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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mud cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Mud-Brick Architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this layer with mud plaster (fig. 2; Arnold 2003: 47;with reeds coated in mud plaster, were the source of many ofprehistoric period, mud plaster increasingly was employed

Emery, Virginia L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

GLADY CASSIT Y VANDALIA MURPHY CR EEK BU CKHN-CENT URY CLAY  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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3

Red mud characterization using nuclear analytical techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Red mud is a toxic waste left as a byproduct in aluminum production Bayer process. Since it contains significant concentrations of other chemical elements interesting for industry, including REE, it is also potential secondary ore source. Recent events in some countries have shown that red mud presents a serious environmental hazard if not properly stored. The subject of our study is the red mud from an ex-aluminum plant in Obrovac, Croatia, left from processing of bauxite mined during late 70's and early 80's at the eastern Adriatic coast and since than stored in open concrete basins for more than 30 years. We have used energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence analysis (both tube and radioactive source excitation), fast neutron activation analysis and passive gamma spectrometry to identify a number of elements present in the red mud, their concentration levels and radioactivity in the red mud. The high concentrations of Al, Si, Ca, Ti and Fe have been measured. Chemical elements Sc, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, As, Se, Br, Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Pb, Th and U were found in lower concentrations. No significant levels of radioactivity have been measured. (authors)

Obhodas, J.; Sudac, D.; Matjacic, L. [Dept. of Experimental Physics, Inst. Ruder Boskovic, Zagreb (Croatia); Valkovic, V. [A.C.T.d.o.o., Prilesje 4, Zagreb (Croatia)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 544: Cellars, Mud Pits, and Oil Spills, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 544: Cellars, Mud Pits, and Oil Spills, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. The corrective action sites (CASs) within CAU 544 are located within Areas 2, 7, 9, 10, 12, 19, and 20 of the Nevada National Security Site. Corrective Action Unit 544 comprises the following CASs: • 02-37-08, Cellar & Mud Pit • 02-37-09, Cellar & Mud Pit • 07-09-01, Mud Pit • 09-09-46, U-9itsx20 PS #1A Mud Pit • 10-09-01, Mud Pit • 12-09-03, Mud Pit • 19-09-01, Mud Pits (2) • 19-09-03, Mud Pit • 19-09-04, Mud Pit • 19-25-01, Oil Spill • 19-99-06, Waste Spill • 20-09-01, Mud Pits (2) • 20-09-02, Mud Pit • 20-09-03, Mud Pit • 20-09-04, Mud Pits (2) • 20-09-06, Mud Pit • 20-09-07, Mud Pit • 20-09-10, Mud Pit • 20-25-04, Oil Spills • 20-25-05, Oil Spills The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and data confirming that the closure objectives for CASs within CAU 544 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were performed: • Review the current site conditions, including the concentration and extent of contamination. • Implement any corrective actions necessary to protect human health and the environment. • Properly dispose of corrective action and investigation wastes. • Document Notice of Completion and closure of CAU 544 issued by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection.

Mark Krauss and Catherine Birney

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

WH ITNEY CAN YON-CART ER CR K YELLOW CR EEK_WY_D PIN EVIEW AN  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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6

WH ITNEY CAN YON-CART ER CR K YELLOW CR EEK_WY_D PIN EVIEW AN  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface.Laboratory in Golden, Colorado6 March

7

WH ITNEY CAN YON-CART ER CR K YELLOW CR EEK_WY_D PIN EVIEW AN  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface.Laboratory in Golden, Colorado6 MarchLiquids

8

Mud return line connector apparatus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The preferred and illustrated embodiment is a connector adapted to be joined above a blowout preventer and below the rotary table of a drilling rig. It collects the annular flow of returned drilling mud and directs mud to an incorporated, radially directed connective nipple. It enables the blowout preventer to be adjusted in location relative to the drilling rig and further accommodates a variable level of drilling mud in the annular space. The radial nipple connects with a mud line extending at some radial direction with a slope causing the mud to flow by gravity from the annular space to remote located mud tanks.

Ward, B.N.

1981-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

9

Mud degasser method and apparatus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for degassing mud is disclosed. The mud, which has been returned from a borehole, is forced to flow upwardly through a main cylindrical housing by the action of an auger device. The auger flight is spaced from the auger shaft, so that a longitudinally extending, axial passageway is formed within the housing for removal of gases from the mud. The auger flight is comprised of a plurality of sections, each axially spaced from one another, with a perforated member being interposed therebetween. The combined action of the flight and the perforated member causes the mud to assume a flow path which releases an unexpected amount of gas therefrom. An annular trough at the top of the housing collects the degasified mud. A closure member at the upper end of the housing enables the axial passageway to be evacuated which enhances the removal of gases from the mud.

Shifflett, W.M.

1981-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

10

LOOKOU T U-87 U-70 PEC ONI C COM AN CHE CR EEK U-107 HUGO CLIFF  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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11

LOOKOU T U-87 U-70 PEC ONI C COM AN CHE CR EEK U-107 HUGO CLIFF  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecember 2005 (Thousand9,0, 1997EnvironmentElectricityrgy81 § ¨ ¦

12

LOOKOU T U-87 U-70 PEC ONI C COM AN CHE CR EEK U-107 HUGO CLIFF  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecember 2005 (Thousand9,0, 1997EnvironmentElectricityrgy81 § ¨ ¦Liquids Reserve

13

Spectroscopic Investigation of p-Shell Lambda Hypernuclei by the (e,e'K+) Reaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hypernuclear spectroscopy is a powerful tool to investigate Lambda-N interaction. Compared with other Lambda hypernuclei productions, electroproduction via the (e,e'K+) reaction has the advantage of exciting states deeply inside of the hypernucleus and achieving sub-MeV energy resolution. The E05-115 experiment, which was successfully performed in 2009, is the third generation hypernuclear experiment in JLab Hall C. A new splitter magnet and electron spectrometer were installed, and beam energy of 2.344 GeV was selected in this experiment. These new features gave better field uniformity, optics quality and made the ?tilt method? more effective in improving yield-to-background ratio. The magnetic optics of the spectrometers were carefully studied with GEANT simulation, and corrections were applied to compensate for the fringe field cross talk between the compact spectrometer magnets. The non-linear least chi-squared method was used to further calibrate the spectrometer with the events from Lambda, Sigma0 and B12Lambda and uniform magnetic optics as well as precise kinematics were achieved. Several p-shell Lambda hypernuclear spectra, including B12Lambda, Be10Lambda, He7Lambda, were obtained with high energy resolution and good accuracy. For B12Lambda, eight peaks were recognized with the resolution of ~540keV (FWHM), and the ground state binding energy was obtained as 11.529 ± 0.012(stat.) ± 0.110(syst.) MeV. Be10Lambda, twelve peaks were recognized with the resolution of ~520keV (FWHM), and the binding energy of the ground state was determined as 8.710 ± 0.059(stat.) ± 0.114(syst.) MeV. For He7Lambda, three peaks were recognized with the resolution of ~730keV, and the ground state binding energy was obtained as 5.510 ± 0.050(stat.) ± 0.120(syst.) MeV. Compared with the published data of B12Lambda from the JLab Hall A experiment, four extra peaks were fitted and interpreted thanks to the highest ever energy resolution and sufficient statistics. The determined binding energy of Be10Lambda provides new information on charge symmetry breaking effect in the Lambda-N interaction. Compared with the results of He7Lambda from the E01-011 experiment, the ground state position is consistent with 4 times more statistics, and two extra peaks corresponding to excited states were recognized.

Chen, Chunhua [Hampton University

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 357: Mud Pits and Waste Dump, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 357: Mud Pits and Waste Dump, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. The CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Unit 357 is comprised of 14 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 1, 4, 7, 8, 10, and 25 of the NTS (Figure 1-1). The NTS is located approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 357 consists of 11 CASs that are mud pits located in Areas 7, 8, and 10. The mud pits were associated with drilling activities conducted on the NTS in support of the underground nuclear weapons testing. The remaining three CASs are boxes and pipes associated with Building 1-31.2el, lead bricks, and a waste dump. These CAS are located in Areas 1, 4, and 25, respectively. The following CASs are shown on Figure 1-1: CAS 07-09-02, Mud Pit; CAS 07-09-03, Mud Pit; CAS 07-09-04, Mud Pit; CAS 07-09-05, Mud Pit; CAS 08-09-01, Mud Pit; CAS 08-09-02, Mud Pit; CAS 08-09-03, Mud Pit; CAS 10-09-02, Mud Pit; CAS 10-09-04, Mud Pit; CAS 10-09-05, Mud Pit; CAS 10-09-06, Mud Pit, Stains, Material; CAS 01-99-01, Boxes, Pipes; CAS 04-26-03, Lead Bricks; and CAS 25-15-01, Waste Dump. The purpose of the corrective action activities was to obtain analytical data that supports the closure of CAU 357. Environmental samples were collected during the investigation to determine whether contaminants exist and if detected, their extent. The investigation and sampling strategy was designed to target locations and media most likely to be contaminated (biased sampling). A general site conceptual model was developed for each CAS to support and guide the investigation as outlined in the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan (NNSA/NSO, 2003b). This CR summarizes the results of corrective action activities, provides the data confirming the selection of corrective actions, and provides documentation of the completed closure activities conducted in accordance with the SAFER Plan (NNSA/NSO, 2003b). A brief description of the CAU and associated CASs is provided in the following section. A more detailed history of each CAS is provided in the SAFER Plan for CAU 357 (NNSA/NSO, 2003b).

Laura A. Pastor

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 553: Areas 19, 20 Mud Pits and Cellars, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 553: Areas 19, 20 Mud Pits and Cellars, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. The corrective action sites (CASs) within CAU 553 are located within Areas 19 and 20 of the Nevada Test Site. Corrective Action Unit 553 is comprised of the following CASs: •19-99-01, Mud Spill •19-99-11, Mud Spill •20-09-09, Mud Spill •20-99-03, Mud Spill The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and provide data confirming that the closure objectives for CASs within CAU 553 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were or will be performed: •Review the current site conditions including the concentration and extent of contamination. •Implement any corrective actions necessary to protect human health and the environment. •Properly dispose of corrective action and investigation wastes. •Document the Notice of Completion and closure of CAU 553 to be issued by Nevada Division of Environmental Protection.

Al Wickline

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Mud Logging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

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17

MUD DAUBERS Timothy J. Gibb, Extension Entomologist  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wasp with blue wings. This one does not build its own mud nest but instead uses the abandoned nests, activities, and facilities without regard to race, religion, color, sex, age, national origin or ancestry

Ginzel, Matthew

18

Blanchard Cr JohnsonGulch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dirt yfaceCr Sheep Cr Essex Cr Dic key Cr Paola Cr Cr ystalCr Deerlick Cr Howe Cr M id dle Fork FlatheadRiver Mid dle Fork Bowl C r So u th Fork Scalp Cr West Fork WhistlerCr GraniteCr DodgeCr Flathea d

19

Mud E Boot title page2  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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20

Category:Mud Logging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBostonFacilityCascadeJump to:Lists Jump to: Jump to:page? For detailedMud

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mud cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Experiments concerning the dynamic filtration of drilling mud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXPERIMENTS CONCERNING THE DYNAMIC FILTRATION OF DRILLING MUD A Thesis by JOHN GARY ELLER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 1989 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering EXPERIMENTS CONCERNING THE DYNAMIC FILTRATION OF DRILLING MUD A Thesis by JOHN GARY ELLER Approved as to style and content by: Hans C. Ju am-Wold (Chair of Committee) tephen A. Holditch (Member) Ted...

Eller, John Gary

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

New mud system produces solids-free, reusable water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Corpus Christi, Texas, based Cameron Equipment Co., Inc., has developed a closed-loop mud treating system that removes solids from water-based systems and leaves the separated fluid clean and chemical free enough to be re-used directly on the rig. The system has been successfully applied by a Gulf of Mexico operator in areas where zero discharge is required. The alternative mud conditions program offered by the developers is called the Cameron Fluid Recycling System. Designed for closed-loop water-based fluids, the system is a new method of removing solids from normally discharged fluids such as drilling mud, waste and wash water, or any other water-based fluid that contains undesirable solids. The patented method efficiently produces end products that are (1) dry solids; and (2) essentially 100% solids-free fluid that can be re-used in the same mud system. All excess drilling mud, and all wash water that would normally go to the reserve pit or a cuttings barge are collected in a tank. Recycled fluid is compatible with the mud system fluid, no harmful chemicals are used, and pH is not altered.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 234: Mud Pits, Cellars, and Mud Spills Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 234, Mud Pits, Cellars, and Mud Spills, located in Areas 2, 3, 4, 12, and 15 at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996; as amended February 2008). Corrective Action Unit 234 is comprised of the following 12 corrective action sites: •02-09-48, Area 2 Mud Plant #1 •02-09-49, Area 2 Mud Plant #2 •02-99-05, Mud Spill •03-09-02, Mud Dump Trenches •04-44-02, Mud Spill •04-99-02, Mud Spill •12-09-01, Mud Pit •12-09-04, Mud Pit •12-09-08, Mud Pit •12-30-14, Cellar •12-99-07, Mud Dump •15-09-01, Mud Pit The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure of CAU 234 with no further corrective action. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 234: Mud Pits, Cellars, and Mud Spills (NNSA/NSO, 2007). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process: •Determine whether contaminants of concern are present. •If contaminants of concern are present, determine their extent. •Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. The CAU 234 dataset from the investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the dataset for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs.

Grant Evenson

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Blanchard Cr West Fk Clearwater R  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dirt yfaceCr Sheep Cr Essex Cr Dick ey Cr Paola Cr Cry stalCr Deerlick Cr Howe Cr M id dle Fork FlatheadRiver Mid dle Fork Bowl Cr So u th Fork Scalp Cr West Fork WhistlerCr GraniteCr DodgeCr Flathead

25

Advanced Mud System for Microhole Coiled Tubing Drilling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An advanced mud system was designed and key components were built that augment a coiled tubing drilling (CTD) rig that is designed specifically to drill microholes (less than 4-inch diameter) with advanced drilling techniques. The mud system was tailored to the hydraulics of the hole geometries and rig characteristics required for microholes and is capable of mixing and circulating mud and removing solids while being self contained and having zero discharge capability. Key components of this system are two modified triplex mud pumps (High Pressure Slurry Pumps) for advanced Abrasive Slurry Jetting (ASJ) and a modified Gas-Liquid-Solid (GLS) Separator for well control, flow return and initial processing. The system developed also includes an additional component of an advanced version of ASJ which allows cutting through most all materials encountered in oil and gas wells including steel, cement, and all rock types. It includes new fluids and new ASJ nozzles. The jetting mechanism does not require rotation of the bottom hole assembly or drill string, which is essential for use with Coiled Tubing (CT). It also has low reactive forces acting on the CT and generates cuttings small enough to be easily cleaned from the well bore, which is important in horizontal drilling. These cutting and mud processing components and capabilities compliment the concepts put forth by DOE for microhole coiled tubing drilling (MHTCTD) and should help insure the reality of drilling small diameter holes quickly and inexpensively with a minimal environmental footprint and that is efficient, compact and portable. Other components (site liners, sump and transfer pumps, stacked shakers, filter membranes, etc.. ) of the overall mud system were identified as readily available in industry and will not be purchased until we are ready to drill a specific well.

Kenneth Oglesby

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

An In-depth Investigation of an Aluminum Chloride Retarded Mud Acid System on Sandstone Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sandstone acidizing using mud acid is a quick and complex process where dissolution and precipitation occur simultaneously. Retarded mud acids are less reactive with the rock reducing the reaction rate hence increased penetration into the formation...

Aneto, Nnenna

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

27

The corrosion of some stainless steels in a marine mud  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report presents the results for three alloys: carbon steel, 316L stainless steel and a proprietary super duplex stainless steel (UNS S32760), exposed in a marine mud off the south coast of England for 5 years. Analysis of the mud showed it to be very aggressive using a corrosion index developed at the University of Manchester. Carbon steel showed a typical corrosion rate for microbial attack with pits up to 0.64mm deep. The 316L stainless steel had extensive broad, shallow attack with a few, deeper pits. The Z100 parent pipe and weldments showed no evidence of corrosion attack.

Francis, R.; Byrne, G. [Weir Materials and Foundries Park Works, Manchester (United Kingdom); Campbell, H.S. [Univ. of Surrey (United Kingdom). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Speciation and mobility of heavy metals in mud in coastal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the properties of the pore water in the mud may induce the release of some heavy metals into the mud. Field, but the heavy metals in the groundwater are in- creased. The release of heavy metals into pore water dueORIGINAL ARTICLE Speciation and mobility of heavy metals in mud in coastal reclamation areas

Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

29

HYDROTHERMAL ACTIVITY AND CARBON-DIOXIDE DISCHARGE AT SHRUB AND UPPER KLAWASI MUD VOLCANOES,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HYDROTHERMAL ACTIVITY AND CARBON-DIOXIDE DISCHARGE AT SHRUB AND UPPER KLAWASI MUD VOLCANOES and July 1973 at Shrub and Upper Klawasi mud volcanoes 8 ii #12;HYDROTHERMAL ACTIVITY AND CARBON. Map of diffuse carbon dioxide flow from soils near the summit of Shrub mud volcano 9 TABLES 1

30

The application of a new polymer mud to horizontal drilling in the Dagang Oilfield  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new kind of polymer muds, which is generally referred to as the amphionic polymer mud, has been applied to the two horizontal well drilling for the first time in the Dagang Oilfield, located in east China. In this mud system, two amphionic polymers are usually used as the main additives, the one with high molecular weight is an inhibitive encapsuler and filtration control agent, and the other one with low molecular weight is a deflocculant. The amphionic polymer, just as its name, is defined as the polymer that both organic cations and anions simultaneously exist in their molecular chains. The design criteria, formulations and properties of this mud system are discussed. As a case history, the field performance of this new polymer mud in the different sections of the second well (by name Guan H-1, a medium-radius horizontal well) is also given. It was shown from the laboratory and field tests that the amphionic polymer mud not only has all the advantages of the polymer muds commonly used, but is able to overcome the disadvantages of those muds, indicated by its highly inhibitive character while maintaining excellent mud performances. For this reason, the major drilling problems for horizontal wells in the Dagang Oilfield, such as hole cleaning, wellbore stability, lubricity, lost circulation and formation damage, which were hardly solved by the use of other water-based muds, could be solved successfully by the use of the amphionic polymer mud at much lower cost than the oil-based mud.

Yan, J.; Jiang, G.; Zong, R.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Microbes turn mud into electricity By Paula Hartman Cohen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compounds, such as toluene, to electricity. Lovley says this suggests that some Geobacters can be usedMicrobes turn mud into electricity By Paula Hartman Cohen News Office staff microorganisms can transform organic matter commonly found at the bottom of the ocean into electrical energy

Lovley, Derek

32

Optimization of Mud Hammer Drilling Performance--A Program to Benchmark the Viability of Advanced Mud Hammer Drilling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operators continue to look for ways to improve hard rock drilling performance through emerging technologies. A consortium of Department of Energy, operator and industry participants put together an effort to test and optimize mud driven fluid hammers as one emerging technology that has shown promise to increase penetration rates in hard rock. The thrust of this program has been to test and record the performance of fluid hammers in full scale test conditions including, hard formations at simulated depth, high density/high solids drilling muds, and realistic fluid power levels. This paper details the testing and results of testing two 7 3/4 inch diameter mud hammers with 8 1/2 inch hammer bits. A Novatek MHN5 and an SDS Digger FH185 mud hammer were tested with several bit types, with performance being compared to a conventional (IADC Code 537) tricone bit. These tools functionally operated in all of the simulated downhole environments. The performance was in the range of the baseline ticone or better at lower borehole pressures, but at higher borehole pressures the performance was in the lower range or below that of the baseline tricone bit. A new drilling mode was observed, while operating the MHN5 mud hammer. This mode was noticed as the weight on bit (WOB) was in transition from low to high applied load. During this new ''transition drilling mode'', performance was substantially improved and in some cases outperformed the tricone bit. Improvements were noted for the SDS tool while drilling with a more aggressive bit design. Future work includes the optimization of these or the next generation tools for operating in higher density and higher borehole pressure conditions and improving bit design and technology based on the knowledge gained from this test program.

Arnis Judzis

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 234: Mud Pits, Cellars, and Mud Spills, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit 234, Mud Pits, Cellars, and Mud Spills, consists of 12 inactive sites located in the north and northeast section of the NTS. The 12 CAU 234 sites consist of mud pits, mud spills, mud sumps, and an open post-test cellar. The CAU 234 sites were all used to support nuclear testing conducted in the Yucca Flat and Rainier Mesa areas during the 1950s through the 1970s. The CASs in CAU 234 are being investigated because hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and the environment. Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for the CASs. Additional information will be generated by conducting a CAI before evaluating and selecting appropriate corrective action alternatives.

Grant Evenson

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Mud Pit Risk-Based Closure Strategy Report, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the findings of the human and ecological risk assessment for the NTS mud pits. The risk assessment utilizes data from 52 of the 270 NTS mud pits in conjunction with corroborative data from 87 other DOE mud pits associated with nuclear testing (at locations on the NTS, in the western United States, and Alaska) as well as relevant process knowledge. Based on the risk assessment findings, the report provides a strategy for further evaluation, characterization, and closure of all 270 NTS mud pit CASs using the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER).

Brain Hoenes

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

E-Print Network 3.0 - amazonian shelf muds Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

shoals... to build a subaqueous mud delta on the adjacent continental shelf along a broad front across Atchafalaya... Continental Shelf Research 25 (2005) 2213-2232 Storm...

36

Seismic interpretation and classification of mud volcanoes of the South Caspian Basin, offshore Azerbaijan.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basin. A 2D seismic grid in southeastern offshore Azerbaijan is used to define the areal distribution of mud volcanoes and to make a classification of the mud volcanoes based on characteristic seismic features. As a result detailed database for each...

Yusifov, Mehdi Zahid

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Are reefs and mud mounds really so different? Rachel Wood ,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Are reefs and mud mounds really so different? Rachel Wood ,1 Department of Earth Sciences-1223-333-450. E-mail address: rw43@esc.cam.ac.uk (R. Wood). 1 Current address: Schlu¨mberger Cambridge Research). While mud mounds are now accepted to be rigid, framework reefs (see Pratt, 1982; 1995; Webb, 1996; Wood

38

Study of the seismic attenuation generated by the mud layer in Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the gassy sediment in the mud layer, and the high attenuation of the compressional and shear waves. This mud layer sediment is heavy and is not suspended in the water. Furthermore, it is compacted enough to support shear stresses and, therefore, has a...

Perez Arredondo, Javier Antonio

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

39

MA 125-4 CR PH 105-4 CR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

490-3 CR Mechanical Engineering Design I I Proj Lab Proj Lab MA 125-4 CR Calculus I or Equivalent M MEMA 125-4 CR Calculus I or Equivalent PH 105-4 CR Gen Physics with Calculus MA 126-4 CR Calculus I I or Equivalent M Required Course Elective Course Prerequisite NS M W LAB Proj Lab Natural Science Mathematics

Carver, Jeffrey C.

40

Oxidation behavior of Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxidation of hypoeutectic Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb alloys containing 6 and 12% Nb at 950 C resulted in formation of a multiproduct scale consisting of a continuous Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} outer layer and an inner region of discrete CrNbO{sub 4} products interspersed with Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Overall oxidation behavior resembled that of Cr as reactions with the Cr-rich phase tended to dominate. Oxidation resistance, in terms of reaction kinetics and scale adherence, increased with increasing volume fraction of the Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb eutectic phase. A model for the oxidation of these alloys based on the growth of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the Cr-rich matrix regions and the formation of a slower growing CrNbO{sub 4} on the Cr{sub 2}Nb-enriched phase can qualitatively explain the development of the multiproduct scale and the observed gravimetric and spallation results. Possible microstructural/compositional modifications to improve oxidation resistance are suggested.

Tortorelli, P.F.; Pint, B.A.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mud cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Remedial Action Work Plan Amchitka Island Mud Pit Closures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This remedial action work plan presents the project organization and construction procedures developed for the performance of the remedial actions at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE's) sites on Amchitka Island, Alaska. During the late1960s and early 1970s, the U.S. Department of Defense and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (the predecessor agency to DOE) used Amchitka Island as a site for underground nuclear tests. A total of nine sites on the Island were considered for nuclear testing; however, tests were only conducted at three sites (i.e., Long Shot in 1965, Milrow in 1969, and Cannikin in 1971). In addition to these three sites, large diameter emplacement holes were drilled in two other locations (Sites D and F) and an exploratory hole was in a third location (Site E). It was estimated that approximately 195 acres were disturbed by drilling or preparation for drilling in conjunction with these activities. The disturbed areas include access roads, spoil-disposal areas, mud pits which have impacted the environment, and an underground storage tank at the hot mix plant which was used to support asphalt-paving operations on the island. The remedial action objective for Amchitka Island is to eliminate human and ecological exposure to contaminants by capping drilling mud pits, removing the tank contents, and closing the tank in place. The remedial actions will meet State of Alaska regulations, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service refuge management goals, address stakeholder concerns, and address the cultural beliefs and practices of the native people. The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office will conduct work on Amchitka Island under the authority of the Comprehensive Emergency Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. Field activities are scheduled to take place May through September 2001. The results of these activities will be presented in a subsequent Closure Report.

DOE/NV

2001-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

42

The geological and geochemical study of the mud volcanoes of Azerbaijan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Azerbaijan is a classic region for the study of mud volcanism. Of the 700 mud volcanoes known in the world, 220 are in Azerbaijan. These are of great interest, not least in relation to oil and gas exploration since they give information on subsurface sediments beyond the reach of drilling. Mud volcanoes are clearly visible on satellite images. They are confined to structural lineaments and associated fractures. Changes in the morphology of some mud volcanoes post-eruption can be detected from a series of images pre-dating and post-dating eruptions. Mud volcanoes are notable for gradients of temperature that are by an order of magnitude or a factor of 102 greater than the temperature gradients established elsewhere. The gases of mud volcanoes consist mainly of methane (95-100%). There are small amounts of C{sub 2-6}, CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, He and Ar. The isotopic composition of carbon (ICC) within the methane varies from -61.29. to -35.W{close_quotes} which is isotopically heavier than the methane from producing fields. The ICC of the CO{sub 2} has a very wide range (from -49.6% to +23.1%), indicating several sources of its formation. The isotopically superheavy CO{sub 2} (+5%) is especially interesting. Oils from mud volcanoes are typically severely biodegraded. Their ICC ranges from -24.76% to -28.2%. A relationship between {partial_derivative}{sup l3}C of oils and ages of accumulations has been established. Waters of mud volcanoes are lightly mineralised, containing chiefly bicarbonates and sodium. The hydrogen composition of the water is abnormally heavy. Ejected rocks from mud volcanoes range in age from Cretaceous - Pliocene. Their study suggests that deeply buried reservoirs maintain good poroperm characteristics because of relatively little catagenesis.

Guliyev, I.A.; Aliyev, A.A.; Rahmanov, R.R. [Geological Institute of the Azerbaijan academy of sciences (GIA), Baku (Azerbaijan)] [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

INTEGRATED DRILLING SYSTEM USING MUD ACTUATED DOWN HOLE HAMMER AS PRIMARY ENGINE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A history and project summary of the development of an integrated drilling system using a mud-actuated down-hole hammer as its primary engine are given. The summary includes laboratory test results, including atmospheric tests of component parts and simulated borehole tests of the hammer system. Several remaining technical hurdles are enumerated. A brief explanation of commercialization potential is included. The primary conclusion for this work is that a mud actuated hammer can yield substantial improvements to drilling rate in overbalanced, hard rock formations. A secondary conclusion is that the down-hole mud actuated hammer can serve to provide other useful down-hole functions including generation of high pressure mud jets, generation of seismic and sonic signals, and generation of diagnostic information based on hammer velocity profiles.

John V. Fernandez; David S. Pixton

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

E-Print Network 3.0 - active dashgil mud Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8, 09773, 2006 SRef-ID: 1607-7962graEGU06-A-09773 Summary: Geosciences Union 2006 Sediment and fluid migration in mud volcanoes: Dashgil-Bakhar area, Azerbaijan A... in the...

45

Electronics I 4 cr with Lab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECE 332 Electronics I 4 cr with Lab ECE 370 Signals & Systems 3 cr co ECE 225 Electric Circuits 3 106 - 4 cr General Physics with Calculus CS 116 - 1 cr Intro to Comp. Program. Lab co MATH 227 4 cr cr Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering -- Department of Physics and Astromony

Carver, Jeffrey C.

46

Nanoscale Phase Separation In Epitaxial Cr-Mo and Cr-V Alloy...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Separation In Epitaxial Cr-Mo and Cr-V Alloy Thin Films Studied Using Atom Probe Tomography: Comparison Of Nanoscale Phase Separation In Epitaxial Cr-Mo and Cr-V Alloy Thin Films...

47

Mathematics Required Courses Cr. Semester Gr.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discrete Mathematics 3 Math 321 or Math 421 Applied Stat. Methods Stat. Theory I 3 Elective Course* Cr Student: ID# Catalog: Advisor Upper Division Courses* Required Courses Cr. Semester Gr. *20 cr

Delene, David J.

48

Strike-slip faulting as a trigger mechanism for overpressure release through piercement structures. Implications for the Lusi mud volcano, Indonesia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Implications for the Lusi mud volcano, Indonesia A. Mazzini a,*, A. Nermoen a , M. Krotkiewski a , Y 2009 Accepted 12 March 2009 Available online 19 March 2009 Keywords: Java, Indonesia Lusi mud volcano the newly formed Lusi mud volcano in Indonesia (Mazzini et al., 2007). Lusi became active the 29th of May

Mazzini, Adriano

49

Numerical Investigation of Oil -Base-Mud Contamination in Condensates: From Cleanup to Sample Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

through pressure transient testing after the onset of invasion. Mud filtrate invasion takes place. For such fluids, contamination in the stock tank oil is just as critical as that of the bulk fluid because only fluids can take extremely long times to completely clean up during a formation test or even during a well

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

50

Author's personal copy Numerical investigation of oil-base mud contamination in condensates: From  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

connectivity through pressure transient testing after the onset of invasion. Mud filtrate invasion takes place. For such fluids, contamination in the stock tank oil is just as critical as that of the bulk fluid because only fluids can take extremely long times to completely clean up during a formation test or even during a well

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

51

Investigation of the Dashigil mud volcano (Azerbaijan) using beryllium-10 K.J. Kim a,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geological Research Division, Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources, Daejeon 305-350, Republic of Korea b Department of Geology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48202, USA c Geology Institute volcanoes, sedimentary volca- noes, gas­oil volcanoes etc. Mud volcanoes resemble magmatic volcanoes

52

Modeling study of growth and potential geohazard for LUSI mud volcano: East Java, Indonesia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling study of growth and potential geohazard for LUSI mud volcano: East Java, Indonesia Bambang., Wisma Mulia 22nd Floor, JI. Jend. Gatot Subroto 42, 12710 Jakarta, Indonesia b Bakosurtanal, Jl. Jakarta-Bogor Km. 46, 16911 Cibinong, Indonesia c Applied Geology Research Division, Institute of Technology

Manga, Michael

53

Forward osmosis treatment of drilling mud and fracturing wastewater from oil and gas operations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forward osmosis treatment of drilling mud and fracturing wastewater from oil and gas operations fracturing of wells during oil and gas (O&G) exploration consumes large volumes of fresh water and generates fracturing of oil and gas (O&G) wells are becoming of greater concern in the United States and around

54

Sublethal metabolic responses of the hermatypic coral Madracis decactis exposed to drilling mud enriched with ferrochrome lignosulfonate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to each measurement period, aquaria were flushed with 0. 45-um filteresi seawater to remove the drill mud-ferrochrome lignosulfonate suspen- sion so that it and natural particulates present in the aquaria during the normia 1 flow-through mode did... 1 coral protein h ~). Figure A-3: 0/NH4-N ratio for each drill mud + FCLS regime. . . 63 65 . . 67 INTRODUCTI OTN Dr~illin Muds and Dril1 indi Fluids. According to the U. S. Bureau of Land Manage!sent (1976), ove! 8700 oil an!I gas wells have...

Krone, Michael August

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Improvement of SOFC Electrodes through Catalyst Infiltration & Control of Cr Volatilization from FeCr Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation discusses the improvement of SOFC electrodes through catalyst infiltration and control of Cr volatilization from FeCr components.

Visco, S.J.; Jacobson, C.; Kurokawa, H.; Sholklapper, T.; Lu, C.; De Jonghe, L.

2005-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

56

The effect of various mud filtrates on the permeability of sandstone cores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

' or the Degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1954 MAJOR SUBJECT: PETROLEUM ENGINEERING THE EFFECT OF VARIOUS MUD FILTRATES ON THE PERMEABILITY OF SANDSTONE CORES A Thesis By Robert A. Pfile Appr ved as to styIe and content by: (Chairman of mmittee... kind and amount of clay contained in the different cores. INTRODUCTION There is general agreement among members of the petroleum industry that the productive capacity of a well penetrating a clay- containing oil sand may be seriously impaired due...

Pfile, Robert Ambrose

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment Work Plan Mud Pit Release Sites, Amchitka Island, Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Work Plan describes the approach that will be used to conduct human health and ecological risk assessments for Amchitka Island, Alaska, which was utilized as an underground nuclear test site between 1965 and 1971. During this period, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (now the U.S. Department of Energy) conducted two nuclear tests (known as Long Shot and Milrow) and assisted the U.S. Department of Defense with a third test (known as Cannikin). Amchitka Island is approximately 42 miles long and located 1,340 miles west-southwest of Anchorage, Alaska, in the western end of the Aleutian Island archipelago in a group of islands known as the Rat Islands. Historically including deep drilling operations required large volumes of drilling mud, a considerable amount of which was left on the island in exposed mud pits after testing was completed. Therefore, there is a need for drilling mud pit remediation and risk assessment of historical mud pit releases. The scope of this work plan is to document the environmental objectives and the proposed technical site investigation strategies that will be utilized for the site characterization of the constituents in soil, surface water, and sediment at these former testing sites. Its goal is the collection of data in sufficient quantity and quality to determine current site conditions, support a risk assessment for the site surfaces, and evaluate what further remedial action is required to achieve permanent closure of these three sites that will protect both human health and the environment. Suspected compounds of potential ecological concern for investigative analysis at these sites include diesel-range organics, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, volatile organic compounds, and chromium. The results of these characterizations and risk assessments will be used to evaluate corrective action alternatives to include no further action, the implementation of institutional controls, capping on site, or off-sit e disposal of contaminated waste. The results of this evaluation will be presented in a subsequent corrective action decision document.

DOE /NV

2001-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

58

A New Stochastic Modeling of 3-D Mud Drapes Inside Point Bar Sands in Meandering River Deposits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The environment of major sediments of eastern China oilfields is a meandering river where mud drapes inside point bar sand occur and are recognized as important factors for underground fluid flow and distribution of the remaining oil. The present detailed architectural analysis, and the related mud drapes' modeling inside a point bar, is practical work to enhance oil recovery. This paper illustrates a new stochastic modeling of mud drapes inside point bars. The method is a hierarchical strategy and composed of three nested steps. Firstly, the model of meandering channel bodies is established using the Fluvsim method. Each channel centerline obtained from the Fluvsim is preserved for the next simulation. Secondly, the curvature ratios of each meandering river at various positions are calculated to determine the occurrence of each point bar. The abandoned channel is used to characterize the geometry of each defined point bar. Finally, mud drapes inside each point bar are predicted through random sampling of various parameters, such as number, horizontal intervals, dip angle, and extended distance of mud drapes. A dataset, collected from a reservoir in the Shengli oilfield of China, was used to illustrate the mud drapes' building procedure proposed in this paper. The results show that the inner architectural elements of the meandering river are depicted fairly well in the model. More importantly, the high prediction precision from the cross validation of five drilled wells shows the practical value and significance of the proposed method.

Yin, Yanshu, E-mail: yys6587@126.com [Yangtze University, School of Geosciences (China)] [Yangtze University, School of Geosciences (China)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

Underpinning Mathematics/Science: (min 40 cr) Mathematics (16 cr)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Materials Science and Engineering BS Degree Requirements for students beginning in or after Fall 2011 04 324 Introductory Applied Statistics for Engineers Physics (10 cr) Phys 201 or Phys 207 or Phys 247 Modern Physics for Engineers Phys 235 Introduction to Solid State Electronics Phys 241 Intro to Modern

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

60

Method and apparatus for balancing discharge fluid flow in drilling mud treatment units  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method of controlling fluid flow in the drilling mud treatment units of an oil/gas well drilling rig such as, for example, the shale shaker, desander, desilter, and mud cleaner portions thereof provides floating the inlet of an intake conduit at the supernatent liquid layer of the drilling rig reserve pit and providing a common distributor head for routing the supernatent liquid to the various solid control units. A pump is connected to the intake conduit and the header at the intake and discharge respectively. The pump transmits the reserve pit supernatent from the reserve pit to the header by pumping. There is provided one or more branch lines affixed to the header each discharging respectively into the drain of a drilling mud treatment unit associated with the drilling rig with the flow of reserve pit supernatent liquid keeping the various drains open. The drains are positioned to discharge back into the reserve pit. The method saves the use of fresh water for the purpose of keeping drains open by the use of the supernatent liquid.

Gay, C.J.

1983-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mud cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Prediction of pressure depletion from wireline and mud logs, Golden Trend field, Garvin County, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Golden Trend, a giant oil field encompassing several overlapping Pennsylvanian stratigraphic traps on the eastern flank of the Anadarko basin, has undergone a resurgence in the 1980s with deeper drilling for pre-Pennsylvanian targets. Approximately 200 new wells in and near the Antioch Southwest, Panther Creek, and Elmore Northeast waterflood units (T2, 3N, R2, 3W) have encountered evidence of undrained reserves in both established and new pay intervals of Pennsylvanian Hart and Gibson sandstones. Although all porous Hart and Gibson sandstones in the study area were originally oil bearing, evaluation of the state of depletion is necessary for planning future recompletions to these reservoirs. In general, wireline and mud logs over intervals with known production histories exhibit characteristics suggestive of pressure depletion, even in areas of old waterfloods. The most consistent parameters correlating to low reservoir pressure are lost circulation, lack of an increase in penetration rate when drilling porous sandstone, excessive gas effect on neutron-density logs, and low methane and total gas levels on the mud logs. The resistivity invasion profile also reflects lower pressure, but is subtle. The SP curve and gas composition on the mud log do not vary substantially as a function of pressure. Visual sample shows are slightly weaker in depleted sandstones, but are less reliable, owing to dependence on reservoir quality and variations between geologists on oral descriptions of show quality.

Sorenson, R.P.; White, F.W.; Struckel, J.C.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

al cd cr: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

junctions with CrFe and CrFeCr barriers. Although the exact... Robinson, J. W. A.; Banerjee, N.; Blamire, M. G. 2014-03-05 134 SEM CR GRADE Intro to Chem Eng 1 Engineering...

63

The effect of drill mud on the free amino acid pool of Acropora cervicornis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECTS OF DRILL KlD ON THE FREE AMINO ACID POOL OF ACROPORA CERVICORNIS A Thesis BETH JOHN CONNOR Approved as to style and content by: Pr ' Powel an) Thomas Br' t (Member ) $~2r- David Owens (Member ) Robert Reid (Department Head...) December 1983 ABSTRACT THE EFFECTS OF DRILL MUD ON THE FREE AMINO ACID POOL OF ACROPORA CERVICORNIS (December 1983) BETH JOHN CONNOR, B. S. , City College/CUNY; Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Eric Powell Four in situ experiments were conducted...

Connor, Seth John

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Strike-slip faulting as a trigger mechanism for overpressure release through piercement structures. Implications for the Lusi mud volcano, Indonesia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Implications for the Lusi mud volcano, Indonesia A. Mazzini a,*, A. Nermoen a , M. Krotkiewski a , Y 2009 Accepted 12 March 2009 Available online xxx Keywords: Java, Indonesia Lusi mud volcano Faulting volcano in Indonesia (Mazzini et al., 2007). Lusi became active the 29th of May 2006 on the Java Island

Podladchikov, Yuri

65

Quantitative comparison of processes of oil-and water-based mud-filtrate invasion and corresponding effects on borehole resistivity measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for hydrocarbon exploration and production, drilling fluids sustain a pressure higher than that of formationQuantitative comparison of processes of oil- and water-based mud-filtrate invasion-filtrate invasion on borehole resistivity measurements. We simulate the process of mud-fil- trate invasion

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

66

I. NANOSCIENCE COURSE REQUIREMENTS CR A. Communication Skills (8 cr.) CR APSC-101 Applied Science Profession I 1 ENGL-101 Freshman English Composition Required OR 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I. NANOSCIENCE COURSE REQUIREMENTS CR A. Communication Skills (8 cr.) CR APSC-101 Applied Science OF SCIENCE Concentration in Nanoscience University of Wisconsin-Stout 2010-2011 #12;I. MATERIALS SCIENCE

Wu, Mingshen

67

Thermodynamics of Cr2O3, FeCr2O4, ZnCr2O4 and CoCr2O4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High temperature heat capacity measurements were obtained for Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}, ZnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} and CoCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} using a differential scanning calorimeter. These data were combined with previously-available, overlapping heat capacity data at temperatures up to 400 K and fitted to 5-parameter Maier-Kelley C{sub p}(T) equations. Expressions for molar entropy were then derived by suitable integration of the Maier-Kelley equations in combination with recent S{sup o}(298) evaluations. Finally, a database of high temperature equilibrium measurements on the formation of these oxides was constructed and critically evaluated. Gibbs energies of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} and CoCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} were referenced by averaging the most reliable results at reference temperatures of 1100, 1400 and 1373 K, respectively, while Gibbs energies for ZnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} were referenced to the results of Jacob [Thermochim. Acta 15 (1976) 79-87] at 1100 K. Thermodynamic extrapolations from the high temperature reference points to 298.15 K by application of the heat capacity correlations gave {Delta}{sub f}G{sup o}(298) = -1049.96, -1339.40, -1428.35 and -1326.75 kJ mol{sup -1} for Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}, ZnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} and CoCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}, respectively.

Ziemniak SE, Anovitz LM, Castelli RA, Porter WD

2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

68

Mobilisation of arsenic from bauxite residue (red mud) affected soils: Effect of pH and redox conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Typically, it comprises residual iron oxides, quartz, sodium aluminosilicates, titanium dioxide, calciumMobilisation of arsenic from bauxite residue (red mud) affected soils: Effect of pH and redox elements, including arsenic. Aerobic and anaer- obic batch experiments were prepared using soils from near

Burke, Ian

69

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 358: Areas 18, 19, 20 Cellars/Mud Pits, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This closure report documents that the closure activities performed at Corrective Action Unit 358: Areas 18, 19, 20 Cellars/Mud Pits, were in accordance with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection approved Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 358.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Modeling Mud-Filtrate Invasion Effects on Resistivity Logs to Estimate Permeability of Vuggy and Fractured Carbonate Formations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPE 121136 Modeling Mud-Filtrate Invasion Effects on Resistivity Logs to Estimate Permeability to diagnose and estimate secondary porosity and absolute permeability of fractured and vuggy carbonate-connected) and fractured porosity, all embedded in a tight matrix. Rock-core data and wellbore resistivity images indicate

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

71

Like this post? Subscribe to our RSS feed and stay up to date. Navy Develops Battery that Runs on Mud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Geobacter uses hair-like extensions known as pili to generate electricity from mud and wastewater by converting decomposed marine organisms into electricity." By converting naturally occurring fuels and oxidants in the marine environment into electricity, Naval vessels could be running on a clean

Lovley, Derek

72

Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism and magnetization interaction reversal. Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism and...

73

AVTA: 2010 Honda CR-Z Hybrid Downloadable Dynamometer Database...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

CR-Z Hybrid Downloadable Dynamometer Database Reports AVTA: 2010 Honda CR-Z Hybrid Downloadable Dynamometer Database Reports The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle...

74

CR-B-02-01.PDF  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

CR-B-02-01 AUDIT REPORT FIXED-PRICE CONTRACTING FOR DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CLEANUP ACTIVITIES OCTOBER 2001 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF AUDIT...

75

CR-B-02-02.PUB  

Energy Savers [EERE]

CR-B-02-02 AUDIT REPORT U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF AUDIT SERVICES PROCUREMENT ADMINISTRATION AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY AUGUST 2002 U....

76

A study of the effects of mud filtrate invasion on the response of standard resistivity logging tools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the extremely small pore throats in the reservoir rock. These high capillary pressures, together with low relative permeabilities, are the reason for the high initial water saturations in many tight gas sands. Imbibition plays a large role in mud filtrate... of increased formation water saturation has a decreased resistivity. The annulus region has been generally assumed to form only in high permeability oil zones. The reason this type of resistivity profile is called an annulus is that if three resistivity...

Semmelbeck, Mark Edward

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

77

Triplet pair correlations and nonmonotonic supercurrent decay with Cr thickness in Nb/Cr/Fe/Nb Josephson devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

roughness and interdiffusion, an antiferromagnetic spin density wave (SDW) state can still form in Cr close to the interface. Here, we show evidence for triplet pair correlations in Josephson junctions with Cr/Fe and Cr/Fe/Cr barriers. Although the exact...

Robinson, J. W. A.; Banerjee, N.; Blamire, M. G.

2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

78

-delayed proton emission branches in 43Cr  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The + decay of very neutron-deficient 43Cr was studied by means of an imaging time projection chamber that allowed recording tracks of charged particles. Events of -delayed emission of one, two, and three protons were clearly identified. The absolute branching ratios for these channels were determined to be (81 4)%, (7.1 0.4)%, and (0.08 0.03)%, respectively. 43Cr is thus established as the second case in which the -3p decay occurs. Although the feeding to the proton-bound states in 43V is expected to be negligible, the large branching ratio of (12 4)% for decays without proton emission is found.

Pomorski, M. [University of Warsaw; Miernik, K. [University of Warsaw; Dominik, W. [University of Warsaw; Janas, Z. [University of Warsaw; Pfutzner, M. [University of Warsaw; Bingham, C. R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Czyrkowski, H. [University of Warsaw; Cwiok, Mikolaj [Warsaw University; Darby, Iain [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Dabrowski, Ryszard [Warsaw University; Ginter, T. N. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz [ORNL; Karny, M. [University of Warsaw; Korgul, A. [University of Warsaw; Kusmierz, W. [University of Warsaw; Liddick, Sean [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rajabali, M. M. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr [ORNL; Stolz, A. [Michigan State University, East Lansing

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Morphology, deformation, and defect structures of TiCr{sub 2} in Ti-Cr alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The morphologies and defect structures of TiCr{sub 2} in several Ti-Cr alloys have been examined by optical metallography, x-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), in order to explore the room-temperature deformability of the Laves phase TiCr{sub 2}. The morphology of the Laves phase was found to be dependent upon alloy composition and annealing temperature. Samples deformed by compression have also been studied using TEM. Comparisons of microstructures before and after deformation suggest an increase in twin, stacking fault, and dislocation density within the Laves phase, indicating some but not extensive room-temperature deformability.

Chen, K.C.; Allen, S.M.; Livingston, J.D.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

80

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 177: Mud Pits and Cellars Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Closure Report presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 177: Mud Pits and Cellars, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. This Closure Report complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. The Corrective Action Sites (CASs) within CAU 177 are located within Areas 8, 9, 19, and 20 of the Nevada Test Site. The purpose of this Closure Report is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and data that confirm the corrective actions implemented for CAU 177 CASs.

Alfred Wickline

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mud cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

NUREG/CR-6870 Consideration of Geochemical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Groundwater Restoration at Uranium In-Situ Leach Mining Facilities Manuscript Completed: December 2006 Date associated with uranium mining sites throughout the United States are also included in this report. A tableNUREG/CR-6870 Consideration of Geochemical Issues in Groundwater Restoration at Uranium In

82

Porosity, permeability, and petroleum: Determining the three P's by integrating mud logs with wireline logs and drill-stem tests in central and western Kansas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mud logging has long been a part of the complete formation evaluation picture in most oil and gas producing provinces of the US. In Kansas, however, mud logging has often been omitted from this picture. Typically, a well in central and western Kansas is drill-stem tested and then logged. Although this technique is often successful, there are also times when drill-stem tests and logs conflict with one another. Mud-logging techniques, especially hydrocarbon ratio analysis, could provide this necessary third aspect of formation evaluation to be integrated with drill-stem tests and wireline logs. Generally, the most important characteristics of a reservoir are porosity, permeability, and petroleum saturation. All three styles of formation evaluation (mud logs, wireline logs, and drill-stem tests) can determine most of these characteristics either qualitatively or quantitatively. The mud log, through hydrocarbon ratio analysis in conjunction with the drilling time log, can contribute at least ballpark estimates on porosity, permeability, and type of reservoir fluid. Wireline logs and drill-stem tests provide the more direct or quantitative measure of these formation characteristics. The central/western Kansas wells chosen for this study show that no single formation evaluation method is more important than the others. Each method must be weighed or calibrated to each specific study area as to its particular track record in that area. The difficulty in answering the question, Should I set pipe therefore can be minimized by integrating the mud log, the wireline log, and drill-stem test information.

Deboer, D.A. (Oil Production Systems, Inc., Cushing, OK (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

E-Print Network 3.0 - aceros al cr-mo-v Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

G. F. Janssens, Dierk Raabe, Ernst Kozeschnik, Mark A. Miodownik, Summary: , ,,Dissimilar 2.25Cr-9Cr and 2Cr-0.5CrMoV steel welds, I. Characterisation of the weld zone and...

