appendix 2. Survey Definitions. There is a Glossary of Terminology and Definitions (Appendix 1). The survey form is Appendix 3 of this Report

109

RADIATION DETECTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector of the type is described wherein a condenser is directly connected to the electrodes for the purpose of performing the dual function of a guard ring and to provide capacitance coupling for resetting the detector system.

Wilson, H.N.; Glass, F.M.

1960-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

110

NIST Radiation thermometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation thermometry. Summary: ... Description: Radiation thermometers are calibrated using a range of variable-temperature blackbodies. ...

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

111

NIST Optical Radiation Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical Radiation Group. Welcome. The Optical Radiation Group maintains, improves, and disseminates the national scales ...

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

112

Environmental Survey preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Sandia National Laboratories conducted August 17 through September 4, 1987. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with Sandia National Laboratories-Albuquerque (SNLA). The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at SNLA, and interviews with site personnel. 85 refs., 49 figs., 48 tabs.

Not Available

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Infrared Surveys for AGN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From the earliest extragalactic infrared studies AGN have shown themselves to be strong infrared sources and IR surveys have revealed new populations of AGN. I briefly review current motivations for AGN surveys in the infrared and results from previous IR surveys. The Luminous Infrared Galaxies, which in some cases house dust-enshrouded AGN, submillimeter surveys, and recent studies of the cosmic x-ray and infrared backgrounds suggest that there is a population of highly-obscured AGN at high redshift. ISO Surveys have begun to resolve the infrared background and may have detected this obscured AGN population. New infrared surveys, particularly the SIRTF Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic Legacy Survey (SWIRE), will detect this population and provide a platform for understanding the evolution of AGN, Starbursts and passively evolving galaxies in the context of large-scale structure and environment.

Smith, H E

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Infrared Surveys for AGN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From the earliest extragalactic infrared studies AGN have shown themselves to be strong infrared sources and IR surveys have revealed new populations of AGN. I briefly review current motivations for AGN surveys in the infrared and results from previous IR surveys. The Luminous Infrared Galaxies, which in some cases house dust-enshrouded AGN, submillimeter surveys, and recent studies of the cosmic x-ray and infrared backgrounds suggest that there is a population of highly-obscured AGN at high redshift. ISO Surveys have begun to resolve the infrared background and may have detected this obscured AGN population. New infrared surveys, particularly the SIRTF Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic Legacy Survey (SWIRE), will detect this population and provide a platform for understanding the evolution of AGN, Starbursts and passively evolving galaxies in the context of large-scale structure and environment.

Harding E. Smith

2002-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

115

3D Radiation Field Estimation Algorithm v1.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The product is a calculational subprogram to be used within CAD, Laser scan or GIS software products to extrapolate / interpolate gamma radiation dose rates at 3-D locations for which no field survey data had been ...

2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

116

Radiation receiver  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles. 5 figs.

Hunt, A.J.

1983-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

117

Radiation receiver  

SciTech Connect

The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles.

Hunt, Arlon J. (Oakland, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

RADIATION SOURCES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel long-lived source of gamma radiation especially suitable for calibration purposes is described. The source of gamma radiation is denoted mock iodine131, which comprises a naixture of barium-133 and cesium-137. The barium and cesium are present in a barium-cesium ratio of approximately 5.7/1 to 14/1, uniformly dispersed in an ion exchange resin and a filter surrounding the resin comprised of a material of atomic number below approximately 51, and substantially 0.7 to 0.9 millimeter thick.

Brucer, M.H.

1958-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

Aerial radiological surveys of Steed Pond, Savannah River Site: Dates of surveys, 1984--1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From June 1984 to August 1985, three aerial radiological surveys were conducted over Steed Pond at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. In addition, Steed Pond was included in larger-area surveys of the Savannah River Site in subsequent years. The surveys were conducted by the Remote Sensing Laboratory of EG&G Energy Measurements, Inc., Las Vegas, Nevada, for the US Department of Energy. Airborne measurements were obtained for both natural and man-made gamma radiation over Steed Pond and surrounding areas. The first survey was conducted when the pond was filled to normal capacity for the time of the year. On September 1, 1984, the Steed Pond dam spillway failed causing the pond to drain. The four subsequent surveys were conducted with the pond drained. The second survey and the third were conducted to study silt deposits exposed by the drop in water level after the spillway`s opening. Steed Pond data from the February 1987 and April 1989 Savannah River Site surveys have been included to bring this study up to date.

Fritzsche, A.E.; Jobst, J.E.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Radiation Protection Act (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act combines the radiation safety provisions of The Atomic Energy Development and Radiation Control Act and the Environmental Radiation Protection Act, and empowers the Department of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-agency radiation survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Radiation Tolerant Metallic Multilayers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Strategies that can alleviate radiation damage may assist the design of radiation tolerant materials. We will summarize our recent studies on radiation damage in ...

122

NEW SOURCES OF RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Project Report No. 75/07.IBL 79M0733 Fig. 20. Radiation emission pattern by electronsWinick, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Fig. 21.

Schimmerling, W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Radiation-induced angiosarcoma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1a Figure 1b Figure 1. Radiation-induced angiosarcoma in afollowing completion of radiation therapy. Figure 2a Figurecell histiocytosis after radiation for breast carcinoma: can

Anzalone, C Lane; Cohen, Philip R; Diwan, Abdul H; Prieto, Victor G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Berkeley Lab Postdoc Survey  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Founded in 1983, MOR Associates has led dozens of major survey efforts on behalf of higher education, such as UC Berkeley, MIT, Stanford University, University of Washington,...

125

ORISE: Characterization surveys  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

extent of radiological contamination at sites scheduled for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). A fundamental aspect of all D&D projects, characterization surveys provide...

126

The Dark Energy Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new proposed optical?near infrared survey of 5000 square degrees of the South Galactic Cap is presented. To perform it

E. Sánchez; Dark Energy Survey Collaboration

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

An aerial radiological survey of the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

A team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory conducted an aerial radiological survey of the US Department of Energy's Nevada Test Site including three neighboring areas during August and September 1994. The survey team measured the terrestrial gamma radiation at the Nevada Test Site to determine the levels of natural and man-made radiation. This survey included the areas covered by previous surveys conducted from 1962 through 1993. The results of the aerial survey showed a terrestrial background exposure rate that varied from less than 6 microroentgens per hour (mR/h) to 50 mR/h plus a cosmic-ray contribution that varied from 4.5 mR/h at an elevation of 900 meters (3,000 feet) to 8.5 mR/h at 2,400 meters (8,000 feet). In addition to the principal gamma-emitting, naturally occurring isotopes (potassium-40, thallium-208, bismuth-214, and actinium-228), the man-made radioactive isotopes found in this survey were cobalt-60, cesium-137, europium-152, protactinium-234m an indicator of depleted uranium, and americium-241, which are due to human actions in the survey area. Individual, site-wide plots of gross terrestrial exposure rate, man-made exposure rate, and americium-241 activity (approximating the distribution of all transuranic material) are presented. In addition, expanded plots of individual areas exhibiting these man-made contaminations are given. A comparison is made between the data from this survey and previous aerial radiological surveys of the Nevada Test Site. Some previous ground-based measurements are discussed and related to the aerial data. In regions away from man-made activity, the exposure rates inferred from the gamma-ray measurements collected during this survey agreed very well with the exposure rates inferred from previous aerial surveys.

Hendricks, T J; Riedhauser, S R

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Radiation properties of cavity Cerenkov radiation  

SciTech Connect

Cerenkov radiation from cavities has been analyzed by quantum electrodynamic theory. Analytical expressions of basic radiation properties such as the Einstein's A and B coefficients are derived and shown to be directly modified by the cavities. The analysis leads to the conclusion that the coherent radiation from the Cerenkov radiation devices is due to super radiance of spontaneous emission instead of stimulated emission. Coherent and incoherent radiations are analyzed in the THz radiation range.

Gao Ju; Shen Fang [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

129

ORNL-5680 Radiological Surveys  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

These guidelines recommend the following graded action levels for remedial action in terms of external gamma radiation level (EGR) and indoor radon daughter concentration level...

130

An aerial radiological survey of the Ames Laboratory and surrounding area, Ames, Iowa. Date of survey: July 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An aerial radiological survey of the Ames Laboratory and surrounding area in Ames, Iowa, was conducted during the period July 15--25, 1991. The purpose of the survey was to measure and document the terrestrial radiological environment at the Ames Laboratory and the surrounding area for use in effective environmental management and emergency response planning. The aerial survey was flown at an altitude of 200 feet (61 meters) along a series of parallel lines 350 feet (107 meters) apart. The survey encompassed an area of 36 square miles (93 square kilometers) and included the city of Ames, Iowa, and the Iowa State University. The results are reported as exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level (inferred from the aerial data) in the form of a gamma radiation contour map. Typical background exposure rates were found to vary from 7 to 9 microroentgens per hour ({mu}R/h). No anomalous radiation levels were detected at the Ames Laboratory. However, one anomalous radiation source was detected at an industrial storage yard in the city of Ames. In support of the aerial survey, ground-based exposure rate and soil sample measurements were obtained at several sites within the survey perimeter. The results of the aerial and ground-based measurements were found to agree within the expected uncertainty of {+-}15%.

Maurer, R.J.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

REMOTE SENSING GEOLOGICAL SURVEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REMOTE SENSING IN GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF BRAZIL August/2010 Mônica Mazzini Perrotta Remote Sensing Division Head #12;SUMMARY The Geological Survey of Brazil mission The Remote Sensing Division Main remote, Paleontology, Remote Sensing Director of Hydrology and Land Management But Remote Sensing Division gives

132

Utility Baghouse Survey 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI conducted comprehensive surveys of utility baghouse installations in 1981, 1991, and 2005 to summarize the state of the technology. The current survey focuses on nine selected pulse-jet baghouses to provide a better understanding of the design, performance, and operation of recent installations.

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

133

NASA Customer Satisfaction Survey  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Customer Satisfaction Survey Customer Satisfaction Survey NASA's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) would like to encourage you to participate in the NASA ESDIS 2013 American Customer Satisfaction Survey. The ORNL DAAC is one of twelve data centers sponsored by NASA's Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) project. The ESDIS project uses the results of this survey to evaluate our success and to determine where improvements are needed. Invitations will be sent to you, our users, from CFI Group [CFI Group on behalf of NASA (NASA@jangomail.com)] during the week of August 20, 2013. Each invitation will reference us as "ORNL DAAC / FLUXNET", and contain a unique secure link to this Web-based anonymous survey. We encourage you to participate!

134

Building Technologies Residential Survey  

SciTech Connect

Introduction A telephone survey of 1,025 residential occupants was administered in late October for the Building Technologies Program (BT) to gather information on residential occupant attitudes, behaviors, knowledge, and perceptions. The next section, Survey Results, provides an overview of the responses, with major implications and caveats. Additional information is provided in three appendices as follows: - Appendix A -- Summary Response: Provides summary tabular data for the 13 questions that, with subparts, comprise a total of 25 questions. - Appendix B -- Benchmark Data: Provides a benchmark by six categories to the 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey administered by EIA. These were ownership, heating fuel, geographic location, race, household size and income. - Appendix C -- Background on Survey Method: Provides the reader with an understanding of the survey process and interpretation of the results.

Secrest, Thomas J.

2005-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

135

Types of Radiation Exposure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

External Irradiation Contamination Incorporation Biological Effects of Acute, Total Body Irradiation Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Types of radiation...

136

Radiation Effects In Ceramics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RADIATION MATERIALS SCIENCE IN TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS II: Radiation Effects in Ceramics. Sponsored by: Jt. SMD/MSD Nuclear Materials ...

137

Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry. ... OH. US Air Force Radiation Dosimetry Laboratory, Wright-Patterson - Base, OH [100548- 0] PA. ...

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

138

Radiation Physics Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Radiation Physics Division, part of the Physical Measurement Laboratory ... the measurement standards for ionizing radiations and radioactivity ...

2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

139

An aerial radiological survey of Naturita, Colorado and surrounding area. Date of survey: September 1981  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey of four areas in the vicinity of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Naturita, Colorado was conducted in September 1981. The average background radiation exposure rate (normalized to 3 feet above the ground) was about 10 to 16 microroentgens per hour ({mu}R/h). Uranium ore or tailings were detected at Naturita, Nucla, East Vancorum, and the general region downriver and downwind from the former mill tailings site.

Jaffe, R.J.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

ARM User Survey Report: Data Access, Quality, and Delivery  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this survey was to obtain user feedback to determine how users of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Data Archive interact with the more than 2000 available types of datastreams. The survey also gathered information about data discovery and data quality. The Market and Competitive Analysis group at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory worked with web administrators to develop a landing page from which users could access the survey. A survey invitation was sent by ARM via email to about 6100 users on February 22, 2012. The invitation was also posted on the ARM website and Facebook page. Reminders were sent via e-mail and posted on Facebook while the survey was open, February 22-March 23, 2012.

Mather, JH; Roeder, LR; Sivaraman, C

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-agency radiation survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility SURF III ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Synchrotron Radiation. What is Synchrotron Radiation? Synchrotron radiation ... known. Properties of Synchrotron Radiation. Schwinger ...

142

Solar energy industry survey  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of a survey of companies in the solar energy industry. The general objective of the survey was to provide information to help evaluate the effectiveness of technology transfer mechanisms for the development of the solar industry. The specific objectives of the survey included: (1) determination of the needs of the solar industry; (2) identification of special concerns of the solar industry; and (3) determination of the types of technology transfer mechanisms that would be most helpful to the solar industry in addressing these needs and concerns. The major focus was on technical problems and developments, but institutional and marketing considerations were also treated. The majority of the sample was devoted to the solar heating and cooling (SHAC) component of the industry. However, a small number of photovoltaic (PV), wind, and power generation system manufacturers were also surveyed. Part I discusses the methodology used in the selection, performance, and data reduction stages of the survey, comments on the nature of the responses, and describes the conclusions drawn from the survey. The latter include both general conclusions concerning the entire solar industry, and specific conclusions concerning component groups, such as manufacturers, architects, installers, or dealers. Part II consists of tabulated responses and non-attributed verbatim comments that summarize and illustrate the survey results.

1979-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

143

Report on the survey of abandoned uraniferous lignite mines in southwestern North Dakota  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A radiation survey was conducted in October 1983 as part of the proposed reclamation plan of abandoned uraniferous lignite mines in southwestern North Dakota. The survey was made to determine the extent of contamination caused by mining operations in the 1960's. Radiation measurements were made and soil samples were taken at approximately 300 locations around six mine sites comprising eleven lignite mine pits. Toxic element analysis was also done on 50 of the soil samples.

Lyon, R.J.; Prochaska, D.; Burgess, J.L.; Patrick, D.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Radiological Habits Survey, Dumfries and Galloway Coast, 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-washed pasture 19 4.6 Internal exposure 19 4.7 External exposure 24 5. COMBINED PATHWAYS 26 6. MATERIALS.2 Determination of critical groups 10 4. AQUATIC RADIATION PATHWAYS 13 4.1 Aquatic survey area 13 4.2 Commercial of radioactivity in the Irish Sea. Potential exposure pathways include con

145

Generalized survey propagation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Survey propagation (SP) has recently been discovered as an efficient algorithm in solving classes of hard constraint-satisfaction problems (CSP). Powerful as it is, SP is still a heuristic algorithm, and further understanding its algorithmic nature, ...

Ronghui Tu / Yongyi Mao, Jiying Zhao

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

n tal Specialist and the DOE NEPA Compliance Officer. NOTE: If Change of Scope oc:c:urs, Project Lead must submit a new NEPA Compliance Survey and contact the Technical...

147

Site Energy Surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Operating improvements and selected investments have already improved US refining and petrochemical energy utilization efficiency by about 20%, compared to 1972 operating efficiencies. This is equivalent to saving well over 250,000 B/D of crude; which is equal to the output of several major synthetic fuels projects! Site Energy Surveys can be an important technique for achieving the next major increment (1520%) in energy savings, even when using existing technology. These surveys encompass the total site, all associated plants, and investigate all aspects of energy requirements, heat integration configurations, steam/power cogeneration possibilities and inefficient practices. After potential energy conservation opportunities have been identified, screening is conducted to develop their economic attractiveness. This presentation reviews factors leading to the need for Site Energy Surveys, the objectives for conducting surveys, the approach utilized, considerations given to values of energy and concludes with overall improvements achieved.

Lockett, W., Jr.; Guide, J. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Evaluating Our Instruction: Surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

you put in; and as the grandest mill in the world will not extract wheat flour from peascod, so pagesEvaluating Our Instruction: Surveys Mathematics may be compared to a mill of exquisite workmanship

Maryland at College Park, University of

149

Trojan Nuclear Plant Decommissioning: Final Survey for the Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the final radiological survey for the area where Portland General Electric (PGE) will construct the Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) at Trojan nuclear power plant. The survey fulfills the requirements for release of this area from Trojan's 10 CFR 50 license before radiation levels increase with spent fuel storage in the ISFSI.

1998-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

150

Gamma Radiation & X-Rays  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gamma Radiation and X-Rays 1. Gamma radiation and X-rays are electromagnetic radiation like visible light, radio waves, and ultraviolet light. These electromagnetic radiations...

151

Radiation Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brotherhood of Locomotive Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers & Trainmen Scott Palmer BLET Radiation Safety Officer New Hire Training New Hire study topics * GCOR * ABTH * SSI * Employee Safety * HazMat * Railroad terminology * OJT * 15-week class * Final test Hazardous Materials * Initial new-hire training * Required by OSHA * No specified class length * Open book test * Triennial module Locomotive Engineer Training A little bit older...a little bit wiser... * Typically 2-4 years' seniority * Pass-or-get-fired promotion * Intensive program * Perpetually tested to a higher standard * 20 Weeks of training * 15 of that is OJT * General Code of Operating Rules * Air Brake & Train Handling * System Special Instructions * Safety Instructions * Federal Regulations * Locomotive Simulators * Test Ride * Pass test with 90% Engineer Recertification

152

RADIATION COUNTER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a radiation counter, and more particularly, to a scintillation counter having high uniform sensitivity over a wide area and capable of measuring alpha, beta, and gamma contamination over wide energy ranges, for use in quickly checking the contami-nation of personnel. Several photomultiplier tubes are disposed in parallel relationship with a light tight housing behind a wall of scintillation material. Mounted within the housing with the photomultipliers are circuit means for producing an audible sound for each pulse detected, and a range selector developing a voltage proportional to the repetition rate of the detected pulses and automatically altering its time constant when the voltage reaches a predetermined value, so that manual range adjustment of associated metering means is not required.

Goldsworthy, W.W.

1958-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

RADIATION DOSIMETER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement was made in the determination of amounts of ionizing radiation, particularly low-energy beta particles of less than 1000 rad total dose by means of fluid-phase dosimeter employing a stabilized-- sensitized ferrous-ferric colorimetric system in a sulphuric acid medium. The improvement in the dosimeter consists of adding to the ferrous-ferric system in concentrations of 10/sub -2/ to 10/sup -4/M an organic compound having one or more carboxylic or equivalent groups, such compounds being capable of chelating or complexing the iron ions in the solution. Suitable sensitizing and stabilizing agents are benzoic, phthalic, salicylic, malonic, lactic, maleic, oxalic, citric, succinic, phenolic tartaric, acetic, and adipic acid, as well as other compounds which are added to the solution alone or in certain combinations. As in conventional fluid-phase dosimeters, the absorbed dosage is correlated with a corresponding change in optical density at particular wavelengths of the solution.

Balkwell, W.R. Jr.; Adams, G.D. Jr.

1960-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

154

Radiological Habits Survey: Torness, 2006 This page has been intentionally left blank  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cover 25 5.3 Novel radiation pathways 25 5.4 Internal exposure 25 6. DIRECT RADIATION 27 6.1 Direct.5 Wildfowling 19 4.6 The use of seaweed as a fertiliser 19 4.7 Internal exposure 19 4.8 External exposure 22 4 ratios for use in dose assessments 13 4. AQUATIC RADIATION PATHWAYS 14 4.1 Aquatic survey area 14 4

155

Operational Radiation Protection in High-Energy Physics Accelerators  

SciTech Connect

An overview of operational radiation protection (RP) policies and practices at high-energy electron and proton accelerators used for physics research is presented. The different radiation fields and hazards typical of these facilities are described, as well as access control and radiation control systems. The implementation of an operational RP programme is illustrated, covering area and personnel classification and monitoring, radiation surveys, radiological environmental protection, management of induced radioactivity, radiological work planning and control, management of radioactive materials and wastes, facility dismantling and decommissioning, instrumentation and training.

Rokni, S.H.; Fasso, A.; Liu, J.C.; /SLAC

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

156

DETECTORS FOR RADIATION DOSIMETRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2) W. J. Price, "Nuclear Radiation Detection" (2nd ed. , Newand R. J. Berry, "Manual on Radiation Dosimetry" (New York:4) G. F. Knoll, "Radiation Detection and Measurement" (New

Perez-Mendez, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Range Management Survey Date: Range Management Survey Date: 12/6/10 DOE Code: 6730.020.0000 Contractor 8067-788 Code: Project Lead: I Anthony Bowler Project Overview We will use a backhoe to get samples for our range management survey. At each site. one or 1. Brief project descnptlon [include anything that two holes will be excavated, and the samples will be taken from 0-1' and 1-2' deep. After could 1mpad the environment] excavating and the samples taken. the remaining soli Will be replaced and tamped back into 2. Legal location place. 3. Duratfon of tile project See attached NPR-3 Maps for preliminary locations : N~ area well 6-A-2\ NVV SW Section 21 . 4. Major equipment to be used f Township 39N, Range 78E) Middle area well 48-1 -Sh (SE SW 34 Township 39N, Range 4 WU-LSIT£5

158

Operations Improvement Surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exxon Chemical Company developed unique site-wide energy optimization technology in the mid1970's. This technology was applied by means of site energy surveys which were carried out at every major Exxon facility throughout the world during the 1976-1981 timeframe. The first 20% of energy savings, versus the 1972 reference, had already been captured or was in progress via conventional energy conservation methods. The site energy surveys identified attractive investments to save a second 20% of energy use. In early 1982, Exxon Corp. started to apply this same technology to its major facilities to define attractive NO INVESTMENT and LOW INVESTMENT operational improvement savings which could be implemented quickly. This presentation covers Exxon's approach to site energy optimization and the Operations Improvement Survey Program. The Program has identified at many sites, an average of 5% reduction in today's energy costs at No/Low investment plus additional savings in the feedstock and energy supply areas.

Guide, J. J.; O'Brien, W. J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Solar radiation resource assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The bulletin discusses the following: introduction; Why is solar radiation resource assessment important Understanding the basics; the solar radiation resource assessment project; and future activities.

Not Available

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Courses on Synchrotron Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Synchrotron Radiation The following is an incomplete list of courses on Synchrotron Radiation. For additional courses, check lightsources.org. XAFS School The APS XAFS School...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-agency radiation survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Radiation Physics Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Radiation Physics Events. Radiation Physics Events. (showing 1 - 3 of 3). CIRMS 2012 Start Date: 10/22/2012 ...

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Bayesian Radiation Source Localization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Special Issue on the 16th Biennial Topical Meeting of the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division / Radiation Measurements and General Instrumentation

Kenneth D. Jarman; Erin A. Miller; Richard S. Wittman; Christopher J. Gesh

163

Radiation Control (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Health is responsible for regulating radiation and radioactive materials in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Although the Department's Radiation Control Program primarily focuses on...

164

Wireless sensor network survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A wireless sensor network (WSN) has important applications such as remote environmental monitoring and target tracking. This has been enabled by the availability, particularly in recent years, of sensors that are smaller, cheaper, and intelligent. These ... Keywords: Protocols, Sensor network deployment, Sensor network services, Survey, Wireless sensor network

Jennifer Yick; Biswanath Mukherjee; Dipak Ghosal

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Low Dose Radiation Program: Radiation Biology and the Radiation Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biology and the Radiation Research Program Biology and the Radiation Research Program The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor organizations, Energy Research and Development Agency (ERDA) and Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), always have been concerned about the health effects of ionizing radiation. Extensive research has been conducted under their sponsorship at all levels of biological organization from molecules to man. Over the past 60 years, studies using every type of radiation source have included exposure to both external radiation sources and to internally deposited radioactive materials. These exposures used different dose patterns and distributions delivered over a wide range of experimental times. This extensive research provided the basis for the new Low Dose Radiation Research Program, linking

166

Microsoft Word - 11319 Final.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Phoenix, AZ Phoenix, AZ Pre-MARSSIM Surveys in a MARSSIM World: Demonstrating How Pre-MARSSIM Radiological Data Demonstrate Protectiveness at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Sites - 11319 Christopher Clayton*, Vijendra Kothari**, Michael Widdop***, Susan Kamp***, Laura Cummins***, and Joey Gillespie*** *U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Washington, DC 20585 **U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Morgantown, West Virginia 26505 ***S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, Colorado 81503 ABSTRACT The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other agencies conducted a significant amount of radiological remediation over decades prior to the development and implementation of the Multi-Agency Radiation

167

An aerial radiological survey of the Central Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An aerial radiological survey was conducted over a 194-square- kilometer (75-square-mile) area encompassing the central portion of the Savannah River Site (SRS). The survey was flown during February 10--27, 1987. These radiological measurements were used as baseline data for the central area and for determining the extent of man-made radionuclide distribution. Previous SRS surveys included small portions of the area; the 1987 survey was covered during the site- wide survey conducted in 1979. Man-made radionuclides (including cobalt-60, cesium-137, protactinium-234m, and elevated levels of uranium-238 progeny) that were detected during the survey were typical of those produced by the reactor operations and material processing activities being conducted in the area. The natural terrestrial radiation levels were consistent with those measured during prior surveys of other SRS areas. 1 refs., 4 figs.

Feimster, E.L.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

NIST MIRF - Accelerator Radiation Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accelerator Radiation Physics. Medium-energy accelerators are under investigation for production of channeling radiation ...

