Sample records for mu mol mol-1

  1. availability in two different treatment implementations: (1) from seedlings exposed to 360, 550, and 700 mu mol mol(-1) CO2 in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and 700 mu mol mol(-1) CO2 in a glasshouse; and (2) from intact adults exposed to 360 and 550 mu mol mol(-1) CO2 at the Nevada Desert FACE (Free Air CO2 Enrichment) Facility. FACE and glasshouse wed-watered Larrea significantly down- regulated photosynthesis at elevated CO2, reducing maximum photosynthetic rate

  2. MU Eneg

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 3400, U.S.MajorMarketsNov-14Biomass feedstocksMU Eneg a~-s u

  3. SUMMON@MU---Intro Video MU Libraries 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Jerry

    SUMMON@MU---Intro Video MU Libraries 1 This is a brief introduction to Summon@MU, the newest way options are also available. #12;SUMMON@MU---Intro Video MU Libraries 2 After running a search... you can... #12;SUMMON@MU---Intro Video MU Libraries 3 And you can also limit your items to those with full text

  4. TARGETRY FOR A MU+MU- COLLIDER.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KIRK,H.G.

    1999-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The requirement for high luminosity in a {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} collider leads one to conclude that a prodigious source of pions is needed followed by an efficient capture/decay channel. Significant targetry issues are raised by these demands. Among these are (1) the best target configuration to tolerate a high-rep rate, high-power proton beam ({approx} 10{sup 14} ppp at 15 Hz), (2) the pion spectra of the produced pions and (3) the best configuration for maximizing the quantity of captured pions. In this paper, the current thinking of the {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} collider collaboration for solutions to these issues is discussed. In addition, we give a description of the R&D program designed to provide a proof-of-principle for a muon capture system capable of meeting the demands of a future high-luminosity machine.

  5. Lepton-flavor-violating decay {tau}{yields}{mu}{mu}{mu} at the CERN LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giffels, M.; Stahl, A. [III. Physikalisches Institut, RWTH Aachen, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Kallarackal, J. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, RWTH Aachen, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Kraemer, M.; O'Leary, B. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, RWTH Aachen, 52074 Aachen (Germany)

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lepton-flavor-violating {tau} decays are predicted in many extensions of the standard model at a rate observable at future collider experiments. In this article we focus on the decay {tau}{yields}{mu}{mu}{mu}, which is a promising channel to observe lepton-flavor violation at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We present analytic expressions for the differential decay width derived from a model-independent effective Lagrangian with general four-fermion operators, and estimate the experimental acceptance for detecting the decay {tau}{yields}{mu}{mu}{mu} at the LHC. Specific emphasis is given to decay angular distributions and how they can be used to discriminate new physics models. We provide specific predictions for various extensions of the standard model, including supersymmetric, little Higgs, and technicolor models.

  6. Mixed-mu superconducting bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, J.R.; Mulcahy, T.M.

    1998-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A mixed-mu superconducting bearing is disclosed including a ferrite structure disposed for rotation adjacent a stationary superconductor material structure and a stationary permanent magnet structure. The ferrite structure is levitated by said stationary permanent magnet structure. 9 figs.

  7. Mixed-mu superconducting bearings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R. (Hinsdale, IL); Mulcahy, Thomas M. (Western Springs, IL)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mixed-mu superconducting bearing including a ferrite structure disposed for rotation adjacent a stationary superconductor material structure and a stationary permanent magnet structure. The ferrite structure is levitated by said stationary permanent magnet structure.

  8. Producing [mu][sup [minus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knowles, P.E.; Beer, G.A.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A. (Victoria Univ., BC (Canada)); Bailey, J.M. (Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom)); Beveridge, J.L.; Marshall, G.M.; Brewer, J.H.; Forster, B.M. (British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada)); Huber, T.M. (Gustavus Adolphus Coll., St. Peter, MN (United States)); Jacot-Guillarmod, R.; Schellenberg, L. (Fribourg Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. de Physique); Kammel,

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After the feasibility of vacuum isolated [mu][sup -]d production was demonstrated at TRIUMF in 1989, development was begun on a target system that would take advantage of the process to aid in the understanding of the muon catalyzed fusion cycle. Minimal neutron backgrounds, the ability to use silicon detectors, and compatibility with tritium were considered important for a very versatile target system. the advantages which the target gives isolating [mu]CF process will be outlined.

  9. Noether theorem for mu-symmetries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Cicogna; G. Gaeta

    2007-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a version of Noether theorem adapted to the framework of mu-symmetries; this extends to such case recent work by Muriel, Romero and Olver in the framework of lambda-symmetries, and connects mu-symmetries of a Lagrangian to a suitably modified conservation law. In some cases this "mu-conservation law'' actually reduces to a standard one; we also note a relation between mu-symmetries and conditional invariants. We also consider the case where the variational principle is itself formulated as requiring vanishing variation under mu-prolonged variation fields, leading to modified Euler-Lagrange equations. In this setting mu-symmetries of the Lagrangian correspond to standard conservation laws as in the standard Noether theorem. We finally propose some applications and examples.

  10. Search for NMSSM Higgs bosons in the h ---> aa ---> mu mu mu mu, mu mu tau tau channels using p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, B.; /Oklahoma U.; Abolins, M.; /Michigan State U.; Acharya, B.S.; /Tata Inst.; Adams, M.; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, T.; /Florida State U.; Aguilo, E.; /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U.; Ahsan, M.; /Kansas State U.; Alexeev, G.D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Northeastern U.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a first search for production of the lightest neutral CP-even Higgs boson (h) in the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model, where h decays to a pair of neutral pseudoscalar Higgs bosons (a), using 4.2 fb{sup -1} of data recorded with the D0 detector at Fermilab. The a bosons are required to either both decay to {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} or one to {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and the other to {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}. No significant signal is observed, and we set limits on its production as functions of M{sub a} and M{sub h}.

  11. Behavioural Ecology Field Course Mols Laboratories, Denmark 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburg,.Universität

    1 REPORTS Behavioural Ecology Field Course Mols Laboratories, Denmark 2007 Teachers: Dr. Trine ................................................................................................................................... 64 Receptor based feeding preferences; An investigation of the taste perception of three classes ............................................................................................................................ 79 Taste perception in the wood ant, Formica rufa Jeppe Jensen

  12. Mu2e Technical Design Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Bartoszek; E. Barnes; J. P. Miller; J. Mott; A. Palladino; J. Quirk; B. L. Roberts; J. Crnkovic; V. Polychronakos; V. Tishchenko; P. Yamin; C. -h. Cheng; B. Echenard; K. Flood; D. G. Hitlin; J. H. Kim; T. S. Miyashita; F. C. Porter; M. Röhrken; J. Trevor; R. -Y. Zhu; E. Heckmaier; T. I. Kang; G. Lim; W. Molzon; Z. You; A. M. Artikov; J. A. Budagov; Yu. I. Davydov; V. V. Glagolev; A. V. Simonenko; Z. U. Usubov; S. H. Oh; C. Wang; G. Ambrosio; N. Andreev; D. Arnold; M. Ball; R. H. Bernstein; A. Bianchi; K. Biery; R. Bossert; M. Bowden; J. Brandt; G. Brown; H. Brown; M. Buehler; M. Campbell; S. Cheban; M. Chen; J. Coghill; R. Coleman; C. Crowley; A. Deshpande; G. Deuerling; J. Dey; N. Dhanaraj; M. Dinnon; S. Dixon; B. Drendel; N. Eddy; R. Evans; D. Evbota; J. Fagan; S. Feher; B. Fellenz; H. Friedsam; G. Gallo; A. Gaponenko; M. Gardner; S. Gaugel; K. Genser; G. Ginther; H. Glass; D. Glenzinski; D. Hahn; S. Hansen; B. Hartsell; S. Hays; J. A. Hocker; E. Huedem; D. Huffman; A. Ibrahim; C. Johnstone; V. Kashikhin; V. V. Kashikhin; P. Kasper; T. Kiper; D. Knapp; K. Knoepfel; L. Kokoska; M. Kozlovsky; G. Krafczyk; M. Kramp; S. Krave; K. Krempetz; R. K. Kutschke; R. Kwarciany; T. Lackowski; M. J. Lamm; M. Larwill; F. Leavell; D. Leeb; A. Leveling; D. Lincoln; V. Logashenko; V. Lombardo; M. L. Lopes; A. Makulski; A. Martinez; D. McArthur; F. McConologue; L. Michelotti; N. Mokhov; J. Morgan; A. Mukherjee; P. Murat; V. Nagaslaev; D. V. Neuffer; T. Nicol; J. Niehoff; J. Nogiec; M. Olson; D. Orris; R. Ostojic; T. Page; C. Park; T. Peterson; R. Pilipenko; A. Pla-Dalmau; V. Poloubotko; M. Popovic; E. Prebys; P. Prieto; V. Pronskikh; D. Pushka; R. Rabehl; R. E. Ray; R. Rechenmacher; R. Rivera; W. Robotham; P. Rubinov; V. L. Rusu; V. Scarpine; W. Schappert; D. Schoo; A. Stefanik; D. Still; Z. Tang; N. Tanovic; M. Tartaglia; G. Tassotto; D. Tinsley; R. S. Tschirhart; G. Vogel; R. Wagner; R. Wands; M. Wang; S. Werkema; H. B. White Jr.; J. Whitmore; R. Wielgos; R. Woods; C. Worel; R. Zifko; P. Ciambrone; F. Colao; M. Cordelli; G. Corradi; E. Dane; S. Giovannella; F. Happacher; A. Luca; S. Miscetti; B. Ponzio; G. Pileggi; A. Saputi; I. Sarra; R. S. Soleti; V. Stomaci; M. Martini; P. Fabbricatore; S. Farinon; R. Musenich; D. Alexander; A. Daniel; A. Empl; E. V. Hungerford; K. Lau; G. D. Gollin; C. Huang; D. Roderick; B. Trundy; D. Na. Brown; D. Ding; Yu. G. Kolomensky; M. J. Lee; M. Cascella; F. Grancagnolo; F. Ignatov; A. Innocente; A. L'Erario; A. Miccoli; A. Maffezzoli; P. Mazzotta; G. Onorato; G. M. Piacentino; S. Rella; F. Rossetti; M. Spedicato; G. Tassielli; A. Taurino; G. Zavarise; R. Hooper; D. No. Brown; R. Djilkibaev; V. Matushko; C. Ankenbrandt; S. Boi; A. Dychkant; D. Hedin; Z. Hodge; V. Khalatian; R. Majewski; L. Martin; U. Okafor; N. Pohlman; R. S. Riddel; A. Shellito; A. L. de Gouvea; F. Cervelli; R. Carosi; S. Di Falco; S. Donati; T. Lomtadze; G. Pezzullo; L. Ristori; F. Spinella; M. Jones; M. D. Corcoran; J. Orduna; D. Rivera; R. Bennett; O. Caretta; T. Davenne; C. Densham; P. Loveridge; J. Odell; R. Bomgardner; E. C. Dukes; R. Ehrlich; M. Frank; S. Goadhouse; R. Group; E. Ho; H. Ma; Y. Oksuzian; J. Purvis; Y. Wu; D. W. Hertzog; P. Kammel; K. R. Lynch; J. L. Popp

    2015-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab will search for charged lepton flavor violation via the coherent conversion process mu- N --> e- N with a sensitivity approximately four orders of magnitude better than the current world's best limits for this process. The experiment's sensitivity offers discovery potential over a wide array of new physics models and probes mass scales well beyond the reach of the LHC. We describe herein the preliminary design of the proposed Mu2e experiment. This document was created in partial fulfillment of the requirements necessary to obtain DOE CD-2 approval.

  13. Mu2e Technical Design Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartoszek, L; Miller, J P; Mott, J; Palladino, A; Quirk, J; Roberts, B L; Crnkovic, J; Polychronakos, V; Tishchenko, V; Yamin, P; Cheng, C -h; Echenard, B; Flood, K; Hitlin, D G; Kim, J H; Miyashita, T S; Porter, F C; Röhrken, M; Trevor, J; Zhu, R -Y; Heckmaier, E; Kang, T I; Lim, G; Molzon, W; You, Z; Artikov, A M; Budagov, J A; Davydov, Yu I; Glagolev, V V; Simonenko, A V; Usubov, Z U; Oh, S H; Wang, C; Ambrosio, G; Andreev, N; Arnold, D; Ball, M; Bernstein, R H; Bianchi, A; Biery, K; Bossert, R; Bowden, M; Brandt, J; Brown, G; Brown, H; Buehler, M; Campbell, M; Cheban, S; Chen, M; Coghill, J; Coleman, R; Crowley, C; Deshpande, A; Deuerling, G; Dey, J; Dhanaraj, N; Dinnon, M; Dixon, S; Drendel, B; Eddy, N; Evans, R; Evbota, D; Fagan, J; Feher, S; Fellenz, B; Friedsam, H; Gallo, G; Gaponenko, A; Gardner, M; Gaugel, S; Genser, K; Ginther, G; Glass, H; Glenzinski, D; Hahn, D; Hansen, S; Hartsell, B; Hays, S; Hocker, J A; Huedem, E; Huffman, D; Ibrahim, A; Johnstone, C; Kashikhin, V; Kashikhin, V V; Kasper, P; Kiper, T; Knapp, D; Knoepfel, K; Kokoska, L; Kozlovsky, M; Krafczyk, G; Kramp, M; Krave, S; Krempetz, K; Kutschke, R K; Kwarciany, R; Lackowski, T; Lamm, M J; Larwill, M; Leavell, F; Leeb, D; Leveling, A; Lincoln, D; Logashenko, V; Lombardo, V; Lopes, M L; Makulski, A; Martinez, A; McArthur, D; McConologue, F; Michelotti, L; Mokhov, N; Morgan, J; Mukherjee, A; Murat, P; Nagaslaev, V; Neuffer, D V; Nicol, T; Niehoff, J; Nogiec, J; Olson, M; Orris, D; Ostojic, R; Page, T; Park, C; Peterson, T; Pilipenko, R; Pla-Dalmau, A; Poloubotko, V; Popovic, M; Prebys, E; Prieto, P; Pronskikh, V; Pushka, D; Rabehl, R; Ray, R E; Rechenmacher, R; Rivera, R; Robotham, W; Rubinov, P; Rusu, V L; Scarpine, V; Schappert, W; Schoo, D; Stefanik, A; Still, D; Tang, Z; Tanovic, N; Tartaglia, M; Tassotto, G; Tinsley, D; Tschirhart, R S; Vogel, G; Wagner, R; Wands, R; Wang, M; Werkema, S; White, H B; Whitmore, J; Wielgos, R; Woods, R; Worel, C; Zifko, R; Ciambrone, P; Colao, F; Cordelli, M; Corradi, G; Dane, E; Giovannella, S; Happacher, F; Luca, A; Miscetti, S; Ponzio, B; Pileggi, G; Saputi, A; Sarra, I; Soleti, R S; Stomaci, V; Martini, M; Fabbricatore, P; Farinon, S; Musenich, R; Alexander, D; Daniel, A; Empl, A; Hungerford, E V; Lau, K; Gollin, G D; Huang, C; Roderick, D; Trundy, B; Brown, D Na; Ding, D; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lee, M J; Cascella, M; Grancagnolo, F; Ignatov, F; Innocente, A; L'Erario, A; Miccoli, A; Maffezzoli, A; Mazzotta, P; Onorato, G; Piacentino, G M; Rella, S; Rossetti, F; Spedicato, M; Tassielli, G; Taurino, A; Zavarise, G; Hooper, R; Brown, D No; Djilkibaev, R; Matushko, V; Ankenbrandt, C; Boi, S; Dychkant, A; Hedin, D; Hodge, Z; Khalatian, V; Majewski, R; Martin, L; Okafor, U; Pohlman, N; Riddel, R S; Shellito, A; de Gouvea, A L; Cervelli, F; Carosi, R; Di Falco, S; Donati, S; Lomtadze, T; Pezzullo, G; Ristori, L; Spinella, F; Jones, M; Corcoran, M D; Orduna, J; Rivera, D; Bennett, R; Caretta, O; Davenne, T; Densham, C; Loveridge, P; Odell, J; Bomgardner, R; Dukes, E C; Ehrlich, R; Frank, M; Goadhouse, S; Ho, E; Ma, H; Oksuzian, Y; Purvis, J; Wu, Y; Hertzog, D W; Kammel, P; Lynch, K R; Popp, J L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mu2e experiment at Fermilab will search for charged lepton flavor violation via the coherent conversion process mu- N --> e- N with a sensitivity approximately four orders of magnitude better than the current world's best limits for this process. The experiment's sensitivity offers discovery potential over a wide array of new physics models and probes mass scales well beyond the reach of the LHC. We describe herein the preliminary design of the proposed Mu2e experiment. This document was created in partial fulfillment of the requirements necessary to obtain DOE CD-2 approval.

  14. CLIMATE STUDY Phase II: MU Student Services Providers Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Jerry

    MU CAMPUS CLIMATE STUDY VOLUME 2 Phase II: MU Student Services Providers Survey Phase III: MU CAMPUS CLIMATE STUDY: PHASES II ­ IV Over the past three years, members of the University of Missouri-Columbia (MU) have participated in the MU Campus Climate Study for Underrepresented Groups conducted by a team

  15. Search for Doubly-charged Higgs Boson Production in the Decay H++ H-- ---> mu+ mu+ mu- mu- with 1.1 fb**(-1) at D0 Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Tae Jeong; /Korea U.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents a search for the pair production of doubly-charged Higgs bosons in the process p{bar p} {yields} H{sup ++}H{sup --} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}{mu}{sup -} using the data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of about 1.1 fb{sup -1}. This is the complete dataset of RunIIa taken from April 19, 2002 to February 22, 2006 by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. In the absence of significant excess above standard model background, 95% confidence level mass limits of M(H{sub L}{sup {+-}{+-}}) > 150 GeV and M(H{sub R}{sup {+-}{+-}}) > 126.5 GeV are set for left-handed and right-handed doubly-charged Higgs bosons respectively assuming a 100% branching ratio into muons.

  16. Relating B_S Mixing and B_S to mu+mu- with New Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golowich, Eugene; /Massachusetts U., Amherst; Hewett, JoAnne; /SLAC; Pakvasa, Sandip; /Hawaii U.; Petrov, Alexey A; /Wayne State U. /Michigan U., MCTP; Yeghiyan, Gagik K; /Wayne State U.