84

DEVELOPMENT OF A MUD-PULSE HIGH-TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT-WHILE-DRILLING (MWD) SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall program objective is to develop a mud-pulse measurement-while-drilling (MWD) tool for oil and gas drilling operations that can be used where downhole temperatures are as high as 195 C (383 F). The work was planned to be completed in two phases: Phase I and an optional Phase II. The objectives of Phase I were first to identify critical components of existing MWD systems that can or cannot operate at 195 C. For components not able to meet the higher standard, one of several strategies was pursued: (1) locate high-temperature replacement components, (2) develop new designs that eliminate the unavailable components, or (3) use cooling to keep components at acceptable operating temperatures (under 195 C). New designs and components were then tested under high temperatures in the laboratory. The final goal of Phase I was to assemble two high-temperature MWD prototype tools and test each in at least one low-temperature well to verify total system performance. Phase II was also envisioned as part of this development. Its objective would be to test the two new high-temperature MWD prototype tools in wells being drilled in the United States where the bottom-hole temperatures were 195 C (or the highest temperatures attainable). The high-temperature MWD tool is designed to send directional and formation data to the surface via mud pulses, to aid in the drilling of guided wellbores. The modules that comprise the tool are housed in sealed barrels that protect the electronics from exposure to down-hole fluids and pressures. These pressure barrels are hung inside a non-magnetic collar located above the drilling assembly. A number of significant accomplishments were achieved during the course of the Phase I project, including: (1) Tested two MWD strings for function in an oven at 195 C; (2) Conducted field test of prototype 195 C MWD tool (at well temperatures up to 140-180 C); (3) Tested ELCON hybrid chip with processor, clock, and memory in a custom package for 700 hours at 200 C; (4) Contracted with APS Technology to conduct study of thermoelectric cooling of downhole electronics; (5) Conducted successful Peltier cooling test with APS Technology; (6) Tested and improved the electronics of Sperry Sun's Geiger Muller-based gamma detector for operation at 195 C; (7) Developed two high-temperature magnetometers (one in-house, one with Tensor); and (8) Encouraged outside source to develop lithium/magnesium high-temperature batteries (operating temperature of 125 to 215 C). One of this project's greatest achievements was improvement in Sperry Sun's current tool with changes made as a direct result of work performed under this project. These improvements have resulted in longer life and a more robust MWD tool at the previous temperature rating of 175 C, as well as at higher temperatures. A field test of two prototype 195 C MWD tools was conducted in Lavaca County, Texas. The purpose of this operation was to provide directional services on a sidetrack of a straight hole. The sidetrack was to intersect the formation up-dip above the water/gas interface. In addition, the gamma tool provided formation data including seam tops and thickness. Results from these field tests indicate progress in the development of a 195 C tool. Although the pulsers failed downhole in both tools, failure of the pulsers was determined to be from mechanical rather than electrical causes. Analysis of the economics of the 195 C tool highlights the greatest obstacle to future commercialization. Costs to screen individual components, then subassemblies, and finally completed tools for high-temperature operations are very high. Tests to date also show a relatively short life for high-temperature tools--on the order of 300 hours. These factors mean that the daily cost of the tool will be higher (3 to 5 times more) than a conventional tool.

John H. Cohen; Greg Deskins; William Motion; Jay Martin

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 177: Mud Pits and Cellars, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 177, Mud Pits and Cellars, identified in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order''. Corrective Action Unit 177 consists of the 12 following Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 8, 9, 19, and 20 of the Nevada Test Site: (1) 08-23-01, Mud Pit and Cellar; (2) 09-09-41, Unknown No.3 Mud Pit/Disposal Area; (3) 09-09-45, U-9bz PS No.1A Mud Pit (1) and Cellar; (4) 09-23-05, Mud Pit and Cellar; (5) 09-23-08, Mud Pit and Cellar; (6) 09-23-09, U-9itsx20 PS No.1A Cellar; (7) 10-23-02, Mud Pit and Cellar; (8) 10-23-03, Mud Pit and Cellar; (9) 19-23-01, Mud Pit and Cellar; (10) 19-23-02, Cellar and Waste Storage Area; (11) 19-23-03, Cellar with Casing; and (12) 20-23-07, Cellar. This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing each CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 177 using the SAFER process. The data quality objective process developed for this CAU identified the following expected closure options: (1) investigation and confirmation that no contamination exists above the preliminary action levels (PALs), leading to a no further action declaration, or (2) characterization of the nature and extent of contamination, leading to closure in place with use restrictions. The expected closure options were selected based on available information including contaminants of potential concern, future land use, and assumed risks. A decision flow process was developed to outline the collection of data necessary to achieve closure. There are two decisions that need to be answered for closure. Decision I is to determine whether contaminants of potential concern are present in concentrations exceeding the PALs. If contaminants of potential concern are found to be present above PALs, Decision II will be to determine the extent of contamination and generate the information necessary to close the site in place and implement the appropriate administrative controls (i.e., use restrictions). The following text summarizes the types of activities that will support the closure of CAU 177: (1) Perform site preparation activities (e.g., boundary setup, utility clearances, vegetation removal, movement/removal of fencing and debris). (2) Remove non-hazardous debris at various CASs, as required. (3) Collect environmental samples of residual drilling mud and soil using probabilistic (mud pits) and judgmental (cellars) sampling to confirm or disprove the presence of contaminants of concern (COCs) (i.e., nature of contamination) if these data do not already exist. Collect environmental samples from designated target populations (e.g., clean soil adjacent to contaminated soil if COCs exist) and submit for laboratory analyses to define the extent of COC contamination. (4) Establish no further action as the corrective action if no contaminants are detected above final action levels. (5) If COCs are present at a CAS, establish the corrective action and implement appropriate use restrictions. (6) Confirm the preferred closure option is sufficient to protect human health and the environment. (7) Document all closure activities for CAU 177 in a Closure Report.

Alfred Wickline

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Cr-doped scandium borate laser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A broadly wavelength-tunable laser is provided which comprises as the laser medium a single crystal of MBO.sub.3 :Cr.sup.3+, where M is selected from the group of Sc, In and Lu. The laser may be operated over a broad temperature range from cryogenic temperatures to elevated temperatures. Emission is in a spectral range from red to infrared, and the laser is useful in the fields of defense, communications, isotope separation, photochemistry, etc.

Chai, Bruce H. (Bridgewater, NJ); Lai, Shui T. (Florham Park, NJ); Long, Margaret N. (Landing, NJ)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Carbon migration in 5Cr-0.5Mo/21Cr-12Ni dissimilar metal welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The carbon migration between a ferritic steel and an austenitic steel was studied in submerged arc-welded 5Cr-0.5Mo/21Cr-12Ni dissimilar metal welds (DMWs) after aging at 500 C for various times and after long-term service in technical practice. The distribution of carbon, chromium, nickel, and iron in the areas around the weld interface was determined by electron probe microanalysis, and the microstructural aspect in the carbon-depleted/enriched zone was characterized by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Furthermore, the precipitation sequences and composition characteristics of the carbides were identified by diffraction pattern microanalysis and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalysis. It was found (1) that there exists a coherent relationship between intracrystalline M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and the austenitic matrix; (2) that the composition of M{sub 23}C{sub 6} in the carbon-enriched zone is independent of the duration of aging and service; (3) that the maximum carbon concentration is determined by the carbide type, the composition characteristic of precipitated carbides, and the concentration of carbide-forming Cr adjacent to the weld interface in the carbon-enriched zone; and (4) that the carbon migration in the 5Cr-0.5Mo/21Cr-12Ni DMWs can be described by a diffusion model.

Huang, M.L.; Wang, L. [Dalian Univ. of Technology (China). Dept. of Materials Engineering

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Terr. Atmos. Ocean. Sci., Vol. 17, No. 4, 703-722, December 2006 Distribution of Gassy Sediments and Mud Volcanoes Offshore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sediments and Mud Volcanoes Offshore Southwestern Taiwan Jui-Kun Chiu 1 , Wei-Hao Tseng 1 , and Char@ntu.edu.tw This study presents the results from recent intense marine geophysical surveys conducted offshore: offshore Kaohsiung, adjacent to the Kaoping Submarine Canyon, near the head of the Fangliao Submarine

Lin, Andrew Tien-Shun

89

The following 24 credits are required. Course Cr Semester Course Cr Semester  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fundamentals of Pest Management 3 Soil and Water Science Minor 15 credits required Course Cr Required SWS Agriculture & Environmental Quality 3 SWS2007 World of Water 3 SWS2008 Humans, Soils, & Environmental Impact 3 SWS3023L Soil Judging 2 SWS4116 Environmental Nutrient Management 3 SWS4223 Environmental

Watson, Craig A.

90

CR mammography: Design and implementation of a quality control program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite the recent acquisition of significant quantities of computed radiography CR equipment for mammography, Mexican regulations do not specify the performance requirements for digital systems such as those of CR type. The design of a quality control program QCP specific for CR mammography systems was thus considered relevant. International protocols were taken as reference to define tests, procedures and acceptance criteria. The designed QCP was applied in three CR mammography facilities. Important deficiencies in spatial resolution, noise, image receptor homogeneity, artifacts and breast thickness compensation were detected.

Moreno-Ramirez, A.; Brandan, M. E.; Villasenor-Navarro, Y.; Galvan, H. A.; Ruiz-Trejo, C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, DF 04510 (Mexico); Departamento de Radiodiagnostico, Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, DF 14080 (Mexico); Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, DF 04510 (Mexico)

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

91

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 356: Mud Pits and Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Revision No. 0, August 2001)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions necessary for the characterization and closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 356, Mud Pits and Disposal Sites, as identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). The CAU, located on the Nevada Test Site in Nevada, consists of seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 03-04-01, Area 3 Change House Septic System; CAS 03-09-01, Mud Pit Spill Over; CAS 03-09-03, Mud Pit; CAS 03-09-04, Mud Pit; CAS 03-09-05, Mud Pit; CAS 20-16-01, Landfill; CAS 20-22-21, Drums. Sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations are the basis for the development of the phased approach chosen to address the data collection activities prior to implementing the preferred closure alternative for each CAS. The Phase I investigation will determine through collection of environmental samples from targeted populations (i.e., mud/soil cuttings above textural discontinuity) if contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) are present in concentrations exceeding preliminary action levels (PALs) at each of the CASs. If COPCs are present above PALs, a Phase II investigation will be implemented to determine the extent of contamination to support the appropriate corrective action alternative to complete closure of the site. Groundwater impacts from potentially migrating contaminants are not expected due to the depths to groundwater and limiting hydrologic drivers of low precipitation and high evaporation rates. Future land-use scenarios limit future uses to industrial activities; therefore, future residential uses are not considered. Potential exposure routes to site workers from contaminants of concern in septage and soils include oral ingestion, inhalation, or dermal contact (absorption) through in-advertent disturbance of contaminated structures and/or soils. Diesel within drilling muds is expected to be the primary COPC based on process knowledge. Recirculation processes within the mud pits enhance volatilization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), thereby reducing the potential concentrations of any VOCs that may be present. A secondary source of contaminants from random truck dumping activities and leaking vehicle discharge may have released fuels, grease, motor oil, and hydraulic fluids into the mud pit effluent stream. Radionuclide contamination is not expected at these CASs based on historical information. The primary radioisotopes that could be expected, if present, are cesium-137, tritium, and strontium-90. The SAFER process ends with closure of the site based on the laboratory analytical results of the environmental samples. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 356 using the SAFER process. On completion of the field activities, a Closure Report will be prepared and submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for review and approval.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV)

2001-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

92

Risk-assessment-methodology development for waste isolation in geologic media. Technical review of documents NUREG/CR-0394, NUREG/CR-0424, NUREG/CR-0458  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review of five documents that were prepared for the USNRC by Sandia Laboratories is presented in this report. The documents covered in the present review include: NUREG/CR-1262, NUREG/CR-1376, NUREG/CR-1377, NUREG/CR-1397 and NUREG/CR-1608. This constitutes the second phase of the review; the first phase was reported in Volume 1 of NUREG/CR-1672, November 1980. Two of the documents concern simplified computational methods illustrative of the calculations necessary to produce a response surface. Three of the reports pertain to statistical methods, including the application of Latin hypercube Sampling (LHS). The following observations have been made relative to the above reports: (1) the reports are, in general, difficult to read, due, in part, to unnecessarily complicated notation and lack of adequate explanation and examples, (2) the relationship of the work to similar work in the US and abroad is not discussed, and (3) limitations of the LHS method are not discussed in sufficient depth. The Sandia's response to this review is published as NUREG/CR-2428. Volume 1 is scheduled for completion in June 1982.

Stevens, C.A.; Fullwood, R.R.; Basin, S.L.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

NUREG/CR-6911 Tests of Uranium (VI) Adsorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NUREG/CR-6911 Tests of Uranium (VI) Adsorption Models in a Field Setting U.S. Geological Survey U/CR-6911 Tests of Uranium (VI) Adsorption Models in a Field Setting Manuscript Completed: August 2006 Date Published: August 2006 Prepared by G. P. Curtis, J. A. Davis Water Resources Division U.S. Geological Survey

94

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 553: Areas 19, 20 Mud Pits and Cellars, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No. 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the actions necessary for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 553: Areas 19, 20 Mud Pits and Cellars, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. It has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. A SAFER may be performed when the following criteria are met: (1) Conceptual corrective actions are clearly identified (although some degree of investigation may be necessary to select a specific corrective action before completion of the Corrective Action Investigation [CAI]); (2) Uncertainty of the nature, extent, and corrective action must be limited to an acceptable level of risk; (3) The SAFER Plan includes decision points and criteria for making data quality objective (DQO) decisions. The purpose of the investigation will be to document and verify the adequacy of existing information; to affirm the decision for clean closure, closure in place, or no further action; and to provide sufficient data to implement the corrective action. The actual corrective action selected will be based on characterization activities implemented under this SAFER Plan. This SAFER Plan identifies decision points developed in cooperation with the Nevada Department of Environmental Protection (NDEP), where the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) will reach consensus with the NDEP before beginning the next phase of work. Corrective Action Unit 553 is located in Areas 19 and 20 of the NTS, approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Corrective Action Unit 553 is comprised of the four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: 19-99-01, Mud Spill; 19-99-11, Mud Spill; 20-09-09, Mud Spill; and 20-99-03, Mud Spill. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites (i.e., the expected nature and extent of contaminants of potential concern [COPCs]) to recommend closure of CAU 553 using the SAFER process (FFACO, 1996).

Boehlecke, Robert F.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Usnesen ze 4. zasedn Vdeck rady AV CR konanho dne 10. z 1. Oven a kontrola zpisu z 3. zasedn  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reform terciárního vzdlávání. Vdecká rada AV CR bere se souhlasem na vdomí stanovisko AR AV CR k reform

Tebbens, Jurjen Duintjer

96

9 Cr-- 1 Mo steel material for high temperature application  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

One or more embodiments relates to a high-temperature, titanium alloyed, 9 Cr-1 Mo steel exhibiting improved creep strength and oxidation resistance at service temperatures up to 650.degree. C. The 9 Cr-1 Mo steel has a tempered martensite microstructure and is comprised of both large (0.5-3 .mu.m) primary titanium carbides and small (5-50 nm) secondary titanium carbides in a ratio of. from about 1:1.5 to about 1.5:1. The 9 Cr-1 Mo steel may be fabricated using exemplary austenizing, rapid cooling, and tempering steps without subsequent hot working requirements. The 9 Cr-1 Mo steel exhibits improvements in total mass gain, yield strength, and time-to-rupture over ASTM P91 and ASTM P92 at the temperature and time conditions examined.

Jablonski, Paul D; Alman, David; Dogan, Omer; Holcomb, Gordon; Cowen, Christopher

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

97

TI--CR--AL--O thin film resistors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Thin films of Ti--Cr--Al--O are used as a resistor material. The films are rf sputter deposited from ceramic targets using a reactive working gas mixture of Ar and O.sub.2. Resistivity values from 10.sup.4 to 10.sup.10 Ohm-cm have been measured for Ti--Cr--Al--O film <1 .mu.m thick. The film resistivity can be discretely selected through control of the target composition and the deposition parameters. The application of Ti--Cr--Al--O as a thin film resistor has been found to be thermodynamically stable, unlike other metal-oxide films. The Ti--Cr--Al--O film can be used as a vertical or lateral resistor, for example, as a layer beneath a field emission cathode in a flat panel display; or used to control surface emissivity, for example, as a coating on an insulating material such as vertical wall supports in flat panel displays.

Jankowski, Alan F. (Livermore, CA); Schmid, Anthony P. (Solana Beach, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

COURSE OR OR CR. MATH 201f 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P.O.Box: CR. 30 COURSE OR OR CR. MATH 201f 3 MATH 210f 3 MATH 218 MATH 219 3 STAT 233 f 3 STAT 234 f 3 STAT 235 f 3 STAT 236 f 3 STAT 237 f 3 STAT 238 f 3 ELECT .1 3 ELECT .2 3 ELECT .3 3 36 CMPS 200 : NAME: Tel #: ID #: MAY NOT ENROLL IN CVSP 203 OR 204 OR VICE VERSA. 3 ELECTIVES IN HUMANITIES OR SOCIAL

Shihadeh, Alan

99

COURSE OR OR CR. MATH 201f 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P.O.Box: CR. 30 COURSE OR OR CR. MATH 201f 3 MATH 210f 3 MATH 219 3 STAT 233f 3 STAT 234f 3 STAT 235f 3 STAT 236f 3 STAT 237f 3 STAT 238f 3 ELECT. 1 3 ELECT. 2 3 ELECT. 3 3 36 CMPS 200 4 ELECT. 1 3 OR EQUIVALENTa : NAME: Tel #: ID #: E-mail: @aub.edu.lb DIPLOMA TYPE : ENTRY LEVEL: FR SO JR SR COMMENTS Total

Shihadeh, Alan

100

COURSE OR OR CR. STAT 235f 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P.O.Box: CR. 30 COURSE OR OR CR. MATH 201 f 3 MATH 210 f 3 MATH 219 3 STAT 233 f 3 STAT 234 f 3 STAT 235f 3 STAT 236 f 3 STAT 237f 3 STAT 238f 3 ELECT. 1 3 ELECT. 2 3 ELECT. 3 3 36 CMPS 200 4 ELECT WHO ELECT CVSP 206 FRESHMAN CLASS OR EQUIVALENT a : NAME: Tel #: ID #: E-mail: @aub.edu.lb DIPLOMA

Shihadeh, Alan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mud cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

COURSE or or CR. MATH 218 MATH 219 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P.O.Box: CR. 30 COURSE or or CR. MATH 201 e 3 MATH 210 e 3 MATH 218 MATH 219 3 STAT 233e 3 STAT 234e 3 STAT 235e 3 STAT 236e 3 STAT 237e 3 STAT 238e 3 ELECT .1 3 ELECT .2 3 ELECT .3 3 36 ELECT. 1 3 3 credits requirement for graduation. ID #: E-mail: @aub.edu.lb DIPLOMA TYPE : ENTRY LEVEL: FR SO JR SR

Shihadeh, Alan

102

COURSE OR OR CR. MATH 201f 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P.O.Box: CR. 30 COURSE OR OR CR. MATH 201f 3 MATH 210 f 3 MATH 219 3 STAT 233f 3 STAT 234 f 3 STAT 235 f 3 STAT 236 f 3 STAT 237 f 3 STAT 238 f 3 ELECT. 1 3 ELECT. 2 3 ELECT. 3 3 36 CMPS 200 4 ELECT. 1 CVSP 206 FRESHMAN CLASS OR EQUIVALENTa : NAME: Tel #: ID #: E-mail: @aub.edu.lb DIPLOMA TYPE : ENTRY

Shihadeh, Alan

103

COURSE OR OR CR. MATH 201f 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P.O.Box: CR. 30 COURSE OR OR CR. MATH 201f 3 MATH 210f 3 MATH 218 MATH 219 3 STAT 233f 3 STAT 234f 3 STAT 235f 3 STAT 236f 3 STAT 237f 3 STAT 238f 3 ELECT .1 3 ELECT .2 3 ELECT .3 3 36 CMPS 200 4 REQUIRMENTS FRESHMAN CLASS OR EQUIVALENTa : NAME: Tel #: ID #: MAY NOT ENROLL IN CVSP 203 OR 204 OR VICE VERSA

Shihadeh, Alan

104

COURSE OR OR CR. MATH 201g 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P.O.Box: CR. 30 COURSE OR OR CR. MATH 201g 3 MATH 210g 3 MATH 219 3 STAT 233g 3 STAT 234g 3 STAT 235g 3 STAT 236g 3 STAT 237g 3 STAT 238g 3 ELECT. 1 3 ELECT. 2 3 ELECT. 3 3 36 CMPS 200 4 ELECT. 1 3: Tel #: ID #: Total Credits in Major: E-mail: @aub.edu.lb DIPLOMA TYPE : ENTRY LEVEL: FR SO JR SR

Shihadeh, Alan

105

Atom probe: a direct technique for kinetic measurements. [Fe-24Cr; Fe-32Cr; Fe-28. 5Cr-10. 6Co  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The atom probe has been used to study the phase transformations occurring within the low-temperature miscibility gaps in Fe-Cr and Fe-Cr-Co alloys. The morphology of the two-phase microstructure resulting from phase separation deep within the miscibility gaps was found to be highly interconnected and charactristic of an isotropic spinodal reaction. The characteristic dimensions of the microstructure and the changes in composition were measured as a function of aging. The coarsening of the network structures could be fitted with a power law with time exponents that were significantly less than the classical Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner value of one-third.

Miller, M.K.; Brenner, S.S.; Camus, P.P.; Soffa, W.A.

1984-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

106

Roles of Fe2+, Fe3+, and Cr3+ Surface Sites in the Oxidation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fe3+, and Cr3+ Surface Sites in the Oxidation of NO on the (Fe,Cr)3O4(1 1 1) Surface Termination of an -(Fe,Cr Roles of Fe2+, Fe3+, and Cr3+ Surface Sites in the Oxidation of NO...

107

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN GEOLOGY (UNOFFICIAL) CATALOG 129 Fall (Th-Pr) Cr Spring (Th-Pr) Cr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN GEOLOGY (UNOFFICIAL) CATALOG 129 Fall (Th-Pr) Cr Spring (Th-Pr) Cr Freshman Geology (3-3) 4 GEOL 106 Historical Geology (3-3) 4 MATH 166 Topics in Cont. Math II 1 (3-0) 3 MATH 131-3) 4 GEOP 341 Introduction to Global Geophysics (3-0) 3 GEOL 309 Introduction to Geologic Field Methods

108

Characterization of the CR-39 neutron track etch dosimeter and evaluation of a combination CR-39/thermoluminescent dosimeter badge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . Objectives . THEORY 2 5 9 12 14 Charged Particle Interactions and Damage Track Formation Neutron Converters The Etching Process Background Effects The Quality Factor MATERIALS AND METHODS 14 16 18 21 22 31 CR-39 Supply . CR-39... effectiveness and used for calculating the dose equivalent (H) of exposed personnel, do not offer the same margin of safety for all radiations, including neutrons. The result is a proposed increase in applied Q values to assure comparable safety in all...

Hoover, Paul Steven

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Effect of the magnetic phase transition on the charge transport in layered semiconductor ferromagnets TlCrS{sub 2} and TlCrSe{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TlCrS{sub 2} and TlCrSe{sub 2} crystals were synthesized by solid-state reaction. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that TlCrS{sub 2} and TlCrSe{sub 2} compounds crystallize in the hexagonal crystal system with lattice parameters a = 3.538 A, c = 21.962 A, c/a {approx} 6.207, z = 3; a = 3.6999 A, c = 22.6901 A, c/a {approx} 6.133, z = 3; and X-ray densities {rho}{sub x} = 6.705 and 6.209 g/cm{sup 3}, respectively. Magnetic and electric studies in a temperature range of 77-400 K showed that TlCrS{sub 2} and TlCrSe{sub 2} are semiconductor ferromagnets. Rather large deviations of the experimental effective magnetic moment of TlCrS{sub 2} (3.26 {mu}{sub B}) and TlCrSe{sub 2} (3.05 {mu}{sub B}) from the theoretical one (3.85 {mu}{sub B}) are attributed to two-dimensional magnetic ordering in the paramagnetic region of strongly layered ferromagnets TlCrS{sub 2} and TlCrSe{sub 2}. The effect of the magnetic phase's transition on the charge transport in TlCrS{sub 2} and TlCrSe{sub 2} is detected.

Veliyev, R. G.; Sadikhov, R. Z.; Kerimova, E. M., E-mail: ekerimova@physics.ab.az; Asadov, Yu. G.; Jabbarov, A. I. [Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

X-ray micro-tomography investigation of the foaming process in the system of waste glass–silica mud–MnO{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In case of foamed lightweight aggregates (LWAs), porosity is introduced by the addition of a foaming agent to the glassy matrix, which degasses at an elevated temperature, so that the resulting gases remain trapped inside the glassy structure. The efficiency of action of MnO{sub 2} as a foaming agent in waste glass and waste glass/silica mud systems was studied. Samples were fired at different temperatures and with different dwelling times at a certain temperature, and the development of porosity was investigated by means of X-ray micro-tomography. It was found that, with the prolongation in dwelling times, the number of pores decreased, while, on the other hand, the volume of these pores increased, and that the addition of silica mud increases the foaming temperature and slows down the foaming process. - Highlights: • Preparation of lightweight aggregate from waste glass, silica sludge, and MnO{sub 2} • DTA/TG investigation of MnO{sub 2} • Characterization of pore-forming process by means of X-ray micro-tomography (?cT)

Ducman, V., E-mail: vilma.ducman@zag.si [ZAG Ljubljana, Dimi?eva 12, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Korat, L.; Legat, A. [ZAG Ljubljana, Dimi?eva 12, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Mirti?, B. [NTF, Ašker?eva 12, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

111

Grain boundary depletion and migration during selective oxidation of Cr in a Ni-5Cr binary alloy exposed to high-temperature hydrogenated water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-resolution microscopy of a high-purity Ni-5Cr alloy exposed to 360°C hydrogenated water reveals intergranular selective oxidation of Cr accompanied by local Cr depletion and diffusion-induced grain boundary migration (DIGM). The corrosion-product oxide consists of a porous, interconnected network of Cr2O3 platelets with no further O ingress into the metal ahead. Extensive grain boundary depletion of Cr (to <0.05at.%) is observed typically 20–100 nm wide as a result of DIGM and reaching depths of many micrometers beyond the oxidation front.

Schreiber, Daniel K.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

Mud-Brick Architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

architecture in ancient Egypt. Warminster: Aris & Phillips.In Glimpses of ancient Egypt: Studies in honour of H. W.organization in ancient Egypt more generally. References

Emery, Virginia L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Mud-Brick Architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Publishers. Minault-Gout, Anne, and Patrick Deleuze 1992at Balat/Ain Asil (Minault-Gout and Deleuze 1992: 15 - 30,

Emery, Virginia L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Supernova 1996cr: SN 1987A's Wild Cousin?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on new VLT optical spectroscopic and multi-wavelength archival observations of SN1996cr, a previously identified ULX known as Circinus Galaxy X-2. Our optical spectrum confirms SN1996cr as a bona fide type IIn SN, while archival imaging isolates its explosion date to between 1995-02-28 and 1996-03-16. SN1996cr is one of the closest SNe (~3.8 Mpc) in the last several decades and in terms of flux ranks among the brightest radio and X-ray SNe ever detected. The wealth of optical, X-ray, and radio observations that exist for this source provide relatively detailed constraints on its post-explosion expansion and progenitor history, including an preliminary angular size constaint from VLBI. The archival X-ray and radio data imply that the progenitor of SN1996cr evacuated a large cavity just prior to exploding: the blast wave likely expanded for ~1-2 yrs before eventually striking the dense circumstellar material which surrounds SN1996cr. The X-ray and radio emission, which trace the progenitor mass-loss rate, have respectively risen by a factor of ~2 and remained roughly constant over the past 7 yr. This behavior is reminiscent of the late rise of SN1987A, but 1000 times more luminous and much more rapid to onset. Complex Oxygen line emission in the optical spectrum further hints at a possible concentric shell or ring-like structure. The discovery of SN1996cr suggests that a substantial fraction of the closest SNe observed in the last several decades have occurred in wind-blown bubbles. An Interplanetary Network position allows us to reject a tentative GRB association with BATSE 4B960202. [Abridged

F. E. Bauer; V. V. Dwarkadas; W. N. Brandt; S. Immler; S. Smartt; N. Bartel; M. F. Bietenholz

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

115

COURSE or or CR. MATH 201e 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P.O.Box: CR. 30 COURSE or or CR. MATH 201e 3 MATH 210e 3 MATH 218 MATH 219 3 STAT 233e 3 STAT 234e 3 STAT 235e 3 STAT 236e 3 STAT 237e 3 STAT 238e 3 ELECT .1 3 ELECT .2 3 ELECT .3 3 36 ELECT. 1 3 3 or any 207 (A,B,C...) TOTAL CREDITS NEEDED for GRADUATION HUMANITIES LIST I OR IIc ,f ID #: E-mail: @aub

Shihadeh, Alan

116

Nitrate Enhanced Microbial Cr(VI) Reduction-Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major challenge for the bioremediation of radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium) and metals (i.e., Cr(VI), Hg) is the co-occurrence of nitrate as it can inhibit metal transformation. Denitrification (nitrate reduction to dinitrogen gas) is considered the most important ecological process. For many metal and metalloid reducing bacteria, however, ammonia is the end product through respiratory nitrate reduction (RNRA). The focus of this work was to determine how RNRA impacts Cr(VI) transformation. The goal was to elucidate the specific mechanism(s) that limits Cr(VI) reduction in the presence of nitrate and to use this information to develop strategies that enhance Cr(VI) reduction (and thus detoxification). Our central hypothesis is that nitrate impacts the biotransformation of metals and metalloids in three ways 1) as a competitive alternative electron acceptor (inhibiting transformation), 2) as a co-metabolite (i.e., concomitant reduction, stimulating transformation), and 3) as an inducer of specific proteins and pathways involved in oxidation/reduction reactions (stimulating transformation). We have identified three model organisms, Geobacter metallireducens (mechanism 1), Sulfurospirillum barnesii, (mechasism 2), and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (mechanisms 3). Our specific aims were to 1) investigate the role of Cr(VI) concentration on the kinetics of both growth and reduction of nitrate, nitrite, and Cr(VI) in these three organisms; 2) develop a profile of bacterial enzymes involved in nitrate transformation (e.g., oxidoreductases) using a proteomic approach; 3) investigate the function of periplasmic nitrite reductase (Nrf) as a chromate reductase; and 4) develop a strategy to maximize microbial chromium reduction in the presence of nitrate. We found that growth on nitrate by G. metallireducens was inhibited by Cr(VI). Over 240 proteins were identified by LC/MS-MS. Redox active proteins, outer membrane heavy metal efflux proteins, and chemotaxis sensory proteins (Gmet_2478 and Gmet_1641) were up-regulated with exposure to Cr(VI). A nine-heme cytochrome C was purified that could reduce nitrite and could be oxidized by Cr(VI). For D. desulfuricans, we found that confirmed that Cr(VI) induced a prolonged lag period when Cr(VI) was reduced. Over three hundred proteins were unequivocally identified by LC/MS-MS and a significant number of down-regulated proteins for which the levels were changed >2 fold compared to control. Sulfite reductase levels were similar, however, nitrate and nitrite reductase were down-regulated. The supernatant of spent cultures was found to contain a filterable, heat stable compound that rapidly reduced Cr(VI). In addition, desulfoviridin was purified from nitrate grown cells and shown to have nitrite reductase activity that was inhibited by Cr(VI). For S. barnesii, periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap), nitrite reductase (Nrf), and the metalloid reductase (Rar) were purified and characterized. The supernatant of spent cultures was also found to contain a filterable, heat stable compound that rapidly reduced Cr(VI) but that Rar also reduced Cr(VI). Our results from specific aims 1 through 3 indicate that for G. metallireducens, Cr(VI) inhibits nitrate respiration as it oxidizes cytochromes involved in nitrate respiration. Iron reduction is apparently not affected and the inhibitory affects of Cr(VI) may be attenuated by the addition of sufficient Fe(III) to generate Fe(II) that abiotically reduces the chromium. For S. barnesii, although the enzyme assays indicate that the components of the respiratory pathway for nitrate (e.g. Nap and Nrf) are inhibited by chromate, the organism has a mechanism to prevent this from actually occurring. Our current hypothesis is that the non-specific metalloid reductase (Rar) is providing resistance by reducing the Cr(VI). The strategy here would be to enhance its growth and metabolism in the natural setting. Lactate is a suitable electron donor for S. barnesii but other donors are possible. Although the version of the Phylochip used for monitoring the microb

John F. Stolz

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

117

Structural relaxation around substitutional Cr3+ in pyrope garnet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the spinel- garnet transformation -a major phase boundary in the Earth's upper mantle- to pressures as high shells of neighbors (Mg and Si) relax only partially. Site relaxation is accommodated by strain diamonds (Irifune et al. 1982). In the garnet structure (Novak and Gibbs 1971), Cr3+ is small enough

118

Aquatic Chemistry Course Id: CHEM 605 (3 cr.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aquatic Chemistry Fall 2010 Course Id: CHEM 605 (3 cr.) Lecture: TR 3:40-5:20pm, REIC 165 of this course is to introduce students to the concepts and models used in aquatic chemistry while providing-base chemistry, complexation, precipitation-dissolution and reduction-oxidation reactions. Student Learning

Wagner, Diane

119

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 357: Mud Pits and Waste Dump, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0, Including Record of Technical Change No. 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) plan was prepared as a characterization and closure report for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 357, Mud Pits and Waste Dump, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The CAU consists of 14 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 1, 4, 7, 8, 10, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). All of the CASs are found within Yucca Flat except CAS 25-15-01 (Waste Dump). Corrective Action Site 25-15-01 is found in Area 25 in Jackass Flat. Of the 14 CASs in CAU 357, 11 are mud pits, suspected mud pits, or mud processing-related sites, which are by-products of drilling activities in support of the underground nuclear weapons testing done on the NTS. Of the remaining CASs, one CAS is a waste dump, one CAS contains scattered lead bricks, and one CAS has a building associated with Project 31.2. All 14 of the CASs are inactive and abandoned. Clean closure with no further action of CAU 357 will be completed if no contaminants are detected above preliminary action levels. A closure report will be prepared and submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for review and approval upon completion of the field activities. Record of Technical Change No. 1 is dated 3/2004.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2003-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

120

Thermal stability and oxidation resistance of TiCrAlYO coatings...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

stability and oxidation resistance of TiCrAlYO coatings on SS430 for solid oxide fuel cell interconnect applications. Thermal stability and oxidation resistance of TiCrAlYO...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mud cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Reduction of Health Risks Due to Chromium(VI)Using Mesquite: A Potential Cr Phytoremediator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chromium is a transition metal extensively used in industry. Cr mining and industrial operations account for chromium wastes at Superfund sites in the United States. A study was performed to investigate the possibility of using mesquite (Prosopis spp.), which is an indigenous desert plant species, to remove Cr from contaminated sites. In this study, mesquite plants were grown in an agar-based medium containing 75 mg L-1 and 125 mg L-1 of Cr(VI). The Cr content of leaf tissue (992 mg kg-1 of dry weight, from 125 mg L-1 of Cr(VI)) indicated that mesquite could be classified as a chromium hyperaccumulator. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies performed to experimental samples showed that mesquite roots absorbed some of the supplied Cr(VI). However, the data analyses of plant tissues demonstrated that the absorbed Cr(VI) was fully reduced to Cr(III) in the leaf tissue.

Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L.; Aldrich, Mary V.; Peralta-Videa, Jose R.; Parsons, Jason G.

2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

122

Surface structure of ?-Cr2O3(0001) after activated oxygen...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Surface structure of ?-Cr2O3(0001) after activated oxygen exposure. Surface structure of ?-Cr2O3(0001) after activated oxygen exposure. Abstract: The surface structure...

123

Growth of Cr-doped TiO Films in the Rutile and Anatase Structures...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Cr-doped TiO Films in the Rutile and Anatase Structures by Oxygen Plasma Assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy . Growth of Cr-doped TiO Films in the Rutile and Anatase Structures by...

124

Excited Carrier Dynamics of ?-Cr2O3/?-Fe2O3 Core...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Excited Carrier Dynamics of ?-Cr2O3?-Fe2O3 Core-Shell Nanostructures. Abstract: In this work ?-Cr2O3?-Fe2O3 core-shell polycrystalline...

125

Integrated Ecogenomics Study for Bioremediation of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reducer isolated from the Hanford 100H site capable of Iron(study for bioremediation of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H area RomyVI)contamination at Hanford ?? Cr(VI) highly soluble, toxic

Chakraborty, Romy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Lightest Isotope of Bh Produced Via the 209Bi(52Cr,n)260Bh Reaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

models. For many years, “cold fusion” reactions utilizingproduced via the new “cold fusion” reaction 209 Bi( 52 Cr,

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Radiation effects on interface reactions of U/Fe, U/(Fe + Cr), and U/(Fe + Cr + Ni)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the effects of radiation damage on interdiffusion and intermetallic phase formation at the interfaces of U/Fe, U/(Fe + Cr), and U/(Fe + Cr + Ni) diffusion couples. Magnetron sputtering is used to deposit thin films of Fe, Fe + Cr, or Fe + Cr + Ni on U substrates to form the diffusion couples. One set of samples are thermally annealed under high vacuum at 450 C or 550 C for one hour. A second set of samples are annealed identically but with concurrent 3.5 MeV Fe++ ion irradiation. The Fe++ ion penetration depth is sufficient to reach the original interfaces. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry analysis with high fidelity spectral simulations is used to obtain interdiffusion profiles, which are used to examine differences in U diffusion and intermetallic phase formation at the buried interfaces. For all three diffusion systems, Fe++ ion irradiations enhance U diffusion. Furthermore, the irradiations accelerate the formation of intermetallic phases. In U/Fe couples, for example, the unirradiated samples show typical interdiffusion governed by Fick’s laws, while the irradiated ones show step-like profiles influenced by Gibbs phase rules.

KUn Shao; Di Chen; Chaochen Wei; Michael S. Martin; Xuemei Wang; Youngjoo Park; Ed Dein; Kevin R. Coffey; b , Yongho Sohn; Bulent H. Sencer; J. Rory Kennedy

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Non-classical nuclei and growth kinetics of Cr precipitates in FeCr alloys during ageing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this manuscript, we quantitatively calculated the thermodynamic properties of critical nuclei of Cr precipitates in FeCr alloys. The concentration profiles of the critical nuclei and nucleation energy barriers were predicted by the constrained shrinking dimer dynamics (CSDD) method. It is found that Cr concentration distribution in the critical nuclei strongly depend on the overall Cr concentration as well as temperature. The critical nuclei are non-classical because the concentration in the nuclei is smaller than the thermodynamic equilibrium value. These results are in agreement with atomic probe observation. The growth kinetics of both classical and non-classical nuclei was investigated by the phase field approach. The simulations of critical nucleus evolution showed a number of interesting phenomena: 1) a critical classical nucleus first shrinks toward its non-classical nucleus and then grows; 2) a non-classical nucleus has much slower growth kinetics at its earlier growth stage compared to the diffusion-controlled growth kinetics. 3) a critical classical nucleus grows faster at the earlier growth stage than the non-classical nucleus. All of these results demonstrate that it is critical to introduce the correct critical nuclei in order to correctly capture the kinetics of precipitation.

Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Xin

2014-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

129

austenitnoj cr-mn stali: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cr-mn stali First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Cavitation erosion of laser processed Fe-Cr-Mn and Fe-Cr-Co alloys CiteSeer Summary: Received...

130

High coercivity CoCrPt films achieved by post-deposition rapid thermal annealing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

layer, a CoCrPt mag- netic layer, a capping Mn diffusion layer, and a final CrTi oxidation protection conditions were stud- ied. II. EXPERIMENT All layers were deposited onto glass substrates by rf di- ode, and CrTi oxida- tion protection layer were all 200 Ã? thick. Post-deposition annealing was performed

Laughlin, David E.

131

Surface half-metallicity of CrS thin films and perfect spin filtering and spin diode effects of CrS/ZnSe heterostructure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently, ferromagnetic zinc-blende Mn{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x}S thin films (above x?=?0.5) were fabricated experimentally on ZnSe substrate, which confirmed the previous theoretical prediction of half-metallic ferromagnetism in zinc-blende CrS. Here, we theoretically reveal that both Cr- and S-terminated (001) surfaces of the CrS thin films retain the half-metallicity. The CrS/ZnSe(001) heterogeneous junction exhibits excellent spin filtering and spin diode effects, which are explained by the calculated band structure and transmission spectra. The perfect spin transport properties indicate the potential applications of half-metallic CrS in spintronic devices. All computational results are obtained by using the density functional theory combined with nonequilibrium Green's function.

Gao, G. Y., E-mail: guoying-gao@mail.hust.edu.cn; Yao, K. L., E-mail: klyao@mail.hust.edu.cn [School of Physics and Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

132

Grain boundary migration induced segregation in V-Cr-Ti alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analytical electron microscopy results are reported for a series of vanadium alloys irradiated in the HFIR JP23 experiment at 500{degrees}C. Alloys were V-5Cr-5Ti and pure vanadium which are expected to have transmuted to V-15Cr-5Ti and V-10Cr following irradiation. Analytical microscopy confirmed the expected transmutation occurred and showed redistribution of Cr and Ti resulting from grain boundary migration in V-5Cr-5Ti, but in pure V, segregation was reduced and no clear trends as a function of position near a boundary were identified.

Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Ohnuki, S.; Takahashi, H. [Univ. of Hokkaido (Japan)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Partially filled intermediate band of Cr-doped GaN films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated the band structure of sputtered Cr-doped GaN (GaCrN) films using optical absorption, photoelectron yield spectroscopy, and charge transport measurements. It was found that an additional energy band is formed in the intrinsic band gap of GaN upon Cr doping, and that charge carriers in the material move in the inserted band. Prototype solar cells showed enhanced short circuit current and open circuit voltage in the n-GaN/GaCrN/p-GaN structure compared to the GaCrN/p-GaN structure, which validates the proposed concept of an intermediate-band solar cell.

Sonoda, S. [Department of Electronics, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

134

Cr{sub 2}Nb-based alloy development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes recent progress in developing Cr{sub 2}Nb/Cr(Nb) alloys for structural use in advanced fossil energy conversion systems. Alloy additions were added to control the microstructure and mechanical properties. Two beneficial elements have been identified among all alloying additions added to the alloys. One element is effective in refining the coarse eutectic structure and thus substantially improves the compressive strength and ductility of the alloys. The other element enhances oxidation resistance without sacrificing the ductility. The tensile properties are sensitive to cast defects, which can not be effectively reduced by HIPping at 1450-1580{degrees}C and/or directionally solidifying via a floating zone remelting method.

Liu, C.T.; Horton, J.A.; Carmichael, C.A.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Gestion d'un cache Loris Marchal CR08 ordonnancement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gestion d'un cache Loris Marchal ­ CR08 ordonnancement 30 novembre 2011 1 Introduction On s'int´eresse au probl`eme de la gestion d'une m´emoire temporaire, couramment ap- pel´ee cache. Plut^ot qu´etitivit´e On consid`ere le cas offline, c'est-`a-dire qu'on conna^it `a l'avance toute la s´equence des requ

Marchal, Loris

136

Gestion d'un cache Loris Marchal CR07 ordonnancement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gestion d'un cache Loris Marchal ­ CR07 ordonnancement 17 d´ecembre 2012 1 Introduction On s'int´eresse au probl`eme de la gestion d'une m´emoire temporaire, couramment ap- pel´ee cache. Plut^ot qu´etitivit´e On consid`ere le cas offline, c'est-`a-dire qu'on conna^it `a l'avance toute la s´equence des requ

Marchal, Loris

137

Improving thermostability of CrO{sub 2} thin films by doping with Sn  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chromium dioxide (CrO{sub 2}) is an ideal material for spin electronic devices since it has almost 100% spin polarization near Fermi level. However, it is thermally unstable and easily decomposes to Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} even at room temperature. In this study, we try to improve the thermal stability of CrO{sub 2} thin films by doping with Sn whose oxide has the same structure as CrO{sub 2}. High quality epitaxial CrO{sub 2} and Sn-doped CrO{sub 2} films were grown on single crystalline TiO{sub 2} (100) substrates by chemical vapor deposition. Sn{sup 4+} ions were believed to be doped into CrO{sub 2} lattice and take the lattice positions of Cr{sup 4+}. The magnetic measurements show that Sn-doping leads to a decrease of magnetocrystalline anisotropy. The thermal stabilities of the films were evaluated by annealing the films at different temperatures. Sn-doped films can withstand a temperature up to 510?°C, significantly higher than what undoped films can do (lower than 435?°C), which suggests that Sn-doping indeed enhances the thermal stability of CrO{sub 2} films. Our study also indicates that Sn-doping may not change the essential half metallic properties of CrO{sub 2}. Therefore, Sn-doped CrO{sub 2} is expected to be very promising for applications in spintronic devices.

Ding, Yi; Wang, Ziyu; Liu, Shuo; Shi, Jing; Yin, Di, E-mail: dyin@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Yuan, Cheng; Lu, Zhihong, E-mail: zludavid@live.com [School of Materials and Metallurgy, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Xiong, Rui, E-mail: xiongrui@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Wuhan 430062 (China)

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

E-Print Network 3.0 - allikmaa margus eek Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

economics. Estonian ICT industry has gone through a total reorganization with a lot of SMEs born to meet new market requirements. There is a continuous need from Summary: of...

139

Long-term corrosion of Cr-Mo steels in superheated steam at 482 and 538/sup 0/C. [21/4 Cr-1 Mo; 9 Cr-1 Mo; Sumitomo 9 Cr-2 Mo; Sandvik HT-9  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The corrosion of several Cr-Mo ferritic steels was investigated in superheated steam at an operating power plant. Tests were conducted at 482 and 538/sup 0/C (900 and 1000/sup 0/F) in a once-through loop for times up to 28,000 h. Chromium concentrations ranged from 2.0 to 11.3%, and the effect of surface preparation on corrosion was investigated. Only one of many specimens showed evidence of exfoliation at 482/sup 0/C, but at 538/sup 0/C exfoliation occurred on at least some of the specimens of most materials; the exceptions were the alloy with the highest chromium content (Sandvik HT-9), one heat of 9 Cr-1 Mo steel with the highest silicon content, and Sumitomo 9 Cr-2 Mo steel, which was in test for only 19,000 h. Parabolic oxidation kinetics adequately described the corrosion process for about the first year, after which corrosion rates were constant and lower than predicted from extrapolation of the initial part of the penetration versus time curves. With chromium concentrations between 2 and 9%, corrosion behavior was independent of chromium content, and corrosion was only slightly less with Sandvik HT-9. Corrosion was nearly independent of surface preparation, but in two cases the presence of mill scale on the surface prior to steam exposure seemed to retard oxidation in steam. 11 figures, 5 tables.

Griess, J.C.; DeVan, J.H.; Maxwell, W.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Room Temperature, Intrinsic Vacancy Mediated Ferromagnetism in Cr:Ga2Se3/Si E. N. Yitamben,1,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Room Temperature, Intrinsic Vacancy Mediated Ferromagnetism in Cr:Ga2Se3/Si E. N. Yitamben,1, T. C of 4 µB/Cr. The intrinsic- vacancy structure of defected-zinc-blende -Ga2Se3 enables Cr incorporation, as well as strong overlap between Cr 3d states and the Se 4p states lining the intrinsic vacancy rows, ob

Olmstead, Marjorie

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mud cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Low-cost, highly efficient, and tunable ultrafast laser technology based on directly diode-pumped Cr:Colquiriites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This doctoral project aims to develop robust, ultra low-cost ($5,000-20,000), highly-efficient, and tunable femtosecond laser technology based on diode-pumped Cr:Colquiriite gain media (Cr:LiCAF, Cr3+:LiSAF and Cr:LiSGaF). ...

Demirbas, Umit

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

MgO seed layers for CoCrPt/Cr longitudinal magnetic recording media Li-Lien Lee, B. K. Cheong,a)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MgO seed layers for CoCrPt/Cr longitudinal magnetic recording media Li-Lien Lee, B. K. Cheong,a) D, the industry is still in the process of search- ing for a better seed layer. MgO is an ionic crystal that has

Laughlin, David E.

143

Vibronic spectroscopy of unsaturated transition metal complexes: CrC2H, CrCH3 , and NiCH3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to characterize diatomic transition metal oxides, nitrides, and carbides.8­22 In addition to these pure metallicVibronic spectroscopy of unsaturated transition metal complexes: CrC2H, CrCH3 , and NiCH3 Dale J investigation of small transition metal clusters and organo- metallic radicals is that these species serve

Morse, Michael D.

144

Soft zone formation in dissimilar welds between two Cr-Mo steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two dissimilar weldments between 9Cr-1Mo and 2.25Cr-1Mo ferritic steels have been characterized for their microstructural stability during various postweld heat treatments (PWHTs). The samples for the investigation were extracted from bead-on-plate weldments made by depositing 2.25Cr-1Mo weld metal on 9Cr-1Mo base plate and vice versa. Subsequent application of PWHT resulted in the formation of a soft zone in the low Cr ferritic steel weld or base plate. A carbide-rich hard zone, adjoining the soft zone, was also detected in the high Cr side of the weldment. Unmixed zones in the weld metal provided additional soft and hard zones in the weld metals. The migration of carbon from low-Cr steel to high-Cr steel, driven by the carbon activity gradient, has been shown to be responsible for the formation of soft and hard zones. A carbon activity diagram for 2.25Cr-1Mo/9Cr-1Mo weldments has been proposed to aid in the selection of welding consumables for reducing or preventing the soft zone formation.