169

NIST Synchrotron radiation in SSD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synchrotron radiation in the Sensor Science Division. ... Synchrotron Radiation-Based Calibrations for Space Weather Prediction. ...

2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

170

An aerial radiological survey of the Durango, Colorado uranium mill tailings site and surrounding area. Date of survey: August 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An aerial radiological survey of Durango, Colorado, including the inactive uranium mill tailings piles located southwest of the town, was conducted during August 25--29, 1980, for the Department of Energy`s Environmental and Safety Engineering Division. Areas of radiation exposure rates higher than the local background, which was about 15 microrentgens per hour ({mu}R/h), were observed directly over and to the south of the mill tailings piles, over a cemetery, and at two spots near the fairgrounds. The rapidly changing radiation exposure rates at the boundaries of the piles preclude accurate extrapolation of aerial radiological data to ground level exposure rates in their immediate vicinity. Estimated radiation exposure rates close to the piles, however, approached 30 times background, or about 450 {mu}R/h. Radiation exposure rates in a long area extending south from the tailings piles were about 25 {mu}R/h.

Hilton, L.K.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

2010 Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey Page 1 of 20 ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Department of Energy 2010 Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey: Trend Report (2006 and 2008 results have been recalculated to exclude Do Not Know/No Basis to Judge responses) Response Summary Surveys Completed 2010 Governmentwide 263,475 2010 Department of Energy 6,648 2008 Department of Energy 6,093 2006 Department of Energy 7,742 This 2010 Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey Report provides summary results for your department or agency. The results include Positive, Neutral, and Negative response percentages for each survey item. For each of the

172

FACILITY SURVEY & TRANSFER Facility Survey & Transfer Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SURVEY & TRANSFER SURVEY & TRANSFER Facility Survey & Transfer Overview Transfer Activities Checklist Pre-Survey Information Request Survey Report Content Detailed Walkdown Checklist Walkdown Checklist Clipboard Aids S & M Checklist Survey Report Example - Hot Storage Garden Survey Report Example - Tritium System Test Assembly Survey Report Example - Calutron Overview As DOE facilities become excess, many that are radioactively and/or chemically contaminated will become candidate for transfer to DOE-EM for deactivation and decommissioning. Requirements and guidance for such transfers are contained in:  DOE Order 430.1B Chg. 2, REAL PROPERTY & ASSET MANAGEMENT  DOE Guide 430.1-5, TRANSITION IMPLEMENTATION GUIDE The transfer process is illustrated in the Transfer Process figure. The purpose here is to provide examples of methods and

173

Radiation Detection Instruments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Directory of Accredited Laboratories. Radiation Detection Instruments. In 2005, the Department of Homeland Security requested ...

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

174

Radiation monitoring system for the environment and safety project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The project RAMSES (Radiation Monitoring System for the Environment and Safety) will provide LHC with a state of the art radiation monitoring and alarm system. RAMSES will survey the LHC accelerator, the LHC experimental areas and the environment of the LHC. The TIS (Technical Inspection and Safety) division will exploit this system to assess radiation risks and to control the releases of radioactivity. In addition, it will be integrated into the control rooms of the LHC accelerator and the LHC experiments. Obviously, RAMSES will already take into account CERN wide needs to renew the radiation monitoring system around the other CERN facilities. The requirements of the system are derived from CERN's own safety standards (CERN's Radiation Protection Manual, SAPOCO), from those of the CERN's two host states and from European standards. The mandate of the project team covers the system specification, prototyping, tendering, installation and integration of radiation monitors and industrial control equipment for sa...

Forkel-Wirth, Doris; Scibile, L; Segura, G; Vojtyla, P; CERN. Geneva. ST Division

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

radiation.p65  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

5 5 United States Department of Energy This fact sheet explains the potential health hazards associated with the radioactive decay of uranium and other radioactive elements found in ore and mill tailings. Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Man-made sources of radiation, most notably from medical uses and consumer products, contribute to the remaining radiation dose that individuals receive. A few household products, including smoke detectors, micro- wave ovens, and color televisions, emit small amounts of radiation. For most people, the benefits from using such products far outweigh the radiation risks. Radiation Dose Radiation is measured in various units. Individuals who have been exposed to radiation have received a radiation dose. Radiation dose to people is expressed in

176

Radiation Field Control Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Radiation Management Program is dedicated to reducing nuclear power plant worker personnel exposure by developing practices and technologies to increase the radiation protection of the worker, and to implement methods to reduce radiation fields. The nuclear power industry has recently implemented the RP2020 Initiative to promote positive radiation protection trends. Control of radiation fields is crucial to one of the initiative goals of reducing exposure. This manual provides the current state ...

2004-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

177

Instrumentation for environmental monitoring. Volume 3. Radiation  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive survey of instrunnentation for environmental monitoring is being carried out by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory under a grant from the Natioral Science Foundation. Instruments being investigated are those useful for measurements of Air Quality, Water Quality, Radiation, and Biomedical Parameters related to environmental research and monitoring. Consideration is given to instruments and techniques presently in use and to those developed for other purposes but having possible applications to this work. The results of the survey are given as (a) descriptions of the physical and operating characteristics of available instruments, (b) critical comparisons among instrumentation methods, and (c) recommendations of promising methodology and development of new instrumentation. The survey material is compiled in 5 loose- leaf volumes which can be periodically updated. An update for volume 3 on radiation instrumentation is presented. New pages are included for insertion in the introductory material and also under the headings nuclear reactors, combination instruments, alpha particle instrumentation, beta particle instrumentation, x and gamma radiation monitoring instrumentation, gamma spectrometry, neutron monitoring instrumentation, personnel dosimetry, radionuclides (strontium -89 and -90, iodine -129 and -131, radium, uranium, plutonium, and instrument notes), and infrared. (WHK)

1973-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

2006 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 User Survey Results 6 User Survey Results Show All | 1 2 3 4 5 ... 15 | Next » 2006 User Survey Results Table of Contents Survey Results Users are invited to provide overall comments about NERSC: Here are the survey results: Respondent Demographics Overall Satisfaction and Importance All Satisfaction, Importance and Usefulness Ratings All Usefulness Topics Hardware Resources Software Visualization and Data Analysis HPC Consulting Services and Communications Web Interfaces Training Comments about NERSC Survey Results Many thanks to the 256 users who responded to this year's User Survey. This represents a response rate of about 13 percent of the active NERSC users. The respondents represent all six DOE Science Offices and a variety of home institutions: see Respondent Demographics. The survey responses provide feedback about every aspect of NERSC's

179

Sloan digital sky survey  

SciTech Connect

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey will produce a detailed digital photometric map of half the northern sky to about 23 magnitude using a special purpose wide field 2.5 meter telescope. From this map we will select {approximately} 10{sup 6} galaxies and 10{sup 5} quasars, and obtain high resolution spectra using the same telescope. The imaging catalog will contain 10{sup 8} galaxies, a similar number of stars, and 10{sup 6} quasar candidates.

Kent, S.M.; Stoughton, C.; Newberg, H.; Loveday, J.; Petravick, D.; Gurbani, V.; Berman, E.; Sergey, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Lupton, R. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Magma Source Location Survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A survey of Industry/University geophysicists was conducted to obtain their opinions on the existence of shallow (less than 10 km from surface) magma bodies in the western conterminous United States and methods for locating and defining them. Inputs from 35 individuals were received and are included. Responses were that shallow magma bodies exist and that existing geophysical sensing systems are adequate to locate them.

Hardee, H.C.; Dunn, J.C.; Colp, J.L.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-agency radiation survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Survey of solar homeowners  

SciTech Connect

Some key results are presented of a national mail survey of 3800 solar homeowners. The solar owners expressed their perceptions about performance, cost, problem areas, and their own motivations and degree of satisfaction. Various types of residential solar installations are represented, including active and passive water heating, space heating, and wind energy systems. After each question put to the respondents, the breakdown of answers is listed and a brief interpretation of the findings is presented. (LEW)

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Does an accelerated electron radiate Unruh radiation?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An accelerated particle sees the Minkowski vacuum as thermally excited, and the particle moves stochastically due to an interaction with the thermal bath. This interaction fluctuates the particle's transverse momenta like the Brownian motion in a heat bath. Because of this fluctuating motion, it has been discussed that the accelerated charged particle emits extra radiation (the Unruh radiation) in addition to the classical Larmor radiation, and experiments are under planning to detect such radiation by using ultrahigh intensity lasers constructed in near future. There are, however, counterarguments that the radiation is canceled by an interference effect between the vacuum fluctuation and the fluctuating motion. In fact, in the case of an internal detector where the Heisenberg equation of motion can be solved exactly, there is no additional radiation after the thermalization is completed. In this paper, we revisit the issue in the case of an accelerated charged particle in the scalar QED. We first prove the e...

Iso, Satoshi; Zhang, Sen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Definition: Airborne Gravity Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Survey Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Airborne Gravity Survey Airborne gravity gradiometry (AGG) surveys provide information regarding the mass distribution of the...

184

2010 State Laboratory Program Workload Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. 2010 State Laboratory Program Workload Survey 2010 SLP Survey v.1.00 August 17, 2011 Page 2. SLP Survey 2010 - Page 2 of 122 ...

2011-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

185

2002 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey - User Needs Survey  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2002 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey: User-Needs Survey 2002 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey: User-Needs Survey View current results. We need your help in designing the next “ Energy Consumption Survey” (MECS)! As our valued customer, you are in an important position to tell us what kinds of data are most useful in helping you understand energy consumption in the U.S. manufacturing sector. Below is a short electronic survey with just a few questions. We will stop collecting responses for user feedback on May 17, 2002. This deadline serves to meet our intended release date of April/May 2003 for fielding MECS2002. The MECS is designed to produce estimates of energy consumption and other energy-related activities in manufacturing. The survey also collects information on energy expenditures, average prices, onsite generation of

186

Review of radiological surveys of the General Services Administration's Raritan Depot in Edison, New Jersey  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews two recent radiological surveys of the General Services Administration (GSA) Raritan Depot in Edison, New Jersey, that were conducted after somewhat elevated levels of radiation were detected within a depot building. The first survey indicated gamma radiation levels were higher than natural background levels in some buildings and identified the probable source of the radiation as gypsum-like building tiles that contained natural uranium-chain radionuclides at a level 20 times higher than other materials. Elevated levels of radon and radon decay products also were detected in some buildings. A follow-on survey was conducted to confirm the January measurements and to measure radiation levels at other locations: additional buildings at the depot, buildings on the Middlesex County College campus, and a possible outdoor disposal site. EPA measurements established that ceiling material is the primary source of the radiation. Radioisotope analysis of the ceiling tile material from buildings with elevated radiation levels showed the presence of radium-226 at levels of approximately 25 picocuries per gram (pCi/g); this material would thus have to be treated as hazardous waste, should it be removed. This report critiques the methodology and results of the two surveys and recommends further action.

Herzenberg, C.L.; Winter, R.C.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

radiation.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Radiation-It's a Fact of Life Radiation-It's a Fact of Life It has been with us since the beginning of time. Everyone who has ever walked on this planet has been exposed to radiation. For the most part, nature is the largest source of exposure. It's in the air we breathe, the ground we walk on, and even the food we eat. The radiation we receive from all natural and some man-made sources is called "background radiation." The millirem (mrem) is a unit used for measuring radiation received by a person. The total average background for radiation received by people living in the United States is 360 millirem per year (mrem/yr), of which 300 mrem/yr is from natural sources, and 60 mrem/yr is man-made. Cosmic Radiation from the sun and stars Internal Radiation from naturally radioactive

188

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - General Radiation Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Radiation Information Answers to Questions about Radiation Dose Ranges Charts - tables showing radiation dose ranges from radio diagnostics to cancer radiotherapy....

189

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Websites about Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Websites About Radiation The ABC's of Nuclear Science A Teacher's Guide To The Nuclear Science Wall Chart Answers to Questions about Radiation and You Background Radiation:...

190

Radiological Habits Survey, Torness 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

............................................................................ 30 4.5 Internal exposure................................................................................................................ 39 5.4 Internal Exposure ................................................................................ 12 4 AQUATIC RADIATION PATHWAYS

191

An aerial radiological survey of Naturita, Colorado and surrounding area  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey of four areas in the vicinity of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Naturita, Colorado was conducted in September 1981. The average background radiation exposure rate (normalized to 3 feet above the ground) was about 10 to 16 microroentgens per hour ({mu}R/h). Uranium ore or tailings were detected at Naturita, Nucla, East Vancorum, and the general region downriver and downwind from the former mill tailings site.

Jaffe, R.J.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Plutonium radiation surrogate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A self-contained source of gamma-ray and neutron radiation suitable for use as a radiation surrogate for weapons-grade plutonium is described. The source generates a radiation spectrum similar to that of weapons-grade plutonium at 5% energy resolution between 59 and 2614 keV, but contains no special nuclear material and emits little .alpha.-particle radiation. The weapons-grade plutonium radiation surrogate also emits neutrons having fluxes commensurate with the gamma-radiation intensities employed.

Frank, Michael I. (Dublin, CA)

2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

193

Tachyons and Gravitational Cherenkov Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND GRAVITATIONAL CHERENKOV RADIATION CHARLES SCHWARTZwould emit gravitational radiation. It is very small.gravitational waves; Cherenkov radiation. In a recent work,

Schwartz, Charles

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Los Alamos Lab: Radiation Protection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advisor Paul Hoover Special Assistant and Issues Management Coordinator Elinor Gwynn Radiation Protection Radiation Protection The Radiation Protection Division supports the...

195

RADIATION SAFETY OFFICE UNIVERSITYOF MARYLAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2. RADIATION EXPOSURE CONTROL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 2.2.2. Internal ExposureRADIATION SAFETY OFFICE UNIVERSITYOF MARYLAND RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND

Rubloff, Gary W.

196

ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 RESIDENTIAL TRANSPORTATION 5 RESIDENTIAL TRANSPORTATION ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY Prepared for: UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION OFFICE OF ENERGY MARKETS AND END USE ENERGY END USE DIVISION RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL BRANCH WASHINGTON, DC 20585 Prepared by: THE ORKAND CORPORATION 8484 GEORGIA AVENUE SILVER SPRING, MD 20910 October 1986 Contract Number DE-AC01-84EI19658 TABLE OF CONTENTS FRONT MATTER Index to Program Descriptions........................................... vi List of Exhibits ....................................................... viii Acronyms and Abbreviations ............................................. ix SECTION 1: GENERAL INFORMATION ........................................ 1-1 1.1. Summary ....................................................... 1-1

197

Laundered protective clothing survey  

SciTech Connect

It is considered appropriate occasionally to make independent checks on the effectiveness of the plant laundry in removing radioactive contamination from plant-issue protective clothing. Previous surveys have offered constructive criticism resulting in improved handling of high level and soft beta contaminated clothing and incorporation in new designs of ventilating and air sampling recommendations. Recurrently the adequacy of laundry reject limits is questioned, and only recently an accurate, special study resulted in relaxed limits for Metal Preparation area clothing. A current question concerns the advisability of determining the reject level on the beta-gamma monitor more frequently than once a day. 2 tabs.

Clukey, H.V.

1952-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

SURVEY OF ROLLING MILL USED BY BETHLEHEM STEEL CORPORATION LACKAWANNA, NEW YORK  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

SURVEY OF ROLLING MILL USED BY SURVEY OF ROLLING MILL USED BY BETHLEHEM STEEL CORPORATION LACKAWANNA, NEW YORK Work performed by the Health and Safety Research Division Gak Ridge fiational Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 September 1980 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY operated by UNION CARBIDE CORPORATION for the DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites!- Remedial Action Program SURVEY OF ROLLING MILL USED BY BETHLEHEM STEEL CORPORATION LACKAWANNA, NEW YORK A radiological survey was conducted at the Bethelem Steel Corporation Plant in Lackawanna, New York, on September 23, 1980, by representatives of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The subject of the radiological survey was a portion of the original 25.4-cm (lo-inch) bar mill used in converting uranium billets into 3.8-cm rods. All radiation survey

199

Determining Background Radiation Levels in Support of Decommissioning Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a technical reference for determining background radiation levels in support of surveys for decommissioning nuclear power facilities. Careful planning and data evaluation are essential for a valid survey. The report discusses important considerations for successful establishment of background levels for soils, surfaces, structures, and groundwater. It also explores alternatives to performing a formal background study.

2001-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

200

Group value and intention to use - A study of multi-agency disaster management information systems for public safety  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines and extends the theory of information systems success in the context of large-scale disaster management (DM) for public safety. In the recent past, various evaluation reports on DM efforts have concluded that information quality and ... Keywords: Disaster management, Group value, Information systems success, Intention to use, Public sector, Task support, User satisfaction

JinKyu Lee; Nitesh Bharosa; Jing Yang; Marijn Janssen; H. R. Rao

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-agency radiation survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Maryland Radiation Act (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The policy of the state is to provide for the constructive use of radiation and control radiation emissions. This legislation authorizes the Department of the Environment to develop comprehensive...

202

WI Radiation Protection  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute seeks to regulate radioactive materials, to encourage the constructive uses of radiation, and to prohibit and prevent exposure to radiation in amounts which are or may be detrimental...

203

Nonionizing Radiation and HIV  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nonionizing Radiation and HIV Name: Flora R Pitchford Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: What are the effects of nonionizing radiation on DNA , RNA or any other cell...

204

Radiation and Ozone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation is the driving force for the general circulation of the atmosphere and controls the Earth's climate. Ozone is responsible for the warm stratosphere and protects life on Earth from harmful solar ultraviolet radiation. In July 1959, the ...

G. Ohring; R. D. Bojkov; H-J. Bolle; R. D. Hudson; H. Volkert

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Alpha-beta radiation detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is based in part on the discovery that a plastic housing that is lightweight is surprisingly efficient inasmuch as background signals from any gamma radiation are significantly reduced by using a plastic housing instead of a metal housing. A further aspect of the present invention is the profile of the housing as a bi-linear approximation to a parabola resulting in full optical response from any location on the scintillation material to the photomultiplier tube. A yet further aspect of the present invention is that the survey probe is resistant to magnetic fields. A yet further aspect of the present invention is the use of a snap-fit retaining bracket that overcomes the need for multiple screws.

Fleming, Dale M. (Richland, WA); Simmons, Kevin L. (Kennewick, WA); Froelich, Thomas J. (West Richland, WA); Carter, Gregory L. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY # 350 8 Revised 8/2/10 mjt Attachment 1 Written by Dan Smallwood Production Enhancement Project-5 T-2-34 to T-1-33 MIT all wells in this area to determine which are producing wells. There are 15 wells shut in this area because of no tank or shipping line. According to the old test sheet these wells make 24bbls oil and 120bbls of water. Two of these wells have leaks in the flow lines that will be fixed. One is 33-S-34 which could be run to 34-AX-34, about 400' .6 bbl/pd and the other is 35 shx 34 which could be run to 35-AX-34 which is about 200'.5bbl/pd. 42-AX-34 could be ran to 32-AX-34 and then to 33-SX-34 to 34-AX-34. There are two manifolds at T-2-34, one with 10 wells and the other with 12. None of the flow lines have valves or checks in the lines. I propose we flush, disconnect, and plug all wells that

207

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 Project Information Project Title: Survey Centralizer Design Date: 2-10-2010 DOE Code: 6730.020.71091 Contractor Code: 8067-762 Project Lead: Frank Ingham Project Overview 1. What are the environmental No environmental impacts. impacts? Run a logging tool through existing wells at : 2. What is the /ega/location? 67-LBT-3, SW SE sec 3, T38N , R78W 86-1 -X-10 , NE SE Sec 10, T38N , R78W 3. What is the duration of the project? 22-2-X-10H , NW NW Sec 10, T38N , R78W 4. What major equipment will be used if any (work over rig , drilling rig, 4 Days etc.)? Stinger truck or crane . The table below is to be completed by the Project Lead and reviewed by the Environmental Specialist and the DOE NEPA Compliance Officer. NOTE: If Change of Scope occurs, Project Lead must submit a new NEPA Compliance Survey and

208

Radiation protection at CERN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper gives a brief overview of the general principles of radiation protection legislation; explains radiological quantities and units, including some basic facts about radioactivity and the biological effects of radiation; and gives an overview of the classification of radiological areas at CERN, radiation fields at high-energy accelerators, and the radiation monitoring system used at CERN. A short section addresses the ALARA approach used at CERN.

Forkel-Wirth, Doris; Silari, Marco; Streit-Bianchi, Marilena; Theis, Christian; Vincke, Heinz; Vincke, Helmut

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Radiation Dosimetry Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation Dosimetry Data. Stopping-Power and Range Tables for Electrons, Protons, and Helium Ions. MJ Berger The databases ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

210

Radiation Shields Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2009. Symposium, Materials Solutions for the Nuclear Renaissance. Presentation Title, Radiation ...

211

An aerial radiological survey of the Oyster Creek Nuclear Power Plant and surrounding area, Forked River, New Jersey. Date of survey: September 18--25, 1992  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey was conducted over the Oyster Creek Nuclear Power Plant in Forked River, New Jersey, during the period September 18 through September 24, 1992. The survey was conducted at an altitude of 150 feet (46 meters) over a 26-square-mile (67-square-kilometer) area centered on the power station. The purpose of the survey was to document the terrestrial gamma radiation environment of the Oyster Creek Nuclear Power plant and surrounding area. The results of the aerial survey are reported as inferred gamma radiation exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level in the form of a contour map. Outside the plant boundary, exposure rates were found to vary between 4 and 10 microroentgens per hour and were attributed to naturally-occurring uranium, thorium, and radioactive potassium gamma emitters. The aerial data were compared to ground-based benchmark exposure rate measurements and radionuclide assays of soil samples obtained within the survey boundary. The ground-based measurements were found to be in good agreement with those inferred from the aerial measuring system. A previous survey of the power plant was conducted in August 1969 during its initial startup phase. Exposure rates and radioactive isotopes revealed in both surveys were consistent and within normal terrestrial background levels.

Hopkins, H.A.; McCall, K.A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Robot Reworked to Analyze Radiation in Japan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Robot Reworked to Analyze Radiation in Japan Robot Reworked to Analyze Radiation in Japan Robot Reworked to Analyze Radiation in Japan April 14, 2011 - 2:30pm Addthis A technician at Idaho National Laboratory demonstrates the modified TALON robot. A technician at Idaho National Laboratory demonstrates the modified TALON robot. John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs How does it work? Sensors on the TALON robots provide visual, radiological survey, and/or mapping data about areas that are not accessible to people because of too-high levels of radiation. Radiation-sensing packages have been sent for robots already in Japan. The Department of Energy has been working around the clock to provide whatever assistance we can to the Government of Japan as they work to bring

213

2000 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 User Survey Results 0 User Survey Results Show All | 1 2 3 4 5 ... 10 | Next » 2000 User Survey Results Table of Contents Response Summary User Information Overall Satisfaction and Importance All Satisfaction Questions and FY 1999 to FY 2000 Changes Consulting and Account Support Web and Communications Hardware Resources Software Resources Training User Comments Response Summary NERSC extends its thanks to all the users who participated in this year's survey. Your responses provide feedback about every aspect of NERSC's operation, help us judge the quality of our services, give DOE information on how well NERSC is doing, and point us to areas we can improve. Every year we institute changes based on the survey; the FY 1999 survey resulted in the following changes: We created a long-running queue (12 hours maximum) for jobs using up

214

2002 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 User Survey Results 2 User Survey Results Show All | 1 2 3 4 5 ... 11 | Next » 2002 User Survey Results Table of Contents Response Summary User Information Overall Satisfaction and Importance All Satisfaction Questions and Changes from Previous Years Visualization and Grid Computing Web, NIM, and Communications Hardware Resources Software Training User Services Comments about NERSC Response Summary Many thanks to the 300 users who responded to this year's User Survey -- this represents the highest response level in the five years we have conducted the survey. The respondents represent all five DOE Science Offices and a variety of home institutions: see User Information. You can see the FY 2002 User Survey text, in which users rated us on a 7-point satisfaction scale. Some areas were also rated on a 3-point

215

2005 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 User Survey Results 5 User Survey Results Show All | 1 2 3 4 5 ... 10 | Next » 2005 User Survey Results Table of Contents Response Summary Respondent Demographics All Satisfaction, Importance and Usefulness Ratings Hardware Resources Software Visualization and Data Analysis Services and Communications Web Interfaces Training Comments about NERSC Response Summary Many thanks to the 201 users who responded to this year's User Survey. The respondents represent all six DOE Science Offices and a variety of home institutions: see Respondent Demographics. The survey responses provide feedback about every aspect of NERSC's operation, help us judge the quality of our services, give DOE information on how well NERSC is doing, and point us to areas we can improve. The survey results are listed below.

216

NIST Optical Radiation Staff Directory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical Radiation Staff Directory. Staff. Name, Position, Office Phone. ... Contact. Optical Radiation Group Eric Shirley, Group Leader. ...

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

217

NVLAP Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry LAP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry LAP. ... This site has been established for applicants to the accreditation program for ionizing radiation dosimetry. ...

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

218

Radiation and Biomolecular Physics Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Welcome. The Radiation and Biomolecular Physics Division is a division ... disseminate the national standards for ionizing radiations and radioactivity ...

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

219

NIST Radiation Thermometry Short Course  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Radiation Thermometry Short Course. ... 2012 NIST Radiation Thermometry Short Course October 15-19, 2012 NIST Gaithersburg, Maryland. ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

NIST Ionizing Radiation Division - 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Ionizing Radiation Division of the Physics Laboratory supports the ... meaningful, and compatible measurements of ionizing radiations (x rays ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-agency radiation survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

TERSat: Trapped Energetic Radiation Satellite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation damage caused by interactions with high-energy particles in the Van Allen Radiation Belts is a leading

Clements, Emily B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Radioactivity and Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioactivity and Radiation Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium and Its Compounds line line What is Uranium? Chemical Forms of Uranium Properties of Uranium Compounds Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium Health Effects Radioactivity and Radiation Discussion of radioactivity and radiation, uranium and radioactivity, radiological health risks of uranium isotopes and decay products. Radioactivity Radioactivity is the term used to describe the natural process by which some atoms spontaneously disintegrate, emitting both particles and energy as they transform into different, more stable atoms. This process, also called radioactive decay, occurs because unstable isotopes tend to transform into a more stable state. Radioactivity is measured in terms of disintegrations, or decays, per unit time. Common units of radioactivity

223

Radiation detection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detection system which utilizes the generation of Cerenkov light in and the transmission of that light longitudinally through fiber optic wave guides in order to transmit intelligence relating to the radiation to a remote location. The wave guides are aligned with respect to charged particle radiation so that the Cerenkov light, which is generated at an angle to the radiation, is accepted by the fiber for transmission therethrough. The Cerenkov radiation is detected, recorded, and analyzed at the other end of the fiber.

