National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for multi-agency radiation survey

  1. ORISE: Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEY UNIVERSE TheForensic ScienceHow toMentor(MARSSIM) Site

  2. Multi-agency radiation survey and site investigation manual (MARSIM). Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    The MARSSIM provides information on planning, conducting, evaluating, and documenting building surface and surface soil final status radiological surveys for demonstrating compliance with dose or risk-based regulations or standards. The MARSSIM is a multi-agency consensus document that was developed collaboratively by four Federal agencies having authority and control over radioactive materials: Department of Defense (DOD), Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The MARSSIM`s objective is to describe a consistent approach for planning, performing, and assessing building surface and surface soil final status surveys to meet established dose or risk-based release criteria, while at the same time encouraging an effective use of resources.

  3. ORISE: Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Assessment of Materials and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEY UNIVERSE TheForensic ScienceHow toMentor

  4. MULTI-AGENCY RADIATION SURVEY AND SITE INVESTIGATION MANUAL, REVISION 1, CORRECTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regulatory Commission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-7 1.4.3 Department.4.1 Environmental Protection Agency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-7 1.4.2 Nuclear

  5. RSSC RADIATION DETECTORS & SURVEY INSTRUMENTS 8/99 4-1 RADIATION DETECTORS AND SURVEY INSTRUMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    RSSC RADIATION DETECTORS & SURVEY INSTRUMENTS 8/99 4-1 CHAPTER 4 RADIATION DETECTORS AND SURVEY........................................................................................................... 4-3 II. Use of Radiation Survey Instruments

  6. Radiation Protection Surveys in Clinical Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) it is necessary to perform routine radiation protection surveys

  7. Federal Government Awards Multi-Agency Solar Power Purchase in...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Solar to Federal Buildings in Washington, D.C. Federal Government Awards Multi-Agency Solar Power Purchase in California, Nevada California: SunShot-Supported Technology...

  8. 2009 Canadian Radiation Oncology Resident Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Debenham, Brock, E-mail: debenham@ualberta.net [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Banerjee, Robyn [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Fairchild, Alysa; Dundas, George [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Trotter, Theresa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Yee, Don [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Statistics from the Canadian post-MD education registry show that numbers of Canadian radiation oncology (RO) trainees have risen from 62 in 1999 to approximately 150 per year between 2003 and 2009, contributing to the current perceived downturn in employment opportunities for radiation oncologists in Canada. When last surveyed in 2003, Canadian RO residents identified job availability as their main concern. Our objective was to survey current Canadian RO residents on their training and career plans. Methods and Materials: Trainees from the 13 Canadian residency programs using the national matching service were sought. Potential respondents were identified through individual program directors or chief resident and were e-mailed a secure link to an online survey. Descriptive statistics were used to report responses. Results: The eligible response rate was 53% (83/156). Similar to the 2003 survey, respondents generally expressed high satisfaction with their programs and specialty. The most frequently expressed perceived weakness in their training differed from 2003, with 46.5% of current respondents feeling unprepared to enter the job market. 72% plan on pursuing a postresidency fellowship. Most respondents intend to practice in Canada. Fewer than 20% of respondents believe that there is a strong demand for radiation oncologists in Canada. Conclusions: Respondents to the current survey expressed significant satisfaction with their career choice and training program. However, differences exist compared with the 2003 survey, including the current perceived lack of demand for radiation oncologists in Canada.

  9. CLIMATE SCIENCE The Community Climate System Model results from a multi-agency collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Nicholas

    . Thus, climate science--which by nature involves advanced computing technology and methods--has beenCLIMATE SCIENCE The Community Climate System Model results from a multi-agency collaboration designed to construct cutting-edge climate science simulation models for a broad research community

  10. Reirradiation After Radical Radiation Therapy: A Survey of Patterns of Practice Among Canadian Radiation Oncologists

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph, Kurian Jones [Cross Cancer Institute and University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)], E-mail: kurianjo@cancerboard.ab.ca; Al-Mandhari, Zahid; Pervez, Nadeem; Parliament, Matthew [Cross Cancer Institute and University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Wu, Jackson [Tom Baker Cancer Center and University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Ghosh, Sunita [Cross Cancer Institute and University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Tai, Patricia [Allan Blair Cancer Centre and University of Saskatchewan, Saskatchewan (Canada); Lian Jidong [Cross Cancer Institute and University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Levin, Wilfred [University of Toronto and Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada)

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to survey the use of reirradiation (Re-RT) for in-field failures after previous radical radiation treatment (RT) among Canadian radiation oncologists (ROs). Methods and Materials: An electronic survey was sent to 271 ROs in Canada. The completed surveys were received electronically via e-mail and the data were analyzed using SAS 9.1.3 software. Results: A total of 183 ROs (67.5%) completed and returned the survey. The majority of the respondents were involved in the practice of either breast (48%) or genitourinary (43%) tumor sites. A total of 49% of the participants were interested in using Re-RT for the management of in-field recurrences. The goals of the therapy would be improvement of quality of life (99%), locoregional control (80%), or cure (32%). Most of the physicians believed that patients should have a minimum Karnofsky performance status of 50 or Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 3, a minimum life expectancy of 3 months, and a minimum interval from initial treatment of 3 months if Re-RT were to be given with curative intent. Conclusions: This survey showed that a wide variation existed among ROs in their approach to Re-RT. Newer technologies in RT planning and delivery would be employed to facilitate normal tissue avoidance. The results of this study suggested that a consensus meeting was needed to establish guidelines for the practice and prospective evaluation of Re-RT.

  11. Smart repeater system for communications interoperability during multi-agency law enforcement operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crutcher, R.I.; Jones, R.W.; Moore, M.R.; Smith, S.F.; Tolley, A.L.; Rochelle, R.W.

    1996-12-31

    A prototype smart repeater that provides interoperability capabilities for radio communication systems in multi-agency and multi-user scenarios is being developed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The smart repeater functions as a deployable communications platform that can be dynamically reconfigured to cross-link the radios of participating federal, state, and local government agencies. This interconnection capability improves the coordination and execution of multi-agency operations, including coordinated law enforcement activities and general emergency or disaster response scenarios. The repeater provides multiple channels of operation in the 30--50, 118--136, 138--174, and 403--512 MHz land mobile communications and aircraft bands while providing the ability to cross-connect among multiple frequencies, bands, modulation types, and encryption formats. Additionally, two telephone interconnects provide links to the fixed and cellular telephone networks. The 800- and 900-MHz bands are not supported by the prototype, but the modular design of the system accommodates future retrofits to extend frequency capabilities with minimal impact to the system. Configuration of the repeater is through a portable personal computer with a Windows-based graphical interface control screen that provides dynamic reconfiguration of network interconnections and formats.

  12. How Radiation Oncologists Would Disclose Errors: Results of a Survey of Radiation Oncologists and Trainees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Suzanne B.; Yu, James B.; Chagpar, Anees

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To analyze error disclosure attitudes of radiation oncologists and to correlate error disclosure beliefs with survey-assessed disclosure behavior. Methods and Materials: With institutional review board exemption, an anonymous online survey was devised. An email invitation was sent to radiation oncologists (American Society for Radiation Oncology [ASTRO] gold medal winners, program directors and chair persons of academic institutions, and former ASTRO lecturers) and residents. A disclosure score was calculated based on the number or full, partial, or no disclosure responses chosen to the vignette-based questions, and correlation was attempted with attitudes toward error disclosure. Results: The survey received 176 responses: 94.8% of respondents considered themselves more likely to disclose in the setting of a serious medical error; 72.7% of respondents did not feel it mattered who was responsible for the error in deciding to disclose, and 3.9% felt more likely to disclose if someone else was responsible; 38.0% of respondents felt that disclosure increased the likelihood of a lawsuit, and 32.4% felt disclosure decreased the likelihood of lawsuit; 71.6% of respondents felt near misses should not be disclosed; 51.7% thought that minor errors should not be disclosed; 64.7% viewed disclosure as an opportunity for forgiveness from the patient; and 44.6% considered the patient's level of confidence in them to be a factor in disclosure. For a scenario that could be considerable, a non-harmful error, 78.9% of respondents would not contact the family. Respondents with high disclosure scores were more likely to feel that disclosure was an opportunity for forgiveness (P=.003) and to have never seen major medical errors (P=.004). Conclusions: The surveyed radiation oncologists chose to respond with full disclosure at a high rate, although ideal disclosure practices were not uniformly adhered to beyond the initial decision to disclose the occurrence of the error.

  13. EHS-RC-CONSURVY rev 9/93 RADIATION/CONTAMINATION SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    EHS-RC-CONSURVY rev 9/93 RADIATION/CONTAMINATION SURVEY PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: SURVEYOR: ROOM NO & Serial # Work Area mR/hr Waste Facilities mR/hr Storage Areas mR/hr CONTAMINATION SURVEY RESULTS Counting

  14. Bikini Atoll ionizing radiation survey, May 1985-May 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shingleton, K.L.; Cate, J.L.; Trent, M.G.; Robison, W.L.

    1987-10-01

    Between 1946 and 1958, the United States conducted 23 nuclear tests at the Bikini Atoll in the Marshall Islands, which resulted in extensive radioactive contamination of a number of islands in the atoll and prevented the timely resettlement of the native population. Although the external dose rates from beta and gamma radiation have been previously determined by aerial survey and a variety of ground measurement techniques, technical constraints limited the assessment of external beta dose rates that result from the /sup 137/Cs and /sup 90/Sr//sup 90/Y contamination on the islands. Now, because of the recent development of very thin thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs), the external beta dose rates can be measured. 18 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. INDEPENDENT CONFIRMATORY SURVEY OF THE NUCLEAR RESEARCH LABORATORY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS URBANA-CHAMPAIGN, ILLINOIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EVAN M. HARPENAU

    2012-06-28

    ORAU conducted confirmatory survey activities within the NRL at the University during the week of May 7, 2012. The survey activities included visual inspections/ assessments, surface activity measurements, and volumetric concrete sampling activities. During the course of the confirmatory activities, ORAU noted several issues with the survey-for-release activities performed at the University. Issues included inconsistencies with: survey unit classifications were not designated according to Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual guidance; survey instrument calibrations were not representative of the radionuclides of concern; calculations for instrumentation detection capabilities did not align with the release criteria discussed in the licensee’s survey guidance documents; total surface activity measurements were in excess of the release criteria; and Co-60 and Eu-152 concentrations in the confirmatory concrete samples were above their respective guidelines. Based on the significant programmatic issues identified, ORAU cannot independently conclude that the NRL satisfied the requirements and limits for release of materials without radiological restrictions.

  16. NNSA to conduct Aerial Radiation Assessment Survey over Boston...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    background radiation. Officials from U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) announced that the radiation assessment will cover...

  17. A National Radiation Oncology Medical Student Clerkship Survey: Didactic Curricular Components Increase Confidence in Clinical Competency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jagadeesan, Vikrant S.; Raleigh, David R.; Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R.; Chmura, Steven J.; Golden, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Students applying to radiation oncology residency programs complete 1 or more radiation oncology clerkships. This study assesses student experiences and perspectives during radiation oncology clerkships. The impact of didactic components and number of clerkship experiences in relation to confidence in clinical competency and preparation to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident are evaluated. Methods and Materials: An anonymous, Internet-based survey was sent via direct e-mail to all applicants to a single radiation oncology residency program during the 2012-2013 academic year. The survey was composed of 3 main sections including questions regarding baseline demographic information and prior radiation oncology experience, rotation experiences, and ideal clerkship curriculum content. Results: The survey response rate was 37% (70 of 188). Respondents reported 191 unique clerkship experiences. Of the respondents, 27% (19 of 70) completed at least 1 clerkship with a didactic component geared towards their level of training. Completing a clerkship with a didactic component was significantly associated with a respondent's confidence to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident (Wilcoxon rank–sum P=.03). However, the total number of clerkships completed did not correlate with confidence to pursue radiation oncology as a specialty (Spearman ? P=.48) or confidence to function as a first year resident (Spearman ? P=.43). Conclusions: Based on responses to this survey, rotating students perceive that the majority of radiation oncology clerkships do not have formal didactic curricula. Survey respondents who completed a clerkship with a didactic curriculum reported feeling more prepared to function as a radiation oncology resident. However, completing an increasing number of clerkships does not appear to improve confidence in the decision to pursue radiation oncology as a career or to function as a radiation oncology resident. These results support further development of structured didactic curricula for the radiation oncology clerkship.

  18. SU-E-T-200: IBA ProteusOne Compact Proton Therapy System Radiation Survey Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, J; Syh, J; Syh, J; White, M; Patel, B; Song, X; Wu, H [Willis-Knighton Cancer Center, Shreveport, LA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study summarizes the results of an initial radiation survey of the Willis-Knighton Cancer Center in Shreveport, Louisiana. The facility houses an IBA ProteusOne compact single room proton therapy unit coupled with a C230 cyclotron that operates at a maximum energy of 230 MeV. Methods: A calibrated survey meter was used for the photon measurements to obtain reliable results. A neutron detector was used as the measuring instrument for neutrons. The locations of the survey and measurements were planned carefully in order to get a proper evaluation of the facility shielding configuration. The walls, ceiling, vault entrance, and the adjacent environment were each surveyed with suitable measurement instruments. A total of 22 locations were chosen for radiation survey. Dose equivalent values were calculated for both the photon and the neutron radiation using measured data. Results: All measured dose values are presented in millisievert per year. The highest dose measured at the vault entrance is 0.34 mSv/year. A dedicated shielding door was not present at the time of the measurement. The vault entrance area is considered as a controlled area. The shielding design goals are not to exceed 5 mSv/year for the controlled area and 1 mSv/year the uncontrolled area. The total combined neutron and photon dose equivalent values were found to be compliant with the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality radiation protection regulatory codes. Conclusion: In our efforts to evaluate the radiation levels at the Willis-Knighton Cancer Center proton treatment facility, we have found that all the measured values of the radiation shielding are below the critical radiation limits per year. Since the total dose measured at the vault entrance is below the shielding design goal, a shielding door is not required at this proton treatment vault.

  19. Coordination of Breast Cancer Care Between Radiation Oncologists and Surgeons: A Survey Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jagsi, Reshma; Abrahamse, Paul; Morrow, Monica; Hamilton, Ann S.; Katz, Steven J.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To assess whether radiation oncologists and surgeons differ in their attitudes regarding the local management of breast cancer, and to examine coordination of care between these specialists. Methods and Materials: We surveyed attending surgeons and radiation oncologists who treated a population-based sample of patients diagnosed with breast cancer in metropolitan Detroit and Los Angeles. We identified 419 surgeons, of whom 318 (76%) responded, and 160 radiation oncologists, of whom 117 (73%) responded. We assessed demographic, professional, and practice characteristics; challenges to coordinated care; and attitudes toward management in three scenarios. Results: 92.1% of surgeons and 94.8% of radiation oncologists indicated access to a multidisciplinary tumor board. Nevertheless, the most commonly identified challenge to radiation oncologists, cited by 27.9%, was failure of other providers to include them in the treatment decision process early enough. Nearly half the surgeons (49.7%) stated that few or almost none of the breast cancer patients they saw in the past 12 months had consulted with a radiation oncologist before undergoing definitive surgery. Surgeons and radiation oncologists differed in their recommendations in management scenarios. Radiation oncologists were more likely to favor radiation than were surgeons for a patient with 3/20 lymph nodes undergoing mastectomy (p = 0.03); surgeons were more likely to favor more widely clear margins after breast conservation than were radiation oncologists (p = 0.001). Conclusions: Despite the widespread availability of tumor boards, a substantial minority of radiation oncologists indicated other providers failed to include them in the breast cancer treatment decision-making process early enough. Earlier inclusion of radiation oncologists may influence patient decisions, and interventions to facilitate this should be considered.

  20. Community Surveys: Low Dose Radiation. Fernald, Ohio and Rocky Flats, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. K. Mertz; James Flynn; Donald G. MacGregor; Theresa Satterfield; Stephen M. Johnson; Seth Tuler; Thomas Webler

    2002-10-16

    This report is intended to present a basic description of the data from the two community surveys and to document the text of the questions; the methods used for the survey data collection; and a brief overview of the results. Completed surveys were conducted at local communities near the Rocky Flats, Colorado and the Fernald, Ohio sites; no survey was conducted for the Brookhaven, New York site. Fernald. The Fernald sample was randomly selected from 98% of all potential residential telephones in the townships of Ross, Morgan, and Crosby. The only telephone exchanges not used for the Fernald study had 4%, or fewer, of the holders of the telephone numbers actually living in either of the three target townships. Surveying started on July 24, 2001 and finished on August 30, 2001. A total of 399 completed interviews were obtained resulting in a CASRO response rate of 41.8%. The average length of an interview was 16.5 minutes. Rocky Flats. The sample was randomly selected from all potential residential telephones in Arvada and from 99% of the potential telephones in Westminster. Surveying started on August 10, 2001 and finished on September 25, 2001. A total of 401 completed interviews were obtained with a CASRO response rate of 32.5%. The average length of an interview was 15.7 minutes. Overall, respondents hold favorable views of science. They indicate an interest in developments in science and technology, feel that the world is better off because of science, and that science makes our lives healthier, easier, and more comfortable. However, respondents are divided on whether science should decide what is safe or not safe for themselves and their families. The majority of the respondents think that standards for exposure to radiation should be based on what science knows about health effects of radiation and on what is possible with today's technology. Although few respondents had visited the sites, most had heard or read something about Fernald or Rocky Flat s in the media. Impressions of the sites tend to be negative. Most respondents feel that overall their community would be better off without the site. However, when asked about the economic future of their community after cleanup and closure of the site, only 31-43% thought that it will be better, 47-56% thought their local economy will be about the same.

  1. Background Radiation Survey of the Radiological/Nuclear Countermeasures Test and Evaluation Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colin Okada

    2010-09-16

    In preparation for operations at the Radiological/Nuclear Countermeasures Test and Evaluation Complex (Rad/NucCTEC), the Department of Homeland Security Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DHS/DNDO) requested that personnel from the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) conduct a survey of the present radiological conditions at the facility. The measurements consist of the exposure rate from a high-pressure ion chamber (HPIC), high-resolution spectra from a high-purity germanium (HPGe) system in an in situ configuration, and low-resolution spectra from a sodium iodide (NaI) detector in a radiation detection backpack. Measurements with these systems were collected at discrete locations within the facility. Measurements were also collected by carrying the VECTOR backpack throughout the complex to generate a map of the entire area. The area was also to be surveyed with the Kiwi (an array of eight-2-inch x 4-inch x 16-inch NaI detectors) from the Aerial Measuring Systems; however, conflicts with test preparation activities at the site prevented this from being accomplished.

  2. Surveys

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Surveys can be a useful way to gauge the opinions of your readers and learn more about your website's audiences, but you'll often need approval from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) to run...

  3. REGULATIONS AND REQUIREMENTS ASSOCIATED WITH RADIATION SURVEYS AND SITE INVESTIGATIONS1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , special nuclear, and byproduct materials be managed, processed, and used in a manner that protects public Radiation Protection Standards for the Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes (40 CFR 191) ! Nuclear Waste Poli

  4. THE BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF IONIZING RADIATION: EPIDEMIOLOGICAL SURVEYS AND LABORATORY ANIMAL EXPERIMENTS. IMPLICATIONS FOR RISK EVALUATION AND DECISION PROCESSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    2010-01-01

    human cancer risk from low radiation doses primarily frommodel for low-dose, low-LET radiation and carcinogenesis theis not observed at low radiation doses [ 1 9 ] . ships for

  5. THE BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF IONIZING RADIATION: EPIDEMIOLOGICAL SURVEYS AND LABORATORY ANIMAL EXPERIMENTS. IMPLICATIONS FOR RISK EVALUATION AND DECISION PROCESSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    2010-01-01

    Protection. The Evaluation of Risks from Radiation. PergamonIMPLICATIONS FOR RISK EVALUATION AND DECISION PROCESSES -responsible for the evaluation of risks and for decision-

  6. Final Status Survey Report for Corrective Action Unit 117 - Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeremy Gwin and Douglas Frenette

    2010-09-30

    This document contains the process knowledge, radiological data and subsequent statistical methodology and analysis to support approval for the radiological release of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 117 – Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201 located in Area 26 of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Preparations for release of the building began in 2009 and followed the methodology described in the Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM). MARSSIM is the DOE approved process for release of Real Property (buildings and landmasses) to a set of established criteria or authorized limits. The pre-approved authorized limits for surface contamination values and corresponding assumptions were established by DOE O 5400.5. The release criteria coincide with the acceptance criteria of the U10C landfill permit. The U10C landfill is the proposed location to dispose of the radiologically non-impacted, or “clean,” building rubble following demolition. However, other disposition options that include the building and/or waste remaining at the NNSS may be considered providing that the same release limits apply. The Final Status Survey was designed following MARSSIM guidance by reviewing historical documentation and radiological survey data. Following this review a formal radiological characterization survey was performed in two phases. The characterization revealed multiple areas of residual radioactivity above the release criteria. These locations were remediated (decontaminated) and then the surface activity was verified to be less than the release criteria. Once remediation efforts had been successfully completed, a Final Status Survey Plan (10-015, “Final Status Survey Plan for Corrective Action Unit 117 – Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201”) was developed and implemented to complete the final step in the MARSSIM process, the Final Status Survey. The Final Status Survey Plan consisted of categorizing each individual room into one of three categories: Class 1, Class 2 or Class 3 (a fourth category is a “Non-Impacted Class” which in the case of Building 2201 only pertained to exterior surfaces of the building.) The majority of the rooms were determined to fall in the less restrictive Class 3 category, however, Rooms 102, 104, 106, and 107 were identified as containing Class 1 and 2 areas. Building 2201 was divided into “survey units” and surveyed following the requirements of the Final Status Survey Plan for each particular class. As each survey unit was completed and documented, the survey results were evaluated. Each sample (static measurement) with units of counts per minute (cpm) was corrected for the appropriate background and converted to a value with units of dpm/100 cm2. With a surface contamination value in the appropriate units, it was compared to the surface contamination limits, or in this case the derived concentration guideline level (DCGLw). The appropriate statistical test (sign test) was then performed. If the survey unit was statistically determined to be below the DCGLw, then the survey unit passed and the null hypothesis (that the survey unit is above limits) was rejected. If the survey unit was equal to or below the critical value in the sign test, the null hypothesis was not rejected. This process was performed for all survey units within Building 2201. A total of thirty-three “Class 1,” four “Class 2,” and one “Class 3” survey units were developed, surveyed, and evaluated. All survey units successfully passed the statistical test. Building 2201 meets the release criteria commensurate with the Waste Acceptance Criteria (for radiological purposes) of the U10C landfill permit residing within NNSS boundaries. Based on the thorough statistical sampling and scanning of the building’s interior, Building 2201 may be considered radiologically “clean,” or free of contamination.

  7. The initial conditions of high-mass star formation: radiative transfer models of IRDCs seen in the Herschel Hi-GAL survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcock, L A; Stamatellos, D; Ward-Thompson, D; Whitworth, A; Battersby, C; Brunt, C; Fuller, G A; Griffin, M; Molinari, S; Martin, P; Mottram, J C; Peretto, N; Plume, R; Smith, H A; Thompson, M A; 10.1051/0004-6361/201015488

    2011-01-01

    The densest infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) may represent the earliest observable stage of high-mass star formation. These clouds are very cold, hence they emit mainly at far-infrared and sub-mm wavelengths. For the first time, Herschel has provided multi-wavelength, spatially resolved observations of cores within IRDCs, which, when combined with radiative transfer modelling, can constrain their properties, such as mass, density profile and dust temperature. We use a 3D, multi-wavelength Monte Carlo radiative transfer code to model in detail the emission from six cores in three typical IRDCs seen in the Hi-GAL survey (G030.50+00.95, G031.03+00.26 and G031.03+00.76), and thereby to determine the properties of these cores and compare them with their low-mass equivalents. We found masses ranging from 90 to 290 solar masses with temperatures from 8 to 11K at the centre of each core and 18 to 28K at the surface. The maximum luminosity of an embedded star within each core was calculated, and we rule out the possibilit...

  8. Internet-Based Survey Evaluating Use of Pain Medications and Attitudes of Radiation Oncology Patients Toward Pain Intervention

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simone, Charles B. Vapiwala, Neha; Hampshire, Margaret K.; Metz, James M.

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: Pain is a common symptom among cancer patients, yet many patients do not receive adequate pain management. Few data exist quantifying analgesic use by radiation oncology patients. This study evaluated the causes of pain in cancer patients and investigated the reasons patients fail to receive optimal analgesic therapy. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved, Internet-based questionnaire assessing analgesic use and pain control was posted on the OncoLink (available at (www.oncolink.org)) Website. Between November 2005 and April 2006, 243 patients responded. They were predominantly women (73%), white (71%), and educated beyond high school (67%) and had breast (38%), lung (6%), or ovarian (6%) cancer. This analysis evaluated the 106 patients (44%) who underwent radiotherapy. Results: Of the 106 patients, 58% reported pain from their cancer treatment, and 46% reported pain directly from their cancer. The pain was chronic in 51% and intermittent in 33%. Most (80%) did not use medication to manage their pain. Analgesic use was significantly less in patients with greater education levels (11% vs. 36%, p = 0.002), with a trend toward lower use by whites (16% vs. 32%, p 0.082) and women (17% vs. 29%, p = 0.178). The reasons for not taking analgesics included healthcare provider not recommending medication (87%), fear of addiction or dependence (79%), and inability to pay (79%). Participants experiencing pain, but not taking analgesics, pursued alternative therapies for relief. Conclusions: Many radiation oncology patients experience pain from their disease and cancer treatment. Most study participants did not use analgesics because of concerns of addiction, cost, or failure of the radiation oncologist to recommend medication. Healthcare providers should have open discussions with their patients regarding pain symptoms and treatment.

  9. Factors that Determine Academic Versus Private Practice Career Interest in Radiation Oncology Residents in the United States: Results of a Nationwide Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Daniel T., E-mail: dtchang@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Shaffer, Jenny L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Wilson, Lynn D. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To determine what factors US radiation oncology residents consider when choosing academic or nonacademic careers. Methods and Materials: A 20-question online survey was developed and sent to all US radiation oncology residents to assess factors that influence their career interest. Residents were asked to rate their interest in academics (A) versus private practice (PP) on a 0 (strong interest in A) to 100 (strong interest in PP) scale. Responses were classified as A (0-30), undecided (40-60), and PP (70-100). Residents were also asked to rank 10 factors that most strongly influenced their career interest. Results: Three hundred thirty-one responses were collected, of which 264 were complete and form the basis for this analysis. Factors that correlated with interest in A included having a PhD (P=.018), postgraduate year level (P=.0006), research elective time (P=.0003), obtaining grant funding during residency (P=.012), and number of publications before residency (P=.0001), but not number of abstracts accepted in the past year (P=.65) or publications during residency (P=.67). The 3 most influential factors for residents interested in A were: (1) baseline interest before residency; (2) academic role models; and (3) research opportunities during residency. The 3 most influential factors for residents interested in PP were: (1) baseline interest before residency; (2) academic role models; and (3) academic pressure and obligations. Conclusions: Interest in A correlated with postgraduate year level, degree, and research time during residency. Publications before but not during residency correlated with academic interest, and baseline interest was the most influential factor. These data can be used by residency program directors to better understand what influences residents' career interest.

  10. Multi-Agency Veterans Hiring Event

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Location: DOT Headquarters - 1200 New Jersey Ave., SE, Washington, DC 20590POC: vetprogram@hq.doe.govWebsite: http://vethiringevent.eventbrite.com/?aff=Transportation

  11. Phase 1 Final status survey plan for the West Valley demonstration project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R. L. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-05-31

    This plan provides the technical basis and associated protocols to support Phase 1 final status survey (FSS) data collection and interpretation as part of the West Valley Demonstration Project Phase 1 Decommissioning Plan process. This plan is consistent with the Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM). The Phase 1 Decommissioning Plan provides the relevant derived concentration guideline levels (DCGLs) for the Phase 1 radionuclides of interest. This plan includes protocols that will be applied to the deep excavations planned for Waste Management Area (WMA) 1 and WMA 2, for surface soils outside the WMA 1 and WMA 2 excavations that do not have contamination impacts at depths greater than one meter, and for areas that are used for Phase 1 contaminated soil lay-down purposes. All excavated and lay-down areas will be classified as MARSSIM Class 1 areas. Surface soils that have not been excavated, are not expected to exceed DCGLs, and do not have contamination impacts at depths greater than one meter will be divided into either Class 1 or Class 2 areas depending on the expected potential for surface soil contamination in those areas. The plan uses gamma scans combined with biased soil samples to address DCGLemc concerns. The plan uses systematic soil sampling combined with area factors to address DCGLw and DCGLemc concerns. The Sign test will be used to statistically evaluate DCGLw compliance. If the results from the characterization sampling and analysis plan (CSAP) data collection indicate that background may be a significant issue for Sign test implementation, the Wilcoxon rank sum (WRS) test will be used instead to demonstrate DCGLw compliance. A reference area will be selected on the basis of CSAP data results if the WRS test becomes a necessity. The WMA 1 excavation footprint includes approximately 476 foundation pilings that will be trimmed and left in place. Piling-specific systematic and biased sampling will be conducted to address concerns that these pilings may have served as preferential flow pathways into the underlying Lavery till. Phase 1 FSS data collection results will be summarized, presented, and interpreted in one or more FSS reports.

  12. DC Survey 2013 | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Related News NNSA emergency response assets highlighted NNSA displays helicopter in Baltimore NNSA to Conduct Aerial Radiation Monitoring Survey over Boston April 17-20 Emergency...