Albert, S.K.; Gill, T.P.S.; Tyagi, A.K.; Mannan, S.L.; Rodriguez, P. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Kulkarni, S.D. [Indian Inst. of Tech., Bombay (India)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Microstructural analyses of Cr(VI) speciation in chromite ore processing Residue (COPR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The speciation and distribution of Cr(VI) in the solid phase was investigated for two types of chromite ore processing residue (COPR) found at two deposition sites in the United States: gray-black (GB) granular and hard brown (HB) cemented COPR. COPR chemistry and mineralogy were investigated using micro-X-ray absorption spectroscopy and micro-X-ray diffraction, complemented by laboratory analyses. GB COPR contained 30percent of its total Cr(VI) (6000 mg/kg) as large crystals(>20 ?m diameter) of a previously unreported Na-rich analog of calcium aluminum chromate hydrates. These Cr(VI)-rich phases are thought to be vulnerable to reductive and pH treatments. More than 50percent of the Cr(VI) was located within nodules, not easily accessible to dissolved reductants, and bound to Fe-rich hydrogarnet, hydrotalcite, and possibly brucite. These phases are stable over a large pH range, thus harder to dissolve. Brownmilleritewasalso likely associated with physical entrapment of Cr(VI) in the interior of nodules. HB COPR contained no Cr(VI)-rich phases; all Cr(VI) was diffuse within the nodules and absent from the cementing matrix, with hydrogarnet and hydrotalcite being the main Cr(VI) binding phases. Treatment ofHBCOPRis challenging in terms of dissolving the acidity-resistant, inaccessible Cr(VI) compounds; the same applies to ~;;50percent of Cr(VI) in GB COPR.

CHRYSOCHOOU, MARIA; FAKRA, SIRINE C .; Marcus, Matthew A.; Moon, Deok Hyun; Dermatas, Dimitris

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Addendum 2 to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 358: Areas 18, 19, 20 Cellars/Mud Pits, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revison 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document constitutes an addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 358: Areas 18, 19, 20 Cellars/Mud Pits, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, January 2004 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: • This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information • The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document • The NDEP approval letter • The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 19-09-05, Mud Pit. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was reevaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the UR because contamination is not present at the site above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at this site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at this site that are unrelated to the FFACO UR such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at this site.

Grant Evenson

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Improved oxidation sulfidation resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

High temperature resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy compositions to oxidative and/or sulfidative conditions is provided by the incorporation of about 1 to 8 wt % of Zr or Nb and results in a two-phase composition having an alloy matrix as the first phase and a fine grained intermetallic composition as the second phase. The presence and location of the intermetallic composition between grains of the matrix provides mechanical strength, enhanced surface scale adhesion, and resistance to corrosive attack between grains of the alloy matrix at temperatures of 500 to 1000/sup 0/C.

Natesan, K.; Baxter, D.J.

1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

148

Oxidation sulfidation resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

High temperature resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy compositions to oxidative and/or sulfidative conditions is provided by the incorporation of about 1-8 wt. % of Zr or Nb and results in a two-phase composition having an alloy matrix as the first phase and a fine grained intermetallic composition as the second phase. The presence and location of the intermetallic composition between grains of the matrix provides mechanical strength, enhanced surface scale adhesion, and resistance to corrosive attack between grains of the alloy matrix at temperatures of 500.degree.-1000.degree. C.

Natesan, Ken (Naperville, IL); Baxter, David J. (Woodridge, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

SF6432-CR (02-01-13) Cost Reimbursement  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStoriesSANDIA REPORT SANDSDNTM (04-95)7/31/137/31/13 PageCR

150

The response of CR-39 nuclear track detector to 1–9 MeV protons  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

The response of CR-39 nuclear track detector (TasTrak®) to protons in the energy range of 0.92–9.28 MeV has been studied. Previous studies of the CR-39 response to protons have been extended by examining the piece-to-piece variability in addition to the effects of etch time and etchant temperature; it is shown that the shape of the CR-39 response curve to protons can vary from piece-to-piece. Effects due to the age of CR-39 have also been studied using 5.5 MeV alpha particles over a 5-year period. Track diameters were found to degrade with the age of the CR-39 itself rather than the age of the tracks, consistent with previous studies utilizing different CR-39 over shorter time periods.

Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Manuel, M.; McDuffee, S. C.; Casey, D. T.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

151

Bulk and track etch properties of CR-39 SSNTD etched in NaOH/ethanol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bulk and track etch properties of CR-39 SSNTD etched in NaOH/ethanol K.F. Chan, F.M.F. Ng, D. described the use of NaOH/ethanol as an etchant for the CR-39 detector, and have determined the corre and track etch properties of CR- 39 in NaOH/ethanol were derived from direct measurements. The bulk etch

Yu, K.N.

152

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 357: Mud Pits and Waste Dump, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document constitutes an addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 357: Mud Pits and Waste Dump, Nevada Test Site, Nevada as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications To Remove Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order dated September 2013. The Use Restriction Removal document was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection on October 16, 2013. The approval of the UR Removal document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the UR Removal document, this addendum consists of: This page that refers the reader to the UR Removal document for additional information The cover, title, and signature pages of the UR Removal document The NDEP approval letter The corresponding section of the UR Removal document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 04-26-03, Lead Bricks. This UR was established as part of FFACO corrective actions and was based on the presence of lead contamination at concentrations greater than the action level established at the time of the initial investigation.

Krauss, Mark J

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

CORROSION OF Fe-10Al-Cr ALLOYS BY COAL CHAR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

off-gas from a typical gasifier contains large percentagesIOAl-Cr alloys at coal-gasifier This FeS and CaS0 operating

Gordon, B.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Proton spectroscopy of 48Ni, 46Fe, and 44Cr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Results of decay spectroscopy on nuclei in vicinity of the doubly magic 48Ni are presented. The measurements were performed with a Time Projection Chamber with optical readout which records tracks of ions and protons in the gaseous volume. Six decays of 48Ni including four events of two-proton ground-state radioactivity were recorded. An advanced reconstruction procedure yielded the 2p decay energy for 48Ni of Q2p = 1.29(4) MeV. In addition, the energy spectra of \\b{eta}-delayed protons emitted in the decays of 44Cr and 46Fe, as well as half-lives and branching ratios were determined. The results were found to be consistent with the previous measurements made with Si detectors. A new proton line in the decay of 44Cr corresponding to the decay energy of 760 keV is reported. The first evidence for the \\b{eta}2p decay of 46 Fe, based on one clear event, is shown.

M. Pomorski; M. Pfützner; W. Dominik; R. Grzywacz; A. Stolz; T. Baumann; J. S. Berryman; H. Czyrkowski; R. D?browski; A. Fija?kowska; T. Ginter; J. Johnson; G. Kami?ski; N. Larson; S. N. Liddick; M. Madurga; C. Mazzocchi; S. Mianowski; K. Miernik; D. Miller; S. Paulauskas; J. Pereira; K. P. Rykaczewski; S. Suchyta

2014-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

155

Postirradiation deformation of ferritic Fe-Cr binary alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Six binary Fe-Cr alloys ranging from 3 to 18% chromium were irradiated in the form of miniature tensile specimens in the Fast Flux Test Facility and tested at room temperature. The irradiation conditions produced 7 to 30 dpa at 365 to 574{degrees}C. The major purpose of the experiment was to compare the behavior of these simple alloys with that of more complex commercial alloys, The tensile data obtained on these specimens at room temperature are discussed with appropriate fractographic and microstructural support. Previous studies on similar materials had revealed the presence of a feature typically exhibited in channel fractures: elongated voids were evident in shear bands of an irradiated and deformed TEM disk of a binary Fe-6Cr alloy. An additional purpose of the experiment was therefore to provide a better understanding of the potential contribution of channel fracture to deformation in ferritic alloys. No evidence for channel fracture was found, however. 14 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Precipitation in 9Ni-12Cr-2Cu maraging steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two maraging steels with the compositions 9Ni-12Cr-2Cu-4Mo (wt%) and 9Ni-12Cr-2Cu and with small additions of Al and Ti were investigated using atom probe field ion microscopy. Tomographic atom probe investigations were performed to clarify the spatial distribution of elements in and close to the precipitates. Materials heat treated at 475 C for 5, 25 min, 1, 2, 4 and 400 h were analyzed. Precipitates in the Mo-rich material were observed already after 5 min of aging, while in the material without MO, precipitation started later. In both materials precipitation begins with the formation of Cu-rich particles which work as nucleation sites for a Ni-rich phase of type Ni{sub 3}(Ti,Al). A Mo-rich phase was detected in the Mo-rich steel after 2 h of aging. The distribution of alloying elements in the precipitates, their role in the precipitation process, and the mechanism of hardening in the two materials are discussed.

Stiller, K.; Haettestrand, M. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Physics] [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Physics; Danoix, F. [Univ. de Rouen, Mont Saint Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Ionique] [Univ. de Rouen, Mont Saint Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Ionique

1998-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

157

Corrosion resistance evaluation of 22Cr duplex stainless steel weldments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Among the alternatives for the materials to be used for the construction of two flowlines 22Cr duplex stainless steel was taken into consideration. Corrosion resistance of the welds when exposed to the produced sour fluids was considered as the most critical point, so a program of corrosion testing on the 22Cr duplex stainless steel welds was developed. Three different welding procedures were used and tested in two different laboratories; specimens belonging to one of the welding procedures were also tested after a pre-strain to assess the effect of the deformation induced in the pipe by the wrapping in a reel. Tests were performed in an environment simulating the expected flowlines internal service conditions. Several testing procedures were used. Pitting test according to ASTM G48 Standard were carried out in order to rank welds and exposure tests in simulated field conditions were performed to assess stress corrosion and localized corrosion resistance. Test results showed that all the welds passed the tests and were applicable as corrosion resistant in the service environment. A ranking of the weld procedure based on their corrosion resistance has been determined.

Kopliku, A. [AGIP S.p.A., Milan (Italy); Bell, D. [AGIP UK, London (United Kingdom); Barteri, M. [C.S.M., Rome (Italy); Fowler, C. [CAPCIS, Manchester (United Kingdom)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Effect of Cr2O3 on the 18O Tracer Incorporation in SOFC Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Investigations of the impact of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlayers on the oxygen self diffusion in two SOFC materials were conducted to gain insight into the Cr poisoning mechanism at the cathode side of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) with stainless steel interconnects. High density Y{sub 0.15}Zr{sub 0.85}O{sub 2} (YSZ) and La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (LSCF) sintered pellets were covered with 3 to 30 nm Cr overlayers that were subsequently oxidized, forming Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Standard {sup 18}O tracer diffusion experiments at 800 C were performed and ToF-SIMS profiling revealed that the oxygen ion diffusion coefficients were unaffected by the thin Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlayers, which is predictable since they are a bulk property, but the extracted effective surface exchange coefficients varied with Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlayer thickness. Solid-state reaction measurements and electronic structure considerations concerning the surface exchange, led to the conclusion that the observed oxygen uptake hindrance for Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} capped LSCF and the slight increase of the surface exchange coefficient for Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} capped YSZ can be attributed to the electronic properties of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. A critical thickness for Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} was determined to be 12 nm where the transition from decreasing cathode-performance to a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-property-governed regime occurs.

Finsterbusch, M.; Lussier, A; Negusse, E; Zhu, Z; Smith, R; Schaefer, J; Idzerda, Y

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Corrosion Behavior of Solution-Annealed CoCrMo Medical Implant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

! ! ! Corrosion Behavior of Solution- Annealed CoCrMo Medical Implant Alloys Pooja Panigrahi University June 6, 2011 #12;! ! ""! Corrosion Behavior of Solution-Annealed CoCrMo Medical Implant Alloys and Applied Sciences Northwestern University June 6, 2011 Abstract Corrosion behavior of solution annealed

Shull, Kenneth R.

160

ENDOR study of Cr3 centers substituting for lithium in lithium niobate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENDOR study of Cr3¿ centers substituting for lithium in lithium niobate G. Malovichko,1, * V centers in lithium niobate crystals were investigated with the help of electron nuclear double resonance and the parameters of hyperfine and quadrupole interactions were determined. It is found that Cr3 substitutes for Li

Malovichko, Galina

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mud cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

MAGNESIUM ISOTOPIC COMPOSITION OF CAIs AND CHONDRULES FROM CR CHONDRITES. B. , M. Gounelle1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MAGNESIUM ISOTOPIC COMPOSITION OF CAIs AND CHONDRULES FROM CR CHONDRITES. B. Mimoun1 , M. Gounelle1. Introduction: The magnesium isotopic composi- tion of primitive extraterrestrial materials is worth measuring.g. 10]. Figure 1: The magnesium isotopic composition of CAIs in CR chondrites. Error bars are 1

Technische Universiteit Delft

162

EPR, ENDOR, and optical-absorption study of Cr3 centers substituting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARTICLES EPR, ENDOR, and optical-absorption study of Cr3¿ centers substituting for niobium in Li of Sciences, Kiev, Ukraine Received 6 January 2000; revised manuscript received 3 May 2000 A triplet of EPR % of Cr. Detailed investigations of the angular dependencies of EPR and electron nuclear double

Malovichko, Galina

163

Field Investigations of Lactate-Stimulated Bioreduction of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this paper is to carry out field investigations to assess the potential for immobilizing and detoxifying chromium-contaminated groundwater using lactate-stimulated bioreduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) at the Hanford 100H site.

T. C. Hazen; B. Faybishenko; D. Joyner; S. Borglin; E. Brodie; S.; K. Williams; J. Peterson; J. Wan; T. Tokunaga; M.; P. E. Long; Resch, C.T.; Newcomer, D.; Koenigsberg, S.; Willet, A.

2005-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

164

Precipitation in a Cu–Cr–Zr–Mg alloy during aging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The precipitation processes in a Cu-0.69Cr-0.10Zr-0.02Mg alloy aged at 450 °C and 550 °C have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The precipitation sequence in this alloy aged at 450 °C is: supersaturated solid solution ? Guinier–Preston zone (fcc Cr-rich phase) ? ordered fcc Cr-rich phase ? ordered bcc Cr-rich phase. The precipitation sequence in this alloy aged at 550 °C is: supersaturated solid solution ? ordered fcc Cr-rich phase ? ordered bcc Cr-rich phase. In the evolution of decomposition, the orientation relationship between the precipitates and the Cu matrix changes from cube-on-cube to Nishiyama–Wassermann orientation. The ordering of Cr-rich precipitates facilitates the formation of the bcc precipitates and promotes the development of Nishiyama–Wassermann orientation. - Highlights: • Two different precipitation sequences in the Cu–Cr–Zr–Mg alloy are proposed. • The changes in orientation relationship of the precipitates are presented. • The roles of ordering and coherent interface of the precipitates are discussed.

Cheng, J.Y., E-mail: bigchengjianyi@163.com; Shen, B.; Yu, F.X.

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

165

Postirradiation deformation behavior in ferritic Fe-Cr alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been demonstrated that fast neutron irradiation produces significant hardening in simple Fe(3-18)Cr binary alloys irradiated to about 35 dpa in the temperature range 365 to 420{degrees}C, whereas irradiation at 574{degrees}C produces hardening only for 15% or more chromium. The irradiation-induced changes in tensile properties are discussed in terms of changes in the power law work hardening exponent. The work hardening exponent of the lower chromium alloys decreased significantly after low temperature irradiation ({le}420{degrees}C) but increased after irradiation at 574{degrees}C. The higher chromium alloys failed either in cleavage or in a mixed ductile/brittle fashion. Deformation microstructures are presented to support the tensile behavior.

Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, VA (United States); Gardner, P.L. [Univ. of Missouri, Rolla (United States)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

Postirradiation deformation behavior in ferritic Fe-Cr alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been demonstrated that fast-neutron irradiation produces significant hardening in simple Fe-(3-18)Cr binary alloys irradiated to about 35 dpa in the temperature range 365 to 420{degrees}C, whereas irradiation at 574{degrees}C produces hardening only for 15% or more chromium. The irradiation-induced changes in tensile properties are discussed in terms of changes in the power law work-hardening exponent. The work-hardening exponent of the lower chromium alloys decreased significantly after low-temperature irradiation ({le} 420{degrees}C) but increased after irradiation at 574{degrees}C. The higher chromium alloys failed either in cleavage or in a mixed ductile/brittle fashion. Deformation microstructures are presented to support the tensile behavior.

Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Gardner, P.L. [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Postirradiation deformation behavior in ferritic Fe-Cr alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been demonstrated that fast-neutron irradiation produces significant hardening in simple Fe-(3-18)Cr binary alloys irradiated to about 35 dpa in the temperature range 365 to 420[degrees]C, whereas irradiation at 574[degrees]C produces hardening only for 15% or more chromium. The irradiation-induced changes in tensile properties are discussed in terms of changes in the power law work-hardening exponent. The work-hardening exponent of the lower chromium alloys decreased significantly after low-temperature irradiation ([le] 420[degrees]C) but increased after irradiation at 574[degrees]C. The higher chromium alloys failed either in cleavage or in a mixed ductile/brittle fashion. Deformation microstructures are presented to support the tensile behavior.

Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Gardner, P.L. (Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

STARDUST INVESTIGATION INTO THE CR CHONDRITE GROVE MOUNTAIN 021710  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the presolar grain inventory of the CR chondrite Grove Mountain 021710. A total of 35 C-anomalous grains ({approx}236 ppm) and 112 O-anomalous grains ({approx}189 ppm) were identified in situ using NanoSIMS ion imaging. Of 35 C-anomalous grains, 28 were determined to be SiC grains by Auger spectroscopy. Seven of the SiC grains were subsequently measured for N and Si isotopes, allowing classification as one nova grain, one Y grain, one Z grain, and four mainstream grains. Eighty-nine out of 112 O-anomalous grains belong to Group 1, indicating origins in low-to-intermediate-mass red giant and asymptotic giant branch stars. Twenty-one are Group 4 grains and have origins in supernovae. Auger spectroscopic elemental measurements of 35 O-anomalous grains show that 33 of them are ferromagnesian silicates. They have higher Mg/(Mg+Fe) ratios than those reported in other meteorites, suggesting a lower degree of alteration in the nebula and/or asteroid parent bodies. Only two oxide grains were identified, with stoichiometric compositions of MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and SiO{sub 2}, respectively. The presolar silicate/oxide ratio of GRV 021710 is comparable with those of the CR3 chondrites (QUE 99177 and MET 00426) and primitive interplanetary dust particles. In order to search for presolar sulfides, the meteorite was also mapped for S isotopes. However, no presolar sulfides were found, suggesting a maximum abundance of 2 ppm. The scarcity of presolar sulfides may be due to their much faster sputtering rate by cosmic rays compared to silicates.

Zhao Xuchao; Lin Yangting [Key Laboratory of the Earth's Deep Interior, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19 Beituchengxi Road, Beijing 100029 (China); Floss, Christine [Laboratory for Space Sciences and Physics Department, Washington University, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Bose, Maitrayee, E-mail: linyt@mail.igcas.ac.cn [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, P.O. Box 871604, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States)

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

169

Solid state phase equilibria and intermetallic compounds of the Al-Cr-Ho system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solid state phase equilibria of the Al-Cr-Ho ternary system at 500 Degree-Sign C were experimentally investigated. The phase relations at 500 Degree-Sign C are governed by 14 three-phase regions, 29 two-phase regions and 15 single-phase regions. The existences of 10 binary compounds and 2 ternary phases have been confirmed. Al{sub 11}Cr{sub 2}, Al{sub 11}Cr{sub 4} and Al{sub 17}Ho{sub 2} were not found at 500 Degree-Sign C. Crystal structures of Al{sub 9}Cr{sub 4} and Al{sub 8}Cr{sub 4}Ho were determined by the Rietveld X-ray powder data refinement. Al{sub 9}Cr{sub 4} was found to exhibit cubic structure with space group I4-bar 3m (no. 217) and lattice parameters a=0.9107(5) nm. Al{sub 8}Cr{sub 4}Ho crystallizes in ThMn{sub 12} structure type with space group I4/mmm (no. 139) and lattice parameters a=0.8909(4) nm, c=0.5120(5) nm. It is concluded that the obtained Al{sub 4}Cr phase in this work should be {mu}-Al{sub 4}Cr by comparing with XRD pattern of the hexagonal {mu}-Al{sub 4}Mn compound. - Graphical abstract: The solid state phase equilibria of the Al-Cr-Ho ternary system at 500 Degree-Sign C. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al-Cr-Ho system has been investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al{sub 9}Cr{sub 4} has cubic structure with space group I4-bar 3m. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al{sub 8}Cr{sub 4}Ho crystallizes in ThMn{sub 12} type with space group I4/mmm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al{sub 4}Cr phase is {mu}-type at 500 Degree-Sign C.

Pang, Mingjun [Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Materials and New Processing Technology, Ministry of Education, Guangxi University, Nanning, Guangxi 530004 (China) [Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Materials and New Processing Technology, Ministry of Education, Guangxi University, Nanning, Guangxi 530004 (China); SAIC-GM-Wuling Automobile Co., Ltd., Liuzhou, Guangxi 545007 (China); Zhan, Yongzhong, E-mail: zyzmatres@yahoo.com.cn [Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Materials and New Processing Technology, Ministry of Education, Guangxi University, Nanning, Guangxi 530004 (China)] [Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Materials and New Processing Technology, Ministry of Education, Guangxi University, Nanning, Guangxi 530004 (China); Du, Yong [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

Mesoporous carbon -Cr2O3 composite as an anode material for lithium ion batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mesoporous carbon-Cr2O3 (M-C-Cr2O3) composite was prepared by co-assembly of in-situ formed phenolic resin, chromium precursor, and Pluronic block copolymer under acidic conditions, followed by carbonization at 750oC under Argon. The TEM results confirmed that the Cr2O3 nanoparticles, ranging from 10 to 20 nm, were well dispersed in the matrix of mesoporous carbon. The composite exhibited an initial reversible capacity of 710 mAh g-1 and good cycling stability, which is mainly due to the synergic effects of carbons within the composites, i.e. confining the crystal growth of Cr2O3 during the high temperature treatment step and buffering the volume change of Cr2O3 during the cycling step. This composite material is a promising anode material for lithium ion batteries.

Guo, Bingkun [ORNL; Chi, Miaofang [ORNL; Sun, Xiao-Guang [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Void swelling resistance in Fe-Cr alloys at 200 dpa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microstructural examinations have been performed on a serious of binary Fe-cr alloys irradiated to 200 dpa at 425 C in a fast breeder reactor. The alloy compositions ranged from 3% to 18% Cr in 3% Cr increments, and the irradiation temperature corresponded to the peak swelling condition for this alloy class. Density measurements showed swelling levels as high as 7.4%, with the highest swelling found in the Fe-9Cr and Fe-6Cr alloys. Microstructural examinations revealed that the highest swelling conditions contained well-developed voids, often as large as 100 nm, and a dislocation network comprised of both a/2<111> and a<100> Burgers vectors. Swelling was lower in the other alloys, and the swelling reduction could be correlated with increased precipitation. These results are considered in light of the current theories for low swelling in ferritic alloys, but no theory is available to completely explain the results.

Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

The resistance to cavitation erosion of CrMnN stainless steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The resistance to cavitation erosion (CE) was measured using a magnetostrictive device and a rotating disk device for some CrMnN stainless steels (Chinese patent ZL 90 1 02197.0). The microstructural changes in the surface layer before and after CE were analyzed by use of Mossbauer spectra. Results show that the resistance to CE of duplex austenitic-martensitic CrMnN stainless steels is much better than that of ZG0Cr13Ni4-6Mo and ZG0Cr16Ni5Mo steel, which are in common use for hydraulic turbine runners. The metastable austenite and its changes in the process of CE are the key factors why the CrMnN stainless steels have excellent resistance to cavitation erosion.

Fu, W.T. [Yanshan Univ., Qinhuangdao (China). Dept. of Materials Engineering] [Yanshan Univ., Qinhuangdao (China). Dept. of Materials Engineering; [Harbin Inst. of Tech. (China); Jing, T.F.; Zheng, Y.Z. [Yanshan Univ., Qinhuangdao (China). Dept. of Materials Engineering] [Yanshan Univ., Qinhuangdao (China). Dept. of Materials Engineering; Yang, Y.B. [Yanshan Univ., Qinhuangdao (China). Dept. of Materials Engineering] [Yanshan Univ., Qinhuangdao (China). Dept. of Materials Engineering; [Bohai Aluminum Industries Co., Ltd., Qinhuangdao (China); Yao, M. [Harbin Inst. of Tech. (China)] [Harbin Inst. of Tech. (China)

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Electron concentration and phase stability in NbCr2-based Laves phase alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase stability in NbCr{sub 2}-based transition-metal Laves phases was studied, based on the data reported for binary X-Cr, Nb-X, and ternary Nb-Cr-X phase diagrams. It was shown that when the atomic size ratios are kept identical, the average electron concentration factor, e/a, is the dominating factor in controlling the phase stability of NbCr{sub 2}-based transition-metal Laves phases. The e/a ratios for different Laves polytypes were determined as followed: with e/a < 5.76, the C15 structure is stabilized; at an e/a range of 5.88--7.53, the C14 structure is stabilized; with e/a > 7.65, the C15 structure is stabilized again. A further increase in the electron concentration factor (e/a > 8) leads to the disordering of the alloy. The electron concentration effect on the phase stability of Mg-based Laves phases and transition-metal A{sub 3}B intermetallic compounds is also reviewed and compared with the present observations in transition-metal Laves phases. In order to verify the e/a/phase stability relationship experimentally, additions of Cu (with e/a = 11) were selected to replace Cr in the NbCr{sub 2} Laves phase. Experimental results for the ternary Nb-Cr-Cu system are reported and discussed in terms of the correlation between the e/a ratio and phase stability in NbCr{sub 2}-based Laves phases. A new phase was found, which has an average composition of Nb-47Cr-3Cu. Within the solubility limit, the electron concentration and phase stability relationship is obeyed in the Nb-Cr-Cu system.

Zhu, J.H.; Liaw, P.K. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Liu, C.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

1997-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

174

Integrated Ecogenomics Study for Bioremediation of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hexavalent chromium is a widespread contaminant found in groundwater. In order to stimulate microbially mediated Cr(VI)-reduction, a poly-lactate compound was injected into Cr(VI)-contaminated aquifers at site 100H at Hanford. Investigation of bacterial community composition using high-density DNA microarray analysis of 16S rRNA gene products revealed a stimulation of Pseudomonas, Desulfovibrio and Geobacter species amongst others. Enrichment of these organisms coincided with continued Cr(VI) depletion. Functional gene-array analysis of DNA from monitoring well indicated high abundance of genes involved in nitrate-reduction, sulfate-reduction, iron-reduction, methanogenesis, chromium tolerance/reduction. Clone-library data revealed Psedomonas was the dominant genus in these samples. Based on above results, we conducted lab investigations to study the dominant anaerobic culturable microbial populations present at this site and their role in Cr(VI)-reduction. Enrichments using defined anaerobic media resulted in isolation of an iron-reducing, a sulfate-reducing and a nitrate-reducing isolate among several others. Preliminary 16S rDNA sequence analysis identified the isolates as Geobacter metallireducens, Pseudomonas stutzeri and Desulfovibrio vulgaris species respectively. The Pseudomonas isolate utilized acetate, lactate, glycerol and pyruvate as alternative carbon sources, and reduced Cr(VI). Anaerobic washed cell suspension of strain HLN reduced almost 95?M Cr(VI) within 4 hr. Further, with 100?M Cr(VI) as sole electron-acceptor, cells grew to 4.05 x 107 /ml over 24 h after an initial lag, demonstrating direct enzymatic Cr(VI) reduction coupled to growth. These results demonstrate that Cr(VI)-immobilization at Hanford 100H site could be mediated by direct microbial metabolism in addition to indirect chemical reduction of Cr(VI) by end-products of microbial activity.

Chakraborty, Romy; Chakraborty, Romy

2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

175

Simulation of Reduction of Cr(VI) by Fe(II) Produced Electrochemically in a Parallel-Plate Electrochemical Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the cathode, electrocoagulation uses electricity to produce a reducing agent ferrous ions from an iron anode the reduction of Cr VI by permeable reactive barriers. Gheju and Lovi7 reported that the re- duction of Cr VI

176

Implementation of scattering pinhole diagnostic for detection of fusion products on CR-39 at high particle fluence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments use solid-state nuclear track detector CR-39 as a means to detect different types of nuclear products. Until recently, it was difficult to use CR-39 in experiments with ...

Orozco, David, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

A new model to account for track overlap in CR-39 data A.B. Zylstra a,n  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in revised form 3 April 2012 Accepted 3 April 2012 Available online 19 April 2012 Keywords: CR-39 Nuclear track detectors Inertial confinement fusion a b s t r a c t The solid-state nuclear track detector CR-39 such as neutron dosimetry and radon detection. The upper limit of detectable charged-particle fluence on CR-39

178

Role of Embedded Clustering in Dilute Magnetic Semiconductors: Cr Doped GaN X. Y. Cui,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, typically 5 (20­30) times smaller for Cr-based (Mn-based) III-V DMS than the value expected, 3 B= Cr4 BRole of Embedded Clustering in Dilute Magnetic Semiconductors: Cr Doped GaN X. Y. Cui,1 J. E configurations coexist and the statistical distribution and associated magnetism will depend sensitively

Medvedeva, Julia E.

179

Differential isotopic fractionation during Cr(VI) reduction by an aquifer-derived bacterium under arobic versus denitrifying conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We studied Cr isotopic fractionation during Cr(VI) reduction by Pseudomonas stutzeri strain RCH2. Despite the fact that strain RCH2 reduces Cr(VI) co-metabolically under both aerobic and denitrifying conditions and at similar specific rates, fractionation was markedly different under these two conditions (ε ~2? aerobically and ~0.4? under denitrifying conditions).

Han, R.; Qin, L.; Brown, S. T.; Christensen, J. N.; Beller, H. R.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Cr-Ga-N materials for negative electrodes in Li rechargeable batteries : structure, synthesis and electrochemical performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrochemical performances of two ternary compounds (Cr2GaN and Cr3GaN) in the Cr-Ga-N system as possible future anode materials for lithium rechargeable batteries were studied. Motivation for this study was dealt in ...

Kim, Miso

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mud cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Nanoscale Phase Separation In Epitaxial Cr-Mo and Cr-V Alloy Thin Films Studied Using Atom Probe Tomography: Comparison Of Experiments And Simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tailored metal alloy thin film-oxide interfaces generated using molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) deposition of alloy thin films on a single crystalline oxide substrate can be used for detailed studies of irradiation damage response on the interface structure. However presence of nanoscale phase separation in the MBE grown alloy thin films can impact the metal-oxide interface structure. Due to nanoscale domain size of such phase separation it is very challenging to characterize by conventional techniques. Therefor laser assisted atom probe tomography (APT) was utilized to study the phase separation in epitaxial Cr0.61Mo0.39, Cr0.77Mo0.23, and Cr0.32V0.68 alloy thin films grown by MBE on MgO(001) single crystal substrates. Statistical analysis, namely frequency distribution analysis and Pearson coefficient analysis of experimental data was compared with similar analyses conducted on simulated APT datasets with known extent of phase separation. Thus the presence of phase separation in Cr-Mo films, even when phase separation was not clearly observed by x-ray diffraction, and the absence of phase separation in the Cr-V film were thus confirmed.

Devaraj, Arun; Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Ramanan, Sathvik; Walvekar, Sarita K.; Bowden, Mark E.; Shutthanandan, V.; Kurtz, Richard J.

2014-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

182

Ni-Cr-P plating bath time dependent characterization by ion chromatography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analysis of Cr VII. HPIC gradient eluation program for anions VIII. HPIC eluation program for HsBOs IX. A method comparison of initial Ni-Cr-P plating bath ionic species concentrations as determined by weight measurement and HPIC analysis. X. Ni... the rate constants for compound C. 40 44 79 80 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Amorphous Nickel-Chromium-Phosphorus (Ni-Cr-P) alloys have outstand- ing corrosion resistance, which is even superior to that of Hastelloy C-276 (1). This corrosion resistance...

Faxel, Ralph Edward

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

High temperature oxidation behavior of Fe-Cr-Al foils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metallic catalytic converters for automotive emission control is becoming an important application for heat resistant alloys as more design opportunities are realized. The service conditions and design of metallic catalytic converters require the alloy to be highly oxidation resistant at gauges typically at 50 microns or less. For conventional heat resistant alloy design the goal is to form a well adherent scale on the alloy surface to protect the alloy matrix from being oxidized. However, the thin gauge results in a limited supply of alloying elements that can form the protective scale on the surface. The alloy chemistry has to be optimized to have the minimum oxidation while maintaining processing characteristics. Furthermore, the ratio of scale thickness to foil gauge is significant and the stress state between them introduces measurable permanent distortion of the foil. In this study, the effect of alloying elements on the oxidation behavior of commonly used Fe-Cr-Al alloys was quantified by the oxidation weight gain and length change measurements.

Chang, C.S.; Jha, B. [Texas Instruments, Inc., Attleboro, MA (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

184

Steamside Oxidation Behavior of Experimental 9%Cr Steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reducing emissions and increasing economic competitiveness require more efficient steam power plants that utilize fossil fuels. One of the major challenges in designing these plants is the availability of materials that can stand the supercritical and ultra-supercritical steam conditions at a competitive cost. There are several programs around the world developing new ferritic and austenitic steels for superheater and reheater tubes exposed to the advanced steam conditions. The new steels must possess properties better than current steels in terms of creep strength, steamside oxidation resistance, fireside corrosion resistance, and thermal fatigue resistance. This paper introduces a series of experimental 9%Cr steels containing Cu, Co, and Ti. Stability of the phases in the new steels is discussed and compared to the phases in the commercially available materials. The steels were tested under both the dry and moist conditions at 650ºC for their cyclical oxidation resistance. Results of oxidation tests are presented. Under the moist conditions, the experimental steels exhibited significantly less mass gain compared to the commercial P91 steel. Microstructural characterization of the scale revealed different oxide compositions.

Dogan, O.N.; Holcomb, G.R.; Alman, D.E.; Jablonski, P.D.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Electrochemical Testing of Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The waste package site recommendation design specified a boron-containing stainless steel, Neutronit 976/978, for fabrication of the internal baskets that will be used as a corrosion-resistant neutron-absorbing material. Recent corrosion test results gave higher-than-expected corrosion rates for this material. The material callout for these components has been changed to a Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy (ASTM-B 932-04, UNS N06464) that is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory. This report discusses the results of initial corrosion testing of this material in simulated in-package environments that could contact the fuel baskets after breach of the waste package outer barrier. The corrosion test matrix was executed using the potentiodynamic and potentiostatic electrochemical test techniques. The alloy performance shows low rates of general corrosion after initial removal of a gadolinium-rich second phase that intersects the surface. The high halide-containing test solutions exhibited greater tendencies toward initiation of crevice corrosion.

T. E. Lister; R. E. Mizia; H. Tian

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Mudpots, Mud Pools, or Mud Volcanoes | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3 ClimateSpurr GeothermalCarmel Public Utility Co

187

CORROSION OF Fe-10Al-Cr ALLOYS BY COAL CHAR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

owned rights. LBL-6946 Corrosion of Fe-lOAl-Cr Alloys byOctober, 1977 Abstract Corrosion of iron-base alloys at 982°high-temperature induced corrosion are probably sulfides and

Gordon, B.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Structure, Magnetism, and Transport of CuCr2Se4 Thin Films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structure, Magnetism, and Transport of CuCr 2 Se 4 Thindichroism shows that the magnetism persists to the surfacesuch as the nature of magnetism at surfaces and interfaces.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

E-Print Network 3.0 - austenitic fe-cr-ni alloys Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

than at 650C. Therefore, for these Fe-Cr-Ni model alloys, increasing... Figure 5 shows LM of the samples after 100x1h cycles at 650C for representative ... Source: Pint, Bruce...

190

C/CrC nanocomposite coating deposited by magnetron sputtering at high ion irradiation conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CrC with the fcc NaCl (B1) structure is a metastable phase that can be obtained under the non-equilibrium conditions of high ion irradiation. A nano-composite coating consisting of amorphous carbon embedded in a CrC matrix was prepared via the unbalanced magnetron sputtering of graphite and Cr metal targets in Ar gas with a high ionized flux (ion-to-neutral ratio Ji/Jn = 6). The nanoscale amorphous carbon clusters self-assembled into layers alternated by CrC, giving the composite a multilayer structure. The phase, microstructure, and composition of the coating were characterized using x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy coupled with electron energy loss spectroscopy. The interpretation of the true coating structure, in particular the carbide type, is discussed.

Zhou, Z.; Rainforth, W. M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Gass, M. H.; Bleloch, A. [SuperSTEM at Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Cheshire, WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Ehiassarian, A. P.; Hovsepian, P. Eh. [Materials Engineering Research Institute, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield, S1 1WB (United Kingdom)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Process for producing Ti-Cr-Al-O thin film resistors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Thin films of Ti-Cr-Al-O are used as a resistor material. The films are rf sputter deposited from ceramic targets using a reactive working gas mixture of Ar and O.sub.2. Resistivity values from 10.sup.4 to 10.sup.10 Ohm-cm have been measured for Ti-Cr-Al-O film <1 .mu.m thick. The film resistivity can be discretely selected through control of the target composition and the deposition parameters. The application of Ti-Cr-Al-O as a thin film resistor has been found to be thermodynamically stable, unlike other metal-oxide films. The Ti-Cr-Al-O film can be used as a vertical or lateral resistor, for example, as a layer beneath a field emission cathode in a flat panel display; or used to control surface emissivity, for example, as a coating on an insulating material such as vertical wall supports in flat panel displays.

Jankowski, Alan F. (Livermore, CA); Schmid, Anthony P. (Solana Beach, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Flat panel display using Ti-Cr-Al-O thin film  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Thin films of Ti--Cr--Al--O are used as a resistor material. The films are rf sputter deposited from ceramic targets using a reactive working gas mixture of Ar and O.sub.2. Resistivity values from 10.sup.4 to 10.sup.10 Ohm-cm have been measured for Ti--Cr--Al--O film <1 .mu.m thick. The film resistivity can be discretely selected through control of the target composition and the deposition parameters. The application of Ti--Cr--Al--O as a thin film resistor has been found to be thermodynamically stable, unlike other metal-oxide films. The Ti--Cr--Al--O film can be used as a vertical or lateral resistor, for example, as a layer beneath a field emission cathode in a flat panel display; or used to control surface emissivity, for example, as a coating on an insulating material such as vertical wall supports in flat panel displays.

Jankowski, Alan F. (Livermore, CA); Schmid, Anthony P. (Solan Beach, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Cr(VI) reduction in aqueous solutions by using copper smelter slag  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability of Copper Smelter Slag (CSS) to reduce Cr(VI) in aqueous solutions has been investigated. The extent of reduction if dependent on the amounts of acid and reductant, contact time, Cr(VI) concentration, temperature of the solution and particle size of CSS. The amount of acid is the most important variable affecting the reduction process. When twice the amount of acid required with respect to Cr(VI) was used, Cr(VI) in 100 ml solution (100 mg/l) was completely reduced in a contact period less than 5 min by a 10 g/l dosage of CSS. Reduction efficiency increased with increase in temperature of solution, showing that the process is endothermic. Reduced chromium, and iron and other metals dissolved from CSS were effectively precipitated by using NaOH or calcinated carbonation sludge from sugar plant.

Kiyak, B.; Oezer, A.; Altundogan, H.S.; Erdem, M.; Tuemen, F. (Firat Univ., Elazig (Turkey))

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Cr(VI) reduction in aqueous solutions by using copper smelter slag  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability of Copper Smelter Slag (CSS) to reduce Cr(VI) in aqueous solutions has been investigated. The extent of reduction if dependent on the amounts of acid and reductant, contact time, Cr(VI) concentration, temperature of the solution and particle size of CSS. The amount of acid is the most important variable affecting the reduction process. When twice the amount of acid required with respect to Cr(VI) was used, Cr(VI) in 100 ml solution (100 mg/l) was completely reduced in a contact period less than 5 min by a 10 g/l dosage of CSS. Reduction efficiency increased with increase in temperature of solution, showing that the process is endothermic. Reduced chromium, and iron and other metals dissolved from CSS were effectively precipitated by using NaOH or calcinated carbonation sludge from sugar plant.

Kiyak, B.; Oezer, A.; Altundogan, H.S.; Erdem, M.; Tuemen, F. [Firat Univ., Elazig (Turkey)] [Firat Univ., Elazig (Turkey)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Microstructures of Metallic NiCrBSi Coatings Manufactured via Hybrid Plasma Spray  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, nanoindentation, NiCrBSi, plasma-laser hybrid process, scratch testing 1. Introduction Electrodeposited hard, uniform microstructure, high hardness, and highly adhesive bonding to the substrate (Ref 8). Nickel

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

196

Electronic Structure of CrN: from Macro to Nano | Argonne National...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electronic Structure of CrN: from Macro to Nano January 28, 2015 11:00AM to 12:00PM Presenter Antia Sanchez Botana, University of California, Davis Location Building 223, Room S105...

197

A few-cycle Cr??:YAG laser and optical studies of photonic crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A prismless Cr4+:YAG laser was used to generate 20 fs pulses at 1450 nm with a bandwidth of 190 nm FWHM. Intracavity group velocity dispersion was compensated with double-chirped mirrors. Pulse spectrum was observable from ...

Ripin, Daniel Jacob, 1973-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

CORROSION OF Fe-10Al-Cr ALLOYS BY COAL CHAR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Potent.ials Encountered in Coal Conversion Systems", NASA TNof Illinois #6 ash and coal char. Figure 1. Cross sectionsof Fe-lOAl-Cr Alloys by Coal Char B. A. Gordon and V.

Gordon, B.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Surface modification to improve fireside corrosion resistance of Fe-Cr ferritic steels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An article of manufacture and a method for providing an Fe--Cr ferritic steel article of manufacture having a surface layer modification for corrosion resistance. Fe--Cr ferritic steels can be modified to enhance their corrosion resistance to liquid coal ash and other chemical environments, which have chlorides or sulfates containing active species. The steel is modified to form an aluminide/silicide passivating layer to reduce such corrosion.

Park, Jong-Hee (Clarendon Hills, IL); Natesan, Krishnamurti (Naperville, IL); Rink, David L. (Mokena, IL)

2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

200

Heat treatment of NiCrFe alloy to optimize resistance to intergrannular stress corrosion  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of producing a NiCrFe alloy having a high resistance to stress corrosion cracking comprising heating a NiCrFe alloy to a temperature sufficient to enable the carbon present in the alloy body in the form of carbide deposits to enter into solution, rapidly cool the alloy body, and heat the cooled body to a temperature between 1100.degree. to 1500.degree. F. for about 1 to 30 hours.

Steeves, Arthur F. (Schenectady, NY); Bibb, Albert E. (Clifton Park, NY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mud cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Optimizing Cr(VI) and Tc(VII) remediation through nano-scale biomineral engineering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To optimize the production of biomagnetite for the bioremediation of metal oxyanion contaminated waters, the reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by two biogenic magnetites and a synthetic magnetite was evaluated under batch and continuous flow conditions. Results indicate that nano-scale biogenic magnetite produced by incubating synthetic schwertmannite powder in cell suspensions of Geobacter sulfurreducens is more efficient at reducing Cr(VI) than either biogenic nano-magnetite produced from a suspension of ferrihydrite 'gel' or synthetic nano-scale Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} powder. Although X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) measurements obtained from post-exposure magnetite samples reveal that both Cr(III) and Cr(VI) are associated with nanoparticle surfaces, X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) studies indicate that some Cr(III) has replaced octahedrally coordinated Fe in the lattice of the magnetite. Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) measurements of total aqueous Cr in the associated solution phase indicated that, although the majority of Cr(III) was incorporated within or adsorbed to the magnetite samples, a proportion ({approx}10-15 %) was released back into solution. Studies of Tc(VII) uptake by magnetites produced via the different synthesis routes also revealed significant differences between them as regards effectiveness for remediation. In addition, column studies using a {gamma}-camera to obtain real time images of a {sup 99m}Tc(VII) radiotracer were performed to visualize directly the relative performances of the magnetite sorbents against ultra-trace concentrations of metal oxyanion contaminants. Again, the magnetite produced from schwertmannite proved capable of retaining more ({approx}20%) {sup 99m}Tc(VII) than the magnetite produced from ferrihydrite, confirming that biomagnetite production for efficient environmental remediation can be fine-tuned through careful selection of the initial Fe(III) mineral substrate supplied to Fe(III)-reducing bacteria.

Cutting, R. S.; Coker, V. S.; Telling, N. D.; Kimber, R. L.; Pearce, C. I.; Ellis, B.; Lawson, R; van der Laan, G.; Pattrick, R.A.D.; Vaughan, D.J.; Arenholz, E.; Lloyd, J. R.

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

202

Event-by-event study of CR composition with the SPHERE experiment using the 2013 data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an event-by-event study of cosmic ray (CR) composition with the reflected Cherenkov light method. The fraction of CR light component above 5 PeV was reconstructed using the 2013 run data of the SPHERE experiment which observed optical Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation of extensive air showers, reflected from snow surface of Lake Baikal. Additionally, we discuss a possibility to improve the elemental groups separability by means of multidimensional criteria.

Antonov, R A; Bonvech, E A; Chernov, D V; Dzhatdoev, T A; Finger, Mich; Finger, Mir; Galkin, V I; Podgrudkov, D A; Roganova, T M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

PVD synthesis and high-throughput property characterization of Ni?Fe?Cr alloy libraries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three methods of alloy library synthesis, thick-layer deposition followed by interdiffusion, composition-spread codeposition and electron-beam melting of thick deposited layers, have been applied to Ni-Fe-Cr ternary and Ni-Cr binary alloys. Structural XRD mapping and mechanical characterization by means of nanoindentation have been used to characterize the properties of the libraries. The library synthesis methods are compared from the point of view of the structural and mechanical information they can provide.

Rar, A.; Frafjord, J.J.; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Specht, E.D.; Rack, P.D.; Santella, M.L.; Bei, H.; George, E.P.; Pharr, G.M. (Tennessee-K); (Tennessee-K); (ORNL)

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

204

High-pressure structure of half-metallic CrO2 B. R. Maddox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transition from rutile -CrO2 phase I P42/mnm to orthorhombic -CrO2 phase II CaCl2-like, Pnnm is presented. The transition to the CaCl2 structure, which appears to be second order, occurs at 12±3 GPa without any typically transforms to another sixfold-coordinated structure, CaCl2, or the -PbO2 structure found in shock

Pickett, Warren

205

Microstructure and Mechanical Property Studies on Neutron-Irradiated Ferritic Fe-Cr Model Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Model Fe, Fe-10Cr and Fe-14Cr alloys were irradiated in Advanced Test Reactor at 300°C and 450°C to target doses of 0.01, 0.1 and 1 dpa. The microstructure and the mechanical property of irradiated specimens were investigated using TEM, APT and hardness measurements. The irradiation-induced hardening was consistent with the observed microstructures. For lower doses of 0.01 and 0.1 dpa, the formation of dislocation loops was the primarily contributor to the hardening; no a’ precipitates of resolvable sizes were observed. By 1 dpa, additional increase in hardening were attributed to the formation of a high density of 1-2 nm a' precipitates. In Fe, the hardness increased less as a function of irradiation dose compared to Fe-Cr alloys because of the lack of a' precipitation and differences in loop structures. Three single-parameter effects have been studied: the Cr content, the irradiation temperature and the grain size. The addition of Cr reduced the mobility of both ½<111> and <100> dislocation loops, leading to a smaller loop size and higher loop density. Also, the Cr contents were positively correlated to the density of a' precipitates, but were less relevant to the precipitate size. Higher irradiation temperature of 450°C resulted in a preferential production of the immobile <100> loops over the mobile ½<111> loops (ex. a ratio of 8:1 in Fe-10Cr irradiated 450°C to 0.01 dpa). At lower temperature of 300°C, heterogeneous formation of dislocation loops at the vicinity of line dislocations frequently. In Fe, the development of dislocation loops was suppressed (compared to Fe-Cr alloys) due to a combination of smaller grain size, high initial dislocation density and high defect mobility.

Jian Gan; Maria Okuniewski; Wei-Ying Chen; Yinbin Miao; Carolyn A. Tomchik; James F. Stubbins; Y. Q. Wu; Stu A. Maloy

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Oxidation behavior of arc evaporated Al-Cr-Si-N thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impact of Al and Si on the oxidation behavior of Al-Cr-(Si)-N thin films synthesized by arc evaporation of powder metallurgically prepared Al{sub x}Cr{sub 1-x} targets with x = Al/(Al + Cr) of 0.5, 0.6, and 0.7 and (Al{sub 0.5}Cr{sub 0.5}){sub 1-z}Si{sub z} targets with Si contents of z = 0.05, 0.1, and 0.2 in N{sub 2} atmosphere was studied in detail by means of differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), x-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy. Dynamical measurements in synthetic air (up to 1440 Degree-Sign C) revealed the highest onset temperature of pronounced oxidation for nitride coatings prepared from the Al{sub 0.4}Cr{sub 0.4}Si{sub 0.2} target. Isothermal TGA at 1100, 1200, 1250, and 1300 Degree-Sign C highlight the pronounced improvement of the oxidation resistance of Al{sub x}Cr{sub 1-x}N coatings by the addition of Si. The results show that Si promotes the formation of a dense coating morphology as well as a dense oxide scale when exposed to air.