Nelson, Melvin A. (Santa Barbara, CA); Davies, Terence J. (Santa Barbara, CA); Morton, III, John R. (Livermore, CA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

PERSONAL RADIATION MONITOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A transistorized, fountain pen type radiation monitor to be worn on the person is described. Radiation produces both light flashes in a small bulb and an audible warning tone, the frequency of both the tone and light flashes being proportional to radiation intensity. The device is powered by a battery and a blocking oscillator step-up power supply The oscillator frequency- is regulated to be proportional to the radiation intensity, to provide adequate power in high radiation fields, yet minimize battery drain at low operating intensities. (AEC)

Dilworth, R.H.; Borkowski, C.J.

1961-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

225

Sandia Laboratories radiation facilities  

SciTech Connect

This brochure is designed as a basic source of information for prospective users of Sandia Laboratories Radiation Facilities. It contains a brief description of the various major radiation sources, a summary of their output characteristics, and additional information useful to experimenters. Radiation source development and source upgrading is an ongoing program, with new source configurations and modes of operation continually being devised to satisfy the ever-changing radiation requirements of the users. For most cases, the information here should allow a potential user to assess the applicability of a particular radiation facility to a proposed experiment and to permit some preirradiation calculations and planning.

Choate, L.M.; Schmidt, T.R.; Schuch, R.L.

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 Project lnfonnation Project Title: C-EAG. Maintenance I grading of existing roads Date: 8/4/2011 and road drainages (barrow ditches): ex 81.3 DOE Code: Contractor Code: Project Lead: Michael J. Taylor [NCO] Project Overview 1. Brief project description [include C-EA 6. Maintenance I grading of existing roads and road drai nages anything that could impact the (barrow ditches) : ex 81.3 environment] Existing roads defined as per May 2010 Aerial Photos. (Changing out culverts, grading I modifying embankments, etc., that has potential to impact wetlands, requires a NCS.) The table below is to be completed by the Project Lead and reviewed by the Environmental Specialist and the DOE NEPA Compliance Officer. NOTE: If Change of Scope occurs, Project Lead must submit a new NEPA Compliance Survey and

227

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Project lnfonnation Project Title: Restoration of 77 -13-SX-3 Date: 2-8-1 0 DOE Code: Contractor Code: Project Lead: Jeff Jones Project Overview We will be restoring 77-SX-3 per procedure. 1. What are the environmental impacts? The duration of this project will be 3-4 days. 2. What is the leg al location? 3. What is the duration of the project? The equipment to be used will be Backhoe, welder, tiller dump truck. 4. What major equipment will be used if any (work over rig , drilling rig , We will take oil contaminated dirt to the Eastside landfarm and backfill with d ean fill dirt from sec. 20. etc.)? The table below is to be completed by the Project Lead and reviewed by the Environmental Specialist and the DOE NEPA Compliance Officer. NOTE: If Change of Scope occurs, Project Lead must submit a new NEPA Compliance Survey and

228

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 Project lnfonnation Project Title: e-EA5. Reclamation of well sites Date: 8/4/2011 DOE Code: Contractor Code: Project Lead: Michael J. Taylor [NCO] Project Overview e-EA 5. Reclamation of wellsites : ex 81.3 and ex 86.1 1. Brief project description [include anything that could impact the Small-scale, short-term cleanup actions including excavation and environment] consolidation of contaminated soils, removal of underground piping, removal of rig anchors or T-bars, drainage control , transport and backfilling of clean soil I fill dirt, and reseeding . The table below is to be completed by the Project Lead and reviewed by the Environmental Specialist and the DOE NEPA Compliance Officer. NOTE: If Change of Scope occurs, Project Lead must submit a new NEPA Compliance Survey and

229

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 Project lnfonnation Project Title: Change out down guy on power pole Date: 2-8-10 DOE Code : Contractor Code: Project Lead: Mike Preston Project Overview 1 What are the environmental No impact to the environment impacts? Power pole east of B-1 -33 2. What is the legal location? 3. What is the duration of the project? 3Hr 4. What major equipment will be used if any (worl< over rig, drilling rig, Backhoe and operator for equ1 pment etc.)? The table below is to be completed by the Project Lead and reviewed by the Environmental Specialist and the DOE NEPA Compliance Officer. NOTE; If ChiingSurvey alld contact Ut TlrCh.,lcal Assunlnce DepartmenL Impacts If YES, then complete below

230

Fermilab Prairie Plant Survey  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Crack the Quadrat* Code! Crack the Quadrat* Code! compass plasnt * What is a Quadrat? It's a one-meter square plot. Plants in the quadrat are identified and counted. Fermilab quadrat specialists can! Attention Citizen Scientists Are you a prairie enthusiast? Learn scientific plant monitoring techniques while enjoying our beautiful prairie. Join a unique science program open to the public, adult groups, families, scouts and more Â…. Become a prairie quadrat specialist and do real science at Fermilab! In the Fermilab Prairie Plant Survey you will learn how to identify prairie plants, map a prairie plot and track restoration progress along with our experts. Use our Website to contribute data you collect. Come once or come back two or three times to see how the prairie changes. Keep an eye on this prairie for years to come!

231

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 Project lnfonnation Project Title: New Drilling Location in Section 29 Date: 12-10-2009 DOE Code: 6730.020.78002 Contractor Code: 8067-371 Project Lead: Mark Duletsky Project Overview The project will involve excavating 3-4 backhoe pits to a depth of about 8 feet to observe soil characteristics 1. What are the environmental impacts? in the vicinity of our planned reserve pit excavation area. 2. What is the legal location? NE 1/4, SE 1/4, Sec. 29. T39N. R78W. Natrona County, Wyoming 3. What is the duration of the project? 4. What major equipment will be used 1 day if any (work over rig, drilling rig, etc.)? Backhoe The table below is to be completed by the Project Lead and reviewed by the Environmental Specialist and the DOE NEPA Compliance Officer. NOTE: If Change of Scope occurs, Project Lead must submit a new NEPA Compliance Survey and

232

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Project l nfonnation Project Title: Reclamation ofT-2-14 Date: 11/2412009 DOE Code: Contractor Code: Project Lead: Jeff Jones Project Overview We will be removing old piping from the treater@ T-2-14. We will also remove the berm and grade and 1. What are the environmental impacts? reclamate location. The duration of this project will be approx. 2 days. Equipment that will be used is as follows backhoe. dumptruck, blade,and a tiller so we can seed with native grasses. 2. What is the legal location? 3. What is the duration of the project? 4. What major equipment will be used if any (woO< over rig, drilling rig, etc.)? The table below Is to be completed by the Project Lead and reviewed by the Environmental Specialist and the DOE NEPA Compliance Officer. NOTE: If Change of Scope occurs, Project Lead must submit a new NEPA Compliance Survey and

233

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 0 Project lnfonnation Project Title: Replace electrical line from well to power pole Date: 3/10/2010 DOE Code: Contractor Code: Project Lead: Mike Preston Project Overview No impact to the environment. 1. What are the environmental impacts? Dig up old electrical line from pumping unit on 61-S-34 to power pole east of well , {approximately 75 feet 2. What is the legal location? from unit) and replace with new line. 3. What is the duration of the project? 4. What major equipment will be used 1 day if any (work over rig , drilling rig , etc.)? Electrician, ditch witch and operator for equipment The table below is to be completed by the Project Lead and reviewed by the Environmental Specialist and the DOE NEPA Compliance Officer. NOTE: If Change of Scope occurs, Project Lead must submit a new NEPA Compliance Survey and

234

SURVEY OF FALLOUT OPERATIONS  

SciTech Connect

A survey was made of fall-out operations in the various countries of the world, These operations are outlined by country. The source of information has largely been the reports submitted to UNSCEAR forwarding data for their consideration. In addition, some material has been received directly in exchange for HASL Quarterlies and other publications of the Laboratory. In many cases, responsible scientists from the country concerned have reviewed the sheets and have made corrections. All of the programs that are shown have been and are subject to modification as time goes on, thus, the data indicate the status of the program as of 1961. No attempt has been made to list re search projects or special fall-out measurements and only programs of a continuing nature have been covered. (auth)

1962-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY 1997  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY 1997. OVERVIEW: MOST POPULOUS STATES ... Homes with air-conditioning: 95%... with a central air-conditioning system: 83%

236

2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Residential Energy Consumption Survey ... Office of Management and Budget, Washington, DC 20503. Form EIA-457A (2001) Form Approval: OMB No. 1905-0092 ...

237

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Radiation Applications Inc - NY 57  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Applications Inc - NY 57 Radiation Applications Inc - NY 57 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: RADIATION APPLICATIONS, INC. ( NY.57 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: RAI NY.57-1 Location: 370 Lexington Avenue , New York , New York NY.57-3 Evaluation Year: 1991 NY.57-4 Site Operations: Developed foam separation techniques and proposed investigations to remove cesium and strontium from fission product waste solutions. No indication that a substantial quantity of radioactive material was involved. NY.57-3 NY.57-5 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote NY.57-4 Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated NY.57-1 Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated

238

RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RADIATION SAFETY is the responsibility of all faculty, staff and students who are directly or indirectly involved in the use of radioisotopes or radiation-producing machines. In July 1963, the State of Texas granted The University of Texas at Austin a broad radioactive materials license for research, development and instruction. While this means a minimum of controls by the state, it requires that The University establish and pursue an effective Radiation Safety Program. The Radiation Safety Committee is responsible for The University's radiation control program outlined in this manual. The use of radiation in a university, where a large number of people may be unaware of their exposure to radiation hazards, makes strict adherence to procedures established by federal and state authorities of paramount importance for the protection of The University and the safety of its faculty, staff and students. It is the responsibility of all faculty, staff and students involved in radiation work to familiarize themselves thoroughly with The University's radiation control program and to comply with its requirements and all applicable federal and state regulations. I hope you will always keep in mind that radiation safety depends on a continuous awareness of potential hazards and on the acceptance

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Solar radiation model validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several mathematical models have been developed within the past few years which estimate the solar radiation from other weather variables. Some of these models have been used to generate data bases which are extensively used in the design and analysis of solar system. Three of these solar radiation models have been used in developing the Augmented SOLMET Solar Data Tapes for the 26 SOLMET sites and the 222 ERSATZ Solar Data Tapes. One of the models, a theoretical one, predicts the solar noon radiation for clear sky conditions from the optical air mass, precipitable water vapor and turbidity variables. A second model, an empirical one, predicts the hourly total horizontal radiation from meteorological variables. And, a third model, also an empirical one, predicts the hourly direct normal radiation from the hourly total horizontal radiation. A study of the accuracy of these three solar radiation models is reported here. To assess the accuracy of these models, data were obtained from several US National Weather Service Stations and other sources, used the models to estimate the solar-radiation, and then compared the modeled radiation values with observed radiation values. The results of these comparisons and conclusions regarding the accuracy of the models are presented.

Hall, I.J.; Prairie, R.R.; Anderson, H.E.; Boes, E.C.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Multidimensional Pattern Matching: A Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for this survey is the problem of searching aerial photographs. The (ambitious) practical goal of this applicationMultidimensional Pattern Matching: A Survey Amihood Amir \\Lambda GIT--CC--92/29 July 1992 Abstract is that of searching an aerial photograph for all ap­ pearances of some object. The issues we discuss are local errors

Amir, Amihood

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-agency radiation survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

1999 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 User Survey Results 9 User Survey Results Show All | 1 2 3 4 5 ... 11 | Next » 1999 User Survey Results Table of Contents Respondent Summary Overall Satisfaction User Information Visualization Consulting and Account Support Information Technology and Communication Hardware Resources Software Training Comments about NERSC All Satisfaction Questions and FY 1998 to FY 1999 Changes Respondent Summary NERSC would like to thank all the users who participated in this year's survey. Your responses provide feedback about every aspect of NERSC's operation, help us judge the quality of our services, give DOE information on how well NERSC is doing, point us to areas we can improve, and show how we compare to similar facilities. This year 177 users responded to our survey, compared with 138 last year.

242

BOREAS Survey On-Line  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FF33"> FF33"> BOREAS Survey On-Line To improve the BOREAS and BOREAS Follow-On data sets and to meet users' needs, we are conducting a survey. The BOREAS and BOREAS Follow-On data sets continue to be important products at the ORNL DAAC. To date we have provided over 8,000 data products from these projects to nearly 1,500 users. We invite you to fill out this survey, identifying any problems you had with the data and documentation or any difficulties you experienced in finding and acquiring the data sets. Information you provide will enable us to address problems that need attention. It will also help us determine which aspects of the BOREAS and BOREAS Follow-On information need to be expanded. You can complete the survey at the BOREAS Home Page. After you complete the on-line survey, submit your answers to the ORNL

243

2004 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 User Survey Results 4 User Survey Results Show All | 1 2 3 4 5 ... 13 | Next » 2004 User Survey Results Table of Contents Response Summary Respondent Demographics Overall Satisfaction and Importance All Satisfaction, Importance and Usefulness Ratings Hardware Resources Software Security and One Time Passwords Visualization and Data Analysis HPC Consulting Services and Communications Web Interfaces Training Comments about NERSC Response Summary Many thanks to the 209 users who responded to this year's User Survey. The respondents represent all six DOE Science Offices and a variety of home institutions: see Respondent Demographics. The survey responses provide feedback about every aspect of NERSC's operation, help us judge the quality of our services, give DOE information on how well NERSC is doing, and point us to areas we can improve. The

244

Results of the radiological survey at Diebold Safe Company, 1550 Grand Boulevard, Hamilton, Ohio (HO001)  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted investigative radiological surveys at Diebold Safe Company, 1550 Grand Boulevard, Hamilton, Ohio in 1988 and 1989. The purpose of the surveys was to determine whether the property was contaminated with radioactive residues, principally {sup 238}U. The surveys included gamma scans; direct and transferable measurements of alpha, beta, and gamma radiation levels; and dust, debris, air, and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. 6 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Residential Energy Consumption Survey:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

E/EIA-0262/2 E/EIA-0262/2 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: 1978-1980 Consumption and Expenditures Part II: Regional Data May 1981 U.S. Department of Energy Energy Information Administration Assistant Administrator for Program Development Office of the Consumption Data System Residential and Commercial Data Systems Division -T8-aa * N uojssaooy 'SOS^-m (£03) ao£ 5925 'uofSfAfQ s^onpojj aa^ndmoo - aojAaag T BU T3gN am rcoj? aig^IT^^ '(adBx Q-naugBH) TOO/T8-JQ/30Q 30^703 OQ ' d jo :moaj ajqBfT^A^ 3J^ sjaodaa aAoqe aqa jo 's-TZTOO-eoo-Tgo 'ON ^ois odo 'g^zo-via/aoQ 'TBST Sujpjjng rXaAang uojidmnsuoo XSaaug sSu-ppjprig ON ^oo^s OdO '^/ZOZO-Via/aOQ *086T aunr '6L6I ?sn§ny og aunf ' jo suja^Bd uoj^dmnsuoo :XaAjng uo^^dmnsuoQ XSaaug OS '9$ '6-ieTOO- 00-T90 OdD 'S/ZOZO-Via/aOa C

246

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Project lnfonnation Project Title: Reclamation of Pits and Boxes Date: Nov. 3, 2010 DOE Code: 6740.010.00000 Contractor Code: 8067-451 Project Lead: Anthony Bowler Project Overview Reclamation of QD.]y the following Pits and Boxes : 1. Brief project description [include 1. B-2-1 0 Skim Box anything that could impact the 2. B-1-14 Skim Box environment 3. Near66-1-STX-14 Pit 2. Legal location 4. T-5-10 Skim Box 3. Duration of the project 5. WDFUpperPit 6. WDFLowerPit 4. Major equipment to be used 7. WDFSkimBox 8. B-1-3 Pit 9. B-1 -3 Skim Box 10. T-2-34 Pit 11 . B-1-10 Pit 12. B-1 -10 Skim Box 13. SE of SG3 & Welding Shop Skim Box 14. 58.Q4-1-SX-3 Skim Box 15. Near Tank 126 Skim Box 16. 77-1-SX-3 NW of Well Pit 17. T-5-3 Pit

247

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 ARM 2003 Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement WARNING! WARNING! Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Two Topics Two Topics * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement ARM Status - Science ARM Status - Science * Steadily increasing productivity - Poster session - over 220 posters (may need to do something about submissions next year) - Peer-reviewed articles: 2.5 to 3 per year per

248

RADIATION WAVE DETECTION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Radiation waves can be detected by simultaneously measuring radiation- wave intensities at a plurality of space-distributed points and producing therefrom a plot of the wave intensity as a function of time. To this end. a detector system is provided which includes a plurality of nuclear radiation intensity detectors spaced at equal radial increments of distance from a source of nuclear radiation. Means are provided to simultaneously sensitize the detectors at the instant a wave of radiation traverses their positions. the detectors producing electrical pulses indicative of wave intensity. The system further includes means for delaying the pulses from the detectors by amounts proportional to the distance of the detectors from the source to provide an indication of radiation-wave intensity as a function of time.

Wouters, L.F.

1960-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

249

Effects of atomic radiation  

SciTech Connect

This book focuses on the lifelong effects of atomic radiation exposure in language understandable by the concerned layperson or the specialist in another field. The base of knowledge used is the work of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission and its successor since 1975 the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. Within the range of Chronic effects on human health the book provides a thorough review, although effects of nonionizing radiation, effects on structures, effects on other living species, and acute effects are not discussed.

Schull, W.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

250

Nevada Test Site Area 25. Radiological survey and cleanup project, 1974-1983. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes radiological survey, decontamination and decommissioning of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Area 25 facilities and land areas incorporated in the Nuclear Rocket Development Station (NRDS). Buildings, facilities and support systems used after 1959 for nuclear reactor and engine testing were surveyed for the presence of radioactive contamination. The cleanup was part of the Surplus Facilities Management Program funded by the Department of Energy's Richland Operations Office. The radiological survey portion of the project encompassed portable instrument surveys and removable contamination surveys (swipe) for alpha and beta plus gamma radiation contamination of facilities, equipment and land areas. Soil sampling was also accomplished. The majority of Area 25 facilities and land areas have been returned to unrestricted use. Remaining radiologically contaminated areas are posted with warning signs and barricades. 12 figures.

McKnight, R.K.; Rosenberry, C.E.; Orcutt, J.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Radiation coloration resistant glass  

SciTech Connect

A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10.sup.7 rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency.

Tomozawa, Minoru (Troy, NY); Watson, E. Bruce (Troy, NY); Acocella, John (Troy, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Radiation Shielding Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shielding Radiation Shielding Applications Heavy concrete is standard concrete in which conventional aggregate (typically gravel) is replaced with aggregate composed of a dense...

253

Radiation Hazards Program (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Health, set allowable radiation standards and mitigation practices, as well as procedures for the transportation of hazardous material.

254

Synchrotron Radiation Effects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Synchrotron Radiation Effects in the IR Solenoid Flux Excluder Peter Tenenbaum LCC-Note-0007 Draft 23-September-1998 Abstract We examine the emittance dilution due to synchrotron...

255

Human Radiation Experiments: Multimedia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the oral histories of researchers and others possessing firsthand knowledge of human radiation experimentation during World War II and the Cold War. Film Clips: Document...

256

Atomic Radiation (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article states permissible levels of radiation in unrestricted areas, environmental standards for uranium fuel cycle and information about notification of incidents.

257

Quick Reference Information - Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gamma and x-rays are photons. Protons: Positively charged elementary particles found in atomic nuclei. Radiation: The propagation of energy through space, or some other medium,...

258

Living with radiation  

SciTech Connect

The authors present an account of the hopes and fears associated with ionizing radiation, extending from nuclear energy and medical radiation to nuclear weapons. They argue that a justified fear of nuclear weapons has led to a widespread, unjustified, and unreasoning fear of the beneficial applications of radiation. Although these two aspects of atomic energy are tied together-they both involve the nucleus of the atom and its radioactive rays-a deep misunderstanding of this relationship by the general public has evolved since the time of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The authors' aim is to place the beneficial applications of nuclear radiation in perspective.

Wagner, H.N. Jr. (Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD (USA). Div. of Nuclear Medicine); Ketchum, L.E. (Proclinica, Inc., New York, NY (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study Science Objective This field campaign is designed to increase scientific knowledge about the evolution of black carbon, primary organic...

260

Telluric Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Telluric Survey Telluric Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Telluric Survey Details Activities (3) Areas (3) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Electrical Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Electromagnetic Sounding Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock composition, mineral and clay content Stratigraphic/Structural: Detection of permeable pathways, fracture zones, faults Hydrological: Resistivity influenced by porosity, grain size distribution, permeability, fluid saturation, fluid type and phase state of the pore water Thermal: Resistivity influenced by temperature Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 522.2252,222 centUSD

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-agency radiation survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Building Energy Codes Survey Tool  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Codes Program Codes Program Building Energy Codes Survey Tool The following surveys are available: No available surveys Please contact ( webmaster@energycode.pnl.gov ) for further assistance. English Albanian Arabic Basque Belarusian Bosnian Bulgarian Catalan Chinese (Simplified) Chinese (Traditional; Hong Kong) Chinese (Traditional; Taiwan) Croatian Czech Danish Dutch Dutch Informal English Estonian Finnish French Galician German German informal Greek Hebrew Hindi Hungarian Icelandic Indonesian Irish Italian Italian (formal) Japanese Korean Latvian Lithuanian Macedonian Malay Maltese Norwegian (Bokmal) Norwegian (Nynorsk) Persian Polish Portuguese Portuguese (Brazilian) Punjabi Romanian Russian Serbian Sinhala Slovak Slovenian Spanish Spanish (Mexico) Swedish Thai Turkish Urdu Vietnamese Welsh

262

Disposition Schedule: Human Radiation Experiments | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Schedule: Human Radiation Experiments Disposition Schedule: Human Radiation Experiments This database contains information on records collections related to human radiation...

263

2008/2009 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

13.4%. The MPP hours used by the survey respondents represents 70.2 percent of total NERSC MPP usage as of the end of the survey period. The PDSF hours used by the PDSF survey...

264

2011 NERSC User Survey (Read Only)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Results Survey Text 2011 NERSC User Survey (Read Only) The survey is closed. Section 1: Overall Satisfaction with NERSC When you are finished with this page click "Save & Go to...

265

Aerial Radiation Monitoring Data over Sea Near Fukushima | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Aerial Radiation Monitoring Data over Sea Near Fukushima Aerial Radiation Monitoring Data over Sea Near Fukushima Aerial Radiation Monitoring Data over Sea Near Fukushima The enclosed package represents radiation data collected over the ocean with the fixed-wing aircraft (C-12) on April 5th, April 18th, and May 9th. The data were collected with an array of large thallium activated sodium iodide (NaI(T)) crystals and associated readout electronics to produce time and location referenced measurements. These results represent raw data that have been validated. They do not include any further evaluation. AMS C12 Sea Data.csv AMS C12 Sea Data Dictionary.pdf AMS C12 Sea Data.kmz More Documents & Publications Social Security Number Reduction Project 2011 - Federal Viewpoint Survey Reports Appendices for the Basis Document

266

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Slide Shows  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dose Health Effects of Radiation Health Effects of Radiation Adaptive Response to Low Dose Radiation PDF Background Radiation PDF Bystander Effects PDF Dirty Bombs PDF DNA Damage...

267

Radiation detection system  

SciTech Connect

A radiation detection system including a radiation-to-light converter and fiber optic wave guides to transmit the light to a remote location for processing. The system utilizes fluors particularly developed for use with optical fibers emitting at wavelengths greater than about 500 nm and having decay times less than about 10 ns.

Franks, Larry A. (Santa Barbara, CA); Lutz, Stephen S. (Santa Barbara, CA); Lyons, Peter B. (Los Alamos, NM)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Solar radiation modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sun is the main energy source of the life on the Earth. Thus, solar radiation energy data and models are important for many areas of research and applications. Many parameters influence the amount of solar energy at a particular standing point of ... Keywords: Digital elevation model, Energy of quasiglobal radiation, Meteorology, Shadows, Virtual Sun motion

Klemen Zakšek; Toma Podobnikar; Krištof Oštir

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Electromagnetic radiation detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electromagnetic radiation detector including a collimating window, a cathode member having a photoelectric emissive material surface angularly disposed to said window whereby radiation is impinged thereon at acute angles, an anode, separated from the cathode member by an evacuated space, for collecting photoelectrons emitted from the emissive cathode surface, and a negatively biased, high transmissive grid disposed between the cathode member and anode.

Benson, Jay L. (Albuquerque, NM); Hansen, Gordon J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Coal Survey Frequently Asked Questions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Survey FAQ Survey FAQ Available FAQ: Q. Whom do I contact if I need assistance completing a survey form? Q. Whom do I contact if I require assistance with the registration process, log-in process, instructions pertaining to JavaScript or cookies? Q. What unit of measurement should be used to calculate Btu? Q. How do I update the information that appears under Item I on IDC? Q. Under "Item II: Coal Receipts, Consumption and Stocks," can a value be negative? Q. How do I convert between short tons and metric tons? Vice Versa. Q. How do I convert between pounds to short tons? Vice Versa. Q. How do I correct a mistake on the Survey Form once I have submitted the data? Q. How do I log in if forgot my password? Q. If I accidently deleted the registration letters, how can I get my Mail ID and Code?