    2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform a study of the standard model fit to the mixing quantities {Delta}M{sub B{sub s}}, and {Delta}{Lambda}{sub B{sub s}}/{Delta}M{sub B{sub s}} in order to bound contributions of new physics (NP) to B{sub s} mixing. We then use this to explore the branching fraction of B{sub s} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} in certain models of NP. In most cases, this constrains NP amplitudes for B{sub s} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} to lie below the standard model component.

  17. FAPRI-MU Biofuel Baseline FAPRI-MU Report #02-13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    FAPRI-MU Biofuel Baseline March 2013 FAPRI-MU Report #02-13 Providing objective analysis for more of Education, Office of Civil Rights. #12;1 Executive Summary This report takes a closer look at the biofuels portion of the U.S. Agricultural and Biofuels Baseline released by the Food and Agricultural Policy

  18. ATCA/muTCA for Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jezynski, Tomasz; /DESY; Larsen, Raymond; /SLAC; Le Du, Patrick; /Lyon, IPN

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ATCA/{mu}TCA platforms are attractive because of the modern serial link architecture, high availability features and many packaging options. Less-demanding availability applications can be met economically by scaling back speed and redundancy. The ATCA specification was originally targeted for the Telecom industry but has gained recently a much wider user audience. The purpose of this paper is to report on present hardware and software R and D efforts where ATCA and {mu}TCA are planned, already being used or in development using selected examples for accelerator and detectors in the Physics community. It will present also the status of a proposal for physics extensions to ATCA/{mu}TCA specifications to promote inter-operability of laboratory and industry designs for physics.

  19. Elements of $\\mu$-calculus and thermodynamics of $\\mu$-Bose gas model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rebesh, A P; Gavrilik, A M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We review on and give some further details about the thermodynamical properties of the \\mu-Bose gas model (arXiv:1309.1363) introduced by us recently. This model was elaborated in connection with \\mu-deformed oscillators. Here, we present the necessary concepts and tools from the so-called \\mu-calculus. For the high temperatures, we obtain the virial expansion of the equation of state, as well as five virial coefficients. In the regime of low temperatures, the critical temperature of condensation is inferred. We also obtain the specific heat, internal energy, and entropy for a \\mu-Bose gas for both low and high temperatures. All thermodynamical functions depend on the deformation parameter \\mu. The dependences of the entropy and the specific heat on the deformation parameter are visualized.

  20. e{sup +}e{sup -{yields}{mu}+{mu}-} scattering in the noncommutative standard model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prakash, Abhishodh; Mitra, Anupam; Das, Prasanta Kumar [Birla Institute of Technology and Science-Pilani, KK Birla Goa Campus, NH-17B, Zuarinagar, Goa 403726 (India)

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study muon pair production e{sup +}e{sup -{yields}{mu}+{mu}-} in the noncommutative (NC) extension of the standard model using the Seiberg-Witten maps of this to the second order of the noncommutative parameter {Theta}{sub {mu}{nu}}. Using O({Theta}{sup 2}) Feynman rules, we find the O({Theta}{sup 4}) cross section (with all other lower order contributions simply cancelled) for the pair production. The momentum dependent O({Theta}{sup 2}) NC interaction significantly modifies the cross section and angular distributions which are different from the commuting standard model. We study the collider signatures of the space-time noncommutativity at the International Linear Collider (ILC) and find that the process e{sup +}e{sup -{yields}{mu}+{mu}-} can probe the NC scale {Lambda} in the range 0.8-1.0 TeV for typical ILC energy ranges.

  1. Higgs boson decay to mu mubar gamma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali Abbasabadi; Wayne W. Repko

    2000-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Higgs boson decay, H -> mu mubar gamma, is studied in the Standard Model at the tree and one-loop levels. It is shown that for Higgs boson masses above 110 GeV, the contribution to the radiative width from the one-loop level exceeds the contribution from the tree level, and for Higgs boson masses above 140 GeV, it even exceeds the contribution from the tree level decay H -> mu mubar. We also show that the contributions to the radiative decay width from the interference terms between the tree and one-loop diagrams are negligible.

  2. Producing {mu}{sup {minus}}d and {mu}{sup {minus}}t in vacuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knowles, P.E.; Beer, G.A.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A. [Victoria Univ., BC (Canada); Bailey, J.M. [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom); Beveridge, J.L.; Marshall, G.M.; Brewer, J.H.; Forster, B.M. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada); Huber, T.M. [Gustavus Adolphus Coll., St. Peter, MN (United States); Jacot-Guillarmod, R.; Schellenberg, L. [Fribourg Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. de Physique; Kammel, P.; Zmeskal, J. [Oesterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Vienna (Austria). Inst. fuer Mittelenergiephysik; Kunselman, A.R. [Wyoming Univ., Laramie, WY (United States); Martoff, C.J. [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Petitjean, C. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    After the feasibility of vacuum isolated {mu}{sup -}d production was demonstrated at TRIUMF in 1989, development was begun on a target system that would take advantage of the process to aid in the understanding of the muon catalyzed fusion cycle. Minimal neutron backgrounds, the ability to use silicon detectors, and compatibility with tritium were considered important for a very versatile target system. the advantages which the target gives isolating {mu}CF process will be outlined.

  3. Diffractive Z/gamma* --> mu+mu- boson production in proton - antiproton collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendoza Navas, Luis Miguel; /Andes U., Bogota

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the inclusive diffractive Z {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} cross section with gap requirement for M{sub {mu}}{sub {mu}} > 40 GeV at {radical} s = 1.96 TeV and fraction of Z bosons produced diffractively with gap requirement from Z inclusive production are presented. The measurements are performed using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 820 pb{sup -1}, collected with the D0 detector at the Tevatron, between 2002 to 2005. A total of 39945 di-muons events are selected and final results of: {sigma}{sub Diff}{sup gap} x Br(Z/{gamma}* {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) = 4.09 {+-} 0.64(stat.) {+-} 0.88(syst.) {+-} 0.27(lumi.) pb and, R{sub Diff}{sup gap} = 1.92 {+-} 0.30(stat.) {+-} 0.41(syst.) {+-} 0.12(lumi) % are obtained. In addition, d{sigma}/d{zeta} and d{sigma}/dy distributions are presented and they are compared with diffractive montecarlo (POMWIG). A reasonable agreement is obtained in this comparation. Finally, comparison of fraction of Z bosons produced diffractively with gap requirement (gap fraction) as measured with D0 during Run I of the Tevatron is compared. A good agreement is found for gap fraction results.

  4. MODAL MU-CALCULI Julian Brad eld and Colin Stirling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stirling, Colin

    12 MODAL MU-CALCULI Julian Brad#12;eld and Colin Stirling 1 Introduction-calculus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 #12; 2 Julian Brad#12;eld and Colin Stirling 1 INTRODUCTION Modal mu-calculus is a logic used

  5. MODAL MU-CALCULI Julian Bradfield and Colin Stirling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sattler, Ulrike

    12 MODAL MU-CALCULI Julian Bradfield and Colin Stirling 1 Introduction-calculus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 753 #12;722 Julian Bradfield and Colin Stirling 1 INTRODUCTION Modal mu-calculus is a logic used

  6. Optimal MU-MIMO precoder with MISO decomposition approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gesbert, David

    Optimal MU-MIMO precoder with MISO decomposition approach Mustapha Amara, Yi Yuan-Wu Orange Labs considered the best existing precoder design algorithm for a MISO multiuser sys- tem proposed in [1 procedure transforming the MU-MIMO channel for each iteration into a MU-MISO channel trough virtual channel

  7. QCD uncertainties in the prediction of B --> K^* mu^+ mu^- observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sébastien Descotes-Genon; Lars Hofer; Joaquim Matias; Javier Virto

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent LHCb angular analysis of the exclusive decay B --> K^* mu^+ mu^- has indicated significant deviations from the Standard Model expectations. In order to give precise theory predictions, it is crucial that uncertainties from non-perturbative QCD are under control and properly included. The dominant QCD uncertainties originate from the hadronic B --> K^* form factors and from charm loops. We present a systematic method to include factorisable power corrections to the form factors in the framework of QCD factorisation and study the impact of the scheme chosen to define the soft form factors. We also discuss charm-loop effects.

  8. FAINT SUBMILLIMETER GALAXY COUNTS AT 450 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Chian-Chou; Cowie, Lennox L.; Barger, Amy J.; Casey, Caitlin M.; Lee, Nicholas; Sanders, David B.; Williams, Jonathan P. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)] [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Wang, Wei-Hao [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)] [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of SCUBA-2 observations at 450 {mu}m and 850 {mu}m of the field lensed by the massive cluster A370. With a total survey area >100 arcmin{sup 2} and 1{sigma} sensitivities of 3.92 and 0.82 mJy beam{sup -1} at 450 and 850 {mu}m, respectively, we find a secure sample of 20 sources at 450 {mu}m and 26 sources at 850 {mu}m with a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) > 4. Using the latest lensing model of A370 and Monte Carlo simulations, we derive the number counts at both wavelengths. The 450 {mu}m number counts probe a factor of four deeper than the counts recently obtained from the Herschel Space Telescope at similar wavelengths, and we estimate that {approx}47%-61% of the 450 {mu}m extragalactic background light resolved into individual sources with 450 {mu}m fluxes greater than 4.5 mJy. The faint 450 {mu}m sources in the 4{sigma} sample have positional accuracies of 3 arcsec, while brighter sources (S/N >6{sigma}) are good to 1.4 arcsec. Using a deep radio map (1{sigma} {approx} 6 {mu}Jy) we find that the percentage of submillimeter sources having secure radio counterparts is 85% for 450 {mu}m sources with intrinsic fluxes >6 mJy and 67% for 850 {mu}m sources with intrinsic fluxes >4 mJy. We also find that 67% of the >4{sigma} 450 {mu}m sources are detected at 850 {mu}m, while the recovery rate at 450 {mu}m of >4{sigma} 850 {mu}m sources is 54%. Combined with the source redshifts estimated using millimetric flux ratios, the recovered rate is consistent with the scenario where both 450 {mu}m and 20 cm emission preferentially select lower redshift dusty sources, while 850 {mu}m emission traces a higher fraction of dusty sources at higher redshifts. We identify potential counterparts in various wavelengths from X-ray to mid-infrared and measure the multiwavelength photometry, which we then use to analyze the characteristics of the sources. We find three X-ray counterparts to our robust submillimeter sample (S/N > 5), giving an active galactic nucleus fraction for our 450 (850) {mu}m sample of 3/8 (3/9) or 38% (33%). We also find a correlation between the K{sub s} band and the 850 {mu}m/20 cm flux ratio.

  9. On the impact of power corrections in the prediction of B->K*mu+mu- observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sébastien Descotes-Genon; Lars Hofer; Joaquim Matias; Javier Virto

    2014-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent LHCb angular analysis of the exclusive decay B->K^*mu+mu- has indicated significant deviations from the Standard Model expectations. Accurate predictions can be achieved at large K*-meson recoil for an optimised set of observables designed to have no sensitivity to hadronic input in the heavy-quark limit at leading order in alpha_s. However, hadronic uncertainties reappear through non-perturbative Lambda_QCD/m_b power corrections, which must be assessed precisely. In the framework of QCD factorisation we present a systematic method to include factorisable power corrections and point out that their impact on angular observables depends on the scheme chosen to define the soft form factors. Associated uncertainties are found to be under control, contrary to earlier claims in the literature. We also discuss the impact of possible non-factorisable power corrections, including an estimate of charm-loop effects. We provide results for angular observables at large recoil for two different sets of inputs for the form factors, spelling out the different sources of theoretical uncertainties. Finally, we comment on a recent proposal to explain the anomaly in B->K*mu+mu- observables through charm-resonance effects, and we propose strategies to test this proposal identifying observables and kinematic regions where either the charm-loop model can be disentangled from New Physics effects or the two options leave different imprints.

  10. Discriminating between nu_mu nu_tau and nu_mu nu_sterile in atmospheric nu_mu oscillations with the Super-Kamiokande detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Habig; for the Super-Kamiokande Collaboration

    2001-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A strong body of evidence now exists for atmospheric nu_mu disappearance oscillations. Such disappearance could be explained by oscillations to either nu_tau or a ``sterile'' neutrino (nu_s). Super-Kamiokande uses three different methods to distinguish between these two scenarios. First, matter effects would suppress the nu_mu nu_s oscillation amplitude at high energy. Second, oscillation to nu_s would reduce the overall neutral-current neutrino interaction rate. Third, the smoking gun of nu_mu nu_tau oscillations would be the observation of tau appearance resulting from charged-current nu_tau interactions. The results of these three techniques are presented, which strongly favor nu_mu nu_tau oscillations over nu_mu nu_s.

  11. Search for the rare decays B{sup +}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}K{sup +}, B{sup 0}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}K*(892){sup 0}, and B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}{phi} at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Maki, T.; Mehtala, P.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Saarikko, H.; Remortel, N. van [Division of High Energy Physics, Department of Physics, University of Helsinki and Helsinki Institute of Physics, FIN-00014, Helsinki (Finland); Adelman, J.; Brubaker, E.; Fedorko, W. T.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Kim, Y. K.; Kwang, S.; Levy, S.; Paramonov, A. A.; Schmidt, M. A.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Wolfe, C.; Yang, U. K. [Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)] (and others)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We search for b{yields}s{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} transitions in B meson (B{sup +}, B{sup 0}, or B{sub s}{sup 0}) decays with 924 pb{sup -1} of pp collisions at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We find excesses with significances of 4.5, 2.9, and 2.4 standard deviations in the B{sup +}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}K{sup +}, B{sup 0}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}K*(892){sup 0}, and B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}{phi} decay modes, respectively. Using B{yields}J/{psi}h (h=K{sup +}, K*(892){sup 0}, {phi}) decays as normalization channels, we report branching fractions for the previously observed B{sup +} and B{sup 0} decays, B(B{sup +}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}K{sup +})=(0.59{+-}0.15{+-}0.04)x10{sup -6}, and B(B{sup 0}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}K*(892){sup 0})=(0.81{+-}0.30{+-}0.10)x10{sup -6}, where the first uncertainty is statistical, and the second is systematic. We set an upper limit on the relative branching fraction B(B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}{phi})/B(B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}{phi})<2.6(2.3)x10{sup -3} at the 95(90)% confidence level, which is the most stringent to date.

  12. Evidence for a Mu llerian mimetic radiation in Asian pitvipers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorpe, Roger Stephen

    Evidence for a Mu¨ llerian mimetic radiation in Asian pitvipers K. L. Sanders, A. Malhotra* and R¨llerian mimicry, in which toxic species gain mutual protection from shared warning signals, is poorly understood knowledge, this represents the first evidence of a Mu¨llerian mimetic radiation in vipers. The putative

  13. September 2010 FAPRI-MU US Biofuels, Corn Processing,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    September 2010 FAPRI-MU US Biofuels, Corn Processing, Distillers Grains, Fats, Switchgrass-882-4256 or the US Department of Education, Office of Civil Rights. #12;1 Overview of FAPRI-MU Biofuels, Corn listed here represent US biofuel, corn processing, distillers grains, fats, switchgrass, and corn stover

  14. Effect of multiple step excitation on the reactivation and x-ray intensities following the fusion d. mu. d, d. mu. t and p. mu. t

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takahashi, H.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Menshikov and Ponomarev recently studied analytically the effect of multistep excitation on the muon reactivation for d..mu..t fusion and got a rather large activation factor of 35%. As expected, this shows a large density effect on the reactivation factor. The numerical cascade calculation with the cross section for multistep excitation, used by them, indicates that the reactivation factor is 25%. Due to the large Auger transition rates in the high excited states, the density effect on the reactivation factor is not large. Muonic x-ray spectra of ..mu../sup 3/He from ..mu..-catalyzed pd and dd fissions, measured by H. bossy et al., are analyzed by the cascade model used for the muon reactivation calculation. The model calculation is in good agreement with the intensity ratios ..mu../sup 3/He(3-1)/..mu../sup 3/He(2-1) of 0.13 +- 0.02 and 0.03 +- 0.007 measured for dd and pd fusions, and the multistep excitation increases 5% of the x-ray ratio for dd fusion. 10 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Search for doubly-charged Higgs Boson production in the decay H++ H-- ---> mu+ mu+ mu- mu - with the D0 detector at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zdrazil, Marian

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents a search for the pair production of doubly-charged Higgs Bosons in the process p{bar p} {yields} H{sup ++}H{sup --} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}{mu}{sup -} using inclusive dimuon events. These data correspond to an integrated luminosity of about 113 pb 1 and were recorded by the D0 experiment between August 2002 and June 2003. In the absence of a signal, 95% confidence level mass limits of M(H{sub L}{sup {+-}{+-}}) > 118.6 GeV/c{sup 2} and M(H{sub R}{sup {+-}{+-}}) > 98.1 GeV/c{sup 2} are set for left-handed and right-handed doubly-charged Higgs boson, assuming 100% branching into muons and hypercharge |Y| = 2 and Yukawa coupling h{sub {mu}{mu}} > 10{sup -7}. This is the first search for doubly-charged Higgs bosons at hadron colliders. It significantly extends the previous mass limit of 100.5 GeV/c{sup 2} for a left-handed doubly-charged Higgs boson measured in the muon final states by the OPAL collaboration.

  16. 446 | Mol. BioSyst., 2014, 10, 446--453 This journal is The Royal Society of Chemistry 2014 Cite this: Mol. BioSyst., 2014,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Huimin

    and serve as a powerful tool for genome engineering. Site-specific DNA cleavage can be made this: Mol. BioSyst., 2014, 10, 446 A single-chain TALEN architecture for genome engineering Ning Suna) nucleases (TALENs) have been widely used for genome editing or engineering in various organisms during

  17. Observation of the rare $B^0_s\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$ decay from the combined analysis of CMS and LHCb data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Lauwers, Jasper; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Rougny, Romain; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dobur, Didar; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Léonard, Alexandre; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Randle-conde, Aidan; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Zenoni, Florian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Crucy, Shannon; Dildick, Sven; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Da Costa, Eliza Melo; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santaolalla, Javier; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Genchev, Vladimir; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Zheng; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A joint measurement is presented of the branching fractions $B^0_s\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$ and $B^0\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$ in proton-proton collisions at the LHC by the CMS and LHCb experiments. The data samples were collected in 2011 at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, and in 2012 at 8 TeV. The combined analysis produces the first observation of the $B^0_s\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$ decay, with a statistical significance exceeding six standard deviations, and the best measurement of its branching fraction so far, and three standard deviation evidence for the $B^0\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$ decay. The measurements are statistically compatible with SM predictions and impose stringent constraints on several theories beyond the SM.