  13. RHOBOT: Radiation hardened robotics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, P.C.; Posey, L.D.

    1997-10-01

    A survey of robotic applications in radioactive environments has been conducted, and analysis of robotic system components and their response to the varying types and strengths of radiation has been completed. Two specific robotic systems for accident recovery and nuclear fuel movement have been analyzed in detail for radiation hardness. Finally, a general design approach for radiation-hardened robotics systems has been developed and is presented. This report completes this project which was funded under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program.

  14. Entry Survey for Laboratories Using Radioactive Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    Entry Survey for Laboratories Using Radioactive Materials Procedure: 7.50 Created: 11 materials or radiation-generating devices is restricted to those facilities, spaces and/or rooms that have materials (RAM) in this location. The entry survey will be performed by Radiation Safety Program personnel

  15. MARSAME Roadmap Introduction to MARSAME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MARSAME Roadmap ROADMAP Introduction to MARSAME The Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Assessment flexibility in the survey process, and this flexibility is incorporated into MARSAME. The Goal of the Roadmap The increased flexibility of MARSAME comes with increased complexity. The goal of the roadmap is to assist

  16. Overview of the United States Department of Energy's ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stokes, G.M. ); Tichler, J.L. )

    1990-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is initiating a major atmospheric research effort, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM). The program is a key component of DOE's research strategy to address global climate change and is a direct continuation of DOE's decade-long effort to improve the ability of General Circulation Models (GCMs) to provide reliable simulations of regional, and long-term climate change in response to increasing greenhouse gases. The effort is multi-disciplinary and multi-agency, involving universities, private research organizations and more than a dozen government laboratories. The objective of the ARM Research is to provide an experimental testbed for the study of important atmospheric effects, particularly cloud and radiative processes, and to test parameterizations of these processes for use in atmospheric models. This effort will support the continued and rapid improvement of GCM predictive capability. 2 refs.

  17. Fundamentals of health physics for the radiation-protection officer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, B.L.; Traub, R.J.; Gilchrist, R.L.; Mann, J.C.; Munson, L.H.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Baer, J.L.

    1983-03-01

    The contents of this book on health physics include chapters on properties of radioactive materials, radiation instrumentation, radiation protection programs, radiation survey programs, internal exposure, external exposure, decontamination, selection and design of radiation facilities, transportation of radioactive materials, radioactive waste management, radiation accidents and emergency preparedness, training, record keeping, quality assurance, and appraisal of radiation protection programs. (ACR)

  18. RSSC ADMINISTRATIVE STRUCTURE OF RADIATION CONTROL PROGRAM / 072011 1-1 ADMINISTRATIVE STRUCTURE OF RADIATION CONTROL PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    ............................................................ 1-13 III. Radiation Detection Instrumentation and Safety Equipment............................................... 1-13 A. Radiation Detection Instruments (Survey MetersRSSC ADMINISTRATIVE STRUCTURE OF RADIATION CONTROL PROGRAM / 072011 1-1 CHAPTER 1 ADMINISTRATIVE

  19. PRELIMINARY SURVEY OF WINCHESTER ENGINEERING AND ANALYTICAL CENTER

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    lim ited to certain lab hoods. No record of that survey was available. . A comprehensive radiation safety program is currently conducted by Neil Gaeta. He indicated that no...

  20. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LR Roeder

    2007-12-01

    This annual report describes the purpose and structure of the program, and presents key accomplishments in 2007. Notable achievements include: • Successful review of the ACRF as a user facility by the DOE Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee. The subcommittee reinforced the importance of the scientific impacts of this facility, and its value for the international research community. • Leadership of the Cloud Land Surface Interaction Campaign. This multi-agency, interdisciplinary field campaign involved enhanced surface instrumentation at the ACRF Southern Great Plains site and, in concert with the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study sponsored by the DOE Atmospheric Science Program, coordination of nine aircraft through the ARM Aerial Vehicles Program. • Successful deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility in Germany, including hosting nearly a dozen guest instruments and drawing almost 5000 visitors to the site. • Key advancements in the representation of radiative transfer in weather forecast models from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. • Development of several new enhanced data sets, ranging from best estimate surface radiation measurements from multiple sensors at all ACRF sites to the extension of time-height cloud occurrence profiles to Niamey, Niger, Africa. • Publication of three research papers in a single issue (February 2007) of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.

  1. Radiation: Radiation Control (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the policy of the state to encourage the constructive uses of radiation and to control its harmful effects. This section contains regulations pertaining to the manufacture, use,...

  2. ARM User Survey Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roeder, LR

    2010-06-22

    The objective of this survey was to obtain user feedback to, among other things, determine how to organize the exponentially growing data within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, and identify users’ preferred data analysis system. The survey findings appear to have met this objective, having received approximately 300 responses that give insight into the type of work users perform, usage of the data, percentage of data analysis users might perform on an ARM-hosted computing resource, downloading volume level where users begin having reservations, opinion about usage if given more powerful computing resources (including ability to manipulate data), types of tools that would be most beneficial to them, preferred programming language and data analysis system, level of importance for certain types of capabilities, and finally, level of interest in participating in a code-sharing community.

  3. Obama Administration Launches $26 Million Multi-Agency Competition...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the initiative is supported by eight other Federal agencies: U.S. Departments of Agriculture, Education, Housing and Urban Development; Environmental Protection Agency;...

  4. Obama Administration Launches $26 Million Multi-Agency Competition...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    from NSF-supported advanced manufacturing research with stakeholders who can accelerate technology commercialization and economic growth," said Thomas Peterson, NSF Assistant...

  5. Obama Administration Launches $26 Million Multi-Agency Competition to

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment ofOffice|in the subsurface isProjectSystemU.S.Gas and Oil Research

  6. DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report - User Survey

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department ofRefrigerators |DepartmentofNames New RichlandGas,DOEOUser

  7. Pitch angle distribution analysis of radiation belt electrons based on Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xinlin

    Pitch angle distribution analysis of radiation belt electrons based on Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite Medium Electrons A data J. L. Gannon,1 X. Li,1 and D. Heynderickx2 Received 13 the Medium Electrons A instrument on the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES), a survey

  8. Survey Data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Knowledge of surface sediment distribution in Galveston Bay is important because it allows us to better understand how the bay works and how human activities impact the bay and its ecosystems. In this project, six areas of bay bottom were surveyed...

  9. COACHE Faculty Job Satisfaction Survey SURVEY INSTRUMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson Jr.,, Ray

    2011-2012 Survey Instrument Theme Benchmark Question Responses Historic Data Available EligibleCOACHE Faculty Job Satisfaction Survey SURVEY INSTRUMENT 2011-12 © 2011 President & Fellows in Higher Education Faculty Job Satisfaction Survey 2011-2012 Survey Instrument Theme Benchmark Question

  10. Danger radiations

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Le conférencier Mons.Hofert parle des dangers et risques des radiations, le contrôle des zones et les précautions à prendre ( p.ex. film badge), comment mesurer les radiations etc.

  11. Natural radiation environment III. [Lead Abstract

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gesell, T.F.; Lowder, W.M.

    1980-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 52 research papers presented at this symposium in April 1978. The major topics in this volume deal with penetrating radiation measurements, radiation surveys and population exposure, radioactivity in the indoor environment, and technologically enhanced natural radioactivity. (KRM)

  12. Solar radiation decreases parasitism in Daphnia Erin P. Overholt,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Spencer

    LETTER Solar radiation decreases parasitism in Daphnia Erin P. Overholt,1 * Spencer R. Hall,2 Craig spores but did not affect host susceptibility to infection. The parasiteÕs sensitivity to solar radiation may underlie patterns in a lake survey: higher penetration of solar radiation into lakes correlated

  13. RADIATION MONITORING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, R.H.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation Exposure due to a Boiling Water Reactor Plume fromIN THE VICINITY OF A BOILING WATER REACTOR EXPOSURE RATE

  14. Lake Survey DETROIT, MICH.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; · Lake Survey Center DETROIT, MICH. NOAA TM NOS LSC 06 NOAA Technical Memorandum NOS LSC 06 U. S Winter 1971_72 R. A. Ass.,i Lake Survey Center National Ocean Survey, NOAA Detroit, Michigan I ABSTRACT

  15. Radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fultz, B.T.

    1980-12-05

    Apparatus is provided for detecting radiation such as gamma rays and x-rays generated in backscatter Moessbauer effect spectroscopy and x-ray spectrometry, which has a large window for detecting radiation emanating over a wide solid angle from a specimen and which generates substantially the same output pulse height for monoenergetic radiation that passes through any portion of the detection chamber. The apparatus includes a substantially toroidal chamber with conductive walls forming a cathode, and a wire anode extending in a circle within the chamber with the anode lying closer to the inner side of the toroid which has the least diameter than to the outer side. The placement of the anode produces an electric field, in a region close to the anode, which has substantially the same gradient in all directions extending radially from the anode, so that the number of avalanche electrons generated by ionizing radiation is independent of the path of the radiation through the chamber.

  16. Autonomous mobile robot for radiologic surveys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dudar, Aed M. (Augusta, GA); Wagner, David G. (Augusta, GA); Teese, Gregory D. (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus for conducting radiologic surveys. The apparatus comprises in the main a robot capable of following a preprogrammed path through an area, a radiation monitor adapted to receive input from a radiation detector assembly, ultrasonic transducers for navigation and collision avoidance, and an on-board computer system including an integrator for interfacing the radiation monitor and the robot. Front and rear bumpers are attached to the robot by bumper mounts. The robot may be equipped with memory boards for the collection and storage of radiation survey information. The on-board computer system is connected to a remote host computer via a UHF radio link. The apparatus is powered by a rechargeable 24-volt DC battery, and is stored at a docking station when not in use and/or for recharging. A remote host computer contains a stored database defining paths between points in the area where the robot is to operate, including but not limited to the locations of walls, doors, stationary furniture and equipment, and sonic markers if used. When a program consisting of a series of paths is downloaded to the on-board computer system, the robot conducts a floor survey autonomously at any preselected rate. When the radiation monitor detects contamination, the robot resurveys the area at reduced speed and resumes its preprogrammed path if the contamination is not confirmed. If the contamination is confirmed, the robot stops and sounds an alarm.

  17. Autonomous mobile robot for radiologic surveys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dudar, A.M.; Wagner, D.G.; Teese, G.D.

    1994-06-28

    An apparatus is described for conducting radiologic surveys. The apparatus comprises in the main a robot capable of following a preprogrammed path through an area, a radiation monitor adapted to receive input from a radiation detector assembly, ultrasonic transducers for navigation and collision avoidance, and an on-board computer system including an integrator for interfacing the radiation monitor and the robot. Front and rear bumpers are attached to the robot by bumper mounts. The robot may be equipped with memory boards for the collection and storage of radiation survey information. The on-board computer system is connected to a remote host computer via a UHF radio link. The apparatus is powered by a rechargeable 24-volt DC battery, and is stored at a docking station when not in use and/or for recharging. A remote host computer contains a stored database defining paths between points in the area where the robot is to operate, including but not limited to the locations of walls, doors, stationary furniture and equipment, and sonic markers if used. When a program consisting of a series of paths is downloaded to the on-board computer system, the robot conducts a floor survey autonomously at any preselected rate. When the radiation monitor detects contamination, the robot resurveys the area at reduced speed and resumes its preprogrammed path if the contamination is not confirmed. If the contamination is confirmed, the robot stops and sounds an alarm. 5 figures.

  18. Radiation dosimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fox, R.J.

    1981-09-01

    A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even through the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

  19. Radiation dosimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fox, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1983-01-01

    A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even though the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

  20. GEODETIC SURVEY SPECIAL PUBLICATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . SP #4 OUT OF PRINT U.S. COAST AND GEODETIC SURVEY. ... GEODESY. THE TRANSCONTINENTAL TRIANGULATION

  1. STEP Participant Survey Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    STEP Participant Survey Report, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  2. Radiation Monitoring Equipment Procedure: 7.513 Created: 10/30/2013 Version: 1.0 Revised

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    equipment for performing radiation detection surveys. This ensures that the work environment is safe and can NaI: Sodium Iodide Counter D. Procedures 1. The lab is responsible for purchasing radiation detection equipment suitable to detect the type of radiation (i.e., alpha, beta, gamma or x ray) being used. Surveys

  3. Evaluation of probes used to detect alpha radiation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sackett, Gregory Duane

    1995-01-01

    difficult to detect with survey meters. In response to these concerns several probes have been designed with an increased sensitivity to alpha radiation, combining larger sensitive surface areas with very thin windows to increase detector efficiency. Two...

  4. Radiation receiver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunt, A.J.

    1983-09-13

    The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles. 5 figs.

  5. Radiation receiver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunt, Arlon J. (Oakland, CA)

    1983-01-01

    The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles.

  6. HOME OF THE ILLINOIS STATE SCIENTIFIC SURVEYS Illinois Natural History Survey Illinois State Archaeological Survey Illinois State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bashir, Rashid

    Archaeological Survey · Illinois State Geological Survey · Illinois State Water Survey · Illinois Sustainable

  7. A Survey on Mining Software Survey Presentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Doo-Hwan

    · Software Metrics IDEA ! · Easy evaluation / validation · Stimulate idea 13 / 39 #12;Research Trend (3/4) 14 ­ Apache and Mozilla 2005 Impact of Software Engineering Research on the Practice of SCM 2007 RepresentingA Survey on Mining Software Archives Survey Presentation Jin Ung, Oh ­ 2007.07.11 #12;Contents

  8. NEPA Litigation Surveys

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CEQ publishes surveys on NEPA litigation on an annual basis. These surveys identify the number of cases involving a NEPA based cause of action, Federal agencies that were identified as a lead...

  9. Radiation Protection Act (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act combines the radiation safety provisions of The Atomic Energy Development and Radiation Control Act and the Environmental Radiation Protection Act, and empowers the Department of...

  10. DETECTORS FOR RADIATION DOSIMETRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez-Mendez, V.

    2010-01-01

    I. Applications of Radiation Detectors 1) X-Rays, Gammaof the Conference DETECTORS FOR RADIATION DOSIMETRY VictorT E D LBL9651 DETECTORS FOR RADIATION DOSIMETRY - DISCLAIM*

  11. Thermostatic Radiator Valve Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dentz, J.; Ansanelli, E.

    2015-01-01

    A large stock of multifamily buildings in the Northeast and Midwest are heated by steam distribution systems. Losses from these systems are typically high and a significant number of apartments are overheated much of the time. Thermostatically controlled radiator valves (TRVs) are one potential strategy to combat this problem, but have not been widely accepted by the residential retrofit market. In this project, the ARIES team sought to better understand the current usage of TRVs by key market players in steam and hot water heating and to conduct limited experiments on the effectiveness of new and old TRVs as a means of controlling space temperatures and reducing heating fuel consumption. The project included a survey of industry professionals, a field experiment comparing old and new TRVs, and cost-benefit modeling analysis using BEopt™ (Building Energy Optimization software).

  12. Environmental Survey preliminary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-04-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Sandia National Laboratories conducted August 17 through September 4, 1987. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with Sandia National Laboratories-Albuquerque (SNLA). The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at SNLA, and interviews with site personnel. 85 refs., 49 figs., 48 tabs.

  13. Infrared Surveys for AGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, H E

    2002-01-01

    From the earliest extragalactic infrared studies AGN have shown themselves to be strong infrared sources and IR surveys have revealed new populations of AGN. I briefly review current motivations for AGN surveys in the infrared and results from previous IR surveys. The Luminous Infrared Galaxies, which in some cases house dust-enshrouded AGN, submillimeter surveys, and recent studies of the cosmic x-ray and infrared backgrounds suggest that there is a population of highly-obscured AGN at high redshift. ISO Surveys have begun to resolve the infrared background and may have detected this obscured AGN population. New infrared surveys, particularly the SIRTF Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic Legacy Survey (SWIRE), will detect this population and provide a platform for understanding the evolution of AGN, Starbursts and passively evolving galaxies in the context of large-scale structure and environment.

  14. Infrared Surveys for AGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harding E. Smith

    2002-03-06

    From the earliest extragalactic infrared studies AGN have shown themselves to be strong infrared sources and IR surveys have revealed new populations of AGN. I briefly review current motivations for AGN surveys in the infrared and results from previous IR surveys. The Luminous Infrared Galaxies, which in some cases house dust-enshrouded AGN, submillimeter surveys, and recent studies of the cosmic x-ray and infrared backgrounds suggest that there is a population of highly-obscured AGN at high redshift. ISO Surveys have begun to resolve the infrared background and may have detected this obscured AGN population. New infrared surveys, particularly the SIRTF Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic Legacy Survey (SWIRE), will detect this population and provide a platform for understanding the evolution of AGN, Starbursts and passively evolving galaxies in the context of large-scale structure and environment.

  15. Radiation Safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * Impacts on GlobalRachel Ruggirello RachelRadiation DrySafety Home

  16. MARSAME References 10 CFR 20.1003. Standards for Protection Against Radiation, Definitions. Code of Federal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MARSAME References REFERENCES 10 CFR 20.1003. Standards for Protection Against Radiation://www.hss.energy.gov/enforce/rands/10CFR820.pdf (accessed October 24, 2008). 10 CFR 835. Occupational Radiation Protection. Code (ANSI) 1997. Radiation Protection Instrumentation Test and Calibration, Portable Survey Instruments

  17. BASF's Energy Survey Methodology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theising, T. R.

    2005-01-01

    Methodology Thomas R. Theising BASF Corporation operates several dozen manufacturing Sites within NAFTA and periodically conducts Energy Surveys at each Site. Although these manufacturing sites represent a variety of industries, BASF has found success.... The discovery phase is the ?Energy Survey? itself. These Surveys involve plant personnel from various functions within Site operations. BASF applies the Pareto Principle in a variety of fashions: 20% of the operation consumes 80% of the energy, lets focus...

  18. ORISE: Characterization surveys

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    objective characterization surveys to define the extent of radiological contamination at sites scheduled for decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). A fundamental...

  19. ARM User Survey Report: Data Access, Quality, and Delivery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mather, JH; Roeder, LR; Sivaraman, C

    2012-06-28

    The objective of this survey was to obtain user feedback to determine how users of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility Data Archive interact with the more than 2000 available types of datastreams. The survey also gathered information about data discovery and data quality. The Market and Competitive Analysis group at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory worked with web administrators to develop a landing page from which users could access the survey. A survey invitation was sent by ARM via email to about 6100 users on February 22, 2012. The invitation was also posted on the ARM website and Facebook page. Reminders were sent via e-mail and posted on Facebook while the survey was open, February 22-March 23, 2012.

  20. Adaptors for radiation detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Livesay, Ronald Jason

    2014-04-22

    Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

  1. Adaptors for radiation detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Livesay, Ronald Jason

    2015-07-28

    Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

  2. Radiation dosimeters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoelsher, James W. (Pullman, WA); Hegland, Joel E. (Pullman, WA); Braunlich, Peter F. (Pullman, WA); Tetzlaff, Wolfgang (Pullman, WA)

    1992-01-01

    Radiation dosimeters and dosimeter badges. The dosimeter badges include first and second parts which are connected to join using a securement to produce a sealed area in which at least one dosimeter is held and protected. The badge parts are separated to expose the dosimeters to a stimulating laser beam used to read dose exposure information therefrom. The badge is constructed to allow automated disassembly and reassembly in a uniquely fitting relationship. An electronic memory is included to provide calibration and identification information used during reading of the dosimeter. Dosimeter mounts which reduce thermal heating requirements are shown. Dosimeter constructions and production methods using thin substrates and phosphor binder-layers applied thereto are also taught.

  3. XSEDE Cloud Survey Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    XSEDE Cloud Survey Report David Lifka, Cornell Center for Advanced Computing Ian Foster, ANL, ANL and The University of Chicago A National Science Foundation-sponsored cloud user survey was conducted from September 2012 to April 2013 by the XSEDE Cloud Integration Investigation Team to better

  4. An aerial radiological survey of Naturita, Colorado and surrounding area. Date of survey: September 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaffe, R.J.

    1982-09-01

    An aerial radiological survey of four areas in the vicinity of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Naturita, Colorado was conducted in September 1981. The average background radiation exposure rate (normalized to 3 feet above the ground) was about 10 to 16 microroentgens per hour ({mu}R/h). Uranium ore or tailings were detected at Naturita, Nucla, East Vancorum, and the general region downriver and downwind from the former mill tailings site.

  5. Extragalactic HI Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanelli, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    We review the results of HI line surveys of extragalactic sources in the local Universe. In the last two decades major efforts have been made in establishing on firm statistical grounds the properties of the HI source population, the two most prominent being the HI Parkes All Sky Survey (HIPASS) and the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey (ALFALFA). We review the choices of technical parameters in the design and optimization of spectro-photometric "blind" HI surveys, which for the first time produced extensive HI-selected data sets. Particular attention is given to the relationship between optical and HI populations, the differences in their clustering properties and the importance of HI-selected samples in contributing to the understanding of apparent conflicts between observation and theory on the abundance of low mass halos. The last section of this paper provides an overview of currently ongoing and planned surveys which will explore the cosmic evolution of properties of the HI population.

  6. 2013 REPORT ILLINOIS NATURAL HISTORY SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bashir, Rashid

    2013 REPORT ILLINOIS NATURAL HISTORY SURVEY ILLINOIS STATE ARCHAEOLOGICAL SURVEY ILLINOIS STATE State Geological Survey Illinois State Water Survey Illinois Sustainable Technology Center Awards GEOLOGICAL SURVEY ILLINOIS STATE WATER SURVEY ILLINOIS SUSTAINABLE TECHNOLOGY CENTER #12;#12;PRAIRIE RESEARCH

  7. Operational Radiation Protection in High-Energy Physics Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rokni, S.H.; Fasso, A.; Liu, J.C.; /SLAC

    2012-04-03

    An overview of operational radiation protection (RP) policies and practices at high-energy electron and proton accelerators used for physics research is presented. The different radiation fields and hazards typical of these facilities are described, as well as access control and radiation control systems. The implementation of an operational RP programme is illustrated, covering area and personnel classification and monitoring, radiation surveys, radiological environmental protection, management of induced radioactivity, radiological work planning and control, management of radioactive materials and wastes, facility dismantling and decommissioning, instrumentation and training.

  8. DETECTORS FOR RADIATION DOSIMETRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez-Mendez, V.

    2010-01-01

    J. Price, "Nuclear Radiation Detection" (2nd ed. , New York:4) G. F. Knoll, "Radiation Detection and Measurement" (NewSons, Inc. from "Radiation Detection and Measurement," G. F.

  9. Intelligent Sensor Management in Nuclear Searches and Radiological Surveys A.V. Klimenko1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanner, Herbert G.

    Intelligent Sensor Management in Nuclear Searches and Radiological Surveys A.V. Klimenko1 , W Special nuclear materials (SNMs) are weak emitters of radiation and are difficult to detect, especially developed intelligent sensor management strategies for nuclear search and radiological surveys

  10. Environmental Credit Marketing Survey Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PAGE 1 Environmental Credit Marketing Survey Report #12;Environmental Credit Marketing Survey, Program Coordinator Yanshu Li, Forest Economist Environmental Credit Marketing Survey Report © 2010 Texas to determine interest in these emerging environmental credit markets, as well as identify potential

  11. Radiation Control (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Health is responsible for regulating radiation and radioactive materials in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Although the Department's Radiation Control Program primarily focuses on...

  12. RADIATIVE AND PASSIVE COOLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, M.

    2011-01-01

    Ext. 6782 Radiative and Passive Cooling Marlo Martin andof the Second Nation- al Passive Solar Conference (owned rights. ,I I RADIATIVE AND PASSIVE COOLING* LAIVRENCE

  13. NNSA to conduct Aerial Radiation Assessment Survey over Boston...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    cover approximately 25 square miles. A twin-engine Bell 412 helicopter, operated by the Remote Sensing Laboratory Aerial Measuring System from Joint Base Andrews, will be...

  14. NNSA to Conduct Aerial Radiation Monitoring Survey over Baltimore Jan.

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) August 2012 Guidance/%2A en20120 201415-16 | National

  15. Radiation Protection and Licensing FNAL Radiation Physics Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    (ALARA). January 13, 2012 Radiation Protection and Licensing #12;4 Shielding for Prompt Radiation Protect

  16. Motivation Literature survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Ghadhban, Samir

    6/19/14 1 #12;Outline 6/19/14 2 Motivation Literature survey System Model Analysis of BLER Capacity analysis Results and Discussion Conclusion and Future Work #12;Introduction & motivation 6

  17. Dark Energy Survey

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Roodman, Aaron; Nord, Brian; Elliot, Ann

    2014-08-12

    Members of the Dark Energy Survey collaboration explain what they hope to learn by studying the southern sky with the world's most advanced digital camera, mounted on a telescope in Chile.

  18. Dark Energy Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roodman, Aaron; Nord, Brian; Elliot, Ann

    2012-12-06

    Members of the Dark Energy Survey collaboration explain what they hope to learn by studying the southern sky with the world's most advanced digital camera, mounted on a telescope in Chile.

  19. Benchmarking survey for recycling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marley, Margie Charlotte; Mizner, Jack Harry

    2005-06-01

    This report describes the methodology, analysis and conclusions of a comparison survey of recycling programs at ten Department of Energy sites including Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). The goal of the survey was to compare SNL/NM's recycling performance with that of other federal facilities, and to identify activities and programs that could be implemented at SNL/NM to improve recycling performance.

  20. MARSAME Develop A Survey Design 4 DEVELOP A SURVEY DESIGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MARSAME Develop A Survey Design 4 DEVELOP A SURVEY DESIGN 4.1 Introduction Once a decision rule has been developed, a disposition survey can be designed for the impacted materials and equipment (M costly and time-consuming development of redundant survey designs. The evaluation of existing SOPs

  1. Electronic Survey Methodology Page 1 Electronic Survey Methodology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nonnecke, Blair

    Electronic Survey Methodology Page 1 Electronic Survey Methodology: A Case Study in Reaching Hard, Maryland preece@umbc.edu 2002 © Andrews, Nonnecke and Preece #12;Electronic Survey Methodology Page 2 Conducting Research on the Internet: Electronic survey Design, Development and Implementation Guidelines

  2. DETECTORS FOR RADIATION DOSIMETRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez-Mendez, V.

    2010-01-01

    RPL) The interaction of radiation with matter in crystallineradiation. Some interactions with crystalline matter are

  3. STEP Participant Survey Executive Summary

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    STEP Participant Survey Executive Summary, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  4. 2001 FEMP Customer Survey Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-01-18

    Appendix A: Survey Instrument; Appendix B: Detailed Responses; Appendix C: Adoption and Diffusion of Innovations

  5. 0036-1445/81.'"2301-0005 $01.00/0 f^MATICAL REMARKS ON THE VAN ALLEN RADIATION BELT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knill, Oliver

    0036-1445/81.'"2301-0005 $01.00/0 f^MATICAL REMARKS ON THE VAN ALLEN RADIATION BELT: A SURVEY radiation belt, were seemingly i vv j . {severai vears. sd, some of these particles were observed to have center or "adiabatic" approximation.) Under these circumstances, it was #12;THE VAN ALLEN RADIATION BELT

  6. United States Office of Radiation and October 1998 Environmental Protection Indoor Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual. This manual is a federal guidance document for investigating for effective restoration. CERMER provides assistance to EPA's Superfund and RCRA programs, Department of Energy

  7. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1991-05-01

    Research at the Radiological Research Laboratory is a blend of physics, chemistry, and biology, involving research at the basic level with the admixture of a small proportion of pragmatic or applied research in support of radiation protection and/or radiotherapy. Current research topics include: oncogenic transformation assays, mutation studies involving interactions between radiation and environmental contaminants, isolation, characterization and sequencing of a human repair gene, characterization of a dominant transforming gene found in C3H 10T1/2 cells, characterize ab initio the interaction of DNA and radiation, refine estimates of the radiation quality factor Q, a new mechanistic model of oncogenesis showing the role of long-term low dose medium LET radiation, and time dependent modeling of radiation induced chromosome damage and subsequent repair or misrepair.

  8. An aerial radiological survey of the Central Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feimster, E.L.

    1991-09-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over a 194-square- kilometer (75-square-mile) area encompassing the central portion of the Savannah River Site (SRS). The survey was flown during February 10--27, 1987. These radiological measurements were used as baseline data for the central area and for determining the extent of man-made radionuclide distribution. Previous SRS surveys included small portions of the area; the 1987 survey was covered during the site- wide survey conducted in 1979. Man-made radionuclides (including cobalt-60, cesium-137, protactinium-234m, and elevated levels of uranium-238 progeny) that were detected during the survey were typical of those produced by the reactor operations and material processing activities being conducted in the area. The natural terrestrial radiation levels were consistent with those measured during prior surveys of other SRS areas. 1 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Plutonium radiation surrogate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frank, Michael I. (Dublin, CA)

    2010-02-02

    A self-contained source of gamma-ray and neutron radiation suitable for use as a radiation surrogate for weapons-grade plutonium is described. The source generates a radiation spectrum similar to that of weapons-grade plutonium at 5% energy resolution between 59 and 2614 keV, but contains no special nuclear material and emits little .alpha.-particle radiation. The weapons-grade plutonium radiation surrogate also emits neutrons having fluxes commensurate with the gamma-radiation intensities employed.

  10. Los Alamos Science: Number 23, 1995. Radiation protection and the human radiation experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, N.G.