271

Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey -- Overview  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Survey > Overview Survey > Overview Overview Percent of FBSS Buildings and Floorspace by Selected Agencies, FY 1993 Percent of FBSS Buildings and Floorspace by Selected Agencies, FY 1993 Sources: Energy Information Administration, Energy Markets and End Use, 1993 Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey. Divider Line Highlights on Federal Buildings The Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey 1993 provides building-level energy-related characteristics for a special sample of commercial buildings owned by the Government. Extensive analysis of the data was not conducted because this report represents the 881 responding buildings (buildings for which interviews were completed) and cannot be used to generalize about Federal buildings in each region. Crosstabulations of the data from the 881 buildings are provided in the Detailed Tables section.

272

2001 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 User Survey Results 1 User Survey Results Show All | 1 2 3 4 5 ... 11 | Next » 2001 User Survey Results Table of Contents Response Summary User Information Overall Satisfaction and Importance All Satisfaction Questions and Changes from Previous Years NERSC Information Management (NIM) System Web and Communications Hardware Resources Software Training User Services Comments about NERSC Response Summary NERSC extends its thanks to the 237 users who participated in this year's survey; this compares with 134 respondents last year. The respondents represent all five DOE Science Offices and a variety of home institutions: see User Information. Your responses provide feedback about every aspect of NERSC's operation, help us judge the quality of our services, give DOE information on how well

273

2012 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

operation, help us judge the quality of our services, give DOE information on how well NERSC is doing, and point us to areas we can improve. The survey strives to be...

274

Underwater radiation detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A detector apparatus for differentiating between gamma and neutron radiation is provided. The detector includes a pair of differentially shielded Geiger-Mueller tubes. The first tube is wrapped in silver foil and the second tube is wrapped in lead foil. Both the silver and lead foils allow the passage of gamma rays at a constant rate in a gamma ray only field. When neutrons are present, however, the silver activates and emits beta radiation that is also detected by the silver wrapped Geiger-Mueller tube while the radiation detected by the lead wrapped Geiger-Mueller tube remains constant. The amount of radiation impinging on the separate Geiger-Mueller tubes is then correlated in order to distinguish between the neutron and gamma radiations.

Kruse, Lyle W. (Albuquerque, NM); McKnight, Richard P. (Albuquerque, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Fundamentals of Radiation Dosimetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The basic concepts of radiation dosimetry are reviewed on basis of ICRU reports and text books. The radiation field is described with, among others, the particle fluence. Cross sections for indirectly ionizing radiation are defined and indicated is how they are related to the mass energy transfer and mass energy absorption coefficients. Definitions of total and restricted mass stopping powers of directly ionizing radiation are given. The dosimetric quantities, kerma, absorbed dose and exposure together with the relations between them are discussed in depth. Finally it is indicated how the absorbed dose can be measured with a calorimeter by measuring the temperature increase and with an ionisation chamber measuring the charge produced by the ionizing radiation and making use of the Bragg-Gray relation.

Bos, Adrie J. J. [Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Mekelweg 15, 2629JB Delft (Netherlands)

2011-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

276

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Organizations Funding Radiation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Funding Radiation Research Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission Centers for Medical Countermeasures Against Radiological and...

277

National Solar Radiation Data Base

The National Solar Radiation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National Solar Radiation Data Base (NSRDB) is the most comprehensive collection of solar data freely available. The 1991 - 2005 NSRDB contains hourly solar radiation (including...

278

Radiation effects on humans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation effects on humans Radiation effects on humans Name: Joe Kemna Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am trying to find information on radiation. I need the effects on humans, the damage it causes to the environment, and any extra information you might have on the subject. Thank you for your time. Replies: Your library should be a good place to start, but first you need to narrow your question a bit. "Radiation" means radio waves, heat, light (including the ultraviolet light that causes suntan and sunburn), and what's called "ionizing radiation." By far the major source of the first three is the Sun, while the last I believe comes principally from cosmic rays and various naturally radioactive elements like uranium and radon. The most significant manmade sources of exposure would --- I think --- be household wiring and appliances (radio), engines and heating devices (heat), lamps (light), and X-ray machines, flying at high altitude in airplanes, and living in well-insulated homes built over radon sources (ionizing radiation). Heat, light and ionizing radiation play vital roles in the ecology of the Earth. Radio, light (in particular "tanning" ultraviolet), and ionizing radiation have all been widely assumed at different times to be particularly good or particularly bad for human health. Some recent issues of public concern have been the effect of radio waves from electric transmission lines, the effect on skin cancer incidence from tanning and sunburns, the depletion of the ultraviolet-light-produced ozone in the upper atmosphere by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), "global warming" from the increased absorption of heat radiation from the surface by atmospheric carbon dioxide and methane, and the effect of a long exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation as for example the people of Eastern Europe are experiencing from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.

279

The Properties of Undulator Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a Dedicated Synchrotron Radiation Facility," IEEE Trans.1983), "Characteristics of Synchrotron Radiation and of itsHandbook on Synchrotron Radiation, E. -E. Koch.1A. 65-172,

Howells, M.R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Coherent Radiation in an Undulator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solving the particle-radiation system in a self-consistentto clarify the coherent radiation mechanism. References 1.the Proceedings Coherent Radiation in an Undulator Y,H. Chin

Chin, Y.H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-agency radiation survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

I RADIOLOGICAL SCOPING SURVEY OF FO,RMER MONSANTO' FACILITIES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-I a.d *4dk *-f--l- -I a.d *4dk *-f--l- --- I. ,e-- - .- --_ -- -. ;,. -* " . I . RADIOLOGICAL SCOPING SURVEY OF FO,RMER MONSANTO' FACILITIES (Unit XII and W a rehouse) DAYTON, OHIO Report Date: 4 September 1997 Survey Dak 27 Aitgust 1991 Prepared by: Mark L. Mays, Chief Radiation Safety Branch Sponsored by: M iamisburg Environmental Matigement Reject Office Ohio FTekl Ofice U.S.. Department of Energy Conducted by: %diation Safety Branch Of&e of Environmental Management ggtb Air Base W ing U.S. Departmtnt of the Air Force In Cooperation W ith: Southwest District Office Ohio Environmental Protection Agency - O h io Cnvironmwhl Protection Agenty Bureau of Radiological Health Ohio Department of Health. I Lb ^U .L*-u i-.-r- --- , .., II ,.--(_ ~_ -_- --- -_ _.. ;

282

Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation Exposures Review of phenomenon appears in Radiation Research Pamela Sykes and Benjamin Blyth One concern of radiobiologists is the effect radiation exposure might have on nearby unirradiated cells. For example, when only a small fraction of cells are directly hit by radiation energy, are the surrounding unirradiated cells also at an increased risk of cancer? The term "radiation-induced bystander effect" is used to describe radiation-induced biological changes that occur in unirradiated cells within an irradiated cell population. Radiation-induced bystander effects have become established in the vernacular and are considered as an authentic radiation response. However, there is still no consensus on a precise definition of the term, which

283

BWR radiation control: plant demonstration. Volume 2. Appendixes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first year's progress is presented for a four-year program intended to implement and evaluate BRAC radiation reduction operational guidelines at the Vermont Yankee BWR and to document the results in sufficient detail to provide guidance to other BWR owners. Past operational, chemistry and radiation level data have been reviewed to provide a historical base of reference. Extensive sampling and chemistry monitoring systems have been installed to evaluate plant chemistry status and the effects of program implemented changes. Radiation surveys and piping gamma scans are being performed at targeted locations to quantify radiation level trends and to identify and quantify piping isotopics. Contact radiation levels on the recirculation line at Vermont Yankee have been increasing at a rate of 175 mR/h-EFPY since 1978. A materials survey of feedwater and reactor components in contact with the process liquid has been performed to identify sources of corrosion product release, particularly cobalt and nickel. A feedwater oxygen injection system has been installed to evaluate the effects of oxygen control on feedwater materials corrosion product releases. A baseline performance evaluation of the condensate treatment and reactor water cleanup systems has been completed. Data on organics and ionics at Vermont Yankee have been obtained. A methodology of BWR feedwater system layup during extended outages was developed, and an evaluation performed of layup and startup practices utilized at Vermont Yankee during the fall 1980 and 1981 refueling outages.

Palino, G.F.; Hobart, R.L.; Wall, P.S.; Sawochka, S.G.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Florida Radiation Protection Act (Florida)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Public Health is responsible for administering a statewide radiation protection program. The program is designed to permit development and utilization of sources of radiation for...

285

NVLAP Radiation Detection Instruments LAP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation Detection Instruments LAP. Leticia Pibida uses a hand-held radiation detection device to check cargo. Photo: Copyright Robert Rathe. ...

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

286

Human Radiation Experiments: What's New  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Defense Report Finding Aids Department of Defense Report on Search for Human Radiation Experiments Records 1944-1994 Exit Human Radiation Experiments Site This...

287

Radiation Effects in Nanoporous Gold  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Foams with filament and porous sizes in the range of nanometers could be unusually resistant to radiation because radiation induced point defects cannot ...

288

An aerial radiological survey of the Pilgrim Station Nuclear Power Plant and surrounding area, Plymouth, Massachusetts  

SciTech Connect

Terrestrial radioactivity surrounding the Pilgrim Station Nuclear Power Plant was measured using aerial radiolog- ical survey techniques. The purpose of this survey was to document exposure rates near the plant and to identify unexpected, man-made radiation sources within the survey area. The surveyed area included land areas within a three-mile radius of the plant site. Data were acquired using an airborne detection system that employs sodium iodide, thallium-activated detectors. Exposure rate and photopeak counts were computed from these data and plotted on aerial photographs of the survey area. Several ground-based exposure measurements were made for comparison with the,aerial survey results. Exposure rates in areas surrounding the plant site varied from 6 to 10 microroentgens per hour, with exposure rates below 6 microroentgens per hour occurring over bogs and marshy areas. Man-made radiation was found to be higher than background levels at the plant site. Radation due to nitrogen-1 6, which is produced in the steam cycle of a boiling-water reactor, was the primaty source of activity found at the plant site. Cesium-137 activity at levels slightly above those expected from natural fallout was found at isolated locations inland from the plant site. No other detectable sources of man-made radioactivity were found.

Proctor, A.E.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Composition for radiation shielding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield has a depleted urum core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container.

Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

The Intense Radiation Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new dispersion relation for photons that are nonlinearly interacting with a radiation gas of arbitrary intensity due to photon-photon scattering. It is found that the photon phase velocity decreases with increasing radiation intensity, it and attains a minimum value in the limit of super-intense fields. By using Hamilton's ray equations, a self-consistent kinetic theory for interacting photons is formulated. The interaction between an electromagnetic pulse and the radiation gas is shown to produce pulse self-compression and nonlinear saturation. Implications of our new results are discussed.

M. Marklund; P. K. Shukla; B. Eliasson

2004-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

291

METHOD FOR MEASURING RADIATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for measuring an unknown integrated quantity of radiation with a condenser ionization chamber is described. The chamber is initially charged to a predetermined voltage by a voltage source. The chamber is then removed from the source and exposed to an unknown quantity of radiation for a period of time. The quantity of radiation to which the chamber was exposed is then measured by detecting the magnitude of the pulse of current necessary to recharge the chamber of its initial value through a suitable impedance. The current pulse is amplified and measured directly by a suitable pulse height analyzing system. (AEC)

Roesch, W.C.; McCall, R.C.

1961-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

292

Miniaturized radiation chirper  

SciTech Connect

The disclosure relates to a miniaturized radiation chirper for use with a small battery supplying on the order of 5 volts. A poor quality CdTe crystal which is not necessarily suitable for high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy is incorporated with appropriate electronics so that the chirper emits an audible noise at a rate that is proportional to radiation exposure level. The chirper is intended to serve as a personnel radiation warning device that utilizes new and novel electronics with a novel detector, a CdTe crystal. The resultant device is much smaller and has much longer battery life than existing chirpers.

Umbarger, C. John (Los Alamos, NM); Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

The Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey: Survey Description and Data Reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS), a 1.1 mm continuum survey at 33" effective resolution of 170 square degrees of the Galactic Plane visible from the northern hemisphere. The survey is contiguous over the range -10.5 90%) and the linear scale at which the attenuation re aches 50% is 3.8'. Comparison with other millimeter-wave data sets implies a possible systematic offset in flux calibration, for which no cause has been discovered. This presentation serves as a companion and guide to the public data release through NASA's Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC) Infrared Science Archive (IRSA). New data releases will be provided through IPAC IRSA with any future improvements in the reduction.

Aguirre, James E; Dunham, Miranda K; Drosback, Meredith M; Bally, John; Battersby, Cara; Bradley, Eric Todd; Cyganowski, Claudia; Dowell, Darren; Evans, Neal J; Glenn, Jason; Harvey, Paul; Rosolowsky, Erik; Stringfellow, Guy S; Walawender, Josh; Williams, Jonathan P

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY 1997 CONSUMPTION AND ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Residential Sector energy Intensities for 1978-1997 using data from EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey.

295

Zigzag Survey Designs in Line Transect Sampling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

survey lines are frequently used in shipboard and aerial line transect surveys of animal populations; Systematic designs; Zigzag designs. 1. INTRODUCTION Shipboard and aerial line transect surveys are widelyZigzag Survey Designs in Line Transect Sampling Samantha STRINDBERG and Stephen T. BUCKLAND Zigzag

Buckland, Steve

296

Method of enhancing radiation response of radiation detection materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method of increasing radiation response of a radiation detection material for a given radiation signal by first pressurizing the radiation detection material. Pressurization may be accomplished by any means including mechanical and/or hydraulic. In this application, the term "pressure" includes fluid pressure and/or mechanical stress.

Miller, Steven D. (Richland, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Quality Profile  

SciTech Connect

The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) is a periodic national survey that provides timely information about energy consumption and expenditures of U.S. households and about energy-related characteristics of housing units. The survey was first conducted in 1978 as the National Interim Energy Consumption Survey (NIECS), and the 1979 survey was called the Household Screener Survey. From 1980 through 1982 RECS was conducted annually. The next RECS was fielded in 1984, and since then, the survey has been undertaken at 3-year intervals. The most recent RECS was conducted in 1993.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

BNL NASA Space Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Activation Decay Times Activation Decay Times The beam used for experimentation at the NSRL facility will result in activation of material exposed to it. All materials irradiated in the NSRL target room are to be controlled as radioactive until surveyed and released by a BNL Radiological Controls Technician (RCT). Samples that have had radioactive tracers such as 3H or 14C added to them shall be controlled as radioactive through out the entire process and will not be released as non-radioactive. When liquid samples are activated, there exists a potential for dispersion of radioactive material through spilling of the sample during handling or manipulation creating a contamination area. Activated samples containing liquids that are manipulated required additional Radiological Training (Benchtop/Dispersable Training), a designated (Posted) radiological area to perform work in, and a Radiation Work Permit (RWP). When samples have had enough time to decay they again become non-dispersible and no special radiological handling is required. Correct and appropriate biological handling techniques always apply regardless of the sample's radiological status.

299

Ionizing radiation detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ionizing radiation detector is provided which is based on the principal of analog electronic integration of radiation sensor currents in the sub-pico to nano ampere range between fixed voltage switching thresholds with automatic voltage reversal each time the appropriate threshold is reached. The thresholds are provided by a first NAND gate Schmitt trigger which is coupled with a second NAND gate Schmitt trigger operating in an alternate switching state from the first gate to turn either a visible or audible indicating device on and off in response to the gate switching rate which is indicative of the level of radiation being sensed. The detector can be configured as a small, personal radiation dosimeter which is simple to operate and responsive over a dynamic range of at least 0.01 to 1000 R/hr.

Thacker, L.H.

1989-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

300

Flexible Composite Radiation Detector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flexible Composite Radiation Detector Flexible Composite Radiation Detector Flexible Composite Radiation Detector A flexible composite scintillator was prepared by mixing fast, bright, dense rare-earth doped powdered oxyorthosilicate (such as LSO:Ce, LSO:Sm, and GSO:Ce) scintillator with a polymer binder. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Flexible Composite Radiation Detector A flexible composite scintillator was prepared by mixing fast, bright, dense rare-earth doped powdered oxyorthosilicate (such as LSO:Ce, LSO:Sm, and GSO:Ce) scintillator with a polymer binder. The binder is transparent to the scintillator emission. The composite is seamless and can be made large and in a wide variety of shapes. Importantly, the composite can be tailored to emit light in a spectral region that matches the optimum

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-agency radiation survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

ARM - Measurement - Backscattered radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsBackscattered radiation govMeasurementsBackscattered radiation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Backscattered radiation The scattering of radiant energy into the hemisphere of space bounded by a plane normal to the direction of the incident radiation and lying on the same side as the incident ray. Categories Aerosols, Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System IAP : In-situ Aerosol Profiles (Cessna Aerosol Flights)

302

Low Dose Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ancient Salt Beds Ancient Salt Beds Repository Science Renewable Energy The WIPP Underground may be ideal to study effects of Very Low Dose Rates on Biological Systems Low Background Radiation Experiment We're all bathing in it. It's in the food we eat, the water we drink, the soil we tread and even the air we breathe. It's background radiation, it's everywhere and we can't get away from it. But what would happen if you somehow "pulled the plug" on natural background radiation? Would organisms suffer or thrive if they grew up without their constant exposure to background radiation? That's what a consortium of scientists conducting an experiment at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant aim to find out. Despite being an underground repository for transuranic radioactive waste,

303

Amorphous silicon radiation detectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

Street, Robert A. (Palo Alto, CA); Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA); Kaplan, Selig N. (El Cerrito, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Amorphous silicon radiation detectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

1992-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

305

Ionizing radiation detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ionizing radiation detector is provided which is based on the principle of analog electronic integration of radiation sensor currents in the sub-pico to nano ampere range between fixed voltage switching thresholds with automatic voltage reversal each time the appropriate threshold is reached. The thresholds are provided by a first NAND gate Schmitt trigger which is coupled with a second NAND gate Schmitt trigger operating in an alternate switching state from the first gate to turn either a visible or audible indicating device on and off in response to the gate switching rate which is indicative of the level of radiation being sensed. The detector can be configured as a small, personal radiation dosimeter which is simple to operate and responsive over a dynamic range of at least 0.01 to 1000 R/hr.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Portal radiation monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portal radiation monitor combines 0.1% FAR with high sensitivity to special nuclear material. The monitor utilizes pulse shape discrimination, dynamic compression of the photomultiplier output and scintillators sized to maintain efficiency over the entire portal area.

Kruse, Lyle W. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Radiation Stress Estimators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiation stresses Sij associated with the propagation of wind-generated waves are principal driving forces for several important surf-zone processes. The accurate estimation of the onshore flux of longshore-directed mean momentum Syx, using ...

S. S. Pawka; D. L. Inman; R. T. Guza

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Adaptive multigroup radiation diffusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes the development and implementation of an algorithm for dramatically increasing the accuracy and reliability of multigroup radiation diffusion simulations at low group counts. This is achieved by ...

Williams, Richard B., Sc. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

An aerial radiological survey of the Robert Emmett Ginna Nuclear Power Plant and surrounding area, Ontario, New York  

SciTech Connect

Terrestrial radioactivity surrounding the Robert Emmett Ginna Nuclear Power Plant was measured using aerial radiological surveying techniques. The purpose of this survey was to document exposure rates near the plant and to identify unexpected, man-made radiation sources within the survey area. The surveyed area included land areas within a three-mile radius of the plant site. Data were acquired using an airborne detection system that employed sodium iodide, thallium-activated detectors. Exposure-rate and photopeak counts were computed from these data and plotted on aerial photographs of the survey area. Several ground-based exposure measurements were made for comparison with the aerial survey results. Exposure rates in the area surrounding the plant site varied from 6 to 10 microroentgens per hour. Man-made radiation (cobalt-60 within the plant site and cesium-1 37 directly over the reactor) was found at the plant site. In addition, small areas of suspected cesium-137 activity were found within the survey areas. Other than these small sites, the survey area was free of man-made radioac- tivity.

Proctor, A.E.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Agencies with Radiation Regulatory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agencies with Radiation Regulatory Concerns and Involvement Agencies with Radiation Regulatory Concerns and Involvement Biological Effects of Low Level Exposures (BELLE) Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission Center for Risk Excellence Health Protection Agency The Health Risks of Extraterrestrial Environments International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, Inc. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA) NASA Space Radiation Program National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) NASA OBRR Task Book Publication National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) National Toxicology Program (NTP) Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

311

P ORNiiTM-7004 Results of Ground Level Radiation  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ORNiiTM-7004 ORNiiTM-7004 Results of Ground Level Radiation Measurements in Support of the 1978 Aerial Survey of the Lake Ontario Ordnance W o rks, Lewiston, New York _ ict~~.. By A, grven _, ,_~ ~.~ _,. :::;(' ~. . ' -- .- ,. R. W . Doane F. F. Haywood W . H. Shinpaugh ORNL/TM-7004 Dist. Category UC-41 Contract No. W-7405eng-26 RESULTS OF GROUND LEVEL RADIATION MEASUREMENTS IN SUPPORT OF THE 1978 AERIAL SURVEY OF THE LAKE ONTARIO ORDNANCE WORKS, LEWISTON, NEW YORK B. A. Berven F. F. Haywood R. W. Doane W. H. Shinpaugh Work performed by Health and Safety Research Division Date Published: September 1979 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 operated by UNION CARBIDE CORPORATION for the DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites -

312

Refraction Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Refraction Survey Refraction Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Refraction Survey Details Activities (16) Areas (13) Regions (5) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Active Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Can provide information on crustal thickness, depth to basement. Hydrological: Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 6,206.80620,680 centUSD 6.207 kUSD 0.00621 MUSD 6.2068e-6 TUSD / mile Median Estimate (USD): 10,877.331,087,733 centUSD 10.877 kUSD 0.0109 MUSD 1.087733e-5 TUSD / mile

313

Geodetic Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geodetic Survey Geodetic Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Geodetic Survey Details Activities (17) Areas (10) Regions (5) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Remote Sensing Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Passive Sensors Parent Exploration Technique: Passive Sensors Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Map regional strain rates Hydrological: Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 250.0025,000 centUSD 0.25 kUSD 2.5e-4 MUSD 2.5e-7 TUSD / point Median Estimate (USD): 600.0060,000 centUSD 0.6 kUSD 6.0e-4 MUSD 6.0e-7 TUSD / point High-End Estimate (USD): 1,500.00150,000 centUSD 1.5 kUSD 0.0015 MUSD 1.5e-6 TUSD / point Time Required Low-End Estimate: 5 days0.0137 years

314

The UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey (GPS) is one of the five near infrared Public Legacy Surveys that are being undertaken by the UKIDSS consortium, using the Wide Field Camera on the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope. It is surveying 1868 sq.deg. of the northern and equatorial Galactic plane at Galactic latitudes -5Science results from DR2 and from the Science Verification programme. These results illustrate how GPS data will frequently be combined with data taken in other wavebands to produce scientific results. The Demonstration Science includes studies of: (i) the star formation region G28.983-0.603, cross matching with Spitzer-GLIMPSE data to identify YSOs; (ii) the M17 nebula; (iii) H_2 emission in the rho Ophiuchi dark cloud; (iv) X-ray sources in the Galactic Centre; (v) external galaxies in the Zone of Avoidance; (vi) IPHAS-GPS optical-infrared spectrophotometric typing. (abridged).

P. W. Lucas; M. G. Hoare; A. Longmore; A. C. Schroder; C. J. Davis; A. Adamson; R. M. Bandyopadhyay; R. de Grijs; M. Smith; A. Gosling; S. Mitchison; A. Gaspar; M. Coe; M. Tamura; Q. Parker; M. Irwin; N. Hambly; J. Bryant; R. S. Collins; N. Cross; D. W. Evans; E. Gonzalez-Solares; S. Hodgkin; J. Lewis; M. Read; M. Riello; E. T. W. Sutorius; A. Lawrence; J. E. Drew; S. Dye; M. A. Thompson

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Radiation and viral DNA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation and viral DNA Radiation and viral DNA Name: Loretta L Lamb Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Can viral DNA be changed through exposure to radiation? If so, what type of radiation will do this? Can these irradiated viruses cause changes in the genome of any human cells they may infect? Can these (or any) viruses actually cause cancer, or do they merely act as triggering devices for cancer? Replies: In theory, any nucleic acid (viral or otherwise) can be changed by exposure to many kinds of radiation. Depending on the type of virus, these may then change the human cells that they infect. Although there are many different things that are being implicated in causing cancers, it looks like a fairly common model involves the sequential "knockout" of several human genes. Viruses may be one cause of such gene changes, radiation and other environmental causes may also contribute. Some of these changes may be inherited through families, so it becomes more likely that the environmental factors may happen to "hit" the right places in cells to cause cancers in these families. If you ask something more specific, perhaps I can focus my response a bit more

316

Packet personal radiation monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiation events, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible "chirp". The rate of the "chirps" is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field.

Phelps, James E. (Knoxville, TN)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

To: John R. Novak Radiation Safety - IRS From: G. T. Lonergan Radiation Safety - II§  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

7, 19% 7, 19% To: John R. Novak Radiation Safety - IRS From: G. T. Lonergan Radiation Safety - II§ Subject: Extrusion of Billets, Titus Metals, Inc., Waterloo, Iowa A grpup of ANL aqloyees consisting of LE. Walker and S. Matsas (MET), E. Leverens (SSE), I(. C.~Buffy'(SPM), and G. T. Lonergan (IRS), traveled to Waterloo, Iowa, on June 29 where they accomplished the extrusion of U308 billets into fuel plates for Argonaut. Prior to beginning the extrusion operation, the floor area around the press, run-out table, stretch straightener, and all accessible portions of the press were surveyed. No activity was detected. The floor area from the furnace (uhere the billets were heated) to the press was coveredwith a layer of vinyl approximately 48fl wide and topped

318

"CONFIRMATORY SURVEY RESULTS FOR THE ABB COMBUSTION ENGINEERING SITE WINDSOR, CONNECTICUT DCN 5158-SR-02-2  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the confirmatory activities were to provide independent contractor field data reviews and to generate independent radiological data for use by the NRC in evaluating the adequacy and accuracy of the contractor?s procedures and FSS results. ORAU reviewed ABB CE?s decommissioning plan, final status survey plan, and the applicable soil DCGLs, which were developed based on an NRC-approved radiation dose assessment. The surveys include gamma surface scans, gamma direct measurements, and soil sampling.