  18. Observation of the rare $B^0_s\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$ decay from the combined analysis of CMS and LHCb data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.,

    2015-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A joint measurement is presented of the branching fractions $B^0_s\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$ and $B^0\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$ in proton-proton collisions at the LHC by the CMS and LHCb experiments. The data samples were collected in 2011 at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, and in 2012 at 8 TeV. The combined analysis produces the first observation of the $B^0_s\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$ decay, with a statistical significance exceeding six standard deviations, and the best measurement of its branching fraction so far, and three standard deviation evidence for the $B^0\\to\\mu^+\\mu^-$ decay. The measurements are statistically compatible with SM predictions and impose stringent constraints on several theories beyond the SM.

  19. Error detection through consistency checking Peng Gong* Lan Mu#

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    Error detection through consistency checking Peng Gong* Lan Mu# *Center for Assessment & Monitoring Hall, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-3110 gong@nature.berkeley.edu mulan, accessibility, and timeliness as recorded in the lineage data (Chen and Gong, 1998). Spatial error refers

  20. Uncorrected Proof Copy RescueMu Protocols 37

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raizada, Manish N.

    : Nettype Chapter: Chapter 3 Date: 3/15/2003 Pub Date: 7/1/2003 Revision: First Proof Template: MiMB/6x9/Template/Rev.02.03 Uncorrected Proof Copy 37 From: Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 236: Plant FunctionalDB. Key Words Mutator, RescueMu, maize, genomics, transposon, genome survey sequence, plasmid res- cue

  1. EXPTIME Tableaux for the Coalgebraic mu-Calculus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirstea, Corina; Pattinson, Dirk

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The coalgebraic approach to modal logic provides a uniform framework that captures the semantics of a large class of structurally different modal logics, including e.g. graded and probabilistic modal logics and coalition logic. In this paper, we introduce the coalgebraic mu-calculus, an extension of the general (coalgebraic) framework with fixpoint operators. Our main results are completeness of the associated tableau calculus and EXPTIME decidability for guarded formulas. Technically, this is achieved by reducing satisfiability to the existence of non-wellfounded tableaux, which is in turn equivalent to the existence of winning strategies in parity games. Our results are parametric in the underlying class of models and yield, as concrete applications, previously unknown complexity bounds for the probabilistic mu-calculus and for an extension of coalition logic with fixpoints.

  2. J. Mol. Biol. (1996) 264, 11641179 How to Derive a Protein Folding Potential? A New

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirny, Leonid

    J. Mol. Biol. (1996) 264, 1164­1179 How to Derive a Protein Folding Potential? A New Approach of deriving a pairwise potentialHarvard University Department of Chemistry for protein folding. The potential of accuracy. 7 1996 Academic Press Limited *Corresponding author Keywords: protein folding; protein folding

  3. Methods Mol Biol . Author manuscript 3D structural models of transmembrane proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    proteins is a major research area. Due to the lack of available 3D structures, automatic homology modelingMethods Mol Biol . Author manuscript Page /1 9 3D structural models of transmembrane proteins: Alexandre De Brevern Abstract Summary Transmembrane proteins

  4. Accepted in Methods Mol Biol. 2010 3D-structural models of transmembrane proteins.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of transmembrane proteins is a major research area. Due to the lack of available 3D structures, automatic homology1 Accepted in Methods Mol Biol. 2010 3D-structural models of transmembrane proteins. Alexandre G proteins are macromolecules implicated in major biological process and diseases. Due to their specific

  5. J. Mol. Model. 2000, 6, 1 8 Springer-Verlag 2000FULL PAPER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luhua, Lai

    candidates in the conformational space of a protein loop. This high efficiency is due to our grid mapping with a simplified energy function and a grid-map- ping method. As a comparison of single simulation, it takes only, Cluster analysis, Simplified energy function, Grid-mapping method Correspondence to: L. Lai #12;2 J. Mol

  6. J. Mol. Biol. (1988) 201, 751-754 Aromatic Rings Act as Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levitt, Michael

    J. Mol. Biol. (1988) 201, 751-754 Aromatic Rings Act as Hydrogen Bond Acceptors Michael Levitt that there is a significant interaction between a hydrogen bond donor (like the > NH group) and the centre of a benzene ring, which acts as a hydrogen bond acceptor. This interaction, hvdrogen bond, which is about half as strong

  7. c : solute concentration in solution, mol or g solutes/ cm3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, C.P.

    by a finite difference, a finite element or a boundary element technique. Then a discretization scheme) algebraic equations that can be solved by different methods. The operation by means of such a mathematical : soil bulk density, g/cm3 : source/sink term, µ mol/cm3 /h or µg/cm3 /h INTRODUCTION In many arid

  8. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 59215941, 2014 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/14/5921/2014/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Jeffrey

    , acetonitrile and isoprene were measured for the first time in the IGP. A new atmo- spheric chemistry facility mol-1 for acetonitrile, 1.9 nmol mol-1 for isoprene, 567 nmol mol-1 for carbon monoxide, 57.8 nmol mol parameters and applying chemical tracers (e.g., acetonitrile for biomass burning) and inter-VOC cor

  9. Improving the Benefits of Multicast Prioritization Algorithms Emili Miedes and Francesc D. Mu~noz-Escoi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, Francesc

    Improving the Benefits of Multicast Prioritization Algorithms Emili Miedes and Francesc D. Mu~noz-Esco and Francesc D. Mu~noz-Esco´i Instituto Tecnol´ogico de Inform´atica Universitat Polit`ecnica de Val

  10. Farzana Rahman (http://www.mscs.mu.edu/~frahman/) Curriculum Vitae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brylow, Dennis

    RFID Systems Advisor: Dr. Sheikh Iqbal Ahamed (http://www.mscs.mu.edu/~iq/) Marquette University. Sheikh Iqbal Ahamed (http://www.mscs.mu.edu/~iq/) Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology

  11. SUBMILLIMETER POLARIZATION OF GALACTIC CLOUDS: A COMPARISON OF 350 {mu}m AND 850 {mu}m DATA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaillancourt, John E. [SOFIA Science Center, Universities Space Research Association, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Matthews, Brenda C., E-mail: jvaillancourt@sofia.usra.edu, E-mail: brenda.matthews@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [Herzberg Institute, National Research Council of Canada, 5071 W. Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada)

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hertz and SCUBA polarimeters, working at 350 {mu}m and 850 {mu}m, respectively, have measured the polarized emission in scores of Galactic clouds. Of the clouds in each data set, 17 were mapped by both instruments with good polarization signal-to-noise ratios. We present maps of each of these 17 clouds comparing the dual-wavelength polarization amplitudes and position angles at the same spatial locations. In total number of clouds compared, this is a four-fold increase over previous work. Across the entire data set real position angle differences are seen between wavelengths. While the distribution of {phi}(850)-{phi}(350) is centered near zero (near-equal angles), 64% of data points with high polarization signal-to-noise (P {>=} 3{sigma}{sub p}) have |{phi}(850)-{phi}(350)| > 10 Degree-Sign . Of those data with small changes in position angle ({<=}10 Degree-Sign ) the median ratio of the polarization amplitudes is P(850)/P(350) = 1.7 {+-} 0.6. This value is consistent with previous work performed on smaller samples and models that require mixtures of different grain properties and polarization efficiencies. Along with the polarization data we have also compiled the intensity data at both wavelengths; we find a trend of decreasing polarization with increasing 850-to-350 {mu}m intensity ratio. All the polarization and intensity data presented here (1699 points in total) are available in electronic format.

  12. The MuCool Test Area and RF Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torun, Y.; Huang, D.; /IIT, Chicago; Norem, J.; /Argonne; Palmer, Robert B.; Stratakis, Diktys; /Brookhaven; Bross, A.; Chung, M.; Jansson, A.; Moretti, A.; Yonehara, K.; /Fermilab; Li, D.; /LBL, Berkeley /Jefferson Lab

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MuCool RF Program focuses on the study of normal conducting RF structures operating in high magnetic field for applications in muon ionization cooling for Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders. Here we give an overview of the program, which includes a description of the test facility and its capabilities, the current test program, and the status of a cavity that can be rotated in the magnetic field, which allows for a detailed study of the maximum stable operating gradient vs. magnetic field strength and angle.

  13. The MuCool Test Area and RF Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bross, A D; Jansson, A; Moretti, A; Yonehara, K; Huang, D; Torun, Y; Li, D; Norem, J; Palmer, R B; Stratakis, D

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MuCool RF Program focuses on the study of normal conducting RF structures operating in high magnetic field for applications in muon ionization cooling for Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders. This paper will give an overview of the program, which will include a description of the test facility and its capabilities, the current test program, and the status of a cavity that can be rotated in the magnetic field which allows for a more detailed study of the maximum stable operating gradient vs. magnetic field strength and angle.

  14. Helio Micro Utility Helio mU | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJumpEnergyStrategyHayesHelio Micro Utility Helio mU Jump

  15. Fermilab Today | Experiment Profiles Archive | Mu2e

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. CategoryFebruaryFebruaryInThe, 2015Ads SubscribeDES andMu2e photo

  16. {mu}-{tau} symmetry and radiatively generated leptogenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahn, Y. H.; Kim, C. S.; Lee, Jake [Department of Physics, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Sin Kyu [Center for Quantum Spacetime, Sogang University, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a {mu}-{tau} symmetry in neutrino sectors realized at the GUT scale in the context of a seesaw model. In our scenario, the exact {mu}-{tau} symmetry realized in the basis where the charged lepton and heavy Majorana neutrino mass matrices are diagonal leads to vanishing lepton asymmetries. We find that, in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the seesaw model with large tan{beta}, the renormalization group (RG) evolution from the GUT scale to seesaw scale can induce a successful leptogenesis even without introducing any symmetry breaking terms by hand, whereas such RG effects lead to tiny deviations of {theta}{sub 23} and {theta}{sub 13} from {pi}/4 and zero, respectively. It is shown that the right amount of the baryon asymmetry {eta}{sub B} can be achieved via so-called resonant leptogenesis, which can be realized at rather low seesaw scale with large tan{beta} in our scenario so that the well-known gravitino problem is safely avoided.

  17. Solenoid magnet system for the Fermilab Mu2e experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lamm, M J; Andreev, N; Ambrosio, G; Brandt, J; Coleman, R; Evbota, D; Kashikhin, V V; Lopes, M; Miller, J; Nicol, T; et al

    2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fermilab Mu2e experiment seeks to measure the rare process of direct muon to electron conversion in the field of a nucleus. Key to the design of the experiment is a system of three superconducting solenoids; a muon production solenoid (PS) which is a 1.8 m aperture axially graded solenoid with a peak field of 5 T used to focus secondary pions and muons from a production target located in the solenoid aperture; an 'S shaped' transport solenoid (TS) which selects and transports the subsequent muons towards a stopping target; a detector solenoid (DS) which is an axially graded solenoidmore »at the upstream end to focus transported muons to a stopping target, and a spectrometer solenoid at the downstream end to accurately measure the momentum of the outgoing conversion elections. The magnetic field requirements, the significant magnetic coupling between the solenoids, the curved muon transport geometry and the large beam induced energy deposition into the superconducting coils pose significant challenges to the magnetic, mechanical, and thermal design of this system. In this paper a conceptual design for the magnetic system which meets the Mu2e experiment requirements is presented.« less

  18. Solenoid magnet system for the Fermilab Mu2e experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lamm, M J [Fermilab; Andreev, N [Fermilab /Boston U.; Ambrosio, G [Fermilab; Brandt, J [Fermilab; Coleman, R [CERN; Evbota, D [Fermilab; Kashikhin, V V [City Coll., N.Y.; Lopes, M [Fermilab; Miller, J [Fermilab; Nicol, T [KEK; Ostojic, R [Tsukuba

    2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fermilab Mu2e experiment seeks to measure the rare process of direct muon to electron conversion in the field of a nucleus. Key to the design of the experiment is a system of three superconducting solenoids; a muon production solenoid (PS) which is a 1.8 m aperture axially graded solenoid with a peak field of 5 T used to focus secondary pions and muons from a production target located in the solenoid aperture; an 'S shaped' transport solenoid (TS) which selects and transports the subsequent muons towards a stopping target; a detector solenoid (DS) which is an axially graded solenoid at the upstream end to focus transported muons to a stopping target, and a spectrometer solenoid at the downstream end to accurately measure the momentum of the outgoing conversion elections. The magnetic field requirements, the significant magnetic coupling between the solenoids, the curved muon transport geometry and the large beam induced energy deposition into the superconducting coils pose significant challenges to the magnetic, mechanical, and thermal design of this system. In this paper a conceptual design for the magnetic system which meets the Mu2e experiment requirements is presented.

  19. Mu2e production solenoid cryostat conceptual design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicol, T.H.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Page, T.M.; Peterson, T.J.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mu2e is a muon-to-electron conversion experiment being designed by an international collaboration of more than 65 scientists and engineers from more than 20 research institutions for installation at Fermilab. The experiment is comprised of three large superconducting solenoid magnet systems, production solenoid (PS), transport solenoid (TS) and detector solenoid (DS). A 25 kW, 8 GeV proton beam strikes a target located in the PS creating muons from the decay of secondary particles. These muons are then focused in the PS and the resultant muon beam is transported through the TS towards the DS. The production solenoid presents a unique set of design challenges as the result of high radiation doses, stringent magnetic field requirements, and large structural forces. This paper describes the conceptual design of the PS cryostat and will include discussions of the vacuum vessel, thermal shield, multi-layer insulation, cooling system, cryogenic piping, and suspension system.

  20. Electroweak Symmetry Breaking without the $\\mu^2$ Term

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goertz, Florian

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate that from a low energy perspective a viable electroweak symmetry breaking can be achieved without the (negative sign) $\\mu^2$ mass term in the Higgs potential, thereby avoiding completely the appearance of relevant operators. We show that such a setup is self consistent and not ruled out by Higgs physics. In particular, we point out that it is the lightness of the Higgs boson that allows for the electroweak symmetry to be broken dynamically via operators of $D\\geq 4$, consistent with the power expansion. Beyond that, we entertain how this scenario might even be preferred phenomenologically compared to the ordinary mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking, as realized in the Standard Model, and argue that it can be fully tested at the LHC. In an appendix, we classify UV completions that could lead to such a setup, considering also the option of generating all scales dynamically.

  1. Search for heavy Majorana neutrinos in $\\mu^\\pm \\mu^\\pm$+jets events in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Lauwers, Jasper; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Rougny, Romain; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dobur, Didar; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Léonard, Alexandre; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Perniè, Luca; Randle-conde, Aidan; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Zenoni, Florian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Crucy, Shannon; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Poyraz, Deniz; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Dos Reis Martins, Thiago; Molina, Jorge; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Da Costa, Eliza Melo; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santaolalla, Javier; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Genchev, Vladimir; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Zheng; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Zhang, Linlin; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Mekterovic, Darko; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search is performed for heavy Majorana neutrinos (N) using an event signature defined by two muons of the same charge and two jets ($\\mu^\\pm \\mu^\\pm \\mathrm{j j}$). The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb$^{-1}$ of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, collected with the CMS detector at the CERN LHC. No excess of events is observed beyond the expected standard model background and upper limits are set on $|V_{\\mu\\mathrm{N}}|^2$ as a function of Majorana neutrino mass $\\mathrm{m}_{\\mathrm{N}}$ for masses in the range of 40-500 GeV, where $|V_{\\mu\\mathrm{N}}|$ is the mixing element of the heavy neutrino with the standard model muon neutrino. The limits obtained are $|V_{\\mu\\mathrm{N}}|^2 \\le 0.00470$ for $\\mathrm{m}_{\\mathrm{N}} = 90$ GeV, $|V_{\\mu\\mathrm{N}}|^2 \\le 0.0123$ for $\\mathrm{m}_{\\mathrm{N}} = 200$ GeV, and $|V_{\\mu\\mathrm{N}}|^2 \\le 0.583$ for $\\mathrm{m}_{\\mathrm{N}} = 500$ GeV. These results extend considerably the regions excluded by previous direct se...

  2. Adding Priorities to Total Order Broadcast Protocols Emili Miedes, Francesc D. Mu~noz-Escoi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, Francesc

    Adding Priorities to Total Order Broadcast Protocols Emili Miedes, Francesc D. Mu~noz-Esco,fmunyoz}@iti.upv.es Technical Report TR-ITI-ITE-07/23 (supersedes TR-ITI-ITE-07/07) E.Miedes,F.D.Mu~noz-Esco´i:AddingPrioritiestoTotalOrderBroadcastProtocolsTR-ITI-ITE-07/23( #12;#12;Adding Priorities to Total Order Broadcast Protocols Emili Miedes, Francesc D. Mu~noz-Esco

  3. On the Cost of Prioritized Atomic Multicast Protocols Emili Miedes, Francesc D. Mu~noz-Escoi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, Francesc

    On the Cost of Prioritized Atomic Multicast Protocols Emili Miedes, Francesc D. Mu~noz-Esco,fmunyoz}@iti.upv.es Technical Report ITI-SIDI-2009/002 E.Miedes,F.D.Mu~noz-Esco´i:OntheCostofPrioritizedAtomicMulticastProtocolsITI-SIDI-2009/002 #12;#12;On the Cost of Prioritized Atomic Multicast Protocols Emili Miedes, Francesc D. Mu~noz-Esco

  4. A Measurement of the Inclusive Z / gamma* --> mu+ mu- Cross-Section and Study of W and Z Events in proton - anti-proton Collisions at D0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nurse, Emily L

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement of the inclusive Z/{gamma}* {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} cross section for M{sub {mu}{mu}} > 40 GeV at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV is presented. The measurement is performed using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 147.7 pb{sup -1}, collected with the D0 detector at the Tevatron, Fermilab, between September 2002 and October 2003. A total of 14352 di-muon events are selected and a final result of {sigma}(Z/{gamma}*) = 327.8 {+-} 3.4(stat.) {+-} 8.4(syst.) {+-} 21.3(lumi.) pb is obtained. Correcting the number of di-muon events by a factor of 0.885 {+-} 0.015 for the contribution from pure {gamma}* exchange and Z/{gamma}* interference, the inclusive Z {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} cross section is found to be: {sigma}(Z) = 290.1 {+-} 3.0(stat.) {+-} 7.4(syst.) {+-} 18.9(lumi.) pb. Finally, comparisons of W and Z boson p{sub T} distributions as measured with D0 during Run I of the Tevatron are compared to HERWIG and MC{at}NLO predictions. Relevant parameters in the simulations are tuned to obtain the best possible fit to the data. An excellent agreement is found for both HERWIG and MC{at}NLO.