    1995-12-31

    There are a variety of myths and misconceptions about the ionizing radiation that surrounds and penetrates us all. Dispel a few of these by taking a leisurely tour of radiation and its properties, of the natural and man-made sources of ionizing radiation, and of the way doses are calculated. By damaging DNA and inducing genetic mutations, ionizing radiation can potentially initiate a cell on the road to cancer. The authors review what is currently known about regulation of cellular reproduction, DNA damage and repair, cellular defense mechanisms, and the specific cancer-causing genes that are susceptible to ionizing radiation. A rapid survey of the data on radiation effects in humans shows that high radiation doses increase the risk of cancer, whereas the effects of low doses are very difficult to detect. The hypothetical risks at low doses, which are estimated from the atomic-bomb survivors, are compared to the low-dose data so that the reader can assess the present level of uncertainty. As part of the openness initiative, ten individuals who have worked with plutonium during various periods in the Laboratory`s history were asked to share their experiences including their accidental intakes. The history and prognosis of people who have had plutonium exposures is discussed by the Laboratory`s leading epidemiologist.

  11. Solar Site Survey Toolkit

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    After a couple outings, a principal technologist at Sandia National Laboratories saw a need for a travel kit that would have the necessary tools to make the task of site surveys more manageable and safer. They have had great success using the kit in the field already.

  12. Operations Improvement Surveys 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guide, J. J.; O'Brien, W. J.

    1984-01-01

    Exxon Chemical Company developed unique site-wide energy optimization technology in the mid1970's. This technology was applied by means of site energy surveys which were carried out at every major Exxon facility throughout the world during the 1976...

  13. REMOTE SENSING GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sensing data used in CPRM geologic projects Future perspective: the Spectral Library of Geological Survey Pesquisa de Recursos Minerais (CPRM) is a state-owned company that carries out the functions of Brazil ­ CPRM #12;Examples of use of LANDSAT imagery in CPRM projects Field works planning ­ Enhancement

  14. DOE Helps Launch the Multi-Agency i6 Green Challenge for Commercializa...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in the i6 Green Challenge to support innovations in the areas of renewable energy, energy efficiency, or green building technology. The partnership will also include the...

  15. Georgia Hosts Multi-Agency Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Transportation Exercise

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    COVINGTON, Ga. – Emergency personnel throughout the U.S. who respond in the event of a potential accident involving radioactive waste shipments take part in mock training scenarios to help them prepare for an actual incident.

  16. DOE Helps Launch the Multi-Agency i6 Green Challenge for Commercialization

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department ofRefrigerators | Department DOE1ProjectsGuideDepartment of|

  17. Federal Government Awards Multi-Agency Solar Power Purchase in California,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunitiesofExtransScientificEnergy Efficiency » Federal4 F u eNevada |

  18. Polymer Composites for Radiation Scintillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qi

    2012-01-01

    Reference G. F. Knoll, Radiation detection and measurement,MI, 1985. G. F. Knoll, Radiation detection and measurement,applications in radiation detection. First, a brief review

  19. Alpha-beta radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, Dale M. (Richland, WA); Simmons, Kevin L. (Kennewick, WA); Froelich, Thomas J. (West Richland, WA); Carter, Gregory L. (Richland, WA)

    1998-01-01

    The invention is based in part on the discovery that a plastic housing that is lightweight is surprisingly efficient inasmuch as background signals from any gamma radiation are significantly reduced by using a plastic housing instead of a metal housing. A further aspect of the present invention is the profile of the housing as a bi-linear approximation to a parabola resulting in full optical response from any location on the scintillation material to the photomultiplier tube. A yet further aspect of the present invention is that the survey probe is resistant to magnetic fields. A yet further aspect of the present invention is the use of a snap-fit retaining bracket that overcomes the need for multiple screws.

  20. WI Radiation Protection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute seeks to regulate radioactive materials, to encourage the constructive uses of radiation, and to prohibit and prevent exposure to radiation in amounts which are or may be detrimental...

  1. Maryland Radiation Act (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The policy of the state is to provide for the constructive use of radiation and control radiation emissions. This legislation authorizes the Department of the Environment to develop comprehensive...

  2. Radiation protection at CERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forkel-Wirth, Doris; Silari, Marco; Streit-Bianchi, Marilena; Theis, Christian; Vincke, Heinz; Vincke, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    This paper gives a brief overview of the general principles of radiation protection legislation; explains radiological quantities and units, including some basic facts about radioactivity and the biological effects of radiation; and gives an overview of the classification of radiological areas at CERN, radiation fields at high-energy accelerators, and the radiation monitoring system used at CERN. A short section addresses the ALARA approach used at CERN.

  3. Authorized Investigator's Laboratory Survey Record Room Diagram and Survey Instruments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sniadecki, Nathan J.

    . 4) All records must be available for inspection and kept for 3 calendar years. Survey InstrumentsAuthorized Investigator's Laboratory Survey Record Room Diagram and Survey Instruments u Instrument Code * Model # Serial # Type Action Level Instrument action level is twice the bkg count

  4. 5th Annual Data Miner Survey 2011 Survey Summary Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morik, Katharina

    5th Annual Data Miner Survey ­ 2011 Survey Summary Report ­ Rexer Analytics For more information Outline · Overview & Key Findings · Where & How Data Miners Work · Data Mining Tools: Usage & Satisfaction Overview & Key Findings #12;© 2012 Rexer Analytics 4 2011 Data Miner Survey: Overview 40% 27% 18% Corporate

  5. MARSAME Evaluate the Survey Results 6 EVALUATE THE SURVEY RESULTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .1 illustrates the assessment phase of the data life cycle. 6.2 Conduct Data Quality Assessment Data quality important milestone. Figure 6.1 The Assessment Phase of the Data Life Cycle In cases where the survey did phase of the data life cycle involves the interpretation of survey results. Interpretation of survey

  6. THE VEX RADIATION MODULE: 2D RADIATION TRANSPORT WITH MIMETIC...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    THE VEX RADIATION MODULE: 2D RADIATION TRANSPORT WITH MIMETIC DIFFUSION FOR EXAFLAG Citation Details In-Document Search Title: THE VEX RADIATION MODULE: 2D RADIATION TRANSPORT WITH...

  7. RADIONUCLIDE RADIATION PROTECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakhor, Avideh

    RADIONUCLIDE AND RADIATION PROTECTION DATA HANDBOOK 2002 D. Delacroix* J. P. Guerre** P. Leblanc'Energie Atomique, CEA/Saclay, France ISBN 1 870965 87 6 RADIATION PROTECTION DOSIMETRY Vol. 98 No 1, 2002 Published by Nuclear Technology Publishing #12;RADIONUCLIDE AND RADIATION PROTECTION DATA HANDBOOK 2nd Edition (2002

  8. Harvesting nanoscale thermal radiation using pyroelectric materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Jin; Frederich, Hugo; Pilon, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    eld radiative heat transfer dominates radiation transferstudy Far field radiation Heat transfer coefficient, h r (W/nanoscale radiation to enhance radiative heat transfer. The

  9. Scottish Social Attitudes - Survey 2004 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wassoff, Fran; Martin, Claudia

    This report sets out the results of questions on family matters in the Scottish Social Attitudes Survey 2004. This part of the survey canvassed public views and knowledge on a range of family-related issues including marriage, cohabitation...

  10. Use of Internet panels to conduct surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hays, RD; Liu, H; Kapteyn, A

    2015-01-01

    surveys. Journal of Medical Internet Research, 15, e260.of RDD telephone surveys and internet surveys conducted withtelephone interviewing versus the Internet: Comparing sample

  11. Radiation Safety (Revised March 2010)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of radiation and a unit of exposure 14 Biological effects of radiation and units of dose 19 ALARA policy

  12. Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science March 30-April 2, 2012; San Francisco...

  13. TERSat: Trapped Energetic Radiation Satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clements, Emily B.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation damage caused by interactions with high-energy particles in the Van Allen Radiation Belts is a leading

  14. Polymer Composites for Radiation Scintillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qi

    2012-01-01

    Principles of radiation interaction in matter and detection,Principles of radiation interaction in matter and detection,

  15. Impact of the Geo-synchronous Orbit Radiation Environment on the Design of Astronomical Observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kruk, Jeffrey W; Armani, Nerses; Stauffer, Craig; Hirata, Christopher M

    2015-01-01

    Geo-Synchronous orbits are appealing for Solar or astrophysical observatories because they permit continuous data downlink at high rates. The radiation environment in these orbits presents unique challenges, however. This paper describes the characteristics of the radiation environment in Geo-Synchronous orbit and the implications for instrument design. Radiation-induced background event rates are given for some simplified shielding models, and for a detailed model of the proposed Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope observatory.

  16. An aerial radiological survey of Naturita, Colorado and surrounding area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaffe, R.J.

    1982-09-01

    An aerial radiological survey of four areas in the vicinity of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Naturita, Colorado was conducted in September 1981. The average background radiation exposure rate (normalized to 3 feet above the ground) was about 10 to 16 microroentgens per hour ({mu}R/h). Uranium ore or tailings were detected at Naturita, Nucla, East Vancorum, and the general region downriver and downwind from the former mill tailings site.

  17. Interpreting the unresolved intensity of cosmologically redshifted line radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Switzer, Eric R; Masui, Kiyoshi W; Pen, Ue-Li; Voytek, Tabitha C

    2015-01-01

    Intensity mapping experiments survey the spectrum of diffuse line radiation rather than detect individual objects at high signal-to-noise. Spectral maps of unresolved atomic and molecular line radiation contain three-dimensional information about the density and environments of emitting gas, and efficiently probe cosmological volumes out to high redshift. Intensity mapping survey volumes also contain all other sources of radiation at the frequencies of interest. Continuum foregrounds are typically ~10^2-10^3 times brighter than the cosmological signal. The instrumental response to bright foregrounds will produce new spectral degrees of freedom that are not known in advance, nor necessarily spectrally smooth. The intrinsic spectra of foregrounds may also not be well-known in advance. We describe a general class of quadratic estimators to analyze data from single-dish intensity mapping experiments, and determine contaminated spectral modes from the data itself. The key attribute of foregrounds is not that they ...

  18. SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY Surveying Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY Surveying Engineering Technology practice FOCUSED WHY SURVEYING ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY? Surveying engineering technology is a practice- focused program that provides students ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY DEGREE? A graduate with a surveying engineering technology degree can work as a party

  19. ORISE: Characterization surveys

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEY UNIVERSE The 2014Capabilities ORISE technicianCharacterization

  20. Radiation Hazards Program (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Health, set allowable radiation standards and mitigation practices, as well as procedures for the transportation of hazardous material.

  1. Atomic Radiation (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This article states permissible levels of radiation in unrestricted areas, environmental standards for uranium fuel cycle and information about notification of incidents.

  2. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, E.J.

    1992-05-01

    The following research programs from the Center for Radiological Research of Columbia University are described: Design and development of a new wall-less ultra miniature proportional counter for nanodosimetry; some recent measurements of ionization distributions for heavy ions at nanometer site sizes with a wall-less proportional counter; a calculation of exciton energies in periodic systems with helical symmetry: application to a hydrogen fluoride chain; electron energy-loss function in polynucleotide and the question of plasmon excitation; a non-parametric, microdosimetric-based approach to the evaluation of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; high-LET radiation risk assessment at medium doses; high-LET radiobiological effects: increased lesion severity or increased lesion proximity; photoneutrons generated by high energy medical linacs; the biological effectiveness of neutrons; implications for radiation protection; molecular characterization of oncogenes induced by neutrons; and the inverse dose-rate effect for oncogenic transformation by charged particles is LET dependent.

  3. STEP Participant Survey Executive Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    STEP. Data Collection The survey was delivered via town newsletters, emails, newspaper ads, flyers posted in the community, etc. Notification included website reference for the...

  4. ON THE JITTER RADIATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelner, S. R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-6917 Heidelberg (Germany); Aharonian, F. A. [Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 31 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Khangulyan, D., E-mail: skelner@rambler.ru, E-mail: Felix.Aharonian@mpi-hd.mpg.de, E-mail: khangul@astro.isas.jaxa.jp [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science/JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)

    2013-09-01

    In a small-scale turbulent medium, when the nonrelativistic Larmor radius R{sub L} = mc {sup 2}/eB exceeds the correlation length {lambda} of the magnetic field, the magnetic Bremsstrahlung radiation of charged relativistic particles unavoidably proceeds to the so-called jitter radiation regime. The cooling timescale of parent particles is identical to the synchrotron cooling time, thus this radiation regime can be produced with very high efficiency in different astrophysical sources characterized by high turbulence. The jitter radiation has distinct spectral features shifted toward high energies, compared to synchrotron radiation. This effect makes the jitter mechanism an attractive broad-band gamma-ray production channel, which, in highly magnetized and turbulent environments, can compete or even dominate over other high-energy radiation mechanisms. In this paper, we present a novel study of the spectral properties of the jitter radiation performed within the framework of perturbation theory. The derived general expression for the spectral power of radiation is presented in a compact and convenient form for numerical calculations.

  5. Radiative Flux Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Chuck

    2008-05-14

    The Radiative Flux Analysis is a technique for using surface broadband radiation measurements for detecting periods of clear (i.e. cloudless) skies, and using the detected clear-sky data to fit functions which are then used to produce continuous clear-sky estimates. The clear-sky estimates and measurements are then used in various ways to infer cloud macrophysical properties.

  6. Radiation-resistant microorganism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fliermans, Carl B.

    2010-06-15

    An isolated and purified bacterium is provided which was isolated from a high-level radioactive waste site of mixed waste. The isolate has the ability to degrade a wide variety of organic contaminants while demonstrating high tolerance to ionizing radiation. The organism is uniquely suited to bioremediation of a variety or organic contaminants while in the presence of ionizing radiation.

  7. Photochemistry Radiation and Photolysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    energy is done (i.e. energy per unit time) #12;Sample Problem: A microwave oven puts out radiation at 50? How does a microwave oven heat food anyway? First note that 50 GHz is a frequency (Hz = s-1) E = hn, as a function of l · Amount of solar radiation, as a function of

  8. Appendix G. Radiation Appendix G. Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    energy, is energy in the form of waves or particles moving through space. Visi- ble light, heat, radio in the form of electromagnetic waves. Examples include gamma rays, ultraviolet light, and radio waves waves, and alpha particles are examples of radiation. When people feel warmth from sunlight

  9. RADIATION DAMAGE OF GERMANIUM DETECTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pehl, Richard H.

    2011-01-01

    occurring within the detector, radiation may also change theLBL-7967 RADIATION DAMAGE OF GERMANIUM DETECTORS Richard H.LBL-7967 RADIATION DAMAGE OF GERMANIUM DETECTORS* Richard H.

  10. Campus Climate Survey Binghamton University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Zhongfei "Mark"

    1 Campus Climate Survey Binghamton University 2014-15 Office of Diversity, Equity a campus climate that values diversity, equity and inclusion. One of the early tasks of ODEI was to conduct a campus-wide "Campus Climate Survey" to gather a variety of data related to institutional climate

  11. A survey of structures on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Suhyoung

    A survey of projective geometric structures on 2-,3-manifolds S. Choi Outline Classical geometries Euclidean geometry Spherical geometry Manifolds with geometric structures: manifolds need some canonical descriptions.. Manifolds with (real) projective structures A survey of projective geometric structures on 2

  12. Designing Surveys for HCI Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortes, Corinna

    Mountain View, CA 94041, US asedley@gmail.com Permission to make digital or hard copies of part or all or distributed for profit or commercial advantage and that copies bear this notice and the full citation. in Mountain View, focused on tracking and analyzing user attitudes via surveys. He currently leads survey

  13. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    RidgeRd. SimcoeSt. Hwy.7&12 RegRd.57 0 4 8 Kilometers Area = 51,980 Hectares #12;POPULATION CHARACTERISTICSdatamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING - UNIVERSITY Drivers Vehicles Trips/day 2011 2006 1996 1986 datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT

  14. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    .7 4.1 5.8 27.9 TRIPS MADE TO TTS AREA 4,070,800 22.8% 51% 22% 6% 21% 61% 13% 12% 2% 8% 4% 7.1 3.3 7datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING - UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO PREPARED BY 5 TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW SURVEY AREA City of Orillia Durham Region City

  15. Radiation Damage/Materials Modification

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ion irradiation is an important tool for studying radiation damage effects Materials in a nuclear reactor are exposed to extreme temperature and radiation conditions that degrade...

  16. Florida Radiation Protection Act (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Public Health is responsible for administering a statewide radiation protection program. The program is designed to permit development and utilization of sources of radiation for...

  17. Radiation Safety System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vylet, Vaclav; Liu, James C.; Walker, Lawrence S.; /Los Alamos

    2012-04-04

    The goal of this work is to provide an overview of a Radiation safety system (RSS) designed for protection from prompt radiation hazard at accelerator facilities. RSS design parameters, functional requirements and constraints are derived from hazard analysis and risk assessment undertaken in the design phase of the facility. The two main subsystems of a RSS are access control system (ACS) and radiation control system (RCS). In this text, a common approach to risk assessment, typical components of ACS and RCS, desirable features and general design principles applied to RSS are described.

  18. Composition for radiation shielding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield has a depleted urum core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container.

  19. Miniaturized radiation chirper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Umbarger, C. John (Los Alamos, NM); Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1980-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a miniaturized radiation chirper for use with a small battery supplying on the order of 5 volts. A poor quality CdTe crystal which is not necessarily suitable for high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy is incorporated with appropriate electronics so that the chirper emits an audible noise at a rate that is proportional to radiation exposure level. The chirper is intended to serve as a personnel radiation warning device that utilizes new and novel electronics with a novel detector, a CdTe crystal. The resultant device is much smaller and has much longer battery life than existing chirpers.

  20. Solar Flares and the Chromosphere A white paper for the Decadal Survey*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Solar Flares and the Chromosphere A white paper for the Decadal Survey* L. Fletcher, R. Turkmani, H acceleration (De Pontieu et al. 2007). The need for chromospheric observations of flares: The solar flare of radiation in a solar flare (Canfield et al 1986, Neidig 1989, Woods et al. 2004). In other words, solar

  1. Portal radiation monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kruse, L.W.

    1982-03-23

    A portal radiation monitor combines .1% FAR with high sensitivity to special nuclear material. The monitor utilizes pulse shape discrimination, dynamic compression of the photomultiplier output and scintillators sized to maintain efficiency over the entire portal area.

  2. Portal radiation monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kruse, Lyle W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1985-01-01

    A portal radiation monitor combines 0.1% FAR with high sensitivity to special nuclear material. The monitor utilizes pulse shape discrimination, dynamic compression of the photomultiplier output and scintillators sized to maintain efficiency over the entire portal area.

  3. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Street, Robert A. (Palo Alto, CA); Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA); Kaplan, Selig N. (El Cerrito, CA)

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

  4. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1992-11-17

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

  5. Radiative-convective instability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wing, Allison A.

    Radiative-moist-convective equilibrium (RCE) is a simple paradigm for the statistical equilibrium the earth's climate would exhibit in the absence of lateral energy transport. It has generally been assumed that for a given ...

  6. Ionizing radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1990-01-01

    An ionizing radiation detector is provided which is based on the principle of analog electronic integration of radiation sensor currents in the sub-pico to nano ampere range between fixed voltage switching thresholds with automatic voltage reversal each time the appropriate threshold is reached. The thresholds are provided by a first NAND gate Schmitt trigger which is coupled with a second NAND gate Schmitt trigger operating in an alternate switching state from the first gate to turn either a visible or audible indicating device on and off in response to the gate switching rate which is indicative of the level of radiation being sensed. The detector can be configured as a small, personal radiation dosimeter which is simple to operate and responsive over a dynamic range of at least 0.01 to 1000 R/hr.

  7. Method of enhancing radiation response of radiation detection materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Steven D. (Richland, WA)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a method of increasing radiation response of a radiation detection material for a given radiation signal by first pressurizing the radiation detection material. Pressurization may be accomplished by any means including mechanical and/or hydraulic. In this application, the term "pressure" includes fluid pressure and/or mechanical stress.

  8. Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Pengcheng

    Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for X-ray Users for Physics 461 & 462 Protocol Title: Basic Radiation Safety Training for X-ray Users Drafted By: Chris Millsaps, RSS Reviewers: ZB, TU, GS Purpose: To provide basic radiation safety training to the users of x-ray producing

  9. Peccei-Quinn axions from frequency dependence radiation dimming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raul Jimenez; Carlos Pena-Garay; Licia Verde

    2011-02-08

    We explore how the Peccei-Quinn (PQ) axion parameter space can be constrained by the frequency-dependence dimming of radiation from astrophysical objects. To do so we perform accurate calculations of photon-axion conversion in the presence of a variable magnetic field. We propose several tests where the PQ axion parameter space can be explored with current and future astronomical surveys: the observed spectra of isolated neutron stars, occultations of background objects by white dwarfs and neutron stars, the light curves of eclipsing binaries containing a white dwarf. We find that the lack of dimming of the light curve of a detached eclipsing white dwarf binary recently observed, leads to relevant constraints on the photon-axion conversion. Current surveys designed for Earth-like planet searches are well matched to strengthen and improve the constraints on the PQ axion using astrophysical objects radiation dimming.

  10. Handbook of radiation effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes-Siedle, A. (ed.) (Radiation Experiments and Monitors, Oxford (United Kingdom) Univ. of West London (United Kingdom)); Adams, L. (ed.) (European Space Agency-ESTEC, Noordwijk (Netherlands). Radiation Effects and Analysis Techniques Unit)

    1993-01-01

    This handbook is intended to serve as a tool for designers of equipment and scientific instruments in cases where they are required to ensure the survival of the equipment in radiation environments. High-technology materials, especially semiconductors and optics, tend to degrade on exposure to radiation in many different ways. Intense high-energy radiation environments are found in nuclear reactors and accelerators, machines for radiation therapy, industrial sterilization, and space. Some engineers have to build equipment which will survive a nuclear explosion from a hostile source. Proper handling of a disaster with radioactive materials requires equipment which depends utterly on semiconductor microelectronics and imaging devices. Thus the technology of radiation-tolerant electronics is an instrument for good social spheres as diverse as disaster planning and the exploration of Mars. In order to design equipment for intense environments like those described above, then degradation from high-energy irradiation must be seen as a basic design parameter. The aim of this handbook is to assist the engineer or student in that thought; to make it possible to write intelligent specifications; to offer some understanding of the complex variety of effects which occur when high-technology components encounter high-energy radiation; and to go thoroughly into the balance of choices of how to alleviate the effects and hence achieve the design aims of the project. Separate abstracts were prepared for 15 chapters of this book.

  11. Radiation analysis devices, radiation analysis methods, and articles of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roybal, Lyle Gene

    2010-06-08

    Radiation analysis devices include circuitry configured to determine respective radiation count data for a plurality of sections of an area of interest and combine the radiation count data of individual of sections to determine whether a selected radioactive material is present in the area of interest. An amount of the radiation count data for an individual section is insufficient to determine whether the selected radioactive material is present in the individual section. An article of manufacture includes media comprising programming configured to cause processing circuitry to perform processing comprising determining one or more correction factors based on a calibration of a radiation analysis device, measuring radiation received by the radiation analysis device using the one or more correction factors, and presenting information relating to an amount of radiation measured by the radiation analysis device having one of a plurality of specified radiation energy levels of a range of interest.

  12. The Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Camilo; A. G. Lyne; R. N. Manchester; J. F. Bell; V. M. Kaspi; N. D'Amico; N. P. F. McKay; F. Crawford; I. H. Stairs; D. J. Morris; D. C. Sheppard; A. Possenti

    1999-11-10

    The Parkes multibeam pulsar survey uses a 13-element receiver operating at a wavelength of 20 cm to survey the inner Galactic plane with remarkable sensitivity. To date we have collected and analyzed data from 45% of the survey region (|b| < 5 deg.; 260 deg. < l < 50 deg.), and have discovered 440 pulsars, in addition to re-detecting 190 previously known ones. Most of the newly discovered pulsars are at great distances, as inferred from a median dispersion measure (DM) of 400 pc/cm^3.

  13. Chapter_7_Surveys_and_Reviews

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    conduct of a survey, the HQ Survey Team identifies a vulnerability that places national security, classified information, or Departmental property at significant risk, the Team...

  14. Pennsylvania Soil Survey Edward J. Ciolkosz,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dePamphilis, Claude

    Pennsylvania Soil Survey History by Edward J. Ciolkosz, Robert L. Cunningham, and Joseph J ............................................................................................... 1 CHAPTER 2 Pennsylvania Soil Characterization ......................................... 10 CHAPTER 4 Soil Survey Committee History

  15. The radiation oncology workforce: A focus on medical dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, Gregg F.; Mobile, Katherine; Yu, Yan

    2014-07-01

    The 2012 Radiation Oncology Workforce survey was conducted to assess the current state of the entire workforce, predict its future needs and concerns, and evaluate quality improvement and safety within the field. This article describes the dosimetrist segment results. The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Workforce Subcommittee, in conjunction with other specialty societies, conducted an online survey targeting all segments of the radiation oncology treatment team. The data from the dosimetrist respondents are presented in this article. Of the 2573 dosimetrists who were surveyed, 890 responded, which resulted in a 35% segment response rate. Most respondents were women (67%), whereas only a third were men (33%). More than half of the medical dosimetrists were older than 45 years (69.2%), whereas the 45 to 54 years age group represented the highest percentage of respondents (37%). Most medical dosimetrists stated that their workload was appropriate (52%), with respondents working a reported average of 41.7 ± 4 hours per week. Overall, 86% of medical dosimetrists indicated that they were satisfied with their career, and 69% were satisfied in their current position. Overall, 61% of respondents felt that there was an oversupply of medical dosimetrists in the field, 14% reported that supply and demand was balanced, and the remaining 25% felt that there was an undersupply. The medical dosimetrists' greatest concerns included documentation/paperwork (78%), uninsured patients (80%), and insufficient reimbursement rates (87%). This survey provided an insight into the dosimetrist perspective of the radiation oncology workforce. Though an overwhelming majority has conveyed satisfaction concerning their career, the study allowed a spotlight to be placed on the profession's current concerns, such as insufficient reimbursement rates and possible oversupply of dosimetrists within the field.

  16. COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    this form to Radiation Safety's Dosimetry Program.) ___ Yes ___ No 1. Was the Dosimeter placed or stored

  17. Radiation oncogenesis in cell culture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borek, C.

    1982-01-01

    This review article examines the oncogenic effects of radiation with emphasis on ionizing radiations. Cell transformation in vitro is examined with respect to culture systems currently used in these studies, initiation and phenotypic expression of transformation and criteria for transformation. The section of radiation oncogenesis in vitro includes ionizing and nonionizing radiation studies and cocarcinogens and modulators of radiogenic transformations.

  18. REPORT NO. 8 radiation hazards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REPORT NO. 8 REVISED guidance for the control of radiation hazards in uranium mining SEPTEMBER 1967 OF RADIATION HAZARDS IN URANIUM MINING SEPTEMBER 1967 Staff Report of the FEDERAL RADIATION COUNCIL #12;FEDERAL...... .... .._ _.... Section I. Introduction. . . Section II. The Radiation Environment AssociatedWith Uranium Mining. Section

  19. 2014 County Commissioner Satisfaction Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Integrity and Compliance Review Office in 2012. A five-point scale was used for evaluation not work personally with Extension. The total number of returned surveys was 86, for an overall response

  20. The Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. H. Stairs; A. G. Lyne; F. Camilo; N. P. F. McKay; D. C. Sheppard; D. J. Morris; R. N. Manchester; J. F. Bell; V. M. Kaspi; F. Crawford; N. D'Amico

    1999-03-18

    The Parkes multibeam pulsar survey is a high-frequency, fast-sampled survey of the Galactic Plane, expected to discover at least 500 new pulsars. To date, over 200 pulsars have been found, including several young pulsars and at least one with a very high magnetic field. Seven of the new stars are in binary systems; this number includes one probable double-neutron-star system, and one pulsar with an extremely massive companion.

  1. Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Won, I.L.; Keiswetter, D.

    1995-12-31

    Ground-based surveys place personnel at risk due to the proximity of buried unexploded ordnance (UXO) items or by exposure to radioactive materials and hazardous chemicals. The purpose of this effort is to design, construct, and evaluate a portable, remotely-piloted, airborne, geophysical survey system. This non-intrusive system will provide stand-off capability to conduct surveys and detect buried objects, structures, and conditions of interest at hazardous locations. During a survey, the operators remain remote from, but within visual distance of, the site. The sensor system never contacts the Earth, but can be positioned near the ground so that weak geophysical anomalies can be detected. The Geophex Airborne Unmanned Survey System (GAUSS) is designed to detect and locate small-scale anomalies at hazardous sites using magnetic and electromagnetic survey techniques. The system consists of a remotely-piloted, radio-controlled, model helicopter (RCH) with flight computer, light-weight geophysical sensors, an electronic positioning system, a data telemetry system, and a computer base-station. The report describes GAUSS and its test results.

  2. Packet personal radiation monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phelps, J.E.

    1988-03-31

    A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiatonevents, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible ''chirp''. The rate of the ''chirps'' is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field. 2 figs.

  3. Remote radiation dosimetry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Braunlich, Peter F. (Pullman, WA); Tetzlaff, Wolfgang (Pullman, WA); Hegland, Joel E. (Pullman, WA); Jones, Scott C. (Pullman, WA)

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed are methods and apparatus for remotely measuring radiation levels. Such are particularly useful for measuring relatively high levels or dosages of radiation being administered in radiation therapy. They are also useful for more general radiation level measurements where remote sensing from the remaining portions of the apparatus is desirable. The apparatus uses a beam generator, such as a laser beam, to provide a stimulating beam. The stimulating beam is preferably of wavelengths shorter than 6 microns, or more advantageously less than 2 microns. The stimulating beam is used to stimulate a remote luminescent sensor mounted in a probe which emits stored luminescent energy resulting from exposure of the sensor to ionizing radiation. The stimulating beam is communicated to the remote luminescent sensor via transmissive fiber which also preferably serves to return the emission from the luminescent sensor. The stimulating beam is advantageously split by a beam splitter to create a detector beam which is measured for power during a reading period during which the luminescent phosphor is read. The detected power is preferably used to control the beam generator to thus produce desired beam power during the reading period. The luminescent emission from the remote sensor is communicated to a suitable emission detector, preferably after filtering or other selective treatment to better isolate the luminescent emission.