Tritremmel, Christian; Daniel, Rostislav; Mitterer, Christian; Mayrhofer, Paul H.; Lechthaler, Markus; Polcik, Peter [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Advanced Hard Coatings, Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Application Oriented Coating Development, Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); OC Oerlikon Balzers AG, Iramali 18, LI-9496 Balzers (Liechtenstein); PLANSEE Composite Materials GmbH, Siebenbuergerstrasse 23, D-86983 Lechbruck am See (Germany)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of n-irradiated Fe-Cr Model Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High chromium ( 9-12 wt %) ferritic/martensitic steels are candidate structural materials for future fusion reactors and other advanced systems such as accelerator driven systems (ADS). Their use for these applications requires a careful assessment of their mechanical stability under high energy neutron irradiation and in aggressive environments. In particular, the Cr concentration has been shown to be a key parameter to be optimized in order to guarantee the best corrosion and swelling resistance, together with the least embrittlement. In this work, the characterization of the neutron irradiated Fe-Cr model alloys with different Cr % with respect to microstructure and mechanical tests will be presented. The behavior of Fe-Cr alloys have been studied using tensile tests at different temperature range ( from -160 deg. C to 300 deg. C). Irradiation-induced microstructure changes have been studied by TEM for two different irradiation doses at 300 deg. C. The density and the size distribution of the defects induced have been determined. The tensile test results indicate that Cr content affects the hardening behavior of Fe-Cr binary alloys. Hardening mechanisms are discussed in terms of Orowan type of approach by correlating TEM data to the measured irradiation hardening. (authors)

Matijasevic, Milena; Al Mazouzi, Abderrahim [Reactor materials research, SCK-CEN, Mol (Belgium)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

O'Donnell S and Jeanne R.L. 2002. The nest as fortress: defensive behavior of Polybia emaciata, a mud-nesting eusocial wasp. 5 pp. Journal of Insect Science, 2:3. Available online: insectscience.org/2.3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

O'Donnell S and Jeanne R.L. 2002. The nest as fortress: defensive behavior of Polybia emaciata, a mud-nesting eusocial wasp. 5 pp. Journal of Insect Science, 2:3. Available online: insectscience.org/2.3 Journal of Insect Science insectscience.org The nest as fortress: defensive behavior of Polybia emaciata

O'Donnell, Sean

209

Detection of charge transfer processes in Cr-doped SrTiO{sub 3} single crystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An insulator-to-metal transition is observed in Cr-doped SrTiO{sub 3} single crystals upon extended exposure to a high electric field, namely, electroconditioning (EC). Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and transport measurements under laser irradiation show anticorrelation between the Cr{sup 3+} EPR signal and the electrical current. This proves that the Cr{sup 3+} ions are responsible for the photocurrent that initiates the EC process. We observe the presence of Cr{sup 3+}/Cr{sup 4+} mixed valencies in the bulk in the conducting state. The EPR characterization of the spectra in the conducting state excludes the possibility of a Cr{sup 3+}-oxygen vacancy complex in the bulk as a result of the EC.

La Mattina, F. [Physik-Institut der Universitaet Zuerich, Winterthurerstr. 190, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland); IBM Research, Zurich Research Laboratory, Saeumerstr. 4, CH-8803 Rueschlikon (Switzerland); Bednorz, J. G.; Alvarado, S. F. [IBM Research, Zurich Research Laboratory, Saeumerstr. 4, CH-8803 Rueschlikon (Switzerland); Shengelaya, A. [Physics Institute of Tbilisi State University, Chavchavadze 3, GE-0128, Tbilisi (Georgia); Keller, H. [Physik-Institut der Universitaet Zuerich, Winterthurerstr. 190, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland)

2008-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

210

Comparative studies of etching mechanisms of CR-39 in NaOH/H2O and NaOH/ethanol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparative studies of etching mechanisms of CR-39 in NaOH/H2O and NaOH/ethanol K.C.C. Tse, D Avenue, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong Available online 13 May 2007 Abstract The bulk etch rate for CR-39 in NaOH/ethanol accumulates on the surface of CR-39 detector during etching in NaOH/ethanol, which is absent during etching

Yu, K.N.

211

Void swelling in binary Fe-Cr alloys at 200 dpa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microstructural examinations have been performed on a series of binary Fe-Cr alloys irradiated in the FFTF/MOTA at 425{degrees}C to 200 dpa. The data represent the highest swelling levels reported in neutron irradiated ferritic alloys. The alloy compositions ranged from 3% to 18% Cr in 3% Cr increments, and the irradiation temperature corresponded to the peak swelling condition for this alloy class. Density measurements showed swelling levels as high as 7.4%, with the highest swelling found in the Fe-9Cr and Fe-6Cr alloys. Microstructural examinations revealed that the highest swelling conditions contained well-developed voids, often as large as 100 nm, and a dislocation network comprised of both a/2<111> and a<100> Burgers vectors. Swelling was lower in the other alloys, and the swelling reduction could be correlated with increased precipitation. These results are considered in light of the current theories for low swelling in ferritic alloys, but no theory is available to completely explain the results.

Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Void swelling in binary Fe-Cr alloys at 200 DPA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microstructural examinations have been performed on a series of binary Fe-Cr alloys irradiated in the FFTF/MOTA at 425C to 200 dpa. The data represent the highest swelling levels reported in neutron irradiated ferritic alloys. The alloy compositions ranged from 3 to 18% Cr in 3% Cr increments, and the irradiation temperature corresponded to the peak swelling condition for this alloy class. Density measurements showed swelling levels as high as 7.4%, with the highest swelling found in the Fe-9Cr and Fe-6Cr alloys. Microstructural examinations revealed that the highest swelling conditions contained well-developed voids, often as large as 100 nm, and a dislocation network comprised of both {sub 2}{sup a}<111> and a<100> Burgers vectors. Swelling was lower in the other alloys, and the swelling reduction could be correlated with increased precipitation. These results are considered in light of current theories for low swelling in ferritic alloys, but no theory is available to completely explain the results.

Gelles, D.S.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Reduced-activation austenitic stainless steels: The Fe--Mn--Cr--C system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nickel-free manganese-stabilized steels are being developed for fusion-reactor applications. As the first part of this effort, the austenite-stable region in the Fe--Mn--Cr--C system was determined. Results indicated that the Schaeffler diagram developed for Fe--Ni--Cr--C alloys cannot be used to predict the constituents expected for high-manganese steels. This is true because manganese is not as strong an austenite stabilizer relative to delta-ferrite formation as predicted by the diagram, but it is a stronger austenite stabilizer relative to martensite than predicted. Therefore, the austenite-stable region for Ne--Mn--Cr--C alloys occurs at lower chromium and hugher combinations of manganese and carbon than predicted by the Schaeffler diagram. Development of a manganese-stabilized stainless steel should be possible in the composition range of 20 to 25% Mn, 10 to 15% Cr, and 0.01 to 0.25%C. Tensile behavior of an Fe--20%Mn--12%Cr--0.25%C alloy was determined. The strength and ductility of this possible base composition was comparable to type 316 stainless steel in both the solution-annealed and cold-worked condition.

Klueh, R.L.; Maziasz, P.J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Recent developments in Cr{sup 2+}-doped II-VI compound lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transition-metal-doped zinc chalcogenide crystals have recently been investigated as potential mid-IR lasers. Tetrahedrally-coordinated Cr{sup 2+} ions are especially attractive as lasants on account of high luminescence quantum yields for emission in the 2000-3000 nm range. {sup 5}E radiative lifetimes and emission cross sections are respectively {approximately}10 {mu}sec and {approximately}10{sup -18} cm{sup 2}. The associated absorption band peaked at {approximately}1800 nm enables laser-diode pumping of the Cr{sup 2+} systems. Laser demonstrations with ZnS:Cr and ZnSe:Cr (using a MgF{sub 2}:Co{sup 2+} laser pump source) gave slope efficiencies up to 30%. Excited-state-absorption losses appear small, and passive losses dominate. Tuning experiments with a birefringent filter evidence a tuning range covering at least 2280 - 2530 nm. Cr-doped laser samples can be produced by Bridgman growth, seeded physical vapor transport, or diffusion doping.

Page, R.H.; DeLoach, L.D.; Schaffers, K.I., Patel, F.D.; Beach, R.J.; Payne, S.A.; Krupke, W.F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Burger, A. [Fisk Univ., Nashville, TN (United States). Center for Photonic Materials and Devices

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Visible Light-Driven Water Oxidation by Ir oxide Clusters Coupledto Single Cr Centers in Mesoporous Silica  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Visible light-induced water oxidation has been demonstrated at an Ir oxide nanocluster coupled to a single Cr{sup VI} site on the pore surface of MCM-41 mesoporous silica. The photocatalytic unit was assembled by the reaction of surface Cr=O groups with Ir(acac){sub 3} precursor followed by calcination at 300 C and bond formation monitored by FT-Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy. High-resolution Z-contrast electron micrographs of the calcined material combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spot analysis confirmed the occlusion of Ir oxide nanoparticles inside the mesopores. Oxygen evolution of an aqueous suspension of the Ir{sub x}O{sub y}-CrMCM-41 upon visible light irradiation of the Cr{sup VI}-O ligand-to-metal charge-transfer absorption was monitored mass-spectrometrically. Comparison of the product yields for samples with low Cr content (Cr/Si {le} 0.02) and high Cr content (Cr/Si = 0.05) indicates that only isolated Cr centers are capable of extracting electrons from Ir oxide clusters, while di- or polychromate species are not. Water oxidation at a multielectron-transfer catalyst coupled to a single metal center has not been demonstrated before. The ability to drive water oxidation with a single metal center as electron pump offers opportunities for coupling the oxygen-evolving photocatalytic unit to reducing sites in the nanoporous scaffold.

Nakamura, Ryuhei; Frei, Heinz

2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

216

Reduction of Cr(VI) under acidic conditions by the facultative Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Acidiphilium cryptum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential for biological reduction of Cr(VI) under acidic conditions was evaluated with the acidophilic, facultatively metal-reducing bacterium Acidiphilium cryptum strain JF-5 to explore the role of acidophilic microorganisms in the Cr cycle in low-pH environments. An anaerobic suspension of washed A. cryptum cells rapidly reduced 50 M Cr(VI) at pH 3.2; biological reduction was detected from pH 1.7-4.7. The reduction product, confirmed by XANES analysis, was entirely Cr(III) that was associated predominantly with the cell biomass (70-80%) with the residual residing in the aqueous phase. Reduction of Cr(VI) showed a pH optimum similar to that for growth and was inhibited by 5 mM HgCl2, suggesting that the reaction was enzyme-mediated. Introduction of O2 into the reaction medium slowed the reduction rate only slightly, whereas soluble Fe(III) (as ferric sulfate) increased the rate dramatically, presumably by the shuttling of electrons from bioreduced Fe(II) to Cr(VI) in a coupled biotic-abiotic cycle. Starved cells could not reduce Cr(VI) when provided as sole electron acceptor, indicating that Cr(VI) reduction is not an energy-conserving process in A. cryptum. We speculate, rather, that Cr(VI) reduction is used here as a detoxification mechanism.

David E. Cummings; Scott Fendorf; Rajesh K. Sani; Brent M. Peyton; Timothy S. Magnuson

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Dissimilar-weld failure analysis and development. Comparative behavior of similar and dissimilar welds. Final report. [Welds of 2-1/4Cr-1Mo to 2-1/4Cr-1Mo using 2-1/4Cr-1Mo filler material; and austenitic to ferritic steel welds made by fusion welding alloy-800H to 2-1/4Cr-1Mo using nickel base filler metal ERNiCr-3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 593/sup 0/C (1100/sup 0/F) stress rupture behavior of similar metal welds (SMWs) and dissimilar metal welds (DMWs) was investigated under cyclic load and cyclic temperature conditions to provide insight into the question, ''Why do DMWs fail sooner than SMWs in the fossil fuel boilers.'' The weld joints of interest were an all ferritic steel SMW made by fusion welding 2-1/4Cr-1Mo to 2-1/4Cr-1Mo using 2-1/4Cr-1Mo filler metal and an austenitic to ferritic steel DMW made by fusion welding Alloy-800H to 2-1/4Cr-1Mo using a nickel base filler metal ERNiCr-3. The stress rupture behavior obtained on cross weld specimens was similar for both types of welds with only a 20% reduction in rupture life for the DMW. For rupture times less than 1500 hours, failures occurred in the 2-1/4Cr-1Mo base metal whereas, for rupture times greater than 1500 hours, failures occurred in the 2-1/4Cr-1Mo heat affected zone (HAZ). The HAZ failures exhibited a more brittle appearance than the base metal failures for both types of welds and it appears that the life of both joints was limited by the stress rupture properties of the HAZ. These results support the hypothesis that increased residual stresses due to abrupt changes in hardness (strength) of metals involved are the major contributors to the reduction in life of DMWs as compared to SMWs. 10 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

Busboom, H.; Ring, P.J.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

CrRb: A molecule with large magnetic and electric dipole moments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report calculations of Born-Oppenheimer potential energy curves of the chromium-rubidium heteronuclear molecule ({sup 52}Cr{sup 87}Rb), and the long-range dispersion coefficient for the interaction between ground state Cr and Rb atoms. Our calculated van der Waals coefficient (C{sub 6}=1770 a.u.) has an expected error of 3%. The ground state {sup 6{Sigma}+} molecule at its equilibrium separation has a permanent electric dipole moment of d{sub e}(R{sub e}=3.34Angstrom)=2.90 D. We investigate the hyperfine and dipolar collisions between trapped Cr and Rb atoms, finding elastic to inelastic cross section ratio of 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3}.

Pavlovic, Z. [ITAMP, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269-3046 (United States); Sadeghpour, H. R. [ITAMP, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Cote, R. [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269-3046 (United States); Roos, B. O. [Department of Theoretical Chemistry, University of Lund, S-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

219

Testing of welded 13% Cr grades martensitic stainless steels for sour service applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The application of 13% Cr grade stainless steels is increasing mainly due to the introduction of higher alloyed and weldable grades with carbon content as low as 0.01 %, and the very favorable costs compared to alternative materials as the 22Cr duplex stainless steel. Therefore these steels now have been subject to a major evaluation for transport of oil and gas offshore in the North Sea. This paper discusses aspects of testing required to assess their corrosion properties and their susceptibility to environment assisted cracking (EAC), caused by both H{sub 2}S internally and cathodic protection externally. Testing is discussed with emphasis on test parameters for welded 13% Cr steel using different types of consumables.

Rogne, T.; Bjordal, M. [SINTEF Materials Technology, Trondheim (Norway)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

The Effect of Water Vapor on Cr Depletion in Advanced Recuperator Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Durable alloy foils are needed for gas turbine recuperators operating at 650--700 C. It has been established that water vapor in the exhaust gas causes more rapid consumption of Cr in austenitic stainless steels leading to a reduction in operating lifetime of these thin-walled components. Laboratory testing at 650--800 C of commercial and model alloys is being used to develop a better understanding of the long-term rate of Cr consumption in these environments. Results are presented for commercial alloys 709, 120 and 625. After 10,000h exposures at 650 C and 700 C in humid air, grain boundary Cr depletion was observed near the surface of all these materials. In the Fe-base alloys, 709 and 120, this depletion led to localized Fe-rich nodule formation. This information then can be used to develop low-cost alternatives to currently available candidate materials.

Pint, Bruce A [ORNL

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mud cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Precipitation behavior of Ni-Cr-22 Fe-18 Mo (Hastelloy-X) and Ni-Cr-22 Co-12 Mo (Inconel-617) after isothermal aging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The precipitation behavior of the nickel-base alloys Ni-Cr-22Fe-18Mo (Hastelloy-X) and Ni-Cr-22Co12Mo (Inconel-617) has been investigated as a function of aging temperature. Hastelloy-X shows that M/sub 6/C and TiN are primary precipitates and M/sub 12/C, A/sub 3/B/sub 2/ (approx. = Fe/sub 3/Mo/sub 2/), and M/sub 23/C/sub 6/ are secondary precipitates, while Inconel-617 also has M/sub 6/C and TiN as primary precipitates and M/sub 23/C/sub 6/, M/sub 12/C, and Ni/sub 3/AlTi as secondary precipitates. The characterization has been carried out by metallographic and transmission electron microscopy investigations and by x-ray examinations of electrochemical isolated precipitates.

Kirchhofer, H.; Nickel, H.; Schubert, F.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

/sup 51/Cr-EDTA: a marker of early intestinal rejection in the rat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intestinal permeability was studied after accessory intestinal transplantation in Lewis rats. Five groups were evaluated: Group 1--isografts (N = 6); Group 2--Lewis X Brown Norway F1 (LBN-F1) allografts (N = 6); Group 3--isografts treated with CsA 2 mg/kg/day X 10 days (N = 6); Group 4--LBN-F1 allografts treated with CsA 2 mg/kg/day X 10 days (N = 6); Group 5--LBN-F1 allografts treated with CsA 4 mg/kg/day X 28 days (N = 6). Chromium-labeled ethylenedimianetetraacetate (/sup 51/Cr-EDTA) was given through the proximal stoma of the graft. Renal clearance of /sup 51/Cr-EDTA and mucosal biopsies were followed post-transplant. The biopsies of the intestinal graft showed no rejection in Groups 1, 3, and 5; fulminant rejection in Group 2; and mild atypical rejection in Group 4. /sup 51/Cr-EDTA clearance was elevated in all groups during the first 7 days post-transplant. Thereafter, /sup 51/Cr-EDTA excretion fell to lower levels in the animals with histologically normal grafts (Groups 1, 3, and 5). /sup 51/Cr-EDTA excretion in Group 4 was increased with the first histological evidence of rejection on Day 14 and remained elevated until sacrifice (P less than 0.02 compared to Groups 3 and 5). A transient permeability defect occurs after intestinal grafting. Once the graft has recovered from this injury, /sup 51/Cr-EDTA is a sensitive marker for intestinal rejection.

Grant, D.; Lamont, D.; Zhong, R.; Garcia, B.; Wang, P.; Stiller, C.; Duff, J.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Magnetic and electrical properties of layered magnets Tl(Cr,Mn,Co)Se{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tl(Cr,Mn,Co)Se{sub 2} crystals were synthesized at T {approx} 1050 K. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that TlCrSe{sub 2}, TlMnSe{sub 2}, and TlCoSe{sub 2} compounds crystallize in the hexagonal crystal system with the lattice parameters: a = 3.6999 A, c = 22.6901 A, c/a {approx} 6.133, z = 3, {rho}{sub x} = 6.209 g/cm{sup 3}; a = 6.53 A, c = 23.96 A, c/a {approx} 3.669, z = 8, {rho}{sub x} = 6.71 g/cm{sup 3}; and a = 3.747 A, c = 22.772 A, c/a {approx} 6.077, z = 3, {rho}{sub x} = 7.577 g/cm{sup 3}, respectively. Magnetic and electrical studies in the temperature range from 80-400 K showed that TlCrSe{sub 2} is a semiconductor ferromagnet, TlMnSe{sub 2} is a semiconductor antiferromagnet, and TlCoSe{sub 2} is a ferrimagnet with a conductivity characteristic of metals. A rather large deviation in the experimental effective magnetic moment for TlCrSe{sub 2} (3.05 {mu}B) from the theoretical value (3.85 {mu}B) is attributed to two-dimensional magnetic ordering in the paramagnetic region of the noticeably layered ferromagnet TlCrSe{sub 2}. In TlCrSe{sub 2}, a correlation between magnetic and electrical properties was detected.

Veliyev, R. G.; Sadikhov, R. Z.; Kerimova, E. M., E-mail: ekerimova@physics.ab.az; Asadov, Yu. G.; Jabbarov, A. I. [National Academy of Sciences of Azerbaijan, Institute of Physics (Azerbaijan)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Toughness of Cr-Mo-V steels for steam-turbine rotors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cr-Mo-V steels are used extensively as the rotor material in the High Pressure and Intermediate Pressure Sections of modern steam turbines. The toughness of these rotors has a major influence on the reliability and efficiency of the turbine and the overall economy of operation and maintenance of the plant. The metallurgical factors affecting the toughness of the rotors and the methods to improve the toughness are now understood better than ever before. This paper will present a broad overview of the materials and design aspects of the toughness of Cr-Mo-V rotors with emphasis on the salient results of recent research programs aimed at improving their toughness.

Viswanathan, R.; Jaffee, R.I.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Repassivation of 13% Cr steel dependent on brine pH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A joint laboratory project, involving an oil production and oil well service company, investigated repassivation of martensitic 13% Cr steel. The rate at which this alloy is repassivated after losing its protective passive oxide layer to hydrochloric acid (HCI) depended on the pH of the spent acid returns. Test samples of 13% Cr cut from oilfield tubing were subjected to a fluid sequence of (1) initial brine, (2) HCI, (3) spent acid, and (4) final brine. In 9 days, the samples regained their passive oxide layers. When spent acid was taken out of the fluid sequence, the samples regained passive oxide layers in 3 days.

Skogsberg, J.W.; Walker, M.L.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Can one identify the intrinsic structure of the yrast states in $^{48}$Cr after the backbending?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The backbending phenomenon in $^{48}$Cr has been investigated using the recently developed Projected Configuration Interaction (PCI) method, in which the deformed intrinsic states are directly associated with shell model (SM) wavefunctions. Two previous explanations, (i) $K=0$ band crossing, and (ii) $K=2$ band crossing have been reinvestigated using PCI, and it was found that both explanations can successfully reproduce the experimental backbending. The PCI wavefunctions in the pictures of $K=0$ band crossing and $K=2$ band crossing are highly overlapped. We conclude that there are no unique intrinsic states associated with the yrast states after backbending in $^{48}$Cr.

Gao, Zao-Chun; Chen, Y S; Chen, Y J; Tuya,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Can one identify the intrinsic structure of the yrast states in $^{48}$Cr after the backbending?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The backbending phenomenon in $^{48}$Cr has been investigated using the recently developed Projected Configuration Interaction (PCI) method, in which the deformed intrinsic states are directly associated with shell model (SM) wavefunctions. Two previous explanations, (i) $K=0$ band crossing, and (ii) $K=2$ band crossing have been reinvestigated using PCI, and it was found that both explanations can successfully reproduce the experimental backbending. The PCI wavefunctions in the pictures of $K=0$ band crossing and $K=2$ band crossing are highly overlapped. We conclude that there are no unique intrinsic states associated with the yrast states after backbending in $^{48}$Cr.

Zao-Chun Gao; Mihai Horoi; Y. S. Chen; Y. J. Chen; Tuya

2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

228

Microstructure and High Temperature Oxidation Behavior of Cr-W Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cr alloys containing 0-30%W by weight were investigated for use in elevated temperature applications. The alloys were melted in a water-cooled, copper-hearth arc furnace. Microstructure of the alloys was characterized using x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and light microscopy. A pseudocyclic oxidation test was employed to study scale formation at 1000ºC in dry air. The scale was predominantly chromia and spalled upon cooling. Alloying with aluminum up to 8 weight percent reduced the spalling drastically. Furthermore, aluminizing the surface of the Cr-W alloys completely stopped the spalling.

Dogan, O.N.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Anodonta imbecillis QA Test 4, Clinch River - Environmental restoration program (CR-ERP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Toxicity testing of split whole sediment samples using juvenile freshwater mussels (Anodonta imbecillis) was conducted by TVA to provide a quality assurance mechanism for test organism quality and overall performance of the test being conducted by CR-ERP personnel as part of the CR-ERP biomonitoring study of Clinch River sediments. Testing of sediment samples collected September 8 from Poplar Creek Miles 6.0 and 1.0 was conducted September 13-22, 1994. Results from this test showed no toxicity (survival effects) to fresh-water mussels during a 9-day exposure to the sediments.

Simbeck, D.J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Audit Report: CR-B-97-01 | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energyon ArmedWaste andAccess to OUO AccessOpportunity | Department7-26CR-B-95-06CR-B-97-01

231

Audit Report: CR-B-99-02 | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energyon ArmedWaste andAccess to OUO AccessOpportunity |Report: CR-B-97-04 AuditCR-B-99-02

232

Audit Report: CR-MA-95-02 | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustionImprovement3--Logistical5/08 Attendance List from 12/05/08CR-MA-95-02 Audit Report: CR-MA-95-02

233

Understanding the solidification and microstructure evolution during CSC-MIG welding of Fe–Cr–B-based alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present is a study of the solidification and microstructure of Fe–28.2%Cr–3.8%B–1.5%Si–1.5%Mn (wt.%) alloy deposited onto a 1020 plain carbon steel substrate using the controlled short-circuit metal inert gas welding process. The as-solidified alloy was a metal matrix composite with a hypereutectic microstructure. Thermodynamic calculation based on the Scheil–Gulliver model showed that a primary (Cr,Fe){sub 2}B phase formed first during solidification, followed by an eutectic formation of the (Cr,Fe){sub 2}B phase and a body-centered cubic Fe-based solid solution matrix, which contained Cr, Mn and Si. Microstructure analysis confirmed the formation of these phases and showed that the shape of the (Cr,Fe){sub 2}B phase was irregular plate. As the welding heat input increased, the weld dilution increased and thus the volume fraction of the (Cr,Fe){sub 2}B plates decreased while other microstructural characteristics were similar. - Highlights: • We deposit Fe–Cr–B-based alloy onto plain carbon steel using the CSC-MIG process. • We model the solidification behavior using thermodynamic calculation. • As deposited alloy consists of (Cr,Fe){sub 2}B plates embedded in Fe-based matrix. • We study the effect of the welding heat input on the microstructure.

Sorour, A.A., E-mail: ahmad.sorour@mail.mcgill.ca; Chromik, R.R., E-mail: richard.chromik@mcgill.ca; Gauvin, R., E-mail: raynald.gauvin@mcgill.ca; Jung, I.-H., E-mail: in-ho.jung@mcgill.ca; Brochu, M., E-mail: mathieu.brochu@mcgill.ca

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

Spin polarization at Fe/Cr interfaces L. Pizzagalli, M. Freyss, G. Moraitis, D. Stoeffler, C. Demangeat, and H. Dreysse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

configuration with zero net moment of a thin Fe layer on a Cr surface due to a high step density. © 1997.g., a zero net magnetic moment of a Cr layer grown on a stepped Fe surface.6 It will be shown below how some irregularities at the interfaces. The spin-polarized electronic charge distribution was calculated by using

Bayreuther, Günther

235

Changes induced in a ZnS:Cr-based electroluminescent waveguide structure by intrinsic near-infrared laser radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The causes of changes that occur in a thin-film electroluminescent metal-insulator-semiconductor-insulator-metal waveguide structure based on ZnS:Cr (Cr concentration of {approx}4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}) upon lasing ({lambda} Almost-Equal-To 2.6 {mu}m) and that induce lasing cessation are studied. It is established that lasing ceases because of light-scattering inhomogeneities formed in the structure and, hence, optical losses enhance. The origin of the inhomogeneities and the causes of their formation are clarified by studying the surface topology and the crystal structure of constituent layers of the samples before and after lasing. The studies are performed by means of atomic force microscopy and X-ray radiography. It is shown that a substantial increase in the sizes of grains on the surface of the structure is the manifestation of changes induced in the ZnS:Cr film by recrystallization. Recrystallization is initiated by local heating by absorbed laser radiation in existing Cr clusters and quickened by a strong electric field (>1 MV cm{sup -1}). The changes observed in the ZnS:Cr film are as follows: the textured growth of ZnS crystallites, an increase in the content of Cr clusters, and the appearance of some CrS and a rather high ZnO content. Some ways for improving the stability of lasing in the ZnS:Cr-based waveguide structures are proposed.

Vlasenko, N. A., E-mail: vlasenko@isp.kiev.ua; Oleksenko, P. F.; Mukhlyo, M. A.; Veligura, L. I. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lashkarev Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Ukraine)] [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lashkarev Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Ukraine)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

USE OF MICRO X-RAY ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY AND DIFFRACTION TO DELINEATE Cr(VI) SPECIATION IN COPR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The speciation of Cr(VI) in Cromite Ore Processing Residue was investigated by means of bulk XRD, and a combination of micro-XRF, -XAS and -XRD at the Advanced Light Source (ALS), Berkeley, CA, U.S.A.. Bulk XRD yielded one group of phases that contained explicitly Cr(VI) in their structure, Calcium Aluminum Chromium Oxide Hydrates, accounting for 60% of the total Cr(VI). Micro-analyses at ALS yielded complimentary information, confirming that hydrogarnets and hydrotalcites, two mineral groups that can host Cr(VI) in their structure by substitution, were indeed Cr(VI) sinks. Chromatite (CaCrO4) was also identified by micro-XRD, which was not possible with bulk methods due to its low content. The acquisition of micro-XRF elemental maps enabled not only the identification of Cr(VI)-binding phases, but also the understanding of their location within the matrix. This information is invaluable when designing Cr(VI) treatment, to optimize release and availability for reduction.

CHRYSOCHOOU, M.; MOON, D. H.; FAKRA, S.; MARCUS, M.; DERMATAS, D.; CHRISTODOULATOS, C.

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

237

Chromium(VI) bioremoval by pseudomonas bacteria: role of microbial exudates for natural attenuation and biotreatment of Cr(VI) contamination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the role of microbial exudates, e.g., exopolymeric substance (EPS) and alginic acid, on microbial Cr(VI) reduction by two different Pseudomonas strains (P. putida P18 and P. aeuroginosa P16) as a method for treating subsurface environment contaminated with Cr(VI). Our results indicate that microbial exudates significantly enhanced microbial Cr(VI) reduction rates by forming less toxic and highly soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes despite the fact Cr(III) has a very low solubility under the experimental conditions studied (e.g., pH 7). The formation of soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes led to the protection of the cells and chromate reductases from inactivation. In systems with no organic ligands, soluble organo-Cr(III) end products were formed between Cr(III) and the EPS directly released by bacteria due to cell lysis. Our results also provide evidence that cell lysis played an important role in microbial Cr(VI) reduction by Pseudomonas bacteria due to the release of constitutive reductases that intracellularly and/or extracellularly catalyzed the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). The overall results highlight the need for incorporation of the release and formation of organo-Cr(III) complexes into reactive transport models to more accurately design and monitor in situ microbial remediation techniques for the treatment of subsurface systems contaminated with Cr(VI).

Dogan, N.M.; Dodge, C.; Kantar, C.; Gulcan, S.; Yilmaz, B.C.; Mazmanci, M.A.

2011-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

238

Chromium(VI) Bioremoval by Pseudomonas Bacteria: Role of Microbial Exudates for Natural Attenuation and Biotreatment of Cr(VI) Contamination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory batch and column experiments were conducted to investigate the role of microbial exudates, e.g., exopolymeric substance (EPS) and alginic acid, on microbial Cr(VI) reduction by two different Pseudomonas strains (P. putida P18 and P. aeuroginosa P16) as a method for treating subsurface environment contaminated with Cr(VI). Our results indicate that microbial exudates significantly enhanced microbial Cr(VI) reduction rates by forming less toxic and highly soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes despite the fact Cr(III) has a very low solubility under the experimental conditions studied (e.g., pH 7). The formation of soluble organo-Cr(III) complexes led to the protection of the cells and chromate reductases from inactivation. In systems with no organic ligands, soluble organo-Cr(III) end products were formed between Cr(III) and the EPS directly released by bacteria due to cell lysis. Our results also provide evidence that cell lysis played an important role in microbial Cr(VI) reduction by Pseudomonas bacteria due to the release of constitutive reductases that intracellularly and/or extracellularly catalyzed the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III). The overall results highlight the need for incorporation of the release and formation of organo-Cr(III) complexes into reactive transport models to more accurately design and monitor in situ microbial remediation techniques for the treatment of subsurface systems contaminated with Cr(VI).

N Mercan Dogan; C Kantar; S Gulcan; C Dodge; B Coskun Yilmaz; M Ali Mazmanci

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

239

Structural alterations in SiC as a result of Cr/sup +/ and N/sup +/ implantation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ion scattering and channeling techniques were used to study production of disorder and randomization of SiC by implantation of Cr/sup +/ and N/sup +/ at doses of up to 3 x 10/sup 16/ /cm/sup 2/ for Cr/sup +/ and 8 x 10/sup 16/ /cm/sup 2/ for N/sup +/. Experiments were designed so that the calculated damage energy profiles would be well matched for the two ion species. The results were compared for the degree of effectiveness of Cr/sup +/ and N/sup +/ in producing disorder. At higher doses, Cr/sup +/ was much more effective than N/sup +/ for a given damage energy using the same calculational method for Cr/sup +/ as for N/sup +/. In correlated studies of swelling, both species had about the same effectiveness in producing swelling.

Williams, J.M.; McHargue, C.J.; Appleton, B.R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Study of hydrogen and carbon monoxide adsorption on modified Zn/Cr catalysts by adsorption calorimetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Differential heat of adsorption (q) of hydrogen (a) and carbon monoxide (b) as a function of the adsorbed amount (a) on Zn/Cr catalysts at 463/sup 0/K; 1) unpromoted catalyst, 2) catalyst promoted with 2.5% of K/sub 2/O.

Yoshin, S.V.; Klyacho, A.L.; Kondrat'ev, L.T.; Leonov, V.E.; Skripchenko, G.B.; Sushchaya, L.E.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mud cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

AN OBATA-TYPE THEOREM IN CR GEOMETRY SONG-YING LI AND XIAODONG WANG  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN OBATA-TYPE THEOREM IN CR GEOMETRY SONG-YING LI AND XIAODONG WANG Abstract. We discuss a sharp. 1 #12;2 SONG-YING LI AND XIAODONG WANG the proof of the Bochner formula in [G]. Due to this error

Wang, Xiaodong

242

G. J. Snyder Page 1 of 6 THERMOELECTRIC PROPERTIES OF CR3S4-TYPE SELENIDES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

devices depends primarily on increasing the figure of merit, ZT, for thermoelectric materials. The figure thermoelectric materials is to search for semiconductors with low lattice thermal conductivity. In this paper we lower than the state-of-the-art thermoelectric material, Bi2Te3 alloys. The structure of Cr3S4 (Figure 1

243

Limitations for the application of 13Cr steel in oil and gas production environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A laboratory investigation of application limits of 13Cr steel was carried out for sweet downhole environments in the CO{sub 2} partial pressure regime up to about 10 bar (1 MPa). Two grades of 13Cr steel were studied, one complying with the API 5CT specification and the other a higher carbon version. Polarization curves, taken at various times after immersion of the specimens in simulated brine, revealed an increasing pitting tendency for the higher chloride levels and indicated better performance for the API 5CT grade. This was in agreement with evidence for chromium depleted zones in the higher carbon grade, obtained from polarization curves in sulfuric acid. Weight loss exposure tests, in which the corrosion rate was also monitored by polarization resistance measurements, were performed at temperatures of 100 and 125 C and supplemented with literature data to extend the temperature range. A mathematical formula was derived to describe the corrosion rate as a function of temperature and chloride content. For instance, if 0.1 mm/y is taken as an acceptable corrosion rate, 13Cr steel could be applied up to 125 C in the presence of 150 g/L Cl{sup {minus}}. In the exposure tests, the API 5CT 13Cr steel did not show pitting at the 0.1 mm/y boundary but the higher carbon grade did suffer from this form of attack.

Huizinga, S.; Liek, W.E. [Shell International Oil Products BV, Amsterdam (Netherlands). Shell Research and Technology Centre

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Comparison of SEM and Optical Analysis of DT Neutron Tracks in CR-39 Detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A solid state nuclear track detector, CR-39, was exposed to DT neutrons. After etching, the resultant tracks were analyzed using both an optical microscope and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). In this communication, both methods of analyzing DT neutron tracks are discussed.

P.A. Mosier-Boss, L.P.G. Forsley, P. Carbonnelle, M.S. Morey, J.R. Tinsley, J. P. Hurley, F.E. Gordon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Transmission electron microscopy of oxide development on 9Cr ODS steel in supercritical water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transmission electron microscopy of oxide development on 9Cr ODS steel in supercritical water A strengthened ferritic steel alloys during exposure to 600 °C supercritical water for 2- and 4-weeks were cladding include austenitic stainless steels, solid solution and precipitation-hardened alloys, ferritic

Motta, Arthur T.

246

Thermodynamic modelling of Cr-bearing garnets with implications for diamond inclusions and peridotite xenoliths  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Zürich, Switzerland e Geological Survey of Western Australia, Mineral House, 100 Plain Street, East Perth, WA 6004, Australia a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 8 September 2008 using free energy minimization techniques. Here we present calculated phase relations in Cr-rich mantle

247

Magnetic anisotropy in Fe-25Cr-12Co-1Si alloy induced by external magnetic field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic anisotropy in Fe-25Cr-12Co-1Si alloy induced by external magnetic field ZHEN Liang( )1 of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001, China; 2. Department 27599-3255, USA Received 29 June 2006; accepted 15 January 2007 Abstract: Structural and magnetic

Qin, Lu-Chang

248

Oxidation resistance of 9-12% Cr steels: effect of rare earth surface treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Medium Cr steels have been used in fossil fired power plants for many years because of their excellent high temperature stability and mechanical properties. The environment in a fossil fired power plant is extremely aggressive in terms of corrosion, especially oxidation. This is only accelerated as the operating temperature increases to 650C and beyond. For any new steel to be qualified for power plant use, in addition to adequate strength at the operating temperature, material wastage from all corrosion processes must be kept to a minimum acceptable level. The use of medium Cr steels provides a means to improve overall corrosion resistance. Three medium Cr are under development for use as high temperature power plant steels: 0.08C-(9-12)Cr-1.2Ni-0.7Mo-3.0Cu-3.0Co-0.5Ti. Oxidation tests were performed on the steels for times greater than 1000 hours in order to determine the oxidation kinetics and extent of material wastage. Also, rare earth oxides were incorporated into the outer surface layers of the steels to see if the oxidation resistance could be improved. These results will be compared to current power plant steels.

Dogan, Omer N.; Alman, David A.; Jablonski, Paul D.

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Diode-Pumped Gigahertz Repetition Rate Femtosecond Cr:Lisaf Laser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report a low-cost, 1 GHz repetition-rate, diode-pumped, saturable Bragg reflectors mode-locked Cr:LiSAF laser, which generates nearly transform-limited 103-fs long pulses around 866 nm, with a record high peak power of 1.45 kW.

Li, Duo

250

Long-term measurements of equilibrium factor with electrochemically etched CR-39 SSNTD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.60 Keywords: Radon progeny concentration; Equilibrium factor; CR-39 1. Introduction Inhaled radon (222 Rn cancer [3]. Methods for long-term monitoring of the concentrations of radon progeny, or the equilibrium factor (which surro- gates the ratios of concentrations of radon progeny to the concentration of the 222

Yu, K.N.

251

Project EARTH-11-DP1: Exploring early solar system processes using Cr isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project EARTH-11-DP1: Exploring early solar system processes using Cr isotopes Supervisors: Dr D Porcelli & Dr K Amor Various isotope methods have been recently developed to explore the conditions in the early solar system and the processes that have led to the formation of the terrestrial planets. Stable

Henderson, Gideon

252

Clostridium chromiireducens sp. nov., isolated from Cr(VI)-contaminated soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by its ability to reduce Cr(VI) in low concentrations. Mixed acid fermentation during growth on glucose resulted in accumulation of acetate, butyrate, formate and lactate. Morphological studies indicated the presence of peritrichous flagella, pili and an S-layer. The major cellular fatty acids (.5 %) were C16 : 0

Florida, University of

253

Relation between thermal expansion and interstitial formation energy in pure Fe and Cr  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Relation between thermal expansion and interstitial formation energy in pure Fe and Cr Janne potentials give lower interstitial formation energy, but predict too small thermal expansion. We also show University, Uppsala, Sweden Abstract By fitting a potential of modified Finnis­Sinclair type to the thermal

254

Investigations of HRC®-Stimulated Bioreduction of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hypothesis: Lactate (Hydrogen Release Compound-HRC{trademark}) injection into chromium contaminated groundwater through an injection well will cause indirect or direct bioreduction of chromate [Cr(VI)] and precipitation of insoluble species of [Cr(III)] on soil particles, probably catalyzed at oxide surfaces, at the field scale. Objective: Assess the potential for immobilizing and detoxifying chromium-contaminated groundwater using lactate-stimulated bioreduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) at the Hanford Site's 100-H Area field site. Types of Research: A three-well system (injection well and upgradient and downgradient monitoring wells) was used for conducting the in situ biostimulation and monitoring. To assess the pre- and post-injection test groundwater conditions, we used an integrated monitoring approach, involving hydraulic, geochemical, microbial, and geophysical techniques and analytical methods, as well as conducted five Br-tracer injection tests and four pumping tests (concurrently with the Br-tracer tests). Groundwater biostimulation was conducted by injection of 40 lbs of {sup 13}C-labeled HRC into the injection well (over the depth interval from 44-50 ft) on 8/3/2004, followed by low-flow pumping (1.2 to 2.5 l/min) through the downgradient well (to ensure capture of groundwater flow lines passing through the injection well) for 27 days. Main Results: Although the total microbial population in sediments is relatively low (<10{sup 5} cells g-1) under background conditions, which is likely insufficient for direct enzymatic Cr(VI) reduction, several types of bacteria, e.g., Bacillus/Arthrobacter and Geobacter, are present in the Hanford sediments, which are known to reduce or sorb hexavalent chromium. The HRC injection stimulated microbial cell counts to reach the maximum of 2 x 10{sup 7} cells g{sup -1} 13-17 days after the injection, and generated highly reducing conditions. Geochemical and isotopic observations confirmed microbial metabolism of HRC. The Cr(VI) concentration in the monitoring and pumping wells decreased below drinking water minimum contaminant limits and remained below background concentrations even after 1.5 years, when redox conditions and microbial densities had returned to background levels. Fe(II) levels have remained high and may account for the continued reduction of Cr(VI).

T.C. Hazen; B. Faybishenko; D. Joyner; S. Borglin; E.Brodie; S. Hubbard; K. Williams; J. Peterson; J. Wan; T. Tokunaga; Long, P.E.; Newcomer, D.; Koenigsberg, S.; Willet, A.

2005-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

255

Investigations of HRC®-Stimulated Bioreduction of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hypothesis: Lactate (Hydrogen Release Compound-HRC{trademark}) injection into chromium contaminated groundwater through an injection well will cause indirect or direct bioreduction of chromate [Cr(VI)] and precipitation of insoluble species of [Cr(III)] on soil particles, probably catalyzed at oxide surfaces, at the field scale. Objective: Assess the potential for immobilizing and detoxifying chromium-contaminated groundwater using lactate-stimulated bioreduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) at the Hanford Site's 100-H Area field site. Types of Research: A three-well system (injection well and upgradient and downgradient monitoring wells) was used for conducting the in situ biostimulation and monitoring. To assess the pre- and post-injection test groundwater conditions, we used an integrated monitoring approach, involving hydraulic, geochemical, microbial, and geophysical techniques and analytical methods, as well as conducted five Br-tracer injection tests and four pumping tests (concurrently with the Br-tracer tests). Groundwater biostimulation was conducted by injection of 40 lbs of {sup 13}C-labeled HRC into the injection well (over the depth interval from 44-50 ft) on 8/3/2004, followed by low-flow pumping (1.2 to 2.5 l/min) through the downgradient well (to ensure capture of groundwater flow lines passing through the injection well) for 27 days. Main Results: Although the total microbial population in sediments is relatively low (<10{sup 5} cells g{sup -1}) under background conditions, which is likely insufficient for direct enzymatic Cr(VI) reduction, several types of bacteria, e.g., Bacillus/Arthrobacter and Geobacter, are present in the Hanford sediments, which are known to reduce or sorb hexavalent chromium. The HRC injection stimulated microbial cell counts to reach the maximum of 2 x 10{sup 7} cells g{sup -1} 13-17 days after the injection, and generated highly reducing conditions. Geochemical and isotopic observations confirmed microbial metabolism of HRC. The CR(VI) concentration in the monitoring and pumping wells decreased below drinking water minimum contaminant limits and remained below background concentrations even after 1.5 years, when redox conditions and microbial densities had returned to background levels. Fe(II) levels have remained high and may account for the continued reduction of Cr(VI).

Hazen, T.C.; Faybishenko, B.; Joyner, D.; Borglin, S.; Brodie, E.; Hubbard, S.; Williams, K.; Peterson, J.; Wan, J.; Tokunaga, T.; Firestone, M.; Long, P.E.; Resch, C.T.; Cantrell, K.; Newcomer, D.; Koenigsberg, S.; Willet, A.

2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

256

Originally presented at Photomask Japan '94, Kanagawa Science Park, April, 1994 Attenuated phase-shifting photomasks fabricated from Cr-based embedded shifter blanks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the cathode powers and gas mixture. Cr-based films' flexible properties are suitable for several applications

Rollins, Andrew M.

257

Structural Properties of the Cr(III)-Fe(III) (Oxy)Hydroxide Compositional Series: Insights for a Nanomaterial “Solid Solution”  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chromium(III) (oxy)hydroxide and mixed Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides are environmentally important compounds for controlling chromium speciation and bioaccessibility in soils and aquatic systems and are also industrially important as precursors for materials and catalyst synthesis. However, direct characterization of the atomic arrangements of these materials is complicated because of their amorphous X-ray properties. This study involves synthesis of the complete Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxide compositional series, and the use of complementary thermal, microscopic, spectroscopic, and scattering techniques for the evaluation of their structural properties. Thermal analysis results show that the Cr end member has a higher hydration state than the Fe end member, likely associated with the difference in water exchange rates in the first hydration spheres of Cr(III) and Fe(III). Three stages of weight loss are observed and are likely related to the loss of surface/structural water and hydroxyl groups. As compared to the Cr end member, the intermediate composition sample shows lower dehydration temperatures and a higher exothermic transition temperature. XANES analysis shows Cr(III) and Fe(III) to be the dominant oxidation states. XANES spectra also show progressive changes in the local structure around Cr and Fe atoms over the series. Pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of synchrotron X-ray total scattering data shows that the Fe end member is nanocrystalline ferrihydrite with an intermediate-range order and average coherent domain size of {approx}27 {angstrom}. The Cr end member, with a coherent domain size of {approx}10 {angstrom}, has only short-range order. The PDFs show progressive structural changes across the compositional series. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) results also show the loss of structural order with increasing Cr content. These observations provide strong structural evidence of chemical substitution and progressive structural changes along the compositional series.

Tang, Y.; Zhang, L.; Michel, F.M.; Harrington, R.; Parise, J.B.; Reeder, R.J.

2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

258

Structural Properties of the Cr(III)-Fe(III) (Oxy)hydroxide Compositional Series: Insights for a Nanomaterial "Solid Solution"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chromium(III) (oxy)hydroxide and mixed Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides are environmentally important compounds for controlling chromium speciation and bioaccessibility in soils and aquatic systems and are also industrially important as precursors for materials and catalyst synthesis. However, direct characterization of the atomic arrangements of these materials is complicated because of their amorphous X-ray properties. This study involves synthesis of the complete Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxide compositional series, and the use of complementary thermal, microscopic, spectroscopic, and scattering techniques for the evaluation of their structural properties. Thermal analysis results show that the Cr end member has a higher hydration state than the Fe end member, likely associated with the difference in water exchange rates in the first hydration spheres of Cr(III) and Fe(III). Three stages of weight loss are observed and are likely related to the loss of surface/structural water and hydroxyl groups. As compared to the Cr end member, the intermediate composition sample shows lower dehydration temperatures and a higher exothermic transition temperature. XANES analysis shows Cr(III) and Fe(III) to be the dominant oxidation states. XANES spectra also show progressive changes in the local structure around Cr and Fe atoms over the series. Pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of synchrotron X-ray total scattering data shows that the Fe end member is nanocrystalline ferrihydrite with an intermediate-range order and average coherent domain size of 27 {angstrom}. The Cr end member, with a coherent domain size of 10 {angstrom}, has only short-range order. The PDFs show progressive structural changes across the compositional series. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) results also show the loss of structural order with increasing Cr content. These observations provide strong structural evidence of chemical substitution and progressive structural changes along the compositional series.

Michel, Y.; Michel, F; Zhang, L; Harrington, R; Parise, J; Reeder, R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Doubly resonant Raman electron paramagnetic transitions of Cr{sup 3+} in ruby (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Cr{sup 3+}).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the Raman electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of Cr{sup 3+} in ruby (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Cr{sup 3+}) in the {sup 4}A{sub 2} (ground) and E{sup -} (excited) states of its well-known R{sub 1} emission line. Using tunable dye laser excitation within the range of the Zeeman components of R{sub 1}, we observe highly selective doubly resonant enhancements of the Raman EPR lines. The double resonances confirm the assignments of the Raman EPR lines, and they underscore the simultaneous occurrence of both 'in resonance' and 'out resonance' as visualized in the Kramers-Heisenberg quantum-mechanical picture of inelastic light scattering. The g factors of the {sup 4}A{sub 2} and E{sup -} states are consistent with the observed magnetic field dependence of the Raman EPR shifts. Through the interplay of Raman effect and the sharp Zeeman components of R{sub 1}, the results provide clear insights into the underlying microscopic mechanism of these resonant Raman EPR spectra of ruby.

Lu, X.; Venugopalan, S.; Kim, H.; Grimsditch, M.; Rodriguez, S.; Ramdas, A. K.; Materials Science Division; Purdue Univ.; State Univ. of New York at Binghamton; Sogang Univ.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Magnetization switching of rare earth orthochromite CeCrO{sub 3}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the synthesis of single phase rare earth orthochromite CeCrO{sub 3} and its magnetic properties. A canted antiferromagnetic transition with thermal hysteresis at T?=?260?K is observed, and a magnetic compensation (zero magnetization) near 133?K is attributed to the antiparallel coupling between Ce{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 3+} moments. At low temperature, field induced magnetization reversal starting from 43?K for H?=?1.2 kOe reveals the spin flip driven by Zeeman energy between the net moments and the applied field. These findings may find potential uses in magnetic switching devices such as nonvolatile magnetic memory which facilitates two distinct states of magnetization.

Cao, Yiming; Cao, Shixun, E-mail: sxcao@shu.edu.cn; Ren, Wei; Feng, Zhenjie; Yuan, Shujuan; Kang, Baojuan; Zhang, Jincang [Department of Physics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Lu, Bo [Laboratory for Microstructures, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China)

2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mud cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Irradiation effects on base metal and welds of 9Cr-1Mo (EM10) martensitic steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

9Cr martensitic steels are being developed for core components (wrapper tubes) of fast breeder reactors as well as for fusion reactor structures. Here, the effects of fast neutron irradiation on the mechanical behavior of base metal and welds of 9Cr-1Mo (EM10) martensitic steel have been studied. Two types of weldments have been produced by TIG and electron beam techniques. Half of samples have been post-weld heat treated to produce a stress-relieved structure. The irradiation has been conducted in the Phenix reactor to doses of 63--65 dpa in the temperature range 450--459 C. The characterization of the welds, before and after irradiation, includes metallographic observations, hardness measurements, tensile and Charpy tests. It is shown that the mechanical properties of the welds after irradiation are in general similar to the characteristics obtained on the base metal, which is little affected by neutron irradiation.