ADAMS, WADE C

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

319

Department of Energy: 2011 Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy 2011 Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey: Trend Report Response Summary Surveys...

320

Reflection Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Reflection Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Reflection Survey Details Activities (35) Areas (22) Regions (2) NEPA(3) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Seismic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Active Seismic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Rock unit density influences elastic wave velocities. Stratigraphic/Structural: Structural geology- faults, folds, grabens, horst blocks, sedimentary layering, discontinuities, etc. Hydrological: Combining compressional and shear wave results can indicate the presence of fluid saturation in the formation. Thermal: High temperatures and pressure impact the compressional and shear wave velocities.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-agency radiation survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Aeromagnetic Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Aeromagnetic Survey Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Aeromagnetic Survey Details Activities (26) Areas (19) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geophysical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Magnetic Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Magnetic Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: map structure, basin fill thickness, and magnetic mineral concentrations in ore bodies Hydrological: Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 22.532,253 centUSD

322

NIST Ionizing Radiation Division - 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TECHNICAL ACTIVITIES 1998 - NISTIR 6268 IONIZING RADIATION DIVISION. The Neutron Interferometer. The neutron ...

323

NIST Ionizing Radiation Division - 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Technical Activities 2000" - Table of Contents, Division home page. Ionizing Radiation Division. ...

324

An aerial radiological survey of the southwest drainage basin area of the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey was conducted over a 106-square-mile area of the Savannah River Site (SRS), formerly the Savannah River Plant. The survey was conducted from August 24 through September 8, 1988, to collect baseline radiological data over the area. Both natural and man-made gamma emitting radionuclides were detected in the area. The detected man-made sources were confined to creeks, branches, and SRS facilities in the surveyed area and were a result of SRS operations. Naturally-occurring radiation levels were consistent with those levels detected in adjacent areas during previous surveys. The annual dose levels were within the range of levels found throughout the United States.

Feimster, E.L.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Radiation delivery system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation delivery system and method are described. The system includes a treatment configuration such as a stent, balloon catheter, wire, ribbon, or the like, a portion of which is covered with a gold layer. Chemisorbed to the gold layer is a radiation-emitting self-assembled monolayer or a radiation-emitting polymer. The radiation delivery system is compatible with medical catheter-based technologies to provide a therapeutic dose of radiation to a lesion following an angioplasty procedure.

Sorensen, Scott A. (Overland Park, KS); Robison, Thomas W. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Craig M. V. (Jemez Springs, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Radiation in Particle Simulations  

SciTech Connect

Hot dense radiative (HDR) plasmas common to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and stellar interiors have high temperature (a few hundred eV to tens of keV), high density (tens to hundreds of g/cc) and high pressure (hundreds of megabars to thousands of gigabars). Typically, such plasmas undergo collisional, radiative, atomic and possibly thermonuclear processes. In order to describe HDR plasmas, computational physicists in ICF and astrophysics use atomic-scale microphysical models implemented in various simulation codes. Experimental validation of the models used to describe HDR plasmas are difficult to perform. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the many-body interactions of plasmas is a promising approach to model validation but, previous work either relies on the collisionless approximation or ignores radiation. We present four methods that attempt a new numerical simulation technique to address a currently unsolved problem: the extension of molecular dynamics to collisional plasmas including emission and absorption of radiation. The first method applies the Lienard-Weichert solution of Maxwell's equations for a classical particle whose motion is assumed to be known. The second method expands the electromagnetic field in normal modes (planewaves in a box with periodic boundary-conditions) and solves the equation for wave amplitudes coupled to the particle motion. The third method is a hybrid molecular dynamics/Monte Carlo (MD/MC) method which calculates radiation emitted or absorbed by electron-ion pairs during close collisions. The fourth method is a generalization of the third method to include small clusters of particles emitting radiation during close encounters: one electron simultaneously hitting two ions, two electrons simultaneously hitting one ion, etc. This approach is inspired by the virial expansion method of equilibrium statistical mechanics. Using a combination of these methods we believe it is possible to do atomic-scale particle simulations of fusion ignition plasmas including the important effects of radiation emission and absorption.

More, R; Graziani, F; Glosli, J; Surh, M

2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

327

An aerial radiological survey of the Durango, Colorado uranium mill tailings site and surrounding area  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey of Durango, Colorado, including the inactive uranium mill tailings piles located southwest of the town, was conducted during August 25--29, 1980, for the Department of Energy's Environmental and Safety Engineering Division. Areas of radiation exposure rates higher than the local background, which was about 15 microrentgens per hour ({mu}R/h), were observed directly over and to the south of the mill tailings piles, over a cemetery, and at two spots near the fairgrounds. The rapidly changing radiation exposure rates at the boundaries of the piles preclude accurate extrapolation of aerial radiological data to ground level exposure rates in their immediate vicinity. Estimated radiation exposure rates close to the piles, however, approached 30 times background, or about 450 {mu}R/h. Radiation exposure rates in a long area extending south from the tailings piles were about 25 {mu}R/h.

Hilton, L.K.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Biomedical question answering: A survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objectives: In this survey, we reviewed the current state of the art in biomedical QA (Question Answering), within a broader framework of semantic knowledge-based QA approaches, and projected directions for the future research development in this critical ... Keywords: Answer/reason extraction, Biomedical question answering, Semantic information extraction

Sofia J. Athenikos; Hyoil Han

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Automotive Powertrain Control - A Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper surveys recent and historical publications on automotive powertrain control. Controloriented models of gasoline and diesel engines and their aftertreatment systems are reviewed, and challenging control problems for conventional engines, hybrid vehicles and fuel cell powertrains are discussed. Fundamentals are revisited and advancements are highlighted. A comprehensive list of references is provided. 1

Jeffrey A. Cook; Jing Sun; Julia H. Buckl; Ilya V. Kolmanovsky; Huei Peng; Jessy W. Grizzle

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Quantum Gravity An introductory survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum Gravity An introductory survey Hermann Nicolai Max-Planck-Institut f¨ur Gravitationsphysik (Albert­Einstein­Institut, Potsdam) . ­ p.1/25 #12;Why Quantum Gravity? . ­ p.2/25 #12;Why Quantum Gravity theories: . ­ p.2/25 #12;Why Quantum Gravity? General Relativity and Quantum Theory: not only very

Rossak, Wilhelm R.

331

The NRC planetary decadal survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Once every ten years, the National Research Council carries out a "decadal survey" in planetary science. The objective is to recommend a decade-long national strategy for solar system exploration for NASA and the NSF. The most recent planetary decadal ...

Steven W. Squyres

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Body Area Networks: A Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advances in wireless communication technologies, such as wearable and implantable biosensors, along with recent developments in the embedded computing area are enabling the design, development, and implementation of body area networks. This class of ... Keywords: body area networks, survey, wireless sensor networks

Min Chen; Sergio Gonzalez; Athanasios Vasilakos; Huasong Cao; Victor C. Leung

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

ORISE: REAC/TS Radiation Patient Treatment Algorithm  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Incident Victim Incident Victim Life Threatening Problem? External Contamination External Exposure Dosimetry Internal Contamination Stabilize Medical & Incident History Admit to Controlled Area Remove Clothing (Contain) Assess & Treat Medical Condition Admit to Regular Emergency Department Evaluate for ARS & Local Radiation Injury Persistent Vomiting? Document Time to Emesis Serial CBCs with diff; Amylase/CRP qd X3d Medical Evaluation & Treatment Document with Color Photos Collect Samples & Count (Nasal/Mouth Swabs) Minimize Uptake & Facilitate Excretion ID Contaminant ID Contaminant Transfer/Discharge ID Radionuclide Call REAC/TS Call REAC/TS Call REAC/TS Assess Intake* Survey Whole Body Survey Collect samples (Nasal/Mouth Swabs) Rad Survey and Document (Priorities: 1) Wounds,

334

Packet personal radiation monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiatonevents, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible ''chirp''. The rate of the ''chirps'' is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field. 2 figs.

Phelps, J.E.

1988-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

335

Nuclear radiation actuated valve  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear radiation actuated valve for a nuclear reactor. The valve has a valve first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a valve second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics. The valve's first part is positioned to receive nuclear radiation from the nuclear reactor's fuel region. The valve's second part is positioned so that its nuclear radiation induced swelling is different from that of the valve's first part. The valve's second part also is positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system.

Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Schively, Dixon P. (Richland, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

AREA RADIATION MONITOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

S>An improved area radiation dose monitor is designed which is adapted to compensate continuously for background radiation below a threshold dose rate and to give warning when the dose integral of the dose rate of an above-threshold radiation excursion exceeds a selected value. This is accomplished by providing means for continuously charging an ionization chamber. The chamber provides a first current proportional to the incident radiation dose rate. Means are provided for generating a second current including means for nulling out the first current with the second current at all values of the first current corresponding to dose rates below a selected threshold dose rate value. The second current has a maximum value corresponding to that of the first current at the threshold dose rate. The excess of the first current over the second current, which occurs above the threshold, is integrated and an alarm is given at a selected integrated value of the excess corresponding to a selected radiation dose. (AEC)

Manning, F.W.; Groothuis, S.E.; Lykins, J.H.; Papke, D.M.

1962-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

337

Remote radiation dosimetry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are methods and apparatus for remotely measuring radiation levels. Such are particularly useful for measuring relatively high levels or dosages of radiation being administered in radiation therapy. They are also useful for more general radiation level measurements where remote sensing from the remaining portions of the apparatus is desirable. The apparatus uses a beam generator, such as a laser beam, to provide a stimulating beam. The stimulating beam is preferably of wavelengths shorter than 6 microns, or more advantageously less than 2 microns. The stimulating beam is used to stimulate a remote luminescent sensor mounted in a probe which emits stored luminescent energy resulting from exposure of the sensor to ionizing radiation. The stimulating beam is communicated to the remote luminescent sensor via transmissive fiber which also preferably serves to return the emission from the luminescent sensor. The stimulating beam is advantageously split by a beam splitter to create a detector beam which is measured for power during a reading period during which the luminescent phosphor is read. The detected power is preferably used to control the beam generator to thus produce desired beam power during the reading period. The luminescent emission from the remote sensor is communicated to a suitable emission detector, preferably after filtering or other selective treatment to better isolate the luminescent emission.

Braunlich, Peter F. (Pullman, WA); Tetzlaff, Wolfgang (Pullman, WA); Hegland, Joel E. (Pullman, WA); Jones, Scott C. (Pullman, WA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Remote radiation dosimetry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are methods and apparatus for remotely measuring radiation levels. Such are particularly useful for measuring relatively high levels or dosages of radiation being administered in radiation therapy. They are also useful for more general radiation level measurements where remote sensing from the remaining portions of the apparatus is desirable. The apparatus uses a beam generator, such as a laser beam, to provide a stimulating beam. The stimulating beam is preferably of wavelengths shorter than 6 microns, or more advantageously less than 2 microns. The stimulating beam is used to stimulate a remote luminescent sensor mounted in a probe which emits stored luminescent energy resulting from exposure of the sensor to ionizing radiation. The stimulating beam is communicated to the remote luminescent sensor via a transmissive fiber which also preferably serves to return the emission from the luminescent sensor. The stimulating beam is advantageously split by a beam splitter to create a detector beam which is measured for power during a reading period during which the luminescent phosphor is read. The detected power is preferably used to control the beam generator to thus produce desired beam power during the reading period. The luminescent emission from the remote sensor is communicated to a suitable emission detector, preferably after filtering or other selective treatment to better isolate the luminescent emission. 8 figures.

Braunlich, P.F.; Tetzlaff, W.; Hegland, J.E.; Jones, S.C.

1991-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

339

An Aerial Radiological Survey of Selected Areas of Area 18 - Nevada Test Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the proficiency training for the Radiological Mapping mission of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS), a survey team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory-Nellis (RSL-Nellis) conducted an aerial radiological survey of selected areas of Area 18 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the purpose of mapping man-made radiation deposited as a result of the Johnnie Boy and Little Feller I tests. The survey area centered over the Johnnie Boy ground zero but also included the ground zero and deposition area of the Little Feller I test, approximately 7,000 feet (2133 meters) southeast of the Johnnie Boy site. The survey was conducted in one flight. The completed survey covered a total of 4.0 square miles. The flight lines (with the turns) over the surveyed areas are presented in Figure 1. One 2.5-hour-long flight was performed at an altitude of 100 ft above ground level (AGL) with 200 foot flight-line spacing. A test-line flight was conducted near the Desert Rock Airstrip to ensure quality control of the data. The test line is not shown in Figure 1. However, Figure 1 does include the flight lines for a ''perimeter'' flight. The path traced by the helicopter flying over distinct roads within the survey area can be used to overlay the survey data on a base map or image. The flight survey lines were flown in an east-west orientation perpendicular to the deposition patterns for both sites. This technique provides better spatial resolution when contouring the data. The data were collected by the AMS data acquisition system (REDAR V) using an array of twelve 2-inch x 4-inch x 16-inch sodium iodide (NaI) detectors flown on-board a twin-engine Bell 412 helicopter. Data, in the form of gamma energy spectra, were collected every second over the course of the survey and were geo-referenced using a differential Global Positioning System. Spectral data allows the system to distinguish between ordinary fluctuations in natural background radiation levels and the signature produced by man-made radioisotopes. Spectral data can also identify specific radioactive isotopes. Based on the results of the RSL NTS 1994 surveys, this area was chosen for a resurvey to improve the spatial resolution of the reported depositions for the Johnnie Boy and Little Feller I events. In addition, the survey was expected to confirm the absence of detectable concentrations of Americium-241 (Am-241) at the Johnnie Boy site and attempt to confirm the presence of Uranium-235 (U-235).

Craig Lyons

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

340

Video Camera Use at Nuclear Power Plants: Tools for Increasing Productivity and Reducing Radiation Exposure: Tools for Increasing Pr oductivity and Reducing Radiation Exposure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear power plants have increased the use of industrial video cameras as support tools for a variety of plant operations and outage tasks. This survey on utility use of video cameras, the equipment being used, and the benefits derived found that the video camera is an important tool for reducing radiation exposure and improving productivity through more efficient use of personnel.

1990-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-agency radiation survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Organizations Conducting Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conducting Low Dose Radiation Research Conducting Low Dose Radiation Research DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program DoReMi Integrating Low Dose Research High Level Expert Group (HLEG) on European Low Dose Risk Research Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative (MELODI) RISC-RAD Radiosensitivity of Individuals and Susceptibility to Cancer induced by Ionizing Radiation United States Transuranium & Uranium Registries Organizations Conducting other Radiation Research Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Armed Forces Radiology Research Institute (AFRRI) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) Colorado State University Columbia University

342

Radiation shielding for underground low-background experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design task of creating an efficient radiation shield for the new COBRA double-beta decay experiment led to a comprehensive study of commercially available shielding materials. The aim was to find the most efficient combination of materials under the constraints of an extreme low-background experiment operating in a typical underground laboratory. All existing shield configurations for this type of experiment have been found to perform sub-optimally in comparison to the class of multilayered configurations proposed in this study. The method used here to create a specific shield configuration should yield a close to optimal result when applied to any experiment utilising a radiation shield. In particular, the survey of single material response to a given radiation source turns out to give a guideline for the construction of efficient multilayer shields.

D. Y Stewart; P. F. Harrison; B. Morgan; Y. A. Ramachers

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

343

Composition for radiation shielding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition for use as a radiation shield is disclosed. The shield has a depleted uranium core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container. 2 figs.

Kronberg, J.W.

1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

344

Audible radiation monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention consists of a method and apparatus for monitoring ionizing radiation comprising radiation detectors in electrical connection with an isotopic analyzer and a device for producing chords to which each isotope is mapped so that the device produces a unique chord for each isotope. Preferably the chords are pleasing to the ear, except for chords representing unexpected isotopes, and are louder or softer depending on the level of radioactivity produced by each isotope, and musical instrument voices may be simulated in producing the chords as an aid to distinguishing similar-sounding chords. Because of the representation by chords, information regarding the level and composition of the radiation in an area can be conveyed to workers in that area more effectively and yet without distracting them.

Odell, D.M.C.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

345

Semiconductor radiation detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A semiconductor detector for ionizing electromagnetic radiation, neutrons, and energetic charged particles. The detecting element is comprised of a compound having the composition I-III-VI.sub.2 or II-IV-V.sub.2 where the "I" component is from column 1A or 1B of the periodic table, the "II" component is from column 2B, the "III" component is from column 3A, the "IV" component is from column 4A, the "V" component is from column 5A, and the "VI" component is from column 6A. The detecting element detects ionizing radiation by generating a signal proportional to the energy deposited in the element, and detects neutrons by virtue of the ionizing radiation emitted by one or more of the constituent materials subsequent to capture. The detector may contain more than one neutron-sensitive component.

Bell, Zane W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Burger, Arnold (Knoxville, TN)

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

346

The ESSENCE Supernova Survey: Survey Optimization, Observations, and Supernova Photometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe the implementation and optimization of the ESSENCE supernova survey, which we have undertaken to measure the equation of state parameter of the dark energy. We present a method for optimizing the survey exposure times and cadence to maximize our sensitivity to the dark energy equation of state parameter w = P/{rho}c{sup 2} for a given fixed amount of telescope time. For our survey on the CTIO 4m telescope, measuring the luminosity distances and redshifts for supernovae at modest redshifts (z {approx} 0.5 {+-} 0.2) is optimal for determining w. We describe the data analysis pipeline based on using reliable and robust image subtraction to find supernovae automatically and in near real-time. Since making cosmological inferences with supernovae relies crucially on accurate measurement of their brightnesses, we describe our efforts to establish a thorough calibration of the CTIO 4m natural photometric system. In its first four years, ESSENCE has discovered and spectroscopically confirmed 102 type Ia SNe, at redshifts from 0.10 to 0.78, identified through an impartial, effective methodology for spectroscopic classification and redshift determination. We present the resulting light curves for the all type Ia supernovae found by ESSENCE and used in our measurement of w, presented in Wood-Vasey et al. (2007).

Miknaitis, Gajus; Pignata, G.; Rest, A.; Wood-Vasey, W.M.; Blondin, S.; Challis, P.; Smith, R.C.; Stubbs, C.W.; Suntzeff, N.B.; Foley, R.J.; Matheson, T.; Tonry, J.L.; Aguilera, C.; Blackman, J.W.; Becker, A.C.; Clocchiatti, A.; Covarrubias, R.; Davis, T.M.; Filippenko, A.V.; Garg, A.; Garnavich, P.M.; /Fermilab /Chile U., Catolica /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs. /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /Harvard U. /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /NOAO, Tucson /Inst. Astron., Honolulu /Res. Sch. Astron. Astrophys., Weston Creek /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Bohr Inst. /Notre Dame U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Texas A-M /European Southern Observ. /Ohio State U., Dept. Astron. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Johns Hopkins U. /Stockholm U.

2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

347

The Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey: HerMES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey, HerMES, is a legacy program designed to map a set of nested fields totalling ~380 deg^2. Fields range in size from 0.01 to ~20 deg^2, using Herschel-SPIRE (at 250, 350 and 500 \\mu m), and Herschel-PACS (at 100 and 160 \\mu m), with an additional wider component of 270 deg^2 with SPIRE alone. These bands cover the peak of the redshifted thermal spectral energy distribution from interstellar dust and thus capture the re-processed optical and ultra-violet radiation from star formation that has been absorbed by dust, and are critical for forming a complete multi-wavelength understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. The survey will detect of order 100,000 galaxies at 5\\sigma in some of the best studied fields in the sky. Additionally, HerMES is closely coordinated with the PACS Evolutionary Probe survey. Making maximum use of the full spectrum of ancillary data, from radio to X-ray wavelengths, it is designed to: facilitate redshift determination; rapidly identi...

Oliver, S J; Altieri, B; Amblard, A; Arumugam, V; Aussel, H; Babbedge, T; Beelen, A; Béthermin, M; Blain, A; Boselli, A; Bridge, C; Brisbin, D; Buat, V; Burgarella, D; Castro-Rodríguez, N; Cava, A; Chanial, P; Cirasuolo, M; Clements, D L; Conley, A; Conversi, L; Cooray, A; Dowell, C D; Dubois, E N; Dwek, E; Dye, S; Eales, S; Elbaz, D; Farrah, D; Feltre, A; Ferrero, P; Fiolet, N; Fox, M; Franceschini, A; Gear, W; Giovannoli, E; Glenn, J; Gong, Y; Solares, E A González; Griffin, M; Halpern, M; Harwit, M; Hatziminaoglou, E; Heinis, S; Hurley, P; Hwang, H S; Hyde, A; Ibar, E; Ilbert, O; Isaak, K; Ivison, R J; Lagache, G; Floc'h, E Le; Levenson, L; Faro, B Lo; Lu, N; Madden, S; Maffei, B; Magdis, G; Mainetti, G; Marchetti, L; Marsden, G; Marshall, J; Mortier, A M J; Nguyen, H T; O'Halloran, B; Omont, A; Page, M J; Panuzzo, P; Papageorgiou, A; Patel, H; Pearson, C P; Pérez-Fournon, I; Pohlen, M; Rawlings, J I; Raymond, G; Rigopoulou, D; Riguccini, L; Rizzo, D; Rodighiero, G; Roseboom, I G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Portal, M Sánchez; Schulz, B; Scott, Douglas; Seymour, N; Shupe, D L; Smith, A J; Stevens, J A; Symeonidis, M; Trichas, M; Tugwell, K E; Vaccari, M; Valtchanov, I; Vieira, J D; Viero, M; Vigroux, L; Wang, L; Ward, R; Wardlow, J; Wright, G; Xu, C K; Zemcov, M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Radiation Safety and Education in the Applicants of the Final Test for the Expert of Pain Medicine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The C-arm fluoroscope is known as the most important equipment in pain interventions. This study was conducted to investigate the completion rate of education on radiation safety, the knowledge of radiation exposure, the use of radiation protection, and so on. Methods: Unsigned questionnaires were collected from the 27 pain physicians who applied for the final test to become an expert in pain medicine in 2011. The survey was composed of 12 questions about the position of the hospital, the kind of hospital, the use of C-arm fluoroscopy, radiation safety education, knowledge of annual permissible radiation dose, use of radiation protection, and efforts to reduce radiation exposure. Results: In this study, although most respondents (93%) had used C-arm fluoroscopy, only 33 % of the physicians completed radiation safety education. Even though nine (33%) had received education on radiation safety, none of the physicians knew the annual permissible radiation dose. In comparing the radiation safety education group and the no-education group, the rate of wearing radiation-protective glasses or goggles and the use of radiation badges or dosimeters were significantly higher in the education group. However, in the use of other protective equipment, knowledge of radiation safety, and efforts to reduce radiation exposure, there were no statistical differences between the two groups. Conclusions: The respondents knew very little about radiation safety and had low interest in their radiation exposure. To make the use of fluoroscopy safer, additional education, as well as attention to and knowledge of practices of radiation safety are required for pain physicians. (Korean J Pain 2012; 25: 16-21)

Department Of Anesthesiology; Pain Medicine; Yong Chul Kim

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Advanced Assay Systems for Radionuclide Contamination in Soils  

SciTech Connect

Through the support of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) Technical Assistance Program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed and deployed a suite of systems that rapidly scan, characterize, and analyze surface soil contamination. The INL systems integrate detector systems with data acquisition and synthesis software and with global positioning technology to provide a real-time, user-friendly field deployable turn-key system. INL real-time systems are designed to characterize surface soil contamination using methodologies set forth in the Multi-Agency Radiation Surveys and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM). MARSSIM provides guidance for planning, implementing, and evaluating environmental and facility radiological surveys conducted to demonstrate compliance with a dose or risk-based regulation and provides real-time information that is immediately available to field technicians and project management personnel. This paper discusses the history of the development of these systems and describes some of the more recent examples and their applications.

J. R. Giles; L. G. Roybal; M. V. Carpenter; C. P. Oertel; J. A. Roach

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Unruh radiation and Interference effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A uniformly accelerated charged particle feels the vacuum as thermally excited and fluctuates around the classical trajectory. Then we may expect additional radiation besides the Larmor radiation. It is called Unruh radiation. In this report, we review the calculation of the Unruh radiation with an emphasis on the interference effect between the vacuum fluctuation and the radiation from the fluctuating motion. Our calculation is based on a stochastic treatment of the particle under a uniform acceleration. The basics of the stochastic equation are reviewed in another report in the same proceeding. In this report, we mainly discuss the radiation and the interference effect.

Iso, Satoshi; Zhang, Sen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Unruh radiation and Interference effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A uniformly accelerated charged particle feels the vacuum as thermally excited and fluctuates around the classical trajectory. Then we may expect additional radiation besides the Larmor radiation. It is called Unruh radiation. In this report, we review the calculation of the Unruh radiation with an emphasis on the interference effect between the vacuum fluctuation and the radiation from the fluctuating motion. Our calculation is based on a stochastic treatment of the particle under a uniform acceleration. The basics of the stochastic equation are reviewed in another report in the same proceeding. In this report, we mainly discuss the radiation and the interference effect.

Satoshi Iso; Yasuhiro Yamamoto; Sen Zhang

2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

352

A Rapid Radiative Transfer Model for Reflection of Solar Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A rapid analytical radiative transfer model for reflection of solar radiation in plane-parallel atmospheres is developed based on the Sobolev approach and the delta function transformation technique. A distinct advantage of this model over ...

X. Xiang; E. A. Smith; C. G. Justus

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Toward Radiation-Resistant Ionic Liquids. Radiation Stability...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation-Resistant Ionic Liquids. Radiation Stability of Sulfonyl Imide Anions I. A. Shkrob, T. W. Marin, Sergey D. Chemerisov, J. L. Hatcher, and J. F. Wishart J. Phys. Chem. B...