  5. Precision monitoring of relative beam intensity for Mu2e

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, N.J.; Kopp, S.E.; /Texas U.; Prebys, E.; /Fermilab

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For future experiments at the intensity frontier, precise and accurate knowledge of beam time structure will be critical to understanding backgrounds. The proposed Mu2e experiment will utilize {approx}200 ns (FW) bunches of 3 x 10{sup 7} protons at 8 GeV with a bunch-to-bunch period of 1695 ns. The out-of-bunch beam must be suppressed by a factor of 10{sup -10} relative to in-bunch beam and continuously monitored. I propose a Cerenkov-based particle telescope to measure secondary production from beam interactions in a several tens of microns thick foil. Correlating timing information with beam passage will allow the determination of relative beam intensity to arbitrary precision given a sufficiently long integration time. The goal is to verify out-of-bunch extinction to the level 10{sup -6} in the span of several seconds. This will allow near real-time monitoring of the initial extinction of the beam resonantly extracted from Fermilabs Debuncher before a system of AC dipoles and collimators, which will provide the final extinction. The effect on beam emittance is minimal, allowing the necessary continuous measurement. I will present the detector design and some concerns about bunch growth during the resonant extraction.

  6. Thermal Design of the Mu2e Detector Solenoid

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dhanaraj, Nandhini; Wands, Bob; Buehler, Marc; Feher, Sandor; Page, Thomas M; Peterson, Thomas; Schmitt, Richard L

    2015-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reference design for a superconducting Detector Solenoid (DS) for the Mu2e experiment has been completed. The main functions of the DS are to provide a graded field in the region of the stopping target which ranges from 2 T to 1 T and a uniform precision magnetic field of 1 T in a volume large enough to house a tracker downstream of the stopping target. The inner diameter of the magnet cryostat is 1.9 m and the length is 10.9 m. The gradient section of the magnet is about 4 m long and the spectrometer section with a uniformmore »magnetic field is about 6 m long. The inner cryostat wall supports the stopping target, tracker, calorimeter and other equipment installed in the DS. This warm bore volume is under vacuum during operation. It is sealed on one end by the muon beam stop, while it is open on the other end where it interfaces with the Transport Solenoid. The operating temperature of the magnetic coil is 4.7 K and is indirectly cooled with helium flowing in a thermosiphon cooling scheme. This paper describes the thermal design of the solenoid, including the design aspects of the thermosiphon for the coil cooling, forced flow cooling of the thermal shields with 2 phase LN2 (Liquid Nitrogen) and the transient studies of the cool down of the cold mass as well.« less

  7. The changing accretion states of the intermediate polar MU Camelopardalis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Staude; A. D. Schwope; R. Schwarz; J. Vogel; M. Krumpe; A. Nebot Gomez-Moran

    2008-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the timing and spectral properties of the intermediate polar MU Camelopardalis (1RXS J062518.2+733433) to determine the accretion modes and the accretion geometry from multi-wavelength, multi-epoch observational data. Light curves in different observed energy ranges (optical, UV, X-ray) are extracted. The timescales of variability in these light curves are determined using Analysis of Variance. Phase-resolved X-ray spectra are created with respect to the most prominent detected periodicities and each fitted with an identical model, to quantify the differences in the fitted components. The published tentative value for the spin period is unambiguously identified with the rotation period of the white dwarf. We detect a distinct soft X-ray component that can be reproduced well by a black body. The analysis of data obtained at different epochs demonstrates that the system is changing its accretion geometry from disk-dominated to a combination of disk- plus stream-dominated, accompanied with a significant change in brightness at optical wavelengths.

  8. The changing accretion states of the intermediate polar MU Camelopardalis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staude, A; Schwarz, R; Vogel, J; Krumpe, M; Gomez-Moran, A Nebot

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the timing and spectral properties of the intermediate polar MU Camelopardalis (1RXS J062518.2+733433) to determine the accretion modes and the accretion geometry from multi-wavelength, multi-epoch observational data. Light curves in different observed energy ranges (optical, UV, X-ray) are extracted. The timescales of variability in these light curves are determined using Analysis of Variance. Phase-resolved X-ray spectra are created with respect to the most prominent detected periodicities and each fitted with an identical model, to quantify the differences in the fitted components. The published tentative value for the spin period is unambiguously identified with the rotation period of the white dwarf. We detect a distinct soft X-ray component that can be reproduced well by a black body. The analysis of data obtained at different epochs demonstrates that the system is changing its accretion geometry from disk-dominated to a combination of disk- plus stream-dominated, accompanied with a significant...

  9. Thermal Design of the Mu2e Detector Solenoid

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dhanaraj, Nandhini [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Wands, Bob [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Buehler, Marc [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Feher, Sandor [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Page, Thomas M [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Peterson, Thomas [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Schmitt, Richard L [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reference design for a superconducting Detector Solenoid (DS) for the Mu2e experiment has been completed. The main functions of the DS are to provide a graded field in the region of the stopping target which ranges from 2 T to 1 T and a uniform precision magnetic field of 1 T in a volume large enough to house a tracker downstream of the stopping target. The inner diameter of the magnet cryostat is 1.9 m and the length is 10.9 m. The gradient section of the magnet is about 4 m long and the spectrometer section with a uniform magnetic field is about 6 m long. The inner cryostat wall supports the stopping target, tracker, calorimeter and other equipment installed in the DS. This warm bore volume is under vacuum during operation. It is sealed on one end by the muon beam stop, while it is open on the other end where it interfaces with the Transport Solenoid. The operating temperature of the magnetic coil is 4.7 K and is indirectly cooled with helium flowing in a thermosiphon cooling scheme. This paper describes the thermal design of the solenoid, including the design aspects of the thermosiphon for the coil cooling, forced flow cooling of the thermal shields with 2 phase LN2 (Liquid Nitrogen) and the transient studies of the cool down of the cold mass as well.

  10. Cryogenics for the MuCool Test Area (MTA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darve, Christine; Norris, Barry; Pei, Liu-Jin; /Fermilab

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MuCool Test Area (MTA) is a complex of buildings at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, which are dedicated to operate components of a cooling cell to be used for Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory R&D. The long-term goal of this facility is to test ionization cooling principles by operating a 25-liter liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) absorber embedded in a 5 Tesla superconducting solenoid magnet. The MTA solenoid magnet will be used with RF cavities exposed to a high intensity beam. Cryogens used at the MTA include LHe, LN{sub 2} and LH{sub 2}. The latter dictates stringent system design for hazardous locations. The cryogenic plant is a modified Tevatron refrigerator based on the Claude cycle. The implementation of an in-house refrigerator system and two 300 kilowatt screw compressors is under development. The helium refrigeration capacity is 500 W at 14 K. In addition the MTA solenoid magnet will be batch-filled with LHe every 2 days using the same cryo-plant. This paper reviews cryogenic systems used to support the Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory R&D programs and emphasizes the feasibility of handling cryogenic equipment at MTA in a safe manner.

  11. Thermal Design of the Mu2e Detector Solenoid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dhanaraj, Nandhini; Wands, Bob; Buehler, Marc; Feher, Sandor; Page, Thomas M; Peterson, Thomas; Schmitt, Richard L

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The reference design for a superconducting Detector Solenoid (DS) for the Mu2e experiment has been completed. The main functions of the DS are to provide a graded field in the region of the stopping target which ranges from 2 T to 1 T and a uniform precision magnetic field of 1 T in a volume large enough to house a tracker downstream of the stopping target. The inner diameter of the magnet cryostat is 1.9 m and the length is 10.9 m. The gradient section of the magnet is about 4 m long and the spectrometer section with a uniform magnetic field is about 6 m long. The inner cryostat wall supports the stopping target, tracker, calorimeter and other equipment installed in the DS. This warm bore volume is under vacuum during operation. It is sealed on one end by the muon beam stop, while it is open on the other end where it interfaces with the Transport Solenoid. The operating temperature of the magnetic coil is 4.7 K and is indirectly cooled with helium flowing in a thermosiphon cooling scheme. This paper describes the thermal design of the solenoid, including the design aspects of the thermosiphon for the coil cooling, forced flow cooling of the thermal shields with 2 phase LN2 (Liquid Nitrogen) and the transient studies of the cool down of the cold mass as well.

  12. Isotope shifts at 1. 28. mu. m in Pb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeves, J.M.; Fortson, E.N. (Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (USA))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The isotopic shift of the 6{ital p}{sup 2} {ital P}{sub 0}{r arrow}6{ital p}{sup 2} {sup 3}{ital P}{sub 1} (1.28 {mu}m) magnetic-dipole transition in Pb, which had been previously estimated incorrectly in the literature, has been measured, together with the magnetic hyperfine constant of the {sup 3}{ital P}{sub 1} level in {sup 207}Pb. The shifts of the {sup 206}Pb and {sup 207}Pb lines from the {sup 208}Pb position are {delta}(206--208)=220.4(15) MHz and {delta}(207--208)=138.0(17) MHz, and the hyperfine constant {ital A}(6{ital p}{sup 2} {ital P}{sub 1})={minus}2388.2(45) MHz. Inclusion of the shifts in calculated optical rotation line shapes removes long-standing discrepancies between theory and experiment, which have limited the precision of parity-nonconservation measurements in Pb.

  13. Confocal {mu}-XRF, {mu}-XAFS, and {mu}-XRD Studies of Sediment from a Nuclear Waste Disposal Natural Analogue Site and Fractured Granite Following a Radiotracer Migration Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denecke, Melissa A.; Brendebach, Boris; Rothe, Joerg; Simon, Rolf [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Janssens, Koen; Nolf, Wout de; Vekemans, Bart [Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Antwerp (Belgium); Falkenberg, Gerald [Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor (HASYLAB) at DESY, Notkestr. 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Somogyi, Andrea [Synchrotron Soleil, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Noseck, Ulrich [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Theodor-Heuss-Strasse 4, D-38122 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Combined {mu}-XRF, {mu}-XAFS, and {mu}-XRD investigations of a uranium-rich tertiary sediment, from a nuclear repository natural analogue site, and a fractured granite bore core section after a column tracer experiment using a Np(V) containing cocktail have been performed. Most {mu}-XRF/{mu}-XAFS measurements are recorded in a confocal geometry to provide added depth information. The U-rich sediment results show uranium to be present as a tetravalent phosphate and that U(IV) is associated with As(V). Arsenic present is either As(V) or As(0). The As(0) forms thin coatings on the surface of pyrite nodules. A hypothesis for the mechanism of uranium immobilization is proposed, where arsenopyrite acted as reductant of ground water dissolved U(VI) leading to precipitation of less soluble U(IV) and thereby forming As(V). Results for the granite sample show the immobilized Np to be tetravalent and associated with facture material.

  14. Dynamic Total Order Protocol Replacement Emili Miedes, Francesc D. Mu~noz-Escoi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, Francesc

    Dynamic Total Order Protocol Replacement Emili Miedes, Francesc D. Mu~noz-Esco´i InstitutoMiedesetal.:DynamicTotalOrderProtocolReplacementITI-SIDI-2012/009 #12;#12;Dynamic Total Order Protocol Replacement Emili Miedes, Francesc D. Mu~noz-Esco

  15. Dynamic Software Update Emili Miedes and Francesc D. Mu~noz-Escoi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, Francesc

    Dynamic Software Update Emili Miedes and Francesc D. Mu~noz-Esco´i Instituto Universitario MixtoMiedesetal.:DynamicSoftwareUpdateITI-SIDI-2012/004 #12;#12;Dynamic Software Update Emili Miedes and Francesc D. Mu~noz-Esco´i Instituto

  16. A Survey about Dynamic Software Updating Emili Miedes and Francesc D. Mu~noz-Escoi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, Francesc

    A Survey about Dynamic Software Updating Emili Miedes and Francesc D. Mu~noz-Esco´i InstitutoMiedesetal.:ASurveyaboutDynamicSoftwareUpdatingITI-SIDI-2012/003 #12;#12;A Survey about Dynamic Software Updating Emili Miedes and Francesc D. Mu~noz-Esco

  17. mu-term: A Tool for Proving Termination of Context-Sensitive Rewriting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucas, Salvador

    mu-term: A Tool for Proving Termination of Context-Sensitive Rewriting Salvador Lucas DSIC@dsic.upv.es Abstract. Restrictions of rewriting can eventually achieve termination by pruning all infinite rewrite. This paper describes mu-term, a tool which can be used to automatically prove termination of CSR. The tool

  18. mu-term: A Tool for Proving Termination of Context-Sensitive Rewriting ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucas, Salvador

    mu-term: A Tool for Proving Termination of Context-Sensitive Rewriting ? Salvador Lucas DSIC@dsic.upv.es Abstract. Restrictions of rewriting can eventually achieve termination by pruning all in#12;nite rewrite. This paper describes mu-term, a tool which can be used to automatically prove termination of CSR. The tool

  19. Feasibility Studies on a Downstream Injection System for Mu2e Calorimeter Calibration Guangyong Koha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gollin, George

    Feasibility Studies on a Downstream Injection System for Mu2e Calorimeter Calibration Electrons A calibration-electron injection system sited downstream of the calorimeters within the Mu2e detector solenoid directed along the beam axis), progressing downstream over the extent of the stopping target array.1

  20. Prof. S.K. Saha MuDRA: Connecting engineering minds with society 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saha, Subir Kumar

    Prof. S.K. Saha MuDRA: Connecting engineering minds with society 1 MultibodyMultibody DynamicsEngineeringMinds with SocietyConnectingEngineeringMinds with Society -------- Prof. S.K. Saha Naren Gupta Chair Professor Dept the Seriesin the Series Total: 31 India: 26 Poland: 1 Ethiopia: 1 USA: 1 Mexico: 2 #12;Prof. S.K. Saha Mu

  1. Recent results of. mu. CF experiments at SIN (Swiss Institute For Nuclear Research)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breunlich, W.H.; Cargnelli, M.; Bistirlich, J.; Crowe, K.M.; Justice, M.; Kurck, J.; Petitjean, C.; Sherman, R.H.; Bossy, H.; Daniel, H.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Important topics concerning Muon Catalyzed Fusion were investigated in experiments at the Swiss Institute for Nuclear Research (SIN), including transient and steady state rates for the main d..mu..t cycle as well as detailed information about the competing d..mu..d and t..mu..t fusion branches. The basic kinetic parameters were determined and striking features of the resonant d..mu..t formation process were revealed (density effect, epithermal behavior). DT sticking was measured with independent techniques, i.e., detection of fusion neutrons as well as ..mu..He x-rays after fusion. Fusion yields per muon of 113 +- 10 were observed at liquid conditions, yields exceeding 200 are anticipated for optimal conditions from our results. 43 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Measurement of \\Gamma_{ee}(J/\\psi)*Br(J/\\psi->e^+e^-) and \\Gamma_{ee}(J/\\psi)*Br(J/\\psi->\\mu^+\\mu^-)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anashin, V V; Baldin, E M; Barladyan, A K; Barnyakov, A Yu; Barnyakov, M Yu; Baru, S E; Bedny, I V; Beloborodova, O L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bobrov, A V; Bobrovnikov, V S; Bogomyagkov, A V; Bondar, A E; Bondarev, D V; Buzykaev, A R; Eidelman, S I; Glukhovchenko, Yu M; Gulevich, V V; Gusev, D V; Karnaev, S E; Karpov, G V; Karpov, S V; Kharlamova, T A; Kiselev, V A; Kononov, S A; Kotov, K Yu; Kravchenko, E A; Kulikov, V F; Kurkin, G Ya; Kuper, E A; Levichev, E B; Maksimov, D A; Malyshev, V M; Maslennikov, A L; Medvedko, A S; Meshkov, O I; Mishnev, S I; Morozov, I I; Muchnoi, N Yu; Neufeld, V V; Nikitin, S A; Nikolaev, I B; Okunev, I N; Onuchin, A P; Oreshkin, S B; Orlov, I O; Osipov, A A; Peleganchuk, S V; Pivovarov, S G; Piminov, P A; Petrov, V V; Poluektov, A O; Popkov, I N; Prisekin, V G; Ruban, A A; Sandyrev, V K; Savinov, G A; Shamov, A G; Shatilov, D N; Shwartz, B A; Simonov, E A; Sinyatkin, S V; Skovpen, Yu I; Skrinsky, A N; Smaluk, V V; Sokolov, A V; Sukharev, A M; Starostina, E V; Talyshev, A A; Tayursky, V A; Telnov, V I; Tikhonov, Yu A; Todyshev, K Yu; Tumaikin, G M; Usov, Yu V; Vorobiov, A I; Yushkov, A N; Zhilich, V N; Zhulanov, V V; Zhuravlev, A N

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The products of the electron width of the J/\\psi meson and the branching fraction of its decays to the lepton pairs were measured using data from the KEDR experiment at the VEPP-4M electron-positron collider. The results are \\Gamma_{ee}(J/\\psi)*Br(J/\\psi->e^+e^-)=0.3323\\pm0.0064\\pm0.0048 keV, \\Gamma_{ee}(J/\\psi)*Br(J/\\psi->\\mu^+\\mu^-)=0.3318\\pm0.0052\\pm0.0063 keV. Assuming e\\mu universality and using the world average value of the lepton branching fraction, we also determine the leptonic \\Gamma_{ll}=5.59\\pm0.12 keV and total \\Gamma=94.1\\pm2.7 keV widths of the J/\\psi meson.