Alamo, A.; Seran, J.L.; Rabouille, O.; Brachet, J.C.; Maillard, A.; Touron, H.; Royer, J. [CEA Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

262

High-reflectivity Cr/Sc multilayer condenser for compact soft x-ray microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The condenser is a critical component in compact water-window x-ray microscopes as it influences the exposure time via its efficiency and the resolution via its numerical aperture. Normal-incidence multilayer mirrors can reach large geometrical collection efficiencies and match the numerical aperture of the zone plate but require advanced processing for high total reflectivity. In the present article we demonstrate large-diameter normal-incidence spherical Cr/Sc multilayer condensers with high and uniform reflectivity. Dc-magnetron sputtering was used to deposit 300 bilayers of Cr/Sc with a predetermined d-spacing matching the {lambda}=3.374 nm operating wavelength on spherical substrates. The mirrors show a uniform reflectivity of {approx}3% over the full 58 mm diameter condenser area. With these mirrors an improvement in exposure time by a factor of 10 was achieved, thereby improving the performance of the compact x-ray microscope significantly.

Stollberg, H.; Yulin, S.; Takman, P. A. C.; Hertz, H. M. [Biomedical and X-Ray Physics, Department of Applied Physics, KTH-AlbaNova, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Fraunhofer-Institut fur Angewandte Optik und Feinmechanik, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 7, 07745 Jena (Germany); Biomedical and X-Ray Physics, Department of Applied Physics, KTH-AlbaNova, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

Development and characterization of PdCr temperature-compensaated wire resistance strain gage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A temperature-compensated resistance static strain gage with potential to be used to 600 C was recently developed. Gages were fabricated from specially developed palladium-13 w/o chromium (Pd-13Cr) wire and platinum (Pt) compensator. When bonded to high temperature Hastelloy X, the apparent strain from room temperature to 600 C was within 400 microstrain for gages with no preheat treatment and within 3500 microstrain for gages with 16 hours prestabilization at 640 C. The apparent strain versus temperature relationship of stabilized PdCr gages were repeatable with the reproducibility within 100 microstrain during three thermal cycles to 600 C and an 11 hours soak at 600 C. The gage fabrication, construction and installation is described. Also, the coating system used for this compensated resistance strain gage is explained. The electrical properties of the strain sensing element and main characteristics of the compensated gage including apparent strain, drift and reproducibility are discussed.

Lei, J.F.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Absence of long-range chemical ordering in equimolar FeCoCrNi  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Equimolar FeCoCrNi alloys have been the topic of recent research as 'high-entropy alloys,' where the name is derived from the high configurational entropy of mixing for a random solid solution. Despite their name, no systematic study of ordering in this alloy system has been performed to date. Here, we present results from anomalous x-ray scattering and neutron scattering on quenched and annealed samples. An alloy of FeNi{sub 3} was prepared in the same manner to act as a control. Evidence of long-range chemical ordering is clearly observed in the annealed FeNi{sub 3} sample from both experimental techniques. The FeCoCrNi sample given the same heat treatment lacks long-range chemical order.

Lucas, M. S. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States); UTC Inc., 1270 North Fairfield Road, Dayton, Ohio 45432 (United States); Wilks, G. B.; Senkov, O. N. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States); UES, Inc., 4401 Dayton-Xenia Rd., Dayton, Ohio 45432 (United States); Mauger, L.; Munoz, J. A. [California Institute of Technology, W. M. Keck Laboratory 138-78, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Michel, E. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States); Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio 45435 (United States); Horwath, J.; Semiatin, S. L. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States); Stone, M. B.; Abernathy, D. L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1, Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Karapetrova, E. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

265

Absence of long-range chemical ordering in equimolar FeCoCrNi  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Equimolar FeCoCrNi alloys have been the topic of recent research as high-entropy alloys, where the name is derived from the high configurational entropy of mixing for a random solid solution. Despite their name, no systematic study of ordering in this alloy system has been performed to date. Here we present results from anomalous x-ray scattering and neutron scattering on quenched and annealed samples. An alloy of FeNi3 was prepared in the same manner to act as a control. Evidence of longrange chemical ordering is clearly observed in the annealed FeNi3 sample from both experimental techniques. The FeCoCrNi sample given the same heat treatment lacks long-range chemical order.

Lucas, Matthew [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH; Wilks, G B [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH; Mauger, L [W. M. Keck Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Munoz, Jorge A. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Senkov, Oleg [ORNL; Michel, E [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH; Horwath, J [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH; Semiatin, S L [Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH; Stone, Matthew B [ORNL; Abernathy, Douglas L [ORNL; Karapetrova, Evgenia [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Improved recovery from Gulf of Mexico reservoirs. Volume I (of 4): Task 1, conduct research on mud-rich submarine fans. Final report, February 14, 1995--October 13, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective for this portion of the research involved conducting field studies and laboratory investigations to develop and refine models for mud-rich submarine fan architectures used by seismic analysis and reservoir engineers. These research aspects have been presented in two papers as follows: (1) Bouma, A.H., {open_quotes}Review of Fine-Grained Submarine Fans and Turbidite Systems{close_quotes}; (2) Kirkova, J.T. and Lorenzo, J.M., {open_quotes}Synthetic Seismic Modeling of Measured Submarine Fans Sections, Case Study of the Tanqua Complex, Karoo, South Africa{close_quotes} The {open_quotes}Review of Fine-Grained Submarine Fans and Turbidite Systems{close_quotes} by Arnold Bouma discusses research targeted toward stimulating an increase in oil and gas recovery by developing new and improved geological understanding. The {open_quotes}Synthetic Seismic Modeling of Measured Submarine Fan Sections, Case Study of the Tanqua Complex, Karoo, South Africa{close_quotes} by J.T. Kirkova and J.M. Lorenso discusses the limitations of verticle resolution and how this affects the interpretation and characterization of submarine fan complexes.

Kimbrell, W.C.; Bassiouni, Z.A.; Bourgoyne, A.T.

1997-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

267

MICROSTRUCTURAL EXAMINATION OF V-4CR-4TI PRESSURIZED THERMAL CREEP TUBES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two further failed thermal creep pressurized tubes of V-4Cr-4Ti tested at 700 and 800 degrees C have been examined using optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy in order to understand failure and creep mechanisms. These conditions represent lower stress states than were previously examined. Creep deformation at lower stress is shown to be controlled by sub-boundary formation and mis-orientation between sub-grains arising from climb of dislocations within the boundary.

Gelles, David S.

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

High pressure synthesis of a new chromite, ScCrO{sub 3}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new compound, ScCrO{sub 3} has been synthesized at 45 kbar and 1,200 C using the cylindrical type press (USCA-1000). It has Pbnm symmetry with a = 5.0329(2) {angstrom}, b = 5.3602(3) {angstrom}, and c = 7.3790(4) {angstrom}, and its structure has been refined using the Rietveld technique and the synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction data.

Park, J.H.; Parise, J.B. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)] [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

The energy distribution of beta CrB for the specific stellar abundances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The comparison of the observed and computed energy distributions of beta CrB has shown that a model with the specific chemical composition of the star can account for the visual enery distribution, while it is still unable to reproduce ultraviolet observations shortward of 1700 A. Furthermore, the predicted absorption of strong Fe II and Mg II UV lines is much larger than the observed one.

F. Castelli

1998-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

270

The MSFR as a flexible CR reactor: the viewpoint of safety  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, the possibility has first been discussed of using the liquid-fuelled Molten Salt Fast Reactor (MSFR) as a flexible conversion ratio (CR) reactor without design modification. By tuning the reprocessing rate it is possible to determine the content of fission products in the core, which in turn can significantly affect the neutron economy without incurring in solubility problems. The MSFR can thus be operated as U-233 breeder (CR>1), iso-breeder (CR=1) and burner reactor (CR<1). In particular a 40 year doubling time can be achieved, as well as a considerable Transuranics and MA (minor actinide) burning rate equal to about 150 kg{sub HN}/GWE-yr. The safety parameters of the MSFR have then been evaluated for different fuel cycle strategies. Th use and a softer spectrum combine to give a strong Doppler coefficient, one order of magnitude higher compared to traditional fast reactors (FRs). The fuel expansion coefficient is comparable to the Doppler coefficient and is only mildly affected by core compositions, thus assisting the fuel cycle flexibility of the MSFR. ?eff and generation time are comparable to the case of traditional FRs, if a static fuel is assumed. A notable reduction of ?eff is caused by salt circulation, but a low value of this parameter is a limited concern in the MSFR thanks to the lack of a burnup reactivity swing and of positive feedbacks. A simple approach has also been developed to evaluate the MSFR capabilities to withstand all typical double-fault accidents, for different fuel cycle options.

Fiorina, C.; Cammi, A. [Politecnico di Milano, Via La Masa 34, 20136 Milan (Italy); Franceschini, F. [Westinghouse Electric Company LL, 1000 Westinghouse Dr., Cranberry Township, PA 16066 (United States); Krepel, J. [Paul Scherrer Institut, PSI WEST, 5234 Villigen (Switzerland)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Ferromagnetic ordering of Cr and Fe doped p-type diamond: An ab initio study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ferromagnetic ordering of transition metal dopants in semiconductors holds the prospect of combining the capabilities of semiconductors and magnetic systems in single hybrid devices for spintronic applications. Various semiconductors have so far been considered for spintronic applications, but low Curie temperatures have hindered room temperature applications. We report ab initio DFT calculations on the stability and magnetic properties of Fe and Cr impurities in diamond, and show that their ground state magnetic ordering and stabilization energies depend strongly on the charge state and type of co-doping. We predict that divacancy Cr{sup +2} and substitutional Fe{sup +1} order ferromagnetically in p-type diamond, with magnetic stabilization energies (and magnetic moment per impurity ion) of 16.9 meV (2.5 ?{sub B}) and 33.3 meV (1.0 ?{sub B}), respectively. These magnetic stabilization energies are much larger than what has been achieved in other semiconductors at comparable impurity concentrations, including the archetypal dilute magnetic semiconductor GaAs:Mn. In addition, substitutional Fe{sup +1} exhibits a strong half-metallic character, with the Fermi level crossing bands in only the spin down channel. These results, combined with diamond’s extreme properties, demonstrate that Cr or Fe dopedp-type diamond may successfully be considered in the search for room temperature spintronic materials.

Benecha, E. M. [Department of Physics, University of South Africa, P.O Box 392, UNISA 0003, Pretoria (South Africa); Lombardi, E. B. [College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, P.O Box 392, UNISA 0003, Pretoria (South Africa)

2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

272

Attribute Cr. Course Name Prereq 4 BIOL 220 (204) Principles of Biology: Organisms, Ecology, Evolution Plus Lab and discussion (Fall)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Attribute Cr. Course Name Prereqs Prereq 4 BIOL 220 (204) Principles of Biology: Organisms, Ecology Foundations of Learning and Memory (Fall, Spr) Beh. Elec. 3 PSYC 317 Sensation and Perception (Fall) Beh

Lewis, Robert Michael

273

Raman Spectroscopic and Visible Absorption Investigation of LiCrSi2O6 Pyroxene Under Pressure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

symmetry.6,7 Spodumene (LiAlSi2O6) and LiCrSi2O6 behave similarly at the phase transition; both go from 6

Downs, Robert T.

274

Auger Nanoprobe analysis of presolar ferromagnesian silicate grains from primitive CR chondrites QUE 99177 and MET 00426  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Auger Nanoprobe analysis of presolar ferromagnesian silicate grains from primitive CR chondrites inventories are dominated by ferromagnesian silicates with group 1 oxygen isotopic compositions, indicative interstellar silicates have stoichiometries between olivine and pyroxene type silicates. Although structural

275

Microbial community changes during sustained Cr(VI) reduction at the 100H site in Hanford, WA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the 100H site in Hanford, WA Romy Chakraborty 1 , Eoin Lcontaminated aquifer at the Hanford (WA) 100H site in 2004.Cr(VI) reduction at Hanford, and a comparison of the

Chakraborty, Romy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

In situ long-term reductive bioimmobilization of Cr(VI) in groundwater using hydrogen release compound  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

100 H Area of the DOE Hanford Facility, Quantum EngineeringCr-immobilization research site at Hanford 100-H area. Wellexperiment was conducted at the Hanford Site (Washington), a

Faybishenko, B.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Structure of multilayered Cr(Al)N/SiO{sub x} nanocomposite coatings fabricated by differential pumping co-sputtering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Cr(Al)N/38 vol. % SiO{sub x} hard coating was prepared on a (001) Si substrate at 250 °C in a differential pumping co-sputtering system, which has two chambers for radio frequency (RF) sputtering and a substrate holder rotating on the chambers. The composite coating was grown by alternate sputter-depositions from CrAl and SiO{sub 2} targets with flows of N{sub 2}+Ar and Ar at RF powers of 200 and 75 W, respectively, on transition layers grown on the substrate. Analytical electron microscopy reveled that the Cr(Al)N/SiO{sub x} coating had a multilayered structure of Cr(Al)N crystal layers ?1.6 nm thick and two-dimensionally dispersed amorphous silicon oxide (a-SiO{sub x}) particles with sizes of ?1 nm or less. The a-SiO{sub x} particles were enclosed with the Cr(Al)N layers. The coating had a low indentation hardness of ?25 GPa at room temperature, due to a high oxide fraction of 38 vol. % and a low substrate rotational speed of 1 rpm. Faster rotation and lower oxide fraction would make a-SiO{sub x} particles smaller, resulting in the formation of Cr(Al)N crystal including the very fine a-SiO{sub x} particles with small number density. They would work as obstacles for the lattice deformation of the Cr(Al)N crystals. We have fabricated a superhard coating of Cr(Al)N/17 vol. % SiO{sub x} with a hardness of 46 GPa prepared at 12 rpm.

Kawasaki, Masahiro [JEOL USA Inc., 11 Dearborn Road, Peabody, Massachusetts 01960 (United States)] [JEOL USA Inc., 11 Dearborn Road, Peabody, Massachusetts 01960 (United States); Nose, Masateru [Faculty of Art and Design, University of Toyama, 180 Futagami-machi, Takaoka 933-8588 (Japan)] [Faculty of Art and Design, University of Toyama, 180 Futagami-machi, Takaoka 933-8588 (Japan); Onishi, Ichiro [JEOL Ltd. 3-1-2 Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan)] [JEOL Ltd. 3-1-2 Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Shiojiri, Makoto [Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)] [Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

278

Cr-W-V bainitic/ferritic steel with improved strength and toughness and method of making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high strength, high toughness Cr-W-V ferritic steel composition suitable for fast induced-radioactivity (FIRD) decay after irradiation in a fusion reactor comprises 2.5-3.5 wt % Cr, 2. This invention was made with Government support under contract DE-AC05-840R21400 awarded by the U.S. Department of Energy to Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. and the Government has certain rights in this invention.

Klueh, Ronald L. (Knoxville, TN); Maziasz, Philip J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Transmission electron microscopy of RSP Fe/Cr/Mn/Mo/C alloy. [Fe-3 wt % Cr-2 wt % Mn-0. 5 wt % Mo, -0. 3 wt % C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rapid solidification processing (RSP) has been carried out on an Fe/Cr/Mn/Mo/C alloy using both electron-beam melting and piston-and-anvil techniques. Preliminary TEM results show RSP produces a refined duplex microstructure of ferrite and martensite, with a typical ferrite grain size of 0.50 - 3.0 microns. This RSP microstructure is significantly different from that observed in the conventionally austenitized and quenched alloys - a lath martensitic microstructure with thin films of retained interlath austenite. The morphological change produced by RSP is accompanied by an increase in hardness from 48R/sub c/ to 61R/sub c/ (approx. 480 to 720 VHN). It is intended to use electron-beam specimens to examine the potential beneficial effect of RSP upon sliding wear resistance and, by careful TEM studies, it will be possible to characterize the microstructure and its role in the hardness and wear behavior of the RSP alloy.

Rayment, J.J.; Thomas, G.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Reactive oxygen species mediate Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis through PI3K/AKT-dependent activation of GSK-3?/?-catenin signaling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cr(VI) compounds are known human carcinogens that primarily target the lungs. Cr(VI) produces reactive oxygen species (ROS), but the exact effects of ROS on the signaling molecules involved in Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis have not been extensively studied. Chronic exposure of human bronchial epithelial cells to Cr(VI) at nanomolar concentrations (10–100 nM) for 3 months not only induced cell transformation, but also increased the potential of these cells to invade and migrate. Injection of Cr(VI)-stimulated cells into nude mice resulted in the formation of tumors. Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) increased levels of intracellular ROS and antiapoptotic proteins. Transfection with catalase or superoxide dismutase (SOD) prevented Cr(VI)-mediated increases in colony formation, cell invasion, migration, and xenograft tumors. While chronic Cr(VI) exposure led to activation of signaling cascades involving PI3K/AKT/GSK-3?/?-catenin and PI3K/AKT/mTOR, transfection with catalase or SOD markedly inhibited Cr(VI)-mediated activation of these signaling proteins. Inhibitors specific for AKT or ?-catenin almost completely suppressed the Cr(VI)-mediated increase in total and active ?-catenin proteins and colony formation. In particular, Cr(VI) suppressed autophagy of epithelial cells under nutrition deprivation. Furthermore, there was a marked induction of AKT, GSK-3?, ?-catenin, mTOR, and carcinogenic markers in tumor tissues formed in mice after injection with Cr(VI)-stimulated cells. Collectively, our findings suggest that ROS is a key mediator of Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis through the activation of PI3K/AKT-dependent GSK-3?/?-catenin signaling and the promotion of cell survival mechanisms via the inhibition of apoptosis and autophagy. - Highlights: • Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) induces carcinogenic properties in BEAS-2B cells. • ROS play an important role in Cr(VI)-induced tumorigenicity of BEAS-2B cells. • PI3K/AKT/GSK-3?/?-catenin signaling involved in Cr(VI) carcinogenesis. • The inhibition of apoptosis and autophagy contributes to Cr(VI) carcinogenesis.

Son, Young-Ok; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Wang, Lei; Wang, Xin; Fan, Jia; Kim, Dong-Hern; Lee, Ju-Yeon; Zhang, Zhuo [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States); Lee, Jeong-Chae [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States); School of Dentistry and Institute of Oral Biosciences, Research Center of Bioactive Materials, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Shi, Xianglin, E-mail: xshi5@email.uky.edu [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mud cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Letter Report Documenting Progress of Second Generation ATF FeCrAl Alloy Fabrication  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development of the 2nd generation ATF FeCrAl alloy has been initiated, and a candidate alloy was selected for trial tube fabrication through hot-extrusion and gun-drilling processes. Four alloys based on Fe-13Cr-4.5Al-0.15Y in weight percent were newly cast with minor alloying additions of Mo, Si, Nb, and C to promote solid-solution and second-phase precipitate strengthening. The alloy compositions were selected with guidance from computational thermodynamic tools. The lab-scale heats of ~ 600g were arc-melted and drop-cast, homogenized, hot-forged and -rolled, and then annealed producing plate shape samples. An alloy with Mo and Nb additions (C35MN) processed at 800°C exhibits very fine sub-grain structure with the sub-grain size of 1-3?m which exhibited more than 25% better yield and tensile strengths together with decent ductility compared to the other FeCrAl alloys at room temperature. It was found that the Nb addition was key to improving thermal stability of the fine sub-grain structure. Optimally, grains of less than 30 microns are desired, with grains up to and order of magnitude in desired produced through Nb addition. Scale-up effort of the C35MN alloy was made in collaboration with a commercial cast company who has a capability of vacuum induction melting. A 39lb columnar ingot with ~81mm diameter and ~305mm height (with hot-top) was commercially cast, homogenized, hot-extruded, and annealed providing 10mm-diameter bar-shape samples with the fine sub-grain structure. This commercial heat proved consistent with materials produced at ORNL at the lab-scale. Tubes and end caps were machined from the bar sample and provided to another work package for the ATF-1 irradiation campaign in the milestone M3FT-14OR0202251.

Yamamoto,, Y. [ORNL] [ORNL; Yang, Y. [ORNL] [ORNL; Field, K. G. [ORNL] [ORNL; Terrani, K. [ORNL] [ORNL; Pint, B. A. [ORNL] [ORNL; Snead, L. L. [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

282

CHARACTERIZATION OF PRESOLAR MATERIAL IN THE CR CHONDRITE NORTHWEST AFRICA 852  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated the inventory of presolar silicate, oxide, and silicon carbide (SiC) grains in the CR2 chondrite Northwest Africa (NWA) 852. Thirty-one O-anomalous grains were detected: 24 were identified as silicates ({approx}78 ppm); the remaining 7 are Al-rich oxides ({approx}38 ppm). NWA 852 is the first C2 chondrite containing O-anomalous presolar dust in concentrations comparable to other more primitive meteorites. Eight presolar SiC grains have been found, representing the highest abundance ({approx}160 ppm) observed so far in primitive meteorites. {sup 15}N-enriched matter is also present, although very heterogeneously distributed. Twenty-six of the O-anomalous grains are enriched in {sup 17}O, originating from the outflows of low-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. We calculate a silicate/oxide abundance ratio of {approx}2, which indicates a higher degree of aqueous alteration than observed for other presolar-grain-rich meteorites. NWA 852 thus stands between the presolar-grain-rich CR3 chondrites (MET 00426, QUE 99177) and CR2 chondrites with low presolar grain abundances (Renazzo, NWA 530). We calculate an initial presolar silicate abundance of {approx}800 ppm for NWA 852, if silicate destruction by aqueous alteration is taken into account. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) investigation of one presolar Al-rich grain of an AGB star origin revealed that the grain mainly consists of a single crystal of hibonite with slightly varying orientations. A distinct subgrain (d < 100 nm) with a Ca/Ti ratio of {approx}1 is located in the central region, most likely indicating a perovskite-like phase. Our data suggest this phase to be a primary condensate and not an alteration product.

Leitner, J.; Hoppe, P. [Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Particle Chemistry Department, P.O. Box 3060, 55020 Mainz (Germany); Vollmer, C. [Institut fuer Mineralogie, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Zipfel, J., E-mail: jan.leitner@mpic.de [Forschungsinstitut und Naturmuseum Senckenberg, Sektion Meteoritenforschung, Senckenberganlage 25, 60325 Frankfurt (Germany)

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

283

Microstructural examination of V-(4-5%) Cr-(4-5%)Ti irradiated in X530  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microstructural examination results are reported for two heats of V-(4-5%)Cr-(4-5%)Ti irradiated in the X530 experiment to {approximately}400{degrees}C to provide an understanding of the microstructural evolution that may be associated with degradation of mechanical properties. Fine precipitates were observed in high density intermixed with small defect clusters for all conditions examined following the irradiation. The irradiation-induced precipitation does not appear to be affected by preirradiation heat treatment at 950-1125{degrees}C. There was no evidence for a significant density of large (diameter >10 nm) dislocation loops or network dislocations.

Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Chung, H.M. [Argonne Natinonal Lab., IL (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Determination of mechanical properties of Ni-Cr-P amorphous alloys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DETERMINATION OF MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF Ni-Cr-P AMORPHOUS ALLOYS A Thesis by SWAROOP KUMAR R. KONDLAPUDI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree.... Kondlapudi, B. E. , Qsmania University Co-Chairs of Advisory Committee : Dr. A. wolfenden Dr. R. Griffin A study of the mechanical properties of Ni80 xCrxPgp amorphous alloys (x = 0 to 40 at% in steps of 5. 0) has been undertaken at Texas A&M University...

Kondlapudi, Swaroop Kumar R

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

285

Oxidation Characteristics of Fe-18Cr-18Mn-stainless alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air oxidation studies of Fe-18Cr-18Mn stainless steels were conducted at 525°C, 625°C, and 725°C. Alloys were evaluated with respect to changes in oxidation properties as a result of interstitial additions of nitrogen and carbon and of minor solute additions of silicon, molybdenum, and nickel. Interstitial concentrations possibly had a small, positive effect on oxidation resistance. Minor solute additions significantly improved oxidation resistance but could also reduce interstitial solubility resulting in formation of chromium carbides. Loss of solute chromium resulted in a slight reduction in oxidation protection. Oxidation lasting over 500 hours produced a manganese rich, duplex oxide structure: an outer sesquioxide and an inner spinel oxide.

James Rawers

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Audit Report: CR-B-95-06 | Department of Energy  

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287

Audit Report: CR-B-96-01 | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

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288

Audit Report: CR-B-97-04 | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

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289

Audit Report: CR-B-98-01 | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

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290

Audit Report: CR-B-98-02 | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

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291

Audit Report: CR-FS-96-03 | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

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292

NUREG/CR-0413 ANLlES-67 Distribution Code: RE ARGONNE NATIONAL LABORATORY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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293

Grain boundary depletion and migration during selective oxidation of Cr in  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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294

Audit Report: CR-B-01-01 | Department of Energy  

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295

Permeable Reactive Biobarriers for In Situ Cr(VI) Reduction: Bench Scale Tests Using Cellulomonas sp. Strain ES6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chromate (Cr(VI)) reduction studies were performed in bench scale flow columns using the fermentative subsurface isolate Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6. In these tests, columns packed with either quartz sand or hydrous ferric oxide (HFO)-coated quartz sand, were inoculated with strain ES6 and fed nutrients to stimulate growth before nutrient-free Cr(VI) solutions were injected. Results show that in columns containing quartz sand, a continuous inflow of 2 mg/L Cr(VI) was reduced to below detection limits in the effluent for durations of up to 5.7 residence times after nutrient injection was discontinued proving the ability of strain ES6 to reduce chromate in the absence of an external electron donor. In the HFO-containing columns, Cr(VI) reduction was significantly prolonged and effluent Cr(VI) concentrations remained below detectable levels for periods of up to 66 residence times after nutrient injection was discontinued. Fe was detected in the effluent of the HFO-containing columns throughout the period of Cr(VI) removal indicating that the insoluble Fe(III) bearing solids were being continuously reduced to form soluble Fe(II) resulting in prolonged abiotic Cr(VI) reduction. Thus, growth of Cellulomonas within the soil columns resulted in formation of permeable reactive barriers that could reduce Cr(VI) and Fe(III) for extended periods even in the absence of external electron donors. Other bioremediation systems employing Fe(II)-mediated reactions require a continuous presence of external nutrients to regenerate Fe(II). After depletion of nutrients, contaminant removal within these systems occurs by reaction with surface-associated Fe(II) that can rapidly become inaccessible due to formation of crystalline Fe-minerals or other precipitates. The ability of fermentative organisms like Cellulomonas to reduce metals without continuous nutrient supply in the subsurface offers a viable and economical alternative technology for in situ remediation of Cr(VI)-contaminated groundwater through formation of permeable reactive biobarriers (PRBB).

Sridhar Viamajala; Brent M. Peyton; Robin Gerlach; Vaideeswaran; William A. Apel; James N. Petersen

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Effect of V and Ta on the precipitation behavior of 12%Cr reduced activation ferrite/martensite steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

12%Cr reduced activation ferrite/martensite steels are promising candidate materials for good corrosion and irradiation resistance used for supercritical water-cooled reactor cladding and in-core components. V and Ta are considered to have improved the creep strength of high Cr steels by precipitating as MX phase. In this paper, a series of trial products microalloyed with V and V–Ta are produced, and the microstructure is characterized after quenching at 1050 °C and tempering at 780 °C by using TEM method to investigate the effect of these elements on the precipitation behavior of 12%Cr reduced activation ferrite/martensite steel. The results from both the experimental observations and thermodynamic and kinetic calculations reveal that V and V–Ta can promote the stable MX precipitation instead of M{sub 2}X, thus increasing the volume fraction of M{sub 23}C{sub 6}. Two-phase separation behavior of the (Ta, V)(C, N) carbonitride into a Ta(V)C(N) phase and a V(Ta)N(C) phase in 12Cr3WVTa steel is observed and further discussed. - Highlights: • Microalloyed with V and V-Ta can promote the precipitation of MX instead of M{sub 2}X. • The presence of delta-ferrite in microstructure affects the morphology of MX. • Two-phase separation of MX carbonitride was observed in 12Cr3WVTa steel.

Xiao, Xiang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu, Guoquan, E-mail: g.liu@ustb.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Hu, Benfu; Wang, Jinsan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Ullah, Asad [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Department of Mathematics, Karakoram International University, Gilgit-Baltistan (Pakistan)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

Corrosion property of 9Cr-ODS steel in nitric acid solution for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrosion tests of oxide dispersion strengthened with 9% Cr (9Cr-ODS) steel, which is one of the desirable materials for cladding tube of sodium-cooled fast reactors, in pure nitric acid solution, spent FBR fuel solution, and its simulated solution were performed to understand the corrosion behavior in a spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. In this study, the 9Cr-ODS steel with lower effective chromium content was evaluated to understand the corrosion behavior conservatively. As results, the tube-type specimens of the 9Cr-ODS steels suffered severe weight loss owing to active dissolution at the beginning of the immersion test in pure nitric acid solution in the range from 1 to 3.5 M. In contrast, the weight loss was decreased and they showed a stable corrosion in the higher nitric acid concentration, the dissolved FBR fuel solution, and its simulated solution by passivation. The corrosion rates of the 9Cr-ODS steel in the dissolved FBR fuel solution and its simulated solution were 1-2 mm/y and showed good agreement with each other. The passivation was caused by the shift of corrosion potential to noble side owing to increase in nitric acid concentration or oxidative ions in the dissolved FBR fuel solution and the simulated spent fuel solution. (authors)

Takeuchi, M.; Koizumi, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Inoue, M.; Koyama, S.I. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Oarai-machi, Higashi-ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) study, Ambient water toxicity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a study during the week of January 25-February 1, 1994, as described in the Statement of Work (SOW) document. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Surface water samples were collected by TVA Field Engineering personnel from Clinch River Mile 9.0, Poplar Creek Mile 1.0, and Poplar Creek Mile 2.9 on January 24, 26, and 28. Samples were partitioned (split) and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival or growth) to fathead minnows; however, toxicity to daphnids (significantly reduced reproduction) was demonstrated in undiluted samples from Poplar Creek Mile 1.0 in testing conducted by TVA based on hypothesis testing of data. Point estimation (IC{sub 25}) analysis of the data, however, showed no toxicity in PCM 1.0 samples.

Simbeck, D.J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Solidification characterization of a new rapidly solidified Ni-Cr-Co based superalloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solidification characterization of a new rapidly solidified Ni-Cr-Co based superalloy prepared by plasma rotating electrode process was investigated by means of optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, and transmission electron microscope. The results show that the solidification microstructure changes from dendrites to cellular and microcrystal structures with decreasing powder size. The elements of Co, Cr, W and Ni are enriched in the dendrites, while Mo, Nb and Ti are higher in the interdendritic regions. The relationships between powder size with the average solid-liquid interface moving rate, the average interface temperature gradient and the average cooling rate are established. Microsegregation is increased with larger powder size. The geometric integrity of MC Prime type carbides in the powders changes from regular to diverse with decreasing powder size. The morphology and quantity of carbides depend on the thermal parameters and non-equilibrium solute partition coefficients during rapid solidification. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The relations of solidification thermal parameters with powder size are established. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The relation of non-equilibrium solute partition with powder size is investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The solidification microstructure is related to thermal parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The segregation behavior is linked to non-equilibrium partition coefficients. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The morphology and quantity of carbides depend on the above combined factors.

Wu, Kai, E-mail: wk-ustb@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu, Guoquan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China) [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Hu, Benfu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Li, Feng [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)] [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Zhang, Yiwen [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China) [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); High Temperature Materials Research Institution, CISRI, Beijing 100081 (China); Tao, Yu; Liu, Jiantao [High Temperature Materials Research Institution, CISRI, Beijing 100081 (China)] [High Temperature Materials Research Institution, CISRI, Beijing 100081 (China)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

Localized Corrosion of a Neutron Absorbing Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd Alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program, located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), has developed a new nickel-chromium-molybdenum-gadolinium structural alloy for storage and long-term disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The new alloy will be used for SNF storage container inserts for nuclear criticality control. Gadolinium has been chosen as the neutron absorption alloying element due to its high thermal neutron absorption cross section. This alloy must be resistant to localized corrosion when exposed to postulated Yucca Mountain in-package chemistries. The corrosion resistance properties of three experimental heats of this alloy are presented. The alloys performance are be compared to Alloy 22 and borated stainless steel. The results show that initially the new Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy is less resistant to corrosion as compared to another Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy (Alloy 22); but when the secondary phase that contains gadolinium (gadolinide) is dissolved, the alloy surface becomes passive. The focus of this work is to qualify these gadolinium containing materials for ASME code qualification and acceptance in the Yucca Mountain Repository.

R.E. Mizia; T. E. Lister; P. J. Pinhero; T. L. Trowbridge

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

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301

Discovery of Optical Bursts from MS1603.6+2600 = UW CrB  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the discovery of several optical burst-like events from the low-mass X-ray binary MS1603.6+2600 (UW CrB). The events last for a few tens of seconds, exhibit a very fast rise and slow decay, and involve optical brightening of a factor of 2-3. The flares appear distinct from the lower level flickering and instead strongly resemble reprocessed type-I X-ray bursts as seen in a number of other neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries. In conjunction with the previously reported candidate X-ray burst, these confirm that the compact object in UW CrB is a neutron star. We examine the optical burst brightness and recurrence times and discuss how the nature of the system can be constrained. We conclude that the source is most likely an accretion disk corona source at an intermediate distance, rather than a nearby quiescent system or very distant dipper.

R. I. Hynes; E. L. Robinson; E. Jeffery

2004-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

302

Demonstrations of diode-pumped and grating-tuned ZnSe:Cr{sup 2+} lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Within the last few years, divalent-transition-metal-doped II-VI material class has been proposed as source of new tunable mid-IR lasers. Cr{sup 2+} is a prime laser candidate on account of its high luminescence quantum yield and the expectation that ESA would be absent. The first ZnSe:Cr{sup 2+} laser demonstrations were conducted in an end-pumped geometry with a tightly focused (0.2 mm spot) MgF{sub 2}-Co{sup 2+} laser beam, for a peak pump intensity well over 100 kW/cm{sup 2}, so laser threshold was easily reached. Grating tuning experiments were done by replacing the cavity high-reflector with a diffraction grating. The diode array was removed and pump beam from a MgF{sub 2}:Co{sup 2+} laser was focused onto the crystal using the same cylindrical lens. Output wavelengths were checked with a monochromator. The long-wavelength limit of operation was 2799 nm. Short-wavelength cutoff was 2134 nm; even though the emission cross section remains substantial, self-absorption inhibits laser operation.

Page, R.H.; Skidmore, J.A.; Schaffers, K.I.; Beach, R.J.; Payne, S.A.; Krupke, W.F.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Effect of prior cold work on age hardening of Cu-3Ti-1Cr alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of 50%, 75% and 90% cold work on the age hardening behavior of Cu-3Ti-1Cr alloy has been investigated by hardness and tensile tests, and light optical and transmission electron microscopy. Hardness increased from 118 Hv in the solution-treated condition to 373 Hv after 90% cold work and peak aging. Cold deformation reduced the peak aging time and temperature of the alloy. The yield strength and ultimate tensile strength reached a maximum of 1090 and 1110 MPa, respectively, following 90% deformation and peak aging. The microstructure of the deformed alloy exhibited elongated grains and deformation twins. The maximum strength on peak aging was obtained due to precipitation of the ordered, metastable and coherent {beta}'-Cu{sub 4}Ti phase, in addition to high dislocation density and deformation twins. Over-aging resulted in decreases in hardness and strength due to the formation of incoherent and equilibrium {beta}-Cu{sub 3}Ti phase in the form of a cellular structure. However, the morphology of the discontinuous precipitation changed to a globular form on high deformation. The mechanical properties of Cu-3Ti-1Cr alloy are superior to those of Cu-2.7Ti, Cu-3Ti-1Cd and the commercial Cu-0.5Be-2.5Co alloys in the cold-worked and peak-aged condition.

Markandeya, R. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, College of Engineering, Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Kukatpally, Hyderabad-500 072 (India); Nagarjuna, S. [Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad-500 058 (India)]. E-mail: snagarjuna1@rediffmail.com; Sarma, D.S. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221 005 (India)

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Ab initio study on noncompensated CrO codoping of GaN for enhanced solar energy conversion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe a novel photocatalyst obtained by codoping GaN with CrO, according to a new "noncompensated" codoping concept based on first-principles calculations. The approach enables controllable narrowing of the GaN band gap with significantly enhanced carrier mobility and photocatalytic activity in the visible light region and thus offers immense potential for application in solar energy conversion, water splitting, and a variety of solar-assisted photocatalysis. Our calculations indicate that the formation energy for the cation doping is greatly reduced by noncompensated codoping with an anion. Although Cr doping alone can split the band gap with the formation of an intermediate band, the mobility is low due to carrier trapping by the localized states. The first-principles calculations also demonstrate that CrO codoping of GaN shifts the Fermi level into the conduction band resulting in high carrier density and mobility.

Pan, Hui [ORNL; Gu, Baohua [ORNL; Eres, Gyula [ORNL; Zhang, Zhenyu [ORNL

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Microbial community changes during sustained Cr(VI) reduction at the 100H site in Hanford, WA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hexavalent Chromium is a widespread contaminant found in soil, sediment, and groundwater. In order to stimulate microbially-mediated reduction of Cr(VI), a poly-lactate compound (HRC) was injected into the Chromium-contaminated aquifer at the Hanford (WA) 100H site in 2004. Cr(VI) concentrations rapidly declined to below the detection limit and remained so for more than three years after injection. Based on the results of the bacterial community composition using high-density DNA 16S rRNA gene microarrays, we observed the community to transition through denitrifying, ironreducing and sulfate-reducing populations. As a result, we specifically focused isolation efforts on three bacterial species that were significant components of the community. Positive enrichments in defined anaerobic media resulted in the isolation of an iron-reducing Geobacter metallireducens-like isolate, a sulfate-reducing Desulfovibrio vukgaris-like strain and a nitrate-reducing Pseudomonas stutzeri-like isolate among several others. All of these isolates were capable of reducing Cr(VI) anoxically and have been submitted for genome sequencing to JGI. To further characterize the microbial, and geochemical mechanisms associated with in situ Cr(VI) reduction at the site, additional HRC was injected in 2008. The goal was to restimulate the indigenous microbial community and to regenerate the reducing conditions necessary for continued Cr(VI) bio-immobilization in the groundwater. Analysis of the microbial populations post-injection revealed that they recovered to a similar density as after the first injection in 2004. In this study, we present the results from our investigation into microbially-mediated Cr(VI) reduction at Hanford, and a comparison of the microbial community development following two HRC injections four years apart.

Chakraborty, Romy; Brodie, Eoin L; Faybishenko, Boris; Piceno, Yvette M; Tom, Lauren; Choudhuri, Swati; Beller, Harry R; Liu, Jenny; Torok, Tamas; Joyner, Dominique C; Joachimiak, Marcin P; Zhou, Aifen; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Zhou, Joe; Long, Phil E; Newcomer, Darrell R; Andersen, Gary L; Hazen, Terry C.

2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

306

Temperature dependence of dynamic Young's modulus and internal friction in three plasma sprayed NiCrAlY coating alloys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF DYNAM'IIC YOUNG'S MODULUS AND INTERNAL FRICTION IN THREE PLASMA SPRAYED NiCrAlY COATING -ALLOYS A Thesis LLOYD STEVEN COOK Submitted to the 08ice of Graduate Studies of Texas AE M University in part. al full...'illment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1989 Itiajor Subject: l'dechanical Engineering TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF DYNAMIC YOUNG'S MODULUS AND INTERNAL FRICTION IN THREE PLASMA SPRAYED NiCrAIY COATING ALLOYS A Thesis by LLOYD STEVEN COOK...

Cook, Lloyd Steven

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Can one identify the intrinsic structure of the yrast states in {sup 48}Cr after the backbending?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The backbending phenomenon in {sup 48}Cr has been investigated using the recently developed projected configuration interaction (PCI) method, in which the deformed intrinsic states are directly associated with shell model wave functions. Two previous explanations, (i) K=0 band crossing and (ii) K=2 band crossing, have been reinvestigated using PCI, and it was found that both explanations can successfully reproduce the experimental backbending. The PCI wave functions in the pictures of K=0 band crossing and K=2 band crossing are highly overlapped. We conclude that there are no unique intrinsic states associated with the yrast states after backbending in {sup 48}Cr.

Gao Zaochun; Chen, Y. S.; Chen, Y. J. [China Institute of Atomic Energy P.O. Box 275-10, Beijing 102413 (China); Horoi, Mihai [Department of Physics, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, Michigan 48859 (United States); Tuya [College of Physics Science and Technology, Shenyang Normal University, ShenYang 110034 (China)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

Quantitative measurement of Cr segregation in Co0.8xCrxPt0.1B0.1 recording media by scatter diagram analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- trometry or electron energy-loss spectrometry EELS data at each point. In most cases this technique diagram analysis of chemically resolved energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy EFTEM images the Cr enrichment is suf- ficiently high as to render the local Co­Cr composition non- magnetic

Krishnan, Kannan M.

309

Thermally Nitrided Stainless Steels for Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell Bipolar Plates: Part 1 Model Ni-50Cr and Austenitic 349TM alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal nitridation of a model Ni-50Cr alloy at 1100 C for 2 h in pure nitrogen resulted in the formation of a continuous, protective CrN/Cr{sub 2}N surface layer with a low interfacial contact resistance. Application of similar nitridation parameters to an austenitic stainless steel, 349{sup TM}, however, resulted in a discontinuous mixture of discrete CrN, Cr{sub 2}N and (Cr,Fe){sub 2}N{sub 1-x} (x = 0--0.5) phase surface particles overlying an exposed {gamma} austenite-based matrix, rather than a continuous nitride surface layer. The interfacial contact resistance of the 349{sup TM} was reduced significantly by the nitridation treatment. However, in the simulated PEMFC environments (1 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 2 ppm F{sup -} solutions at 70 C sparged with either hydrogen or air), very high corrosion currents were observed under both anodic and cathodic conditions. This poor behavior was linked to the lack of continuity of the Cr-rich nitride surface formed on 349{sup TM} Issues regarding achieving continuous, protective Cr-nitride surface layers on stainless steel alloys are discussed.

Wang, Heli [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Turner, John [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Microstructural examination of irradiated V-(4-5%)Cr-(4-5%)Ti.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microstructural examination results are reported for two heats of V-(4-5%) Cr-(4-5%)Ti irradiated in the EBR-II X530 experiment to 4.5 dpa at {approximately}400 C to provide an understanding of the microstructural evolution that may be associated with degradation of mechanical properties. Fine precipitates were observed in high density intermixed with small defect clusters for all conditions examined following the irradiation. The irradiation-induced precipitation does not appear to be affected by preirradiation heat treatment at 950-1125 C. There was no evidence for a significant density of large (diameter >10 nm) dislocation loops or network dislocations. Analytical investigations successfully demonstrated that the precipitates were enriched in titanium, depleted in vanadium and contained no nitrogen. These results are discussed in terms of future alloy development options.

Gelles, D. S.

1998-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

311

FURTHER OBSERVATIONS ON V-4Cr-4Ti PRESSURIZED CREEP TUBES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Further observations are provided for pressurized thermal creep tubes of V-4Cr-4Ti examined following testing in the range 650 to 800°C for tests lasting up to ~104 h. Precipitate particles have been analyzed by EELS to define interstitial contents, and are shown to be either C or O rich with only minor N contents. Grain shape aspect ratios as a function of strain have been measured and these data shows shape change as a result of effective mid-wall strains as high as 12.7%. Deformation mechanisms are considered to explain Newtonian viscous flow response at 800°C below effective midwall stresses of 70 MPa, and it is concluded that grain boundary sliding probably is the predominant mechanism based on the microstructural information presented here, but there is evidence that Harper-Dorn creep may also be a contributing creep mechanism under these conditions.

Gelles, David S.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Thomas, Larry E.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Microstructural examination of irradiated V-(4-5%)Cr-(4-5%)Ti  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microstructural examination results are reported for two heats of V-(4-5%)Cr-(4-5%)Ti irradiated in the EBR-II X530 experiment to {approximately}4 dpa at {approximately}400 C to provide an understanding of the microstructural evolution that may be associated with degradation of mechanical properties. Fine precipitates were observed in high density intermixed with small defect clusters for all conditions examined following the irradiation. The irradiation-induced precipitation does not appear to b affected by preirradiation heat treatment at 950--1125 C. There was no evidence for a significant density of large (diameter >10 nm) dislocation loops or network dislocations. Analytical investigators successfully demonstrated that the precipitates were enriched in titanium, depleted in vanadium and contained no nitrogen.

Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Rice, P.M.; Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Chung, H.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

On the origin of the low temperatures resistivity minimum in Cr thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present measurements of the electrical resistivity and Hall coefficient, ? and R{sub H}, in Cr films of different thicknesses grown on MgO (100) substrates, as a function of temperature T and applied magnetic field H. The results show a low temperature minimum in ?(T), which is thickness dependent. From 40?K to 2?K, the Hall coefficient is a monotonous increasing function as T is reduced with no particular signature at the temperature T{sub min} where the minimum develops. We explain the resistivity minimum assuming an imperfect nesting of the Fermi surface leading to small electron and hole pockets. We introduce a phenomenological model which supports this simple physical picture.

Osquiguil, E.; Tosi, L.; Kaul, E. E.; Balseiro, C. A. [Centro Atómico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina)

2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

314

2011 HONDA CR-Z 2982 - HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLE BATTERY TEST RESULTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing traction batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2011 Honda CR-Z (VIN JHMZF1C64BS002982). Battery testing was performed by Intertek Testing Services NA. The Idaho National Laboratory and Intertek collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Office of the U.S. Department of Energy.

Gray, Tyler [Interek; Shirk, Matthew [Idaho National Laboratory; Wishart, Jeffrey [Interek

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

2011 Honda CR-Z 4466 - Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing traction batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2011 Honda CR-Z (VIN JHMZF1C67BS004466). Battery testing was performed by Intertek Testing Services NA. The Idaho National Laboratory and Intertek collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Office of the U.S. Department of Energy.

Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk; Jeffrey Wishart

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Heat treated 9 Cr-1 Mo steel material for high temperature application  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to a composition and heat treatment for a high-temperature, titanium alloyed, 9 Cr-1 Mo steel exhibiting improved creep strength and oxidation resistance at service temperatures up to 650.degree. C. The novel combination of composition and heat treatment produces a heat treated material containing both large primary titanium carbides and small secondary titanium carbides. The primary titanium carbides contribute to creep strength while the secondary titanium carbides act to maintain a higher level of chromium in the finished steel for increased oxidation resistance, and strengthen the steel by impeding the movement of dislocations through the crystal structure. The heat treated material provides improved performance at comparable cost to commonly used high-temperature steels such as ASTM P91 and ASTM P92, and requires heat treatment consisting solely of austenization, rapid cooling, tempering, and final cooling, avoiding the need for any hot-working in the austenite temperature range.

Jablonski, Paul D.; Alman, David; Dogan, Omer; Holcomb, Gordon; Cowen, Christopher

2012-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

317

Mn-Fe base and Mn-Cr-Fe base austenitic alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Manganese-iron base and manganese-chromium-iron base austenitic alloys designed to have resistance to neutron irradiation induced swelling and low activation have the following compositions (in weight percent): 20 to 40 Mn; up to about 15 Cr; about 0.4 to about 3.0 Si; an austenite stabilizing element selected from C and N, alone or in combination with each other, and in an amount effective to substantially stabilize the austenite phase, but less than about 0.7 C, and less than about 0.3 N; up to about 2.5 V; up to about 0.1 P; up to about 0.01 B; up to about 3.0 Al; up to about 0.5 Ni; up to about 2.0 W; up to about 1.0 Ti; up to about 1.0 Ta; and with the remainder of the alloy being essentially iron.

Brager, Howard R. (Richland, WA); Garner, Francis A. (Richland, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Thermodynamic modeling and experimental validation of the Fe-Al-Ni-Cr-Mo alloy system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NiAl-type precipitate-strengthened ferritic steels have been known as potential materials for the steam turbine applications. In this study, thermodynamic descriptions of the B2-NiAl type nano-scaled precipitates and body-centered-cubic (BCC) Fe matrix phase for four alloys based on the Fe-Al-Ni-Cr-Mo system were developed as a function of the alloy composition at the aging temperature. The calculated phase structure, composition, and volume fraction were validated by the experimental investigations using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and atom probe tomography. With the ability to accurately predict the key microstructural features related to the mechanical properties in a given alloy system, the established thermodynamic model in the current study may significantly accelerate the alloy design process of the NiAl-strengthened ferritic steels.