354

THE BOLOCAM GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY: SURVEY DESCRIPTION AND DATA REDUCTION  

SciTech Connect

We present the Bolocam Galactic Plane Survey (BGPS), a 1.1 mm continuum survey at 33'' effective resolution of 170 deg{sup 2} of the Galactic Plane visible from the northern hemisphere. The BGPS is one of the first large area, systematic surveys of the Galactic Plane in the millimeter continuum without pre-selected targets. The survey is contiguous over the range -10.5 {<=} l {<=} 90.5, |b| {<=} 0.5. Toward the Cygnus X spiral arm, the coverage was flared to |b| {<=} 1.5 for 75.5 {<=} l {<=} 87.5. In addition, cross-cuts to |b| {<=} 1.5 were made at l= 3, 15, 30, and 31. The total area of this section is 133 deg{sup 2}. With the exception of the increase in latitude, no pre-selection criteria were applied to the coverage in this region. In addition to the contiguous region, four targeted regions in the outer Galaxy were observed: IC1396 (9 deg{sup 2}, 97.5 {<=} l {<=} 100.5, 2.25 {<=} b {<=} 5.25), a region toward the Perseus Arm (4 deg{sup 2} centered on l = 111, b = 0 near NGC 7538), W3/4/5 (18 deg{sup 2}, 132.5 {<=} l {<=} 138.5), and Gem OB1 (6 deg{sup 2}, 187.5 {<=} l {<=} 193.5). The survey has detected approximately 8400 clumps over the entire area to a limiting non-uniform 1{sigma} noise level in the range 11-53 mJy beam{sup -1} in the inner Galaxy. The BGPS source catalog is presented in a previously published companion paper. This paper details the survey observations and data reduction methods for the images. We discuss in detail the determination of astrometric and flux density calibration uncertainties and compare our results to the literature. Data processing algorithms that separate astronomical signals from time-variable atmospheric fluctuations in the data timestream are presented. These algorithms reproduce the structure of the astronomical sky over a limited range of angular scales and produce artifacts in the vicinity of bright sources. Based on simulations, we find that extended emission on scales larger than about 5.'9 is nearly completely attenuated (>90%) and the linear scale at which the attenuation reaches 50% is 3.'8. Comparison with other millimeter-wave data sets implies a possible systematic offset in flux calibration, for which no cause has been discovered. This presentation serves as a companion and guide to the public data release (http://irsa.ipac.caltech.edu/Missions/bolocam.html) through NASA's Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC) Infrared Science Archive (IRSA). New data releases will be provided through IPAC-IRSA with any future improvements in the reduction. The BGPS provides a complementary long-wavelength spectral band for the ongoing ATLASGAL and Herschel-SPIRE surveys, and an important database and context for imminent observations with SCUBA-2 and ALMA.

Aguirre, James E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ginsburg, Adam G.; Bally, John; Battersby, Cara; Glenn, Jason; Harvey, Paul; Stringfellow, Guy S. [CASA, University of Colorado, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Dunham, Miranda K.; Evans, Neal J. II [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Drosback, Meredith M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Bradley, Eric Todd [Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Boulevard, Orlando, FL 32816-2385 (United States); Cyganowski, Claudia [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Dowell, Darren [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91104 (United States); Rosolowsky, Erik [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Okanagan (Canada); Walawender, Josh [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 640 North Aohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Williams, Jonathan P., E-mail: jaguirre@sas.upenn.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

355

NEPA Litigation Surveys | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEPA Litigation Surveys NEPA Litigation Surveys NEPA Litigation Surveys CEQ publishes surveys on NEPA litigation on an annual basis. These surveys identify the number of cases involving a NEPA based cause of action, Federal agencies that were identified as a lead defendant, general information on plaintiffs, general information on why litigation was pursued, and the outcomes of the cases decided during the year. Each year, Federal agencies conduct hundreds of EISs, tens of thousands of EAs and hundreds of thousands of CEs. The amount of litigation on these NEPA analyses is comparatively small. Since 2001, fewer than 175 NEPA cases were filed each year - with less than 100 filed in 2007, 2009, 2010, and 2011. The annual surveys are provided below: 2011 Litigation Survey 2010 Litigation Survey

356

NEPA Litigation Surveys | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEPA Litigation Surveys NEPA Litigation Surveys NEPA Litigation Surveys CEQ publishes surveys on NEPA litigation on an annual basis. These surveys identify the number of cases involving a NEPA based cause of action, Federal agencies that were identified as a lead defendant, general information on plaintiffs, general information on why litigation was pursued, and the outcomes of the cases decided during the year. Each year, Federal agencies conduct hundreds of EISs, tens of thousands of EAs and hundreds of thousands of CEs. The amount of litigation on these NEPA analyses is comparatively small. Since 2001, fewer than 175 NEPA cases were filed each year - with less than 100 filed in 2007, 2009, 2010, and 2011. The annual surveys are provided below: 2011 Litigation Survey 2010 Litigation Survey

357

2008/2009 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8/2009 User Survey Results 8/2009 User Survey Results Show All | 1 2 3 4 5 ... 9 | Next » 2008/2009 User Survey Results Table of Contents Response Survey Respondent Demographics Overall Satisfaction and Importance All Satisfaction and Importance Ratings Hardware Resources Software HPC Consulting Services and Communications Comments Response Survey Many thanks to the 421 users who responded to this year's User Survey. The response rate is comparable to last year's and both are significantly increased from previous years: 77.4 percent of users who had used more than 250,000 XT4-based hours when the survey opened responded 36.6 percent of users who had used between 10,000 and 250,000 XT4-based hours responded The overall response rate for the 3,134 authorized users during the survey period was 13.4%.

358

Hybrid heuristic algorithm for GPS surveying problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces several approaches based on ant colony optimization for efficient scheduling the surveying activities of designing satellite surveying networks. These proposed approaches use a set of agents called ants that cooperate to iteratively ...

Stefka Fidanova

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

TECHNICAL DOCUMENTATION Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This is the technical documentation for the public use data set based on the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), the national sample survey of commercial buildings and their energy suppliers conducted by the Energy Information Administration.

Information Center

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

A Survey of Information Retrieval Vendors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a survey of vendors that develop and market information retrieval technology. The objective of this survey is to provide information for those who want an overview of text retrieval and document management companies, their products, and ...

Robert J. Kuhns

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-agency radiation survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

NERSC-8 Vendor Market Survey  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Antypas! Antypas! NERSC-8 Project Lead NERSC-8 Market Survey --- 1 --- November 15, 2012 * Seek v endor i nput t o o p6mize 6 ming, r equirements and business prac6ces * Opportunity f or v endors t o p rovide i nput p rior t o formal p rocurement p rocess We are starting our next procurement, NERSC-8, with a round of market surveys Vendor B riefing --- 2 --- NERSC's mission is to enable science NERSC Mission: To accelerate the pace of scientific discovery by providing high-performance computing, data systems and services to the DOE Office of Science community. NERSC has over 4500 users in 650 projects that produce about 1500 publications per year! --- 3 --- Vendor B riefing NERSC's Long Term Strategy * New s ystem e very ~ 3 y ears, r un f or 5 ---6 y ears - Maximizes s tability r ather t han p eak / m achine

362

I COMPREHENSIVE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

im im I COMPREHENSIVE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY I Prepared by Oak Ridge Associated Universities Prprd* OFF-SITE PROPERTY H' | Prepared for Office of Operational FORMER LAKE ONTARIO ORDNANCE WORKS SITE Safety U.S. Department LEWISTON, NEW YORK I of Energy i J.D. BERGER i Radiological Site Assessment Program Manpower Education, Research, and Training Division I l*~~~~~~ ~~~~DRAFT REPORT January 1983 I I I ------- COMPREHENSIVE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OFF-SITE PROPERTY H' FORMER LAKE ONTARIO ORDNANCE WORKS SITE LEWISTON, NEW YORK Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites -- Remedial Action Program J. D. Berger Project Staff L.W. Cole W.O. Helton R.D. Condra T.J. Sowell P.R. Cotten C.F. Weaver G.R. Foltz T.S. Yoo R.C. Gosslee Prepared by Radiological Site Assessment Program

363

PRELIMINARY SURVEY OF VITRO CORPORATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

PRELIMINARY SURVEY OF VITRO CORPORATION (VITRO LABORATORIES) WEST ORANGE, NEW JERSEY Work performed by the Health and Safety Research Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 March 1980 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY operated by UNION CARBIDE CORPORATION for the DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites-- Remedial Actton Program VITRO CORPORATION (VITRO LABORATORIES) WEST ORANGE, NEW JERSEY At the request of the Department of Energy (DOE), a preliminary survey was performed at the former Vitro Corporation Laboratory in West Orange, New Jersey (see Fig 1), on November 30, 1977, to assess the radiological status of those facilities utilized under Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) contract during the late 1950s and early 1960s. This

364

Simulator for Microlens Planet Surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We summarize the status of a computer simulator for microlens planet surveys. The simulator generates synthetic light curves of microlensing events observed with specified networks of telescopes over specified periods of time. Particular attention is paid to models for sky brightness and seeing, calibrated by fitting to data from the OGLE survey and RoboNet observations in 2011. Time intervals during which events are observable are identified by accounting for positions of the Sun and the Moon, and other restrictions on telescope pointing. Simulated observations are then generated for an algorithm that adjusts target priorities in real time with the aim of maximizing planet detection zone area summed over all the available events. The exoplanet detection capability of observations was compared for several telescopes.

Ipatov, Sergei I; Alsubai, Khalid A; Bramich, Daniel M; Dominik, Martin; Hundertmark, Markus P G; Liebig, Christine; Snodgrass, Colin D B; Street, Rachel A; Tsapras, Yiannis

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Rural electric cooperatives IRP survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the integrated resource planning (IRP) practices of US rural electric cooperatives and the IRP policies which influence these practices. It was prepared by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and its subcontractor Garrick and Associates to assist the US Department of Energy (DOE) in satisfying the reporting requirements of Title 1, Subtitle B, Section 111(e)(3) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), which states: (e) Report--Not later than 2 years after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary (of the US Department of Energy) shall transmit a report to the President and to the Congress containing--(the findings from several surveys and evaluations, including:); (3) a survey of practices and policies under which electric cooperatives prepare IRPs, submit such plans to REA, and the extent to which such integrated resource planning is reflected in rates charged to customers.

Garrick, C. [Garrick and Associates, Morrison, CO (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey 1993  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey (FBSS) was conducted by EIA in conjunction with DOE's Office of Federal Energy Management Programs (OFEMP) to gain a better understanding of how Federal buildings use energy. This report presents the data from 881 completed telephone interviews with Federal buildings in three Federal regions. These buildings were systematically selected using OFEMP's specifications; therefore, these data do not statistically represent all Federal buildings in the country .

Information Center

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

"Radiative Liquid Lithium (metal) Divertor" Inventor..-- Masayuki...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"Radiative Liquid Lithium (metal) Divertor" Inventor..-- Masayuki Ono The invention utilizes liquid lithium as a radiative material. The radiative process greatly reduces the...

368

MEASUREMENT AND ANALYSIS OF CIRCUMSOLAR RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Character of Solar and Circumsolar Radiation. Proceedings ~all of the direct solar radiation (that originating from thethat attenuate the solar radiation available to terres-

Grether, Donald

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

MEASUREMENT AND ANALYSIS OF CIRCUMSOLAR RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

all of the direct solar radiation (that originating from thea suitable site for solar radiation measurements. A requestused to estimate the solar radiation per unit wavelength at

Grether, D.F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

TIME-RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPY USING SYNCHROTRON RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3395 (1977). H. Winick, VUV Radiation Physics, edited by E.M. W. Zemansky, Resonance Radiation and Exci- ted Atoms, (II. III. Appendix A - Radiation Trapping. Appendix B -

Poliakoff, E.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Terahertz radiation from laser accelerated electron bunches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NUMBER 5 MAY 2004 Terahertz radiation from laser acceleratedand millimeter wave radiation from laser acceleratedNo. 5, May 2004 Terahertz radiation from laser accelerated

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

POLARIZATION OF THE COSMIC BACKGROUND RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Galactic Synchrotron Radiation at 33 GHz NOIiWNPQaa s x s sthe Cosmic Background Radiation Philip Michael Lubin Spacethe Cosmic Background Radiation. The ground-based experiment

Lubin, Philip Lubin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Betatron radiation from density tailored plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Betatron radiation from density tailored plasmas K. Tathe resulting betatron radiation spectrum can therefore bepro?le, the betatron radiation emitted by theses electrons

Ta Phuoc, Kim

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Below are historical data tables from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). These tables cover the total number of households ...

375

Airborne electromagnetic surveys as a reconnaissance technique...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

electromagnetic surveys as a reconnaissance technique for geothermal exploration Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Airborne...

376

Survey of renewable chemicals produced from ...  

RESEARCH Open Access Survey of renewable chemicals produced from lignocellulosic biomass during ionic liquid pretreatment Patanjali Varanasi1,2, ...

377

Survey of innovative rates, 1991  

SciTech Connect

Current innovative rate data from 135 major utilities throughout the United States were gathered and analyzed. Over 1000 innovative rates that were in use by the utilities in 1990 and 1991 were identified, abstracted and entered into a database. Survey results indicate that over 616 million MWh were sold to the nearly five million customers using the innovative rates offered. From an annual sales perspective, the most widely used rates are demand-side management rates -- rates intended to change customer energy use -- and rates that are market-driven.'' The survey identified 525 demand-side management rates serving our four million customers with reported sales of approximately 520 million MWh. These rates serve over 80% of the total innovative rate customers and account for 84% of the total MWh sales. Also important in terms of MWh sales they represent are market-driven rates, which accounted for sales of 48 million MWh in 1990. Both demand-side management and market-driven rates show a 20% customer growth rate between 1988 and 1990. Other innovative rates examined in the survey included: prepaid service; load retention incentive rates; technology specific rates; and those rates related expressly to non-utility generators -- namely buy-back and standby rates.

White, L.J.; Wakefield, R.A.; McVicker, C.M.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Survey of innovative rates, 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current innovative rate data from 135 major utilities throughout the United States were gathered and analyzed. Over 1000 innovative rates that were in use by the utilities in 1990 and 1991 were identified, abstracted and entered into a database. Survey results indicate that over 616 million MWh were sold to the nearly five million customers using the innovative rates offered. From an annual sales perspective, the most widely used rates are demand-side management rates -- rates intended to change customer energy use -- and rates that are market-driven.'' The survey identified 525 demand-side management rates serving our four million customers with reported sales of approximately 520 million MWh. These rates serve over 80% of the total innovative rate customers and account for 84% of the total MWh sales. Also important in terms of the MWh sales they represent are market-driven rates, which accounted for sales of 48 million MWh in 1990. Both demand-side management and market-driven rates show a 20% customer growth rate between 1988 and 1990. Other innovative rates examined in the survey included: prepaid service; load retention incentive rates; technology specific rates; and those rates related expressly to non-utility generators -- namely buy-back and standby rates.

White, L.J.; Wakefield, R.A.; McVicker, C.M.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Radiation Source Replacement Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes a Radiation Source Replacement Workshop in Houston Texas on October 27-28, 2010, which provided a forum for industry and researchers to exchange information and to discuss the issues relating to replacement of AmBe, and potentially other isotope sources used in well logging.

Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Moran, Traci L.; Bond, Leonard J.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Photovoltaic radiation detector element  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector element is formed of a body of semiconductor material, a coating on the body which forms a photovoltaic junction therewith, and a current collector consisting of narrow metallic strips, the aforesaid coating having an opening therein the edge of which closely approaches but is spaced from the current collector strips.

Agouridis, Dimitrios C. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-agency radiation survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Local microwave background radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An inquiry on a possible local origin for the Microwave Background Radiation is made. Thermal MBR photons are contained in a system called {\\it magnetic bottle} which is due to Earth magnetic field and solar wind particles, mostly electrons. Observational tests are anticipated.

Domingos S. L. Soares

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

382

Hyperon radiative decay  

SciTech Connect

The radiative decay widths of the low-lying strange baryons are calculated both within the relativistic quark bag model and the nonrelativistic potential model. These widths are found to depend sensitively upon the quark-model dynamics through multiplet mixing and q/sup 4/q-bar admixtures. The comparison between our calculated results and the very limited experimental data is discussed.

Kaxiras, E.; Moniz, E.J.; Soyeur, M.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Radiation detector spectrum simulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source generates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith to generate several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

Wolf, M.A.; Crowell, J.M.

1985-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

384

Photovoltaic radiation detector element  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector element is formed of a body of semiconductor material, a coating on the body which forms a photovoltaic junction therewith, and a current collector consisting of narrow metallic strips, the aforesaid coating having an opening therein in the edge of which closely approaches but is spaced from the current collector strips.

Agouridis, D.C.

1980-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

385

STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LIGHTSOURCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-926-4100 SLAC is operated by Stanford University for the U.S. Department of Energy SSRL Facility Research Associate for Small Angle X-ray Scattering The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) has) program. This position has a component (roughly 50%) that involves beam line development at SSRL

Ford, James

386

Radiation detector spectrum simulator  

SciTech Connect

A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source nerates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith generates several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM); Crowell, John M. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Radiation Safety Manual Dec 2012 Page 1 RADIATION SAFETY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Management Commitment B. Training C. Monitoring of Individual Radiation Exposures D. Program Reviews 1 of Radiation A. Research Applications 1. Non-Human User 2. Animal Use 3. Human Use B. Clinical Applications C Materials Chapter VI: Occupational Exposure to Radiation and Personnel Monitoring and Bioassay Program #12;A

Grishok, Alla

388

Electric/hybrid vehicle Delphi survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document presents the methodology and results of the Delphi survey. The viewgraphs depict the surveyed population in detail and the surveyed vehicles attributes such as range, recharging time, velocity, acceleration, etc. These opinions are given for forecast years 2000, 2010, and 2020.

Ng, H.K.; Anderson, J.L.; Santini, D.J.

1995-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

389

Christopher U.S. Geological Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Christopher Magirl U.S. Geological Survey 934 Broadway Suite 300 Tacoma, Washington 98402 Phone; Hydraulic modeling; Computer programming (C/C++, Fortran, Perl), Field survey; Geographic information Research Hydrologist U.S. Geological Survey, Tacoma, Washington. September 2009 ­ present · Analyzing

390

HERRING SPAWNING SURVEYS IN SOUTHEASTERN ALASKA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

--Fisheries No. 321 Washington, D. C. December 1959 #12;CONTENTS Page Introduction 1 Methods of aerial survey and Wildlife Service Galveston, Texas ABSTRACT Aerial surveys to observe milt herring in Southeastern Alaska that intensive ground surveys to assess spawn deposition are not feasible. There- fore, a method of aerial

391

Radiative Forcing of Climate Change  

SciTech Connect

Chapter 6 of the IPCC Third Assessment Report Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis. Sections include: Executive Summary 6.1 Radiative Forcing 6.2 Forcing-Response Relationship 6.3 Well-Mixed Greenhouse Gases 6.4 Stratospheric Ozone 6.5 Radiative Forcing By Tropospheric Ozone 6.6 Indirect Forcings due to Chemistry 6.7 The Direct Radiative Forcing of Tropospheric Aerosols 6.8 The Indirect Radiative Forcing of Tropospheric Aerosols 6.9 Stratospheric Aerosols 6.10 Land-use Change (Surface Albedo Effect) 6.11 Solar Forcing of Climate 6.12 Global Warming Potentials hydrocarbons 6.13 Global Mean Radiative Forcings 6.14 The Geographical Distribution of the Radiative Forcings 6.15 Time Evolution of Radiative Forcings Appendix 6.1 Elements of Radiative Forcing Concept References.

Ramaswamy, V.; Boucher, Olivier; Haigh, J.; Hauglustaine, D.; Haywood, J.; Myhre, G.; Nakajima, Takahito; Shi, Guangyu; Solomon, S.; Betts, Robert E.; Charlson, R.; Chuang, C. C.; Daniel, J. S.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Feichter, J.; Fuglestvedt, J.; Forster, P. M.; Ghan, Steven J.; Jones, A.; Kiehl, J. T.; Koch, D.; Land, C.; Lean, J.; Lohmann, Ulrike; Minschwaner, K.; Penner, Joyce E.; Roberts, D. L.; Rodhe, H.; Roelofs, G.-J.; Rotstayn, Leon D.; Schneider, T. L.; Schumann, U.; Schwartz, Stephen E.; Schwartzkopf, M. D.; Shine, K. P.; Smith, Steven J.; Stevenson, D. S.; Stordal, F.; Tegen, I.; van Dorland, R.; Zhang, Y.; Srinivasan, J.; Joos, Fortunat

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Isocurvature perturbations in extra radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent cosmological observations, including measurements of the CMB anisotropy and the primordial helium abundance, indicate the existence of an extra radiation component in the Universe beyond the standard three neutrino species. In this paper we explore the possibility that the extra radiation has isocurvatrue fluctuations. A general formalism to evaluate isocurvature perturbations in the extra radiation is provided in the mixed inflaton-curvaton system, where the extra radiation is produced by the decay of both scalar fields. We also derive constraints on the abundance of the extra radiation and the amount of its isocurvature perturbation. Current observational data favors the existence of an extra radiation component, but does not indicate its having isocurvature perturbation. These constraints are applied to some particle physics motivated models. If future observations detect isocurvature perturbations in the extra radiation, it will give us a hint to the origin of the extra radiation.

Kawasaki, Masahiro; Nakayama, Kazunori; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Gamma Survey of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at Monticello, Utah...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gamma Survey of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at Monticello, Utah Gamma Survey of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at Monticello, Utah Gamma Survey of a Permeable Reactive Barrier at...

394

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

Thacker, L.H.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

395

NREL: Solar Radiation Research - Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities NREL's solar radiation research staff provides expertise in renewable energy measurement and instrumentation. Major capabilities include solar resource measurement,...

396

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

Thacker, L.H.

1995-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

397

Hybrid Radiator-Cooling System  

Technology Development & Commercialization Current Challenges Coolant radiators in highway trucks are designed to transfer maximum heat at a ...

398

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

SciTech Connect

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

SciTech Connect

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Survey Design Surveys were conducted using an Aero Commander 690A at a speed of 110  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and exploratory tracklines. (see Rone et al. aerial survey poster) Sonobuoy deployments were incorporated whale detections. After considering limitations encountered during the aerial survey that year (iSurvey Design Surveys were conducted using an Aero Commander 690A at a speed of 110 knots and 1000

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-agency radiation survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Coherent Radiation in Insertion Devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the coherent radiation in an undulator/wiggler with a vacuum chamber of arbitrary cross section. The backward radiation is a coherent and it has wavelengths about twice the period of the undulator/wiggler. Mostly of coherent radiation is going with the wavelengths approximately the bunch length at small angles however.

Mikhailichenko, A A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Cerenkov radiation of spinning particle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Cerenkov radiation of a neutral particle with magnetic moment is considered, as well as the spin-dependent contribution to the Cerenkov radiation of a charged spinning particle. The corresponding radiation intensity is obtained for an arbitrary value of spin and for an arbitrary spin orientation with respect to velocity.

I. B. Khriplovich

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

403

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Radiation Protection Group: Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Who To Call Who To Call Rad Training Dosimetry Telemetry Laser Safety Radiation Safety Committee Pub-3000 Ch. 21 Forms RPG Procedures RPG Internal Radiation Safety Committee Charter Purpose The Berkeley Lab Radiation Safety Committee (RSC) is appointed by, and reports to, the Laboratory Director and is responsible for advising LBNL Management on all matters related to occupational and environmental radiation safety. The Radiation Safety Committee reviews and recommends approval of radiation safety policies and guides the Environment, Health and Safety Division and radiation user divisions in carrying out these programs. The scope of its actions will generally be in issues of broad institutional concern and impact, or areas of potential high consequence either in terms of safety or institutional needs.

404

Harvesting nanoscale thermal radiation using pyroelectric materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

exceeding Planck’s blackbody radiation law”. Applied PhysicsA] I b ? spectral blackbody radiation intensity [W/m 2 ] kNanoscale radiation blackbody radiation limit. In addition,

Fang, Jin; Frederich, Hugo; Pilon, Laurent

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

An Aerial Radiological Survey of the Yucca Mountain Project Proposed Land Withdrawal and Adjacent Areas  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) proposed land withdrawal was conducted from January to April 2006, and encompassed a total area of approximately 284 square miles (73,556 hectares). The aerial radiological survey was conducted to provide a sound technical basis and rigorous statistical approach for determining the potential presence of radiological contaminants in the Yucca Mountain proposed Land withdrawal area. The survey site included land areas currently managed by the Bureau of Land Management, the U.S. Air Force as part of the Nevada Test and Training Range or the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) as part of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The survey was flown at an approximate ground speed of 70 knots (36 meters per second), at a nominal altitude of 150 ft (46 m) above ground level, along a set of parallel flight lines spaced 250 ft (76 m) apart. The flight lines were oriented in a north-south trajectory. The survey was conducted by the DOE NNSA/NSO Remote Sensing Laboratory-Nellis, which is located in Las Vegas, Nevada. The aerial survey was conducted at the request of the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The primary contaminant of concern was identified by YMP personnel as cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs). Due to the proposed land withdrawal area's proximity to the historical Nuclear Rocket Development Station (NRDS) facilities located on the NTS, the aerial survey system required sufficient sensitivity to discriminate between dispersed but elevated {sup 137}Cs levels from those normally encountered from worldwide fallout. As part of that process, the survey also measured and mapped the exposure-rate levels that currently existed within the survey area. The inferred aerial exposure rates of the natural terrestrial background radiation varied from less than 3 to 22 microroentgens per hour. This range of exposure rates was primarily due to the surface geological features within the survey area. The survey area has extensive areas of desert valleys, mountain ranges, extinct volcanic cones, and old lava flows. With the exception of five areas identified within the NRDS boundaries (discussed later in this report), there were no areas within the survey that exceeded aerial survey minimum detectable concentration levels of 0.4 through 0.7 picocuries per gram (pCi/g). The {sup 137}Cs levels do not exceed typical worldwide fallout levels for the continental United States.