  3. Search for a standard model-like Higgs boson in the $\\mu^+\\mu^-$ and $\\mathrm{e^+e^-}$ decay channels at the LHC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan [Yervan Physics Institute (Armenia); et al.,

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search is presented for a standard model-like Higgs boson decaying to the $\\mu^+\\mu^-$ or $\\mathrm{e^+e^-}$ final states based on proton-proton collisions recorded by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC. The data correspond to integrated luminosities of 5.0$~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ at a centre-of-mass energy of $7~\\mathrm{TeV}$ and $19.7~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ at $8~\\mathrm{TeV}$ for the $\\mu^+\\mu^-$ search, and of $19.7~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ at a centre-of-mass energy of $8~\\mathrm{TeV}$ for the $\\mathrm{e^+e^-}$ search. To enhance the sensitivity of the search, events are categorized by topologies according to production process and dilepton invariant mass resolution. Upper limits on the production cross section times branching fraction at the 95% confidence level are reported for Higgs boson masses in the range from 120 to 150$~\\mathrm{GeV}$. For a Higgs boson with a mass of 125$~\\mathrm{GeV}$ decaying to $\\mu^+\\mu^-$, the observed (expected) upper limit on the production rate is found to be 7.4 ($6.5^{+2.8}_{-1.9}$) times the standard model value. This corresponds to an upper limit on the branching fraction of 0.0016. Similarly, for $\\mathrm{e^+e^-}$, an upper limit of 0.0019 is placed on the branching fraction, which is ${\\approx}3.7\\times10^5$ times the standard model value. These results, together with recent evidence of the 125$~\\mathrm{GeV}$ boson coupling to $\\tau$-leptons with a larger branching fraction consistent with the standard model, show for the first time that the leptonic couplings of the new boson are not flavour-universal.

  4. Search for a standard model-like Higgs boson in the $\\mu^+\\mu^-$ and $\\mathrm{e^+e^-}$ decay channels at the LHC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.,

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search is presented for a standard model-like Higgs boson decaying to the $\\mu^+\\mu^-$ or $\\mathrm{e^+e^-}$ final states based on proton-proton collisions recorded by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC. The data correspond to integrated luminosities of 5.0$~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ at a centre-of-mass energy of $7~\\mathrm{TeV}$ and $19.7~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ at $8~\\mathrm{TeV}$ for the $\\mu^+\\mu^-$ search, and of $19.7~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ at a centre-of-mass energy of $8~\\mathrm{TeV}$ for the $\\mathrm{e^+e^-}$ search. To enhance the sensitivity of the search, events are categorized by topologies according to production process and dilepton invariant mass resolution. Upper limits on the production cross section times branching fraction at the 95%more »confidence level are reported for Higgs boson masses in the range from 120 to 150$~\\mathrm{GeV}$. For a Higgs boson with a mass of 125$~\\mathrm{GeV}$ decaying to $\\mu^+\\mu^-$, the observed (expected) upper limit on the production rate is found to be 7.4 ($6.5^{+2.8}_{-1.9}$) times the standard model value. This corresponds to an upper limit on the branching fraction of 0.0016. Similarly, for $\\mathrm{e^+e^-}$, an upper limit of 0.0019 is placed on the branching fraction, which is ${\\approx}3.7\\times10^5$ times the standard model value. These results, together with recent evidence of the 125$~\\mathrm{GeV}$ boson coupling to $\\tau$-leptons with a larger branching fraction consistent with the standard model, show for the first time that the leptonic couplings of the new boson are not flavour-universal.« less

  5. DISCOVERY AND ANALYSIS OF 21 {mu}m FEATURE SOURCES IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volk, Kevin; Meixner, Margaret; Gordon, Karl D. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Hrivnak, Bruce J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Valparaiso University, Valparaiso, IN 46383 (United States); Matsuura, Mikako [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCL-Institute of Origins, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Bernard-Salas, Jeronimo [Institut d Astrophysique Spatiale, CNRS/Universite Paris-Sud 11, 91405, Orsay (France); Szczerba, Ryszard [N. Copernicus Astronomical Center, Rabianska 8, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Sloan, G. C. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Kraemer, Kathleen E. [Air Force Research Laboratory, AFRL/RVBYB, 29 Randolph Road, Hanscom AFB, MA 01731 (United States); Van Loon, Jacco Th. [Astrophysics Group, Lennard-Jones Laboratories, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Kemper, F.; Woods, Paul M.; Zijlstra, Albert A. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Sahai, Raghvendra [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, MS 183-900, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Gruendl, Robert A. [Astronomy Department, University of Illinois, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Tielens, Alexander G. G. M. [Leiden Observatory, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Indebetouw, Remy [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Marengo, Massimo, E-mail: volk@stsci.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, A313E Zaffarano, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2011-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Spitzer Space Telescope mid-infrared spectroscopy has been obtained for 15 carbon-rich protoplanetary nebulae (PPNe) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and for two other such stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). Of these 17 PPNe, the unidentified 21 {mu}m feature is strong in 7 spectra, weak in 2 spectra, and very weak or questionable in 4 spectra. Two of the four spectra without the 21 {mu}m feature have a very strong feature near 11 {mu}m, similar to a feature observed in some carbon-rich planetary nebulae (PNe) in the LMC. We attribute this feature to unusual SiC dust, although the feature-to-continuum ratio is much larger than for SiC features in Galactic or Magellanic Cloud carbon star spectra. The remaining two objects show typical carbon-rich PPNe spectra with no 21 {mu}m features. One of the LMC objects that lacks the 21 {mu}m feature and one SMC object with a questionable 21 {mu}m detection may have mixed dust chemistries based upon their spectral similarity to Galactic [WC] PNe. The 13 objects that either definitely or may show the 21 {mu}m feature have distinct dust shell properties compared to the Galactic 21 {mu}m objects-the 21 {mu}m features are weaker, the estimated dust temperatures are significantly higher, the unidentified infrared (UIR) bands are stronger, and the UIRs show more structure. Four of the 21 {mu}m objects appear to show normal SiC emission features in their spectra. Many of the PPNe show strong 30 {mu}m features, although this feature carries less of the total mid-infrared emission than is normally the case for the Galactic 21 {mu}m PPNe. The LMC objects are in the LMC halo rather than in the LMC bar. The estimated luminosities of these PPNe vary from 4700 to 12,500 L{sub sun}.

  6. Measurement of the cross section for scattering of p. mu. atoms in gaseous hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bystritskii, V.M.; Dzhelepov, V.P.; Petrukhin, V.I.; Rudenko, A.I.; Suvorov, V.M.; Fil'chenkov, V.V.; Khovanskii, N.N.; Khomenko, B.A.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The muon beam of the synchrocyclotron at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research has been used in an experiment with gaseous hydrogen at a pressure of 41 atm to measure the cross section for scattering of p..mu.. atoms by hydrogen molecules sigma(p..mu..+H/sub 2/) = (42 +- 8) x 10/sup -21/ cm/sup 2/, which corresponds to a cross section for scattering by free protons sigma(p..mu..+p) = (17.4 +- 3.3) x 10/sup -21/ cm/sup 2/.

  7. Dynamic Total-Order Broadcast Protocol Replacement Emili Miedes De Elias, Francesc D. Mu~noz-Escoi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, Francesc

    Dynamic Total-Order Broadcast Protocol Replacement Emili Miedes De El´ias, Francesc D. Mu~noz-Esco. Mu~noz-Esco´i Instituto Universitario Mixto Tecnol´ogico de Inform´atica Universidad Polit´ecnica de

  8. Determination of the semi-leptonic weak interaction pseudoscalar coupling constant , g$_{P}$, using the reaction $\\mu^{-}$p --> $\

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasinoff, M D; Azuelos, Georges; Bertl, W; Blecher, M; Chen, C Q; Depommier, P; Doyle, B; Von Egidy, T; Gorringe, T P; Gumplinger, P; Henderson, R; Jonkmans, G; Larabee, A J; MacDonald, J A; McDonald, S C; Munro, M H; Poutissou, J M; Poutissou, R; Robertson, B C; Sample, D G; Schott, W; Taylor, G N; Veillette, S; Wright, D H

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Determination of the semi-leptonic weak interaction pseudoscalar coupling constant , g$_{P}$, using the reaction $\\mu^{-}$p --> $\

  9. Laboratory Hydro-mechanical Characterisation of Boom Clay at Essen and Mol Y. F. Deng1, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Laboratory Hydro-mechanical Characterisation of Boom Clay at Essen and Mol Y. F. Deng1, 2 , A. M. In the present work, the hydro-mechanical behaviour of Boom clay samples from the borehole Essen-1 at a depth and hydro-mechanical behaviour of Boom clay from Essen at 227-m, 240-m and 248-m depths are similar

  10. Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging . Author manuscript The age of reason for FDG PET image-derived indices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging . Author manuscript Page /1 3 The age of reason for FDG PET image Author Keywords image derived parameters ; 18F-FDG-PET ; prediction ; prognosis ; therapy response The clinical use of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging using the 2-deoxy-2-(18F

  11. ISOLATION OF NUCLEAR DNA FROM PLANTS Based on Peterson et al. (1997), Plant Mol. Biol. Reptr. 15: 148-153.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, David

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ISOLATION OF NUCLEAR DNA FROM PLANTS Based on Peterson et al. (1997), Plant Mol. Biol. Reptr. 15 quantities of nuclear DNA from a wide variety of plants including pine, tomato, juniper, cypress, sorghum for plants in which polyphenols are a problem, although it has provided good results for every plant species

  12. J. Mol. Biol. (1975) 91, 101-120 A Neutron Scattering Study of the Distribution of Protein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Mol. Biol. (1975) 91, 101-120 A Neutron Scattering Study of the Distribution of Protein and RNA coli have been measured by neutron scattering experiments on the intact subunit. In addition the radius, 1972; Lutter et al., 1972), and neutron scattering (Engelman & Moore, 1972; Moore et al., 1974

  13. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol . Author manuscript Defective angiogenesis in hypoplastic human fetal lungs correlates with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol . Author manuscript Page /1 12 Defective angiogenesis in hypoplastic human fetal lungs correlates with nitric oxide synthase deficiency that occurs despite enhanced.bourbon@inserm.fr > Abstract Lung hypoplasia (LH) is a life-threatening congenital abnormality with various causes. It involves

  14. HYDROGEN DISTILLATION AT THE DEUTERIUM REMOVAL UNIT OF MuCap EXPERIMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Titov, Anatoly

    321 HYDROGEN DISTILLATION AT THE DEUTERIUM REMOVAL UNIT OF MuCap EXPERIMENT I.A. Alekseev, E for manufacturing of ultra pure protium from hydrogen [2]. A principle of hydrogen cryogenic distillation was used

  15. Search for B{sub c}{sup {plus_minus}} {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup {plus_minus}} and the B rare decays B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +} mu{sup {minus}} and B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup {minus}} at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speer, T. [Geneva Univ. (Switzerland); CDF Collaboration

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for the {ital B}{sup +}{sub {ital c}}{yields}{ital J}/{Psi}{pi}{sup {+-}}. We measure the limit of {delta}({ital B}{sup {+-}}{sub {ital c}}){center_dot}{ital BR(B{sub c}{sup {+-}}{yields}J/{Psi}{pi}{sup {+-}})/{delta}(B{sup +-}{sub u}){center_dot}BR(B{sup {+-}}{sub u}{yields}J/{Psi}{Kappa}{sup {+-}}}) as a function of the {ital B{sup {+-}}{sub c}} lifetime, using {approx} 110 {ital pb}{sup -1} of data collected at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). We present also a search for the rare decays {ital B}{sup 0}{sub {ital d}}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and {ital B}{sup 0}{sub {ital s}}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, setting an upper limit on their respective branching ratios.

  16. Luscher's mu-term and finite volume bootstrap principle for scattering states and form factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Pozsgay

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the leading order finite size correction (Luscher's mu-term) associated to moving one-particle states, arbitrary scattering states and finite volume form factors in 1+1 dimensional integrable models. Our method is based on the idea that the mu-term is intimately connected to the inner structure of the particles, ie. their composition under the bootstrap program. We use an appropriate analytic continuation of the Bethe-Yang equations to quantize bound states in finite volume and obtain the leading mu-term (associated to symmetric particle fusions) by calculating the deviations from the predictions of the ordinary Bethe-Yang quantization. Our results are compared to numerical data of the E8 scattering theory obtained by truncated fermionic space approach. As a by-product it is shown that the bound state quantization does not only yield the correct mu-term, but also provides the sum over a subset of higher order corrections as well.

  17. The AAA+ ClpX machine unfolds a keystone subunit to remodel the Mu transpososome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Tania

    A hyperstable complex of the tetrameric MuA transposase with recombined DNA must be remodeled to allow subsequent DNA replication. ClpX, a AAA+ enzyme, fulfills this function by unfolding one transpososome subunit. Which ...

  18. Performance of Closed Form and Iterative MU-MIMO Precoders for Different Broadcast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gesbert, David

    in improving both reliability and capacity of the system. Some theoretical analysis of the capacity, and Hassibi) algorithm proposed in [12] as it is an iterative algorithm for MU-MISO sumrate maximization based

  19. Design, Synthesis and Evaluation of Peptide-Based Affinity Labels for Mu Opioid Receptors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinha, Bhaswati

    2009-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Narcotic analgesics produce pain relief generally through activation of &mu opioid receptors (MOR), but the use of these analgesics is limited by their side effects, namely respiratory depression, tolerance, physical ...

  20. A 205 {mu}m [N II] MAP OF THE CARINA NEBULA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberst, T. E.; Parshley, S. C.; Nikola, T.; Stacey, G. J. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Loehr, A.; Lane, A. P.; Stark, A. A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kamenetzky, J., E-mail: oberstte@westminster.edu [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80303 (United States)

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a {approx}250 arcmin{sup 2} mapping of the 205 {mu}m [N II] fine-structure emission over the northern Carina Nebula, including the Car I and Car II H II regions. Spectra were obtained using the South Pole Imaging Fabry-Perot Interferometer (SPIFI) at the Antarctic Submillimeter Telescope and Remote Observatory (AST/RO) at the South Pole. We supplement the 205 {mu}m data with new reductions of far-IR fine-structure spectra from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) in 63 {mu}m [O I], 122 {mu}m [N II], 146 {mu}m [O I], and 158 {mu}m [C II]; the 146 {mu}m [O I] data include 90 raster positions which have not been previously published. Morphological comparisons are made with optical, radio continuum, and CO maps. The 122/205 line ratio is used to probe the density of the low-ionization gas, and the 158/205 line ratio is used to probe the fraction of C{sup +} arising from photodissociation regions (PDRs). The [O I] and [C II] lines are used to construct a PDR model of Carina. When the PDR properties are compared with other sources, Carina is found to be more akin to 30 Doradus than galactic star-forming regions such as Orion, M17, or W49; this is consistent with the view of Carina as a more evolved region, where much of the parent molecular cloud has been ionized or swept away. These data constitute the first ground-based detection of the 205 {mu}m [N II] line, and the third detection overall since those of COBE FIRAS and the Kuiper Airborne Observatory in the early 1990s.

  1. Leaf gas exchange and carbohydrate concentrations in Pinus pinaster plants subjected to elevated CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    to elevated CO2 and a soil drying cycle Catherine Picon-Cochard Jean-Marc Guehl Unité de recherches en.) were acclimated for 2 years under ambient (350 ?mol mol-1)and elevated (700 ?mol mol-1) CO2 concentrations ([CO2]). In the summer of the second growing season, the plants were subjected to a soil drying

  2. On the model discriminating power of mu to e conversion in nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cirigliano, Vincenzo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kitano, Ryuichiro [JAPAN; Okada, Yashuiro [JAPAN; Tuzon, Paulo [ITALY

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lepton Flavor Violating (LFV) charged lepton decays provide a highly sensitive probe of physics beyond the Standard Model (SM), due to the un-observably small branching fractions ({approx}10{sup -50}) predicted for these modes in the SM (minimally extended to include massive neutrinos). Searches for SM forbidden muon processes, such as {mu} {yields} e{gamma}, {mu} {yields} e{bar e}e, and {mu} {yields} e conversion in nuclei, have provided so far the strongest constraints on LFV new physics. This statement can be characterized in a model-independent way as a lower bound on the scale associated to a set of dimension six effective operators parameterizing new physics beyond the SM. It is a well known fact that while the decay {mu} {yields} e{gamma} is only sensitive to a transition magnetic dipole operator, both {mu} {yields} e{bar e}e and {mu} {yields} e conversion in nuclei are sensitive to transition charge radii operators as well as purely contact four-fermion interactions induced by physics beyond the SM. In other words, different LFV decays have different sensitivities to underlying LFV mechanisms (effective operators). This leads naturally to ask the question whether one could infer the relative strength of these different operators in a completely phenomenological and model-independent way. This would allow one to discriminate among different underlying models of LFV and thus would provide valuable input for model building. In Ref. [1] it was pointed out that in principle, by combining the rates of {mu} {yields} e{gamma} and {mu} {yields} e conversion on different target nuclei, one could discriminate underlying models. In this work we go back to this issue with the aim to: quantify the theoretical uncertainty induced by the hadronization process; and quantify the experimental precision required to realistically infer useful information on the underlying LFV mechanisms. We organize our discussion as follows: in Section 2 we review the derivation of the {mu} {yields} e conversion rate starting from a general effective theory description of the LFV physics. In Section 3 we explore the phenomenological consequence of the simplest possible models, in which only one effective LFV operator dominates. We extend this analysis in Section 4 to the class of models in which two operators dominate. In Section 5 we specialize our discussion to the SUSY see-saw model and summarize the conclusions of our analysis in Section 6.

  3. Search for B?s ? ?+ ?- and B?d ? mu+mu- decays in p anti-p collisions with CDF. II.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M. G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Aoki, M.; Apollinari, G.; Arguin, J. -F.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Azfar, F.

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a search for B?s ? ?+ ?- and B?d ? mu+mu- decays in p anti-p collisions at ?s = 1.96 TeV using 364.4 pb -1 of data collected by the CDF II dectector at Fermilab Tevatron Collider. After applying all selection requirements, we observe no candidates inside the B?s or B?d mass windows. The resulting upper limits on the branching fractions are ?(B?s ? ?+?-) < 1.5 x 10-7 and ?(B?d ? ?+?-) < 3.9 x 10-8 at 90 % confidence level. (auth)

  4. Routine {sup 18}F{sup -} production with 180 {mu}A to 200 {mu}A target beam current on a GE PETtrace 800 cyclotron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eberl, S.; Eriksson, T.; Svedberg, O.; Norling, J.; Henderson, D.; Lam, P.; Bourdier, T.; Fulham, M. [Department of PET and Nuclear Medicine, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia); GEMS PET Systems AB, Uppsala (Sweden); Department of PET and Nuclear Medicine, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Through upgrades and enhancements, which are now standard on current PETtrace 800 cyclotrons, a GE PETtrace cyclotron installed in 2002 has demonstrated reliable routine [{sup 18}F]FDG production at total target beam currents of 180 {mu}A without detriment to saturation and [{sup 18}F]FDG yields. Routine production at 200 {mu}A has been achieved and its evaluation is continuing. Self-shielded target using W/Cu alloy for the target body afforded a reduction in dose rate from the Havar foils by a factor of {approx} 8-10, reducing dose from the targets and need for removing targets during maintenance. The main activation product in the shield is {sup 187}W (T1/2 24 h). The {sup 60}Co ((T1/2 5.3 y) activation is about 250 times less at 24 h post EOB and is not considered a major issue despite its long half-life.