Teng, Zhenke [ORNL; Zhang, F [CompuTherm LLC, Madison, WI; Miller, Michael K [ORNL; Liu, Chain T [Hong Kong Polytechnic University; Huang, Shenyan [ORNL; Chou, Y.T. [Multi-Phase Services Inc., Knoxville; Tien, R [Multi-Phase Services Inc., Knoxville; Chang, Y A [ORNL; Liaw, Peter K [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Microstructural characterization of as-cast biocompatible Co-Cr-Mo alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The microstructure of a cobalt-base alloy (Co-Cr-Mo) obtained by the investment casting process was studied. This alloy complies with the ASTM F75 standard and is widely used in the manufacturing of orthopedic implants because of its high strength, good corrosion resistance and excellent biocompatibility properties. This work focuses on the resulting microstructures arising from samples poured under industrial environment conditions, of three different Co-Cr-Mo alloys. For this purpose, we used: 1) an alloy built up from commercial purity constituents, 2) a remelted alloy and 3) a certified alloy for comparison. The characterization of the samples was achieved by using optical microscopy (OM) with a colorant etchant to identify the present phases and scanning electron microscopy (SE-SEM) and energy dispersion spectrometry (EDS) techniques for a better identification. In general the as-cast microstructure is a Co-fcc dendritic matrix with the presence of a secondary phase, such as the M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides precipitated at grain boundaries and interdendritic zones. These precipitates are the main strengthening mechanism in this type of alloys. Other minority phases were also reported and their presence could be linked to the cooling rate and the manufacturing process variables and environment. - Research Highlights: {yields}The solidification microstructure of an ASTM-F75 type alloy were studied. {yields}The alloys were poured under an industrial environment. {yields}Carbides and sigma phase identified by color metallography and scanning microscopy (SEM and EDS). {yields}Two carbide morphologies were detected 'blocky type' and 'pearlite type'. {yields}Minority phases were also detected.

Giacchi, J.V., E-mail: jgiacchi@exa.unicen.edu.ar [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Av. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AAJ Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Fisica de Materiales Tandil (IFIMAT-FCE-CICPBA) Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399 B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina); Morando, C.N.; Fornaro, O. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Av. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AAJ Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Fisica de Materiales Tandil (IFIMAT-FCE-CICPBA) Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399 B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina); Palacio, H.A. [Comision de Investigaciones Cientificas de la Provincia de Buenos Aires (CICPBA), Calle 526 e/10 y 11 B1096APP La Plata (Argentina); Instituto de Fisica de Materiales Tandil (IFIMAT-FCE-CICPBA) Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399 B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

Transmission infrared spectra (225 lm) of carbonaceous chondrites (CI, CM, CVCK, CR, C2 ungrouped): Mineralogy, water, and asteroidal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transmission infrared spectra (2­25 lm) of carbonaceous chondrites (CI, CM, CV­CK, CR, C2 ungrouped t In this work, infrared transmission spectra (2­25 lm range, 5000­400 cm�1 ) of 40 carbonaceous chon- drites. The variability in the silicate features is correlated with the intensity of an ­OH related absorption at 3-lm

Montes-Hernandez, German

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mud cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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321

Characterization of Gas Metal Arc Welding welds obtained with new high Cr-Mo ferritic stainless steel filler wires  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Characterization of Gas Metal Arc Welding welds obtained with new high Cr-Mo ferritic stainless Several compositions of metal cored filler wire were manufactured to define the best welding conditions for homogeneous welding, by Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) process, of a modified AISI 444 ferritic stainless steel

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

322

Directed-energy electron-beam processing of a hypoeutectic Cr/sub 90/Ta/sub 10/ alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A hypoeutectic Cr/sub 90/Ta/sub 10/ alloy was processed using a directed-energy electron-beam surface melting and resolidification technique to study its microstructure evolution during rapid solidification. The power of the electron beam was 2500 W and the scan speed ranged from 0.13 to 2.0 m/sec. Microstructure characteristics such as transitions from planar front to dendritic growth, and from cellular to dendritic growth were observed. At low solidification rate, the interdendritic regions are characterized by the Cr/Cr/sub 2/Ta eutectic, and at high solidification rate the intercellular regions are characterized by a Cr/sub 2/Ta phase. For the latter, the distribution of Ta-solute across the interior of a cell is very uniform. In a given sample, the primary cell spacing increases as the solidification front moves from the substrate/regrowth interface toward the surface. The solidification parameters, i.e., temperature gradient and growth velocity, were determined with finite-element heat flow analyses. The observed microstructure characteristics were correlated to these parameters using available theoretical models. 9 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

Huang, J.S.; Kaufmann, E.N.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Re-Evaluation of Results in NUREG/CR-6674 for Carbon and Low-Alloy Steel Components (MRP-76)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report evaluates the conservatisms and uncertainties reported in NUREG/CR-6674 that lead to high probabilities of cracking in carbon and low-alloy steel for reactor piping. The report uses additional data generated since the completion of the report to eliminate uncertainties and show lower probabilities of cracking.

A. Deardorff; D. Harris; D. Dedhia

2002-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

324

Combined filtered cathodic arc etching pretreatment-magnetron sputter deposition of highly adherent CrN films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CrN films were prepared on steel substrates by a hybrid method utilizing filtered cathodic arc for Cr ion pretreatment and magnetron sputtering for coating deposition. During pretreatment the substrates were biased to -1200 V and exposed to filtered chromium plasma. The substrate-coating interface formed during the pretreatment contained a Cr-enriched modified layer with composition that was strongly influenced by the temperature of the substrate as observed by scanning transmission electron microscopy--energy dispersive spectroscopy. The modified layer had a nanocrystalline morphology and thickness of 15 nm. The path of formation of the layer is linked to the combined action of implantation, diffusion, and resputtering. The resulting adhesion of 3 {mu}m thick CrN films was very high with scratch test critical load values of 83 N. The morphology of the films was smooth without large scale defects and the microstructure was columnar. The coatings behaved well in dry sliding tests with very low wear coefficients of 2.3x10{sup -16} m{sup 3} N{sup -1} m{sup -1}, which can be linked to the high adhesion and defect-free microstructure. The smooth coatings also had a high resistance to corrosion as demonstrated by potentiodynamic tests with particularly high pitting potentials of +800 mV.

Ehiasarian, A. P.; Anders, A.; Petrov, I. [Materials and Engineering Research Institute, Sheffield Hallam University, Howard St., Sheffield S1 1WB (United Kingdom); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

325

Sputter-Deposited Pt/CrN Nanoparticle PEM Fuel Cell Cathodes: Limited Proton Conductivity Through Electrode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sputter-Deposited Pt/CrN Nanoparticle PEM Fuel Cell Cathodes: Limited Proton Conductivity Through for proton exchange membrane PEM fuel cells. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy show manuscript received September 17, 2009. Published November 13, 2009. Proton exchange membrane PEM fuel cells

Gall, Daniel

326

The CR 2.0mm (.079") insulation displacement connector features a mounting height as low as  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

7 The CR 2.0mm (.079") insulation displacement connector features a mounting height as low as 6.9mm") pitch insulation displacement connector allows automatic harness production for connection of UL1007 of misinsertion without being permanently distorted. · Twin U-slot insulation displacement section The insulation

Wedeward, Kevin

327

Modulation of physical and photocatalytic properties of (Cr, N) codoped TiO{sub 2} nanorods using soft solution processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Facile polymerized complex reactions together with a hydrothermal reaction were implemented to make single crystalline TiO{sub 2} nanorods for the first time. Chromium (Cr) and nitrogen (N{sub 2}) co-doping was performed to tailor the physical properties. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction study illustrated that highly reactive facets of (101), (111), and (001) dominated rutile TiO{sub 2} nanorods. A growth model, based on formation of complex species, was proposed to elucidate effectiveness of the soft solution processing in making TiO{sub 2} nanorods. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis and consideration of fundamentals of charge neutrality showed N{sub 2} doping could inhibit formation of Cr{sup 6+} and oxygen vacancies (V{sub O}{sup 2+}). An investigation of the photocatalytic properties exhibited high efficiency of photodegradation of methylene blue in 15?min under pH?=?10, using a nanocomposite of (7% Cr, 0.0021% N) codoped and 3% Cr doped TiO{sub 2} nanorods.

Lu, Wen-Chung [Institute of Nanotechnology and Microsystems Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China); Nguyen, Hoang-Diem; Wu, Chun-Yi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China); Chang, Kao-Shuo, E-mail: kschang@mail.ncku.edu.tw; Yoshimura, Masahiro [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China); Promotion Center for Global Materials Research (PCGMR), National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China)

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

328

Tunable blue light source by intracavity frequency doubling of a Cr-LiSrAIF6 laser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tunable blue light source by intracavity frequency doubling of a Cr- LiSrAIF6 laser Franqois-switched operation at 10 kHz was intracavity frequency doubled by using a LiIOl crystal. The 230 ns tunable blue lasers emitting in the blue-green wavelength range are expected to be the key components for optical

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

329

Targeting Cancer More Effectively CR@B brings together researchers from across the University and the Royal United Hospital, Bath.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Targeting Cancer More Effectively CR@B brings together researchers from across the University to find a cure for various types of cancer. 40 academic groups from nearly every department to bedside and back again. Drug Discovery The discovery of a new family of anti-cancer drugs called steroid

Burton, Geoffrey R.

330

Kinetics of oxidation of an organic amine with a Cr(V) salen complex in homogeneous aqueous solution and on the surface of mesoporous silica  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comparative study of catalytic activity under homogeneous and heterogeneous conditions was carried out using the (salen)Cr{sup III}-catalyzed oxidation of tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) with iodosobenzene as a model reaction. Amine-functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) were synthesized in a co-condensation reaction and functionalized with salen via a covalent Si-C bond. A Cr(III) complex of this supported ligand, MSN-(salen)Cr{sup III}, was prepared and characterized. Data from powder XRD, BET isotherms and BJH pore size distribution all showed that MSN-(salen)Cr{sup III} still had the typical MSN high surface area, narrow pore size distribution, and ordered hexagonal pore structure, which were further confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. {sup 13}C and {sup 29}Si solid-state NMR data provided structural information about the catalyst and verified successful functionalization of the salen ligand and coordination to Cr(III). No unreacted salen or Cr(III) were observed. The loadings of salen and salen-Cr{sup III} complex were determined via TGA and EDX, respectively. Both measurements indicated that approximately 0.5 mmol/g of catalyst was loaded on the surface of MSN. The oxidation of TMB with iodosobenzene using MSN-(salen)Cr{sup III} as a heterogeneous catalyst exhibited both similarities and differences with the analogous homogeneous reaction using (salen)Cr{sup III}(H{sub 2}O){sup +} as a catalyst in aqueous acetonitrile. In the presence of 0.10 M HClO{sub 4}, the two catalytic reactions proceeded at similar rates and generated the doubly oxidized product TMB{sup 2+}. In the absence of acid, the radical cation TMB{sup +} was produced. The kinetics of the heterogeneous reaction in the absence of added acid responded to concentrations of all three reagents, i.e. (salen)Cr{sup III}, TMB, and PhIO.

Szajna-Fuller, Ewa; Huang, Yulin; Rapp, Jennifer L.; Chaka, Gezhegn; Lin, Victor S.Y.; Pruski, Marek; Bakac, Andreja

2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

331

Suggestions for Weed Control in Corn  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

F r ontier ? for additional w eed contr ol. Consult (R efer to label for specific w eeds BASF U se rate determined b y inches of soil) or sur face applied the pr oduct label. R o tational cr o p r estrictions will contr olled.) C.E.C. (cationex...) or sur face contr olled.) BASF applied within 2 w eeks of U se rate is determined b y C.E.C. (cation ex change planting. Early postemergence capacity) or soil textur e and organic matter befor e corn is12 inches tall, but content. Can make split...

Baumann, Paul A.

2002-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

332

Impact of x-ray dose on the response of CR-39 to 1-5.5 MeV alphas  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

The CR-39 nuclear track detector is used in many nuclear diagnostics #12;fielded at inertial con#12;nement fusion (ICF) facilities. Large x-ray uences generated by ICF experiments may impact the CR-39 response to incident charged particles. To determine the impact of x-ray exposure on the CR-39 response to alpha particles, a thick-target bremsstrahlung x-ray generator was used to expose CR-39 to various doses of 8 keV Cu-K?#11; and K#12;? x-rays. The CR-39 detectors were then exposed to 1-5.5 MeV alphas from an Am-241 source. The regions of the CR-39 exposed to x-rays showed a smaller track diameter than those not exposed to x-rays: for example, a dose of 3.0#6; ± 0.1 Gy causes a decrease of (19 ± #6;2)% in the track diameter of a 5.5 MeV alpha particle, while a dose of 60.0 ± #6;1.3 Gy results in a decrease of (45 ± #6;5)% in the track diameter. The reduced track diameters were found to be predominantly caused by a comparable reduction in the bulk etch rate of the CR-39 with x-ray dose. A residual eff#11;ect depending on alpha particle energy is characterized using an empirical formula.

Rojas-Herrera, J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Zylstra, A. B.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Orozco, D.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sio, H.; Seguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.

2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Microstructural evolution during solution treatment of Co-Cr-Mo-C biocompatible alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three different Co-Cr-Mo-C alloys conforming to ASTM F75 standard were poured in an industrial environment and subjected to a conventional solution treatment at 1225 Degree-Sign C for several time intervals. The microstructural changes and transformations were studied in each case in order to evaluate the way in which treatment time influences the secondary phase fraction and clarify the microstructural changes that could occur. To assess how treatment time affects microstructure, optical microscopy and image analyzer software, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion spectrometry analysis were employed. The main phases detected in the as-cast state were: {sigma}-phase, M{sub 6}C, and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides. The latter presented two different morphologies, blocky type and lamellar type. Despite being considered the most detrimental feature to mechanical properties, {sigma}-phase and lamellar carbides dissolution took place in the early stages of solution treatment. M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides featured two different behaviors. In the alloy obtained by melting an appropriate quantity of alloyed commercial materials, a decrease in size, spheroidization and transformation into M{sub 6}C carbides were simultaneously observed. In the commercial ASTM F75 alloy, in turn, despite being the same phase, only a marked decrease in precipitates size was noticed. These different behaviors could be ascribed to the initial presence of other phases in the alloy obtained from alloyed materials, such as {sigma}-phase and 'pearlitic' carbides, or to the initial precipitate size which was much larger in the first than in the commercial ASTM F75 alloy studied. M{sub 6}C carbides dissolved directly in the matrix as they could not be detected in samples solution-treated for 15 min. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three different Co-Cr-Mo alloys were poured under an industrial environment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transformation of existing phases followed during conventional solution treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In as-cast/treated samples, phases were identified by color metallography, SEM and EDS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer M{sub 23}C{sub 6} {yields} M{sub 6}C transformation was corroborated by SEM and EDS analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbide spheroidization was also detected prior a noticeably carbide size decreasing.

Giacchi, J.V., E-mail: jgiacchi@exa.unicen.edu.ar [IFIMAT, Instituto de Fisica de Materiales Tandil, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399, B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Av. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Fornaro, O. [IFIMAT, Instituto de Fisica de Materiales Tandil, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399, B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Av. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AA, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Palacio, H. [IFIMAT, Instituto de Fisica de Materiales Tandil, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Pinto 399, B7000GHG Tandil (Argentina); Comision de Investigaciones Cientificas de la Provincia de Buenos Aires (CICPBA), Calle 526 e/10 y 11, B1096APP, La Plata (Argentina)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

334

Corrosion and Stress Corrosion Cracking of High Cr Ferritic-Martensitic Steels in Supercritical Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrosion behavior of the F-M (ferritic-martensitic) steels (T91, T92, T122) and Fe-base ODS (oxide dispersion strengthened) alloy (MA956{sup TM}) were evaluated in an aerated (8 ppm D.O.) SCW (supercritical water) at the temperature range between 300 and 627 deg C under 25 MPa. In aerated SCW the weight change of the F-M steel specimens became greater as the test temperature increased. However, the extent of the weight change at 350 deg C, just below the critical temperature appeared not to be less than those at 550 deg C. And the weight changes of all the F-M steel specimens in the deaerated SCW (for 347 hrs in 100 ppb D.O. for 347 hrs, and in 10 ppb D.O. for 432 hrs) tended to converge to about 1 mgcm{sup -2}. In aerated or deaerated conditions 20Cr Fe-base ODS alloy appeared to be very resistant to a SCW corrosion at all the test temperatures up to 500 hrs. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of 9Cr F-M steels (T91 and T92) was investigated by CERT (Constant Extension Rate Test) in SCW at various temperatures and D.O. levels with different strain rates. T91 did not show any evidence of a SCC in a fully deaerated (below 10 ppb D.O.) SCW at 500, 550, and 600 deg C at the test conditions. T92 specimens were tested at 500 deg C in SCW with different D.O. levels. The strain rate did not seem to affect the SCC behavior of the T92 steel, but D.O. in SCW seems to affect the SCC behavior to some extent. The total elongation of T92 in SCW of 100 ppb or of 500 ppb D.O. was significantly smaller than that at a fully deaerated (below 10 ppb D.O.) SCW (about 15 vs. 20%), and it appears to provide a clue to a SCC on the fracture surface after the CERT test. (authors)

Jinsung, Jang; Seong Sik, Hwang; Chang Hee, Han; Byung Hak, Lee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 150 Deokjin-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

ROOM TEMPERATURE COMPRESSION PROPERTIES OF TWO HEATS OF UNIRRADIATED V-4Cr-4Ti  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vanadium alloys are of interest to the Fusion program as potential first wall structural materials. The expected irradiation conditions for the first wall structural material include a range of temperatures where very high hardening caused by a high density of small, but shearable defect clusters results in a type of deformation called "localized deformation". At the onset of yield in a tensile test, a dislocation may move through a grain shearing the obstacles and clearing out a channel. Subsequent dislocations may easily pass through this channel. As the test progresses, more channels form. In the early stages of deformation, it is thought that the plastic deformation is confined to these channels. One important macroscopic result of this deformation behavior is rapid onset of necking in a tensile test and very low uniform elongation. As a means to help understand the range of stress states where localized deformation may adversely affect macroscopic ductility in vanadium alloys, compression test specimens fabricated from two heats of V-4Cr-4Ti are currently under irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The results of room temperature compression tests on the unirradiated control materials are presented here and compared with uniaxial tensile values from the literature.

Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Kurtz, Richard J.

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

336

Effect of heat treatment on precipitation on V-5Cr-5Ti heat BL63  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The microstructures of V-5Cr-5Ti heat BL63 are compared following heat treatments at 1125{degrees}C for 1 h and 1125{degrees}C for 1 h followed by 890{degrees}C for 24 h. Following the 890{degrees}C treatment, precipitate density was increased due to the presence of a moderate density of highly elongated particles. Microchemical analysis showed that these particles often contained both Ti and V, some particles showed minor amounts of Si, S, and P, but it was also possible to show that these precipitates were enriched in O rather than C or N. Following the 1125{degrees}C heat treatment, only Si was found as a minor impurity in large particles, but S could be identified at grain boundaries, which were coated with a fine distribution of precipitates. The embrittlement observed is ascribed to a combination of interstitial solid solution hardening and grain boundary embrittlement, with interstitial hardening likely the dominant factor.

Gelles, D.S.; Li, H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

FURTHER MICROSTRUCTURAL EXAMINATIONS OF V-4Cr-4Ti PRESSURIZED CREEP TUBES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pressurized thermal creep tubes of V-4Cr-4Ti have been examined following testing in the range 650 to 800°C for tests lasting ~104 h. Creep deformation was found to be controlled by climb-controlled dislocation glide at all temperatures below 800°C whereas at 800°C, sub-grain boundary structure predominated and represented the main obstacle for dislocation motion. At 650 and 700°C after ~104 h an increased density of (Ti,V) oxy-carbo-nitride precipitates near the outer surface extending inwards a distance of 30 and 70 µm, respectively, was found. At 800°C, enhanced (Ti,V) oxy-carbo-nitride precipitation was observed across the entire tube wall thickness and may have affected creep response. Also, evidence for internal precipitation associated with the dislocation structure could be identified. The discussion section addresses differences in the controlling creep mechanisms between grain boundary sliding, sub-grain boundary controlled dislocation climb and individual dislocation climb processes.

Gelles, David S.; Kurtz, Richard J.

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

338

Spatial fractal characteristic of spinodal decomposition in Fe-Cr-Ni duplex stainless steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Owing to the extensive use of duplex stainless steels in areas like chemical and petrochemical industries, considerable interest has arisen concerning the thermal degradation of these materials during service, and the consequent changes on the mechanical properties. The embrittlement of these steels is basically due to the decomposition of the ferrite phase at elevated temperatures, and duplex steels are seldom used at temperatures above 300 C. Although the microstructure of spinodal decomposition has been studied extensively using atom probe, it is interesting to investigate the development of fractal characteristics in the microstructure during spinodal decomposition. In this paper the authors present part of their recent results in this aspect on a duplex stainless steel. The {alpha} and {alpha}{prime} domains evolved from the primary ferrite phase during spinodal decomposition have different morphologies. The {alpha} (Fe-rich) forms the matrix while the {alpha}{prime} (Cr-rich) domains are developed in the form of discrete regions embedded within the {alpha} matrix. The distribution of these domains follows the fractal-growth characteristics with fractal dimensions ranging from 0.1 to 0.2. In addition, there exists a lower critical dimension beyond which the self-similarity of the domains breaks down.

Shek, C.H.; Wong, K.W.; Lai, J.K.L. [City Univ. of Hong Kong (Hong Kong). Dept. of Physics and Materials Science] [City Univ. of Hong Kong (Hong Kong). Dept. of Physics and Materials Science; Shao, Y.Z. [Zhongshan Univ., Guangzhou (China). Dept. of Physics] [Zhongshan Univ., Guangzhou (China). Dept. of Physics

1997-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

Application of NUREG/CR-5999 interim fatigue curves to selected nuclear power plant components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent test data indicate that the effects of the light water reactor (LWR) environment could significantly reduce the fatigue resistance of materials used in the reactor coolant pressure boundary components of operating nuclear power plants. Argonne National Laboratory has developed interim fatigue curves based on test data simulating LWR conditions, and published them in NUREG/CR-5999. In order to assess the significance of these interim fatigue curves, fatigue evaluations of a sample of the components in the reactor coolant pressure boundary of LWRs were performed. The sample consists of components from facilities designed by each of the four U.S. nuclear steam supply system vendors. For each facility, six locations were studied, including two locations on the reactor pressure vessel. In addition, there are older vintage plants where components of the reactor coolant pressure boundary were designed to codes that did not require an explicit fatigue analysis of the components. In order to assess the fatigue resistance of the older vintage plants, an evaluation was also conducted on selected components of three of these plants. This report discusses the insights gained from the application of the interim fatigue curves to components of seven operating nuclear power plants.

Ware, A.G.; Morton, D.K.; Nitzel, M.E. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Magnetic interactions in CoCrPt-oxide based perpendicular magnetic recording media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

First order reversal curves (FORC) method has been reported to be an efficient tool to study interaction between grains and layers of magnetic materials. Although a few studies have been carried out on perpendicular recording media in the past, a study on the effect of systematic variation of exchange interaction in granular perpendicular magnetic recording media on FORC contours has not been carried out in detail. Such a study will help to understand the use of FORC better. In this paper, we have made a systematic set of samples in order to study the variation in exchange coupling and its effect on FORC contours. The pressure during the deposition of the second ruthenium layer and the magnetic layer was varied to alter the separation between the grains and hence the exchange interaction between the grains in the CoCrPt-oxide recording layer. In addition, the thickness of Co-alloy cap layer was used as an additional tool to control the exchange interaction between the magnetic grains. The results indicated that the interaction field obtained from the FORC does not vary in a significant manner when the changes in exchange interaction are small. In comparison, the peak intensity of the FORC shows a clear trend as the exchange coupling is varied, making it a more suitable parameter to study the exchange and magnetostatic interactions in systems such as magnetic recording media.

Tan, H. K.; Varghese, B.; Piramanayagam, S. N., E-mail: prem-SN@dsi.a-star.edu.sg [Data Storage Institute, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A-STAR), Singapore 117608 (Singapore)

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mud cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

High-temperature phase transformation in Cr added TiAl base alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have investigated a microstructure evolution of a Ti-48Al-3.5Cr (in at.%) alloy at high-temperatures ({gt} 1,473K). In the alloy annealed at 1673K for 1.8ks, followed by air-cooling, a characteristic microstructure with a feathery fashion was uniformly formed. From a cooling-rate-controlling study, it was found that formation of the feathery structure is accomplished during continuous cooling from 1673K to 1573K, within the {alpha} + {gamma} two-phase region. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the feathery structure is composed of lamellar colonies (5--10{micro}m) which are crystallographically tilted slightly (a few degree) with their neighbors. A surprising fact is that lamellae in each colony are mostly the {gamma} phase with few {alpha}{sub 2} phase less than 5% in volume. This suggests that the feathery structure is a metastable product and has not resulted from the {alpha} {r{underscore}arrow} {alpha} + {gamma} transformation above 1,573 K. Instead, the feathery structure formation should be attributed to the non-equilibrium {alpha} {r{underscore}arrow} {gamma} transformation which occurs at high-temperatures with a small degree of supercooling. The authors discuss this interesting phase transformation in terms of the {alpha} {r{underscore}arrow} {gamma} massive transformation, based on the continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagram constructed for the present alloy.

Abe, E.; Niinobe, K.; Nobuki, M.; Nakamura, M.; Tsujimoto, T.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Star formation in z>1 3CR host galaxies as seen by Herschel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present Herschel (PACS and SPIRE) far-infrared (FIR) photometry of a complete sample of z>1 3CR sources, from the Herschel GT project The Herschel Legacy of distant radio-loud AGN (PI: Barthel). Combining these with existing Spitzer photometric data, we perform an infrared (IR) spectral energy distribution (SED) analysis of these landmark objects in extragalactic research to study the star formation in the hosts of some of the brightest active galactic nuclei (AGN) known at any epoch. Accounting for the contribution from an AGN-powered warm dust component to the IR SED, about 40% of our objects undergo episodes of prodigious, ULIRG-strength star formation, with rates of hundreds of solar masses per year, coeval with the growth of the central supermassive black hole. Median SEDs imply that the quasar and radio galaxy hosts have similar FIR properties, in agreement with the orientation-based unification for radio-loud AGN. The star-forming properties of the AGN hosts are similar to those of the general popul...

Podigachoski, P; Haas, M; Leipski, C; Wilkes, B; Kuraszkiewicz, J; Westhues, C; Willner, S P; Ashby, M L N; Chini, R; Clements, D L; Fazio, G G; Labiano, A; Lawrence, C; Meisenheimer, K; Peletier, R F; Siebenmorgen, R; Kleijn, G Verdoes

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Phase diagram and magnetocaloric effects in Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}(In{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x}){sub 15} and (Mn{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x})NiGe{sub 1.05} alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The magnetocaloric and thermomagnetic properties of Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}(In{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x}){sub 15} and (Mn{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x}) NiGe{sub 1.05} systems for 0???x???0.105 and 0???x???0.1, respectively, have been studied by x-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, and magnetization measurements. Partial substitution of Cr for Mn in (Mn{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x})NiGe{sub 1.05} results in a first order magnetostructural transition from a hexagonal paramagnetic to an orthorhombic paramagnetic phase near T{sub M}???380?K (for x?=?0.07). Partial substitution of Cr for In in Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}(In{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x}){sub 15} shifts the magnetostructural transition to a higher temperature (T?=?T{sub M}???450?K) for x?=?0.1. Large magnetic entropy changes of ?S?=??12 (J/(kgK)) and ?S?=??11 (J/(kgK)), both for a magnetic field change of 5?T, were observed in the vicinity of T{sub M} for (Mn{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x})NiGe{sub 1.05} and Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}(In{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x}){sub 15}, respectively.

Quetz, Abdiel, E-mail: anorve2002@yahoo.com; Muchharla, Baleeswaraiah; Dubenko, Igor; Talapatra, Saikat; Ali, Naushad [Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois 62901 (United States); Samanta, Tapas; Stadler, Shane [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

344

Using CrAIN Multilayer Coatings to Improve Oxidation Resistance of Steel Interconnects for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stacks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The requirements of low cost and high-tempurature corrosion resistance for bipolar interconnect plates in solid oxide fuel cell stacks has directed attention to the use of metal plates with oxidation resistant coatings. We have investigatedt he performance of steel plates with multilayer coatings consisting of CrN for electrical conductivity and CrAIN for oxidation resistance. The coatings were deposited usin large area filterd arc deposition technolgy, and subsequently annealed in air for up to 25 hours at 800 degrees celsius. The composition, structer and morphology of the coated plates were characterized using RBS, nuclear reaction analysis, AFM and TEM techniques. By altering the architecture of the layers within the coatings, the rate of oxidation was reduced by more than an order of magnitute. Electrical resistance was measured at room temperature.

Smith, Richard J.; Tripp, C.; Knospe, Anders; Ramana, C. V.; Gorokhovsky, Vladimir I.; Shutthanandan, V.; Gelles, David S.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Surface structure and electrochemical characteristics of Ti-V-Cr bcc-type solid solution alloys sintered with Ni  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ti-V-Cr bcc-type solid solution alloys can absorb a large amount of hydrogen and be applied to active materials of the negative electrode in Ni-MH batteries. However, because of the insolubility of Ni into these alloys, the electrochemical characteristics like discharge capacity and cycle life were poor. In order to increase the discharge capacity of hydrogen absorbing alloy electrodes, Ti-V-Cr bcc-type alloy powders were sintered with Ni in order to form Ni contained surface layer on the alloy surface. As sintering temperature rose up, the surface composition changed from TiNi to Ti{sub 2}Ni. TiNi surface layer showed better electrochemical characteristics. For the Ni adding method, Ni electroless plating was preferred because of good adhesion. As a result of optimized conditions, a discharge capacity of 570 mAh/g and an improvement of cycle life were achieved.

Tsuji, Yoichiro; Yamamoto, Osamu; Matsuda, Hiromu; Toyoguchi, Yoshinori

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Demonstrations of diode-pumped and grating-tuned ZnSe:Cr{sup 2+} lasers. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A diode-side-pumped ZnSe:Cr{sup 2+} laser was operated with a 75 - Watt peak power 1.65 {micro}m InGaAsP/InP pump array. The laser was configured with a ``single-bounce`` architecture to maximize its round-trip gain. Peak output powers of {approx}0.3 Watt were obtained with a 10% - transmitting output coupler and a lightly-doped crystal. The estimated ``mode fill`` of {approx}0.06 will increase with Cr{sup 2+} concentration, raising the output power and extraction efficiency. With a grating tuner and MgF{sub 2}:Co{sup 2+} laser pumping, the laser tuned throughout the 2134 - 2799 nm range.

Page, R.H.; Skidmore, J.A.; Schaffers, K.I.; Beach, R.J.; Payne, S.A.; Krupke, W.F.

1997-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

347

Cr, N-Codoped TiO2 Mesoporous Microspheres for Li-ion Rechargeable Batteries with Enhanced Electrochemical Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cr,N-codoped TiO2 mesoporous microspheres synthesized using hydrothermal and subsequent nitridation treatment, exhibited higher solubility of nitrogen, and improved electrical conductivity than N-doped TiO2, as anode for Lithium-ion rechargeable batteries, which led to improving charge-discharge capacity at 0.1 C and twice higher rate capability compared to that of nitrogen-doped TiO2 mesoporous microsphere at 10 C

Bi, Zhonghe [ORNL] [ORNL; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [ORNL] [ORNL; Guo, Bingkun [ORNL] [ORNL; Unocic, Raymond R [ORNL] [ORNL; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL] [ORNL; Bridges, Craig A [ORNL] [ORNL; Sun, Xiao-Guang [ORNL] [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Last update: 3/13/12 SYN COURSE SEC TITLE FAC ROOM TY DAY START END CR PREREQ NOTES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

END CR PREREQ NOTES 9524 ENGL 190A 1W Afro-Caribbean Studies Wilkerson HOLL 217 CLS MWF 03:00PM 04 0 Independent Study Staff 1-4 Permission Required 7186 ENGL 290A 1W American Literary Traditions Askeland HOLL 217 CLS MWF 12:40PM 01:40PM 4 ENGL 170, ENGL 180A or ENGL 190A/C 9599 ENGL 380A 1W The Beat

Bogaerts, Steven

349

AN UNBIASED SPECTRAL LINE SURVEY TOWARD R CrA IRS7B IN THE 345 GHz WINDOW WITH ASTE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have conducted a spectral line survey in the 332-364 GHz region with the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment 10 m telescope toward R CrA IRS7B, a low-mass protostar in the Class 0 or Class 0/I transitional stage. We have also performed some supplementary observations in the 450 GHz band. In total, 16 molecular species are identified in the 332-364 GHz region. Strong emission lines of CN and CCH are observed, whereas complex organic molecules and long carbon-chain molecules, which are characteristics of hot corino and warm carbon-chain chemistry (WCCC) source, respectively, are not detected. The rotation temperature of CH{sub 3}OH is evaluated to be 31 K, which is significantly lower than that reported for the prototypical hot corino IRAS 16293-2422 ({approx}85 K). The deuterium fractionation ratios for CCH and H{sub 2}CO are obtained to be 0.038 and 0.050, respectively, which are much lower than those in the hot corino. These results suggest a weak hot corino activity in R CrA IRS7B. On the other hand, the carbon-chain related molecules, CCH and c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2}, are found to be abundant. However, this source cannot be classified as a WCCC source, since long carbon-chain molecules are not detected. If WCCC and hot corino chemistry represent the two extremes in chemical compositions of low-mass Class 0 sources, R CrA IRS7B would be a source with a mixture of these two chemical characteristics. The UV radiation from the nearby Herbig Ae star R CrA may also affect the chemical composition. The present line survey demonstrates further chemical diversity in low-mass star-forming regions.

Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Sakai, Nami; Yamamoto, Satoshi [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033 (Japan); Lindberg, Johan E.; Bisschop, Suzanne E. [Centre for Star and Planet Formation, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Oster Voldgade 5-7, DK-1350 Copenhagen K. (Denmark); Jorgensen, Jes K. [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen O. (Denmark)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Deformation Behavior of Laser Welds in High Temperature Oxidation Resistant Fe-Cr-Al Alloys for Fuel Cladding Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ferritic-structured Fe-Cr-Al alloys are being developed and show promise as oxidation resistant accident tolerant light water reactor fuel cladding. This study focuses on investigating the weldability of three model alloys in a range of Fe-(13-17.5)Cr-(3-4.4)Al in weight percent with a minor addition of yttrium using laser-welding techniques. A detailed study on the mechanical performance of bead-on-plate welds has been carried out to determine the performance of welds as a function of alloy composition. Laser welding resulted in a defect free weld devoid of cracking or inclusions for all alloys studied. Results indicated a reduction in the yield strength within the fusion zone compared to the base metal. Yield strength reduction was found to be primarily constrained to the fusion zone due to grain coarsening with a less severe reduction in the heat affected zone. No significant correlation was found between the deformation behavior/mechanical performance of welds and the level of Cr or Al in the alloy ranges studied.

Field, Kevin G [ORNL; Gussev, Maxim N [ORNL; Yamamoto, Yukinori [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

High Temperature Thermal Stability and Oxidation Resistance of Magnetron-sputtered Homogeneous CrAlON Coatings on 430 Steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The requirements of low cost and high-temperature corrosion resistance for bipolar interconnect plates in solid oxide fuel cell stacks has directed attention to the use of metal plates with oxidation resistant coatings. We have investigated the performance of steel plates with homogenous coatings of CrAlON (oxynitrides). The coatings were deposited using RF magnetron sputtering, with Ar as a sputtering gas. Oxygen in these coatings was not intentionally added. Oxygen might have come through contaminated nitrogen gas bottle, leak in the chamber or from the partial pressure of water vapors. Nitrogen was added during the growth process to get oxynitride coating. The Cr/Al composition ratio in the coatings was varied in a combinatorial approach. The coatings were subsequently annealed in air for up to 25 hours at 800 deg. C. The composition of the coated plates and the rate of oxidation were characterized using Rutherford backscattering (RBS) and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). From our results, we conclude that Al rich coatings are more susceptible to oxidation than Cr rich coatings.

Kayani, A.; Wickey, K. J.; Nandasiri, M. I.; Moore, A.; Garratt, E.; AlFaify, S.; Gao, X. [Western Michigan University-Kalamazoo, MI 49008 (United States); Smith, R. J.; Buchanan, T. L.; Priyantha, W.; Kopczyk, M.; Gannon, P. E. [Montana State University-Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Gorokhovsky, V. I. [Arcomac Surface Engineering, LLC-Bozeman, MT 59715 (United States)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

352

Formation of Delta Ferrite in 9 Wt Pct Cr Steel Investigated by In-Situ X-Ray Diffraction Using Synchrotron Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Formation of Delta Ferrite in 9 Wt Pct Cr Steel Investigatedthe formation of delta ferrite in a martensitic 9 wt pctaustenite, and delta ferrite were measured as a function of

Mayr, P.; Palmer, T.A.; Elmer, J.W.; Specht, E.D.; Allen, S.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

QUEST: QUantum Electron Simulation Toolbox C.-R. Lee1,10 S. Chiesa2, C. N. Varney3,4, E. Khatami3, Z. Bai5,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

QUEST: QUantum Electron Simulation Toolbox C.-R. Lee1,10 S. Chiesa2, C. N. Varney3,4, E. Khatami3 use of standing electromagnetic waves causes the atoms to e

Bai, Zhaojun

354

A Conceptual model of coupled biogeochemical and hydrogeological processes affected by in situ Cr(VI) bioreduction in groundwater at Hanford 100H Site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Groundwater at Hanford 100H Site B.Faybishenko, P.E.Long,Cr(VI) contaminated groundwater at Hanford 100H site. A slowHRC TM ), was injected in Hanford sediments to stimulate

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Search for pentaquark partners [Theta]??, [Sigma]? and N? in H (e,e'K [pi])) X reactions at Jefferson Lab Hall A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In 1997, D. Diakonov et al. using a soliton model predicted a SU(3)F flavor antide-cuplet of pentaquarks. The most striking prediction using this symmetry group is a narrow exotic state, E+(1540), which has quark component ...

Qiang, Yi, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

tEEK TRANSACJ'JONS ON AUTOMATIC CONTROL. VOL. 36, NO. 7. JULY 1991890 J. C. Jtsangand E. A. Jonckheere, "On compudng the spxtrsd nw.fiua  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

! Equations. ErtglewnodCliffs. NJ: Prentice-Hall. 1964. C. Kenney and G. Hewer, "The senslrivity of the afgebraic and differential Riccati equations," Slit&f J. Corer. Oprimiz., vol. 28, Pp. 50-69., 1990. G. WBM Corporation under the SUR Contract SL 88086, D.S.T.O. of Australia, and by Boeing (WAC). R. Horowitz and W

Moore, John Barratt

357

Role of microbial exopolymeric substances (EPS) on chromium sorption and transport in heterogeneous subsurface soils: I. Cr(III) complexation with EPS in aqueous solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chromium (III) binding by exopolymeric substances (EPS) isolated from Pseudomonas putida P18, Pseudomonas aeruginosa P16 and Pseudomonas stutzeri P40 strains were investigated by the determination of conditional stability constants and the concentration of functional groups using the ion-exchange experiments and potentiometric titrations. Spectroscopic (EXAFS) analysis was also used to obtain information on the nature of Cr(III) binding with EPS functional groups. The data from ion-exchange experiments and potentiometric titrations were evaluated using a non-electrostatic discrete ligand approach. The modeling results show that the acid/base properties of EPSs can be best characterized by invoking four different types of acid functional groups with arbitrarily assigned pK{sub a} values of 4, 6, 8 and 10. The analysis of ion-exchange data using the discrete ligand approach suggests that while the Cr binding by EPS from P. aeruginosa can be successfully described based on a reaction stoichiometry of 1:2 between Cr(III) and HL{sub 2} monoprotic ligands, the accurate description of Cr binding by EPSs extracted from P. putida and P. stutzeri requires postulation of 1:1 Cr(III)-ligand complexes with HL{sub 2} and HL{sub 3} monoprotic ligands, respectively. These results indicate that the carboxyl and/or phosphoric acid sites contribute to Cr(III) binding by microbial EPS, as also confirmed by EXAFS analysis performed in the current study. Overall, this study highlights the need for incorporation of Cr-EPS interactions into transport and speciation models to more accurately assess microbial Cr(VI) reduction and chromium transport in subsurface systems, including microbial reactive treatment barriers.

Kantar, C.; Dodge, C.; Demiray, H.; Dogan, N.M.

2011-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

358

Role of Microbial Exopolymeric Substances (EPS) on Chromium Sorption and Transport in Heterogeneous Subsurface Soils: I. Cr(III) Complexation with EPS in Aqueous Solution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chromium (III) binding by exopolymeric substances (EPS) isolated from Pseudomonas putida P18, Pseudomonas aeruginosa P16 and Pseudomonas stutzeri P40 strains were investigated by the determination of conditional stability constants and the concentration of functional groups using the ion-exchange experiments and potentiometric titrations. Spectroscopic (EXAFS) analysis was also used to obtain information on the nature of Cr(III) binding with EPS functional groups. The data from ion-exchange experiments and potentiometric titrations were evaluated using a non-electrostatic discrete ligand approach. The modeling results show that the acid/base properties of EPSs can be best characterized by invoking four different types of acid functional groups with arbitrarily assigned pK{sub a} values of 4, 6, 8 and 10. The analysis of ion-exchange data using the discrete ligand approach suggests that while the Cr binding by EPS from P. aeruginosa can be successfully described based on a reaction stoichiometry of 1:2 between Cr(III) and HL{sub 2} monoprotic ligands, the accurate description of Cr binding by EPSs extracted from P. putida and P. stutzeri requires postulation of 1:1 Cr(III)-ligand complexes with HL{sub 2} and HL{sub 3} monoprotic ligands, respectively. These results indicate that the carboxyl and/or phosphoric acid sites contribute to Cr(III) binding by microbial EPS, as also confirmed by EXAFS analysis performed in the current study. Overall, this study highlights the need for incorporation of Cr-EPS interactions into transport and speciation models to more accurately assess microbial Cr(VI) reduction and chromium transport in subsurface systems, including microbial reactive treatment barriers.

C Kantar; H Demiray; N Dogan; C Dodge

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

359

X-ray spectroscopic application of Cr/Sc periodic multilayers K. Le Guen, H. Maury, J.-M. Andr, P. Jonnard, A. Hardouin et al.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray spectroscopic application of Cr/Sc periodic multilayers K. Le Guen, H. Maury, J.-M. André, P://apl.aip.org/about/rights_and_permissions #12;X-ray spectroscopic application of Cr/Sc periodic multilayers K. Le Guen,a H. Maury, J.-M. André-Paris 6, UMR-CNRS 7614, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, F-75231 Paris Cedex 05, France A. Hardouin, F

360

Giant magnetoresistive structures based on CrO{sub 2} with epitaxial RuO{sub 2} as the spacer layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Epitaxial ruthenium dioxide (RuO{sub 2})/chromium dioxide(CrO{sub 2}) thin film heterostructures have been grown on (100)-TiO{sub 2} substrates by chemical vapor deposition. Both current-in-plane (CIP) and current-perpendicular-to-plane (CPP) giant magnetoresistive stacks were fabricated with either Co or another epitaxial CrO{sub 2} layer as the top electrode. The Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} barrier, which forms naturally on CrO{sub 2} surfaces, is no longer present after the RuO{sub 2} deposition, resulting in a highly conductive interface that has a resistance at least four orders of magnitude lower. However, only very limited magnetoresistance (MR) was observed. Such low MR is due to the appearance of a chemically and magnetically disordered layer at the CrO{sub 2} and RuO{sub 2} interfaces when Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} is transformed into rutile structures during its intermixing with RuO{sub 2}.

Miao, G.X.; Gupta, A.; Sims, H.; Butler, W.H.; Ghosh, S.; Xiao Gang [Physics Department, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States); Center for Materials for Information Technology, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States); Physics Department, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States)

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mud cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Investigations of the electronic and magnetic structures of Co{sub 2}YGa (Y=Cr, Mn) Heusler alloys and their (100) surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Density functional theory calculations are performed to investigate the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of bulk structures of Co{sub 2}YGa (Y?=?Cr, Mn) Heusler alloys and the surfaces along the (100) orientation. The bulk structures of both alloys show a ferromagnetic behavior with total magnetic moments of 3.03?{sub B} and 4.09?{sub B} and high spin polarizations of 99% and 67% for Co{sub 2}CrGa and Co{sub 2}MnGa, respectively. The surfaces are found to exhibit corrugations due to different relaxations of the surface atoms. For the case of Co{sub 2}CrGa, two surfaces preserve the half metallicity, namely those with Cr-Ga and Ga– terminations with high spin polarizations above 90%, whereas it dropped to about 50% for the other surfaces. However, the spin polarizations of Co-Co and Mn-Ga terminated surfaces remain close to that of bulk Co{sub 2}MnGa alloy, whereas it is suppressed down to 17% for Co– termination. The highest local magnetic moments are found to be 3.26??{sub B} and 4.11??{sub B} for Cr and Mn surface atoms in Cr-Ga and Mn– terminated surfaces, respectively.

Hamad, Bothina, E-mail: b.hamad@ju.edu.jo [Physics Department, The University of Jordan, Amman-11942 (Jordan)

2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

362

Strain-Induced Bond Buckling and Its Role in Insulating Properties of Cr-Doped V{sub 2}O{sub 3}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Structural transformations around both V and Cr atoms in (V{sub 1-x}Cr{sub x}){sub 2}O{sub 3} across its metal-insulator transition (MIT) at x{approx}0.01 are studied by extended x-ray absorption fine-structure technique. Our new results for Cr made possible by the use of a novel x-ray analyzer that we developed reveal the substitutional mechanism of Cr doping. We find that this system has a buckled structure with short Cr-V and long V-V bonds. This system of bonds is disordered around the average trigonal lattice ascertained by x-ray diffraction. Such local distortions can result in a long range strain field that sets in around dilute Cr atoms in microscopic regions. We suggest that such locally strained regions should be insulating even at small x. The possibility of local insulating regions within a metallic phase, first suggested by Rice and Brinkman in 1972, remains unaccounted for in modern MIT theories.

Frenkel, A. I. [Department of Physics, Yeshiva University, New York, New York 10016 (United States); Pease, D. M.; Budnick, J. I.; Shanthakumar, P.; Huang, T. [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269 (United States); Metcalf, P. [Department of Materials Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Stern, E. A. [Department of Physics, Box 351560, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

2006-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

363

Laser welding and post weld treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steel.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser welding and post weld laser treatment of modified 9Cr-1MoVNb steels (Grade P91) were performed in this preliminary study to investigate the feasibility of using laser welding process as a potential alternative to arc welding methods for solving the Type IV cracking problem in P91 steel welds. The mechanical and metallurgical testing of the pulsed Nd:YAG laser-welded samples shows the following conclusions: (1) both bead-on-plate and circumferential butt welds made by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser show good welds that are free of microcracks and porosity. The narrow heat affected zone has a homogeneous grain structure without conventional soft hardness zone where the Type IV cracking occurs in conventional arc welds. (2) The laser weld tests also show that the same laser welder has the potential to be used as a multi-function tool for weld surface remelting, glazing or post weld tempering to reduce the weld surface defects and to increase the cracking resistance and toughness of the welds. (3) The Vicker hardness of laser welds in the weld and heat affected zone was 420-500 HV with peak hardness in the HAZ compared to 240 HV of base metal. Post weld laser treatment was able to slightly reduce the peak hardness and smooth the hardness profile, but failed to bring the hardness down to below 300 HV due to insufficient time at temperature and too fast cooling rate after the time. Though optimal hardness of weld made by laser is to be determined for best weld strength, methods to achieve the post weld laser treatment temperature, time at the temperature and slow cooling rate need to be developed. (4) Mechanical testing of the laser weld and post weld laser treated samples need to be performed to evaluate the effects of laser post treatments such as surface remelting, glazing, re-hardening, or tempering on the strength of the welds.

Xu, Z. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

364

Structural and Spectroscopic Characterization of 17- and 18-Electron Piano-Stool Complexes of Chromium. Thermochemical Analyses of Weak Cr-H Bonds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 17-electron radical CpCr(CO)2(IMe)• (IMe = 1,3-dimethylimidazol-2-ylidene) was synthesized by the reaction of IMe with [CpCr(CO)3]2, and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction and by EPR, IR and variable temperature 1H NMR spectroscopy. The metal-centered radical is monomeric under all conditions and exhibits Curie paramagnetic behavior in solution. An electrochemically reversible reduction to 18-electron CpCr(CO)2(IMe)? takes place at E½ = ?1.89(1) V vs Cp2Fe+•/0 in MeCN, and was accomplished chemically with KC8 in THF. The salts K+(18-crown-6)[CpCr(CO)2(IMe)]? • ½THF and K+[CpCr(CO)2(IMe)]? • ¾THF were crystallographically characterized. Monomeric ion pairs are found in the former, whereas the latter has a polymeric structure due to a network of K???O(CO) interactions. Protonation of K+(18-crown-6)[CpCr(CO)2(IMe)]? • ½THF gives the hydride CpCr(CO)2(IMe)H, which could not be isolated, but was characterized in solution; a pKa of 27.2(4) was determined in MeCN. A thermochemical analysis provides the Cr-H bond dissociation free energy (BDFE) for CpCr(CO)2(IMe)H in MeCN solution as 47.3(6) kcal mol?1. This value is exceptionally low for a transition metal hydride, and implies that the reaction 2 [Cr-H] ? 2 [Cr•] + H2 is exergonic (?G = ?9.0(8) kcal mol?1). This analysis explains the experimental observation that generated solutions of the hydride produce CpCr(CO)2(IMe)• (typically on the timescale of days). By contrast, CpCr(CO)2(PCy3)H has a higher Cr-H BDFE (52.9(4) kcal mol?1), is more stable with respect to H2 loss, and is isolable. We thank the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences for support. M.L.H. carried out the crystallographic studies and was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. The EPR studies were performed at the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research located at PNNL. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is a multiprogram national laboratory operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

van der Eide, Edwin F.; Helm, Monte L.; Walter, Eric D.; Bullock, R. Morris

2013-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

365

Precipitation sensitivity to alloy composition in Fe-Cr-Mn austenitic steels developed for reduced activation for fusion application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Special austenitic steels are being designed in which alloying elements like Mo, Nb, and Ni are replaced with Mn, W, V, Ti, and/or Ta to reduce the long-term radioactivity induced by fusion reactor irradiation. However, the new steels still need to have properties otherwise similar to commercial steels like type 316. Precipitation strongly affects strength and radiation-resistance in austenitic steels during irradiation at 400--600/degree/C, and precipitation is also usually quite sensitive to alloy composition. The initial stage of development was to define a base Fe-Cr-Mn-C composition that formed stable austenite after annealing and cold-working, and resisted recovery or excessive formation of coarse carbide and intermetallic phases during elevated temperature annealing. These studies produced a Fe-12Cr-20Mn-0.25C base alloy. The next stage was to add the minor alloying elements W, Ti, V, P, and B for more strength and radiation-resistance. One of the goals was to produce fine MC precipitation behavior similar to the Ti-modified Fe-Cr-Ni prime candidate alloy (PCA). Additions of Ti+V+P+B produced fine MC precipitation along network dislocations and recovery/recrystallization resistance in 20% cold worked material aged at 800/degree/C for 166h, whereas W, Ti, W+Ti, or Ti+P+B additions did not. Addition of W+Ti+V+P+B also produced fine MC, but caused some sigma phase formation and more recrystallization as well. 29 refs., 14 figs., 9 tabs.