  4. Remote radiation dosimetry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Braunlich, P.F.; Tetzlaff, W.; Hegland, J.E.; Jones, S.C.

    1991-03-12

    Disclosed are methods and apparatus for remotely measuring radiation levels. Such are particularly useful for measuring relatively high levels or dosages of radiation being administered in radiation therapy. They are also useful for more general radiation level measurements where remote sensing from the remaining portions of the apparatus is desirable. The apparatus uses a beam generator, such as a laser beam, to provide a stimulating beam. The stimulating beam is preferably of wavelengths shorter than 6 microns, or more advantageously less than 2 microns. The stimulating beam is used to stimulate a remote luminescent sensor mounted in a probe which emits stored luminescent energy resulting from exposure of the sensor to ionizing radiation. The stimulating beam is communicated to the remote luminescent sensor via a transmissive fiber which also preferably serves to return the emission from the luminescent sensor. The stimulating beam is advantageously split by a beam splitter to create a detector beam which is measured for power during a reading period during which the luminescent phosphor is read. The detected power is preferably used to control the beam generator to thus produce desired beam power during the reading period. The luminescent emission from the remote sensor is communicated to a suitable emission detector, preferably after filtering or other selective treatment to better isolate the luminescent emission. 8 figures.

  5. Composition for radiation shielding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-08-02

    A composition for use as a radiation shield is disclosed. The shield has a depleted uranium core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container. 2 figs.

  6. Pediatric radiation oncology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halperin, E.C.; Kun, L.E.; Constine, L.S.; Tarbell, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    This text covers all aspects of radiation therapy for treatment of pediatric cancer. The book describes the proper use of irradiation in each of the malignancies of childhood, including tumors that are rarely encountered in adult practice. These include acute leukemia; supratentorial brain tumors; tumors of the posterior fossa of the brain and spinal canal; retinoblastoma and optic nerve glioma; neuroblastoma; Hodgkin's disease; malignant lymphoma; Ewing's sarcoma; osteosarcoma; rhabdomyosarcoma; Desmoid tumor; Wilms' tumor; liver and biliary tumors; germ cell and stromal cell tumors of the gonads; endocrine, aerodigestive tract, and breast tumors; Langerhans' cell histiocytosis; and skin cancer and hemangiomas. For each type of malignancy, the authors describe the epidemiology, common presenting signs and symptoms, staging, and proper diagnostic workup. Particular attention is given to the indications for radiation therapy and the planning of a course of radiotherapy, including the optimal radiation dose, field size, and technique.

  7. Semiconductor radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bell, Zane W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Burger, Arnold (Knoxville, TN)

    2010-03-30

    A semiconductor detector for ionizing electromagnetic radiation, neutrons, and energetic charged particles. The detecting element is comprised of a compound having the composition I-III-VI.sub.2 or II-IV-V.sub.2 where the "I" component is from column 1A or 1B of the periodic table, the "II" component is from column 2B, the "III" component is from column 3A, the "IV" component is from column 4A, the "V" component is from column 5A, and the "VI" component is from column 6A. The detecting element detects ionizing radiation by generating a signal proportional to the energy deposited in the element, and detects neutrons by virtue of the ionizing radiation emitted by one or more of the constituent materials subsequent to capture. The detector may contain more than one neutron-sensitive component.

  8. "CONFIRMATORY SURVEY RESULTS FOR THE ABB COMBUSTION ENGINEERING SITE WINDSOR, CONNECTICUT DCN 5158-SR-02-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ADAMS, WADE C

    2013-03-25

    The objectives of the confirmatory activities were to provide independent contractor field data reviews and to generate independent radiological data for use by the NRC in evaluating the adequacy and accuracy of the contractor?s procedures and FSS results. ORAU reviewed ABB CE?s decommissioning plan, final status survey plan, and the applicable soil DCGLs, which were developed based on an NRC-approved radiation dose assessment. The surveys include gamma surface scans, gamma direct measurements, and soil sampling.

  9. Wireless Communication Enhancement Methods for Mobile Robots in Radiation Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nattanmai Parasuraman, Ramviyas; Ferre, Manuel

    In hostile environments such as in scientific facilities where ionising radiation is a dominant hazard, reducing human interventions by increasing robotic operations are desirable. CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, has around 50 km of underground scientific facilities, where wireless mobile robots could help in the operation of the accelerator complex, e.g. in conducting remote inspections and radiation surveys in different areas. The main challenges to be considered here are not only that the robots should be able to go over long distances and operate for relatively long periods, but also the underground tunnel environment, the possible presence of electromagnetic fields, radiation effects, and the fact that the robots shall in no way interrupt the operation of the accelerators. Having a reliable and robust wireless communication system is essential for successful execution of such robotic missions and to avoid situations of manual recovery of the robots in the event that the robot runs ...

  10. Radiative Magnetic Reconnection in Astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A

    2015-01-01

    I review a new rapidly growing area of high-energy plasma astrophysics --- radiative magnetic reconnection, i.e., a reconnection regime where radiation reaction influences reconnection dynamics, energetics, and nonthermal particle acceleration. This influence be may be manifested via a number of astrophysically important radiative effects, such as radiation-reaction limits on particle acceleration, radiative cooling, radiative resistivity, braking of reconnection outflows by radiation drag, radiation pressure, viscosity, and even pair creation at highest energy densities. Self-consistent inclusion of these effects in magnetic reconnection theory and modeling calls for serious modifications to our overall theoretical approach to the problem. In addition, prompt reconnection-powered radiation often represents our only observational diagnostic tool for studying remote astrophysical systems; this underscores the importance of developing predictive modeling capabilities to connect the underlying physical condition...

  11. ATHENA radiation model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shumway, R.W.

    1987-10-01

    The ATHENA computer program has many features that make it desirable to use as a space reactor evaluation tool. One of the missing features was a surface-to-surface thermal radiation model. A model was developed that allows any of the regular ATHENA heat slabs to radiate to any other heat slab. The view factors and surface emissivities must be specified by the user. To verify that the model was properly accounting for radiant energy transfer, two different types of test calculations were performed. Both calculations have excellent results. The updates have been used on both the INEL CDC-176 and the Livermore Cray. 7 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Wireless passive radiation sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Kent B; Rumpf, Arthur N; Yelton, William G; Limmer, Steven J

    2013-12-03

    A novel measurement technique is employed using surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices, passive RF, and radiation-sensitive films to provide a wireless passive radiation sensor that requires no batteries, outside wiring, or regular maintenance. The sensor is small (<1 cm.sup.2), physically robust, and will operate unattended for decades. In addition, the sensor can be insensitive to measurement position and read distance due to a novel self-referencing technique eliminating the need to measure absolute responses that are dependent on RF transmitter location and power.

  13. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koster, J.E.; Bolton, R.D.

    1999-03-02

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans. 4 figs.

  14. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koster, James E. (Los Alamos, NM); Bolton, Richard D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans.

  15. The Phoenix Deep Survey: A Deep Microjansky Radio Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Afonso; B. Mobasher; A. Hopkins; L. Cram

    1999-09-05

    The study of the nature of faint radio sources is of great importance since a significant fraction of these objects is thought to be composed of actively star-forming galaxies. Due to the increased sensitivity of radio telescopes, we are now not only able to catalogue large numbers of these sources in the sub-millijansky regime, but also to start the study of the nature of increasingly fainter microjansky sources. This paper presents a new very deep 1.4 GHz radio survey made as a part of the Phoenix Deep Survey, a project aimed to study the nature of the faintest radio sources. With a limiting sensitivity of 45 microJy, this new survey has allowed us to assemble a large number of sources with 1.4 GHz flux densities below 100 microJy. The resulting source counts and the analysis of the optical properties of the faintest radio sources are presented.

  16. Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Quality Profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) is a periodic national survey that provides timely information about energy consumption and expenditures of U.S. households and about energy-related characteristics of housing units. The survey was first conducted in 1978 as the National Interim Energy Consumption Survey (NIECS), and the 1979 survey was called the Household Screener Survey. From 1980 through 1982 RECS was conducted annually. The next RECS was fielded in 1984, and since then, the survey has been undertaken at 3-year intervals. The most recent RECS was conducted in 1993.

  17. Astronomical Surveys and Big Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mickaelian, A M

    2015-01-01

    Recent all-sky and large-area astronomical surveys and their catalogued data over the whole range of electromagnetic spectrum are reviewed, from Gamma-ray to radio, such as Fermi-GLAST and INTEGRAL in Gamma-ray, ROSAT, XMM and Chandra in X-ray, GALEX in UV, SDSS and several POSS I and II based catalogues (APM, MAPS, USNO, GSC) in optical range, 2MASS in NIR, WISE and AKARI IRC in MIR, IRAS and AKARI FIS in FIR, NVSS and FIRST in radio and many others, as well as most important surveys giving optical images (DSS I and II, SDSS, etc.), proper motions (Tycho, USNO, Gaia), variability (GCVS, NSVS, ASAS, Catalina, Pan-STARRS) and spectroscopic data (FBS, SBS, Case, HQS, HES, SDSS, CALIFA, GAMA). An overall understanding of the coverage along the whole wavelength range and comparisons between various surveys are given: galaxy redshift surveys, QSO/AGN, radio, Galactic structure, and Dark Energy surveys. Astronomy has entered the Big Data era. Astrophysical Virtual Observatories and Computational Astrophysics play a...

  18. Radiation detector spectrum simulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM); Crowell, John M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1987-01-01

    A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source nerates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith generates several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

  19. Radiation detector spectrum simulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolf, M.A.; Crowell, J.M.

    1985-04-09

    A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source generates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith to generate several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

  20. Radiation Source Replacement Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Moran, Traci L.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2010-12-01

    This report summarizes a Radiation Source Replacement Workshop in Houston Texas on October 27-28, 2010, which provided a forum for industry and researchers to exchange information and to discuss the issues relating to replacement of AmBe, and potentially other isotope sources used in well logging.

  1. Thermal radiation Ron Zevenhoven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    .00032, similarly for 2·T = 0.7·2500 = 1750 µmK4 this gives f0-2 = 0.03392. Thus for 0.4 - 0.7 µm, f1-2 = 0Thermal radiation revisited Ron Zevenhoven Åbo Akademi University Thermal and Flow Engineering Laboratory / Värme- och strömningsteknik tel. 3223 ; ron.zevenhoven@abo.fi Process Engineering

  2. Three Dimensional Radiative Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Abel

    2000-05-09

    Radiative Transfer (RT) effects play a crucial role in the thermal history of the intergalactic medium. Here I discuss recent advances in the development of numerical methods that introduce RT to cosmological hydrodynamics. These methods can also readily be applied to time dependent problems on interstellar and galactic scales.

  3. Thermostatic Radiator Valve Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dentz, Jordan; Ansanelli, Eric

    2015-01-01

    A large stock of multifamily buildings in the Northeast and Midwest are heated by steam distribution systems. Losses from these systems are typically high and a significant number of apartments are overheated much of the time. Thermostatically controlled radiator valves (TRVs) are one potential strategy to combat this problem, but have not been widely accepted by the residential retrofit market.

  4. Local microwave background radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Domingos Soares

    2014-11-13

    An inquiry on a possible local origin for the Microwave Background Radiation is made. Thermal MBR photons are contained in a system called {\\it magnetic bottle} which is due to Earth magnetic field and solar wind particles, mostly electrons. Observational tests are anticipated.

  5. Detection Efficiency of Asteroid Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tricarico, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive characterization of the detection efficiency of nine of the major asteroid surveys which have been active over the past two decades is presented. The detection efficiency is estimated on a nightly basis by comparing the detected asteroids with the complete catalog of known asteroids propagated to the same observing epoch. Results include a nightly estimate of the detection efficiency curves as a function of apparent magnitude and apparent velocity of the asteroids, as well as a cumulative analysis to estimate the overall performance of each survey. The limiting magnitude distribution is estimated for each survey, and it is then modeled as a function of telescope aperture to obtain an estimate over a wide range of apertures.

  6. Radiation Chemistry Radiation causes changes in molecules by both

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massey, Thomas N.

    Module 4 Radiation Chemistry · Radiation causes changes in molecules by both direct and indirect radiation on the target molecules · Indirect Action - energy transported by chemical species to cause damage or Pyrimidene. · Loss of Purine or Pyrimidine · Free radical transfer causing the loss of base and chain

  7. Radiation Safety Manual March 21, 2015 RADIATION SAFETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lance, Veronica P.

    . Radioactive Drug Research Committee D. Radiation Safety Officers E. Authorized Users Chapter II: Radiation. Clinical Applications C. Loans and Transfers of Radioactive Materials Chapter VI: Occupational Exposure of Packages Containing Radioactive Materials A. Packages Delivered to the Radiation Safety Office B. Packages

  8. Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Pengcheng

    Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for Sealed Source Users for Physics 461 Protocol Title: Training for Sealed Source Users Drafted By: Chris Millsaps, RSS Reviewers: ZB, TU, GS Purpose: To provide basic radiation safety training to the users of sealed sources located

  9. A new well surveying tool 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haghighi, Manuchehr Mehdizabeh

    1966-01-01

    13 13 11 12 15 l2 48 51 51 51 49 49 49 51 50 49 Undetermined values. 'ARABLE II COMPARISON OF MEASURED ANGLES @ID ANGLES INDICATE' EY SURVEYING DEVICE ACTUAL VALUES EERIE(;QVENTAL VALUES Rnn No. 1 Run No. 2 Depth: Direction of...A NEW WELL SURVEYING TOOL A Thesis By MANUCHEHR MEHDIZABEH HAGHIGHI Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ANM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Major Subject: PETROLEUM...

  10. Student Survey Items (Survey names listed in blue)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltisberger, Jay H.

    by Topical Area: Admissions Berea-Specific Entering Survey, Fall Term First-Year Students and New Transfers community? Cooperative Institutional Research Program (CIRP), Entering Fall Term Students 2010 transfer students) Education Opportunity Center Educational Talent Search Upward Bound Upward Bound

  11. Facility Approvals, Security Surveys, and Nuclear Materials Surveys

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1988-02-03

    To establish the Department of Energy (DOE) requirements for granting facility approvals prior to permitting safeguards and security interests on the premises and the conduct of on-site security and/or nuclear material surveys of facilities with safeguards and security interests. Cancels DOE O 5630.7 and DOE O 5634.1. Canceled by DOE 5634.1B.

  12. Facility Approvals, Security Surveys, and Nuclear Materials Surveys

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-09-15

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) requirements for granting facility approvals prior to permitting safeguards and security interests on the premises and the conduct of insite security and/or nuclear material surveys of facilities with safeguards and security interests. Cancels DOE 5634.1A. Canceled by DOE O 470.1 dated 9-28-95.

  13. RADIATION DAMAGE OF GERMANIUM DETECTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pehl, Richard H.

    2011-01-01

    the high-energy proton damage than was the planar detector.as far as radiation damage is concerned. Unfortunately, some28-29, 1978 LBL-7967 RADIATION DAMAGE OF GERMANIUM DETECTORS

  14. TIME DOMAIN SIMULATIONS OF RADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;Introduction Fan Noise Forward Radiation Fan Noise Aft Radiation Jet Noise (separate LES Code)Traditional CFD a 16-processor machine yourself : 8 dual-processor workstations 800 MHz Pentium III processors 1 GB RAM

  15. DOE Radiation Records Contacts List

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE radiation records contact list for individuals to obtain records of occupational exposure directly from a DOE site.

  16. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, L.H.

    1995-10-17

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  17. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, L.H.

    1994-08-16

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

  18. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  19. Gamma radiation field intensity meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

  20. COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    and will be maintained in a separate file from personnel radiation dosimeter records. All workers are specifically

  1. Radiological survey results at the former Bridgeport Brass Company facility, Seymour, Connecticut

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, R.D.; Carrier, R.F.

    1993-06-01

    At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducted a radiological survey of the former Bridgeport Brass Company facility, Seymour, Connecticut. The survey was performed in May 1992. The purpose of the survey was to determine if the facility had become contaminated with residuals containing radioactive materials during the work performed in the Ruffert building under government contract in the 1960s. The survey included a gamma scanning over a circumscribed area around the building, and gamma and beta-gamma scanning over all indoor surfaces as well as the collection of soil and other samples for radionuclide analyses. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in indoor and outdoor samples, and radiation measurements over floor and wall surfaces, in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program guidelines. Elevated uranium concentrations outdoors were limited to several small, isolated spots. Radiation measurements exceeded guidelines indoors over numerous spots and areas inside the building, mainly in Rooms 1--6 that had been used in the early government work.

  2. Working With Radiation For Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    flight New York to LA 5 Moving from east coast to Denver for one year 50 Moving from frame house to brick with an ever-present background of radiation. Radiation & Life 1* *2 #12;3 · Radiation is energy traveling with sufficiently energy to remove electrons from the atoms or molecules of the substances it passes through. Can

  3. Civil Engineering & Land Surveying Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oviedo, Néstor J.

    Civil Engineering & Land Surveying Services May 6, 2014 COMPANY NAME DATE CONTACT PERSON MAILING ADDRESS PHONE / CELL # 1 Bedrock Engineering 5/6/14 David O. Hartley PO Box 25783 Fresno, CA 93729 559 North Star Engineering Group, Inc. 5/6/14 John Mensonides 620 12th St. Modesto, CA 95354 209-524-3525 4

  4. Hazards Survey and Hazards Assessments

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21

    This volume is to assist DOE Operations/Field Offices and operating contractors in complying with the DOE O 151.1 requirement that Hazards Surveys and facility-specific Hazards Assessments be prepared, maintained, and used for emergency planning purposes. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-2.

  5. Life Choices Student Survey Items

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltisberger, Jay H.

    by Topical Area: Life Choices Berea-Specific Entering Survey, Fall Term First-Year Students and New Transfers for life-long learning Cooperative Institutional Research Program (CIRP), Entering Fall Term Students 2012, Historical Trends) Please indicate the extent to which each of the following describe you Searching

  6. SURVEY 2013 June 6, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Jay

    AND STRATEGY Ithaka S+R Faculty Survey: five triennial cycles of national needs tracking. Ithaka S+R Library. Is there a sustainable role for the library in support of discovery? 3. Should libraries move from collections libraries transition to e-only acquisitions for books? 2. Is there a sustainable role for the library

  7. JOURNAL AUTHORS SURVEY Prepared by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Paul

    JISC/OSI JOURNAL AUTHORS SURVEY Report Prepared by Key Perspectives Ltd 48 Old Coach Road, Playing behind its development 4 2.2 Models and definitions of open access 8 2.2.1 Open access journals 8 2 4.1 Respondent profiles 18 4.2 Awareness of open access journals 18 4.2.1 Extent and longevity

  8. A Survey of Geometric Algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrington, J. Patrick

    A Survey of Geometric Algebra and Geometric Calculus c Alan Macdonald Luther College, Decorah, IA is always available at my web page.) The principal argument for the adoption of geometric algebra and Geometric Algebra: http://faculty.luther.edu/~macdonal/laga/ Vector and Geometric Calculus: http

  9. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING - UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO PREPARED BY 51 TOWN OF RICHMOND HILL REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF YORK LeslieSt. Stouffville Rd. King 6 Kilometers Area = 10,180 Hectares #12;POPULATION CHARACTERISTICS Population Age Daily

  10. KT McDonald RESMM'12 (FNAL) Feb 13, 2012 1 Radiation-Damage Considerations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    appropriately shielded. To design appropriate shielding it is helpful to have quantitative criteria load. We survey such criteria first for superconducting magnets, and then for room-temperature copper of radiation damage to materials associate this with "displacement" of the electronic (not nuclear) structure

  11. rev December 2010 Radiation Safety Manual Section 9 Radiation Protection Procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sniadecki, Nathan J.

    rev December 2010 Radiation Safety Manual Section 9 ­ Radiation Protection Procedures Page 9-1 Section 9 Radiation Protection Procedures Contents Section 9 9-1 Radiation Protection Procedures Protective Measures - External Radiation.....................................9-5 1. Time

  12. Multilayer radiation shield

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Urbahn, John Arthur (Saratoga Springs, NY); Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon (Niskayuna, NY)

    2009-06-16

    A power generation system including: a generator including a rotor including a superconductive rotor coil coupled to a rotatable shaft; a first prime mover drivingly coupled to the rotatable shaft; and a thermal radiation shield, partially surrounding the rotor coil, including at least a first sheet and a second sheet spaced apart from the first sheet by centripetal force produced by the rotatable shaft. A thermal radiation shield for a generator including a rotor including a super-conductive rotor coil including: a first sheet having at least one surface formed from a low emissivity material; and at least one additional sheet having at least one surface formed from a low emissivity material spaced apart from the first sheet by centripetal force produced by the rotatable shaft, wherein each successive sheet is an incrementally greater circumferential arc length and wherein the centripetal force shapes the sheets into a substantially catenary shape.

  13. Handheld CZT radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murray, William S.; Butterfield, Kenneth B.; Baird, William

    2004-08-24

    A handheld CZT radiation detector having a CZT gamma-ray sensor, a multichannel analyzer, a fuzzy-logic component, and a display component is disclosed. The CZT gamma-ray sensor may be a coplanar grid CZT gamma-ray sensor, which provides high-quality gamma-ray analysis at a wide range of operating temperatures. The multichannel analyzer categorizes pulses produce by the CZT gamma-ray sensor into channels (discrete energy levels), resulting in pulse height data. The fuzzy-logic component analyzes the pulse height data and produces a ranked listing of radioisotopes. The fuzzy-logic component is flexible and well-suited to in-field analysis of radioisotopes. The display component may be a personal data assistant, which provides a user-friendly method of interacting with the detector. In addition, the radiation detector may be equipped with a neutron sensor to provide an enhanced mechanism of sensing radioactive materials.

  14. Semiconductor radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Patt, Bradley E. (Sherman Oaks, CA); Iwanczyk, Jan S. (Los Angeles, CA); Tull, Carolyn R. (Orinda, CA); Vilkelis, Gintas (Westlake Village, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A semiconductor radiation detector is provided to detect x-ray and light photons. The entrance electrode is segmented by using variable doping concentrations. Further, the entrance electrode is physically segmented by inserting n+ regions between p+ regions. The p+ regions and the n+ regions are individually biased. The detector elements can be used in an array, and the p+ regions and the n+ regions can be biased by applying potential at a single point. The back side of the semiconductor radiation detector has an n+ anode for collecting created charges and a number of p+ cathodes. Biased n+ inserts can be placed between the p+ cathodes, and an internal resistor divider can be used to bias the n+ inserts as well as the p+ cathodes. A polysilicon spiral guard can be implemented surrounding the active area of the entrance electrode or surrounding an array of entrance electrodes.

  15. General Relativistic Radiative Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Knop; P. H. Hauschildt; E. Baron

    2006-11-30

    We present a general method to calculate radiative transfer including scattering in the continuum as well as in lines in spherically symmetric systems that are influenced by the effects of general relativity (GR). We utilize a comoving wavelength ansatz that allows to resolve spectral lines throughout the atmosphere. The used numerical solution is an operator splitting (OS) technique that uses a characteristic formal solution. The bending of photon paths and the wavelength shifts due to the effects of GR are fully taken into account, as is the treatment of image generation in a curved spacetime. We describe the algorithm we use and demonstrate the effects of GR on the radiative transport of a two level atom line in a neutron star like atmosphere for various combinations of continuous and line scattering coefficients. In addition, we present grey continuum models and discuss the effects of different scattering albedos on the emergent spectra and the determination of effective temperatures and radii of neutron star atmospheres.

  16. Radiation shielding composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Quapp, William J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2000-12-26

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

  17. Radiation shielding composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Quapp, William J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1998-01-01

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

  18. Time encoded radiation imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik; Kiff, Scott

    2014-10-21

    The various technologies presented herein relate to detecting nuclear material at a large stand-off distance. An imaging system is presented which can detect nuclear material by utilizing time encoded imaging relating to maximum and minimum radiation particle counts rates. The imaging system is integrated with a data acquisition system that can utilize variations in photon pulse shape to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray interactions. Modulation in the detected neutron count rates as a function of the angular orientation of the detector due to attenuation of neighboring detectors is utilized to reconstruct the neutron source distribution over 360 degrees around the imaging system. Neutrons (e.g., fast neutrons) and/or gamma-rays are incident upon scintillation material in the imager, the photons generated by the scintillation material are converted to electrical energy from which the respective neutrons/gamma rays can be determined and, accordingly, a direction to, and the location of, a radiation source identified.

  19. Radiation shielding composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Quapp, W.J.; Lessing, P.A.

    1998-07-28

    A composition is disclosed for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm{sup 3} and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile. 5 figs.

  20. Terahertz radiation mixer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanke, Michael C. (Albuquerque, NM); Allen, S. James (Santa Barbara, CA); Lee, Mark (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-05-20

    A terahertz radiation mixer comprises a heterodyned field-effect transistor (FET) having a high electron mobility heterostructure that provides a gatable two-dimensional electron gas in the channel region of the FET. The mixer can operate in either a broadband pinch-off mode or a narrowband resonant plasmon mode by changing a grating gate bias of the FET. The mixer can beat an RF signal frequency against a local oscillator frequency to generate an intermediate frequency difference signal in the microwave region. The mixer can have a low local oscillator power requirement and a large intermediate frequency bandwidth. The terahertz radiation mixer is particularly useful for terahertz applications requiring high resolution.

  1. Current Committee Membership Radiation Protection, Committee on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin

    Current Committee Membership Radiation Protection, Committee on The Committee on Radiation Protection is responsible for the establishment and continuing review of an adequate radiation protection's compliance with radiation protection regulations promulgated by state, federal, and local agencies

  2. Photon Clusters in Thermal Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aleksey Ilyin

    2014-10-30

    Within the framework of Bose-Einstein statistics, it is shown that the blackbody radiation, in addition to single photons, contains photon clusters, or coalescent photons. The probability to find a k-photon cluster versus radiation frequency and temperature is found, as well as the statistics of clusters. Spectra of photon-cluster radiation are calculated as functions of blackbody temperature. The Planck's radiation law is derived based on the existence of photon clusters. The possibility of experimental observation of photon clusters in thermal radiation is discussed.

  3. Method for microbeam radiation therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slatkin, D.N.; Dilmanian, F.A.; Spanne, P.O.

    1994-08-16

    A method is disclosed of performing radiation therapy on a patient, involving exposing a target, usually a tumor, to a therapeutic dose of high energy electromagnetic radiation, preferably X-ray radiation. The dose is in the form of at least two non-overlapping microbeams of radiation, each microbeam having a width of less than about 1 millimeter. Target tissue exposed to the microbeams receives a radiation dose during the exposure that exceeds the maximum dose that such tissue can survive. Non-target tissue between the microbeams receives a dose of radiation below the threshold amount of radiation that can be survived by the tissue, and thereby permits the non-target tissue to regenerate. The microbeams may be directed at the target from one direction, or from more than one direction in which case the microbeams overlap within the target tissue enhancing the lethal effect of the irradiation while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. No Drawings

  4. Method for microbeam radiation therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slatkin, Daniel N. (Sound Beach, NY); Dilmanian, F. Avraham (Yaphank, NY); Spanne, Per O. (Shoreham, NY)

    1994-01-01

    A method of performing radiation therapy on a patient, involving exposing a target, usually a tumor, to a therapeutic dose of high energy electromagnetic radiation, preferably X-ray radiation, in the form of at least two non-overlapping microbeams of radiation, each microbeam having a width of less than about 1 millimeter. Target tissue exposed to the microbeams receives a radiation dose during the exposure that exceeds the maximum dose that such tissue can survive. Non-target tissue between the microbeams receives a dose of radiation below the threshold amount of radiation that can be survived by the tissue, and thereby permits the non-target tissue to regenerate. The microbeams may be directed at the target from one direction, or from more than one direction in which case the microbeams overlap within the target tissue enhancing the lethal effect of the irradiation while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue.

  5. Influence of Extraterrestrial Radiation on Radiation Portal Monitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, Paul E.; Kouzes, Richard T.

    2009-06-01

    Cosmic radiation and solar flares can be a major source of background radiation at the Earth’s surface. This paper examines the relationship between extraterrestrial radiation and the detectable background in radiation portal monitors used for homeland security applications. Background radiation data from 13 radiation portal monitor facilities are examined and compared against external sources of data related to extraterrestrial radiation, including measurements at neutron monitors located at 53 cosmic-ray observatories around the Earth, four polar orbiting satellites, three geostationary satellites, ground-based geomagnetic field data from observatories around the Earth, a solar magnetic index, solar radio flux data, and sunspot activity data. Four-years (January 2003 through December 2006) of data are used in this study, which include the latter part of Solar Cycle 23 as solar activity was on the decline. The analysis shows a significant relationship between some extraterrestrial radiation and the background detected in the radiation portal monitors. A demonstrable decline is shown in the average gamma ray and neutron background at the radiation portal monitors as solar activity declined over the period of the study.

  6. CNR GRADUATION SURVEY RESULTS Fall, 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CNR GRADUATION SURVEY RESULTS Fall, 2001 Received 79 completed surveys out of 126 students who graduated in Dec, 2001 21 (27%) Have fulltime positions (9 temporary and 12 permanent) 3 (4

  7. Residential Energy Consumption Survey Results: Total Energy Consumptio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Residential Energy Consumption Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Intensities (2005) The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) is a national survey...