  5. Search for High-Mass Resonances Decaying into Leptons of Different Flavor (e mu, e tau, mu tau) in p anti-p Collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tu, Yanjun; /Pennsylvania U.

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for high-mass resonances decaying into two leptons of different flavor: e{mu}, e{tau}, and {mu}{tau}. These resonances are predicted by several models beyond the standard model, such as the R-parity-violating MSSM. The search is based on 1 fb{sup -1} of data collected at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF II) in proton anti-proton collisions. Our observations are consistent with the standard model expectations. The results are interpreted to set 95% C.L. upper limits on {sigma} x BR of {tilde {nu}}{sub {tau}} {yields} e{mu}, e{tau}, {mu}{tau}.

  6. A new determination of $\\mathcal{S} \\mathcal{T} \\langle N| \\overline{q} D_{\\mu} D_{\

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gubler, Philipp; Lee, Su Houng

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The symmetric and traceless part of the matrix element $\\mathcal{S} \\mathcal{T} \\langle N| \\overline{q} D_{\\mu} D_{\

  7. Model-Checking the Higher-Dimensional Modal mu-Calculus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lange, Martin; 10.4204/EPTCS.77.6

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The higher-dimensional modal mu-calculus is an extension of the mu-calculus in which formulas are interpreted in tuples of states of a labeled transition system. Every property that can be expressed in this logic can be checked in polynomial time, and conversely every polynomial-time decidable problem that has a bisimulation-invariant encoding into labeled transition systems can also be defined in the higher-dimensional modal mu-calculus. We exemplify the latter connection by giving several examples of decision problems which reduce to model checking of the higher-dimensional modal mu-calculus for some fixed formulas. This way generic model checking algorithms for the logic can then be used via partial evaluation in order to obtain algorithms for theses problems which may benefit from improvements that are well-established in the field of program verification, namely on-the-fly and symbolic techniques. The aim of this work is to extend such techniques to other fields as well, here exemplarily done for process...

  8. An eddy current problem related to electromagnetic Alfredo Bermudez, Rafael Mu~noz, Pilar Salgado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodríguez, Rodolfo

    An eddy current problem related to electromagnetic forming Alfredo Berm´udez, Rafael Mu~noz, Pilar is to analyze a numerical method to solve a transient axisymmetric eddy current problem arising from currents in the workpiece. The magnetic field, together with the eddy currents, originate the Lorentz

  9. Propagation of Intercellular Calcium Waves in Retinal Astrocytes and Mu ller Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Eric A.

    Propagation of Intercellular Calcium Waves in Retinal Astrocytes and Mu¨ ller Cells Eric A. Newman. Experiments were conducted to determine the mechanism of Ca2 wave propagation between glial cells in an intact fluo-4. Mechanical stimulation of astrocyte somata evoked Ca2 waves that propagated through both

  10. MU FAPRI reports economic impact of extending ethanol tax credit, tariff Contact:Duane Dailey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    . ­ Extending the current ethanol tax credit and tariff would boost corn-based fuel production -- and corn for corn as an ethanol fuel source would expand corn acreage by 1.7 million acres, said Seth Meyer, MU for blended fuel at the pump. "At the same time, blenders can pay more to ethanol plants that in turn pay

  11. Crystal-melt interfacial free energies of hard-dumbbell systems Yan Mu and Xueyu Song

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Xueyu

    Crystal-melt interfacial free energies of hard-dumbbell systems Yan Mu and Xueyu Song Department September 2006; published 29 September 2006 The crystal-melt interfacial free energies of different crystal that for the plastic crystal phase, the interfacial free energies decrease as the reduced bond length L* increases

  12. Improving MU-MIMO Performance in LTE-(Advanced) by Efficiently Exploiting Feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gesbert, David

    (CDI/PMI). The standard supports finer granularity feedback i.e. sub-band feedback method, but it-band feedback for providing more frequent update of PMI. However, in order to support this feedback method, we), Downlink Control Information (DCI), Multi-user MIMO (MU-MIMO), Precoding Matrix Indi- cator (PMI

  13. Mu2e collaboration meeting, August 7, 2009 1 Matthew McHugh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gollin, George

    Inside L-Tracker #12;Mu2e collaboration meeting, August 7, 2009 2 The Point · Differentiate between-Kutta ­ Accurate, coinciding paths ­ 1 picosecond intervals · Coordinate transformation ­ Particle within tracker, August 7, 2009 5 Stopping Power, dE/dx · Approximate material as homogenous · Bethe-Bloch for heavy

  14. A classification theorem on Fano bundles Roberto Mu~noz, Gianluca Occhetta, and Luis E. Sola Conde

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Occhetta, Gianluca

    A classification theorem on Fano bundles Roberto Mu~noz, Gianluca Occhetta, and Luis E. Sol´a Conde;2 ROBERTO MU~NOZ, GIANLUCA OCCHETTA, AND LUIS E. SOL´A CONDE (P2) Q3 = LG(1, 3) G(1, 3), (P3) P3 = G(1, 4)Q

  15. Consistency in Scalable Systems M. I. Ruiz-Fuertes, M. R. Pallardo-Lozoya, F. D. Mu~noz-Escoi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, Francesc

    Consistency in Scalable Systems M. I. Ruiz-Fuertes, M. R. Pallard´o-Lozoya, F. D. Mu~noz-Esco Systems M. I. Ruiz-Fuertes, M. R. Pallard´o-Lozoya, F. D. Mu~noz-Esco´i Instituto Universitario Mixto

  16. Software Adaptation through Dynamic Updating Emili Miedes, Josep M. Bernabeu-Auban, Francesc D. Mu~noz-Escoi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, Francesc

    . Mu~noz-Esco´i Instituto Universitario Mixto Tecnol´ogico de Inform´atica Universitat Polit`ecnica de´eu-Aub´an, Francesc D. Mu~noz-Esco´i Instituto Universitario Mixto Tecnol´ogico de Inform´atica Universitat Polit

  17. A Compoundable Specification of the Snapshot Isolation Level Josep M. Bernabe-Gisbert, Francesc D. Mu~noz-Escoi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, Francesc

    . Mu~noz-Esco´i Universitat Polit`ecnica de Val`encia, 46022 Val`encia (Spain) Tel.: +34 963877069 Fax´e-Gisbert, Francesc D. Mu~noz-Esco´i Universitat Polit`ecnica de Val`encia, 46022 Val`encia (Spain) Tel.: +34

  18. Extending Mixed Serialisation Graphs to Replicated Environments Josep M. Bernabe-Gisbert and Francesc D. Mu~noz-Escoi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, Francesc

    ´e-Gisbert and Francesc D. Mu~noz-Esco´i Instituto Tecnol´ogico de Inform´atica, Universidad Polit´ecnica de Valencia´e-Gisbert and Francesc D. Mu~noz-Esco´i Instituto Tecnol´ogico de Inform´atica, Universidad Polit´ecnica de Valencia

  19. Dmitri Babikov (dmitri.babikov@mu.edu; 288-3538) Quantum Origin of Anomalous Isotope Effect in Ozone Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Scott A.

    of photocatalytic hybrid materials for solar energy conversion James Kincaid (james.kincaid@mu.edu; 288 in Ozone Formation Mixed Quantum/Classical Theory for Collisional Energy Transfer Computational Study-Halons Mark Steinmetz (mark.steinmetz@mu.edu; 288-3535) Photochemically Removable Protecting Groups Qadir

  20. Proving Termination Properties with mu-term Beatriz Alarcon, Raul Gutierrez, Salvador Lucas, and Rafael Navarro-Marset

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucas, Salvador

    Proving Termination Properties with mu-term Beatriz Alarc´on, Ra´ul Guti´errez, Salvador Lucas Valencia, Spain Abstract. mu-term is a tool which can be used to verify a number of termination properties of (variants of) Term Rewriting Systems (TRSs): termination of rewriting, termination of innermost rewriting

  1. Measurement of the CP-violation parameter of B0 mixing and decay with p anti-p ---> mu mu X data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro,

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors measure the dimuon charge asymmetry A in p{bar p} collisions at a center of mass energy {radical}s 1960 GeV. The data was recorded with the D0 detector and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of approximately 1.0 fb{sup -1}. Assuming that the asymmetry A is due to asymmetric B{sup 0} {leftrightarrow} {bar B}{sup 0} mixing and decay, they extract the CP-violation parameter of B{sup 0} mixing and decay: R({epsilon}{sub B{sup 0}}/1) + |{epsilon}{sub B{sup 0}}|{sup 2} = A{sub B{sup 0}}/4 = -0.0023 {+-} 0.0011(stat) {+-} 0.0008(syst). A{sub B{sup 0}} is the dimuon charge asymmetry from decays of B{sup 0}{bar B}{sup 0} pairs. The general case, with CP violation in both B{sup 0} and B{sub s}{sup 0} systems, is also considered. Finally they obtain the forward-backward asymmetry that quantifies the tendency of {mu}{sup +} to go in the proton direction and {mu}{sup -} to go in the anti-proton direction. The results are consistent with the standard model and constrain new physics.

  2. High-resolution 25 \\mu m imaging of the disks around Herbig Ae/Be stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honda, M; Okamoto, Y K; Kataza, H; Yamashita, T; Miyata, T; Sako, S; Fujiyoshi, T; Sakon, I; Fujiwara, H; Kamizuka, T; Mulders, G D; Lopez-Rodriguez, E; Packham, C; Onaka, T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We imaged circumstellar disks around 22 Herbig Ae/Be stars at 25 \\mu m using Subaru/COMICS and Gemini/T-ReCS. Our sample consists of equal numbers of objects belonging to the two categories defined by Meeus et al. (2001); 11 group I (flaring disk) and II (at disk) sources. We find that group I sources tend to show more extended emission than group II sources. Previous studies have shown that the continuous disk is hard to be resolved with 8 meter class telescopes in Q-band due to the strong emission from the unresolved innermost region of the disk. It indicates that the resolved Q-band sources require a hole or gap in the disk material distribution to suppress the contribution from the innermost region of the disk. As many group I sources are resolved at 25 \\mu m, we suggest that many, not all, group I Herbig Ae/Be disks have a hole or gap and are (pre-)transitional disks. On the other hand, the unresolved nature of many group II sources at 25 \\mu m supports that group II disks have continuous at disk geometr...

  3. Mixing of. nu. /sub e/ and. nu. /sub. mu. / in SO(10) models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milton, K.; Nandi, S.; Tanaka, K.

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We found previously in SO(10) grand unified theories that if the neutrinos have a Dirac mass and a right-handed Majorana mass (approx.10/sup 15/ GeV) but no left-handed Majorana mass, there is small ..nu../sub e/ mixing but ..nu../sub ..mu../-..nu../sub tau/ mixing can be substantial. We reexamine this problem on the basis of a formalism that assumes that the up, down, lepton, and neutrino mass matrices arise from a single complex 10 and a single 126 Higgs boson. This formalism determines the Majorana mass matrix in terms of quark mass matrices. Adopting three different sets of quark mass matrices that produce acceptable fermion mass ratios and Cabbibo mixing, we obtain results consistent with the above; however, in the optimum case, ..nu../sub e/-..nu../sub ..mu../ mixing can be of the order of the Cabbibo angle. In an extension of this model wherein the Witten mechanism generates the Majorana mass, we illustrate quantitatively how the parameter characterizing the Majorana sector must be tuned in order to achieve large ..nu../sub e/-..nu../sub ..mu../ mixing.

  4. Progress on Design and Construction of a MuCool Coupling Solenoid Magnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, L.; Liu, Xiao Kun; Xu, FengYu; Li, S.; Pan, Heng; Wu, Hong; Guo, Xinglong; Zheng, ShiXian; Li, Derun; Virostek, Steve; Zisman, Mike; Green, M.A.

    2010-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The MuCool program undertaken by the US Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration is to study the behavior of muon ionization cooling channel components. A single superconducting coupling solenoid magnet is necessary to pursue the research and development work on the performance of high gradient, large size RF cavities immersed in magnetic field, which is one of the main challenges in the practical realization of ionization cooling of muons. The MuCool coupling magnet is to be built using commercial copper based niobium titanium conductors and cooled by two cryo-coolers with each cooling capacity of 1.5 W at 4.2 K. The solenoid magnet will be powered by using a single 300A power supply through a single pair of binary leads that are designed to carry a maximum current of 210A. The magnet is to be passively protected by cold diodes and resistors across sections of the coil and by quench back from the 6061 Al mandrel in order to lower the quench voltage and the hot spot temperature. The magnet is currently under construction. This paper presents the updated design and fabrication progress on the MuCool coupling magnet.

  5. Cloud structure and composition of Jupiter's troposphere from 5-{\\mu}m Cassini VIMS spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giles, Rohini S; Irwin, Patrick G J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jupiter's tropospheric composition and cloud structure are studied using Cassini VIMS 4.5-5.1 {\\mu}m thermal emission spectra from the 2000-2001 flyby. We make use of both nadir and limb darkening observations on the planet's nightside, and compare these with dayside observations. Although there is significant spatial variability in the 5-{\\mu}m brightness temperatures, the shape of the spectra remain very similar across the planet, suggesting the presence of a spectrally-flat, spatially inhomogeneous cloud deck. We find that a simple cloud model consisting of a single, compact cloud is able to reproduce both nightside and dayside spectra, subject to the following constraints: (i) the cloud base is located at pressures of 1.2 bar or lower; (ii) the cloud particles are highly scattering; (iii) the cloud is sufficiently spectrally flat. Using this cloud model, we search for global variability in the cloud opacity and the phosphine deep volume mixing ratio. We find that the vast majority of the 5-{\\mu}m inhomoge...

  6. Structural basis of agrin?LRP4?MuSK signaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zong, Yinong; Zhang, Bin; Gu, Shenyan; Lee, Kwangkook; Zhou, Jie; Yao, Guorui; Figueiredo, Dwight; Perry, Kay; Mei, Lin; Jin, Rongsheng (Cornell); (GSHU); (Sanford-Burnham)

    2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Synapses are the fundamental units of neural circuits that enable complex behaviors. The neuromuscular junction (NMJ), a synapse formed between a motoneuron and a muscle fiber, has contributed greatly to understanding of the general principles of synaptogenesis as well as of neuromuscular disorders. NMJ formation requires neural agrin, a motoneuron-derived protein, which interacts with LRP4 (low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4) to activate the receptor tyrosine kinase MuSK (muscle-specific kinase). However, little is known of how signals are transduced from agrin to MuSK. Here, we present the first crystal structure of an agrin-LRP4 complex, consisting of two agrin-LRP4 heterodimers. Formation of the initial binary complex requires the z8 loop that is specifically present in neuronal, but not muscle, agrin and that promotes the synergistic formation of the tetramer through two additional interfaces. We show that the tetrameric complex is essential for neuronal agrin-induced acetylcholine receptor (AChR) clustering. Collectively, these results provide new insight into the agrin-LRP4-MuSK signaling cascade and NMJ formation and represent a novel mechanism for activation of receptor tyrosine kinases.

  7. A photon detector system for the search for the rare muon decay {mu} {yields} e{gamma}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Ausdeln, L.A.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An innovative and state of the art pair spectrometer system to measure the photon component of {mu}{sup +} decay to obtain an improved branching ratio limit for the decay {mu} {yields} e{gamma} is investigated. Analysis algorithms are developed and an experimental inner bremsstrahlung spectrum is obtained and agrees well with Monte Carlo simulations. Background sources are investigated and found to be highly suppressed at various stages of acquisition and analysis.

  8. Conceptual design of the Mu2e production solenoid cold mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashikhin, V.V.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Lamm, M.; Mokhov, N.V.; Nicol, T.H.; Page, T.M.; Pronskikh, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Muon-to-Electron conversion experiment (Mu2e), under development at Fermilab, seeks to detect direct muon to electron conversion to provide evidence for a process violating muon and electron lepton number conservation that cannot be explained by the Standard Model of particle physics. The required magnetic field is produced by a series of superconducting solenoids of various apertures and lengths. This paper describes the conceptual design of the 5 T, 4 m long solenoid cold mass with 1.67 m bore with the emphasis on the magnetic, radiation and thermal analyses.

  9. Left-right symmetric model with {mu}{r_reversible}{tau} symmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez-Izquierdo, Juan Carlos; Perez-Lorenzana, Abdel [Departamento de Fisica, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del I.P.N., Apdo. Post. 14-740, 07000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a Left-right symmetric model with a (Z{sub 2}){sup 3} discrete symmetry which realizes softly broken {mu}{r_reversible}{tau} symmetry, which is broken at tree level in the effective neutrino mass matrix by mass difference in the diagonal Dirac mass terms. Lepton mixings arise from Majorana mass matrix. We determined {theta}{sub 13}, and the deviation from maximal value of {theta}{sub ATM} in terms of the hierarchy scale, m{sub 3}, and a single free parameter, h{sub s}.

  10. Non-standard neutrino interactions in the mu–tau sector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mocioiu, Irina; Wright, Warren

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss neutrino mass hierarchy implications arising from the effects of non-standard neutrino interactions on muon rates in high statistics atmospheric neutrino oscillation experiments like IceCube DeepCore. We concentrate on the mu–tau sector, which is presently the least constrained. It is shown that the magnitude of the effects depends strongly on the sign of the ??? parameter describing this non-standard interaction. A simple analytic model is used to understand the parameter space where differences between the two signs are maximized. We discuss how this effect is partially degenerate with changing the neutrino mass hierarchy, as well as how this degeneracy could be lifted.

  11. Optimization of a Mu2e production solenoid heat and radiation shield using MARS15

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pronskikh, V.S.; Mokhov, N.V.; /Fermilab

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Monte-Carlo study of several Mu2e Production Solenoid (PS) absorber (heat shield) versions using the MARS15 code has been performed. Optimizations for material as well as cost (amount of tungsten) have been carried out. Studied are such quantities as the number of displacements per atom (DPA) in the helium-cooled solenoid superconducting coils, power density and dynamic heat load in various parts of the PS and its surrounding structures. Prompt dose, residual dose, secondary particle flux are also simulated in the PS structures and the experimental hall. A preliminary choice of the PS absorber design is made on the ground of these studies.