Maziasz, P.J.; Klueh, R.L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Prediction and Monitoring Systems of Creep-Fracture Behavior of 9Cr-1Mo Steels for Teactor Pressure Vessels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A recent workshop on next-generation nuclear plant (NGNP) topics underscored the need for research studies on the creep fracture behavior of two materials under consideration for reactor pressure vessel (RPV) applications: 9Cr-1Mo and SA-5XX steels. This research project will provide a fundamental understanding of creep fracture behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel welds for through modeling and experimentation and will recommend a design for an RPV structural health monitoring system. Following are the specific objectives of this research project: • Characterize metallurgical degradation in welded modified 9Cr-1Mo steel resulting from aging processes and creep service conditions. • Perform creep tests and characterize the mechanisms of creep fracture process. • Quantify how the microstructure degradation controls the creep strength of welded steel specimens. • Perform finite element (FE) simulations using polycrystal plasticity to understand how grain texture affects the creep fracture properties of welds. • Develop a microstructure-based creep fracture model to estimate RPVs service life . • Manufacture small, prototypic, cylindrical pressure vessels, subject them to degradation by aging, and measure their leak rates. • Simulate damage evolution in creep specimens by FE analyses. • Develop a model that correlates gas leak rates from welded pressure vessels with the amount of microstructural damage. • Perform large-scale FE simulations with a realistic microstructure to evaluate RPV performance at elevated temperatures and creep strength. • Develop a fracture model for the structural integrity of RPVs subjected to creep loads. • Develop a plan for a non-destructive structural health monitoring technique and damage detection device for RPVs.

Potirniche, Gabriel; Barlow, Fred D.; Charit, Indrajit; Rink, Karl

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

367

Microstructural examination of V-(3-6%)Cr-(3-5%)Ti irradiated in the ATR-A1 experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microstructural examination results are reported for four heats of V-(3-6%)Cr-(3-5%)Ti irradiated in the ATR-A1 experiment to {approximately}4 dpa at {approximately}200 and 300 C to provide an understanding of the microstructural evolution that may be associated with degradation of mechanical properties. Fine precipitates were observed in high density intermixed with small defect clusters for all conditions examined following the irradiation. The irradiation-induced precipitation does not appear to be affected by preirradiation heat treatment or composition.

Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Intracavity laser spectroscopy with a semiconductor disk laser-pumped cw Cr{sup 2+} : ZnSe laser  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Absorption spectra of the air have been measured near 2.31 ?m using intracavity laser spectroscopy with a semiconductor disk laser-pumped cw Cr{sup 2+} : ZnSe laser. It is shown that, at lasing times of at least 3 ms, the sensitivity of the laser to intracavity absorption increases. This allows one to reach an effective path length of 900 km and enables detection of weak lines with absorption coefficients down to 1 × 10{sup -9} cm{sup -1}. (laser spectroscopy)

Kozlovsky, V I; Korostelin, Yu V; Podmar'kov, Yu P; Skasyrsky, Ya K; Frolov, M P [P N Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Okhotnikov, O G [Optoelectronics Research Center, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere (Finland); Akimov, V A [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Dolgoprudnyi, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

369

Application of USNRC NUREG/CR-6661 and draft DG-1108 to evolutionary and advanced reactor designs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the seismic design of evolutionary and advanced nuclear reactor power plants, there are definite financial advantages in the application of USNRC NUREG/CR-6661 and draft Regulatory Guide DG-1108. NUREG/CR-6661, 'Benchmark Program for the Evaluation of Methods to Analyze Non-Classically Damped Coupled Systems', was by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the USNRC, and Draft Regulatory Guide DG-1108 is the proposed revision to the current Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.92, Revision 1, 'Combining Modal Responses and Spatial Components in Seismic Response Analysis'. The draft Regulatory Guide DG-1108 is available at http://members.cox.net/apolloconsulting, which also provides a link to the USNRC ADAMS site to search for NUREG/CR-6661 in text file or image file. The draft Regulatory Guide DG-1108 removes unnecessary conservatism in the modal combinations for closely spaced modes in seismic response spectrum analysis. Its application will be very helpful in coupled seismic analysis for structures and heavy equipment to reduce seismic responses and in piping system seismic design. In the NUREG/CR-6661 benchmark program, which investigated coupled seismic analysis of structures and equipment or piping systems with different damping values, three of the four participants applied the complex mode solution method to handle different damping values for structures, equipment, and piping systems. The fourth participant applied the classical normal mode method with equivalent weighted damping values to handle differences in structural, equipment, and piping system damping values. Coupled analysis will reduce the equipment responses when equipment, or piping system and structure are in or close to resonance. However, this reduction in responses occurs only if the realistic DG-1108 modal response combination method is applied, because closely spaced modes will be produced when structure and equipment or piping systems are in or close to resonance. Otherwise, the conservatism in the current Regulatory Guide 1.92, Revision 1, will overshadow the advantage of coupled analysis. All four participants applied the realistic modal combination method of DG-1108. Consequently, more realistic and reduced responses were obtained. (authors)

Chang 'Apollo', Chen [Apollo Consulting, Inc., Surprise, AZ 85374-4605 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Corrections and additions to the User's Guide for SNAP (NUREG/CR-1245, SAND80-0315). [BSTAT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains corrections and additions to the User's Guide for SNAP (NUREG/CR-1245, SAND80-0315). These update the SNAP report so that it documents the most current version of SNAP. An additional program, BATLE Statistics (BSTAT), is described here. It provides a post-processing capability to analyze engagement data from SNAP simulations. The work documented by this report was performed by Pritsker and Associates, Inc., under contract to Sandia National Laboratories for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research and the US Naval Surface Weapons Center.

Polito, J.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Last update: 3/22/2011 SYN COURSE SEC TITLE FAC ROOM TY DAY START END CR PREREQ NOTES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

201A 1W Inro to Afria and the Diaspora Bailey HOLL 315 CLS MSF 11:30AM 12:30PM 4 1449 AFDS 201C 1W of Chair/Director 1232 ENGL 190A 1W AfroCaribbean Studies Wilkerson HOLL 217 CLS MWF 01:50PM 02:50PM 4 ENGL 06:30PM 09:30PM 4 SYN COURSE SEC TITLE FAC ROOM TY DAY START END CR PREREQ NOTES 4406 ENGL 180A 1W

Bogaerts, Steven

372

Microstructural aspects of low-pressure plasma-sprayed CoNiCrAlY coating on Hastelloy X  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Co-32Ni-21Cr-8Al-0.5Y alloy coating plasma sprayed on Hastelloy X. The microstructure of the coating layer consist of ..gamma.. phase solid solution, ..gamma..' phase, and Y-rich intermetallic phase. This coating exhibits excellent oxidation and sulfidation resistance after exposure in air and in sodium sulfate at 1,000/sup 0/C for 60 h, due to the formation of ..cap alpha..-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ oxide scale. However, the presence of chloride in the sodium sulfate leads to rupture of the aluminium oxide scale, and this results in the precipitation of chlorides and sulfides within the coating layer.

Tjong, S.C.; Shih, G.E.; Ho, N.J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Electrical spin injection using GaCrN in a GaN based spin light emitting diode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have demonstrated electrical spin-injection from GaCrN dilute magnetic semiconductor (DMS) in a GaN-based spin light emitting diode (spin-LED). The remanent in-plane magnetization of the thin-film semiconducting ferromagnet has been used for introducing the spin polarized electrons into the non-magnetic InGaN quantum well. The output circular polarization obtained from the spin-LED closely follows the normalized in-plane magnetization curve of the DMS. A saturation circular polarization of ?2.5% is obtained at 200?K.

Banerjee, D.; Ganguly, S.; Saha, D., E-mail: dipankarsaha@iitb.ac.in [Centre of Excellence in Nanoelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); IITB-Monash Research Academy, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Adari, R.; Sankaranarayan, S.; Kumar, A. [Centre of Excellence in Nanoelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India)] [Centre of Excellence in Nanoelectronics, Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Aldhaheri, R. W.; Hussain, M. A.; Balamesh, A. S. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

374

Epitaxial Cr on n-SrTiO3(001)&mdash;An ideal Ohmic contact . | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy and Assistance EnvironmentalEnzymeEnzymeCr on

375

Fluid diversion and sweep improvement with chemical gels in oil recovery processes. [Four types of gels: resorcinol-formaldehyde; colloidal silica; Cr sup 3+ (chloride)-xanthan; and Cr sup 3+ (acetate)-polyacrylamide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this project were to identify the mechanisms by which gel treatments divert fluids in reservoirs and to establish where and how gel treatments are best applied. Several different types of gelants were examined, including polymer-based gelants, a monomer-based gelant, and a colloidal-silica gelant. This research was directed at gel applications in water injection wells, in production wells, and in high-pressure gas floods. The work examined how the flow properties of gels and gelling agents are influenced by permeability, lithology, and wettability. Other goals included determining the proper placement of gelants, the stability of in-place gels, and the types of gels required for the various oil recovery processes and for different scales of reservoir heterogeneity. During this three-year project, a number of theoretical analyses were performed to determine where gel treatments are expected to work best and where they are not expected to be effective. The most important, predictions from these analyses are presented. Undoubtedly, some of these predictions will be controversial. However, they do provide a starting point in establishing guidelines for the selection of field candidates for gel treatments. A logical next step is to seek field data that either confirm or contradict these predictions. The experimental work focused on four types of gels: (1) resorcinol-formaldehyde, (2) colloidal silica, (3) Cr{sup 3+}(chloride)-xanthan, and (4) Cr{sup 3+}(acetate)-polyacrylamide. All experiments were performed at 41{degrees}C.

Seright, R.S.; Martin, F.D.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Putative quantum criticality in the (Cr{sub 90}Ir{sub 10}){sub 100?y}V{sub y} alloy system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantum criticality (QC) in spin-density-wave antiferromagnetic Cr and Cr alloy systems is a topic of current interest. In the present study, V was used as a tuning parameter to drive the Néel transition temperature (T{sub N}) of the (Cr{sub 90}Ir{sub 10}){sub 100?y}V{sub y} alloy series with 0???y???14.3 to zero and search for effects of QC in the process. The magnetic properties and possible QC behaviour (QCB) in this alloy system were investigated through electrical resistivity (?), specific heat (C{sub p}), and susceptibility (?) measurements as a function of temperature (T), indicating that T{sub N} is suppressed to zero at a critical concentration y{sub c}???9. The Sommerfeld coefficient (?) is considered a key indicator of QCB and a peak is observed in ?(y) at y{sub c} on decreasing y through this concentration, followed by a sharp decreasing trend. This behaviour is reminiscent of that observed for ? of the prototypical Cr{sub 100?x}V{sub x} QC system and allows for the classification of y{sub c} in the (Cr{sub 90}Ir{sub 10}){sub 100?y}V{sub y} alloy system as a possible QC point.

Fernando, P. R.; Prinsloo, A. R. E., E-mail: alettap@uj.ac.za; Sheppard, C. J. [Department of Physics, University of Johannesburg, PO Box 524, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa); Lodya, L. [Sasol Technology, Research and Development, 1 Klasie Havenga Road, Sasolburg 1947 (South Africa)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

377

Report No. 1: Effect of carbon migration in Cr-Mo weldments on metallurgical structure and mechanical properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The occurrence and behavior of a carbon denuded ``soft`` zone in Cr-Mo weldments was studied to determine its influence on mechanical properties and in-service behavior. Room temperature tensile tests, creep rupture tests and Moire interferometry evaluations were performed in order to characterize the behavior of this unique zone in Cr-Mo weldments. The zone is brought about by chromium level differentials between the weld metal and base metal. Extensive metallography was accomplished using OLM, SEM and STEM techniques. The results show that the occurrence of the carbon denuded ``soft`` zone is due to carbon migration, which is driven by elemental differences (especially in chromium) between the weld metal and base metal. The extent of carbon migration depends on the PWHT schedule. Higher strain accumulation and work hardening and/or a constraint effect has been observed in the ``soft`` zone during room temperature testing. However, the work hardening/constraint effect is minimal at elevated temperatures (in the creep regime), hence the ``soft`` zone is a potential failure location in elevated temperature service.

Lundin, C.D.; Khan, K.K.; Yang, D. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Compatibility of V/Y2O3/V-4Cr-4Ti Coatings with Liquid Flowing Li  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characterization was performed on two-layer V/Y2O3 coatings deposited on V-4Cr-4Ti and exposed to Li in a thermal convection loop at 400 -700 C for 2,350h. The coatings exposed at lower temperatures ( 504 C) showed adequate electrical resistivity at 500 C in vacuum after exposure and the morphology of the Y2O3 layer was unchanged. XPS and EELS analysis showed no indication of Li penetration to the oxide layer after exposure at 437 C. However, coatings exposed at higher temperatures ( 565 C) showed higher conductivity after exposure and a change in the Y2O3 grain morphology was apparent using TEM. At the highest temperature, a continuous layer of recrystallized oxide grains was observed adjacent to the substrate suggesting that a reaction occurred between Y2O3 and V-4Cr-4Ti rather than Li infiltration. However, no layer formed during a 2,350h anneal at 700 C of an unexposed coating.

Unocic, Kinga A [ORNL; Leonard, Donovan N [ORNL; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL; Lance, Michael J [ORNL; Pint, Bruce A [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Multiferroic CuCrO{sub 2} under high pressure: In situ X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopic studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The compression behavior of delafossite compound CuCrO{sub 2} has been investigated by in situ x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopic measurements up to 23.2 and 34?GPa, respectively. X-ray diffraction data show the stability of ambient rhombohedral structure up to ?23?GPa. Material shows large anisotropy in axial compression with c-axis compressibility, ?{sub c}?=?1.26?×?10{sup ?3}(1) GPa{sup ?1} and a-axis compressibility, ?{sub a}?=?8.90?×?10{sup ?3}(6) GPa{sup ?1}. Our XRD data show an irreversible broadening of diffraction peaks. Pressure volume data when fitted to 3rd order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state give the value of bulk modulus, B{sub 0}?=?156.7(2.8) GPa with its pressure derivative, B{sub 0}{sup ?} as 5.3(0.5). All the observed vibrational modes in Raman measurements show hardening with pressure. Appearance of a new mode at ?24?GPa indicates the structural phase transition in the compound. Our XRD and Raman results indicate that CuCrO{sub 2} may be transforming to an ordered rocksalt type structure under compression.

Garg, Alka B., E-mail: alkagarg@barc.gov.in; Mishra, A. K.; Pandey, K. K.; Sharma, Surinder M. [High Pressure and Synchrotron Radiation Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

380

Role of Triple Phonon Excitations on Large Angle Quasi-elastic Scattering of {sup 54}Cr+{sup 208}Pb System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the large angle quasi-elastic scattering of {sup 54}Cr+{sup 208}Pb system in terms of the full-order coupled-channels formalism. We especially investigate the role of single, double and triple phonon excitations on quasi-elastic scattering cross section as well as quasi-elastic barrier distribution of this system for which the experimental data have been measured. It is shown that the triple phonon excitations both in {sup 54}Cr and {sup 208}Pb nuclei seem to be needed by the present coupled-channels calculations in order to reproduce the experimental data of quasi-elastic cross section and barrier distribution for the {sup 54}Cr+{sup 208}Pb system. We also show that the standard value of the surface diffuseness parameter for the nuclear potential a = 0.63 fm, is preferred by the experimental quasi-elastic scattering data for this system.

Zamrun, Muhammad F. [Department of Physics, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia); Jurusan Fisika FMIPA, Universitas Haluoleo, Kendari, Sulawesi Tenggara 93232 (Indonesia); Kasim, Hasan Abu [Department of Physics, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603 (Malaysia)

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mud cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Comparative Study on the Corrosion Resistance of Fe-Based Amorphous Metal, Borated Stainless Steel and Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd Alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Iron-based amorphous alloy Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4} was compared to borated stainless steel and Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy on their corrosion resistance in various high-concentration chloride solutions. The melt-spun ribbon of this iron-based amorphous alloy have demonstrated a better corrosion resistance than the bulk borated stainless steel and the bulk Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy, in high-concentration chloride brines at temperatures 90 deg. C or higher. (authors)

Lian, Tiangan; Day, Daniel; Hailey, Phillip; Choi, Jor-Shan; Farmer, Joseph [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, 94550 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Fragmentation cross sections of Fe^{26+}, Si^{14+} and C^{6+} ions of 0.3-10 A GeV on polyethylene, CR39 and aluminum targets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present new measurements of the total and partial fragmentation cross sections in the energy range 0.3-10 A GeV of 56Fe, 28Si and 12C beams on polyethylene, CR39 and aluminum targets. The exposures were made at BNL, USA and HIMAC, Japan. The CR39 nuclear track detectors were used to identify the incident and survived beams and their fragments. The total fragmentation cross sections for all targets are almost energy independent while they depend on the target mass. The measured partial fragmentation cross sections are also discussed.

Cecchini, S; Giacomelli, G; Giorgini, M; Kumar, A; Mandrioli, G; Manzoor, S; Margiotta, A R; Medinaceli, E; Patrizii, L; Popa, V; Qureshi, I E; Sirri, G; Spurio, M; Togo, V

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Fragmentation cross sections of Fe^{26+}, Si^{14+} and C^{6+} ions of 0.3-10 A GeV on CR39, polyethylene and aluminum targets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New measurements of the total and partial fragmentation cross sections in the energy range 0.3-10 A GeV of Fe^{26+}, Si^{14+} and C^{6+} beams on polyethylene, CR39 and aluminum targets are presented. The exposures were made at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), USA, and Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC), Japan. The CR39 nuclear track detectors were used to identify the incident and survived beams and their fragments. The total fragmentation cross sections for all targets are almost energy independent while they depend on the target mass. The measured partial fragmentation cross sections are also discussed.

Miriam Giorgini

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Fragmentation cross sections of Fe^{26+}, Si^{14+} and C^{6+} ions of 0.3-10 A GeV on polyethylene, CR39 and aluminum targets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present new measurements of the total and partial fragmentation cross sections in the energy range 0.3-10 A GeV of 56Fe, 28Si and 12C beams on polyethylene, CR39 and aluminum targets. The exposures were made at BNL, USA and HIMAC, Japan. The CR39 nuclear track detectors were used to identify the incident and survived beams and their fragments. The total fragmentation cross sections for all targets are almost energy independent while they depend on the target mass. The measured partial fragmentation cross sections are also discussed.

S. Cecchini; T. Chiarusi; G. Giacomelli; M. Giorgini; A. Kumar; G. Mandrioli; S. Manzoor; A. R. Margiotta; E. Medinaceli; L. Patrizii; V. Popa; I. E. Qureshi; G. Sirri; M. Spurio; V. Togo

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

385

Fragmentation cross sections of Fe^{26+}, Si^{14+} and C^{6+} ions of 0.3-10 A GeV on CR39, polyethylene and aluminum targets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New measurements of the total and partial fragmentation cross sections in the energy range 0.3-10 A GeV of Fe^{26+}, Si^{14+} and C^{6+} beams on polyethylene, CR39 and aluminum targets are presented. The exposures were made at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), USA, and Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC), Japan. The CR39 nuclear track detectors were used to identify the incident and survived beams and their fragments. The total fragmentation cross sections for all targets are almost energy independent while they depend on the target mass. The measured partial fragmentation cross sections are also discussed.

Giorgini, Miriam

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

The effects of thermo-mechanical treatments on superplasticity of Fe-24Cr-7Ni-3Mo-0.14N duplex stainless steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, the effect of thermo-mechanical treatment on superplasticity of 24Cr-7Ni-3Mo-0.14N alloy was investigated at 850 C in three phase regime consisting of {alpha}, {gamma} and {sigma} phases. In order to examine the effect of thermo-mechanical treatment conditions on superplasticity, the solution treatment temperature and cold reduction ratio were varied. The effects of thermo-mechanical treatment conditions on the microstructural factors of constituent phases were analyzed. The relationships between the microstructural factors and superplasticity in Fe-24Cr-7Ni-3Mo-0.14N duplex stainless steel were discussed.

Han, Y.S.; Hong, S.H. [Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering] [Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; [Center for Advanced Aerospace Materials, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Measurement of the energy resolution and calibration of hybrid pixel detectors with GaAs:Cr sensor and Timepix readout chip  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes an iterative method of per-pixel energy calibration of hybrid pixel detectors with GaAs:Cr sensor and Timepix readout chip. A convolution of precisely measured spectra of characteristic X-rays of different metals with the resolution and the efficiency of the pixel detector is used for the calibration. The energy resolution of the detector is also measured during the calibration. The use of per-pixel calibration allows to achieve a good energy resolution of the Timepix detector with GaAs:Cr sensor: 8% and 13% at 60 keV and 20 keV, respectively.

Butler, A P; Bell, S T; Chelkov, G A; Dedovich, D V; Demichev, M A; Elkin, V G; Gostkin, M I; Kotov, S A; Kozhevnikov, D A; Kruchonak, U G; Nozdrin, A A; Porokhovoy, S Yu; Potrap, I N; Smolyanskiy, P I; Zakhvatkin, M M; Zhemchugov, A S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

ELECTRON-IMPACT EXCITATION OF Cr II: A THEORETICAL CALCULATION OF EFFECTIVE COLLISION STRENGTHS FOR OPTICALLY ALLOWED TRANSITIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we present electron-impact excitation collision strengths and Maxwellian averaged effective collision strengths for the complicated iron-peak ion Cr II. We consider specifically the allowed lines for transitions from the 3d {sup 5} and 3d {sup 4}4s even parity configuration states to the 3d {sup 4}4p odd parity configuration levels. The parallel suite of R-Matrix packages, RMATRX II, which have recently been extended to allow for the inclusion of relativistic effects, were used to compute the collision cross sections. A total of 108 LS{pi}/280 J{pi} levels from the basis configurations 3d {sup 5}, 3d {sup 4}4s, and 3d {sup 4}4p were included in the wavefunction representation of the target including all doublet, quartet, and sextet terms. Configuration interaction and correlation effects were carefully considered by the inclusion of seven more configurations and a pseudo-corrector 4d-bar type orbital. The 10 configurations incorporated into the Cr II model thus listed are 3d {sup 5}, 3d {sup 4}4s, 3d {sup 4}4p, 3d {sup 3}4s {sup 2}, 3d {sup 3}4p {sup 2}, 3d {sup 3}4s4p, 3d{sup 4}4d-bar, 3d{sup 3}4s4d-bar, 3d{sup 3}4p4d-bar, and 3d{sup 3}4d-bar{sup 2}, constituting the largest Cr II target model considered to date in a scattering calculation. The Maxwellian averaged effective collision strengths are computed for a wide range of electron temperatures 2000-100,000 K which are astrophysically significant. Care has been taken to ensure that the partial wave contributions to the collision strengths for these allowed lines have converged with 'top-up' from the Burgess-Tully sum rule incorporated. Comparisons are made with the results of Bautista et al. and significant differences are found for some of the optically allowed lines considered.

Wasson, I. R.; Ramsbottom, C. A.; Scott, M. P., E-mail: iwasson01@qub.ac.uk [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Queen's University, Belfast (United Kingdom)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Spatial distribution and magnetism in poly-Cr-doped GaN from first principles X. Y. Cui,1 J. E. Medvedeva,2 B. Delley,3 A. J. Freeman,4 and C. Stampfl1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spatial distribution and magnetism in poly-Cr-doped GaN from first principles X. Y. Cui,1 J. E the spatial distribution and magnetic coupling of Cr-doped GaN, in which exhaustive structural and magnetic direct evidence that the distribution of the doped magnetic ions is neither homogeneous nor random

Medvedeva, Julia E.

390

Effect of composition changes on the structure and properties of W-Cr-Ni-C detonation gun coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Changes in the microstructure and wear behavior of W-Cr-Ni-C coatings as a function of the composition of the starting powder were studied. The experimental powder compositions were chosen so that the results could be analyzed statistically as a mixture problem with the extreme vertices design. All coatings were deposited by identical detonation gun operating conditions. Although the variation of powder chemistry resulted in distinctively different powder morphologies, all coatings were found to be composed of the same 4 (possibly more) complex carbides. The amount and, to some degree, morphology of a particular carbide was found to change with composition. However, neither amount nor morphology could be correlated to microhardness or wear test results. Predictive equations based on powder composition were obtained which fit the wear test results very well.

Stavros, A.J. [Praxair Surface Technologies Inc., Indianapolis, IN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

391

Lightest Isotope of Bh Produced Via the 209Bi(52Cr,n)260BhReaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The lightest isotope of Bh known was produced in the new {sup 209}Bi({sup 52}Cr,n){sup 260}Bh reaction at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's 88-Inch Cyclotron. Positive identification was made by observation of eight correlated alpha particle decay chains in the focal plane detector of the Berkeley Gas-Filled Separator. {sup 260}Bh decays with a 35{sub -9}{sup +19} ms half-life by alpha particle emission mainly by a group at 10.16 MeV. The measured cross section of 59{sub -20}{sup +29} pb is approximately a factor of four larger than compared to recent model predictions. The influences of the N = 152 and Z = 108 shells on alpha decay properties are discussed.

Nelson, Sarah L.; Gregorich, Kenneth E.; Dragojevic, Irena; Garcia, Mitch A.; Gates, Jacklyn M.; Sudowe, Ralf; Nitsche, Heino

2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

392

Shape and strain-induced magnetization reorientation and magnetic anisotropy in thin film Ti/CoCrPt/Ti lines and rings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The contributions to the magnetic anisotropy of thin-film rings and lines of width 50 nm and above made from Ti(5?nm)/Co[subscript 0.66]Cr[subscript 0.22]Pt[subscript 0.12] (10 and 20 nm)/Ti (3 nm) with a perpendicular ...

Velazquez, D.

393

J. Phys. Chem. 1988, 92, 1731-1738 1731 Energies of cr* Orbitals from Extended Huckel Calculations in Combination wlth HAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. Phys. Chem. 1988, 92, 1731-1738 1731 Energies of cr* Orbitals from Extended Huckel Calculations, Ithaca, New York 14853- 1301 (Received: May 20, 1987) The extended Hiickel theory has been given an approximatededuction from first principles. The use of experimentalionization energies for the atoms in the molecule

Li, Jing

394

Band-Gap Reduction and Dopant Interaction in Epitaxial La,Cr Co-doped SrTiO3 Thin Films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show that by co-doping SrTiO3 (STO) epitaxial thin films with equal amounts of La and Cr it is possible to produce films with an optical band gap ~0.9 eV lower than that of undoped STO. Sr1-xLaxTi1-xCrxO3 thin films were deposited by molecular beam epitaxy and characterized using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy to show that the Cr dopants are almost exclusively in the Cr3+ oxidation state. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements and theoretical modeling suggest that it is thermodynamically preferred for La and Cr dopants to occupy nearest neighbor A- and B-sites in the lattice. Transport measurements show that the material exhibits variable-range hopping conductivity with high resistivity. These results create new opportunities for the use of doped STO films in photovoltaic and photocatalytic applications.

Comes, Ryan B.; Sushko, Petr; Heald, Steve M.; Colby, Robert J.; Bowden, Mark E.; Chambers, Scott A.

2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

395

Published: December 28, 2011 r 2011 American Chemical Society 724 dx.doi.org/10.1021/cr2003272 |Chem. Rev. 2012, 112, 724781  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

large- scale industrial implementation. Thus, carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technologies |Chem. Rev. 2012, 112, 724­781 REVIEW pubs.acs.org/CR Carbon Dioxide Capture in Metal�Organic Frameworks 94720-1460, United States CONTENTS 1. Introduction 724 1.1. Carbon Dioxide Emission from Anthropogenic

396

Empirical assessment of the detection efficiency of CR-39 at high proton fluence and a compact, proton detector for high-fluence applications  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors are widely used in physics and in many inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, and under ideal conditions these detectors have 100% detection efficiency for ?0.5–8 MeV protons. When the fluence of incident particles becomes too high, overlap of particle tracks leads to under-counting at typical processing conditions (5 h etch in 6N NaOH at 80?°C). Short etch times required to avoid overlap can cause under-counting as well, as tracks are not fully developed. Experiments have determined the minimum etch times for 100% detection of 1.7–4.3-MeV protons and established that for 2.4-MeV protons, relevant for detection of DD protons, the maximum fluence that can be detected using normal processing techniques is ?3?×?106 cm?2. A CR-39-based proton detector has been developed to mitigate issues related to high particle fluences on ICF facilities. Using a pinhole and scattering foil several mm in front of the CR-39, proton fluences at the CR-39 are reduced by more than a factor of ?50, increasing the operating yield upper limit by a comparable amount.

Rosenberg, M. J.; Seguin, F. H.; Waugh, C. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Orozco, D.; Frenje, J. A.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Hohenberger, M.; Sangster, T. C.; LePape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Bionta, R. M.; Landen, O. L.; Zacharias, R. A.; Kim, Y.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kilkenny, J. D.

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

REGISTRATION INFORMATION: Registration ad payment should be sent by the third class meeting CRN# Subject Course# Section# VR/CR Hrs Title  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

form is accurate and true. Providing false information can lead to nonacceptance and /or expulsionREGISTRATION INFORMATION: Registration ad payment should be sent by the third class meeting CRN# Subject Course# Section# VR/CR Hrs Title I affirm that the information I have provided on this application

Mohaghegh, Shahab

398

Scientific: Life Science Sem Cr Grade Essential Skills BIOL 100 Biology w/Lab or BIOL 107 Intro Biol I* 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sem Cr Grade STAT 190 Basic Statistics* 3 Truman Week Program 1 OR STAT 290 Statistics* 3 JINS SCIENCE DEGREE WORKSHEET 2013-2014 CATALOG REQUIREMENTS NAME:________________________________ ID General Psychology* 0 Concentration STAT 190 Basic Statistics* 0 OR STAT 290 Statistics* 0 BS REQUIREMENTS

Gering, Jon C.

399

Methane Activation by Transition-Metal Oxides, MOx (M ) Cr, Mo, W; x ) 1, 2, 3) Xin Xu,# Francesco Faglioni, and William A. Goddard, III*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane Activation by Transition-Metal Oxides, MOx (M ) Cr, Mo, W; x ) 1, 2, 3) Xin Xu,# Francesco, 2002 Recent experiments on the dehydrogenation-aromatization of methane (DHAM) to form benzene using a MoO3/HZSM-5 catalyst stimulated us to examine methane activation by the transition-metal oxide

Goddard III, William A.

400

LONG-TERM OPTICAL OBSERVATIONS OF TWO LMXBs: UW CrB (=MS 1603+260) AND V1408 Aql (=4U 1957+115)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present new optical photometry of two low-mass X-ray binary stars, UW CrB (MS 1603+260) and V1408 Aql (4U 1957+115). UW CrB is an eclipsing binary and we refine its eclipse ephemeris and measure an upper limit to the rate of change of its orbital period, | P-dot | < 4.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} (unitless). The light curve of UW CrB shows optical counterparts of type I X-ray bursts. We tabulate the times, orbital phases, and fluences of 33 bursts and show that the optical flux in the bursts comes primarily from the accretion disk, not from the secondary star. The new observations are consistent with a model in which the accretion disk in UW CrB is asymmetric and precesses in the prograde direction with a period of {approx}5.5 days. The light curve of V1408 Aql has a low-amplitude modulation at its 9.33 hr orbital period. The modulation remained a nearly pure sine curve in the new data as it was in 1984 and 2008, but its mean amplitude was lower, 18% against 23% in the earlier data. A model in which the orbital modulation is caused by the varying aspect of the heated face of the secondary star continues to give an excellent fit to the light curve. We derive a much improved orbital ephemeris for the system.

Mason, Paul A. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Robinson, Edward L.; Bayless, Amanda J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Hakala, Pasi J. [Finnish Centre for Astronomy with ESO, Vaeisaelaentie 20, FIN-21500 Piikkioe, University of Turku (Finland)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

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401

Lecture 17 Appendix B (analytic functions and contour We want to consider the analyticity properties (C-R) of the square root function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the analyticity properties (C-R) of the square root function In[1]:= f18 z_ : Sqrt z Now write this function_, y_ : Refine Re ComplexExpand f18 x y , Element x y, Reals ; V18 x_, y_ : Refine Im ComplexExpand f18

Ellis, Steve

402

Compositional analysis and depth profiling of thin film CrO{sub 2} by heavy ion ERDA and standard RBS: a comparison  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chromium dioxide (CrO{sub 2}) thin film has generated considerable interest in applied research due to the wide variety of its technological applications. It has been extensively investigated in recent years, attracting the attention of researchers working on spintronic heterostructures and in the magnetic recording industry. However, its synthesis is usually a difficult task due to its metastable nature and various synthesis techniques are being investigated. In this work a polycrystalline thin film of CrO{sub 2} was prepared by electron beam vaporization of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} onto a Si substrate. The polycrystalline structure was confirmed through XRD analysis. The stoichiometry and elemental depth distribution of the deposited film were measured by ion beam nuclear analytical techniques heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), which both have relative advantage over non-nuclear spectrometries in that they can readily provide quantitative information about the concentration and distribution of different atomic species in a layer. Moreover, the analysis carried out highlights the importance of complementary usage of the two techniques to obtain a more complete description of elemental content and depth distribution in thin films. - Graphical abstract: Heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) both have relative advantage over non-nuclear spectrometries in that they can readily provide quantitative information about the concentration and distribution of different atomic species in a layer. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thin films of CrO{sub 2} have been grown by e-beam evaporation of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} target in vacuum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The composition was determined by heavy ion-ERDA and RBS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HI-ERDA and RBS provided information on the light and heavy elements, respectively.

Khamlich, S., E-mail: skhamlich@gmail.com [Nano-Sciences Laboratories, Materials Research Department, iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Department of Chemistry, Tshwane University of Technology, Private Bag X 680, Pretoria, 0001 (South Africa); The African Laser Centre, CSIR campus, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria (South Africa); Msimanga, M., E-mail: mandla@tlabs.ac.za [Nano-Sciences Laboratories, Materials Research Department, iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); iThemba LABS Gauteng, Private Bag 11, WITS 2050, Johannesburg (South Africa); Pineda-Vargas, C.A. [Nano-Sciences Laboratories, Materials Research Department, iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Faculty of Health and Wellness Sciences, C.P.U.T., P.O. Box 1906, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Nuru, Z.Y. [Nano-Sciences Laboratories, Materials Research Department, iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); McCrindle, R. [Department of Chemistry, Tshwane University of Technology, Private Bag X 680, Pretoria, 0001 (South Africa); Maaza, M. [Nano-Sciences Laboratories, Materials Research Department, iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Department of Chemistry, Tshwane University of Technology, Private Bag X 680, Pretoria, 0001 (South Africa); The African Laser Centre, CSIR campus, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria (South Africa)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

Role of structural factors in formation of chiral magnetic soliton lattice in Cr{sub 1/3}NbS{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sign and strength of magnetic interactions not only between nearest neighbors, but also for longer-range neighbors in the Cr{sub 1/3}NbS{sub 2} intercalation compound have been calculated on the basis of structural data. It has been found that left-handed spin helices in Cr{sub 1/3}NbS{sub 2} are formed from strength-dominant at low temperatures antiferromagnetic (AFM) interactions between triangular planes of Cr{sup 3+} ions through the plane of just one of two crystallographically equivalent diagonals of side faces of embedded into each other trigonal prisms building up the crystal lattice of magnetic Cr{sup 3+} ions. These helices are oriented along the c axis and packed into two-dimensional triangular lattices in planes perpendicular to these helices directions and lay one upon each other with a displacement. The competition of the above AFM helices with weaker inter-helix AFM interactions could promote the emergence of a long-period helical spin structure. One can assume that in this case, the role of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction consists of final ordering and stabilization of chiral spin helices into a chiral magnetic soliton lattice. The possibility of emergence of solitons in M{sub 1/3}NbX{sub 2} and M{sub 1/3}TaX{sub 2} (M?=?Cr, V, Ti, Rh, Ni, Co, Fe, and Mn; X?=?S and Se) intercalate compounds has been examined. Two important factors caused by the crystal structure (predominant chiral magnetic helices and their competition with weaker inter-helix interactions not destructing the system quasi-one-dimensional character) can be used for the crystal chemistry search of solitons.

Volkova, L. M.; Marinin, D. V. [Institute of Chemistry, Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 690022 Vladivostok (Russian Federation)

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

404

Triple ion-beam studies of radiation damage in 9Cr2WVTa ferritic/martensitic steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To simulate radiation damage under a future Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) environment, irradiation experiments were conducted on a candidate 9Cr-2WVTa ferritic/martensitic steel using the Triple Ion Facility (TIF) at ORNL. Irradiation was conducted in single, dual, and triple ion beam modes using 3.5 MeV Fe{sup ++}, 360 keV He{sup +}, and 180 keV H{sup +} at 80, 200, and 350{degrees}C. These irradiations produced various defects comprising black dots, dislocation loops, line dislocations, and gas bubbles, which led to hardening. The largest increase in hardness, over 63 %, was observed after 50 dpa for triple beam irradiation conditions, revealing that both He and H are augmenting the hardening. Hardness increased less than 30 % after 30 dpa at 200{degrees}C by triple beams, compatible with neutron irradiation data from previous work which showed about a 30 % increase in yield strength after 27.2 dpa at 365{degrees}C. However, the very large concentrations of gas bubbles in the matrix and on lath and grain boundaries after these simulated SNS irradiations make predictions of fracture behavior from fission reactor irradiations to spallation target conditions inadvisable.

Lee, E.H.; Hunn, J.D.; Rao, G.R.; Klueh, R.L.; Mansur, L.K.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Computer program for the sensitivity calculation of a CR-39 detector in a diffusion chamber for radon measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computer software for calculation of the sensitivity of a CR-39 detector closed in a diffusion chamber to radon is described in this work. The software consists of two programs, both written in the standard Fortran 90 programming language. The physical background and a numerical example are given. Presented software is intended for numerous researches in radon measurement community. Previously published computer programs TRACK-TEST.F90 and TRACK-VISION.F90 [D. Nikezic and K. N. Yu, Comput. Phys. Commun. 174, 160 (2006); D. Nikezic and K. N. Yu, Comput. Phys. Commun. 178, 591 (2008)] are used here as subroutines to calculate the track parameters and to determine whether the track is visible or not, based on the incident angle, impact energy, etching conditions, gray level, and visibility criterion. The results obtained by the software, using five different V functions, were compared with the experimental data found in the literature. Application of two functions in this software reproduced experimental data very well, while other three gave lower sensitivity than experiment.

Nikezic, D., E-mail: nikezic@kg.ac.rs; Stajic, J. M. [Faculty of Science, University of Kragujevac, R. Domanovica 12, Kragujevac 34000 (Serbia)] [Faculty of Science, University of Kragujevac, R. Domanovica 12, Kragujevac 34000 (Serbia); Yu, K. N. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue (Hong Kong)] [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue (Hong Kong)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

406

Audit calculations with CORCON-MOD 3 of the duration of superheat in NUREG/CR-5423  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analyses have shown that early rupture of the Mark-I boiling water reactor containment-by the direct action of core debris depends strongly on the time that core debris is superheated above its liquidus. The analyses of the duration of superheat in the core debris are compared to predictions obtained with the CORCON-MOD 3 computer code. The predicitons of this computer code as functions of the core debris mass, composition, and initial superheat are used to create a polynomial response surface. This response surface is used in a Monte Carlo analysis to produce probability distributions for the duration of superheat in core debris in the drywell of a Mark-I containment. It is concluded that to a high level of confidence (>90%) the duration of superheating predicted with the CORCON-MOD 3 code is less than what has been used in the analyses of the threats to the Mark-I containment liner. Based on these results, to the extent superheat duration dictates the threat to the liner, analyses in NUREG/CR-5423 would appear to overestimate the threat to the liner in comparison to threats estimated using the predictions of the duration of superheating obtained with CORCON-MOD 3.

Powers, D.A.; Heames, T.J.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Application of the NUREG/CR-6850 EPRI/NRC Fire PRA Methodology to a DOE Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The application NUREG/CR-6850 EPRI/NRC fire PRA methodology to DOE facility presented several challenges. This paper documents the process and discusses several insights gained during development of the fire PRA. A brief review of the tasks performed is provided with particular focus on the following: • Tasks 5 and 14: Fire-induced risk model and fire risk quantification. A key lesson learned was to begin model development and quantification as early as possible in the project using screening values and simplified modeling if necessary. • Tasks 3 and 9: Fire PRA cable selection and detailed circuit failure analysis. In retrospect, it would have been beneficial to perform the model development and quantification in 2 phases with detailed circuit analysis applied during phase 2. This would have allowed for development of a robust model and quantification earlier in the project and would have provided insights into where to focus the detailed circuit analysis efforts. • Tasks 8 and 11: Scoping fire modeling and detailed fire modeling. More focus should be placed on detailed fire modeling and less focus on scoping fire modeling. This was the approach taken for the fire PRA. • Task 14: Fire risk quantification. Typically, multiple safe shutdown (SSD) components fail during a given fire scenario. Therefore dependent failure analysis is critical to obtaining a meaningful fire risk quantification. Dependent failure analysis for the fire PRA presented several challenges which will be discussed in the full paper.

Tom Elicson; Bentley Harwood; Richard Yorg; Heather Lucek; Jim Bouchard; Ray Jukkola; Duan Phan

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Specification of CuCrZr Alloy Properties after Various Thermo-Mechanical Treatments and Design Allowables including Neutron Irradiation Effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Precipitation hardened CuCrZr alloy is a promising heat sink and functional material for various applica- tions in ITER, for example the first wall, blanket electrical attachment, divertor, and heating systems. Three types of thermo-mechanical treatment were identified as most promising for the various applica- tions in ITER: solution annealing, cold working and ageing; solution annealing and ageing; solution annealing and ageing at non-optimal condition due to specific manufacturing processes for engineer- ing-scale components. The available data for these three types of treatments were assessed and mini- mum tensile properties were determined based on recommendation of Structural Design Criteria for the ITER In-vessel Components. The available data for these heat treatments were analyzed for assess- ment of neutron irradiation effect. Using the definitions of the ITER Structural Design Criteria the design allowable stress intensity values are proposed for CuCrZr alloy after various heat treatments.

Barabash, Vladimir [ITER Organization, Saint Paul Lez Durance, France] [ITER Organization, Saint Paul Lez Durance, France; Kalinin, G. M. [RDIPE, P.O. Box 788, 101000 Moscow, Russia] [RDIPE, P.O. Box 788, 101000 Moscow, Russia; Fabritsiev, Sergei A. [D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute, St. Petersburg, Russia] [D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute, St. Petersburg, Russia; Zinkle, Steven J [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Level crossings and zero-field splitting in the {Cr8}-cubane spin-cluster studied using inelastic neutron scattering and magnetization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inelastic neutron scattering (INS) in variable magnetic field and high-field magnetization measurements in the millikelvin temperature range were performed to gain insight into the low-energy magnetic excitation spectrum and the field-induced level crossings in the molecular spin cluster {Cr8}-cubane. These complementary techniques provide consistent estimates of the lowest level-crossing field. The overall features of the experimental data are explained using an isotropic Heisenberg model, based on three distinct exchange interactions linking the eight CrIII paramagnetic centers (spins s = 3/2), that is supplemented with a relatively large molecular magnetic anisotropy term for the lowest S = 1 multiplet. It is noted that the existence of the anisotropy is clearly evident from the magnetic field dependence of the excitations in the INS measurements, while the magnetization measurements are not sensitive to its effects.

Vaknin, D. [Ames Laboratory; Garlea, Vasile O [ORNL; Demmel, F. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; Mamontov, Eugene [ORNL; Nojiri, H [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan; Martin, Catalin [Florida State University; Chiorescu, Irinel [Florida State University; Qiu, Y. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Luban, M. [Ames Laboratory; Kogerler, P. [Ames Laboratory; Fielden, J. [Ames Laboratory; Engelhardt, L [Francis Marion University, Florence, South Sarolina; Rainey, C [Francis Marion University, Florence, South Sarolina

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Irradiation performance of 9--12 Cr ferritic/martensitic stainless steels and their potential for in-core application in LWRs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ferritic-martensitic stainless steels exhibit radiation stability and stress corrosion resistance that make them attractive replacement materials for austenitic stainless steels for in-core applications. Recent radiation studies have demonstrated that 9% Cr ferritic/martensitic stainless steel had less than a 30C shift in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) following irradiation at 365C to a dose of 14 dpa. These steels also exhibit very low swelling rates, a result of the microstructural stability of these alloys during radiation. The 9 to 12% Cr alloys to also exhibit excellent corrosion and stress corrosion resistance in out-of-core applications. Demonstration of the applicability of ferritic/martensitic stainless steels for in-core LWR application will require verification of the irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking behavior, measurement of DBTT following irradiation at 288C, and corrosion rates measurements for in-core water chemistry.

Jones, R.H.; Gelles, D.S.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Low temperature and magnetic field behaviour of the (Cr{sub 84}Re{sub 16}){sub 89.6}V{sub 10.4} alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of the temperature (T) dependence of the magnetic susceptibility (?) and electrical resistance (R) on an antiferromagnetic (AFM) (Cr{sub 84}Re{sub 16}){sub 89.6}V{sub 10.4} alloy are reported in order to probe the existence of quantum critical behaviour (QCB) utilizing static magnetic fields (H) as a tuning parameter. The results indicate that an increase in H suppresses T{sub N} in such a way that it varies exponentially with increasing H. R(T) measurements show evidence of possible superconducting (SC) behaviour below 1?K at H?=?0?T. These results therefore indicate the coexistence of the AFM and SC phases in the (Cr{sub 84}Re{sub 16}){sub 89.6}V{sub 10.4} alloy.

Jacobs, B. S., E-mail: sjacobs@uj.ac.za; Sheppard, C. J.; Prinsloo, A. R. E. [Department of Physics, University of Johannesburg, P.O. Box 524, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa); Lodya, L. [Sasol Technology, Research and Development, 1 Klasie Havenga Road, Sasolburg 1947 (South Africa)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

412

Electrocatalytic reduction of nitric oxide at electrodes modified with electropolymerized films of [Cr(v-tpy){sub 2}]{sup 3+} and their application to cellular NO determinations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nitric oxide can be electrocatalytically reduced at electrodes modified with electropolymerized films of [Cr(v-tpy){sub 2}]{sup 3+}. Upon further modification with a thin film of Nafion (to prevent interferences from anions, especially nitrite), these electrodes can be employed as NO sensors in solution with submicromolar detection limits and fast response. We have carried out preliminary studies of cellular NO release from Rhodobacter sphaeroides bacterial cells with excellent results. 21 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Maskus, M.; Wu, Q.; Shapleigh, J.P.; Abruna, H.D. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)] [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Pariente, F. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain)] [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain); Toffanin, A. [Ciudad Universitaria, Madrid (Spain)] [Ciudad Universitaria, Madrid (Spain)

1996-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

Corrosion behavior in high heat input welded heat-affected zone of Ni-free high-nitrogen Fe–18Cr–10Mn–N austenitic stainless steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pitting corrosion and interphase corrosion behaviors in high heat input welded heat-affected zone (HAZ) of a metastable high-nitrogen Fe–18Cr–10Mn–N austenitic stainless steel were explored through electrochemical tests. The HAZs were simulated using Gleeble simulator with high heat input welding condition of 300 kJ/cm and the peak temperature of the HAZs was changed from 1200 °C to 1350 °C, aiming to examine the effect of ?-ferrite formation on corrosion behavior. The electrochemical test results show that both pitting corrosion resistance and interphase corrosion resistance were seriously deteriorated by ?-ferrite formation in the HAZ and their aspects were different with increasing ?-ferrite fraction. The pitting corrosion resistance was decreased by the formation of Cr-depleted zone along ?-ferrite/austenite (?) interphase resulting from ?-ferrite formation; however it didn't depend on ?-ferrite fraction. The interphase corrosion resistance depends on the total amount of Cr-depleted zone as well as ferrite area and thus continuously decreased with increasing ?-ferrite fraction. The different effects of ?-ferrite fraction on pitting corrosion and interphase corrosion were carefully discussed in terms of alloying elements partitioning in the HAZ based on thermodynamic consideration. - Highlights: • Corrosion behavior in the weld HAZ of high-nitrogen austenitic alloy was studied. • Cr{sub 2}N particle was not precipitated in high heat input welded HAZ of tested alloy. • Pitting corrosion and interphase corrosion show a different behavior. • Pitting corrosion resistance was affected by whether or not ?-ferrite forms. • Interphase corrosion resistance was affected by the total amount of ?-ferrite.