  8. STEP Non-Participant Survey Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    STEP Non-Participant Survey Report, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  9. UC SANTA CRUZ WATER EFFICIENCY SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    UC SANTA CRUZ WATER EFFICIENCY SURVEY FINAL REPORT December 2007 Prepared By Maddaus Water Management and UC Santa Cruz ` #12;UC Santa Cruz 2 Maddaus Water Management Water Efficiency Survey WATER EFFICIENCY SURVEY OF UC SANTA CRUZ, SANTA CRUZ, CA TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

  10. NORTHEAST PACIFIC ALBACORE OCEANOGRAPHY SURVEY, 1961

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    444 NORTHEAST PACIFIC ALBACORE OCEANOGRAPHY SURVEY, 1961 by R. W. Owen, Jr. SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC OCEANOGRAPHY SURVEY, 1961 by R, W. Owen, Jr. United States Fish and Wildlife Service Special Scientific Report PACIFIC ALBACORE OCEANOGRAPHY SURVEY, 1961 by R. W. Owen, Jr. Fishery Biologist Research Bureau

  11. NATIONAL SURVEY OF FISHING AND HUNTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NATIONAL SURVEY OF FISHING AND HUNTING #12;#12;NATIONAL SURVEY OF FISHING AND HUNTING A REPORT ON THE FIRST NATIONWIDE ^ ^ -. -- ECONOMIC SURVEY OF SPORT FISHING | Q U U AND HUNTING IN THE UNITED STATES, I, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE John L. Farley, Director Circular 44 For sale by the Superintendent

  12. Ground-based Microlensing Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew Gould; B. Scott Gaudi; David P. Bennett

    2007-04-05

    Microlensing is a proven extrasolar planet search method that has already yielded the detection of four exoplanets. These detections have changed our understanding of planet formation ``beyond the snowline'' by demonstrating that Neptune-mass planets with separations of several AU are common. Microlensing is sensitive to planets that are generally inaccessible to other methods, in particular cool planets at or beyond the snowline, very low-mass (i.e. terrestrial) planets, planets orbiting low-mass stars, free-floating planets, and even planets in external galaxies. Such planets can provide critical constraints on models of planet formation, and therefore the next generation of extrasolar planet searches should include an aggressive and well-funded microlensing component. When combined with the results from other complementary surveys, next generation microlensing surveys can yield an accurate and complete census of the frequency and properties of planets, and in particular low-mass terrestrial planets.

  13. Rural electric cooperatives IRP survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrick, C. [Garrick and Associates, Morrison, CO (United States)

    1995-11-01

    This report summarizes the integrated resource planning (IRP) practices of US rural electric cooperatives and the IRP policies which influence these practices. It was prepared by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and its subcontractor Garrick and Associates to assist the US Department of Energy (DOE) in satisfying the reporting requirements of Title 1, Subtitle B, Section 111(e)(3) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), which states: (e) Report--Not later than 2 years after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary (of the US Department of Energy) shall transmit a report to the President and to the Congress containing--(the findings from several surveys and evaluations, including:); (3) a survey of practices and policies under which electric cooperatives prepare IRPs, submit such plans to REA, and the extent to which such integrated resource planning is reflected in rates charged to customers.

  14. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    % 7% 6.5 5.5 6.5 68.5 30,100 10% 5% 51% 34% 73% 17% 1% * 3% 7% 7.0 7.2 10.0 * ANCASTER AREA CITYdatamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING - UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO PREPARED BY 85 ANCASTER AREA CITY OF HAMILTON Mohawk Rd. Main St. Carluke Rd. Governors Rd. Garner

  15. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    ,213,000 38% 13% 35% 14% 60% 14% 16% 1% 7% 2% 5.7 4.1 6.6 30.0 TRIPS MADE TO TTS AREA 3,168,200 23.5% 51% 22datamanagementgroup 2011 SURVEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING - UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO PREPARED BY 5 GREATER TORONTO HAMILTON AREA Durham Region Peel Region City of Hamilton City

  16. Analysis of Contribution from Edge Radiation to Optical Diffraction Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Liu, P. Evtushenko, A. Freyberger, C. Liu, A.H. Lumpkin

    2009-05-01

    Beam size measurement with near-field optical diffraction radiation (ODR) has been carried out successfully at CEBAF. The ODR station is installed on the Hall-A beam line after eight bending magnets. The ODR images were affected by an unexpected radiation. Some calculations for analyzing the source of the radiation will be presented. Furthermore, two schemes will be proposed to alleviate the contamination.

  17. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruce Margon

    1998-08-19

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey is an ambitious, multi-institutional project to create a huge digital imaging and spectroscopic data bank of 25% of the celestial sphere, approximately 10,000 deg^2 centred on the north galactic polar cap. The photometric atlas will be in 5 specially-chosen colours, covering the pi ster of the Survey area to a limiting magnitude of r~23.1, on 0.4" pixels, resulting in a 1 Tpixel map. This data base will be automatically analysed to catalog the photometric and astrometric properties of 10^8 stellar images, 10^8 galaxies, and 10^6 colour-selected QSO candidates; the galaxy data will in addition include detailed morphological data. The photometric data are used to autonomously and homogeneously select objects for the spectroscopic survey, which will include spectra of 10^6 galaxies, 10^5 QSOs, and 10^5 unusual stars. Although the project was originally motivated by the desire to study Large Scale Structure, we anticipate that these data will impact virtually every field of astronomy, from Earth-crossing asteroids to QSOs at z>6. In particular, the ~12 TByte multi-colour, precision calibrated imaging archive should be a world resource for many decades of the next century.

  18. Solar radiation intensity calculations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Randolph Steven

    1978-01-01

    , radiation per unit area per unit time, on a flat-plate collector is given by: I = I cos B (2. 1a) where I is the solar constant. insolation received at one astro- nomical unit from the sun. Since clear sky conditions are assumed I o w i 1 1 b e a.... INSOLATION EQUATIONS TABLE OF CONTENTS Page III. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS REFERENCES APPENDIX VITA 25 47 48 52 Vi LIST OF TABLES TABLE I. Optimal Inclination for Ap=O, No Checks for Ip &0 and a Time Independent Solar Constant. II. Optimal...

  19. Radiation imaging apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anger, H.O.; Martin, D.C.; Lampton, M.L.

    1983-07-26

    A radiation imaging system using a charge multiplier and a position sensitive anode in the form of periodically arranged sets of interconnected anode regions for detecting the position of the centroid of a charge cloud arriving thereat from the charge multiplier. Various forms of improved position sensitive anodes having single plane electrode connections are disclosed. Various analog and digital signal processing systems are disclosed, including systems which use the fast response of microchannel plates, anodes and preamps to perform scintillation pulse height analysis digitally. 15 figs.

  20. Radiation imaging apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anger, Hal O. (Berkeley, CA); Martin, Donn C. (Berkeley, CA); Lampton, Michael L. (Berkeley, CA)

    1983-01-01

    A radiation imaging system using a charge multiplier and a position sensitive anode in the form of periodically arranged sets of interconnected anode regions for detecting the position of the centroid of a charge cloud arriving thereat from the charge multiplier. Various forms of improved position sensitive anodes having single plane electrode connections are disclosed. Various analog and digital signal processing systems are disclosed, including systems which use the fast response of microchannel plates, anodes and preamps to perform scintillation pulse height analysis digitally.

  1. RADIATION LABORATO DISCLAIMER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * Impacts on Global Technology OUTSIDE FRONT7a.R : . . . RADIATION

  2. Radiative Processes Working Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * Impacts on GlobalRachel RuggirelloRadiative Influences onmeeting,

  3. Radiation.cdr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProton Delivery andInnovationsRSSProtectionRadiation

  4. Radiation Control Program and Radiation Control Act (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute authorizes the state to implement a regulatory program for sources of radiation, and contains rules for the Department, licensing and registration, and taxation of radioactive materials.

  5. Thermal radiation, radiation force and dynamics of a polarizable particle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. V. Dedkov; A. A. Kyasov

    2015-08-26

    We discuss basic expressions and interrelations between various physical quantities describing the fluctuation-electromagnetic interaction of a small polarizable particle during relativistic motion relative to the blackbody radiation, namely tangential radiation force, rate of heating, intensity of thermal radiation/absorption, the change of the rest mass of a particle, and acceleration. We obtain an explicit formula for the frictional force acting on the particle in its rest frame and discuss its connection with the particle acceleration and the tangential force given in the reference frame of background radiation. The criticism of our previous results in recent paper by A. I. Volokitin (Phys. Rev. A81, 2015, 032505) is refuted.

  6. Radiological surveys of properties in the Middlesex, New Jersey area. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leggett, R W; Haywood, F.F. Cottrell, W.D.

    1981-03-01

    Results of the radiological surveys conducted at three properties in the Middlesex, New Jersey area as well as one additional location downstream from the Middlesex Sampling Plant (Willow Lake), are presented. The survey revealed that the yard around the church rectory on Harris Avenue is contaminated with a /sup 226/Ra-bearing material, probably pitchblende ore from the former Middlesex Sampling Plant. The elevated /sup 226/Ra concentrations around and, to a lesser extent, underneath the rectory are leading to elevated /sup 222/Rn concentrations in air in the rectory and elevated alpha contamination levels (from radon daughters) on surfaces inside the rectory. External gamma radiation levels in the rectory yard are well above background levels, and beta-gamma dose rates at many points in the yard are above federal guidelines for the release of property for unrestricted use. The radiological survey of a parking lot at the Union Carbide plant in Bound Brook, New Jersey revealed that a nearly circular region of 50-ft diam in the lot showed above-background external gamma radiation levels. Two isolated spots within this region showed concentrations of uranium in soil above the licensable level stated in 10 CFR 40. Soil samples taken in the area of elevated gamma radiation levels generally showed nearly equal activities of /sup 226/Ra and /sup 238/U. The survey at the residences on William Street in Piscataway, revealed that the front yeard is generally contaminated from near the surface to a depth of 1.5 to 2.5 ft with /sup 226/Ra-bearing material, possibly pitchblende ore. The remainder of the yard shows scattered contaminaion. External gamma radiation levels inside the house are above the background level near some outside walls.

  7. DOE 2010 occupational radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE.* The DOE 2010 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with DOE Part 835 dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. The occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site over the past 5 years.

  8. Radiation Embrittlement Archive Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klasky, Hilda B; Bass, Bennett Richard; Williams, Paul T; Phillips, Rick; Erickson, Marjorie A; Kirk, Mark T; Stevens, Gary L

    2013-01-01

    The Radiation Embrittlement Archive Project (REAP), which is being conducted by the Probabilistic Integrity Safety Assessment (PISA) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under funding from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission s (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, aims to provide an archival source of information about the effect of neutron radiation on the properties of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. Specifically, this project is an effort to create an Internet-accessible RPV steel embrittlement database. The project s website, https://reap.ornl.gov, provides information in two forms: (1) a document archive with surveillance capsule(s) reports and related technical reports, in PDF format, for the 104 commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States, with similar reports from other countries; and (2) a relational database archive with detailed information extracted from the reports. The REAP project focuses on data collected from surveillance capsule programs for light-water moderated, nuclear power reactor vessels operated in the United States, including data on Charpy V-notch energy testing results, tensile properties, composition, exposure temperatures, neutron flux (rate of irradiation damage), and fluence, (Fast Neutron Fluence a cumulative measure of irradiation for E>1 MeV). Additionally, REAP contains data from surveillance programs conducted in other countries. REAP is presently being extended to focus on embrittlement data analysis, as well. This paper summarizes the current status of the REAP database and highlights opportunities to access the data and to participate in the project.

  9. Helicopter magnetic survey conducted to locate wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veloski, G.A.; Hammack, R.W.; Stamp, V.; Hall, R.; Colina, K.

    2008-07-01

    A helicopter magnetic survey was conducted in August 2007 over 15.6 sq mi at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3’s (NPR-3) Teapot Dome Field near Casper, Wyoming. The survey’s purpose was to accurately locate wells drilled there during more than 90 years of continuous oilfield operation. The survey was conducted at low altitude and with closely spaced flight lines to improve the detection of wells with weak magnetic response and to increase the resolution of closely spaced wells. The survey was in preparation for a planned CO2 flood for EOR, which requires a complete well inventory with accurate locations for all existing wells. The magnetic survey was intended to locate wells missing from the well database and to provide accurate locations for all wells. The ability of the helicopter magnetic survey to accurately locate wells was accomplished by comparing airborne well picks with well locations from an intense ground search of a small test area.

  10. Electromagnetic radiation by gravitating bodies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iwo Bialynicki-Birula; Zofia Bialynicka-Birula

    2008-05-06

    Gravitating bodies in motion, regardless of their constitution, always produce electromagnetic radiation in the form of photon pairs. This phenomenon is an analog of the radiation caused by the motion of dielectric (or magnetic) bodies. It is a member of a wide class of phenomena named dynamical Casimir effects, and it may be viewed as the squeezing of the electromagnetic vacuum. Production of photon pairs is a purely quantum-mechanical effect. Unfortunately, as we show, the emitted radiation is extremely weak as compared to radiation produced by other mechanisms.

  11. Quality Services: Radiation (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations establish standards for protection against ionizing radiation resulting from the disposal and discharge of radioactive material to the environment. The regulations apply to any...

  12. Radiation Shielding and Radiological Protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shultis, J. Kenneth

    Radiation Shielding and Radiological Protection J. Kenneth Shultis Richard E. Faw Department Shielding and Radiological Protection .. Example Calculations for Distributed Sources

  13. Scintillator Waveguide For Sensing Radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bliss, Mary (West Richland, WA); Craig, Richard A. (West Richland, WA); Reeder; Paul L. (Richland, WA)

    2003-04-22

    The present invention is an apparatus for detecting ionizing radiation, having: a waveguide having a first end and a second end, the waveguide formed of a scintillator material wherein the therapeutic ionizing radiation isotropically generates scintillation light signals within the waveguide. This apparatus provides a measure of radiation dose. The apparatus may be modified to permit making a measure of location of radiation dose. Specifically, the scintillation material is segmented into a plurality of segments; and a connecting cable for each of the plurality of segments is used for conducting scintillation signals to a scintillation detector.

  14. An aerial radiological survey of the Fernald Environmental Management Project and surrounding area, Fernald, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phoenix, K.A.

    1997-04-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted from May 17--22, 1994, over a 36 square mile (93 square kilometer) area centered on the Fernald Environmental Management Project located in Fernald, Ohio. The purpose of the survey was to detect anomalous gamma radiation in the environment surrounding the plant. The survey was conducted at a nominal altitude of 150 feet (46 meters) with a line spacing of 250 feet (76 meters). A contour map of the terrestrial gamma exposure rate extrapolated to 1 meter (3.3 feet) above ground was prepared and overlaid on an aerial photograph of the area. Analysis of the data for man made sources showed five sites within the boundaries of the Fernald Environmental Management Project having elevated readings. The exposure rates outside the plant boundary were typical of naturally occurring background radiation. Soil samples and pressurized ion chamber measurements were obtained at four locations within the survey boundaries to supplement the aerial data. It was concluded that although the radionuclides identified in the high-exposure-rate areas are naturally occurring, the levels encountered are greatly enhanced due to industrial activities at the plant.

  15. Results of the radiological survey at 142 West Central Avenue, Maywood, New Jersey (MJ041)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, R.D.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally /sup 232/Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 142 West Central Avenue, Maywood, New Jersey (MJ041), was conducted during 1988. Results of the survey indicated scattered radiation or ''shine'' from a storage pile, located off the property, containing residual radioactive material. Lead-shielded measurements showed radioactivity in the range of normal background for the northern New Jersey area. Radiological assessments of soil samples from the site demonstrate no radionuclide concentrations in excess of DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. 4 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. ORISE: Radiation Emergency Medicine - Continuing Medical Education Course

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEY UNIVERSEHow ORISE is Making aDose Estimates and OtherRadiation

  17. RESEARCH PROTOCOL SAFETY SURVEY PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR (PI)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsai, Istvan

    NO e. Controlled Substances YES NO f. Ionizing Radiation: (1) Radioactive materials YES NO (2) Radiation generating equipment YES NO g. Nonionizing Radiation: (1) Ultraviolet Light YES NO (2) Lasers (class 3b or class 4) YES NO (3) Radiofrequency or microwave sources YES NO If the answer to any

  18. Site survey method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oldham, J.G.; Spencer, C.R.; Begley, C.L.; Meyer, H.R.

    1991-06-18

    The disclosure of the invention is directed to a site survey ground vehicle based apparatus and method for automatically detecting source materials, such as radioactivity, marking the location of the source materials, such as with paint, and mapping the location of the source materials on a site. The apparatus of the invention is also useful for collecting and analyzing samples. The apparatus includes a ground vehicle, detectors mounted at the front of the ground vehicle, and individual detector supports which follow somewhat irregular terrain to allow consistent and accurate detection, and autolocation equipment. 19 figures.

  19. Geodetic Survey | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky: EnergyGateway EditOpenTechniques Jump2004)2005) |Survey

  20. Telluric Survey | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJ Automation Jump to:Information 8) JumpTellurianTelluric Survey

  1. The LOFAR Multifrequency Snapshot Sky Survey (MSSS) I. Survey description and first results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heald, G H; Orrú, E; Breton, R P; Carbone, D; Ferrari, C; Hardcastle, M J; Jurusik, W; Macario, G; Mulcahy, D; Rafferty, D; Asgekar, A; Brentjens, M; Fallows, R A; Frieswijk, W; Toribio, M C; Adebahr, B; Arts, M; Bell, M R; Bonafede, A; Bray, J; Broderick, J; Cantwell, T; Carroll, P; Cendes, Y; Clarke, A O; Croston, J; Daiboo, S; de Gasperin, F; Gregson, J; Harwood, J; Hassall, T; Heesen, V; Horneffer, A; van der Horst, A J; Iacobelli, M; Jeli?, V; Jones, D; Kant, D; Kokotanekov, G; Martin, P; McKean, J P; Morabito, L K; Nikiel-Wroczy?ski, B; Offringa, A; Pandey, V N; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pietka, M; Pratley, L; Riseley, C; Rowlinson, A; Sabater, J; Scaife, A M M; Scheers, L H A; Sendlinger, K; Shulevski, A; Sipior, M; Sobey, C; Stewart, A J; Stroe, A; Swinbank, J; Tasse, C; Trüstedt, J; Varenius, E; van Velzen, S; Vilchez, N; van Weeren, R J; Wijnholds, S; Williams, W L; de Bruyn, A G; Nijboer, R; Wise, M; Alexov, A; Anderson, J; Avruch, I M; Beck, R; Bell, M E; van Bemmel, I; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Breitling, F; Brouw, W N; Brüggen, M; Butcher, H R; Ciardi, B; Conway, J E; de Geus, E; de Jong, A; de Vos, M; Deller, A; Dettmar, R J; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Engels, D; Falcke, H; Fender, R; Garrett, M A; Grießmeier, J; Gunst, A W; Hamaker, J P; Hessels, J W T; Hoeft, M; Hörandel, J; Holties, H A; Intema, H; Jackson, N J; Jütte, E; Karastergiou, A; Klijn, W F A; Kondratiev, V I; Koopmans, L V E; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; Law, C; van Leeuwen, J; Loose, M; Maat, P; Markoff, S; McFadden, R; McKay-Bukowski, D; Mevius, M; Miller-Jones, J C A; Morganti, R; Munk, H; Nelles, A; Noordam, J E; Norden, M J; Paas, H; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Renting, A; Röttgering, H; Schoenmakers, A; Schwarz, D; Sluman, J; Smirnov, O; Stappers, B W; Steinmetz, M; Tagger, M; Tang, Y; ter Veen, S; Thoudam, S; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; Vogt, C; Wijers, R A M J; Wucknitz, O; Yatawatta, S; Zarka, P

    2015-01-01

    We present the Multifrequency Snapshot Sky Survey (MSSS), the first northern-sky LOFAR imaging survey. In this introductory paper, we first describe in detail the motivation and design of the survey. Compared to previous radio surveys, MSSS is exceptional due to its intrinsic multifrequency nature providing information about the spectral properties of the detected sources over more than two octaves (from 30 to 160 MHz). The broadband frequency coverage, together with the fast survey speed generated by LOFAR's multibeaming capabilities, make MSSS the first survey of the sort anticipated to be carried out with the forthcoming Square Kilometre Array (SKA). Two of the sixteen frequency bands included in the survey were chosen to exactly overlap the frequency coverage of large-area Very Large Array (VLA) and Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) surveys at 74 MHz and 151 MHz respectively. The survey performance is illustrated within the "MSSS Verification Field" (MVF), a region of 100 square degrees centered at J...

  2. St. Louis Sites Fact Sheet RADIATION BASICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    , radiation is described as either non-ionizing (low energy) or ionizing (high energy). Non-ionizing radiation or concrete. WHAT IS DOSE? HOW IS RADIATION MEASURED? The dose is the quantity of radiation or energy received dose and takes into account the type of radiation absorbed into the body and the likelihood of damage

  3. UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO RADIATION PROTECTION SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Hue Sun

    UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO RADIATION PROTECTION SERVICE MEMORANDUM SUBJECT: SAFE USE OF RADIOGRAPHY, visitors, or experimental animals, plants, or cell lines, the Radiation Protection Service has a permit to the Radiation Protection Service. Sandu Sonoc Radiation Safety Officer 416-978-2028 Hector Rocca Radiation

  4. THE UNIVERSITY OF UTAH RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE UNIVERSITY OF UTAH RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAM The use of radiation sources at the University. The Radiation Safety Policy Manual contains the policies and general procedures for radiation protection of Utah entails both legal and moral obligations to provide training on the nature of radiation sources

  5. RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL 2014 RICE UNIVERSITY 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natelson, Douglas

    microscopes. Notify the RSO of any new radiation sources. Notify the RSO if any radiation sources with radioactive materials must attend formal radiation safety training provided by EHS. #12;RADIATION SAFETY with information concerning risk. 4. Provide suggestions for reducing exposure. 5. Monitor your radiation dose wit

  6. Fostering a culture of interprofessional education for radiation therapy and medical dosimetry students

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lavender, Charlotte, E-mail: charlavender@gmail.com; Miller, Seth; Church, Jessica; Chen, Ronald C.; Muresan, Petronella A.; Adams, Robert D.

    2014-04-01

    A less-studied aspect of radiation therapy and medical dosimetry education is experiential learning through attendance at interprofessional conferences. University of North Carolina radiation therapy and medical dosimetry students regularly attended morning conferences and daily pretreatment peer review, including approximately 145 hours of direct interaction with medical attending physicians and residents, medical physicists, and other faculty. We herein assessed the effect of their participation in these interprofessional conferences on knowledge and communication. The students who graduated from our radiation therapy and medical dosimetry programs who were exposed to the interprofessional education initiative were compared with those who graduated in the previous years. The groups were compared with regard to their knowledge (as assessed by grades on end-of-training examinations) and team communication (assessed via survey). The results for the 2 groups were compared via exact tests. There was a trend for the examination scores for the 2012 cohort to be higher than for the 2007 to 2011 groups. Survey results suggested that students who attended the interprofessional education sessions were more comfortable speaking with attending physicians, residents, physicists, and faculty compared with earlier students who did not attend these educational sessions. Interprofessional education, particularly vertical integration, appears to provide an enhanced educational experience both in regard to knowledge (per the examination scores) and in building a sense of communication (via the survey results). Integration of interprofessional education into radiation therapy and medical dosimetry educational programs may represent an opportunity to enrich the learning experience in multiple ways and merits further study.

  7. In situ radiation measurements at the former Soviet Nuclear Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tipton, W.J.

    1996-06-01

    A team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory conducted a series of in situ radiological measurements at the former Soviet Nuclear Test Site near Semipalatinsk, Kazakhstan, during the period of July 21-30, 1994. The survey team measured the terrestrial gamma radiation at selected areas on the site to determine the levels of natural and man-made radiation. The survey was part of a cooperative effort between the United States team and teams of radiation scientists from the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan and the V.G. Khlopin Radium Institute in St. Petersburg, Russia. In addition to in situ radiation measurements made by the United States and Russian teams, soil samples were collected and analyzed by the Russian and Kazakhstani teams. All teams conducted their measurements at ten locations within the test site. The United States team also made a number of additional measurements to locate and verify the positions of three potential fallout plumes containing plutonium contamination from nonnuclear tests. In addition, the United States team made several measurements in Kurchatov City, the housing area used by personnel and their families who work(ed) at the test sites. Comparisons between the United States and Russian in situ measurements and the soil sample results are presented as well as comparisons with a Soviet aerial survey conducted in 1990-1991. The agreement between the different types of measurements made by all three countries was quite good.

  8. Review Article RADIATION SHIELDING TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shultis, J. Kenneth

    Review Article RADIATION SHIELDING TECHNOLOGY J. Kenneth Shultis and Richard E. Faw* Abstract Physics Society INTRODUCTION THIS IS a review of the technology of shielding against the effects to the review. The first treats the evolution of radiation-shielding technology from the beginning of the 20th

  9. RADIATION AND CLOUD MONITORING STATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reeves, Geoffrey D.

    how they affect the energy balance between incoming solar radiation and heat re-radiated from Earth's surface back into space -- is crucial to improving the general circulation models used for climate students. #12;A MONTHLY PUBLICATION OF THE PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICE OF LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY LOS

  10. Pacific Northwest Solar Radiation Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    Pacific Northwest Solar Radiation Data UO SOLAR MONITORING LAB Physics Department -- Solar Energy Center 1274 University of Oregon Eugene, Oregon 97403-1274 April 1, 1999 #12;Hourly solar radiation data can be obtained from the University of Oregon Solar Moni- toring Laboratory after obtaining permission

  11. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN HUMAN POPULATIONS FOLLOWING ACUTE EXPOSURE: NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS AND MEDICAL RADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    2010-01-01

    carcinogenic risk of low-dose, low-LET radiation is subjectcan be made for low-dose, low- LET radiation. Nevertheless,for radiation carcino­ Extrapolation to low doses. Radiation

  12. Position Sensitive Radiation Detector Integrated with an FPGA for Radiation Tolerant Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaMeres, Brock J.

    Position Sensitive Radiation Detector Integrated with an FPGA for Radiation Tolerant Computing radiation sensor was modeled, developed and fabricated then interfaced with a field programmable gate array (FPGA) to create a radiation hardened computing platform. The system exploits environmental information

  13. The 2006 Transportation Tomorrow Survey (TTS) is the largest and most comprehensive travel survey ever conducted in Ontario or perhaps anywhere in North America. The 2006 survey is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    travel survey ever conducted in Ontario or perhaps anywhere in North America. The 2006 survey, expanding the survey area to cover a large part of south central Ontario. The resulting survey now involved ministry. Based on Census information, the survey area covered 60% of Ontario's total population

  14. Surgeons' Knowledge and Practices Regarding the Role of Radiation Therapy in Breast Cancer Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Jessica; Griffith, Kent A.; Hawley, Sarah T.; Zikmund-Fisher, Brian J.; Janz, Nancy K.; Sabel, Michael S.; Katz, Steven J.; Jagsi, Reshma

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Population-based studies suggest underuse of radiation therapy, especially after mastectomy. Because radiation oncology is a referral-based specialty, knowledge and attitudes of upstream providers, specifically surgeons, may influence patients' decisions regarding radiation, including whether it is even considered. Therefore, we sought to evaluate surgeons' knowledge of pertinent risk information, their patterns of referral, and the correlates of surgeon knowledge and referral in specific breast cancer scenarios. Methods and Materials: We surveyed a national sample of 750 surgeons, with a 67% response rate. We analyzed responses from those who had seen at least 1 breast cancer patient in the past year (n=403), using logistic regression models to identify correlates of knowledge and appropriate referral. Results: Overall, 87% of respondents were general surgeons, and 64% saw >10 breast cancer patients in the previous year. In a scenario involving a 45-year-old undergoing lumpectomy, only 45% correctly estimated the risk of locoregional recurrence without radiation therapy, but 97% would refer to radiation oncology. In a patient with 2 of 20 nodes involved after mastectomy, 30% would neither refer to radiation oncology nor provide accurate information to make radiation decisions. In a patient with 4 of 20 nodes involved after mastectomy, 9% would not refer to radiation oncology. Fewer than half knew that the Oxford meta-analysis revealed a survival benefit from radiation therapy after lumpectomy (45%) or mastectomy (32%). Only 16% passed a 7-item knowledge test; female and more-experienced surgeons were more likely to pass. Factors significantly associated with appropriate referral to radiation oncology included breast cancer volume, tumor board participation, and knowledge. Conclusions: Many surgeons have inadequate knowledge regarding the role of radiation in breast cancer management, especially after mastectomy. Targeted educational interventions may improve the quality of care.

  15. Wellbore inertial directional surveying system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andreas, R.D.; Heck, G.M.; Kohler, S.M.; Watts, A.C.

    1982-09-08

    A wellbore inertial directional surveying system for providing a complete directional survey of an oil or gas well borehole to determine the displacement in all three directions of the borehole path relative to the well head at the surface. The information generated by the present invention is especially useful when numerous wells are drilled to different geographical targets from a single offshore platform. Accurate knowledge of the path of the borehole allows proper well spacing and provides assurance that target formations are reached. The tool is lowered down into a borehole on an electrical cable. A computer positioned on the surface communicates with the tool via the cable. The tool contains a sensor block which is supported on a single gimbal, the rotation axis of which is aligned with the cylinder axis of the tool and, correspondingly, the borehole. The gyroscope measurement of the sensor block rotation is used in a null-seeking servo loop which essentially prevents rotation of the sensor block about the gimbal axis. Angular rates of the sensor block about axes which are perpendicular to te gimbal axis are measured by gyroscopes in a manner similar to a strapped-down arrangement. Three accelerometers provide acceleration information as the tool is lowered within the borehole. The uphole computer derives position information based upon acceleration information and angular rate information. Kalman estimation techniques are used to compensate for system errors. 25 figures.