Craig Lyons, Thane Hendricks

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Aeromagnetic Survey (Nannini, 1986) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aeromagnetic Survey (Nannini, 1986) Aeromagnetic Survey (Nannini, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Aeromagnetic Survey (Nannini, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Aeromagnetic Survey Activity Date 1986 Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Detection and quantitative assessment of such intrusive events can be facilitated by magnetic surveys (ground or aerial magnetic field measurements). These surveys are based on the magnetic susceptibility contrast between magmatic rocks at depth and the sedimentary formations above. References Raffaello Nannini (1986) Some Aspects Of Exploration In Non-Volcanic Areas Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Aeromagnetic_Survey_(Nannini,_1986)&oldid=592438"

407

Helicopter magnetic survey conducted to locate wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A helicopter magnetic survey was conducted in August 2007 over 15.6 sq mi at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3’s (NPR-3) Teapot Dome Field near Casper, Wyoming. The survey’s purpose was to accurately locate wells drilled there during more than 90 years of continuous oilfield operation. The survey was conducted at low altitude and with closely spaced flight lines to improve the detection of wells with weak magnetic response and to increase the resolution of closely spaced wells. The survey was in preparation for a planned CO2 flood for EOR, which requires a complete well inventory with accurate locations for all existing wells. The magnetic survey was intended to locate wells missing from the well database and to provide accurate locations for all wells. The ability of the helicopter magnetic survey to accurately locate wells was accomplished by comparing airborne well picks with well locations from an intense ground search of a small test area.

Veloski, G.A.; Hammack, R.W.; Stamp, V. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center); Hall, R. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center); Colina, K. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Workshop on Radiological Surveys in Support of the Edgemont Clean-up Action Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards, has given Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) the responsibility for the development of procedures for the identification of offsite structures and properties in the vicinity of Edgemont, South Dakota, that require remedial action because of elevated radiation levels caused by residual radioactivity as defined in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978. In order to acquaint interested investigators with the procedures PNL has developed and the measurements that have been performed at Edgemont using these procedures, and also to obtain suggestions for the improvement of these procedures, PNL organized a "Workshop on Radiological Surveys in Support of the Edgemont Clean-up Action Program" on behalf of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This workshop was held in Denver on January 21 and 22, 1981. On the first day of the workshop an in-depth discussion of the procedures employed in the entire radiological survey program at Edgemont was held. It included a description of the equipment, techniques and procedures employed in radon daughter measurements within structures, indoor and outdoor gamma radiation surveys, and 226Ra measurements in surface and sub-surface soil samples. On the second day, the results of the measurements that have been conducted at Edgemont were presented. During the afternoon an open discussion of the radiological survey procedures used at Edgemont was held for the purpose of obtaining suggestions for the possible improvement of these procedures. Many useful suggestions were made and a few modifications in the survey procedures at Edgemont have been made in response to these suggestions.

Perkins, R. W.; Young, J. A.; Jackson, P. O.; Thomas, V. W.; Schwendiman, L. C.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

NIST Medical-Industrial Radiation Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Medical-Industrial Radiation Facility. ... Radiation hardness testing; Electron-beam sterilization; Beam diagnostics; Industrial CT scanning. ...

410

Site survey method and apparatus  

SciTech Connect

The disclosure of the invention is directed to a site survey ground vehicle based apparatus and method for automatically detecting source materials, such as radioactivity, marking the location of the source materials, such as with paint, and mapping the location of the source materials on a site. The apparatus of the invention is also useful for collecting and analyzing samples. The apparatus includes a ground vehicle, detectors mounted at the front of the ground vehicle, and individual detector supports which follow somewhat irregular terrain to allow consistent and accurate detection, and autolocation equipment.

Oldham, James G. (Albuquerque, NM); Spencer, Charles R. (Boise, ID); Begley, Carl L. (Albuquerque, NM); Meyer, H. Robert (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

411

Site survey method and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure of the invention is directed to a site survey ground vehicle based apparatus and method for automatically detecting source materials, such as radioactivity, marking the location of the source materials, such as with paint, and mapping the location of the source materials on a site. The apparatus of the invention is also useful for collecting and analyzing samples. The apparatus includes a ground vehicle, detectors mounted at the front of the ground vehicle, and individual detector supports which follow somewhat irregular terrain to allow consistent and accurate detection, and autolocation equipment. 19 figures.

Oldham, J.G.; Spencer, C.R.; Begley, C.L.; Meyer, H.R.

1991-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

412

Radiation Emergency Procedure Demonstrations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Managing Radiation Emergencies Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstrations Procedure Demonstrations Note: RealPlayer is needed for listening to the narration that accompany these demonstrations. Real Player Dressing To Prevent the Spread of Radioactive Contamination This demonstration shows how your team can dress to prevent the spread of radioactive contamination. Click to begin presentation on dressing to prevent the spread of radioactive contamination. Preparing The Area This demonstration shows basic steps you can take to gather equipment and prepare a room to receive a patient who may be contaminated with radioactive material. Click to begin presentation on preparing a room to receive a radioactive contaminated patient. Removing Contaminated Clothing This demonstration shows the procedure for removing clothing from a patient who may be contaminated with radioactive material.

413

National Ambient Radiation Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently developed a searchable database and website for the Environmental Radiation Ambient Monitoring System (ERAMS) data. This site contains nationwide radiation monitoring data for air particulates, precipitation, drinking water, surface water and pasteurized milk. This site provides location-specific as well as national information on environmental radioactivity across several media. It provides high quality data for assessing public exposure and environmental impacts resulting from nuclear emergencies and provides baseline data during routine conditions. The database and website are accessible at www.epa.gov/enviro/. This site contains (1) a query for the general public which is easy to use--limits the amount of information provided, but includes the ability to graph the data with risk benchmarks and (2) a query for a more technical user which allows access to all of the data in the database, (3) background information on ER AMS.

Dziuban, J.; Sears, R.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

414

Multilayer radiation shield  

SciTech Connect

A power generation system including: a generator including a rotor including a superconductive rotor coil coupled to a rotatable shaft; a first prime mover drivingly coupled to the rotatable shaft; and a thermal radiation shield, partially surrounding the rotor coil, including at least a first sheet and a second sheet spaced apart from the first sheet by centripetal force produced by the rotatable shaft. A thermal radiation shield for a generator including a rotor including a super-conductive rotor coil including: a first sheet having at least one surface formed from a low emissivity material; and at least one additional sheet having at least one surface formed from a low emissivity material spaced apart from the first sheet by centripetal force produced by the rotatable shaft, wherein each successive sheet is an incrementally greater circumferential arc length and wherein the centripetal force shapes the sheets into a substantially catenary shape.

Urbahn, John Arthur (Saratoga Springs, NY); Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon (Niskayuna, NY)

2009-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

415

Radiation shielding composition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

Quapp, William J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Radiation shielding composition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

Quapp, William J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2000-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

417

Terahertz radiation mixer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A terahertz radiation mixer comprises a heterodyned field-effect transistor (FET) having a high electron mobility heterostructure that provides a gatable two-dimensional electron gas in the channel region of the FET. The mixer can operate in either a broadband pinch-off mode or a narrowband resonant plasmon mode by changing a grating gate bias of the FET. The mixer can beat an RF signal frequency against a local oscillator frequency to generate an intermediate frequency difference signal in the microwave region. The mixer can have a low local oscillator power requirement and a large intermediate frequency bandwidth. The terahertz radiation mixer is particularly useful for terahertz applications requiring high resolution.

Wanke, Michael C. (Albuquerque, NM); Allen, S. James (Santa Barbara, CA); Lee, Mark (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

418

RADIATION SHIELDING DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

ABS>A radiation shield that is suitable for the protection of personnel from both gamma rays and nentrons is described. The shield is comprised of a hollow wall and an aggregate consisting of iron and water in approximately equal amounts by volume substantially filling the wall. A means is provided to circulate the water through the wall to cool the shield when in use.

Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

1958-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

419

West Coast Aerial Sardine Survey Application for Exempted Fishing Permit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

West Coast Aerial Sardine Survey 2010 Application for Exempted Fishing Permit Applicants ........................................................................................5 A. Coastwide Summer Aerial Sardine Survey (July-August, 2010) ....................6 I. Survey Design ­ Coastwide Summer Aerial Sardine Survey ...............................6 Stage 1: Aerial Transect

420

Radiation damage considerations  

SciTech Connect

The designs of nuclear fission and fusion power plants do not, in general, appear to make unusual demands on materials in terms of mechanical- property requirements. Radiation environments produce unique effects on the composition, microstructure, and defect population of these alloys, resulting in time-dependent and time-independent changes in mechanical properties. To illustrate these problems, the materials needs of the core of a Liquid-Metal Fast- Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) and of the first wall of a fusion reactor are discussed. In the case of the LMFBR core, the phenomenon of void swelling causes serious design problems, and a search is being made for a low-swelling alloy that has adequate mechanical properties. The fusion reactor poses different problems because the neutron energy is high (14 MeV) and is accompanied by a high flux of charged particles. The long-term choices for a wall material have been narrowed to vanadium and niobium alloys. In the search for low-swelling alloys, it has become clear that minor elements play an important role in determining the nature of the radiation effects. The segregation of minor elements to void surfaces and the dispersion and reformation of second-phase precipitates are two important radiation-induced phenomena that require additional study in view of their influence on void swelling and high-temperature properties. (auth)

Frost, B.R.T.

1975-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-agency radiation survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

On the collective curvature radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper deals with the one possible mechanism of the pulsar radio emission, i.e., with the collective curvature radiation of the relativistic particle stream moving along the curved magnetospheric magnetic field lines. It is shown that the electromagnetic wave containing one cylindrical harmonic exp{is{\\phi}} can not be radiated by the curvature radiation mechanism, that corresponds to radiation of a charged particle moving along curved magnetic field lines. The point is that the particle in vacuum radiates the triplex of harmonics (s, s \\pm 1), so for the collective curvature radiation the wave polarization is very important and cannot be fixed a priori. For this reason the polarization of real unstable waves must be determined directly from the solution of wave equations for the media. Its electromagnetic properties should be described by the dielectric permittivity tensor \\^{\\epsilon}({\\omega},k,r), that contains the information on the reaction on all possible types of radiation.

Istomin, Ya N; Beskin, V S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Method for microbeam radiation therapy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of performing radiation therapy on a patient, involving exposing a target, usually a tumor, to a therapeutic dose of high energy electromagnetic radiation, preferably X-ray radiation, in the form of at least two non-overlapping microbeams of radiation, each microbeam having a width of less than about 1 millimeter. Target tissue exposed to the microbeams receives a radiation dose during the exposure that exceeds the maximum dose that such tissue can survive. Non-target tissue between the microbeams receives a dose of radiation below the threshold amount of radiation that can be survived by the tissue, and thereby permits the non-target tissue to regenerate. The microbeams may be directed at the target from one direction, or from more than one direction in which case the microbeams overlap within the target tissue enhancing the lethal effect of the irradiation while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue.

Slatkin, Daniel N. (Sound Beach, NY); Dilmanian, F. Avraham (Yaphank, NY); Spanne, Per O. (Shoreham, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Radiation control standards and procedures  

SciTech Connect

This manual contains the Radiation Control Standards'' and Radiation Control Procedures'' at Hanford Operations which have been established to provide the necessary control radiation exposures within Irradiation Processing Department. Provision is also made for including, in the form of Bulletins'', other radiological information of general interest to IPD personnel. The purpose of the standards is to establish firm radiological limits within which the Irradiation Processing Department will operate, and to outline our radiation control program in sufficient detail to insure uniform and consistent application throughout all IPD facilities. Radiation Control Procedures are intended to prescribe the best method of accomplishing an objective within the limitations of the Radiation Control Standards. A procedure may be changed at any time provided the suggested changes is generally agreeable to management involved, and is consistent with department policies and the Radiation Control Standards.

1956-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

424

Method for microbeam radiation therapy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed of performing radiation therapy on a patient, involving exposing a target, usually a tumor, to a therapeutic dose of high energy electromagnetic radiation, preferably X-ray radiation. The dose is in the form of at least two non-overlapping microbeams of radiation, each microbeam having a width of less than about 1 millimeter. Target tissue exposed to the microbeams receives a radiation dose during the exposure that exceeds the maximum dose that such tissue can survive. Non-target tissue between the microbeams receives a dose of radiation below the threshold amount of radiation that can be survived by the tissue, and thereby permits the non-target tissue to regenerate. The microbeams may be directed at the target from one direction, or from more than one direction in which case the microbeams overlap within the target tissue enhancing the lethal effect of the irradiation while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. No Drawings

Slatkin, D.N.; Dilmanian, F.A.; Spanne, P.O.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

425

An aerial radiological survey of the project Rio Blanco and surrounding area  

SciTech Connect

A team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada, conducted an aerial radiation survey of the area surrounding ground zero of Project Rio Blanco in the northwestern section of Colorado in June 1993. The object of the survey was to determine if there were man-made radioisotopes on or near the surface resulting from a nuclear explosion in 1972. No indications of surface contamination were found. A search for the cesium-137 radioisotope was negative. The Minimum Detectable Activity for cesium-137 is presented for several detection probabilities. The natural terrestrial exposure rates in units of Roentgens per hour were mapped and are presented in the form of a contour map over-laid on an aerial photograph. A second team made independent ground-based measurements in four places within the survey area. The average agreement of the ground-based with aerial measurements was six percent.

Singman, L.V.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Evaluation of probes used to detect alpha radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Portable survey instrumentation has always been an integral part of most operational health physics programs. The ability to detect and prevent the spread of contamination is one of the most significant roles of portable survey meters, and manufacturers are continually attempting to improve the sensitivity and usefulness of such equipment. A major concern of instrument makers deals with the sensitivity of probes to alpha emitting radionuclides, which, due to extremely short ranges, are very difficult to detect with survey meters. In response to these concerns several probes have been designed with an increased sensitivity to alpha radiation, combining larger sensitive surface areas with very thin windows to increase detector efficiency. Two such probes were evaluated in this study, the 350A Alpha Probe of Dosimeter Corporation and the AB100 Scintillator Probe produced by Harshaw Bicron. As an additional comparison, a Ludlum Model 44-9 (Pancake) GM Probe was also evaluated, since it has served as an industry standard for many years and continues to be used frequently. The evaluation consisted of several tests concerning response to radiation under various laboratory conditions and also under actual conditions, to determine overall probe performance.

Sackett, Gregory Duane

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Influence of Extraterrestrial Radiation on Radiation Portal Monitors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cosmic radiation and solar flares can be a major source of background radiation at the Earth’s surface. This paper examines the relationship between extraterrestrial radiation and the detectable background in radiation portal monitors used for homeland security applications. Background radiation data from 13 radiation portal monitor facilities are examined and compared against external sources of data related to extraterrestrial radiation, including measurements at neutron monitors located at 53 cosmic-ray observatories around the Earth, four polar orbiting satellites, three geostationary satellites, ground-based geomagnetic field data from observatories around the Earth, a solar magnetic index, solar radio flux data, and sunspot activity data. Four-years (January 2003 through December 2006) of data are used in this study, which include the latter part of Solar Cycle 23 as solar activity was on the decline. The analysis shows a significant relationship between some extraterrestrial radiation and the background detected in the radiation portal monitors. A demonstrable decline is shown in the average gamma ray and neutron background at the radiation portal monitors as solar activity declined over the period of the study.

Keller, Paul E.; Kouzes, Richard T.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

An aerial radiological survey of the Fernald Environmental Management Project and surrounding area, Fernald, Ohio  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey was conducted from May 17--22, 1994, over a 36 square mile (93 square kilometer) area centered on the Fernald Environmental Management Project located in Fernald, Ohio. The purpose of the survey was to detect anomalous gamma radiation in the environment surrounding the plant. The survey was conducted at a nominal altitude of 150 feet (46 meters) with a line spacing of 250 feet (76 meters). A contour map of the terrestrial gamma exposure rate extrapolated to 1 meter (3.3 feet) above ground was prepared and overlaid on an aerial photograph of the area. Analysis of the data for man made sources showed five sites within the boundaries of the Fernald Environmental Management Project having elevated readings. The exposure rates outside the plant boundary were typical of naturally occurring background radiation. Soil samples and pressurized ion chamber measurements were obtained at four locations within the survey boundaries to supplement the aerial data. It was concluded that although the radionuclides identified in the high-exposure-rate areas are naturally occurring, the levels encountered are greatly enhanced due to industrial activities at the plant.

Phoenix, K.A.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Wellbore inertial directional surveying system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wellbore inertial directional surveying system for providing a complete directional survey of an oil or gas well borehole to determine the displacement in all three directions of the borehole path relative to the well head at the surface. The information generated by the present invention is especially useful when numerous wells are drilled to different geographical targets from a single offshore platform. Accurate knowledge of the path of the borehole allows proper well spacing and provides assurance that target formations are reached. The tool is lowered down into a borehole on an electrical cable. A computer positioned on the surface communicates with the tool via the cable. The tool contains a sensor block which is supported on a single gimbal, the rotation axis of which is aligned with the cylinder axis of the tool and, correspondingly, the borehole. The gyroscope measurement of the sensor block rotation is used in a null-seeking servo loop which essentially prevents rotation of the sensor block about the gimbal axis. Angular rates of the sensor block about axes which are perpendicular to te gimbal axis are measured by gyroscopes in a manner similar to a strapped-down arrangement. Three accelerometers provide acceleration information as the tool is lowered within the borehole. The uphole computer derives position information based upon acceleration information and angular rate information. Kalman estimation techniques are used to compensate for system errors. 25 figures.

Andreas, R.D.; Heck, G.M.; Kohler, S.M.; Watts, A.C.

1982-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

430

Survey of Climate Data Mining  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global climate change has been a discussion topic for years, finally culminating as a significant problem and a national defense issue according to the 2010 Quadrennial Defense Review. From weather to ecological data, the planet is continuously being monitored by researchers collecting spatio-temporal climate data. With the immense amount of data collected, the challenge is making sense of the data by building models and studying the climatic events that deviate and correlate to the models. Data mining is now being used for this research and has four related problems: preprocessing data, applying data mining techniques to build models and outlier/anomaly detection, evaluation techniques and methods, and data visualization. This survey paper will present a broad survey of these issues by first discussing preprocessing techniques to remove variation and other data quality issues, including a discussion on the two types of outliers: undesirable outliers and outliers that represent interesting climate events. Next this paper will discuss common data mining techniques for building models, including association analysis, clustering, and ICA, and discovering interesting outlier/anomalies using techniques including classification, clustering, and wavelet analysis. Third, evaluation techniques will be covered through descriptions and examples. Finally, issues and techniques for climate data visualization will be discussed including

Jason W. Powell

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Wellbore inertial directional surveying system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wellbore inertial directional surveying system for providing a complete directional survey of an oil or gas well borehole to determine the displacement in all three directions of the borehole path relative to the well head at the surface. The information generated by the present invention is especially useful when numerous wells are drilled to different geographical targets from a single off-shore platform. Accurate knowledge of the path of the borehole allows proper well spacing and provides assurance that target formations are reached. The tool is lowered down into a borehole on the electrical cable. A computer positioned on the surface communicates with the tool via the cable. The tool contains a sensor block which is supported on a single gimbal, the rotation axis of which is aligned with the cylinder axis of the tool and, correspondingly, the borehole. The gyroscope measurement of the sensor block rotation is used in a null-seeking servo loop which essentially prevents rotation of the sensor block aboutthe gimbal axis. Angular rates of the sensor block about axes which are perpendicular to the gimbal axis are measured by gyroscopes in a manner similar to a strapped-down arrangement. Three accelerometers provide acceleration information as the tool is lowered within the borehole. The uphole computer derives position information based upon acceleration information and anular rate information. Kalman estimation techniques are used to compensate for system errors.

Andreas, Ronald D. (Albuquerque, NM); Heck, G. Michael (Albuquerque, NM); Kohler, Stewart M. (Albuquerque, NM); Watts, Alfred C. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Lesson 4 - Ionizing Radiation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 - Ionizing Radiation 4 - Ionizing Radiation Lesson 4 - Ionizing Radiation Lesson Three showed that unstable isotopes emit energy as they become more stable. This energy is known as radiation. This lesson explores forms of radiation, where radiation is found, how we detect and measure radiation, what sources of radiation people are exposed to, whether radiation is harmful, and how we can limit our exposure. Specific topics covered in this lesson include: Types of radiation Non-ionizing Ionizing Forms of ionizing radiation Alpha particles Beta particles Gamma rays Radiation Decay chain Half-life Dose Radiation measurements Sources of radiation Average annual exposure Lesson 4 - Ionizing Radiation.pptx More Documents & Publications DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 DOE-HDBK-1130-2007

433

PRELIMINARY SURVEY OF BETHLEHEM STEEL LACKAWANNA, NEW YORK  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

BETHLEHEM STEEL BETHLEHEM STEEL LACKAWANNA, NEW YORK Work oerformed bi the Health and Safety Research Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 March 1980 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY operated by UNION CARBIDE CORPORATION for the DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites-- Remedial Action Program BETHLEHEM STEEL LACKAWANNA, NEW YORK At the request of the Department of Energy (DOE, then ERDA), a preliminary survey was performed at the Bethlehem Steel Corporation's plant in Lackawanna, New York (see Fig. l), on August 26, 1976, to assess the radiological status of those facilities utilized under Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) contract during the period 1949 through 1951. Anthony LaMastra of Bethlehem Steel, who was in charge of radiation

434

An aerial radiological survey of the Tonopah Test Range including Clean Slate 1,2,3, Roller Coaster, decontamination area, Cactus Springs Ranch target areas. Central Nevada  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey was conducted of major sections of the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in central Nevada from August through October 1993. The survey consisted of aerial measurements of both natural and man-made gamma radiation emanating from the terrestrial surface. The initial purpose of the survey was to locate depleted uranium (detecting {sup 238}U) from projectiles which had impacted on the TTR. The examination of areas near Cactus Springs Ranch (located near the western boundary of the TTR) and an animal burial area near the Double Track site were secondary objectives. When more widespread than expected {sup 241}Am contamination was found around the Clean Slates sites, the survey was expanded to cover the area surrounding the Clean Slates and also the Double Track site. Results are reported as radiation isopleths superimposed on aerial photographs of the area.

Proctor, A.E.; Hendricks, T.J.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

WIPP Subsidence Monument Leveling Survey - 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sections 2 through 7 of this report define the result of the 2005 leveling survey through the subsidence monuments at the WIPP site. Approximately 15 miles of leveling was completed through nine vertical control loops. The 2005 survey includes the determination of elevation on each of the 48 existing subsidence monuments and the WIPP baseline survey, and 14 of the National Geodetic Survey’s (NGS) vertical control points. The field observations were completed during September through November of 2005 by personnel from the Washington TRU Solutions (WTS) Surveying Group, Mine Engineering Department. Additional rod personnel were provided by the Geotechnical Engineering Department. Digital leveling techniques were utilized to achieve better than Second Order Class II loop closures as outlined by the Federal Geodetic Control Subcommittee (FGCS). Because it is important to perform the subsidence survey in exactly the same manner each year, WIPP procedure (WP 09-ES4001) details each step of the survey. Starting with the 2002 survey this procedure has been used to perform the subsidence survey. Starting with the survey of the year 2001, Loop 1 and redundant survey connections among the various loops were removed from the survey and report. This resulted in a reduction of fieldwork with no loss of accuracy or precision. The redundant connections caused multiple elevations for the same stations. The differences were so slight that they were not used in elevation adjustments for the loops. The redundancy was used to spot gross errors in the field. After several years of surveying these loops it is evident that no gross errors occur that are not also evident in the loop closures. Finally, Section 8 contains Table F, which summarizes the elevations for all surveys from 1987 through 2005, inclusive. A detailed listing of the 1986 through 1997 surveys is contained in the report, WIPP Subsidence Monument Leveling Surveys 1986-1997, DOE/WIPP 98-2293. A reference to the summary reports for each year after 1997 is listed in the reference section of this document.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity and Chromosome Instability Induction in TK6 Cells Schwartz J.L. 1 , Jordan R. 1 , Slovic J. 1 , Moruzzi A. 1 , Kimmel R. 2 , and Liber, H.L. 3 1 University of Washington, Seattle, WA; 2 Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA; 3 Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado There are a number of cell responses that can be detected after low dose radiation exposures including the adaptive response, low dose hypersensitivity, and induced genomic instability. The relationship between these different phenomena is unknown. In this study, we measured adaptive responses, low dose hypersensitivity, and induced genomic instability in a human B-lymphoblastoid cell model, TK6, where we could genetically modify radiation responses by either over-expression of BCL-2 or deletion of TP53. TK6

437

ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Integrated Column Description An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere An Integrated Column Description of the Atmosphere Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory The "other" Washington ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Credits to Credits to * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team * Ric Cederwall * Xiquan Dong * Chuck Long * Jay Mace * Mark Miller * Robin Perez * Dave Turner and the rest of the ARM science team ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Outline Outline * A little philosophy

438

BNL | Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) sloan telescope The 2.5-meter Sloan telescope in New Mexico Mapping the Luminous Universe How are galaxies clustered together? What is fueling the accelerating expansion of the universe? Just what is dark energy? These are the big questions that scientists working at the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) are asking. Brookhaven National Lab is a member of BOSS, the largest of the four surveys that make up the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III, which maps the sky over the Northern Hemisphere with New Mexico's 2.5-meter Sloan telescope in an attempt to define dark energy and measure its effects. Building on the legacy of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and SDSS-II, the SDSS-III collaboration is working to map the Milky Way, search

439

Definition: Geodetic Survey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geodetic Survey Geodetic Survey Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Geodetic Survey Geodetic surveys study Earth's geodynamical phenomena (e.g., crustal motion, gravitational field) using a satellite-borne global positioning system (GPS) in conjunction with terrestrial base stations. Geodetic surveys measure three-dimensional changes in crustal motion at the mm-scale. Measurements are typically made over very large areas (1010 km2) spanning years.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Also Known As Geodesy References ↑ GPS and Space-Based Geodetic Methods (Blewitt 2007) from the book Treatise on Geophysics Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Geodetic_Survey&oldid=401158

440

Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Policy and Guidance » Human Capital Management » Federal Employee Policy and Guidance » Human Capital Management » Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey The Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey (FedView survey) is a tool that measures employees' perceptions of whether, and to what extent, conditions characterizing successful organizations are present in their agencies. Survey results provide valuable insight into the challenges agency leaders face in ensuring the Federal Government has an effective civilian workforce and how well they are responding. Documents Available For Download October 31, 2013 2013 - Federal Viewpoint Survey Reports The following highlight report focuses on the Department of Energy's areas of strengths and challenges, identifies areas of progress and opportunities for improvement. The Departments 2013 results are compared

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-agency radiation survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Design Code Survey Form | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Design Code Survey Form Design Code Survey Form Design Code Survey Form Survey of Safety Software Used in Design of Structures, Systems, and Components 1. Introduction The Department's Implementation Plan for Software Quality Assurance (SQA) that was developed in response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 2002-01, Quality Assurance for Safety-Related Software, includes a commitment (4.2.1.5) to conduct a survey of design codes currently in use to determine if any should be included as part of the toolbox codes. Design Code Survey Form September 11, 2003 More Documents & Publications Technical Standards, Safety Analysis Toolbox Codes - November 2003 DOE G 414.1-4, Safety Software Guide for Use with 10 CFR 830 Subpart A, Quality Assurance Requirements, and DOE O 414.1C, Quality Assurance

442

2007/2008 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7/2008 User Survey Results 7/2008 User Survey Results Show All | 1 2 3 4 5 ... 10 | Next » 2007/2008 User Survey Results Table of Contents Response Summary Overall Satisfaction and Importance All Satisfaction, Importance and Usefulness Ratings Hardware Resources Software Visualization and Data Analysis HPC Consulting Services and Communications Web Interfaces Comments about NERSC Response Summary Many thanks to the 467 users who responded to this year's User Survey. The response rate has significantly increased from previous years: 70 percent of users who had used more than 1 million MPP hours when the survey opened responded 43 percent of users who had used between 10,000 and 1 million MPP hours responded The overall response rate for the 2,804 authorized users during the survey period was 16.3%.