Moon, Joonoh, E-mail: mjo99@kims.re.kr; Ha, Heon-Young; Lee, Tae-Ho

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

Fabrication of a 1200 kg Ingot of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy for the DIII-D Radiative Divertor Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vanadium chromium titanium alloys are attractive materials for fusion reactors because of their high temperature capability and their potential for low neutron active and rapid activation decay. A V-4Cr-4Ti alloy has been selected in the U.S. as the current leading candidate vanadium alloy for future use in fusion reactor structural applications. General Atomics (GA), in conjunction with the Department of Energy`s (DOE) DIII-D Program, is carrying out a plan for the utilization of this vanadium alloy in the DIII-D tokamak. The plan will culminate in the fabrication, installation, and operation of a V-4Ti alloy structure in the DIII-D Radiative Divertor (RD) upgrade. The deployment of vanadium alloy will provide a meaningful step in the development and technology acceptance of this advanced material for future fusion power devices. Under a GA contract and material specification, an industrial scale 1200 kg heat (ingot) of a V-4Cr-4Ti alloy has been produced and converted into product forms by Wah Chang of Albany, Oregon (WCA). To assure the proper control of minor and trace impurities which affect the mechanical and activation behavior of this vanadium alloy, selected lots of raw vanadium base metal were processed by aluminothermic reduction of high purity vanadium oxide, and were then electron beam melted into two high purity vanadium ingots. The ingots were then consolidated with high purity Cr and Ti, and double vacuum-arc melted to obtain a 1200 kg V-4Cr-4Ti alloy ingot. Several billets were extruded from the ingot, and were then fabricated into plate, sheet, and rod at WCA. Tubing was subsequently processed from plate material. The chemistry and fabrication procedures for the product forms were specified on the basis of experience and knowledge gained from DOE Fusion Materials Program studies on previous laboratory scale heats and a large scale ingot (500 kg)

Johnson, W.R.; Smith, J.P.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Impact of Lattice Mismatch and Stoichiometry on the Structure and Bandgap of (Fe,Cr)2O3 Epitaxial Thin Films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structural properties of high-quality epitaxial (Fe1-xCrx)2O3 thin films are investigated across the composition range. Epitaxial films are deposited on a-Al2O3(0001) substrates by oxygen-plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Corundum (Fe1-xCrx)2O3 supercells relaxed by density functional theory confirm that the non-linear behavior of the bulk lattice parameters originates in the magnetic structure of the alloy films. High-resolution x-ray diffraction reveals the degree of epitaxial strain relaxation in the films, with Cr-rich films remaining partially strained to the Al2O3 substrate. For intermediate compositions, a lattice expansion and non-Poisson-like tetragonal distortion are found. Scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy reveal a columnar grain structure in the films, with uniform mixing of cations on the nanometer scale. Oxygen non-stoichiometry is quantified by non-Rutherford resonant elastic scattering measurements utilizing 3.04 MeV He+. Intermediate-composition films are found to be slightly over-stoichiometric, resulting in the observed lattice expansion. Cr-rich films, in contrast, appear to be slightly oxygen deficient. A model is proposed to explain these results based on the energetics of oxygen defect formation and rate of oxygen diffusion in the corundum lattice. Compressive biaxial strain is found to reduce the bandgap of epitaxial Cr2O3 relative to the bulk value. The relationships which are elucidated between epitaxial film structure and optical properties can be applied to bandgap optimization in the (Fe,Cr)2O3 system.

Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Chamberlin, Sara E.; Bowden, Mark E.; Colby, Robert J.; Shutthanandan, V.; Manandhar, Sandeep; Wang, Yong; Sushko, Petr; Chambers, Scott A.

2014-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

416

Applicability of Loss of Offsite Power (LOSP) Events in NUREG/CR-6890 for Entergy Nuclear South (ENS) Plants LOSP Calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant differences have been identified in loss of offsite power (LOSP or LOOP) event description, category, duration, and applicability between the LOSP events used in NUREG/CR-6890 and ENS'LOSP packages, which were based on EPRI LOSP reports with plant-specific applicability analysis. Thus it is appropriate to reconcile the LOSP data listed in the subject NUREG and EPRI reports. A cross comparison showed that 62 LOSP events in NUREG/CR-6890 were not included in the EPRI reports while 4 events in EPRI reports were missing in the NUREG. Among the 62 events missing in EPRI reports, the majority were applicable to shutdown conditions, which could be classified as category IV events in EPRI reports if included. Detailed reviews of LERs concluded that some events did not result in total loss of offsite power. Some LOSP events were caused by subsequent component failures after a turbine/plant trip, which have been modeled specifically in most ENS plant PRA models. Moreover, ENS has modeled (or is going to model) the partial loss of offsite power events with partial LOSP initiating events. While the direct use of NUREG/CR-6890 results in SPAR models may be appropriate, its direct use in ENS' plant PRA models may not be appropriate because of modeling details in ENS' plant-specific PRA models. Therefore, this paper lists all the differences between the data in NUREG/CR-6890 and EPRI reports and evaluates the applicability of the LOSP events to ENS plant-specific PRA models. The refined LOSP data will characterize the LOSP risk in a more realistic fashion. (authors)

Li, Yunlong; Yilmaz, Fatma; Bedell, Loys [Entergy Nuclear South (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Methylene megration and coupling on a non-reducible metal oxide: the reaction of dichloromethane on stoichiometric -Cr2O3(0001)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reaction of CH2Cl2 over the nearly-stoichiometric -Cr2O3(0001) surface produces gas phase ethylene, methane and surface chlorine adatoms. The reaction is initiated by the decomposition of CH2Cl2 into surface methylene and chlorine. Photoemission indicates that surface cations are the preferred binding sites for both methylene and chlorine adatoms. Two reaction channels are observed for methylene coupling to ethylene in temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). A desorption-limited, low-temperature route is attributed to two methylenes bound at a single site. The majority of ethylene is produced by a reaction-limited process involving surface migration (diffusion) of methylene as the rate-limiting step. DFT calculations indicate the surface diffusion mechanism is mediated by surface oxygen anions. The source of hydrogen for methane formation is adsorbed background water. Chlorine adatoms produced by the dissociation of CH2Cl2 deactivate the surface by simple site-blocking of surface Cr3+ sites. A comparison of experiment and theory shows that DFT provides a better description of the surface chemistry of the carbene intermediate than DFT+U using reported parameters for a best representation of the bulk electronic properties of -Cr2O3.

Dong, Yujung [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Brooks, John [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Chen, Tsung-Liang [ORNL; Mullins, David R [ORNL; Cox, David F. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Constitutive Model for the Time-Dependent Mechanical Behavior of 430 Stainless Steel and FeCrAlY Foams in Sulfur-Bearing Environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mechanical behavior of 430 stainless steel and pre-oxidized FeCrAlY open-cell foam materials of various densities was evaluated in compression at temperatures between 450 C and 600 C in an environment containing hydrogen sulfide and water vapor. Both materials showed negligible corrosion due to the gaseous atmosphere for up to 168 hours. The monotonic stress-strain response of these materials was found to be dependent on both the strain rate and their density, and the 430 stainless steel foam materials exhibited less stress relaxation than FeCrAlY for similar experimental conditions. Using the results from multiple hardening-relaxation and monotonic tests, an empirical constitutive equation was derived to predict the stress-strain behavior of FeCrAlY foams as a function of temperature and strain rate. These results are discussed in the context of using these materials in a black liquor gasifier to accommodate the chemical expansion of the refractory liner resulting from its reaction with the soda in the black liquor.

Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

First principles calculation of a large variation in dielectric tensor through the spin crossover in the CsFe[Cr(CN){sub 6}] Prussian blue analogue  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dielectric response of spin-crossover (SCO) materials is a key property facilitating their use in next-generation information processing technologies. Solid state hybrid density functional theory calculations show that the temperature-induced and strongly hysteretic SCO transition in the Cs{sup +}Fe{sup 2+}[Cr{sup 3+}(CN{sup ?}){sub 6}] Prussian blue analogue (PBA) is associated with a large change (?) in both the static, ??{sup 0}(HS ? LS), and high frequency, ??{sup ?}(HS ? LS) dielectric constants. The SCO-induced variation in CsFe[Cr(CN){sub 6}] is significantly greater than the experimental ?? values observed previously in other SCO materials. The phonon contribution, ??{sup phon}(HS ? LS), determined within a lattice dynamics approach, dominates over the clamped nuclei term, ??{sup ?}(HS ? LS), and is in turn dominated by the low-frequency translational motions of Cs{sup +} cations within the cubic voids of the Fe[Cr(CN){sub 6}]{sup ?} framework. The Cs{sup +} translational modes couple strongly to the large unit cell volume change occurring through the SCO transition. PBAs and associated metal-organic frameworks emerge as a potentially fruitful class of materials in which to search for SCO transitions associated with large changes in dielectric response and other macroscopic properties.

Middlemiss, Derek S., E-mail: derekmiddlemiss@gmail.com, E-mail: R.J.Deeth@warwick.ac.uk; Deeth, Robert J., E-mail: derekmiddlemiss@gmail.com, E-mail: R.J.Deeth@warwick.ac.uk [Inorganic Computational Chemistry Group, Department of Chemistry, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

420

Nickel Alloy, Corrosion and Heat-Resistant, Sheet, Strip, and Plate 72Ni - 15.5Cr - 0.95Cb(Nb) - 2.5Ti - 0.70Al - 7.0Fe Annealed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nickel Alloy, Corrosion and Heat-Resistant, Sheet, Strip, and Plate 72Ni - 15.5Cr - 0.95Cb(Nb) - 2.5Ti - 0.70Al - 7.0Fe Annealed

SAE Aerospace Standards. London

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Oxygen nonstoichiometry and defect structure analysis of B-site mixed perovskite-type oxide (La, Sr)(Cr, M)O{sub 3-{delta}} (M=Ti, Mn and Fe)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The defect chemical relationships in various B-site mixed LaCrO{sub 3}-based ceramics were investigated by means of high-temperature gravimetry. The nonstoichiometric deviation, {delta}, in (La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3})(Cr{sub 1-y}Ti{sub y})O{sub 3-{delta}} (y=0.1, 0.2 and 0.3) (LSCT){sub ,} (La{sub 0.75}Sr{sub 0.25})(Cr{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 0.5})O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSCM) and (La{sub 0.75}Sr{sub 0.25})(Cr{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5})O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSCF) were measured as a function of oxygen partial pressure, P{sub O{sub 2}}, at temperatures between 973 and 1373 K. The effects of partial replacement of the donor on Cr-sites were examined in LSCT. In LSCM and LSCF, effects of the partial substitution of isovalent transition metals on Cr-sites are discussed. Oxygen nonstoichiometries of various B-site mixed LaCrO{sub 3}-based ceramics were compared with those of A-site substituted perovskite-type oxides, (La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x})MO{sub 3-{delta}} (where x=0-0.3, M=Cr, Mn and Fe). The partial substitution of the different elements on Cr-sites drastically changed the P{sub O{sub 2}} and temperature dependence of oxygen vacancy formation in LaCrO{sub 3}-based ceramics. The defect equilibrium relationships of the localized electron well explained the oxygen vacancy formation in B-site mixed LaCrO{sub 3}-based ceramics. Oxygen vacancy formation in (La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3})(Cr{sub 1-y}Ti{sub y})O{sub 3-{delta}} (y=0.1 and 0.2) and (La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3})(Cr{sub 0.7}Ti{sub 0.3})O{sub 3-{delta}} was explained by redox reaction of Cr and Ti ions, respectively. The defect equilibrium relationships of LSCM and LSCF were interpreted by redox reaction of Mn ions and Fe ions, respectively. No significant change in valence state of Cr{sup 3+} ions in LSCM and LSCF was confirmed under the experimental conditions. - Graphical abstract: Oxygen nonstoichiometry of (La{sub 0.75}Sr{sub 0.25})(Cr{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5})O{sub 3-{delta}} was plotted as the functions of partial oxygen pressure and temperature. The results were well explained by the localized electron on the Fe-sites and the equilibrium constants of the defect chemical equation were determined. A hysteresis was observed under the reducing atmospheres above 1173 K due to decomposition of Fe ions.

Oishi, Masatsugu [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)], E-mail: oishi@mail.tagen.tohoku.ac.jp; Yashiro, Keiji; Sato, Kazuhisa; Mizusaki, Junichiro [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Kawada, Tatsuya [Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, 6-6-01 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

422

Influence of Adsorption Site and Wavelength on the Photodesorption of NO from the (Fe,Cr)3O4(111) Mixed Oxide Surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The photochemical properties of nitric oxide on a mixed oxide single crystal surface was examined in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) using temperature programmed desorption (TPD), photon stimulated desorption (PSD) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED). The mixed oxide was a 75% Fe and 25% Cr corundum (0001) oxide film prepared on an ?-Al2O3(0001) crystal, however its surface became terminated with a magnetite-like (111) structure after sputter/anneal cleaning, leading to a surface designated of (Fe,Cr)3O4(111). TPD of NO from the (Fe,Cr)3O4(111) surface revealed three chemisorbed states at 220, ~315 and 370 K assigned to NO binding at Fe3+, Cr3+ and Fe2+ sites, respectively. No significant thermal chemistry of NO was detected. NO photodesorption, the primary photochemical pathway in UHV, was sensitive to the adsorption site, with rates at the three adsorption sites following the trend: Fe3+ > Fe2+ > Cr3+. Multiexponential rate behavior seen in the overall NO PSD spectra was linked directly to site heterogeneity being manifested as a convolution of the individual NO photodesorption rates at the three types of surface sites. The photodesorption rate with UV light (365 nm) was ~10 times greater than that in the visible, but the per-photon rates across the visible spectrum (from 460 to 630 nm) were independent of the wavelength, which is suggestive of localized photon absorption at the adsorption site. Results in this study demonstrate that the adsorption site plays a critical role in determining photochemical rates on complex oxide surfaces. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multi-program national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. The research was performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Henderson, Michael A.

2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

423

The Earth-Moon CR3BP: A full Atlas of low-energy fast periodic transfer orbits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the framework of the planar CR3BP for mass parameter mu=0.0121505, corresponding to the Earth-Moon system, we identify and describe 80 families of periodic orbits encircling both the Earth and the Moon ("transfer" orbits). All the orbits in these families have very low energies, most of them corresponding to values of the Jacobi constant C for which the Hill surface is closed at the Lagrangian point L2. All of these orbits have also short period T, generally under six months. Most of the families are composed of orbits that are asymmetric with respect to the Earth-Moon axis. The main results presented for each family are: (i) the characteristic curves T(h), y(h), v_y(h), and v_x(h) on the Poincare section Sigma_1={x=0.836915310,y,v_x>0,v_y} normal to the Earth-Moon axis at the Lagrangian point L1, parameterized by their energy h=-C/2 in the synodic coordinate system; (ii) the stability parameter along each family; (iii) the intersections x_i(h) of the orbits with the Earth-Moon axis, on the Poincare section Sigma_2={x,y=0,v_x},v_y>0}; (iv) plots of some selected orbits and details of their circumlunar region; and (v) numerical data for the intersection of an orbit with Sigma_1 at a reference value of h. Some possible extensions and applications of this work are also discussed.

Alejandro M. Leiva; Carlos B. Briozzo

2006-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

424

Reduction of Fe(III), Cr(VI), U(VI), and Tc(VII) by Deinococcus radiodurans R1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deinococcus radiodurans is an exceptionally radiation-resistant microorganism capable of surviving acute exposures to ionizing radiation doses of 15,000 Gy and previously described as having a strictly aerobic respiratory metabolism. Under strict anaerobic conditions, D. radiodurans R1 reduced Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid coupled to the oxidation of lactate to CO{sub 2} and acetate but was unable to link this process to growth. D. radiodurans reduced the humic acid analog anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) to its dihydroquinone form, AH{sub 2}DS, which subsequently transferred electrons to the Fe(III) oxides hydrous ferric oxide and goethite via a previously described electron shuttle mechanism. D. radiodurans reduced the solid-phase Fe(III) oxides in the presence of either 0.1 mM AQDS or leonardite humic acids (2 mg ml{sup {minus}1}) but not in their absence. D. radiodurans also reduced U(VI) and Tc(VII) in the presence of AQDS. In contrast, Cr(VI) was directly reduced in anaerobic cultures with lactate although the rate of reduction was higher in the presence of AQDS. The results are the first evidence that D. radiodurans can reduce Fe(III) coupled to the oxidation of lactate or other organic compounds. Also, D. radiodurans, in combination with humic acids or synthetic electron shuttle agents, can reduce U and Tc and thus has potential applications for remediation of metal- and radionuclide-contaminated sites where ionizing radiation or other DNA-damaging agents may restrict the activity of more sensitive organisms.

Fredrickson, J.K.; Kostandarithes, H.M.; Li, S.W.; Plymake, A.E.; Daly, M.J.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

NUREG/CR-6853  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Air Profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Table 11. H ours w ith Valid Data for Profiler and Sond e Sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Table 12....

426

e cr d  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nd er, ept To fu and to death p dopam fected deletio Bax), o by elec cells ex charac larly s ing DN cally s bioche death, broad-bonyl-V Boc-as not att treatm rine-induced apoptotic cell death. Concurrent treat-ment with an inhibitor of macromolecule synthesis such a blocke protein apopto MN9D/ MPP1 t cent pr expres signific death C-term cell de fect. Ta induce both a te de p ium as y W h. pop de is la of l s ro co s a can be blocked by inhibitors of RNA and protein synthe-sis (23). Cysteine proteases encoded by Caenorhabditis

Won- O; Depar Ko; Nerv Ash

427

11554_cover_CR  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience hands-on halloweenReliable solar:210th LANSCE SchoolI (8/06) Page

428

NUREG/CR-6399  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinan antagonist Journal Article: CrystalFG36-08GO18149 Revision: - Date: 06/15/10 ABENGOANRELu

429

UCRL-CR--10  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layeredof EnergyLeaseEnergy U.S.-Canadat e d N

430

UCRL-CR-104544  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layeredof EnergyLeaseEnergy U.S.-Canadat e d NCR-104544

431

Capital Controls: Mud in the Wheels of Market Discipline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Widespread support for capital account liberalization in emerging markets has recently shifted to skepticism and even support for capital controls in certain circumstances. This sea-change in attitudes has been bolstered ...

Forbes, Kristin J.

2004-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

432

Measuring while drilling apparatus mud pressure signal valve  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a measurement while drilling system for borehole drilling having a downhole instrument connectable in a drill string of a rotary drilling rig including apparatus to sense geological and geophysical parameters and a valve apparatus to pulse modulate drilling fluid flowing in the drill string. A surface apparatus is connected to a drilling fluid flow conductor for extracting intelligence carrying information from the modulated drilling fluid. An improved valve apparatus is described comprising: (a) a drilling fluid flow pulse modulating pressure pulse valve member longitudinally, movably mounted in a body member and movable from a retracted position substantially removed from the drilling fluid flow and an extended position disposed at least partially within the drilling fluid flow thereby temporarily restricting drilling fluid flow within the drill string; and (b) the pulse valve member is a tubular member having a lower end portion displaceable from the body member into the drilling fluid and an upper end portion with opposed fluid pressure force areas thereon being in fluid communication with the drilling fluid flow such that forces due to the drilling fluid acting on the pressure pulse valve member are balanced in a longitudinal direction.

Peppers, J.M.; Shaikh, F.A.

1986-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

433

Nevada Environmental Restoration Project Amchitka Mud Pit Sites  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*.MSE Cores" _ ,' ,:.' :r-2 .

434

Mud Hen Lake, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3 ClimateSpurr GeothermalCarmel Public Utility Co JumpRanierMt

435

Advanced Mud System for Microhole Coiled Tubing Drilling | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWaterBrasil Jump to:Iowa ASHRAEAddis, LA)AdobeFuel

436

Phase-field Model for Interstitial Loop Growth Kinetics and Thermodynamic and Kinetic Models of Irradiated Fe-Cr Alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microstructure evolution kinetics in irradiated materials has strongly spatial correlation. For example, void and second phases prefer to nucleate and grow at pre-existing defects such as dislocations, grain boundaries, and cracks. Inhomogeneous microstructure evolution results in inhomogeneity of microstructure and thermo-mechanical properties. Therefore, the simulation capability for predicting three dimensional (3-D) microstructure evolution kinetics and its subsequent impact on material properties and performance is crucial for scientific design of advanced nuclear materials and optimal operation conditions in order to reduce uncertainty in operational and safety margins. Very recently the meso-scale phase-field (PF) method has been used to predict gas bubble evolution, void swelling, void lattice formation and void migration in irradiated materials,. Although most results of phase-field simulations are qualitative due to the lake of accurate thermodynamic and kinetic properties of defects, possible missing of important kinetic properties and processes, and the capability of current codes and computers for large time and length scale modeling, the simulations demonstrate that PF method is a promising simulation tool for predicting 3-D heterogeneous microstructure and property evolution, and providing microstructure evolution kinetics for higher scale level simulations of microstructure and property evolution such as mean field methods. This report consists of two parts. In part I, we will present a new phase-field model for predicting interstitial loop growth kinetics in irradiated materials. The effect of defect (vacancy/interstitial) generation, diffusion and recombination, sink strength, long-range elastic interaction, inhomogeneous and anisotropic mobility on microstructure evolution kinetics is taken into account in the model. The model is used to study the effect of elastic interaction on interstitial loop growth kinetics, the interstitial flux, and sink strength of interstitial loop for interstitials. In part II, we present a generic phase field model and discuss the thermodynamic and kinetic properties in phase-field models including the reaction kinetics of radiation defects and local free energy of irradiated materials. In particular, a two-sublattice thermodynamic model is suggested to describe the local free energy of alloys with irradiated defects. Fe-Cr alloy is taken as an example to explain the required thermodynamic and kinetic properties for quantitative phase-field modeling. Finally the great challenges in phase-field modeling will be discussed.

Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

Unconventional magnetism in ThCr2Si2-type phosphides, La1 xNdxCo2P2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quaternary phases La1 xNdxCo2P2 (x = 0, 0.12, 0.25, 0.37, 0.50, 0.63, 0.75, 0.88, 1.0) have been synthesized from Sn flux to investigate the origins of drastic differences in properties between ferromagnetic LaCo2P2 and antiferromagnetic NdCo2P2. Powder and single-crystal X-ray diffraction indicate that all La1 xNdxCo2P2 samples are isostructural and crystallize in the ThCr2Si2 structure type. The unit cell parameters and volume change non-linearly with the Nd content (x), with the x < 0.50 10 samples being closer to LaCo2P2 and the ones with x > 0.50 being closer to NdCo2P2. These structural differences are also reflected in the magnetic behavior. The samples with lower Nd content are characterized by ferromagnetic ordering in the Co sublattice with the TC increasing from 132 K for x = 0 to 262 K for x = 0.50, while the samples with higher Nd content exhibit suppressed magnetization in the Co sublattice and canted antiferromagnetic ordering with TC ~ 270 K. Refinement of neutron powder 15 diffraction patterns for x = 0.50 and 0.75 reveals a gradual ordering of the Nd 4f moments under the influence of Co 3d moments below 100 K. At low temperatures and zero field, these samples exhibit antiferromagnetic ordering of both Nd and Co magnetic moments, but under applied field they demonstrate the stabilization of a ferrimagnetic state with antiparallel alignment of the 4f and 3d moments, as indicated by isothermal magnetization measurements. The re-entrant ferrimagnetic transition 20 is also observed in samples with x > 0.50 if the temperature is lowered below 5 K. The occurrence of this low-temperature magnetic transition was confirmed by alternating-current susceptibility measurements.

Thompson, Corey [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Kovnir, Kirill [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Garlea, Vasile O [ORNL; Choi, E. [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (Magnet Lab), Florida; Zhou, Haidong [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Shatruk, Michael [Florida State University, Tallahassee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Manufacturing and properties of newly developed 9%CrMoVNiNbN high-pressure low-pressure rotor shaft forging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to obtain the improved strength and toughness for high-pressure low-pressure rotor shaft forging, fundamental studies using laboratory heats were performed on the 9CrMoV base materials, and effects of chemistry on toughness and creep rupture strength were investigated. From the investigation, it is showed that the superclean 9CrMoVNiNbN steel with reduced Si and Mn contents and Ni addition provides a superior strength versus toughness balance. Based on these fundamental studies, a trial high-pressure low-pressure rotor shaft forging with diameter of low-pressure section of 1,750 mm and diameter of high-pressure section of 1,200 mm was successfully manufactured from the diameter of 1,800 mm, and the weight of 65 ton ESR ingot. From the evaluation test results of this trial rotor forging, homogeneous distribution of chemistry was confirmed and low impurity contents was observed in the whole forging. The superior strength and toughness were confirmed with good creep rupture strength. The FATT at the center of low-pressure section was {minus}3 C with the tensile strength level of 870 MPa. From the results of fracture toughness test, low cycle fatigue test, and isothermal aging test, superior mechanical properties were demonstrated. Thus, the superclean 9CrMoVNiNbN steel with reduced Si and Mn contents and Ni addition, is particularly suitable for the high-pressure low-pressure rotor material for advanced combined cycle power plants.

Azuma, Tsukasa; Tanaka, Yasuhiko; Ishiguro, Tohru; Yoshida, Hajime; Ikeda, Yasumi [Japan Steel Works, Muroran (Japan)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

439

XPS on corrosion products of ZnCr coated steel: on the reliability of Ar+ ion depth profiling for multi component material analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy combined with Ar+ ion etching is a powerful concept to identify different chemical states of compounds in depth profiles, important for obtaining information underneath surfaces or at layer interfaces. The possibility of occurring sputter damage is known but insufficiently investigated for corrosion products of Zn-based steel coatings like ZnCr. Hence, in this work reference materials are studied according to stability against ion sputtering. Indeed some investigated compounds reveal a very unstable chemical nature. On the basis of these findings the reliability of depth profiles of real samples can be rated to avoid misinterpretations of observed chemical species.

Steinberger, Roland; Arndt, Martin; Stifter, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Technical note: Erroneous data in {open_quotes}Nuclear Safety Guide, TID-7016, Revision 2,{close_quotes} NUREG/CR-0095, ORNL/NUREG/CSD-6 (1978)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear Safety Guide, TID-7016 Rev 2 was issued as NUREG/CR-0095 in 1978. Table 2.8 of this report has been found to contain errors. The table was designed to indicate configurations with effective multipliction factors of 0.95. Because of an error in configuration descriptions, some of the configurations have multiplication factors as high as 1.09. A corrected table is available from the undersigned, and Revision 3 of the report is being prepared. Norman L. Pruvost, LANL HSE-6, P. O. Box 1663, M/S-F691, Los Alamos, NM 87545.

Whitesides, G.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mud cr eek" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Excited state absorption of V/sup 2 +/ and Cr/sup 3 +/ ions in crystal hosts. [V/sup 2 +/ in KMgF/sub 3/; Cr/sup 3 +/ in Na/sub 3/Ga/sub 2/Li/sub 3/F/sub 12/ and BeAl/sub 2/O/sub 4/  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have measured the excited state absorption spectra of KMgF/sub 3/:V/sup 2 +/, Na/sub 3/Ga/sub 2/Li/sub 3/F/sub 12/:Cr/sup 3 +/, and BeAl/sub 2/O/sub 4/:Cr/sup 3 +/. The /sup 4/T/sub 2/ ..-->.. /sup 4/T/sub 1/a, /sup 4/T/sub 1/b transitions were observed for the first two systems, while the /sup 2/E, /sup 2/T/sub 1/ ..-->.. /sup 2/T/sub 2/ transitions were seen for BeAl/sub 2/O/sub 4/:Cr/sup 3 +/. All excited state absorptions, except the /sup 4/T/sub 2/ ..-->.. /sup 4/T/sub 1/a transition, can be understood on the basis of simple crystal field theory. The /sup 4/T/sub 2/ ..-->.. /sup 4/T/sub 1/a transition is found to be profoundly modified by the Jahn-Teller effect, such that it is broader and at higher energy than otherwise expected. This excited state absorption is observed to overlap the emission spectrum of KMgF/sub 3/:V/sup 2 +/, and thereby substantially reduce the effective stimulated emission cross-section.

Payne, S.A.; Chase, L.L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Mandatory dedication of park and open space land: effectiveness of and attitudes toward this method of public land acquisition in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the orD. 'nance an" = cate 1 . gi; 1st icr. styucI; &1olin. Hcrwever r tile Ca'. if orn It l the p Cb ro, van Co r -. sts t: he c". Irlci 1. t. Lorl 5 ancl r I's tric f Oy!ri CO tne . 1 O LIWrne CS I t 1 r(l. Cr Wno H eek-nrI C cog!'. 1'Le uty..."r case involved the testing of an ordinance wh' ch had bee-! enacted by the City of Naperville which . ;equi ed mandatory dedication of land for both schools and public op! n space, or . i n 1) eu of land, ?t he contribut! on of money for the establi...

Ehman, Douglas Richard

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

443

Neutron diffraction study of the crystal structure and structural phase transition of La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3-x}Sr{sub x}CrO{sub 3} (0<=x<=0.3)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The crystal structure of the La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3-x}Sr{sub x}CrO{sub 3} series, including the compositional and temperature dependence of the structural parameters, has been studied by variable temperature neutron diffraction measurements. The extent of the distortions from the ideal cubic perovskite structure has been evaluated quantitatively using the average bond lengths and the mean volumes of the [CrO{sub 6}] octahedron and [(La/Ca/Sr)O{sub 12}] polyhedron, and has been shown to decrease with increase of Sr content or temperature. At the structural phase transition from the orthorhombic (Pnma) structure to the rhombohedral (R3-barc) one, the volume of the [CrO{sub 6}] octahedron decreases whereas that of the [(La/Ca/Sr)O{sub 12}] polyhedron shows little difference, resulting in an overall decrease in the level of distortion. The change in the degree of distortion at the phase transition decreases with increase of Sr content, in agreement with the smaller variation of the enthalpy and volume for the specimens with higher Sr content. - Graphical abstract: Temperature dependence of parameter, PHI, representing the extent of distortion from the ideal cubic perovskite structure, for La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}CrO{sub 3} (diamonds) and La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.15}Sr{sub 0.15}CrO{sub 3} (circles) calculated from neutron diffraction patterns.

Omoto, Kazuki [Department of Integrated Sciences in Physics and Biology, College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University, 3-25-40 Sakurajousui, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan); Norberg, Stefan T. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Hull, Steve [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Aoto, Akimitsu [Department of Integrated Sciences in Physics and Biology, College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University, 3-25-40 Sakurajousui, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan); Hashimoto, Takuya, E-mail: takuya@chs.nihon-u.ac.j [Department of Integrated Sciences in Physics and Biology, College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University, 3-25-40 Sakurajousui, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

444

Effect of 4 wt.% Cr on microstructure, corrosion resistance and tribological properties of Fe{sub 3}Al–20 wt.%Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fe{sub 3}Al–20 wt.%Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ultrafine grained composites with 4 wt.% Cr were prepared by mechanical alloying inducing self propagating high temperature synthesis with subsequent plasma activated sintering. Microstructures of the composites were studied by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectrum and transmission electron microscope. Then the relative density, room temperature hardness, static corrosion resistance and dry sliding wear behavior at a temperature range of 25 °C–800 °C of the sintered samples were tested and analyzed. The results showed that the composites had high hardness and a good microstructure with fine grain size, high relative density. The composites with 4 wt.% Cr amount also exhibited excellent comprehensive tribological properties at medium–high temperatures especially at a temperature above 500 °C, although the wear resistance did not be improved at 25 °C–500 °C. 4 wt.% Cr element addition improved the corrosion resistance of the composites significantly with the corrosion loss decreasing by 19.48%. - Highlights: ? In-situ Fe{sub 3}Al–20 wt.%Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites with 4 wt.% Cr was prepared by MA-PAS. ? Composites had good tribological properties at the temperature above 500 °C. ? Corrosion resistance was improved obviously by 4 wt.% Cr amount.

Bai, Yaping, E-mail: jingpingxue2004@163.com; Xing, Jiandong, E-mail: jdxing@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Ma, Shengqiang, E-mail: shengqiang012@163.com; Huang, Qian, E-mail: jiajiamao@126.com; He, Yuanyuan, E-mail: yuanyuanhe.717@stu.xjtu.edu.cn; Liu, Zhen, E-mail: liuzhen89628@163.com; Gao, Yimin, E-mail: ymgao@mail.xjtu.edu.cn

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

445

Structurally-driven metal-insulator transition in Ca{sub 2}Ru{sub 1-x}Cr{sub x}O{sub 4} (0{<=}x<0.14): A single crystal X-ray diffraction study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Correlation between structure and transport properties are investigated in high-quality single-crystals of Ca{sub 2}Ru{sub 1-x}Cr{sub x}O{sub 4} with 0Cr doping and with decreasing temperature. A strong suppression of structural distortions with increasing Cr substitution was identified. No clear T{sub MI} can be observed when x>13.5% and the system behaves as an insulator. Such a large, sharp metal-insulator transition and tuneable transition temperature may have potential applications in electronic devices. -- Graphical abstract: The metal-insulator transition temperature (T{sub MI}) was drastically reduced by Cr doping, and is closely related to the distortion of structure. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} The metal-insulator transition temperature (T{sub MI}) was drastically reduced by doping Cr into Ca{sub 2}RuO{sub 4} single crystal. {yields} Detailed single crystal structural analysis provided important insight into this structurally-driven metal-insulator transition. {yields} Negative Volume Thermal Expansion (NVTE) was observed with increasing temperature.

Qi, T.F., E-mail: tqi2@uky.ed [Center for Advanced Materials, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Ge, M. [Center for Advanced Materials, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); High Magnetic Field Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Korneta, O.B. [Center for Advanced Materials, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Parkin, S. [Center for Advanced Materials, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); De Long, L.E.; Cao, G. [Center for Advanced Materials, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

446

Kondo effect in the paramagnetic phase of CrFe alloy with the spin-density-wave suppressed by pressure or V doping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pressure dependence of the resistivity {rho}(T) of (Cr+2.7 at.{percent}Fe){sub 98}V{sub 2} is measured, following a previous study of the temperature dependence of {rho}(T) in the spin-density-wave (SDW) alloy system, (Cr+2.7 at.{percent} Fe){sub 1{minus}x}(V,Mn){sub x}. The minimum in {rho}(T) in the V-doped alloys seen at T{approx_gt}T{sub N} for x{gt}1 at.{percent} is found to move to lower temperatures under pressure p in the alloy containing 2 at.{percent} V, decreasing in magnitude, and eventually, as the Neel temperature T{sub N} goes to zero at p{approx}10 kbar, becoming a very shallow minimum followed by a maximum and a rapid decrease as T{r_arrow}4.2 K. This latter behavior in the paramagnetic phase is believed to be due to the Kondo effect, while the pressure dependent minimum in {rho}(T) in the SDW phase is a manifestation of impurity resonance scattering. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Galkin, V.Y.; de Camargo, P.C. [Physics Department of Federal University of Parana, Curitiba 81 531 990 (Brazil)] [Physics Department of Federal University of Parana, Curitiba 81 531 990 (Brazil); Budko, S.L.; Saitovitch, E.B. [CBPF, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)] [CBPF, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Fawcett, E. [Physics Department of University of Toronto, Toronto M5S 1A7 (Canada)] [Physics Department of University of Toronto, Toronto M5S 1A7 (Canada)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

High Temperature Oxidation Resistance and Surface Electrical Conductivity of Stainless Steels with Filtered Arc Cr-Al-N Multilayer and/or Superlattice Coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The requirements for low cost and high-tempurater corrosion resistance for bipolar interconnect plates in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks has directed attention to the use of metal plates with oxidation resistant coatings. Candidate coatings must exhibit chemical and thermal-mechanical stability and high electrical conductivity during long-term (>400,000 hrs) exposure to SOFC operatong conditions. The high temperature oxidation resistance and surface electrical donductivity of 304, 440A,a dn Crofer-22 APU steel coupons, with and without multilayer and/or superlattice coatings from a Cr-Al-N system were investigated as a function of exposure in an oxidization atmosphere at high temperatures. The coatins were deposited using large area filtered arc depsition (LAFAD) technology [1], and subsequently annealed in air at 800 degrees C for varying times. Area specific resistance and activation energy for electrical conductivity of oxidized coupons were measured using a 4-point technique with Pt paste for electrical contact between facing oxidized coupon surfaces. The surface compositon, structure and morphology of the coupons were characterized using RBS, nuclear reaction analysis, XPS, SEM, and AFM techniques. The structure of the CRN/CrAlN multilayered superlattice coatings was characterized by TEM. By altering the architecture of the coating layers, both surface electrical conductivity and oxidation resistance [2] improved signigicantly for some of the coated samples tested up to ~100hrs.

Gannon, Paul E.; Tripp, C.; Knospe, Anders; Ramana, C. V.; Deibert, Max; Smith, Richard J.; Gorokhovsky, Vladimir I.; Shutthanandan, V.; Gelles, David S.

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

A Successful Synthesis of the CoCrFeNiAl{sub 0.3} Single-Crystal, High-Entropy Alloy by Bridgman Solidification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the first time, a face-centered-cubic, single-crystal CoCrFeNiAl{sub 0.3} (designated as Al0.3), high-entropy alloy (HEA) was successfully synthesized by the Bridgman solidification (BS) method, at an extremely low withdrawal velocity through a constant temperature gradient, for which it underwent two BS steps. Specially, at the first BS step, the alloy sample underwent several morphological transitions accompanying the crystal growth from the melt. This microstructure evolves from as-cast dendrites, to equiaxed grains, and then to columnar crystals, and last to the single crystal. In particular, at the equiaxed-grain region, some visible annealing twins were observed, which indicates a low stacking fault energy of the Al0.3 alloy. Although a body-centered- cubic CoCrFeNiAl (Al1) HEA was also prepared under the same conditions, only a single columnar-crystal structure with instinctively preferential crystallographic orientations was obtained by the same procedure. A similar morphological transition from dendrites to equiaxed grains occurred at the equiaxed-grain region in Al1 alloy, but the annealing twins were not observed probably because a higher Al addition leads to a higher stacking fault energy for this alloy.

Ma, S. G.; Zhang, S. F.; Gao, M. C.; Liaw, P. K.; Zhang, Y.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Evaluation of 2.25Cr-1Mo Alloy for Containment of LiCl/KCl Eutectic during the Pyrometallurgical Processing of Used Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recovery of uranium from the Mk-IV and Mk-V electrorefiner vessels containing a LiCl/KCl eutectic salt has been on-going for 14 and 12 years, respectively, during the pyrometallurgical processing of used nuclear fuel. Although austenitic stainless steels are typically utilized for LiCl/KCl salt systems, the presence of cadmium in the Mk-IV electrorefiner dictates an alternate material. A 2.25Cr-1Mo alloy (ASME SA-387) was chosen due to the absence of nickel in the alloy which has a considerable solubility in cadmium. Using the transition metal impurities (iron, chromium, nickel, molybdenum, and manganese) in the electrorefined uranium products, an algorithm was developed to derive values for the contribution of the transition metals from the various input sources. Weight loss and corrosion rate data for the Mk-V electrorefiner vessel were then generated based on the transition metal impurities in the uranium products. To date, the corrosion rate of the 2.25Cr-1Mo alloy in LiCl/KCl eutectic is outstanding assuming uniform (i.e. non-localized) conditions.

B.R. Westphal; S.X. Li; G.L. Fredrickson; D. Vaden; T.A. Johnson; J.C. Wass

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Spin dependent transport properties of Mn-Ga/MgO/Mn-Ga magnetic tunnel junctions with metal(Mg, Co, Cr) insertion layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report a first principles theoretical investigation of spin polarized quantum transport in Mn{sub 2}Ga/MgO/Mn{sub 2}Ga and Mn{sub 3}Ga/MgO/Mn{sub 3}Ga magnetic tunneling junctions (MTJs) with the consideration of metal(Mg, Co, Cr) insertion layer effect. By changing the concentration of Mn, our calculation shows a considerable disparity in transport properties: A tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) ratio of 852% was obtained for Mn{sub 2}Ga-based MTJs, however, only a 5% TMR ratio for Mn{sub 3}Ga-based MTJs. In addition, the influence of insertion layer has been considered in our calculation. We found the Co insertion layer can increase the TMR of Mn{sub 2}Ga-based MTJ to 904%; however, the Cr insertion layer can decrease the TMR by 668%; A negative TMR ratio can be obtained with Mg insertion layer. Our work gives a comprehensive understanding of the influence of different insertion layer in Mn-Ga based MTJs. It is proved that, due to the transmission can be modulated by the interfacial electronic structure of insertion, the magnetoresistance ratio of Mn{sub 2}Ga/MgO/Mn{sub 2}Ga MTJ can be improved by inserting Co layer.

Liang, S. H.; Tao, L. L.; Liu, D. P., E-mail: dpliu@iphy.ac.cn; Han, X. F., E-mail: xfhan@iphy.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Magnetism, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Lu, Y. [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198, CNRS-Nancy Université, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre (France)

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

451

Local magnetism in the molecule-based metamagnet [Ru2(O2CMe)4]3[Cr(CN)6] probed with implanted muons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a muon-spin relaxation study of local magnetism in the molecule-based metamagnet [Ru2(O2CMe)4]3[Cr(CN)6]. We observe magnetic order with TN = 33 K, although above 25 K the sublattice spins become less rigid and a degree of static magnetic disorder is observed. The comparison of measurements in applied magnetic field with simulations allows us to understand the origin of the muon response across the metamagnetic transition and to map out the phase diagram of the material. Applied hydrostatic pressures of up to 6 kbar lead to an increase in the local magnetic field along with a complex change in the internal magnetic field distribution.

Lancaster, T. [University of Oxford; Pratt, F. L. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; Blundell, S. J. [University of Oxford; Steele, Andrew J. [University of Oxford; Baker, Peter J. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; Wright, Jack D. [University of Oxford; Fishman, Randy Scott [ORNL; Miller, Joel S. [University of Utah

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Fe-24 wt.%Cr-4.1 wt.%C hardfacing alloy: Microstructure and carbide refinement mechanisms with ceria additive  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The microstructure and carbide refinement mechanisms of Fe-24 wt.%Cr-4.1 wt.%C hardfacing alloys with 0 wt.%, 0.5 wt.%, 1.0 wt.%, 2 wt.%, and 4 wt.% ceria additives have been systematically investigated in this work. Optical microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectrometer, and X-ray diffraction were collectively used to study the microstructure, the phase components, and the chemical formation of inclusion formed in the welding process. Wear-resistance of the alloys was comparatively studied using an abrasive wear testing machine. The structure analysis results show that the Fe-Cr-C hardfacing alloy mainly consists of martensite, retained austenite, MC carbide and M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbide. With increasing ceria additive contents, the average size of the primary M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbide decreases and reaches a most refined state in the alloy with 2 wt.% ceria additives. Comparative wear tests data shows that the wear resistance of the hardfacing alloys with ceria additives is better than that without ceria additive. In a good agreement with the carbide refinement results, the wear resistance of the alloy reaches an optimum level in the sample with 2 wt.% ceria additive. The main RE inclusion type identified with in-situ XRD analysis is RE inclusion Ce{sub 2}O{sub 2}S. Thermodynamics calculation confirms that this type of RE inclusion could precipitate prior to M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbides, and act as a heterogeneous nucleus for M{sub 7}C{sub 3} in the welding process, which effectively provides a mechanism for significant refinement of the M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbide and improves its wear resistance. - Graphical Abstract: Rare Earth inclusion (Ce{sub 2}O{sub 2}S) distributes in the primary M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbide. Moreover, Ce{sub 2}O{sub 2}S, which acts as heterogeneous nuclei of the primary M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbide, is medium effective. Therefore, the primary M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbide has been refined. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Micro-hardness of primary M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbide in Fe-Cr-C hardfacing alloy is 1594 HV. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RE inclusion Ce{sub 2}O{sub 2}S can be observed in the primary M{sub 7}C{sub 3} carbide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ce{sub 2}O{sub 2}S as heterogeneous nuclei of the Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3} is medium effective. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Primary carbide is most refined with 2 wt.% ceria additive.

Zhou, Y.F.; Yang, Y.L.; Jiang, Y.W.; Yang, J. [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Ren, X.J. [School of Engineering, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool L3 3AF (United Kingdom)] [School of Engineering, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool L3 3AF (United Kingdom); Yang, Q.X., E-mail: qxyang@ysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

453

Experimental and analytical investigations of mass transport processes of 12Cr-1MoVW steel in thermally-convected lithium systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental data on corrosion and mass transport in lithium12Cr-1MoVW steel were obtained from two thermal convection loops; one operated from 360 to 505/sup 0/C for 3040 hours and the other from 525 to 655/sup 0/C for 2510 hours. The experimental effort was supported by analytical investigations of mechanisms of corrosion and mass transport. It was found that mass transfer is not a simple function of temperature and alloy component solubility, but that temperature gradient also plays an important role. Above 580/sup 0/C mass transfer appears dominated by temperature gradient. Between 450 and 580/sup 0/C, mass transfer appears related to surface reactions involving nitrogen in lithium with chromium, and carbides on the steel surface. The corrosion rates from this work are significantly lower than those adopted in recent blanket design studies. 16 refs., 5 figs

Bell, G.E.; Abdou, M.A.; Tortorelli, P.F.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Brazing ZrO{sub 2} ceramic to Ti–6Al–4V alloy using NiCrSiB amorphous filler foil: Interfacial microstructure and joint properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reliable brazing of ZrO{sub 2} ceramic and Ti–6Al–4V alloy was achieved using NiCrSiB amorphous filler foil. The interfacial microstructure of ZrO{sub 2}/Ti–6Al–4V joints was characterized by scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive spectrometer and micro-focused X-ray diffractometer. The effects of brazing temperature on the interfacial microstructure and joining properties of brazed joints were investigated in detail. Active Ti of Ti–6Al–4V alloy dissolved into molten filler metal and reacted with ZrO{sub 2} ceramic to form a continuous TiO reaction layer, which played an important role in brazing. Various reaction phases including Ti{sub 2}Ni, Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} and ?-Ti were formed in brazed joints. With an increasing of brazing temperature, the TiO layer thickened gradually while the Ti{sub 2}Ni amount reduced. Shear test indicated that brazed joints tend to fracture at the interface between ZrO{sub 2} ceramic and brazing seam or Ti{sub 2}Ni intermetallic layer. The maximum average shear strength reached 284.6 MPa when brazed at 1025 °C for 10 min. - Graphical Abstract: Interfacial microstructure of ZrO{sub 2}/TC4 joint brazed using NiCrSiB amorphous filler foil was: ZrO{sub 2}/TiO/Ti{sub 2}Ni + ?-Ti + Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3}/?-Ti/Widmanstätten structure/TC4. - Highlights: • Brazing of ZrO{sub 2} ceramic and Ti-6Al-4V alloy was achieved. • Interfacial microstructure was TiO/Ti{sub 2}Ni + ? + Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3}/?/Widmanstätten structure. • The formation of TiO produced the darkening effect of ZrO{sub 2} ceramic. • The highest joining strength of 284.6MPa was obtained.

Cao, J., E-mail: cao_jian@hit.edu.cn [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Special Welding Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai 264209 (China); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Song, X.G., E-mail: song_xiaoguohit@yahoo.com.cn [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Special Welding Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai 264209 (China); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Li, C., E-mail: li_chun1989@yahoo.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhao, L.Y., E-mail: Zhao_ly@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Feng, J.C., E-mail: feng_jicai@163.com [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Special Welding Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology at Weihai, Weihai 264209 (China); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

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Magnetic phase transitions and entropy change in layered NdMn{sub 1.7}Cr{sub 0.3}Si{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A giant magnetocaloric effect has been observed around the Curie temperature, T{sub C}???42?K, in NdMn{sub 1.7}Cr{sub 0.3}Si{sub 2} with no discernible thermal and magnetic hysteresis losses. Below 400?K, three magnetic phase transitions take place around 380?K, 320?K and 42?K. Detailed high resolution synchrotron and neutron powder diffraction (10–400?K) confirmed the magnetic transitions and phases as follows: T{sub N}{sup intra}???380?K denotes the transition from paramagnetism to intralayer antiferromagnetism (AFl), T{sub N}{sup inter}???320?K represents the transition from the AFl structure to the canted antiferromagnetic spin structure (AFmc), while T{sub C}???42?K denotes the first order magnetic transition from AFmc to canted ferromagnetism (Fmc?+?F(Nd)) due to ordering of the Mn and Nd sub-lattices. The maximum values of the magnetic entropy change and the adiabatic temperature change, around T{sub C} for a field change of 5?T are evaluated to be ??S{sub M}{sup max}???15.9?J kg{sup ?1} K{sup ?1} and ?T{sub ad}{sup max}???5?K, respectively. The first order magnetic transition associated with the low levels of hysteresis losses (thermal Cr{sub 0.3}Si{sub 2} offers potential as a candidate for magnetic refrigerator applications in the temperature region below 45?K.

Md Din, M. F., E-mail: mfmd999@uowmail.edu.au; Dou, S. X. [Institute for Superconductivity and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia); Wang, J. L. [Institute for Superconductivity and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia); Bragg Institute, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, Lucas Heights, New South Wales 2234 (Australia); Campbell, S. J. [School of Physical, Environmental, and Mathematical Sciences, The University of New South Wales, Canberra, The Australian Defence Force Academy, Australian Capital Territory 2600 (Australia); Studer, A. J.; Avdeev, M.; Kennedy, S. J. [Bragg Institute, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, Lucas Heights, New South Wales 2234 (Australia); Gu, Q. F. [Australian Synchrotron, 800 Blackburn Rd, Clayton 3168 (Australia); Zeng, R. [Institute for Superconductivity and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia); Solar Energy Technologies, School of Computing, Engineering and Mathematics, University of Western Sydney, Penrith, NSW 2751 (Australia)

2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

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Fe and B Substituted Cr23C6 using First-principles Study You Young Song, Seung-Woo Seo, In Gee Kim and H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fe and B Substituted Cr23C6 using First-principles Study You Young Song, Seung-Woo Seo, In Gee Kim., Phys. Rev. Let . 77 (1996). S-W Seo, YY Song, G. Rahman, IG Kim, M Weinert , and AJ Freeman, J. Magnet

Cambridge, University of

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