  16. Wellbore inertial directional surveying system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andreas, Ronald D. (Albuquerque, NM); Heck, G. Michael (Albuquerque, NM); Kohler, Stewart M. (Albuquerque, NM); Watts, Alfred C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1991-01-01

    A wellbore inertial directional surveying system for providing a complete directional survey of an oil or gas well borehole to determine the displacement in all three directions of the borehole path relative to the well head at the surface. The information generated by the present invention is especially useful when numerous wells are drilled to different geographical targets from a single off-shore platform. Accurate knowledge of the path of the borehole allows proper well spacing and provides assurance that target formations are reached. The tool is lowered down into a borehole on the electrical cable. A computer positioned on the surface communicates with the tool via the cable. The tool contains a sensor block which is supported on a single gimbal, the rotation axis of which is aligned with the cylinder axis of the tool and, correspondingly, the borehole. The gyroscope measurement of the sensor block rotation is used in a null-seeking servo loop which essentially prevents rotation of the sensor block aboutthe gimbal axis. Angular rates of the sensor block about axes which are perpendicular to the gimbal axis are measured by gyroscopes in a manner similar to a strapped-down arrangement. Three accelerometers provide acceleration information as the tool is lowered within the borehole. The uphole computer derives position information based upon acceleration information and anular rate information. Kalman estimation techniques are used to compensate for system errors.

  17. Cosmological Surveys at Submillimetre Wavelengths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David H. Hughes

    2000-03-28

    One of the major goals of observational cosmology is to acquire empirical data that has the diagnostic power to develop the theoretical modelling of the high-redshift universe, ultimately leading to an accurate understanding of the processes by which galaxies and clusters form and subsequently evolve. New bolometer arrays operating on the world's largest submillimetre telescopes now offer a unique view of the high-redshift universe through unbiassed surveys with unprecedented sensitivity. For brevity, except when there is a need to be more specific, the FIR to millimetre wavelength regime (100um 1, and determine their contribution to the submm extragalactic background. The field of observational cosmology will be revolutionized during the course of the next 10 years due to the variety of powerful new ground-based, airborne and satellite facilities, particularly those operating at FIR to millimetre wavelengths. This review summarises the results from the recent blank-field submm surveys, and describes the future observations that will provide accurate source-counts over wider ranges of wavelength and flux-density, constrain the spectral energy distributions of the submm-selected galaxies and accurately constrain the redshift distribution and submm luminosity function by removing the current ambiguities in the optical, IR and radio counterparts.

  18. STATE of the STATE Survey State of the State SurveyState of the State Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riley, Shawn J.

    8White 8.3 9.8 Black 5.7 12.4 Democrat 2.4 15.4 Republican 12.2 2.8 Detroit 3.9 9.2 Southeast Michigan (excluding Detroit) 9.8 10.8 #12;STATE of the STATE Survey Percent of Michigan Residents Who Rate.3 Black 33.5 12.8 53.7 Democrat 14.6 15.8 69.7 Republican 34.1 22.3 43.6 Detroit 32 4 14 0 53 7Detroit 32

  19. Meeting Report--NASA Radiation Biomarker Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Straume, Tore

    2008-01-01

    analysis of low–dose radiation -associated changes incellular responses to low-dose radiation using genomic gene-cellular responses to low-dose radiation and to reduce the

  20. Pipe Explorer{trademark} surveying system. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1999-06-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Chicago Operations Office and the DOE`s Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) developed a Large Scale Demonstration Project (LSDP) at the Chicago Pile-5 Research Reactor (CP-5) at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL). The objective of the LSDP is to demonstrate potentially beneficial decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) technologies in comparison with current baseline technologies. The Pipe Explorer{trademark} system was developed by Science and Engineering Associates, Inc. (SEA), Albuquerque, NM as a deployment method for transporting a variety of survey tools into pipes and ducts. Tools available for use with the system include alpha, beta and gamma radiation detectors; video cameras; and pipe locator beacons. Different versions of this technology have been demonstrated at three other sites; results of these demonstrations are provided in an earlier Innovative Technology Summary Report. As part of a D and D project, characterization radiological contamination inside piping systems is necessary before pipes can be recycled, remediated or disposed. This is usually done manually by surveying over the outside of the piping only, with limited effectiveness and risk of worker exposure. The pipe must be accessible to workers, and embedded pipes in concrete or in the ground would have to be excavated at high cost and risk of exposure to workers. The advantage of the Pipe Explorer is its ability to perform in-situ characterization of pipe internals.

  1. PRELIMINARY SURVEY OF WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC CORPORATION EAST...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    in discussions during the survey, the area utilized was apparently cleaned, and tools and equipment were decontaminated and subsequently sealed in drums and shipped to...

  2. Geothermal resistivity resource evaluation survey Waunita Hot...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal resistivity resource evaluation survey Waunita Hot Springs project, Gunnison County, Colorado Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report:...

  3. 2010 Texas Jurisdiction Energy Code Adoption Survey 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    Deer Park 2006 Del Rio 2003 Denton 2006 Desoto 2003 Devine 2003 Duncanville 2006 Eagle Pass 2009 Edinburg 2006 El Paso 2009 Euless 2003 ESL-TR-10-06-01 2010 Texas Jurisdiction Energy Code Adoption Survey 2 ESL Survey of Texas Building Codes... Lubbock 2000 Lufkin None New Braunfels 2006 Mansfield 2006 McAllen 2006 McKinney 2006 Mesquite 2006 Midland 2009 Mission None ESL-TR-10-06-01 2010 Texas Jurisdiction Energy Code Adoption Survey 3 ESL Survey of Texas Building Codes ? Completed...

  4. SURVEY OF THE FISHERIES FORMER JAPANESE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Survey 2 Part I FIELD SUKVETS BY ISLAND GROUPS 5 I. THE ;.:arskall islands RALIK CHAIN 5 A. Eniwetok

  5. Results of the radiological survey at 4 Hancock Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ060)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, R.D.; Carier, R.F.; Floyd, L.M.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-09-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally {sup 232}Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 4 Hancock Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ060), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Gamma logging results found during this survey and during a previous survey conducted by Bechtel National, Incorporated, strongly indicated radionuclide concentrations in subsurface soil in excess of DOE remedial action criteria. This finding, coupled with the fact that adjacent properties have been found to be contaminated and that Lodi Brook apparently flows under the property, suggests that it be considered for inclusion in the DOE remedial action program. 5 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Radiation-induced lung injury

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosiello, R.A.; Merrill, W.W. )

    1990-03-01

    The use of radiation therapy is limited by the occurrence of the potentially fatal clinical syndromes of radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. Radiation pneumonitis usually becomes clinically apparent from 2 to 6 months after completion of radiation therapy. It is characterized by fever, cough, dyspnea, and alveolar infiltrates on chest roentgenogram and may be difficult to differentiate from infection or recurrent malignancy. The pathogenesis is uncertain, but appears to involve both direct lung tissue toxicity and an inflammatory response. The syndrome may resolve spontaneously or may progress to respiratory failure. Corticosteroids may be effective therapy if started early in the course of the disease. The time course for the development of radiation fibrosis is later than that for radiation pneumonitis. It is usually present by 1 year following irradiation, but may not become clinically apparent until 2 years after radiation therapy. It is characterized by the insidious onset of dyspnea on exertion. It most often is mild, but can progress to chronic respiratory failure. There is no known successful treatment for this condition. 51 references.

  7. Radiative Gaugino Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glennys R. Farrar; Antonio Masiero

    1995-01-12

    We investigate the possibility that gauginos are massless at tree level and that the U(1) R-invariance is broken spontaneously by Higgs vevs, like the chiral symmetry of quarks in the standard model, or else explicitly by dimension 2 or 3 SUSY-breaking terms in the low energy effective Lagrangian. Gluino and lightest neutralino masses then depend on only a few parameters. For a SUSY-breaking scale <~ 400 GeV, the gluino and lightest neutralino have masses typically in the range 1/10 ~ 2 1/2 GeV. On the other hand, for a SUSY-breaking scale several TeV or larger, radiative contributions can yield gluino and lightest neutralino masses of O(50-300) GeV and O(10-30) GeV, respectively. As long as the Higgs vev is the only source of R-invariance breaking, or if SUSY breaking only appears in dimension 2 terms in the effective Lagrangian, the gluino is generically the lightest SUSY particle, modifying the usual phenomenology in interesting ways.

  8. Radiation detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Riedel, Richard A. (Knoxville, TN); Wintenberg, Alan L. (Knoxville, TN); Clonts, Lloyd G. (Knoxville, TN); Cooper, Ronald G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-02-14

    A preamplifier circuit for processing a signal provided by a radiation detector includes a transimpedance amplifier coupled to receive a current signal from a detector and generate a voltage signal at its output. A second amplification stage has an input coupled to an output of the transimpedance amplifier for providing an amplified voltage signal. Detector electronics include a preamplifier circuit having a first and second transimpedance amplifier coupled to receive a current signal from a first and second location on a detector, respectively, and generate a first and second voltage signal at respective outputs. A second amplification stage has an input coupled to an output of the transimpedance amplifiers for amplifying the first and said second voltage signals to provide first and second amplified voltage signals. A differential output stage is coupled to the second amplification stage for receiving the first and second amplified voltage signals and providing a pair of outputs from each of the first and second amplified voltage signals. Read out circuitry has an input coupled to receive both of the pair of outputs, the read out circuitry having structure for processing each of the pair of outputs, and providing a single digital output having a time-stamp therefrom.

  9. Massive Variability Surveys from Venezuela

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cesar Briceno

    2003-04-03

    At the Venezuela National Astronomical Observatory we are carrying out variability surveys spanning many hundreds of square degrees near the celestial equator, using an 8k x 8k CCD Mosaic Camera optimized for drift-scanning on a 1m Schmidt telescope. Among the initial efforts was a project to obtain the first moderately deep, homogeneous sample of young stars over an area of ~180sqr.deg. encompassing the entire Orion OB1 association, one of the nearest and most active regions of star formation. The results show that variability is a powerful technique to identify pre-main sequence populations, specially in sparse areas devoid of gas and dust. We are currently developing a massive database, equipped with web-based data mining tools, that will make our data and results available to the astronomical community.

  10. Innovative financing survey: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, R.L.

    1986-06-06

    This report represents the current knowledge and utilization of Innovative Financing techniques of Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) subgrantees, a sample of Institutional Conservation Program (ICP) grantees, Public Service Commissions (PSC) and selected utilities broadly distributed in the country. The survey inquired essentially about their organizational use and familiarity with the following innovative financing methods: Direct Loan, Loan Interest Reduction, Lease, Lease Purchase, Shared Savings, Energy Service Contracts, Conservation Incentives and Guaranteed Cash Flow. Whatever their characteristics, urban or rural, schools or hospitals, gas and electric utilities of differing ownership types, large or small states, respondents indicated a marginal awareness and utilization of the eight major financing methods. Even though their awareness and use is uneven with respect to their characteristics, certain trends emerge which display an overall lack of application of most of these financing techniques to enhance the program use of grant funds.

  11. 10 CFR 835- Occupational Radiation Protection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The rules in this part establish radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of DOE activities.

  12. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1974 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Seventh Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for AEC & AEC Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and its contractor employees during 1974.

  13. Metamaterials - new opportunity in manipulating terahertz radiation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Metamaterials - new opportunity in manipulating terahertz radiation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Metamaterials - new opportunity in manipulating terahertz radiation...

  14. Radiation-thermoacoustic microscopy of condensed media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyamshev, L.M.; Chelnokov, B.I.

    1984-07-01

    Possibilities are discussed for the application of scanning radiation-thermoacoustic microscopy, using different types of radiation, for microstructure analysis. (AIP)

  15. Standards for Protection Against Radiation (Michigan)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This rule establishes standards for protection against radiation hazards. In addition to complying with requirements set forth, every reasonable effort should be made to maintain radiation levels...

  16. INSTRUMENTATION, INCLUDING NUCLEAR AND PARTICLE DETECTORS; RADIATION

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    interval technical basis document Chiaro, P.J. Jr. 44 INSTRUMENTATION, INCLUDING NUCLEAR AND PARTICLE DETECTORS; RADIATION DETECTORS; RADIATION MONITORS; DOSEMETERS;...

  17. Occupational Radiation Exposure | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Exposure Monitoring Systems (REMS) Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) is the database of occupational radiation exposures for all monitored DOE employees, contractors,...

  18. Actively driven thermal radiation shield

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Madden, Norman W. (Livermore, CA); Cork, Christopher P. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Becker, John A. (Alameda, CA); Knapp, David A. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A thermal radiation shield for cooled portable gamma-ray spectrometers. The thermal radiation shield is located intermediate the vacuum enclosure and detector enclosure, is actively driven, and is useful in reducing the heat load to mechanical cooler and additionally extends the lifetime of the mechanical cooler. The thermal shield is electrically-powered and is particularly useful for portable solid-state gamma-ray detectors or spectrometers that dramatically reduces the cooling power requirements. For example, the operating shield at 260K (40K below room temperature) will decrease the thermal radiation load to the detector by 50%, which makes possible portable battery operation for a mechanically cooled Ge spectrometer.

  19. Ultraviolet radiation induced discharge laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilson, Verle A. (Livermore, CA); Schriever, Richard L. (Livermore, CA); Shearer, James W. (Livermore, CA)

    1978-01-01

    An ultraviolet radiation source associated with a suitable cathode-anode electrode structure, disposed in a gas-filled cavity of a high pressure pulsed laser, such as a transverse electric atmosphere (TEA) laser, to achieve free electron production in the gas by photoelectric interaction between ultraviolet radiation and the cathode prior to the gas-exciting cathode-to-anode electrical discharge, thereby providing volume ionization of the gas. The ultraviolet radiation is produced by a light source or by a spark discharge.

  20. An Aerial Radiological survey of the Alvin W. Vogtle Nuclear Plant and surrounding area, Waynesboro, Georgia: Date of survey: August--September 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    An Aerial Radiological Survey was conducted during the period of August 24 to September 14, 1988 over an area of approximately 310 square kilometers (120 square miles) surrounding the Alvin W. Vogtle Nuclear Plant. The Vogtle Nuclear Plant is located near Augusta, Georgia, along the Savannah River and adjacent to the Savannah River Site (SRS). Several anomalous areas were identified in the portion of the survey extending into the SRS perimeter. The dominant isotopes found in these areas were cesium-137 and cobalt-60. All of these man-made anomalies identified by the aerial measurements were attributed to SRS processing. For the remainder of the survey area, the inferred radiation exposure rates generally varied from 6 to 10 microroentgens per hour ({mu}R/h), which was found to be due to naturally occurring uranium, thorium, and radioactive potassium gamma emitters. The reported exposure rate values included an estimated cosmic ray contribution of 3.6 {mu}R/h. Soils samples and pressurized ion chamber measurements were obtained at three locations within the survey boundaries to support the aerial data. The exposure rate values obtained from these groundbased measurements were in agreement with the corresponding inferred aerial values. 6 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. STPA 35: survey 1 Pre-Survey: STPA 35, Spring 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gille, Sarah T.

    STPA 35: survey 1 Pre-Survey: STPA 35, Spring 2001 Return this page for instructor records Name in this class? #12;STPA 35: survey 2 Preview Questions These questions are merely to whet your appetite Buenos Aires 34 30' S 58 20' W Tokyo 35 45' N 139 45' E Nairobi 01 17' S 36 50' E New England Sea Mounts

  2. Biosensors : A Survey Report Saraju P. Mohanty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanty, Saraju P.

    Biosensors : A Survey Report Saraju P. Mohanty Dept. of Comp. Sc. and Engg. University of South Florida Tampa, FL 33620, USA. smohanty@csee.usf.edu November 24, 2001 Abstract A biosensor is a sensing is to discuss the various biosensors available for dif- ferent biosensing applications. Initially, the survey

  3. Pennsylvania Soil Survey The First 100 Years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dePamphilis, Claude

    Pennsylvania Soil Survey The First 100 Years by Joseph J. Eckenrode and Edward J. Ciolkosz Agronomy Series Number 144 July 1999 #12;Pennsylvania Soil Survey The First 100 Years by Joseph J. Eckenrode1 University Park, PA 16802 July 1999 1 Soil Scientist USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS

  4. BSN CAREER PLANS SURVEY School of Nursing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    Medical Center, Adult Intensive Care Unit, Staff Nurse New York University Medical Center, LaborBSN CAREER PLANS SURVEY School of Nursing Class of 2007 Total number of degrees: 139 Number of BSN graduates who responded to the survey ended up in clinical nursing positions in the healthcare

  5. SALARY SURVEY SEPTEMBER 2012 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    SALARY SURVEY NACE SEPTEMBER 2012 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY National Association of Colleges and Employers | www.naceweb.org STARTING SALARIES FOR NEW COLLEGE GRADUATES · DATA REPORTED BY EMPLOYERS ALL DATA ARE REPORTED BY EMPLOYERS #12;2 | Salary Survey National Association of Colleges and Employers | www

  6. Monocular Pedestrian Detection: Survey and Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Zhigang

    1 Monocular Pedestrian Detection: Survey and Experiments Markus Enzweiler1 Student Member, IEEE. Restrictions apply. #12;2 Abstract Pedestrian detection is a rapidly evolving area in computer vision with key. The first part of the paper consists of a survey. We cover the main components of a pedestrian detection

  7. CAMPUS PEDESTRIAN FACILITIES ADA ASSESSMENT & SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    CAMPUS PEDESTRIAN FACILITIES ADA ASSESSMENT & SURVEY OREGONSTATEUNIVERSITY(OSU) #12;SZSCONSULTING) 130 Oak Creek Corvallis, OR 97331-2001 Re: OSU Campus Accessibility Survey and Assessment ­ Pedestrian Facilities Dear Mike, We are pleased to submit this facility report for the campus pedestrian facility

  8. Monocular Pedestrian Detection: Survey and Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gavrila, Dariu M.

    Monocular Pedestrian Detection: Survey and Experiments Markus Enzweiler, Student Member, IEEE, and Dariu M. Gavrila Abstract--Pedestrian detection is a rapidly evolving area in computer vision with key. The first part of the paper consists of a survey. We cover the main components of a pedestrian detection

  9. CONFIDENTIALITY AND VARIANCE ESTIMATION IN COMPLEX SURVEYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brennand, Tracy

    is the conflict of interest between in- formation sharing and disclosure control. Statistical agencies routinelyCONFIDENTIALITY AND VARIANCE ESTIMATION IN COMPLEX SURVEYS by Wen Wilson Lu M.Sc., Simon Fraser of Philosophy Title of thesis: Confidentiality and Variance Estimation in Complex Surveys Examining Committee

  10. RADIATION ONCOLOGY TARGET YOUR FUTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobar, Michael

    be used to treat almost all cancers anywhere in the body and over half of new cancer patients require. These professions include: · Radiation oncologist - a medical doctor who completes training to specialise

  11. Survivable pulse power space radiator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mims, J.; Buden, D.; Williams, K.

    1988-03-11

    A thermal radiator system is described for use on an outer space vehicle, which must survive a long period of nonuse and then radiate large amounts of heat for a limited period of time. The radiator includes groups of radiator panels that are pivotally connected in tandem, so that they can be moved to deployed configuration wherein the panels lie largely coplanar, and to a stowed configuration wherein the panels lie in a stack to resist micrometerorite damage. The panels are mounted on a boom which separates a hot power source from a payload. While the panels are stowed, warm fluid passes through their arteries to keep them warm enough to maintain the coolant in a liquid state and avoid embrittlement of material. The panels can be stored in a largely cylindrical shell, with panels progressively further from the boom being of progressively shorter length. 5 figs.

  12. Texas Radiation Control Act (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the policy of the state to institute and maintain a regulatory program for radiation sources that is compatible with federal standards and regulatory programs, and, to the degree possible,...

  13. Ionizing Radiation Injury (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation applies to employers that have more than one employee who engages in activities which involve the presence of ionizing radiation. Employers with less than three employees can...

  14. Multiple-mode radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Claus, Liam D.; Derzon, Mark S.; Kay, Randolph R.; Bauer, Todd; Trotter, Douglas Chandler; Henry, Michael David

    2015-08-25

    An apparatus for detecting radiation is provided. In embodiments, at least one sensor medium is provided, of a kind that interacts with radiation to generate photons and/or charge carriers. The apparatus also includes at least one electrode arrangement configured to collect radiation-generated charge from a sensor medium that has been provided. The apparatus also includes at least one photodetector configured to produce an electrical output in response to photons generated by radiation in such a sensor medium, and an electronic circuit configured to produce an output that is jointly responsive to the collected charge and to the photodetector output. At least one such electrode arrangement, at least one such photodetector, and at least one such sensor medium are combined to form an integral unit.

  15. Cataractogenic effects of proton radiation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyzar, James Ronald

    1972-01-01

    the cyclotron would induce cataracts in the exposed eye (1). In 1949 the National Research Council's Committee on Ophthalmology delegated an investigational team to Japan to study the occurrence of radiation cataracts among atom bomb survivors. This team... for the most part to ophthalmological circles arousing little interest in other elements of the scien- tific world (13) . In the decade of the 1940's conditions arose which were to vastly change research into the area of radiation damage. These conditions...

  16. Solar Radiation and Asteroidal Motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jozef Klacka

    2000-09-07

    Effects of solar wind and solar electromagnetic radiation on motion of asteroids are discussed. The results complete the statements presented in Vokrouhlick\\'{y} and Milani (2000). As for the effect of electromagnetic radiation, the complete equation of motion is presented to the first order in $v/c$ -- the shape of asteroid (spherical body is explicitly presented) and surface distribution of albedo should be taken into account. Optical quantities must be calculated in proper frame of reference.

  17. Chapter III: University of Florida Radiation Short Course

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    Protection #12;Radiation Protection Philosophy ALARA As Low As Reasonably Achievable #12;Radiation Protection

  18. Radiometer System to Map the Cosmic Background Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorenstein, Marc V.; Muller, Richard A.; Smoot, George F.; Tyson, J. Anthony

    1977-01-01

    SYSTEM TO MAP THE COSMIC BACKGROUND RADIATION RECEIVEDSystem to Map the Cosmic Background Radiation* Marc V.

  19. Deriving cloud velocity from an array of solar radiation measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bosch, J.L.; Zheng, Y.; Kleissl, J.

    2013-01-01

    of solar radiation based on satellite data. Proc. ISESsolar radiation: a statistical approach using satellite data.

  20. Numerical methods for multidimensional radiative transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    radiation plays a key role in various scientific applications, such as combustion physics, thermonuclear

  1. Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems Data Reporting Guide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Instructions for preparing occupational exposure data for submittal to the Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) repository.

  2. Risk Estimation; Background Radiation (Natural and Artificial )

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massey, Thomas N.

    . · This is necessary to obtain reasonable statistics on these rare events of radiation effects at low dose is based artificial and natural · response to low-level radiation. · personal background radiation level. #12;An Organism's Response to Radiation · The dose response can be linear or nonlinear and threshold or non

  3. Liquid cooled fiber thermal radiation receiver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Butler, B.L.

    1985-03-29

    A radiation-to-thermal receiver apparatus for collecting radiation and converting it to thermal energy is disclosed. The invention includes a fibrous mat material which captures radiation striking the receiver. Captured radiation is removed from the fibrous mat material by a transparent fluid within which the material is bathed.

  4. International Conference Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation SRI `94

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    This report contains abstracts for the international conference on Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  5. University of Toronto Radiation Protection Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Hue Sun

    continuously until Radiation Protection Service is notified otherwise. Type of Thermo-Luminescent Dosimeter

  6. Localized acne induced by radiation therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubiche, T; Sibaud, V

    2014-01-01

    total dose, radiation dose to the skin, fractionation timing, type of beam, treated volume, and irradiation

  7. ORNL/TM-2008/137 Survey of Radiation Effects in Titanium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    ://www.ntis.gov/support/ordernowabout.htm Reports are available to DOE employees, DOE contractors, Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDE

  8. NNSA to Conduct Aerial Radiation Assessment Survey in New Jersey, New York

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal of HonorPoster Session | Nationalhits 21 percent| National

  9. NNSA to Conduct Aerial Radiation Monitoring Survey over Boston April 17-20

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework usesof EnergyY-12 National Security Complex| National Nuclear

  10. SDSS spectroscopic survey of stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Ivezic; D. Schlegel; A. Uomoto; N. Bond; T. Beers; C. Allende Prieto; R. Wilhelm; Y. Sun Lee; T. Sivarani; M. Juric; R. Lupton; C. Rockosi; G. Knapp; J. Gunn; B. Yanny; S. Jester; S. Kent; J. Pier; J. Munn; G. Richards; H. Newberg; M. Blanton; D. Eisenstein; S. Hawley; S. Anderson; H. Harris; F. Kiuchi; A. Chen; J. Bushong; H. Sohi; D. Haggard; A. Kimball; J. Barentine; H. Brewington; M. Harvanek; S. Kleinman; J. Krzesinski; D. Long; A. Nitta; S. Snedden; for the SDSS Collaboration

    2007-01-17

    In addition to optical photometry of unprecedented quality, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is also producing a massive spectroscopic database. We discuss determination of stellar parameters, such as effective temperature, gravity and metallicity from SDSS spectra, describe correlations between kinematics and metallicity, and study their variation as a function of the position in the Galaxy. We show that stellar parameter estimates by Beers et al. show a good correlation with the position of a star in the g-r vs. u-g color-color diagram, thereby demonstrating their robustness as well as a potential for photometric parameter estimation methods. Using Beers et al. parameters, we find that the metallicity distribution of the Milky Way stars at a few kpc from the galactic plane is bimodal with a local minimum at [Z/Zo]~ -1.3. The median metallicity for the low-metallicity [Z/Zo] -1.3 sample. We also find that the low-metallicity sample has ~2.5 times larger velocity dispersion and that it does not rotate (at the ~10 km/s level), while the rotational velocity of the high-metallicity sample decreases smoothly with the height above the galactic plane.

  11. The WSRT virgo filament survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attila Popping; Robert Braun

    2007-03-27

    In the last few years the realization has emerged that the universal baryons are almost equally distributed by mass in three components: (1) galactic concentrations, (2) a warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM) and (3) a diffuse intergalactic medium. These three components are predicted by hydrodynamical simulations and are probed by QSO absorption lines. To observe the WHIM in neutral hydrogen, observations are needed which are deeper than log(N$_{HI}$)=18. The WHIM should appear as a Cosmic Web, underlying the galaxies with higher column densities. We have used the WSRT, to simulate a filled aperture by observing at very high hour angles, to reach very high column density sensitivity. To achieve even higher image fidelity, an accurate model of the WSRT primary beam was developed. This will be used in the joint deconvolution of the observations. To get a good overview of the distribution and kinematics of the Cosmic Web, a deep survey of 1500 square degrees of sky was undertaken, containing the galaxy filament extending between the Local Group and the Virgo Cluster. The auto-correlation data has been reduced and has an RMS of $\\Delta N_{HI} = 4.2\\times10^{16}$ cm$^{-2}$ over 20 kms$^{-1}$. Several sources have been tentatively detected, which were previously unknown, as well as an indication for diffuse intergalactic filaments.

  12. The 1986 residential occupant survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivey, D.L.; Alley, P.K.

    1987-04-01

    In 1986, Pacific Northwest Laboratory developed the Residential Occupant Survey-Spring '86, which was implemented. The overall purpose of the study was to collect demographic, attitudinal, and behavioral data related to the use and conservation of electricity in dwellings participating in the Bonneville Power Administration's End-Use Load and Conservation Assessment Program (ELCAP). Information was collected on the respondents' perceptions of the energy efficiency of their dwelling, temperature the dwelling was kept when people were at home and awake during the last heating season, which rooms, if any, were not heated during the last heating season, number of times the dwelling was unoccupied for at least one week, number of times pets were let out of the dwelling per day, attitudes toward energy use and conservation and several socio-demographic variables such as age, sex, and total household income. The results of the data analyses showed age to be an important factor for reported indoor temperature and perceived energy efficiency of the dwelling. The results also showed that almost 60% of the ELCAP occupants do not heat one or more rooms during the heating season, and almost 45% of the ELCAP dwellings were unoccupied for at least one week during the reporting period. In terms of the reported allocation of household income for household energy expenses, the results showed that the reported dollar amount spent for the expenses remained relatively constant over income levels.

  13. The 2006 Transportation Tomorrow Survey (TTS) is the largest and most comprehensive travel survey ever conducted in Ontario or perhaps anywhere in North America. The survey was con-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    travel survey ever conducted in Ontario or perhaps anywhere in North America. The survey was con- ducted the GTHA to include a large part of south central Ontario. The resulting survey now involved cooperation provincial ministry. Based on Census in- formation, the survey area covered 60 percent of Ontario's total

  14. Radiation Measurements at the Campus of Fukushima Medical University through the 2011 off the Pacific Coast of Tohoku Earthquake and Subsequent Nuclear Power Plant crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kobayashi, Tsuneo

    2011-01-01

    An earthquake, Tohoku region Pacific Coast earthquake, occurred on the 11th of March, 2011, and subsequent Fukushima nuclear power plant accidents have been stirring natural radiation around the author's office in Fukushima Medical University (FMU). FMU is located in Fukushima city, and is 57 km (35 miles) away from northwest of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. This paper presents three types of radiation survey undertaken through the unprecedented accidents at the campus and the hospital of FMU. First, a group of interested people immediately began radiation surveillance; the group members were assembled from the faculty members of "Life Sciences and Social Medicine" and "Human and Natural Sciences". Second, the present author, regardless of the earthquake, had serially observed natural radiations such as gamma radiation in air with NaI scintillation counter, atmospheric radon with Lucas cell, and second cosmic rays with NaI scintillation. Gamma radiation indicated most drastic change, i.e., peak v...