443

1980 Active-Solar Installations Survey  

SciTech Connect

The survey covers active solar installations made during and prior to calendar year 1980. As the first survey of active solar installations in the United States, the objective was to establish a national baseline information system that could provide current data on residential and commercial active solar installations as well as a listing of firms involved in the active solar industry, including installers. Potential respondents were identified from regional lists of solar equipment dealers and installers compiled by each Regional Solar Energy Center (RSEC). The RSEC lists were computerized and combined into a mailing list of 5466 company names and addresses. An additional 1619 referrals, were provided by survey respondents from the RSEC list. However, because of resource constraints, 981 of these referrals were not included in the survey. To substantiate that the results of this survey represent accurate statistics on the number of active solar installations in the United States, a comparison was made to the Solar Collector Manufacturing Survey installations. (PSB)

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Los Alamos Lab: Radiation Protection: Annual Occupational Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annual Occupational Radiation Dosimetry Report Print information on Annual Occupational Radiation Dosimetry Report (pdf). This webpage provides information to help you understand the dose quantities being reported to you on your Annual Occupational Radiation Dosimetry Report. If you would like general information about radiation exposure, please refer to www.radiationanswers.org. Title 10 Code of Federal Regulation Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (10 CFR 835), requires assessment, recording and reporting of radiation doses to individuals who are exposed to sources of radiation or radioactive contamination. This includes assessing external exposure from a variety of radiation types, such as, beta, photon, and neutron radiation. External exposures may be uniform over the whole body or occur in a non-uniform (i.e., limited body location) fashion. Internal doses occur when radioactive material is taken into the body through ingestion, inhalation, absorption or wounds. The requirements include assessing doses to the whole body, skin, lens of the eyes, extremities and various organs and tissues.

445

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Research Societies with Radiation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Societies with Radiation Concerns Academy of Radiology Research American Association of Physicists in Medicine American Nuclear Society American Roentgen Ray Society American...

446

Measurement of Radiation Damage on Silica Aerogel \\v Cerenkov Radiator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We measured the radiation damage on silica aerogel \\v Cerenkov radiators originally developed for the $B$-factory experiment at KEK. Refractive index of the aerogel samples ranged from 1.012 to 1.028. The samples were irradiated up to 9.8~MRad of equivalent dose. Measurements of transmittance and refractive index were carried out and these samples were found to be radiation hard. Deteriorations in transparency and changes of refractive index were observed to be less than 1.3\\% and 0.001 at 90\\% confidence level, respectively. Prospects of using aerogels under high-radiation environment are discussed.

S. K. Sahu et al

1996-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

447

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Low Dose Radiation Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Dose Radiation Research: Outreach and Resources Authors: Antone L. Brooks and Lezlie A. Couch Institution: Washington State University Tri-Cities, Richland, Washington The...

448

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Radiation Response in Normal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

genes. Using rigorous computational methods, we characterized the dose-dependent, radiation-induced gene expression of HSF-42, a primary cell culture. Our preliminary results...

449

Virtual Gamma Ray Radiation Sources through Neutron Radiative Capture  

SciTech Connect

The countrate response of a gamma spectrometry system from a neutron radiation source behind a plane of moderating material doped with a nuclide of a large radiative neutron capture cross-section exhibits a countrate response analogous to a gamma radiation source at the same position from the detector. Using a planar, surface area of the neutron moderating material exposed to the neutron radiation produces a larger area under the prompt gamma ray peak in the detector than a smaller area of dimensions relative to the active volume of the gamma detection system.

Scott Wilde, Raymond Keegan

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Radiation Control Program and Radiation Control Act (Nebraska)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute authorizes the state to implement a regulatory program for sources of radiation, and contains rules for the Department, licensing and registration, and taxation of radioactive materials.

451

Forecasting Cosmological Constraints from Redshift Surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observations of redshift-space distortions in spectroscopic galaxy surveys offer an attractive method for observing the build-up of cosmological structure, which depends both on the expansion rate of the Universe and our theory of gravity. In this paper we present a formalism for forecasting the constraints on the growth of structure which would arise in an idealized survey. This Fisher matrix based formalism can be used to study the power and aid in the design of future surveys.

Martin White; Yong-Seon Song; Will J. Percival

2008-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

452

Nuclear Engineering Academic Programs Survey, 2002 Data  

SciTech Connect

The survey includes degrees granted between July 1, 2001 and June 30, 2002. Enrollment information refers to the fall term 2002. Thirty-five academic programs were in the survey universe and all responded (100% response rate). One of the 35 programs reported that it was discontinued after the 2001-2002 academic year. Also, two programs were discontinued after the previous academic year (2000-2001) and were not included in 2002 survey.

Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Nuclear Engineering Academic Programs Survey, 2003  

SciTech Connect

The survey includes degrees granted between September 1, 2002 and August 31, 2003. Thirty-three academic programs reported having nuclear engineering programs during the survey time period and all responded (100% response rate). Three of the programs included in last year's report were discontinued or out-of-scope in 2003. One new program has been added to the list. This year the survey data include U.S. citizenship, gender, and race/ethnicity by degree level.

Science and Engineering Education, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F (2005) - Household Natural Gas Usage Form F (2005) - Household Natural Gas Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring May 31, 2008 Household Natural Gas Usage Form Service Address: If the customer account number is not shown above, please enter it here. STEP 1 Customer Account: __/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/ STEP 2 Now, please turn the page and provide the requested information for the household identified above. Completed forms are due by March 4, 2006. If you have any questions, please call (toll-free) 1-NNN-NNN-NNNN. Ask for the Supplier Survey Specialist. This report is mandatory under Public Law 93-275, as amended. See the enclosed Answers to Frequently Asked Questions for more details concerning confidentiality and sanctions. Use the enclosed self-addressed envelope and return the completed form to:

455

2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

G (2005) - Household Fuel Oil or Kerosene Usage Form G (2005) - Household Fuel Oil or Kerosene Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring May 31, 2008 Household Fuel Oil or Kerosene Usage Form Service Address: If the customer account number is not shown on the label, please enter it here. STEP 1 Customer Account: __/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/ STEP 2 Now, please turn the page and answer the seven questions for the household identified above. Completed forms are due by March 4, 2006. If you have any questions, please call (toll-free) 1-NNN-NNN-NNNN. Ask for the Supplier Survey Specialist. This report is mandatory under Public Law 93-275, as amended. See the enclosed Answers to Frequently Asked Questions for more details concerning confidentiality and sanctions.

456

2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D (2005) - Household Propane (Bottled Gas or LPG) Usage Form D (2005) - Household Propane (Bottled Gas or LPG) Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring May 31, 2008 Household Propane (Bottled Gas or LPG) Usage Form Service Address: If the customer account number is not shown on the label, please enter it here. STEP 1 Customer Account: __/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/ STEP 2 Now, please turn the page and answer the seven questions for the household identified above. Completed forms are due by March 4, 2006. If you have any questions, please call (toll-free) 1-NNN-NNN-NNNN. Ask for the Supplier Survey Specialist. This report is mandatory under Public Law 93-275, as amended. See the enclosed Answers to Frequently Asked Questions for more details concerning confidentiality

457

Survey of hydrogen monitoring devices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presented are results of a survey of commercially available monitoring devices suitable for hydrogen detection in the secondary containment vessel of a nuclear power plant during the post postulated accident period. Available detectors were grouped into the following five classes: combustion, solid state, electrochemical, thermal conductivity, and absorption. The performance of most available sensors is likely to deteriorate when exposed to the postulated conditions which include moisture, which could be at high temperature, and radioactive noncondensibles. Of the commercial devices, those using metallic filament thermal conductivity detectors seem least susceptible to performance change. Absorption detectors are best suited for this monitoring task but the only available device is designed for pipeline corrosion assessment. Initiation of experimental study to assess apparent deficiencies of commercial detectors is recommended. Also recommended is an analytical/experimental effort to determine the optimum detector array for monitoring in the secondary containment vessels.

Lai, W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Massive Variability Surveys from Venezuela  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the Venezuela National Astronomical Observatory we are carrying out variability surveys spanning many hundreds of square degrees near the celestial equator, using an 8k x 8k CCD Mosaic Camera optimized for drift-scanning on a 1m Schmidt telescope. Among the initial efforts was a project to obtain the first moderately deep, homogeneous sample of young stars over an area of ? 180sqr.deg. encompassing the entire Orion OB1 association, one of the nearest and most active regions of star formation. The results show that variability is a powerful technique to identify pre-main sequence populations, specially in sparse areas devoid of gas and dust. We are currently developing a massive database, equipped with web-based data mining tools, that will make our data and results available to the astronomical community. 1.

C. D. Impey; C. E. Petry; César Briceño

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Massive Variability Surveys from Venezuela  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the Venezuela National Astronomical Observatory we are carrying out variability surveys spanning many hundreds of square degrees near the celestial equator, using an 8k x 8k CCD Mosaic Camera optimized for drift-scanning on a 1m Schmidt telescope. Among the initial efforts was a project to obtain the first moderately deep, homogeneous sample of young stars over an area of ~180sqr.deg. encompassing the entire Orion OB1 association, one of the nearest and most active regions of star formation. The results show that variability is a powerful technique to identify pre-main sequence populations, specially in sparse areas devoid of gas and dust. We are currently developing a massive database, equipped with web-based data mining tools, that will make our data and results available to the astronomical community.

Briceño, C

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Massive Variability Surveys from Venezuela  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At the Venezuela National Astronomical Observatory we are carrying out variability surveys spanning many hundreds of square degrees near the celestial equator, using an 8k x 8k CCD Mosaic Camera optimized for drift-scanning on a 1m Schmidt telescope. Among the initial efforts was a project to obtain the first moderately deep, homogeneous sample of young stars over an area of ~180sqr.deg. encompassing the entire Orion OB1 association, one of the nearest and most active regions of star formation. The results show that variability is a powerful technique to identify pre-main sequence populations, specially in sparse areas devoid of gas and dust. We are currently developing a massive database, equipped with web-based data mining tools, that will make our data and results available to the astronomical community.

Cesar Briceno

2003-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-agency radiation survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

RADIATION LABORATO DISCLAIMER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R : R : . . . RADIATION LABORATO DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any

462

RADIATION SHIELDING COMPOSITION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A light weight radiation shielding composition is described whose mechanical and radiological properties can be varied within wide limits. The composition of this shielding material consists of four basic ingredients: powder of either Pb or W, a plastic resin, a resin plasticizer, and a polymerization catalyst to promote an interaction of the plasticizer with the plastic resin. Air may be mixed into the above ingredients in order to control the density of the final composition. For equivalent gamma attenuation, the shielding composition weighs one-third to one-half as much as conventional Pb shielding. (AEC)

Dunegan, H.L.

1963-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

463

RADIATION DETECTOR SYSTEM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to radiation detection devices and presents a unique detection system especialiy desirable for portable type instruments using a Geiger-Mueller for a high voltage battery, thereby reducing the size and weight of the instrument, by arranging a one-shot multivibrator to recharge a capacitance applying operating potential to tho Geiger-Mueller tube each time a nuclear particle is detected. When detection occurs, the multivibrator further delivers a pulse to an appropriate indicator doing away with the necessity for the pulse amplifier conventionally intermediate between the detector and indicator in pulse detection systems.

Gundlach, J.C.; Kelley, G.G.

1958-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

464

Primary Radiation Damage Formation  

SciTech Connect

The physical processes that give rise to changes in the microstructure, and the physical and mechanical properties of materials exposed to energetic particles are initiated by essentially elastic collisions between atoms in what has been called an atomic displacement cascade. The formation and evolution of this primary radiation damage mechanism are described to provide an overview of how stable defects are formed by displacement cascades, as well as the nature and morphology of the defects themselves. The impact of the primary variables cascade energy and irradiation temperature are discussed, along with a range of secondary factors that can influence damage formation.

Stoller, Roger E [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Survey Background and Technical Information on CBECS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Survey Background and Technical Information Survey Background and Technical Information Survey Background and Technical Information Survey Background The commercial sector encompasses a vast range of building types- service businesses, such as retail and wholesale stores, hotels and motels, restaurants, and hospitals, as well as certain buildings that would not be considered "commercial" in a traditional economic sense, such as public and private schools, correctional institutions, and religious and fraternal organizations. Excluded from the sector are the goods-producing industries: manufacturing, agriculture, mining, forestry and fisheries, and construction. Nearly all energy use in the commercial sector takes place in, or is associated with, the buildings that house these commercial activities. Analysis of the structures, activities, and equipment associated with different types of buildings is the clearest way to evaluate commercial sector energy use. The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is a national-level sample survey of commercial buildings and their energy suppliers conducted quadrennially (previously triennially) by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The 2003 CBECS was the eighth survey in the series begun in 1979. From 1979 to 1986, the survey was known as the Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey, or NBECS.

466

Reflection Survey (Nannini, 1986) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reflection Survey (Nannini, 1986) Reflection Survey (Nannini, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Reflection Survey (Nannini, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Reflection Survey Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes "seismic analyses" - no indication of active/passive, reflection/refraction, etc. ---> "On the contrary, in areas with little or no volcanic activity, assumptions on the nature, size and characteristics of the source of the thermal anomaly are generally much more difficult and hypothetical. In these circumstances, some useful data can be obtained from accurate seismic analyses, together with a seismotectonic and geodynamic

467

Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey - Index Page  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings 1993 Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey Overview Full Report Tables Energy usage and energy costs, by building characteristics, for federally-owned buildings in...

468

PRELIMINARY SURVEY OF WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC CORPORATION EAST...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

EAST PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA At the request of the Department of Energy (DOE, then ERDA), a preliminary survey was performed at the Westinghouse Electric Corporation's East...

469

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Heating and cooling no longer majority of U.S. home energy use. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Residential Energy Consumption Survey.

470

Balancing Authority Related Proposals for EIA Surveys  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

for EIA Surveys EIA Stakeholder Presentation June 5, 2012 . ... smart grid technologies and demand response. Require balancing authorities to post the next day

471

Definition: DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Schlumberger Array) Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png DC Resistivity Survey (Schlumberger Array) The Schlumberger array is a type of electrode configuration for a DC...

472

2009/2010 NERSC User Survey Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demographics Overall Satisfaction All Satisfaction and Importance Ratings HPC Resources NERSC Software Services Comments Survey Text Response Summary Many thanks to the 395 users...

473

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Analysis ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The gross output for the petroleum and coal products subsector grew by about 3 percent, ... Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey, MECS Definition of Fuel Use, ...

474

WIPP Subsidence Monument Leveling Survey - 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sections 2 through 7 of this report define the result of the 2004 leveling survey through the subsidence monuments at the WIPP site. Approximately 15 miles of leveling was completed through nine vertical control loops. The 2004 survey includes the determination of elevation on each of the 48 existing subsidence monuments and the WIPP baseline survey, and 14 of the National Geodetic Survey's (NGS) vertical control points. The field observations were completed during August through November of 2004 by personnel from the WashingtonTRU Solutions (WTS) Surveying Group, Mine Engineering Department. Additional rod personnel were provided by the Geotechnical Engineering department. Digital leveling techniques were utilized to achieve better than Second Order Class II loop closures as outlined by the Federal Geodetic Control Subcommittee (FGCS). Because it is important to perform the subsidence survey in exactly the same manner each year, WIPP procedure (WP 09-ES4001) details each step of the survey. Starting with the 2002 survey this procedure has been used to perform the subsidence survey. Starting with the survey of the year 2001, Loop 1 and redundant survey connections among the various loops were removed from the survey and report. This resulted in a reduction of fieldwork with no loss of accuracy or precision. The redundant connections caused multiple elevations for the same stations. The differences were so slight that they were not used in elevation adjustments for the loops. The redundancy was used to spot gross errors in the field. After several years of surveying these loops it is evident that no gross errors occur that are not also evident in the loop closures. Finally, Section 8 contains Table F, which summarizes the elevations for all surveys from 1987 through 2004, inclusive. A detailed listing of the 1986 through 1997 surveys is contained in the report, WIPP Subsidence Monument Leveling Surveys 1986-1997, DOE/WIPP 98-2293. A reference to the summary reports for each year after 1997 is listed in the reference section of this document.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

475

Supporting Statement for Survey Clearance: Electric Power ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Form EIA-63B, “Annual Photovoltaic Cell/Module Shipments Report” The Form EIA-63B is a mandatory annual census survey of companies engaged in photovol ...

476

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) 2009 Technical ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) Using the 2009 microdata file to compute estimates and standard errors (RSEs) February 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis

477

2005 State Laboratory Program Workload Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. 2005 State Laboratory Program Workload Survey Summary Graphs and Data by NCSLI Legal Metrology Committee FL PR Jun'05 Rev 1 ...

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

478

2003 State Laboratory Program Workload Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. 2003 State Laboratory Program Workload Survey Summary Graphs and Data by NCWM Metrology Subcommittee FL PR Aug'03 Rev 2 ...

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

479

Survey of Geothermal Heat Pump Shipments  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Others 930 3,369 454 4,753 ... Source: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-902 "Annual Geothermal Heat Pump Manufacturers Survey." Relased: March 2006

480

EIA initiates daily gasoline availability survey for ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

To develop the emergency survey, EIA used the representative sample of retail stations selling gasoline used in EIA's Form EIA-878, "Motor Gasoline ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "multi-agency radiation survey" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN HUMAN POPULATIONS FOLLOWING ACUTE EXPOSURE: NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS AND MEDICAL RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN HUMANEXPLOSIONS AND MEDICAL RADIATION . Jacob I. Fabrikant, MD,Low Levels of Ionizing Radiation, Yale University School of

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

JOINT EPA/DOE STATEMENT: Radiation Monitors Confirm That No Radiation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

JOINT EPADOE STATEMENT: Radiation Monitors Confirm That No Radiation Levels of Concern Have Reached the United States JOINT EPADOE STATEMENT: Radiation Monitors Confirm That No...

483

EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN HUMAN POPULATIONS FOLLOWING ACUTE EXPOSURE: NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS AND MEDICAL RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Current State of Radiation Protection Philosophy.Against Pergamon Ionizing Radiation from External Sources,for Protection Against Ionizing Radiation from Supplement to

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

An aerial radiological survey of Pocatello and Soda Springs, Idaho and surrounding area, June--July 1986  

SciTech Connect

Three aerial radiological surveys were conducted during the period 16 June through 15 July 1986 over the towns of Pocatello, Soda Springs, and Fort Hall, Idaho and the surrounding areas. The surveys were performed for the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) by the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL), utilizing the Aerial Measuring System (AMS). This work was completed in cooperation with a study by the EPA to conduct a dose assessment of human radiation exposure for industrial sources in Pocatello and Soda Springs, Idaho. The aerial surveys were performed to document the natural terrestrial radiological environment of the three localities and to map the spatial extent and degree of contamination due to phosphate milling operations. The results of these surveys will be used for planning ground-based measurements in addition to being incorporated into the dose assessment document. 4 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

Berry, H.A.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Safety Around Sources of Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Keeping Exposure Low Keeping Exposure Low Working Safely Around Radioactive Contamination Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Is it safe to be around sources? Too much radiation exposure is harmful. The degree of radiation injury depends on the amount of radiation received and the time involved. In general, the higher the amount, the greater the severity of early effects (occurring within a few weeks) and the greater the possibility of late effects such as cancer. The BEIR V (Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation) Committee of the National Research Council estimates that among 100,000 people exposed to a one-time dose of 10 rem (10,000 mrem) and followed over their life span, about 790 more would die of cancer than the estimated 20,000 cancer deaths that would be expected among a non-exposed group of the same size. NOTE: 10 rem = 100 millisieverts (100 mSv).

486

Poll of radiation health scientists  

SciTech Connect

A sampling of 210 university-employed radiation health scientists randomly selected from the membership lists of the Health Physics Society and the Radiation Research Society was polled in a secret ballot. The results support the positions that the public's fear of radiation is substantially greater than realistic, that TV, newspapers and magazines substantially exaggerate the dangers of radiation, that the amount of money now being spent on radiation protection is sufficient, and that the openness and honesty of U.S. government agencies about dangers of radiation were below average before 1972 but have been above average since then. Respondents give very high credibility ratings to BEIR, UNSCEAR, ICRP, and NCRP and to the individual scientists associated with their reports, and very low credibility ratings to those who have disputed them.

Cohen, B.L.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Deterministic methods in radiation transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Seminar on Deterministic Methods in Radiation Transport was held February 4--5, 1992, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Eleven presentations were made and the full papers are published in this report, along with three that were submitted but not given orally. These papers represent a good overview of the state of the art in the deterministic solution of radiation transport problems for a variety of applications of current interest to the Radiation Shielding Information Center user community.

Rice, A.F.; Roussin, R.W. (eds.)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

INSTRUMENTATION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING--Radiation--Vol3Pt1  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive survey of instrumentation for environmental monitoring is being carried out by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory originally under a grant from the National Science Foundation and now by the Office of Health and Environmental Research of the Department of Energy. Instruments being investigated are those useful for measurements in Air Quality, Water Quality, Radiation, and Biomedicine related to environmental research and monitoring. Consideration is given to instruments and techniques presently in use and to those developed for other purposes but having possible applications to this work. The results of the survey are given as (a) descriptions of the physical and operating characteristics of available instruments, (b) critical comparisons among instrumentation methods, and (c) recommendations of promising methodology and development of new instrumentation. Information is also given regarding the pollutants to be monitored: their characteristics and forms, their sources and pathways, their effects on the ecosystem, and the means of controlling them through process and regulatory controls.

Authors, Various

1972-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

489

BOBCAT Personal Radiation Detector Field Test and Evaluation Campaign  

SciTech Connect

Following the success of the Anole test of portable detection system, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Domestic Nuclear Detection Office organized a test and evaluation campaign for personal radiation detectors (PRDs), also known as “Pagers.” This test, “Bobcat,” was conducted from July 17 to August 8, 2006, at the Nevada Test Site. The Bobcat test was designed to evaluate the performance of PRDs under various operational scenarios, such as pedestrian surveying, mobile surveying, cargo container screening, and pedestrian chokepoint monitoring. Under these testing scenarios, many operational characteristics of the PRDs, such as gamma and neutron sensitivities, positive detection and false alarm rates, response delay times, minimum detectable activities, and source localization errors, were analyzed. This paper will present the design, execution, and methodologies used to test this equipment for the DHS.

Chris Hodge

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

diffuse radiation | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Wiki Apps Datasets Browse Upload data GDR Community Linked Data Search Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon diffuse radiation Dataset Summary...

491

Radiation Emergency Medicine Fact Sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving Global Response Improving Global Response to Radiation Emergencies Improving Radiation Emergency Response Through Education and Specialized Expertise In the event of a radiological or nuclear incident, first responders as well as hospital and emergency management personnel must call on their knowledge and training to provide immediate and effective care for victims. Through practical, hands-on education programs, Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) is improving global response to radiation emergencies. In addition, dedicated 24/7 deployable teams of physicians, nurses, and health physicists from the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS), which is managed by ORAU for DOE/NNSA, provide expert medical management of radiological incidents

492

Tachyons and Gravitational Cherenkov Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the rate at which a free tachyon (faster than light particle) would emit gravitational radiation. It is very small.

Schwartz, Charles

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Scintillator Waveguide For Sensing Radiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an apparatus for detecting ionizing radiation, having: a waveguide having a first end and a second end, the waveguide formed of a scintillator material wherein the therapeutic ionizing radiation isotropically generates scintillation light signals within the waveguide. This apparatus provides a measure of radiation dose. The apparatus may be modified to permit making a measure of location of radiation dose. Specifically, the scintillation material is segmented into a plurality of segments; and a connecting cable for each of the plurality of segments is used for conducting scintillation signals to a scintillation detector.

Bliss, Mary (West Richland, WA); Craig, Richard A. (West Richland, WA); Reeder; Paul L. (Richland, WA)

2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z