  12. Airbreathing Laser Propulsion Experiments with 1 {mu}m Terawatt Pharos IIILaser: Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myrabo, L. N.; Lyons, P. W.; Jones, R. A.; Liu, S. [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Manka, C. [Space Plasma Branch, Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. (United States)

    2011-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This basic research study examines the physics of airbreathing laser propulsion at the extreme flux range of 1-2x10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2}--within the air breakdown threshold for l {mu}m radiation--using the terawatt Pharos III neodymium-glass pulsed laser. Six different experimental setups were employed using a 34 mm line focus with 66 {mu}m focal waist, positioned near the flat impulse surface. The 2nd Campaign investigated impulse generation with the laser beam focused at grazing incidence across near horizontal target surfaces, with pulse energies ranging from 55 to 186 J, and pulse-widths of 2 to 30 ns FWHM. Laser generated impulse was measured with a horizontal Plexiglas registered ballistic pendulum equipped with either a steel target insert or 0.5 Tesla permanent magnet (NEIT-40), to quantify changes in the momentum coupling coefficient (C{sub M}). Part 2 of this 2-part paper covers Campaign no. 2 results including C{sub M} performance data, and long exposure color photos of LP plasma phenomena.

  13. A Circulating Hydrogen Ultra-High Purification System for the MuCap Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Ganzha; P. A. Kravtsov; O. E. Maev; G. N. Schapkin; G. G. Semenchuk; V. Trofimov; A. A. Vasilyev; M. E. Vznuzdaev; S. M. Clayton; P. Kammel; B. Kiburg; M. Hildebrandt; C. Petitjean; T. I. Banks; B. Lauss

    2007-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The MuCap experiment is a high-precision measurement of the rate for the basic electroweak process of muon capture, mu- + p -> n + nu . The experimental approach is based on an active target consisting of a time projection chamber (TPC) operating with pure hydrogen gas. The hydrogen has to be kept extremely pure and at a stable pressure. A Circulating Hydrogen Ultrahigh Purification System was designed at the Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI) to continuously clean the hydrogen from impurities. The system is based on an adsorption cryopump to stimulate the hydrogen flow and on a cold adsorbent for the hydrogen cleaning. It was installed at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in 2004 and performed reliably during three experiment runs. During several months long operating periods the system maintained the hydrogen purity in the detector on the level of 20 ppb for moisture, which is the main contaminant, and of better than 7 ppb and 5 ppb for nitrogen and oxygen, respectively. The pressure inside the TPC was stabilized to within 0.024% of 10 bar at a hydrogen flow rate of 3 standard liters per minute.

  14. {mu}-{tau} symmetry, sterile right-handed neutrinos, and leptogenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riazuddin [National Centre for Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Leptogenesis is studied in a seesaw model with {mu}-{tau} symmetry for SU{sub L}(2)-singlet right-handed neutrinos. It is shown that lepton asymmetry is not zero and is given by the square of the solar neutrino mass difference and can be of the right order of magnitude. Further it involves the same Majorana phase which appears in the neutrinoless double {beta}-decay. In this framework one of the right-handed seesaw partners of light neutrinos can be made massless. This can be identified with a sterile neutrino, once it acquires a tiny mass ({approx_equal}1 eV) when {mu}-{tau} symmetry is broken in the right-handed neutrino sector. The above mentioned sterile neutrino together with another one can be identified to explain the MiniBooNE and LSND results. The light 5x5 neutrino mass matrix is completely fixed if CP is conserved and so is the effective mass for neutrinoless double {beta}-decay.

  15. Production and trapping of radioactive atoms at the TRI\\muP facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Traykov; U. Dammalapati; S. De; O. C. Dermois; L. Huisman; K. Jungmann; W. Kruithof; A. J. Mol; C. J. G. Onderwater; A. Rogachevskiy; M. da Silva e Silva; M. Sohani; O. Versolato; L. Willmann; H. W. Wilschut

    2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The structures for the TRI$\\mu$P facility have been completed and commissioned. At the facility radioactive nuclides are produced to study fundamental interactions and symmetries. An important feature is the possibility to trap radioactive atoms in order to obtain and hold a pure substrate-free sample for precision measurements. In the TRI$\\mu$P facility a production target is followed by a magnetic separator, where radioactive isotopes are produced in inverse reaction kinematics. Separation up to 99.95% could be achieved for $^{21}$Na. A novel transmitting thermal ionizing device was developed to stop the energetic isotopes. Some 50% of stopped $^{21}$Na could be extracted and transported as low energy singly charged ions into a radio frequency quadrupole cooler and buncher with 35% transmission efficiency. The ions are transported lossless via a drift tube and a low energy electrostatic beam line into the experimental setup. Such ions can be neutralized on hot metal foils and the resulting atoms can be stored in a magneto-optical trap. The functioning of that principle was demonstrated with stable Na extracted from the thermal ionizer, radioactive beams will follow next.

  16. than 10 mol% has no further influence on the shape-memory properties. After two cycles of UV irradiation, the clear film turned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tackley, Paul J.

    than 10 mol% has no further influence on the shape-memory properties. After two cycles of UV of shape memory properties were observed (Fig. 3). Although the extent of photoreversibility, the temperature of the polymers does not change, indicating that heating is not the trigger of shape-memory

  17. Energy transfer and 1.54 {mu}m emission in amorphous silicon nitride films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yerci, S.; Li, R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Boston University, 8 Saint Mary's Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02215-2421 (United States); Kucheyev, S. O.; Buuren, T. van [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Basu, S. N. [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Boston University, 15 Saint Mary's Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 02446 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Boston University, 110 Cummington Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Dal Negro, L. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Boston University, 8 Saint Mary's Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02215-2421 (United States); Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Boston University, 15 Saint Mary's Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 02446 (United States)

    2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Er-doped amorphous silicon nitride films with various Si concentrations (Er:SiN{sub x}) were fabricated by reactive magnetron cosputtering followed by thermal annealing. The effects of Si concentrations and annealing temperatures were investigated in relation to Er emission and excitation processes. Efficient excitation of Er ions was demonstrated within a broad energy spectrum and attributed to disorder-induced localized transitions in amorphous Er:SiN{sub x}. A systematic optimization of the 1.54 {mu}m emission was performed and a fundamental trade-off was discovered between Er excitation and emission efficiency due to excess Si incorporation. These results provide an alternative approach for the engineering of sensitized Si-based light sources and lasers.

  18. Radiation Skyshine Calculation with MARS15 for the mu2e Experiment at Fermilab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leveling, A F

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fermilab Antiproton source is to be repurposed to provide an 8 kW proton beam to the Mu2e experiment by 1/3 integer, slow resonant extraction. Shielding provided by the existing facility must be supplemented with in-tunnel shielding to limit the radiation effective dose rate above the shield in the AP30 service building. In addition to the nominal radiation shield calculations, radiation skyshine calculations were required to ensure compliance with Fermilab Radiological Control Manual. A complete model of the slow resonant extraction system including magnets, electrostatic septa, magnetic fields, tunnel enclosure with shield, and a nearby exit stairway are included in the model. The skyshine model extends above the beam enclosure surface to 10 km vertically and 5 km radially.

  19. Non-standard neutrino interactions in the mu–tau sector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mocioiu, Irina; Wright, Warren

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss neutrino mass hierarchy implications arising from the effects of non-standard neutrino interactions on muon rates in high statistics atmospheric neutrino oscillation experiments like IceCube DeepCore. We concentrate on the mu–tau sector, which is presently the least constrained. It is shown that the magnitude of the effects depends strongly on the sign of the ??? parameter describing this non-standard interaction. A simple analytic model is used to understand the parameter space where differences between the two signs are maximized. We discuss how this effect is partially degenerate with changing the neutrino mass hierarchy, as well as how this degeneracymore »could be lifted.« less

  20. Studies of Nu-mu to Nu-e Oscillation Appearance in the MINOS Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pereira e Sousa, Alexandre Bruno

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MINOS experiment uses a long baseline neutrino beam, measured 1 km downstream from its origin in the Near Detector at Fermilab, and 734 km later in the large underground Far Detector in the Soudan mine. By comparing these two measurements, MINOS can probe the atmospheric domain of the neutrino oscillation phenomenology with unprecedented precision. Besides the ability to perform a world leading determination of the {Delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2} and {theta}{sub 23} parameters, via {nu}{sub {mu}} flux disappearance, MINOS has the potential to make a leading measurement of {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillations in the atmospheric sector by looking for {nu}{sub e} appearance at the Far Detector. The observation of {nu}{sub e} appearance, tantamount to establishing a non-zero value of the {theta}{sub 13} mixing angle, opens the way to studies of CP violation in the leptonic sector, the neutrino spectral mass pattern ordering and neutrino oscillations in matter, the driving motivations of the next generation of neutrino experiments. In this thesis, we study the MINOS potential for measuring {theta}{sub 13} in the context of the MINOS Mock Data Challenge using a multivariate discriminant analysis method. We show the method's validity in the application to {nu}{sub e} event classification and background identification, as well as in its ability to identify a {nu}{sub e} signal in a Mock Data sample generated with undisclosed parameters. An independent shower reconstruction method based on three-dimensional hit matching and clustering was developed, providing several useful discriminator variables used in the multivariate analysis method. We also demonstrate that within 2 years of running, MINOS has the potential to improve the current best limit on {theta}{sub 13}, from the CHOOZ experiment, by a factor of 2.

  1. Water vapor on supergiants. The 12 micron TEXES spectra of mu Cephei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Ryde; M. J. Richter; G. M. Harper; K. Eriksson; D. L. Lambert

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Several recent papers have argued for warm, semi-detached, molecular layers surrounding red giant and supergiant stars, a concept known as a MOLsphere. Spectroscopic and interferometric analyses have often corroborated this general picture. Here, we present high-resolution spectroscopic data of pure rotational lines of water vapor at 12 microns for the supergiant mu Cephei. This star has often been used to test the concept of molecular layers around supergiants. Given the prediction of an isothermal, optically thick water-vapor layer in Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium around the star (MOLsphere), we expected the 12 micron lines to be in emission or at least in absorption but filled in by emission from the molecular layer around the star. Our data, however, show the contrary; we find definite absorption. Thus, our data do not easily fit into the suggested isothermal MOLsphere scenario. The 12 micron lines, therefore, put new, strong constraints on the MOLsphere concept and on the nature of water seen in signatures across the spectra of early M supergiants. We also find that the absorption is even stronger than that calculated from a standard, spherically symmetric model photosphere without any surrounding layers. A cool model photosphere, representing cool outer layers is, however, able to reproduce the lines, but this model does not account for water vapor emission at 6 microns. Thus, a unified model for water vapor on mu Cephei appears to be lacking. It does seem necessary to model the underlying photospheres of these supergiants in their whole complexity. The strong water vapor lines clearly reveal inadequacies of classical model atmospheres.

  2. Apparatus and method for generating continuous wave 16. mu. m laser radiation using gaseous CF/sub 4/

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Telle, J.M.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method for generating continuous wave 16 ..mu..m laser radiation using gaseous CF/sub 4/. Laser radiation at 16 ..mu..m has been observed in a cooled static cell containing low pressure CF/sub 4/ optically pumped by an approximately 3 W output power c-w CO/sub 2/ laser. The laser cavity employed was a multiple-pass off-axis-path two spherical mirror ring resonator. Unidirectional CF/sub 4/ laser output power at 615 cm/sup -1/ exceeded 2 mW. Computer calculations indicate that for modest pump powers of about 40 W, approximately 1 W of emitted laser radiation at 16 ..mu..m might be obtained.

  3. Apparatus and method for generating continuous wave 16 .mu.m laser radiation using gaseous CF.sub.4

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Telle, John M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method for generating continuous wave 16 .mu.m laser radiation using gaseous CF.sub.4. Laser radiation at 16 .mu.m has been observed in a cooled static cell containing low pressure CF.sub.4 optically pumped by an approximately 3 W output power cw CO.sub.2 laser. The laser cavity employed was a multiple-pass off-axis-path two spherical mirror ring resonator. Unidirectional CF.sub.4 laser output power at 615 cm.sup.-1 exceeded 2 mW. Computer calculations indicate that for modest pump powers of about 40 W, approximately 1 W of emitted laser radiation at 16 .mu.m might be obtained.

  4. The use of CML and CML in Computational Chemistry and Physics Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wakelin, Jon; Garcia, A; Murray-Rust, Peter

    2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    in the preceding paragraph are illustrated in the flow diagram in Figure 2. The diagram highlights all of the major features of this Combine Mol + Min Create Mesh Calculation Mol + Min Separate Mol + (1) Separate Mol + Min (1) Calculation Mol + Min...

  5. Optical losses of Al-free lasers for {lambda}=0.808 and 0.98 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yi, H.; Diaz, J.; Lane, B.; Razeghi, M. [Center for Quantum Devices, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)] [Center for Quantum Devices, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we study the origin of the optical losses in Al-free InGaAsP/GaAs ({lambda}=0.808 {mu}m) and InGaAs/GaAs/InGaP ({lambda}=0.980 {mu}m) lasers. Theoretical modeling and the experimental results indicate that the scattering of the laser beam by refractive index fluctuation in the alloys is the dominant loss in our lasers, and the loss due to the free-carrier absorption and scattering by interface roughness are negligible. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Managing Scalable Persistent Data F. D. Mu~noz-Escoi, J. R. Garcia-Escriva, M. R. Pallardo-Lozoya, J. Esparza-Peidro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, Francesc

    Managing Scalable Persistent Data F. D. Mu~noz-Esco´i, J. R. Garc´ia-Escriv´a, M. R. Pallard-SIDI-2011/003 FrancescD.Mu~noz-Esco´ietal.:ManagingScalablePersistentDataITI-SIDI-2011/003 #12;#12;Managing Scalable Persistent Data F. D. Mu~noz-Esco´i, J. R. Garc´ia-Escriv´a, M. R. Pallard´o-Lozoya, J. Esparza

  7. New building blocks for the ALICE SDD readout and Detector Control System in a commercial 0.25 $\\mu$ m CMOS technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivetti, A; Idzik, M; Rotondo, F

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New building blocks for the ALICE SDD readout and Detector Control System in a commercial 0.25 $\\mu$ m CMOS technology

  8. The source of widespread 3-$\\mu$m absorption in Jupiter's clouds: Constraints from 2000 Cassini VIMS observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sromovsky, Lawrence

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cassini flyby of Jupiter in 2000 provided spatially resolved spectra of Jupiter's atmosphere using the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS). These spectra contain a strong absorption at wavelengths from about 2.9 $\\mu$m to 3.1 $\\mu$m, previously noticed in a 3-$\\mu$m spectrum obtained by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) in 1996. While Brooke et al. (1998, Icarus 136, 1-13) were able to fit the ISO spectrum very well using ammonia ice as the sole source of particulate absorption, Sromovsky and Fry (2010, Icarus 210, 211-229), using significantly revised NH$_3$ gas absorption models, showed that ammonium hydrosulfide (NH$_4$SH) provided a better fit to the ISO spectrum than NH$_3$ , but that the best fit was obtained when both NH$_3$ and NH$_4$SH were present. Although the large FOV of the ISO instrument precluded identification of the spatial distribution of these two components, the VIMS spectra at low and intermediate phase angles show that 3-$\\mu$m absorption is present in zones and belts...

  9. On rank 2 vector bundles on Fano manifolds Roberto Mu~noz, Gianluca Occhetta, and Luis E. Sola Conde

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Occhetta, Gianluca

    On rank 2 vector bundles on Fano manifolds Roberto Mu~noz, Gianluca Occhetta, and Luis E. Sol´a~NOZ, GIANLUCA OCCHETTA, AND LUIS E. SOL´A CONDE setting of rank two vector bundles on Fano manifolds of Picard

  10. High-quality fiber-optic polarization entanglement distribution at 1.3mu m telecom wavelength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, Tony D.

    We demonstrate high-quality distribution of 1.3?mu m polarization-entangled photons generated from a fiber-coupled periodically poled KTiOPO[subscript 4] waveguide over 200?m fiber-optic cables. Time-multiplexed measurements ...

  11. Anisotropic Interfacial Free Energies of the Hard-Sphere Crystal-Melt Interfaces Yan Mu, Andrew Houk, and Xueyu Song*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Xueyu

    Anisotropic Interfacial Free Energies of the Hard-Sphere Crystal-Melt Interfaces Yan Mu, Andrew-melt interfacial free energy calculations using capillary wave approach. Using this method, we have calculated the free energies of the fcc crystal-melt interfaces for the hard-sphere system as a function of crystal

  12. Thermonuclear yield of targets under the action of high-power short-wavelength (lambda< or =1. mu. ) lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basov, N.G.; Gus'kov, S.Y.; Danilova, G.V.; Demchenko, N.N.; Zmitrenko, N.V.; Karpov, V.Y.; Mishchenko, T.V.; Rozanov, V.B.; Samarskii, A.A.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A unified optimization scheme is used in a numerical calculation of the dependences of the thermonuclear yield of two-layer shell targets on the absorbed laser energy in the range 0.3--10 mJ for lasers emitting radiation of wavelengths shorter than 1 ..mu...

  13. Pyrolysis in Porous Media: Numerical Analysis and Comparison to Experiments.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    by the combustor [7,8]. Carbon- or oxide-based composite materials are preferred for thermal, mechanical components in aerospace vehicles such as combustors in rocket engines. The numerical simulation = activation energy (J.mol-1 ) H = enthalpy of reaction (J.mol-1 ) effk = effective thermal conductivity

  14. Theoretical characterization of the hydrogen-bond interaction of diacetamide with water and methanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Minh Tho

    and methanol Minh Tho Nguyen, Natalie Leroux and The re` se Zeegers-Huyskens* Department of Chemistry formed from interaction of diacetamide with water and methanol. In both water and methanol complexes/6-31G** level being [44 kJ mol~1 for the water complex and [48 kJ mol~1 for the methanol complex

  15. Determining matrix elements and resonance widths from finite volume: the dangerous mu-terms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Takacs

    2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The standard numerical approach to determining matrix elements of local operators and width of resonances uses the finite volume dependence of energy levels and matrix elements. Finite size corrections that decay exponentially in the volume are usually neglected or taken into account using perturbation expansion in effective field theory. Using two-dimensional sine-Gordon field theory as "toy model" it is shown that some exponential finite size effects could be much larger than previously thought, potentially spoiling the determination of matrix elements in frameworks such as lattice QCD. The particular class of finite size corrections considered here are mu-terms arising from bound state poles in the scattering amplitudes. In sine-Gordon model, these can be explicitly evaluated and shown to explain the observed discrepancies to high precision. It is argued that the effects observed are not special to the two-dimensional setting, but rather depend on general field theoretic features that are common with models relevant for particle physics. It is important to understand these finite size corrections as they present a potentially dangerous source of systematic errors for the determination of matrix elements and resonance widths.