  15. Results of the 2008/2009 Knowledge and Opinions Surveys conducted...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The 20082009 survey includes these four groups and adds a fifth group, safety and code officials. The same survey methods were used for both surveys; the 20082009 survey...

  16. The Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey: preliminary results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. D'Amico; A. G. Lyne; R. N. Manchester; F. M. Camilo; V. M. Kaspi; J. Bell; I. H. Stairs; F. Crawford; D. Morris; A. Possenti

    1999-11-26

    A high-frequency survey of the Galactic plane for radio pulsars is in progress, using the multibeam receiver on the 64-m Parkes radiotelescope. We describe the survey motivations, the observing plan and the inital results. The survey is discovering many pulsars, more than 500 so far. Eight of the new pulsars are binary, one with a massive companion. At least eight are young, with characteristic ages of less than 100 kyr. Two of these (Kaspi et al, this Conference) have surface dipole magnetic field strengths greater than any other known radio pulsar.

  17. Experience with 113 Retrofit Insulation Surveys 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webber, W. O.

    1985-01-01

    RETROFIT INSULATION SURVEYS W. O. Webber Energy Conservation Consultants Baytown, Texas ABSTRACT We have surveyed 113 plants for thirteen clie~ts. The results of 21 recent surveys, at today s avera&e fuel price, show an average project scope... generat10n of $151,000 while saving about 5MMBTU/hour with a 72% DCF rate of return. The ~ize of the retrofit project generated, or scope, ~s of course sensitive to the fuel price This is an important consideration because of th~ variability of fuel...

  18. Ground Gravity Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Allis...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ground Gravity Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Allis, Et Al., 2000) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey...

  19. Ground Gravity Survey At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (FURUMOTO...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ground Gravity Survey At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (FURUMOTO, 1976) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey...

  20. Geodetic Survey At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geodetic Survey At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geodetic Survey At...

  1. Survey of Emissions Models for Distributed Combined Heat and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Survey of Emissions Models for Distributed Combined Heat and Power Systems, 2007 Survey of Emissions Models for Distributed Combined Heat and Power Systems, 2007 The models...

  2. NOAA Fisheries Protocols For Hydro-dynamic Dredge Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Fisheries Protocols For Hydro-dynamic Dredge Surveys: Surf Clams and Ocean Quahogs December 19..................................................................................................................................... 1 NOAA Fisheries Hydro-dynamic Clam Dredge Survey Protocols

  3. Geodetic Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blewitt...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geodetic Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geodetic Survey At...

  4. Geodetic Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blewitt...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geodetic Survey At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blewitt Et Al, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geodetic Survey At...

  5. Assessing Galaxy Limiting Magnitudes in Large Optical Surveys...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Assessing Galaxy Limiting Magnitudes in Large Optical Surveys Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Assessing Galaxy Limiting Magnitudes in Large Optical Surveys Authors:...

  6. Survey of Biomass Resource Assessments and Assessment Capabilities...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Survey of Biomass Resource Assessments and Assessment Capabilities in APEC Economies Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Survey of Biomass Resource Assessments and Assessment...

  7. Hawking Radiation from Feynman Diagrams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Parentani

    1999-04-09

    The aim of this letter is to clarify the relationships between Hawking radiation and the scattering of light by matter falling into a black hole. To this end we analyze the S-matrix elements of a model composed of a massive infalling particle (described by a quantized field) and the radiation field. These fields are coupled by current-current interactions and propagate in the Schwarzschild geometry. As long as the photons energy is much smaller than the mass of the infalling particle, one recovers Hawking radiation since our S-matrix elements identically reproduce the Bogoliubov coefficients obtained by treating the trajectory of the infalling particle classically. But after a brief period, the energy of the `partners' of Hawking photons reaches this mass and the production of thermal photons through these interactions stops. The implications of this result are discussed.

  8. Absorber for terahertz radiation management

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Biallas, George Herman; Apeldoorn, Cornelis; Williams, Gwyn P.; Benson, Stephen V.; Shinn, Michelle D.; Heckman, John D.

    2015-12-08

    A method and apparatus for minimizing the degradation of power in a free electron laser (FEL) generating terahertz (THz) radiation. The method includes inserting an absorber ring in the FEL beam path for absorbing any irregular THz radiation and thus minimizes the degradation of downstream optics and the resulting degradation of the FEL output power. The absorber ring includes an upstream side, a downstream side, and a plurality of wedges spaced radially around the absorber ring. The wedges form a scallop-like feature on the innermost edges of the absorber ring that acts as an apodizer, stopping diffractive focusing of the THz radiation that is not intercepted by the absorber. Spacing between the scallop-like features and the shape of the features approximates the Bartlett apodization function. The absorber ring provides a smooth intensity distribution, rather than one that is peaked on-center, thereby eliminating minor distortion downstream of the absorber.

  9. Drive Alive: Teen Seat Belt Survey Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    students in a high school parking lot over a 38-month periodthe entrance to the student parking lot of the studied high100 vehicles entering the parking lot. The pre-surveys were

  10. Transport Survey 2008 (Staff and student)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    Transport Survey 2008 (Staff and student) April 2008 Ramon Arigoni Ortiz Wan-Jung Chou Department................................................................................................6 2. Transport use and travel behaviour......................................................................10 2.1. Modes of transport

  11. 1 INTRODUCTION A Survey of Collaborative Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarma, Anita

    1 INTRODUCTION A Survey of Collaborative Tools in Software Development Anita Sarma Institute tools. Enabling software developers to collaborate effectively and effortlessly is a difficult task team members. Accordingly, research in collaborative development has produced a host of tools, each

  12. Geothermal Energy Growth Continues, Industry Survey Reports

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A survey released by the Geothermal Energy Association (GEA) shows continued growth in the number of new geothermal power projects under development in the United States, a 20% increase since January of this year.

  13. A survey of integral ?-helical membrane proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    opti- mum eukaryotic integral membrane proteins forLarge-scale identi?cation of yeast integral membrane protein009-9069-8 A survey of integral a-helical membrane proteins

  14. The satellite archaeological survey of Egypt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2011-01-01

    Starting from the recent announcement of 17 new pyramids discovered in Egypt, this paper is once more proposing a discussion on the use of Google Maps for archaeological surveys.

  15. Laboratory Safety Survey Chemical Hygiene Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    Laboratory Safety Survey Chemical Hygiene Plan OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY UNIVERSITY and charged? (if not, call UC Davis Fire Department). 17. Are sinks labeled "Industrial Water - Do Not Drink

  16. A Survey of Network Design Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Richard T.

    This report is a survey of the design of various types of networks that frequently occur in the study of transportation and communication problems. The report contains a general framework which facilitates comparisons ...

  17. A Survey of Network Design Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Richard T.

    Network design problems arise in many different application areas such as air freight, highway traffic, and communication systems. The intention of this survey is to present a coherent unified view of a number of papers ...

  18. Storm Water Survey Answer Sheet About You

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Storm Water Survey Answer Sheet About You 1. What is your-4 5-10 11-20 21+ About Storm Water Runoff 1. What is not allowed in the storm drains on campus? (Check all that apply) Irrigation water

  19. A Survey of Systemic Risk Analytics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bisias, Dimitrios

    We provide a survey of 31 quantitative measures of systemic risk in the economics and finance literature, chosen to span key themes and issues in systemic risk measurement and management. We motivate these measures from ...

  20. COACHE Survey Results UTFA Council Presentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    and Recognition, Collaboration and Interdisciplinary Work ­ Leadership ­ Benefits and Family Policies Web link Collaborative on Academic Careers in Higher Education Harvard Graduate School of Education Consortium of > 200;Survey Themes Nature of Work (Research, Teaching, Service) Collaboration & Interdisciplinary Work

  1. BSc (Hons) Building Surveying Course content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    BSc (Hons) Building Surveying Course content Year One Year One modules Professional, Academic and openings o Upper floor construction o Internal walls and partitions o Roofs, roof coverings and rain water

  2. Drive Alive: Teen Seat Belt Survey Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    Traffic Safety Facts – Seat Belt Use in 2009 – OverallTraffic Safety Facts – Seat Belt Use in 2008 – DemographicClick-it-or-Ticket Safety Belt Initiative Telephone Survey.

  3. Analogy and mathematical reasoning : a survey 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, C.D.F.

    1983-01-01

    We survey the literature of Artificial Intelligence, and other related work, pertaining to the modelling of mathematical reasoning and its relationship with the use of analogy. In particular, we discuss the contribution ...

  4. Innovative Gamma Ray Spectrometer Detection Systems for Conducting Scanning Surveys on Challenging Terrain - 13583

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palladino, Carl; Mason, Bryan; Engle, Matt; LeVangie, James [The Palladino Company, Inc., 720 Fillmore St., San Francisco, CA 94117 (United States)] [The Palladino Company, Inc., 720 Fillmore St., San Francisco, CA 94117 (United States); Dempsey, Gregg [United States Environmental Protection Agency, P.O. Box 98517, Las Vegas, NV 89193-8517 (United States)] [United States Environmental Protection Agency, P.O. Box 98517, Las Vegas, NV 89193-8517 (United States); Klemovich, Ron [HydroGeoLogic, Inc., 6340 Glenwood, Suite 200, Building No. 7, Overland Park, KS 66202 (United States)] [HydroGeoLogic, Inc., 6340 Glenwood, Suite 200, Building No. 7, Overland Park, KS 66202 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The Santa Susana Field Laboratory located near Simi Valley, California was investigated to determine the nature and extent of gamma radiation anomalies. The primary objective was to conduct gamma scanning surveys over 100 percent of the approximately 1,906,000 square meters (471 acre) project site with the most sensitive detection system possible. The site had challenging topography that was not conducive to traditional gamma scanning detection systems. Terrain slope varied from horizontal to 48 degrees and the ground surface ranged from flat, grassy meadows to steep, rocky hillsides. In addition, the site was home to many protected endangered plant and animal species, and archaeologically significant sites that required minimal to no disturbance of the ground surface. Therefore, four innovative and unique gamma ray spectrometer detection systems were designed and constructed to successfully conduct gamma scanning surveys of approximately 1,076,000 square meters (266 acres) of the site. (authors)

  5. Contrasting the direct radiative effect and direct radiative forcing of aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heald, Colette L.

    The direct radiative effect (DRE) of aerosols, which is the instantaneous radiative impact of all atmospheric particles on the Earth's energy balance, is sometimes confused with the direct radiative forcing (DRF), which ...

  6. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN HUMAN POPULATIONS FOLLOWING ACUTE EXPOSURE: NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS AND MEDICAL RADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    2010-01-01

    Implications for radio­ low doses: Radiation Res 71:61-74,effect of ological low-dose radiation in man, and surveyscarcinogenic of low-dose, low-LET radiation is subject to

  7. THE EFFECT OF CIRCUMSOLAR RADIATION ON THE ACCURACY OF PYRHELIOMETER MEASUREMENTS OF THE DIRECT SOLAR RADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grether, D.

    2012-01-01

    Diffuse, and Total Solar Radiation," Solar Energy, vol. 4,r Presented at the Solar Radiation workshop of Solar Rising,MEASUREMENTS OF THE DIRECT SOLAR RADIATION D. Grether, D.

  8. Results of the radiological survey at 24 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ048)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cottrell, W.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Francis, M.W.; Mynatt, J.O.

    1989-08-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monozite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally {sup 232}Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 24 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ048), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 4 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Results of the radiological survey at 6 Hancock Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ033)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth, earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally /sup 232/Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 6 Hancock Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ033), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site.

  10. Results of the radiological survey at 99 Garibaldi Avenue, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ064)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-07-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally /sup 232/Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 99 Garibaldi Avenue, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ064), was conducted during 1987. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 4 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Results of the radiological survey at 106 Columbia Lane, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ063)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-07-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally {sup 232}Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 106 Columbia Lane, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ063), was conducted during 1987. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 4 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Results of the radiological survey at 30 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ045)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cottrell, W.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Francis, M.W.; Mynatt, J.O.

    1989-11-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally {sup 232}Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 30 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ045), was conducted during 1985, 1986, and 1987. Some radionuclide measurements were greater than typical background levels in the northern New Jersey area. However, results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. 5 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Results of the radiological survey at 12 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ054)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.

    1989-11-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extracting process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally {sup 232}Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 12 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ054), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions were not significantly different from normal background levels in the northern New Jersey area.

  14. Results of the radiological survey at 10 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ055)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.

    1989-11-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally {sup 232}Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 10 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ055), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions were not significantly different from normal background levels in the northern New Jersey area. 4 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Results of the radiological survey at 6 Branca Court, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ041)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rate earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally /sup 232/Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 6 Branca Court, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ041), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Act program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Results of the radiological survey at 32 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ046)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cottrell, W.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Francis, M.W.; Mynatt, J.O.

    1989-10-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally {sup 232}Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 32 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ046), was conducted during 1985, 1986, and 1987. Some radionuclide measurements were greater than typical background levels in the northern New Jersey area. However, results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. 5 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Results of the radiological survey at 7 Hancock Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ027)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cottrell, W.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Francis, M.W.; Mynatt, J.O.

    1989-09-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. AT the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally {sup 232}Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 7 Hancock Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ027), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 5 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Results of the radiological survey at 5 Hancock Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ029)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cottrell, W.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Francis, M.W.; Mynatt, J.O.

    1989-09-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally {sup 232}Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 5 Hancock Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ029), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of the material originating from the MCW site. 5 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Results of the radiological survey at 19 Redstone Lane, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ056)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cottrell, W.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Francis, M.W.; Mynatt, J.O.

    1989-10-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally {sup 232}Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 19 Redstone Lane, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ056), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions were not significantly different from normal background levels in the northern New Jersey area. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Results of the radiological survey at 2 Branca Court, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ036)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1961 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally /sup 232/Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 2 Branca Court, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ036), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site.

  1. Results of the radiological survey at 1 Branca Court, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ034)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.

    1989-10-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally {sup 232}Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 1 Branca Court, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ034), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action program criteria. The radionuclide distributions were not significantly different from normal background levels in the northern New Jersey area. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Results of the radiological survey at 174 Essex Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ073)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally /sup 232/Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 174 Essex Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ073), was conducted during 1987. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site.

  3. Results of the radiological survey at 80 Industrial Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ061)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, R.D.; Carrier, R.F.; Floyd, L.M.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-07-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally /sup 232/Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 80 Industrial Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ061), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of DOE remedial action criteria, primarily from the /sup 232/Th decay chain, with some contamination from /sup 226/Ra. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 5 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Results of the radiological survey at 17 Redstone Lane, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ030)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally /sup 232/Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 17 Redstone Lane, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ030), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 4 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Results of the radiological survey at 62 Trudy Drive, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ080)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally /sup 232/Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 62 Trudy Drive, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ080), was conducted during 1988. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 5 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Results of the radiological survey at 9 Hancock Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ028)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cottrell, W.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Francis, M.W.; Mynatt, J.O.

    1989-09-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally {sup 232}Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 9 Hancock Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ028), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Some radionuclide measurements were greater than typical background levels in the northern New Jersey area. However, results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. 5 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Results of the radiological survey at 160 Essex Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ072)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally /sup 232/Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 160 Essex Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ072), was conducted during 1987. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 4 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Results of the radiological survey at 10 Hancock Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ031)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.F.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally /sup 232/Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling from radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 10 Hancock Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ031), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. The radionuclide distributions are typical of the type of material originating from the MCW site. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Results of the radiological survey at 28 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ047)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cottrell, W.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Francis, M.W.; Mynatt, J.O.

    1989-10-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally {sup 232}Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 28 Long Valley Road, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ047), was conducted during 1985, 1986, 1987. Some radionuclide measurements were greater than typical background levels in the northern New Jersey area. However, results of the Survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. 5 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Results of the radiological survey at 205 Main Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ075)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, R.D.; Carrier, R.F.; Floyd, L.M.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-08-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally /sup 232/Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 205 Main Street, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ075), was conducted during 1987 and 1988. Results of the survey indicated radioactivity in the range of normal background for the northern New Jersey area. Radiological assessments of soil samples from the site demonstrate no radionuclide concentrations in excess of DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. 5 refs., 21 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Results of the radiological survey at 7 Redstone Lane, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ044)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cottrell, W.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Francis, M.W.; Mynatt, J.O.

    1989-10-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally {sup 232}Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclides analyses. The survey of this site, 7 Redstone Lane, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ044), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Some radionuclide measurements were greater than typical background levels in the northern New Jersey area. However, results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. 5 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Results of the radiological survey at 4 Branca Court, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ037)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, R.D.; Floyd, L.M.; Carrier, R.R.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-06-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally /sup 232/Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurement of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site, 4 Branca Court, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ037), was conducted during 1985 and 1986. Results of the survey demonstrated no radionuclide concentrations in excess of the DOE Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program criteria. However, this property is apparently located directly over the old Lodi Brook streambed. This factor in combination with the elevated gamma logs of several auger holes is sufficient to recommend this site for inclusion in the DOE remedial action program. 5 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Directory and survey of particle physicists

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    In order to develop a clearer understanding of the demographics of the U.S. particle physics workforce, the US Department of Energy, the National Science Foundation, and the Division of Particles and Fields of the American Physical Society commissioned a survey and census of particle physicists employed in the United States. This survey and census were conducted in 1995, with an update of the census in April 1997. The agencies and the scientific community were represented for the 1995 efforts by Dr. Robert Woods (DOE), Dr. William Chinowsky (NSF), and Prof. Uriel Nauenberg (DPF); for the current census, by Dr. Robert Diebold (DOE), Dr. Marvin Goldberg (NSF), and Dr. Patricia Rankin (NSF). The survey/census were carried out with the assistance of the Particle Data Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. In order to obtain an accurate study of the current workforce and of future needs, we requested that all HEP physicists fill out and return the 1995 survey. There were 2494 respondents. For the 1997 census, a representative of each university and laboratory was asked to provide information on all persons at that institution who spend at least 50% of their research time on particle physics. In some cases this includes accelerator physicists. The total number of physicists in the 1997 census is 3492 from 155 institutions in the United States. The full survey questionnaires are shown. The primary one was addressed to individual particle physicists, while the secondary one was addressed to principal investigators and sought information about people leaving the field. There are many possible tables and plots from this survey, with a variety of correlations. Those chosen are representative of a cross-section of the demographic results. It should be emphasized that this survey was a snapshot in time, and does not have the same capabilities as would a series of surveys that are periodic in time. Care should be taken in interpreting the results of the tables and plots.

  14. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURvEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    datamanagementgroup 2011 SURvEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIvIL ENGINEERING - UNIvERSITY OF TORONTO PREPARED BY datamanagementgroup 2011 SURvEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIvIL ENGINEERING - UNIv% 22% 21% 11% 1% 19% 51% 18% 12% 2.9 1.9 2.2 2.2 7.1 TRIPS MADE BY RESIDENTS OF TOWNSHIP OF KING 9

  15. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURvEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    datamanagementgroup 2011 SURvEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIvIL ENGINEERING - UNIvERSITY OF TORONTO PREPARED BY datamanagementgroup 2011 SURvEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIvIL ENGINEERING - UNIv,800 20.6% 43% 18% 26% 13% 67% 14% 5% 3% 8% 3% 5.7 3.4 3.9 51.8 329,100 28% 9% 45% 18% 69% 19% 4% 2% 5% 1

  16. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURvEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    datamanagementgroup 2011 SURvEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIvIL ENGINEERING - UNIvERSITY OF TORONTO PREPARED BY datamanagementgroup 2011 SURvEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIvIL ENGINEERING - UNIv% 26% 24% 26% 15% 3% 30% 51% 13% 3% 3.2 1.7 2.2 1.9 6.8 TRIPS MADE BY RESIDENTS OF TOWNSHIP OF BROCK

  17. datamanagementgroup 2011 SURvEY AREA SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    datamanagementgroup 2011 SURvEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIvIL ENGINEERING - UNIvERSITY OF TORONTO PREPARED BY datamanagementgroup 2011 SURvEY AREA SUMMARY DEPARTMENT OF CIvIL ENGINEERING - UNIv,000 72% 13% 15% 15% 33% 20% 23% 9% 4% 30% 51% 12% 3% 2.8 1.6 2.0 1.8 6.5 TRIPS MADE BY RESIDENTS OF TOWN

  18. 1993 Radiation Protection Workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    The 1993 DOE Radiation Protection Workshop was conducted from April 13 through 15, 1993 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Over 400 Department of Energy Headquarters and Field personnel and contractors from the DOE radiological protection community attended the Workshop. Forty-nine papers were presented in eleven separate sessions: Radiological Control Manual Implementation, New Approaches to Instrumentation and Calibration, Radiological Training Programs and Initiatives, External Dosimetry, Internal Dosimetry, Radiation Exposure Reporting and Recordkeeping, Air Sampling and Monitoring Issues, Decontamination and Decommissioning of Sites, Contamination Monitoring and Control, ALARA/Radiological Engineering, and Current and Future Health Physics Research. Individual papers are indexed separately on the database.

  19. Appendix G. Radiation Appendix G. Radiation G-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    , radio waves, and alpha particles are examples of radiation. When people feel warmth from sunlight in the form of electromagnetic waves. Examples include gamma rays, ultraviolet light, and radio waves, or radiant energy, is energy in the form of waves or particles moving through space. Visi- ble light, heat

  20. Appendix F. Radiation Appendix F. Radiation F-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    energy, is energy in the form of waves or particles moving through space. Visi- ble light, heat, radio in the form of electromagnetic waves. Examples include gamma rays, ultraviolet light, and radio waves waves, and alpha particles are examples of radiation. When people feel warmth from sunlight

  1. Radiative Forcing EarthRadiative Forcing, Earth Temperature, and Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhanqing

    trapped by the additional absorption goes inot heating the surface. Some , for example goes as additional latent heat. · So one should view the inference of the equationSo one should view the inference transmission of the atmosphereWhere Teff is the effective transmission of the atmosphere to thermal radiation

  2. Design and analysis of redshift surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. F. Heavens; A. N. Taylor

    1997-05-27

    In this paper we consider methods of analysis and optimal design of redshift surveys. In the first part, we develop a formalism for analysing galaxy redshift surveys which are essentially two-dimensional, such as thin declination slices. The formalism is a power spectrum method, using spherical coordinates, allowing the distorting effects of galaxy peculiar velocities to be calculated to linear order on the assumption of statistical isotropy but without further approximation. In this paper, we calculate the measured two-dimensional power for a constant declination strip, widely used in redshift surveys. We present a likelihood method for estimating the three-dimensional real-space power spectrum and the redshift distortion simultaneously, and show that for thin surveys of reasonable depth, the large-scale 3D power cannot be measured with high accuracy. The redshift distortion may be estimated successfully, and with higher accuracy if the 3D power spectrum can be measured independently, for example from a large-scale sky-projected catalogue. In the second part, we show how a 3D survey design can be optimized to measure the power spectrum, considering whether areal coverage is more important than depth, and whether the survey should be sampled sparsely or not. We show quite generally that width is better than depth, and show how the optimal sparse-sampling fraction, f, depends on the power, P, to be measured. For a Schechter luminosity function, a simple optimization fP \\simeq 500 h^{-3} Mpc^3 is found.

  3. An aerial radiological survey of the West Valley Demonstration Project and surrounding area, West Valley, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, H.A.

    1991-09-01

    An aerial radiological survey of the West Valley Demonstration Project and the surrounding area was conducted from mid-August through early September 1984 by EG G Energy Measurements, Inc. for the United States Department of Energy. The radiological survey was part of the United States Department of Energy Comprehensive Integrated Remote Sensing (CIRS) program, which provides state-of-the-art remote sensing to support the needs of the various DOE facilities. The survey consisted of airborne measurements of both natural and man-made gamma radiation emanating from the terrestrial surface. These measurements allowed an estimate of the distribution of isotopic concentrations in the area surrounding the project site. Results are reported as isopleths superimposed on aerial photographs of the area. Gamma ray energy spectra are also presented for the net man-made radionuclides. 8 refs., 16 figs., 9 tabs.

  4. GASS: The Parkes Galactic All-Sky Survey. Update: improved correction for instrumental effects and new data release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalberla, Peter M W

    2015-01-01

    The Galactic All-Sky Survey is a survey of Galactic atomic hydrogen emission in the southern sky observed with the Parkes 64-m Radio Telescope. The first data release (GASS I) concerned survey goals and observing techniques, the second release (GASS II) focused on stray radiation and instrumental corrections. We seek to remove the remaining instrumental effects and present a third data release. We use the HEALPix tessellation concept to grid the data on the sphere. Individual telescope records are compared with averages on the nearest grid position for significant deviations. All averages are also decomposed into Gaussian components with the aim of segregating unacceptable solutions. Improved priors are used for an iterative baseline fitting and cleaning. In the last step we generate 3-D FITS data cubes and examine them for remaining problems. We have removed weak, but systematic baseline offsets with an improved baseline fitting algorithm. We have unraveled correlator failures that cause time dependent oscil...

  5. Results of the radiological survey at the property at Main Street and Highway 46, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ074)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, R.D.; Carrier, R.F.; Floyd, L.M.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1989-09-01

    Maywood Chemical Works (MCW) of Maywood, New Jersey, generated process wastes and residues associated with the production and refining of thorium and thorium compounds from monazite ores from 1916 to 1956. MCW supplied rare earth metals and thorium compounds to the Atomic Energy Commission and various other government agencies from the late 1940s to the mid-1950s. Area residents used the sandlike waste from this thorium extraction process mixed with tea and cocoa leaves as mulch in their yards. Some of these contaminated wastes were also eroded from the site into Lodi Brook. At the request of the US Department of Energy (DOE), a group from Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts investigative radiological surveys of properties in the vicinity of MCW to determine whether a property is contaminated with radioactive residues, principally {sup 232}Th, derived from the MCW site. The survey typically includes direct measurements of gamma radiation levels and soil sampling for radionuclide analyses. The survey of this site located at the intersection of Main Street and Highway 46, Lodi, New Jersey (LJ074), was conducted during 1987. While some radiological measurements taken at the vacant lot at the intersection of Main Street and Highway 46 were greater than background levels typically encountered in the northern New Jersey area, no radiation levels nor radionuclide concentrations exceeded the applicable DOE criteria. The survey results demonstrate that the radiological condition of this property conforms to DOE guidelines for remedial action. 4 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. NITRATE DESTRUCTION LITERATURE SURVEY AND EVALUATION CRITERIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steimke, J.

    2011-02-01

    This report satisfies the initial phase of Task WP-2.3.4 Alternative Sodium Recovery Technology, Subtask 1; Develop Near-Tank Nitrate/Nitrite Destruction Technology. Some of the more common anions in carbon steel waste tanks at SRS and Hanford Site are nitrate which is corrosive, and nitrite and hydroxide which are corrosion inhibitors. At present it is necessary to periodically add large quantities of 50 wt% caustic to waste tanks. There are three primary reasons for this addition. First, when the contents of salt tanks are dissolved, sodium hydroxide preferentially dissolves and is removed. During the dissolution process the concentration of free hydroxide in the tank liquid can decrease from 9 M to less than 0.2 M. As a result, roughly half way through the dissolution process large quantities of sodium hydroxide must be added to the tank to comply with requirements for corrosion control. Second, hydroxide is continuously consumed by reaction with carbon dioxide which occurs naturally in purge air used to prevent buildup of hydrogen gas inside the tanks. The hydrogen is generated by radiolysis of water. Third, increasing the concentration of hydroxide increases solubility of some aluminum compounds, which is desirable in processing waste. A process that converts nitrate and nitrite to hydroxide would reduce certain costs. (1) Less caustic would be purchased. (2) Some of the aluminum solid compounds in the waste tanks would become more soluble so less mass of solids would be sent to High Level Vitrification and therefore it would be not be necessary to make as much expensive high level vitrified product. (3) Less mass of sodium would be fed to Saltstone at SRS or Low Level Vitrification at Hanford Site so it would not be necessary to make as much low level product. (4) At SRS less nitrite and nitrate would be sent to Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) so less formic acid would be consumed there and less hydrogen gas would be generated. This task involves literature survey of technologies to perform the nitrate to hydroxide conversion, selection of the most promising technologies, preparation of a flowsheet and design of a system. The most promising technologies are electrochemical reduction of nitrates and chemical reduction with hydrogen or ammonia. The primary reviewed technologies are listed and they aredescribed in more detail later in the report: (1) Electrochemical destruction; (2) Chemical reduction with agents such as ammonia, hydrazine or hydrogen; (3) Hydrothermal reduction process; and (4) Calcination. Only three of the technologies on the list have been demonstrated to generate usable amounts of caustic; electrochemical reduction and chemical reduction with ammonia, hydrazine or hydrogen and hydrothermal reduction. Chemical reduction with an organic reactant such as formic acid generates carbon dioxide which reacts with caustic and is thus counterproductive. Treatment of nitrate with aluminum or other active metals generates a solid product. High temperature calcination has the potential to generate sodium oxide which may be hydrated to sodium hydroxide, but this is unproven. The following criteria were developed to evaluate the most suitable option. The numbers in brackets after the criteria are relative weighting factors to account for importance: (1) Personnel exposure to radiation for installation, routine operation and maintenance; (2) Non-radioactive safety issues; (3) Whether the technology generates caustic and how many moles of caustic are generated per mole of nitrate plus nitrite decomposed; (4) Whether the technology can handle nitrate and nitrite at the concentrations encountered in waste; (5) Maturity of technology; (6) Estimated annual cost of operation (labor, depreciation, materials, utilities); (7) Capital cost; (8) Selectivity to nitrogen as decomposition product (other products are flammable and/or toxic); (9) Impact of introduced species; (10) Selectivity for destruction of nitrate vs. nitrite; and (11) Cost of deactivation and demolition. Each technology was given a score from one

  7. Factories: The Ionising Radiations (Sealed Sources) (Radiation Dose Record) Order, 1961 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hare, John

    1961-01-01

    This Order prescribes the particulars to be contained in radiation dose records kept under paragraph (I) of Regulation 24 of the Ionising Radiations (Sealed Sources) Regulations, 1961.

  8. Characterization of Thallium Bromide (TlBr) for Room Temperature Radiation Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Holland McTyeire

    2013-01-01

    Radiation Detectors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .bromide crystals for radiation detector applications,”Thallium bromide radiation detectors,” IEEE Transactions on

  9. Solid state radiative heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berdahl, Paul H. (Oakland, CA)

    1986-01-01

    A solid state radiative heat pump (10, 50, 70) operable at room temperature (300.degree. K.) utilizes a semiconductor having a gap energy in the range of 0.03-0.25 eV and operated reversibly to produce an excess or deficit of charge carriers as compared to thermal equilibrium. In one form of the invention (10, 70) an infrared semiconductor photodiode (21, 71) is used, with forward or reverse bias, to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. In another form of the invention (50), a homogeneous semiconductor (51) is subjected to orthogonal magnetic and electric fields to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. Three methods of enhancing transmission of radiation through the active surface of the semiconductor are disclosed. In one method, an anti-reflection layer (19) is coated into the active surface (13) of the semiconductor (11), the anti-reflection layer (19) having an index of refraction equal to the square root of that of the semiconductor (11). In the second method, a passive layer (75) is spaced from the active surface (73) of the semiconductor (71) by a submicron vacuum gap, the passive layer having an index of refractive equal to that of the semiconductor. In the third method, a coupler (91) with a paraboloid reflecting surface (92) is in contact with the active surface (13, 53) of the semiconductor (11, 51), the coupler having an index of refraction about the same as that of the semiconductor.

  10. Radiation augmentation energy storage system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christe, K.O.

    1990-02-27

    This patent describes a method of converting radiation energy into chemical energy to produce a high-performance propellant. It comprises: photolytically converting oxygen to ozone; storing and stabilizing the ozone in liquid oxygen to form an ozone/liquid oxygen solution; and combusting the ozone/liquid oxygen solution with hydrogen.

  11. Thermal effects in radiation processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zagorski, Z.P.

    1984-10-21

    The balance of ionizing radiation energy incident on an object being processed is discussed in terms of energy losses, influencing the amount really absorbed. To obtain the amount of heat produced, the absorbed energy is corrected for the change in internal energy of the system and for the heat effect of secondary reactions developing after the initiation. The temperature of a processed object results from the heat evolved and from the specific heat of the material comprising the object. The specific heat of most materials is usually much lower than that of aqueous systems and therefore temperatures after irradiation are higher. The role of low specific heat in radiation processing at cryogenic conditions is stressed. Adiabatic conditions of accelerator irradiation are contrasted with the steady state thermal conditions prevailing in large gamma sources. Among specific questions discussed in the last part of the paper are: intermediate and final temperature of composite materials, measurement of real thermal effects in situ, neutralization of undesired warming experienced during radiation processing, processing at temperatures other than ambient and administration of very high doses of radiation.

  12. Synchrotron radiation and biomedical imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luccio, A.

    1986-08-01

    In this lecture we describe the characteristics of Synchrotron radiation as a source of X rays. We discuss the properties of SR arc sources, wigglers, undulators and the use of backscattering of laser light. Applications to angiography, X ray microscopy and tomography are reviewed. 16 refs., 23 figs.

  13. Solid state radiative heat pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berdahl, P.H.

    1984-09-28

    A solid state radiative heat pump operable at room temperature (300 K) utilizes a semiconductor having a gap energy in the range of 0.03-0.25 eV and operated reversibly to produce an excess or deficit of change carriers as compared equilibrium. In one form of the invention an infrared semiconductor photodiode is used, with forward or reverse bias, to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. In another form of the invention, a homogenous semiconductor is subjected to orthogonal magnetic and electric fields to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. Three methods of enhancing transmission of radiation the active surface of the semiconductor are disclosed. In one method, an anti-refection layer is coated into the active surface of the semiconductor, the anti-reflection layer having an index of refraction equal to the square root of that of the semiconductor. In the second method, a passive layer is speaced trom the active surface of the semiconductor by a submicron vacuum gap, the passive layer having an index of refractive equal to that of the semiconductor. In the third method, a coupler with a paraboloid reflecting surface surface is in contact with the active surface of the semiconductor, the coupler having an index of refraction about the same as that of the semiconductor.

  14. Radiation Detection Computational Benchmark Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaver, Mark W.; Casella, Andrew M.; Wittman, Richard S.; McDonald, Ben S.

    2013-09-24

    Modeling forms an important component of radiation detection development, allowing for testing of new detector designs, evaluation of existing equipment against a wide variety of potential threat sources, and assessing operation performance of radiation detection systems. This can, however, result in large and complex scenarios which are time consuming to model. A variety of approaches to radiation transport modeling exist with complementary strengths and weaknesses for different problems. This variety of approaches, and the development of promising new tools (such as ORNL’s ADVANTG) which combine benefits of multiple approaches, illustrates the need for a means of evaluating or comparing different techniques for radiation detection problems. This report presents a set of 9 benchmark problems for comparing different types of radiation transport calculations, identifying appropriate tools for classes of problems, and testing and guiding the development of new methods. The benchmarks were drawn primarily from existing or previous calculations with a preference for scenarios which include experimental data, or otherwise have results with a high level of confidence, are non-sensitive, and represent problem sets of interest to NA-22. From a technical perspective, the benchmarks were chosen to span a range of difficulty and to include gamma transport, neutron transport, or both and represent different important physical processes and a range of sensitivity to angular or energy fidelity. Following benchmark identification, existing information about geometry, measurements, and previous calculations were assembled. Monte Carlo results (MCNP decks) were reviewed or created and re-run in order to attain accurate computational times and to verify agreement with experimental data, when present. Benchmark information was then conveyed to ORNL in order to guide testing and development of hybrid calculations. The results of those ADVANTG calculations were then sent to PNNL for compilation. This is a report describing the details of the selected Benchmarks and results from various transport codes.

  15. Final Report-Confirmatory Survey Results for the ABB Combustion Engineering Site, Windsor, Connecticut; Revision 1 (DCN 5158-SR-02-1) (Docket No. 030-03754; RFTA No. 12-003)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ADAMS, WADE C

    2013-01-28

    The objectives of the confirmatory activities were to provide independent contractor field data reviews and to generate independent radiological data for use by the NRC in evaluating the adequacy and accuracy of the contractor?s procedures and FSS results. ORAU reviewed ABB CE?s decommissioning plan, final status survey plan, and the applicable soil DCGLs, which were developed based on an NRC-approved radiation dose assessment. The surveys included gamma surface scans, gamma direct measurements, and soil sampling.

  16. Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT Web Survey Service Institutional Research,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, Rafael

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology MIT Web Survey Service Institutional Research, Office.mit.edu/ist/isnews/v21/n02/210210.html 1. Coordination with the MIT Institutional Research & Web Survey Service. The MIT, intended audience, and desired schedule. The Web Survey Service will host certain web surveys

  17. SOIL SURVEY OF PAYNE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA OSURR Section 17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    66 26 76 26 26 26 SOIL SURVEY OF PAYNE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA OSURR Section 17 0 300 600 900 1,200150 Feet 0 100 20050 Meters Web Soil Survey 1.1 National Cooperative Soil Survey 5/7/2007 Page 1 of 3 #12;MAP INFORMATION SOIL SURVEY OF PAYNE COUNTY, OKLAHOMA OSURR Section 17 Source of Map: Natural Resources

  18. History of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource | Stanford...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    History of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource SPEAR Based on new applications of synchrotron radiation, SSRL began in 1973 as the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Project...

  19. Discovery and Characterization of Radiation Mitigator Yel002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivina, Yelena Olegovna

    2013-01-01

    20. Bonner WM. Low-dose radiation: thresholds, bystanderR. ; Haran-Ghera, N. Low doses of radiation induce systemicattributable to low doses of ionizing radiation: assessing

  20. IONIZING RADIATION RISKS TO SATELLITE POWER SYSTEMS (SPS) WORKERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyman, J.T.

    2010-01-01

    of carcinogenesis at low-dose radiation. These include: theeffect of low-dose ionizing radiation. Different organs and1980). However, low doses of radiation may accelerate the

  1. Stromal Modulation of Radiation Carcinogenesis in Breast Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, David Hiendat Hua

    2011-01-01

    reports that low doses radiation alters the response toexposed to long-term low-dose radiation exhibit significantthe biology following low dose radiation differs from that

  2. Radiation Dose From Medical Imaging: A Primer for Emergency Physicians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Jesse G.A.; Mills, Christopher N.; Mogensen, Monique A.; Lee, Christoph I.

    2012-01-01

    risk imparted by low-dose radiation prove to be correct, CTattributable to low doses of ionizing radiation: assessingreducing radiation dose have developed low-dose CT protocols

  3. Introduction and Fundamentals: Course on Advances in Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Ralph H.

    2010-01-01

    1972, Radiation Carcinogenisis at Low Doses, Science 175,may underestimate radiation effects at low doses. Despitelow dose problem it is prudent to assume that all radiation

  4. IceCube: A Cubic Kilometer Radiation Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, S.; IceCube Collaboration

    2008-01-01

    Cubic Kilometer Radiation Detector The IceCube CollaborationA Cubic Kilometer Radiation Detector Spencer R. Klein, forlarge detector is to search for optical Cherenkov radiation

  5. PROTECTIVE SURFACE COATINGS ON SEMICONDUCTOR NUCLEAR RADIATION DETECTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, W.L.

    2010-01-01

    SEMICONDUCTOR NUCLEAR RADIATION DETECTORS W. L. Hansen, E.SEMICONDUCTOR NUCLEAR RADIATION DETECTORS* W. L. Hansen, E.suita­ bility for radiation detectors. Collimated gamma-ray

  6. RADIATION DAMAGE RESISTANCE OF REVERSE ELECTRODE GE COAXIAL DETECTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pehl, Richard H.

    2011-01-01

    Parker, "Radiation Damage of Germanium Detectors", Bull. Am.to radiation damage between the two detectors was clearlyRADIATION DAMAGE RESISTANCE OF REVERSE ELECTRODE GE COAXIAL DETECTORS

  7. Radiative Heat Transfer in Enhanced Hydrogen Outgassing of Glass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kitamura, Rei; Pilon, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    and J.R. Howell, Thermal radiation heat transfer, Hemispheremade: 1. The heat, mass, and radiation transfer are treatedOne- dimensional heat, mass, and radiation transfers were

  8. DOE 2010 Occupational Radiation Exposure November 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Analysis

    2011-11-11

    This report discusses radiation protection and dose reporting requirements, presents the 2010 occupational radiation dose data trended over the past 5 years, and includes instructions to submit successful ALARA projects.

  9. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1978 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eleventh Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1978.

  10. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1977 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1977.

  11. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1975 Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Eighth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for ERDA & ERDA Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and its contractor employees during 1975.

  12. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1976 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ninth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1976.

  13. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1984 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Seventeenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1984.

  14. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1986 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Nineteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1986.

  15. Heat pipes for NEP spacecraft radiators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernst, D.M.

    1981-01-01

    Reliable, low mass, passive radiators for the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Spacecraft require innovative system designs and the use of high performance, high temperature liquid metal heat pipes. This paper covers the evolution of the NEP spacecraft and radiator. 1 ref.

  16. THE BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF IONIZING RADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    sickness · Chronic ­ Low dose over long period of time ­ Cancer, anemia, cataracts #12;Appearance of Biological Effects · Prompt/Acute effect ­ effects seen immediately after large doses of radiation if no treatment is given #12;Dose / Radiation Syndrome Relationship · Dose

  17. Performance Evaluation of Undulator Radiation at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuyu Liu, Geoffrey Krafft, Guimei Wang

    2010-05-01

    The performance of undulator radiation (UR) at CEBAF with a 3.5 m helical undulator is evaluated and compared with APS undulator-A radiation in terms of brilliance, peak brilliance, spectral flux, flux density and intensity distribution.

  18. Flipping photons backward: reversed Cherenkov radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Hongsheng

    Charged particles moving faster than light in a medium produce Cherenkov radiation. In traditional, positive index-of-refraction materials this radiation travels forward. Metamaterials, with negative indices of refraction, ...

  19. Interaction of Radiation with Matter Electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massey, Thomas N.

    Module 2 Interaction of Radiation with Matter · Gammas · Electrons · Charged Particles · Neutron of mass. · Energy from radiation only deposited if it interacts with the material. · Only the amount;Pair Production #12;Gamma Interaction with Water #12;http://physics

  20. Wave radiation in simple geophysical models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, Stuart William

    2013-07-01

    Wave radiation is an important process in many geophysical flows. In particular, it is by wave radiation that flows may adjust to a state for which the dynamics is slow. Such a state is described as “balanced”, meaning ...

  1. Cellular telephone-based radiation detection instrument

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Craig, William W. (Pittsburg, CA); Labov, Simon E. (Berkeley, CA)

    2011-06-14

    A network of radiation detection instruments, each having a small solid state radiation sensor module integrated into a cellular phone for providing radiation detection data and analysis directly to a user. The sensor module includes a solid-state crystal bonded to an ASIC readout providing a low cost, low power, light weight compact instrument to detect and measure radiation energies in the local ambient radiation field. In particular, the photon energy, time of event, and location of the detection instrument at the time of detection is recorded for real time transmission to a central data collection/analysis system. The collected data from the entire network of radiation detection instruments are combined by intelligent correlation/analysis algorithms which map the background radiation and detect, identify and track radiation anomalies in the region.

  2. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1985 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eighteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1985.

  3. Radiation load to the SNAP CCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. V. Mokhov, I. L. Rakhno and S. I. Striganov

    2003-08-14

    Results of an express Monte Carlo analysis with the MARS14 code of radiation load to the CCD optical detectors in the Supernova Acceleration Project (SNAP) mission presented for realistic radiation environment over the satellite orbit.

  4. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1982 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fifteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1982.

  5. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1979 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Twelfth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1979.

  6. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1983 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Sixteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1983.

  7. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1980 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Thirteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1980.

  8. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1981 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fourteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1981.

  9. Survey Paper Cyber security in the Smart Grid: Survey and challenges q

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wenye

    Survey Paper Cyber security in the Smart Grid: Survey and challenges q Wenye Wang , Zhuo Lu Accepted 29 December 2012 Available online 17 January 2013 Keywords: Smart Grid Cyber security Attacks and countermeasures Cryptography Security protocols a b s t r a c t The Smart Grid, generally referred to as the next

  10. Identity and Access Management: Access Management Survey 1 Access Management Survey Questions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    Identity and Access Management: Access Management Survey 1 Access Management Survey Questions The Identity and Access Management (IAM) Technical Architect Group (TAG) was formed by Kevin Morooney, the vice assistance with defining the requirements for Access Management, as outlined in Strategic Recommendations 4

  11. Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics and Radiative Flux

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mace, Gerald

    2008-01-15

    Atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates for the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

  12. Harvesting nanoscale thermal radiation using pyroelectric materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Jin; Frederich, Hugo; Pilon, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Rytov, S. M. , 1953. Theory of Electrical Fluctuation andRadiation Based on the theory of electrical ?uctuation and

  13. CRAD, Environmental Radiation Protection- December 7, 2009

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Environmental Radiation Protection, Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry (HSS CRAD 64-36, Rev. 0)

  14. Optimization of radiation protection: a bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, G.R.; Khan, T.A.; Sullivan, S.G.

    1996-10-01

    This document provides a bibliography of radiation protection optimization documents. Abstracts, an author index, and a subject index are provided.

  15. Anisotropic conducting films for electromagnetic radiation applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cavallo, Francesca; Lagally, Max G.; Rojas-Delgado, Richard

    2015-06-16

    Electronic devices for the generation of electromagnetic radiation are provided. Also provided are methods for using the devices to generate electromagnetic radiation. The radiation sources include an anisotropic electrically conducting thin film that is characterized by a periodically varying charge carrier mobility in the plane of the film. The periodic variation in carrier mobility gives rise to a spatially varying electric field, which produces electromagnetic radiation as charged particles pass through the film.

  16. Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics and Radiative Flux

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mace, Gerald

    Atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates for the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

  17. The variable sky of deep synoptic surveys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridgway, Stephen T.; Matheson, Thomas; Mighell, Kenneth J.; Olsen, Knut A. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85725 (United States); Howell, Steve B., E-mail: ridgway@noao.edu [NASA Ames Research Center, P.O. Box 1, M/S 244-30, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2014-11-20

    The discovery of variable and transient sources is an essential product of synoptic surveys. The alert stream will require filtering for personalized criteria—a process managed by a functionality commonly described as a Broker. In order to understand quantitatively the magnitude of the alert generation and Broker tasks, we have undertaken an analysis of the most numerous types of variable targets in the sky—Galactic stars, quasi-stellar objects (QSOs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and asteroids. It is found that the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) will be capable of discovering ?10{sup 5} high latitude (|b| > 20°) variable stars per night at the beginning of the survey. (The corresponding number for |b| < 20° is orders of magnitude larger, but subject to caveats concerning extinction and crowding.) However, the number of new discoveries may well drop below 100 per night within less than one year. The same analysis applied to GAIA clarifies the complementarity of the GAIA and LSST surveys. Discovery of AGNs and QSOs are each predicted to begin at ?3000 per night and decrease by 50 times over four years. Supernovae are expected at ?1100 per night, and after several survey years will dominate the new variable discovery rate. LSST asteroid discoveries will start at >10{sup 5} per night, and if orbital determination has a 50% success rate per epoch, they will drop below 1000 per night within two years.

  18. Angular clustering in the SUMSS radio survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chris Blake; Tom Mauch; Elaine M. Sadler

    2003-10-05

    We measure the angular correlation function of radio galaxies selected by the 843 MHz Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey (SUMSS). We find that the characteristic imprint of large-scale structure is clearly detectable, and that the survey is very uniform. Through comparison with similar analyses for other wide-area radio surveys - the 1400 MHz NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) and the 325 MHz Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS) - we are able to derive consistent angular clustering parameters, including a steep slope for the clustering function, $w(\\theta) \\propto \\theta^{-1.1}$. We revise upwards previous estimates of the NVSS clustering amplitude, and find no evidence for dependence of clustering properties on radio frequency. It is important to incorporate the full covariance matrix when fitting parameters to the measured correlation function. Once the redshift distribution for mJy radio galaxies has been determined, these projected clustering measurements will permit a robust description of large-scale structure at $z \\sim 0.8$, the median redshift of the sources.

  19. Solar Survey of PV System Owners: San Diego

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The purpose of the survey was to understand the motivation, challenges and benefits perceived by individuals who decided to install solar systems in the City of San Diego. Approximately 2000 surveys were sent, and 641 surveys were completed. The primary response was from the residential sector. Individuals had the option to reply electronically, using Survey Monkey, or to complete a paper survey. All responses were combined and checked to ensure that there were no duplicates.

  20. Radiation Safety Edward O'Connell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /Bureau of Environmental Radiation Protection (BERP) · Regulatory Compliance ­ State Sanitary 16 · Required Radiation to cause ionization depends on the energy #12;Radiation Can Cause Ionization #12;Units of Measurements millirem per year. · At 50,000 feet, the dose rate is about 1 millirem per hour. · There are areas

  1. Radiation Therapy Program Technical Standards Procedure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacMillan, Andrew

    Radiation Therapy Program Technical Standards Procedure Original Approval Date: October 27, 2014 of the Radiation Therapy Program. 1 #12;Radiation Therapy Program Technical Standards Procedure accurately observe, as well as competently and independently complete complex technical procedures in a reasonable amount

  2. Creating Artificial Radiation Belts in the Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauel, Michael E.

    Creating Artificial Radiation Belts in the Lab or "Some Observations of Hot Plasma Trapped Jeff #12;Outline · The Earth's radiation belts and ring current · Fast-electron interchange instability) fusion. #12;#12;"Artificial Radiation Belts" Van Allen kissing Explorer 4 "good bye" before it's launch

  3. Radiation damage issues for superconducting magnet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    and "RAL 71A", developed at RAL · What are the disadvantages? · Can have low radiation hardness so polymer dictates magnet lifetime #12;Known radiation dose limits for polymers Many factors influence rad ions and radicals Ideally we should consider more than just dose... Radiation types do have different

  4. INFORMATION SURFING FOR RADIATION MAP BUILDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    technology in radiation detection is not well suited for the type of scenario described. Currently, searchingINFORMATION SURFING FOR RADIATION MAP BUILDING R. A. Cortez , H. G. Tanner , R. Lumia , and C. T a group of mobile sensors to map radiation over a given planar polygonal region. The advantage

  5. Density Functional Theory Models for Radiation Damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Density Functional Theory Models for Radiation Damage S.L. Dudarev EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association and informative as the most advanced experimental techniques developed for the observation of radiation damage investigation and assessment of radiation damage effects, offering new insight into the origin of temperature

  6. ,FebrUary 1991 Radiation Protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    -N-ASA _Technical Paper _3079 ,FebrUary 1991 Radiation Protection for Human Missions to the Moon Division Radiation Protection for Human Missions to the Moon and Mars Lisa C. Simonsen and John E. Nealy Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia #12;#12;Summary Radiation protection assessments are performed

  7. UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO RADIATION PROTECTION SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Hue Sun

    UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO RADIATION PROTECTION SERVICE SAFE USE OF RADIOGRAPHY SOURCES PROGRAM the Radiation Protection Service, Office of Environmental Health and Safety. The permit must be authorized by the Radiation Protection Service. Once the radiographic testing is complete, the permit is returned

  8. Subject Title: UV Radiation Safety Program at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Hue Sun

    programs. The current UV radiation safety program does not cover exposure to solar UV light. Exposure to solar UV radiation is the predominant cause of skin cancer, particularly when the sun is highest exposure in both occupational and recreational activities. Solar UV radiation also affects the eyes

  9. Topics in radiation at accelerators: Radiation physics for personnel and environmental protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cossairt, J.D.

    1993-11-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Composition of Accelerator Radiation Fields; Shielding of Electrons and Photons at Accelerators; Shielding of Hadrons at Accelerators; Low Energy Prompt Radiation Phenomena; Induced Radioactivity at Accelerators; Topics in Radiation Protection Instrumentation at Accelerators; and Accelerator Radiation Protection Program Elements.

  10. RADIATION CONTROL GUIDE rev 12/99 1-1 RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sin, Peter

    RADIATION CONTROL GUIDE rev 12/99 1-1 CHAPTER 1 RADIATION PROTECTION PROGRAM I. INTRODUCTION In view of increased utilization of ionizing and nonionizing radiation at the University of Florida, a university-wide radiation control program was established in September, l960. The primary responsibilities

  11. Survey of lepton number violation via effective operators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gouvea, Andre de; Jenkins, James [Northwestern University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    2008-01-01

    We survey 129 lepton number violating effective operators, consistent with the minimal standard model gauge group and particle content, of mass dimension up to and including 11. Upon requiring that each one radiatively generates the observed neutrino masses, we extract an associated characteristic cutoff energy scale which we use to calculate other observable manifestations of these operators for a number of current and future experimental probes, concentrating on lepton number violating phenomena. These include searches for neutrinoless double-beta decay and rare meson, lepton, and gauge boson decays. We also consider searches at hadron/lepton collider facilities in anticipation of the CERN LHC and the future ILC. We find that some operators are already disfavored by current data, while more are ripe to be probed by next-generation experiments. We also find that our current understanding of lepton mixing disfavors a subset of higher dimensional operators. While neutrinoless double-beta decay is the most promising signature of lepton number violation for the majority of operators, a handful is best probed by other means. We argue that a combination of constraints from various independent experimental sources will help to pinpoint the ''correct'' model of neutrino mass, or at least aid in narrowing down the set of possibilities.

  12. Industry survey for horizontal wells. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, D.D.; Kaback, D.S. [CDM Federal Programs Corp., Denver, CO (United States); Denhan, M.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Watkins, D. [CDM Federal Programs Corp., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1993-07-01

    An international survey of horizontal environmental wells was performed during May and June of 1993. The purpose of the survey was to provide the environmental industry with an inventory of horizontal environmental wells and information pertaining to the extent of the use of horizontal environmental wells, the variety of horizontal environmental well applications, the types of geologic and hydrogeologic conditions within which horizontal environmental wells have been installed, and the companies that perform horizontal environmental well installations. Other information, such as the cost of horizontal environmental well installations and the results of tests performed on the wells, is not complete but is provided as general information with the caveat that the information should not be used to compare drilling companies. The result of the survey is a catalogue of horizontal environmental wells that are categorized by the objective or use of the wells, the vertical depth of the wells, and the drilling company contracted to install the wells.

  13. Topics in radiation at accelerators: Radiation physics for personnel and environmental protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cossairt, J.D.

    1996-10-01

    In the first chapter, terminology, physical and radiological quantities, and units of measurement used to describe the properties of accelerator radiation fields are reviewed. The general considerations of primary radiation fields pertinent to accelerators are discussed. The primary radiation fields produced by electron beams are described qualitatively and quantitatively. In the same manner the primary radiation fields produced by proton and ion beams are described. Subsequent chapters describe: shielding of electrons and photons at accelerators; shielding of proton and ion accelerators; low energy prompt radiation phenomena; induced radioactivity at accelerators; topics in radiation protection instrumentation at accelerators; and accelerator radiation protection program elements.

  14. Radiation source with shaped emission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kubiak, Glenn D.; Sweatt, William C.

    2003-05-13

    Employing a source of radiation, such as an electric discharge source, that is equipped with a capillary region configured into some predetermined shape, such as an arc or slit, can significantly improve the amount of flux delivered to the lithographic wafers while maintaining high efficiency. The source is particularly suited for photolithography systems that employs a ringfield camera. The invention permits the condenser which delivers critical illumination to the reticle to be simplified from five or more reflective elements to a total of three or four reflective elements thereby increasing condenser efficiency. It maximizes the flux delivered and maintains a high coupling efficiency. This architecture couples EUV radiation from the discharge source into a ring field lithography camera.

  15. Radiation-hardened polymeric films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, C. Jr.; Hughes, R.C.; Kepler, R.G.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1984-07-16

    The radiation-induced conductivity of polymeric dielectrics with low electronic mobility is reduced by doping with electron donor or electron acceptor compounds at a level of 10/sup 15/ to 10/sup 21/ molecules of dopant/cm/sup 3/. Polyesters, polyolefins, perfluoropolyolefins, vinyl polymers, vinylidene polymers, polycarbonates, polysulfones and polyimides can benefit from such a treatment. Usable dopants include 2,4,7-trinitro-9-fluorenone, tetracyanethylene, 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane, m-dinitrobenzene, 2-isopropylcarbazole, and triphenylamine.

  16. Radiation-hardened polymeric films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jr., Charles (Albuquerque, NM); Hughes, Robert C. (Albuquerque, NM); Kepler, R. Glen (Albuquerque, NM); Kurtz, Steven R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1986-01-01

    The radiation-induced conductivity of polymeric dielectrics with low electronic mobility is reduced by doping with electron donor or electron acceptor compounds at a level of 10.sup.15 to 10.sup.21 molecules of dopant/cm.sup.3. Polyesters, polyolefins, perfluoropolyolefins, vinyl polymers, vinylidene polymers, polycarbonates, polysulfones and polyimides can benefit from such a treatment. Usable dopants include 2,4,7-trinitro-9-fluorenone, tetracyanethylene, 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane, m-dinitrobenzene, 2-isopropylcarbazole, and triphenylamine.

  17. Environmental radiation detection via thermoluminescence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, S.D.

    1993-03-23

    The method and apparatus of the present invention relate to cryogenically cooling a thermoluminescent material, exposing it to a low level of radiation (less than about 1 R) while it is at the cooled temperature, warming the thermoluminescent material to room temperature'' and counting the photons emitted during heating. Sufficient sensitivity is achieved without exposing the thermoluminescent material to ultraviolet light thereby simplifying the measurements.

  18. Environmental radiation detection via thermoluminescence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Steven D. (Richland, WA)

    1993-01-01

    The method and apparatus of the present invention relate to cryogenically cooling a thermoluminescent material, exposing it to a low level of radiation (less than about 1 R) while it is at the cooled temperature, warming the thermoluminescent material to "room temperature", and counting the photons emitted during heating. Sufficient sensitivity is achieved without exposing the thermoluminescent material to ultraviolet light thereby simplifying the measurements.

  19. The Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey Data Release

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Bell; R. Manchester; F. Crawford; A. Lyne; F. Camilo; V. Kaspi; I. Stairs; D. Morris; N. D'Amico; N. McKay; M. Kramer; D. Sheppard; A. Possenti

    1999-11-17

    The Parkes multibeam pulsar survey began in 1997 and is now about 50% complete. It has discovered more than 400 new pulsars so far, including a number of young, high magnetic field, and relativistic binary pulsars. Early results, descriptions of the survey and follow up timing programs can be found in papers by Lyne et al. (1999 MNRAS in press, astro-ph/9911313), Camilo et al. (astro-ph/9911185), and Manchester et al. (astro-ph/9911319). This paper describes the data release policy and how you can gain access to the raw data and details on the pulsars discovered.

  20. Utility FGD Survey, January--December 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hance, S.L.; McKibben, R.S.; Jones, F.M. )

    1992-03-01

    The Utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) Survey report, which is generated by a computerized data base management system, represents a survey of operational and planned domestic utility flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. It summarizes information contributed by the utility industry, system and equipment suppliers, system designers, research organizations, and regulatory agencies. The data cover system design, fuel characteristics, operating history, and actual system performance. Also included is a unit-by-unit discussion of problems and solutions associated with the boilers, scrubbers, and FGD systems. The development status (operational, under construction, or in the planning stages), system supplier, process, waste disposal practice, and regulatory class are tabulated alphabetically by utility company.