  16. Design and test results of a pulsed quadrupole magnet with a 2. mu. s rise time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bywater, J.A.; Lari, R.J.; Ratner, L.G.; Lee, Y.Y.; Fujisaki, M.; Krisch, A.D.; Terwilliger, K.M.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Major polarization losses will be encountered during acceleration of polarized protons in the Brookhaven AGS due to eight intrinsic depolarizing resonances. Pulsing a set of 12 vertical tune shift quadrupole magnets with a 2 ..mu..s rise time, 3 ms fall, and 60 ms repetition rate should reduce these losses. This requires a gradient of 1.87 T/M over the 8.89 x 12.7 cm vacuum chamber. A ferrite core quadrupole magnet has been designed, built, and magnetically measured. The pole tip has a hyperbolic shape and the coil consists of four parallel 0.318 cm by 0.453 cm turns per pole. This approximates a current sheet 0.318 cm thick and curves to lie along a flux line. Placed as close to the vacuum chamber as possible, it minimizes the inductance of the magnet and the voltage of the power supply. Proper spacing of the four turns assures a more uniform gradient over a large aperture. Two slabs of ferrite are bonded together and machined to form one pole of half length. These are bonded end-to-end, and a prewound coil on a fiberglass support is attached. Four such pole assemblies are then assembled around the vacuum chamber and electrically connected together. The design, construction, and measurements are presented.

  17. THE LEGACY OF SCUPOL: 850 {mu}m IMAGING POLARIMETRY FROM 1997 TO 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Brenda C.; McPhee, Christie A.; Fissel, Laura M. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, 5071 W. Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Curran, Rachel L. [Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 31 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2 (Ireland)], E-mail: brenda.matthews@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    SCUPOL, the polarimeter for SCUBA on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, was the most prolific thermal imaging polarimeter built to date. Between 1997 and 2005, observations of 104 regions were made at 850 {mu}m in the mapping mode. The instrument has produced {approx}50 refereed journal publications, and that number is still growing. We have systematically re-reduced all imaging polarimetry made in the standard 'jiggle-map' mode from the SCUBA archive (2800+ individual observations) to produce a catalog of SCUPOL images and tables. We present the results of our analysis with figures and data tables produced for all 83 regions where significant polarization was detected. In addition, the reduced data cubes and data tables can be accessed online. In many cases, the data included in this paper have been previously published elsewhere. However, this publication includes unpublished data sets, in whole or in part, toward 39 regions, including cores in {rho} Ophiuchus, Orion's OMC-2 region, several young stellar objects, and the galaxy M87.

  18. Commissioning report of the MuCool 5 Tesla solenoid coupled with helium refrigerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geynisman, Michael; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MuCool 5T solenoid was successfully cooled down and operated coupled with MTA 'Brown' refrigerator. The system performed as designed with substantial performance margin. All process alarms and interlocks, as well as ODH and fire alarms, were active and performed as designed. The cooldown of the refrigerator started from warm conditions and took 44 hours to accumulate liquid helium level and solenoid temperature below 5K. Average liquid nitrogen consumption for the refrigerator precool and solenoid shield was measured as 20 gal/hr (including boil-off). Helium losses were small (below 30 scfh). The system was stable and with sufficient margin of performance and ran stably without wet expansion engine. Quench response demonstrated proper operation of the relieving devices and pointed to necessity of improving tightness of the relieving manifolds. Boil-off test demonstrated average heat load of 3 Watts for the unpowered solenoid. The solenoid can stay up to 48 hours cold and minimally filled if the nitrogen shield is maintained. A list of improvements includes commencing into operations the second helium compressor and completion of improvements and tune-ups for system efficiency.

  19. An Estimate of Out of Time Beam Upon Extraction for Mu2e

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prebys, E.; /Fermilab; Evans, N.J.; Kopp, S.E.; /Texas U.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For future experiments at the intensity frontier precise and accurate knowledge of beam time structure will be critical to understanding backgrounds. The proposed Mu2e experiment calls for {approx} 200ns (FW, 40 ns rms) bunches of 3 x 10{sup 7} 8 GeV protons and a bunch spacing of 1695 ns. The interbunch beam must be suppressed from the main pulse by a factor of 10{sup -10}, this is known as the beam extinction requirement. Beam from Fermilab's Booster will be formed into 2.5 MHz buckets in the Fermilab Recycler then transferred to the Delivery Ring (formerly the Debuncher) and slow spilled from a single filled bucket in an h = 4 RF system. Because the final extinction level is not expected from the Delivery Ring an AC dipole and collimation system will be used to achieve final extinction. Here I present calculations leading to a first estimate of the extinction level expected upon extraction from the Delivery Ring of {le} 3.36 x 10{sup -4}. Intrabunch, residual gas scattering and scattering off the extraction septum are included. Contributions from bunch formation are not considered.

  20. CONSTRAINING EXPLOSION TYPE OF YOUNG SUPERNOVA REMNANTS USING 24 {mu}m EMISSION MORPHOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Charee L.; Stassun, Keivan G. [Department of Physics, Fisk University, 1000 17th Ave N Nashville, TN 37208 (United States); Lopez, Laura A.; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali [MIT-Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, 37-664H, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico, E-mail: charee.l.peters@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95060 (United States)

    2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Determination of the explosion type of supernova remnants (SNRs) can be challenging, as SNRs are hundreds to thousands of years old and supernovae are classified based on spectral properties days after explosion. Previous studies of thermal X-ray emission from Milky Way and Large Magellanic Cloud SNRs have shown that Type Ia and core-collapse (CC) SNRs have statistically different symmetries, and thus these sources can be typed based on their X-ray morphologies. In this Letter, we extend the same technique, a multipole expansion technique using power ratios, to infrared (IR) images of SNRs to test whether they can be typed using the symmetry of their warm dust emission as well. We analyzed archival Spitzer Space Telescope Multiband Imaging Photometer 24 {mu}m observations of the previously used X-ray sample, and we find that the two classes of SNRs separate according to their IR morphologies. The Type Ia SNRs are statistically more circular and mirror symmetric than the CC SNRs, likely due to the different circumstellar environments and explosion geometries of the progenitors. Broadly, our work indicates that the IR emission retains information of the explosive origins of the SNR and offers a new method to type SNRs based on IR morphology.

  1. Radiation and thermal analysis of production solenoid for Mu2e experimental setup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pronskikh, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Mokhov, N.V.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Muon-to-Electron (Mu2e) experiment at Fermilab, will seek the evidence of direct muon to electron conversion at the sensitivity level where it cannot be explained by the Standard Model. An 8-GeV 25-kW proton beam will be directed onto a tilted gold target inside a large-bore superconducting Production Solenoid (PS) with the peak field on the axis of {approx}5T. The negative muons resulting from the pion decay will be captured in the PS aperture and directed by an S-shaped Transport Solenoid towards the stopping target inside the Detector Solenoid. In order for the superconducting magnets to operate reliably and with a sufficient safety margin, the peak neutron flux entering the coils must be reduced by 3 orders of magnitude that is achieved by means of a sophisticated absorber placed in the magnet aperture. The proposed absorber, consisting of W- and Cu-based alloy parts, is optimized for the performance and cost. Results of MARS15 simulations of energy deposition and radiation are reported. The results of the PS magnet thermal analysis, coordinated with the coil cooling scheme, are reported as well for the selected absorber design.

  2. Optimization of Extinction Efficiency in the 8-GeV Mu2e Beam Line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakhno, I.L.; Drozhdin, A.I.; Johnstone, C.; Mokhov, N.V.; Prebys, E.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A muon-to-electron conversion experiment at Fermilab, Mu2e, is being designed to probe for new physics beyond the standard model at mass scales up to 10{sup 4} TeV. For this experiment, the advance in experimental sensitivity will be four orders of magnitude when compared to existing data on charged lepton flavor violation. The muon beam will be produced by delivering a proton beam contained in short 100-ns bunches onto a muon production target, with an inter-bunch separation of about 1700 ns. A critical requirement of the experiment is to ensure a low level of background at the muon detector consistent with the required sensitivity. To meet the sensitivity requirement, protons that reach the target between bunches must be suppressed by an enormous factor, so that an extinction factor, defined as a number of background protons between main bunches per proton in such a bunch, should not exceed 10{sup -9}. This paper describes the advanced beam optics and results of numerical modeling with STRUCT and MARS codes for a beam line with a collimation system that allows us to achieve the experimental extinction factor of one per billion.

  3. Process Replication with Log-Based Amnesia Support Ruben de Juan-Marin, Luis Irun-Briz and Francesc D. Mu~noz-Escoi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, Francesc

    ´un-Briz and Francesc D. Mu~noz-Esco´i Instituto Tecnol´ogico de Inform´atica - Universidad Polit´ecnica de Valencia. Mu~noz-Esco´i Instituto Tecnol´ogico de Inform´atica - Universidad Polit´ecnica de Valencia Camino de

  4. Amnesia Issue in Majority Progress Condition Ruben de Juan-Marin, Luis Irun-Briz and Francesc D. Mu~noz-Escoi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, Francesc

    . Mu~noz-Esco´i Instituto Tecnol´ogico de Inform´atica, Universidad Polit´ecnica de Valencia Camino de in Majority Progress Condition Rub´en de Juan-Mar´in, Luis Ir´un-Briz and Francesc D. Mu~noz-Esco´i Instituto

  5. An Access-Logging Tool for JDBC Applications A. Torrenti-Roman, L. Pascual-Miret, L. Irun-Briz, S. Beyer, F. D. Mu~noz-Escoi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, Francesc

    ´un-Briz, S. Beyer, F. D. Mu~noz-Esco´i Instituto Tecnol´ogico de Inform´atica Ciudad Polit´ecnica de la-Miret, L. Ir´un-Briz, S. Beyer, F. D. Mu~noz-Esco´i Instituto Tecnol´ogico de Inform´atica Ciudad Polit

  6. Scalability Approaches for Causal Broadcasts R. de Juan-Marin, E. Miedes, H. Decker and F. D. Mu~noz-Escoi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, Francesc

    Scalability Approaches for Causal Broadcasts R. de Juan-Mar´in, E. Miedes, H. Decker and F. D. Mu~noz-Esco and F. D. Mu~noz-Esco´i Instituto Tecnol´ogico de Inform´atica Universidad Polit´ecnica de Valencia

  7. A Characterisation of Dynamic Distributed Systems Felix Garcia-Neiva, Ruben de Juan-Marin and Francesc D. Mu~noz-Escoi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, Francesc

    -Mar´in and Francesc D. Mu~noz-Esco´i Institut Universitari Mixt Tecnol`ogic d'Inform`atica Universitat Polit`ecnica de Characterisation of Dynamic Distributed Systems F´elix Garc´ia-Neiva, Rub´en de Juan-Mar´in and Francesc D. Mu~noz-Esco

  8. Water in Emission in the ISO Spectrum of the Early M Supergiant Star mu Cephei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Tsuji

    2000-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a detection of water in emission in the spectrum of the M2 supergiant atar mu Cep (M2Ia) observed by the Short Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) aboard Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) and now released as the ISO Archives. The emission first appears in the 6 micron region (nu2 fundamental) and then in the 40 micron region (pure rotation lines) despite the rather strong dust emission. The intensity ratios of the emission features are far from those of the optically thin gaseous emission. Instead, we could reproduce the major observed emission features by an optically thick water sphere of the inner radius about two stellar radii (1300Rsun), Tex = 1500K, and Ncol (H2O) = 3.0E+20/cm2. This model also accounts for the H2O absorption bands in the near infrared (1.4, 1.9, and 2.7 micron) as well. The detection of water in emission provides strong constraints on the nature of water in the early M supergiant stars, and especially its origin in the outer atmosphere is confirmed against other models such as the large convective cell model. We finally confirm that the early M supergiant star is surrounded by a huge optically thick sphere of the warm water vapor, which may be referred to as MOLsphere for simplicity. Thus, the outer atmosphere of M supergiant stars should have a complicated hierarchical and/or hybrid structure with at least three major constituents including the warm MOLsphere (T about 1.0E+3K) together with the previously known hot chromosphere (T about 1.0E+4K) and cool expanding gas-dust envelope (T about 1.0E+2K).

  9. The 10 $\\mu$m infrared band of silicate dust: A laboratory study comparing the aerosol and KBr pellet techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tamanai, A; Blum, J; Meeus, G

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The profile of the silicate 10 $\\mu$m IR band contains important information about the evolutional stage of dust in circumstellar environments and the possible ongoing process of planetesimal formation. In order to extract this information, the observed band profiles are compared with calculated or laboratory-measured absorption cross sections of amorphous and crystalline grains with different sizes and compositions. We present in this study the first laboratory measurements of the 10 $\\mu$m band profiles of nonembedded, i.e. free-flying, particles of amorphous and crystalline Mg$_2$SiO$_4$ (with two different particle shapes), amorphous and crystalline MgSiO$_3$, and crystalline olivine. We compare the spectra with those measured on embedded grains and discuss the potential of the new experimental method for comparison with observed spectra, as well as for future studies of agglomeration and surface manipulation of the grains.

  10. Experiment to investigate anti. nu. /sub. mu. /. -->. anti. nu. /sub e/ oscillations at Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruse, H.W.; Toevs, J.W.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experiment, being planned at LAMPF, aims to investigate a possible neutrino oscillation channel, anti ..nu../sub ..mu../ ..-->.. anti ..nu../sub e/. If anti ..nu../sub ..mu../, produced in the LAMPF beam stop, oscillate to anti ..nu../sub e/, then interactions anti ..nu../sub e/ + p ..-->.. e/sup +/ + n, may be detected. A large volume liquid scintillator (4470 liter) emplaced at 33 m from the beam stop, detects e/sup +/ and n, after moderation in the hydrogenous liquid and capture in Gd, loaded into the scintillator. Our anticipated signal rate is currently estimated at 1.67 (sigma m/sup 2/)/sup 2//day assuming full amplitude oscillation. The corresponding counting rate, assuming all anti ..nu../sub ..mu../ have oscillated to anti ..nu../sub e/ at the detector is 1.5/day. Cosmic rates are estimated at 0.033/day. Correlated backgrounds from the beam stop are calculated to be small in comparison to cosmic events, except for reactions of ..nu../sub e/ in Pb. These reactions may be reduced with an Fe shield within the detector. With the above rate, a limit on the sensitivity of our experiment for the value of sigma m/sup 2/ is estimated at 0.12 eV/sup 2/ with 70 days of counting. Detector features, estimated background rates, and sensitivity values are discussed.

  11. Results of the LSND search for {ovr {nu}}{sub {mu}} {yields} {ovr {nu}}{sub e} oscillations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Federspiel, F.J.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for {ovr {nu}}{sub {mu}}{yields}{ovr {nu}}{sub e} oscillations has been conducted at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility by using {ovr {nu}}{sub {mu}} from {mu}{sup +} decay at rest. The {ovr {nu}}{sub e} are detected via the reaction {ovr {nu}}{sub e}p {yields} e{sup +} n , correlated with a {gamma} from np {yields} d{gamma} (2.2 MeV). The use of tight cuts to identify e{sup +} events with correlated {gamma} rays yields 22 events with e{sup +} energy between 36 and 60 MeV and only 4.6 {plus_minus} 0.6 background events. The probability that this observation can be explained by statistical fluctuation is less than 10{sup -7}. Assuming these events are due to oscillations, a likelihood fit to all the e{sup +} events between 20 and 60 MeV has been performed to extract the oscillation parameters sin{sup 2} 2{theta} and {Delta}m{sup 2}. The favored region resulting from this fit is shown.

  12. Search for excited and exotic muons in the mu gamma decay channel in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst.

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors present a search for excited and exotic muon states {mu}*, conducted using an integrated luminosity of 371 pb{sup -1} of data collected in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Tevatron with the CDF II detector. They search for associated production of {mu}{mu}* followed by the decay {mu}* {yields} {mu}{gamma}, resulting in the {mu}{mu}{gamma} final state. They compare the data to model predictions as a function of the mass of the excited muon M{sub {mu}*}, the compositeness energy scale {Lambda}, and the gauge coupling factor f. No signal above the standard model expectation is observed in the {mu}{gamma} mass spectrum. In the contact interaction model, they exclude 107 < M{sub {mu}*} < 853 GeV/c{sup 2} for {Lambda} = M{sub {mu}*}; in the gauge-mediated model, they exclude 100 < M{sub {mu}*} < 410 GeV/c{sup 2} for f/{Lambda} = 10{sup -2} GeV{sup -1}. These 95% confidence level exclusions extend previous limits and are the first hadron collider results on {mu}* production in the gauge-mediated model.

  13. Laser-plasma instabilities in large plasmas irradiated at 1. 06. mu. m and the wavelength scaling of the absorption, hot-electron production, ablation pressure for 1. 06-, 0. 53-, and 0. 35-. mu. m light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillion, D.W.; Campbell, E.M.; Turner, R.E.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasmas were created by exploding 7000 A thick CH foils at the irradiation conditions: 1.064 ..mu..m, 3 kJ, 2.5 x 10/sup 15/ W/cm/sup 2/, 900 ps FWHM, 400 ..mu..m spot diameter. Ten percent of the laser energy appeared as Raman light and 0.04% as 3..omega../sub 0//2 light. The 3..omega../sub 0//2 light and the 30-70 keV X rays occurred simultaneouly at t=-120/sup +50//sub -//sub 200/ psec and lasted only 300 psec FWHM. The foil was calculated to explode to n/sub c/4 at t=-300 psec. The spectrum and angular distribution of the Raman light were also measured. Time-resolved spectral measurements have been made in experiments with 5320 A laser light in a 600-900 psec FWHM pulse. The scaling of the 3..omega../sub 0//2 light with both the laser spot size and pulse length has been studied.

  14. Study of quasielastic scattering using charged-current nu_mu-iron interactions in the MINOS Near Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Adamson; I. Anghel; A. Aurisano; G. Barr; M. Bishai; A. Blake; G. J. Bock; D. Bogert; S. V. Cao; C. M. Castromonte; S. Childress; J. A. B. Coelho; L. Corwin; D. Cronin-Hennessy; J. K. de Jong; A. V. Devan; N. E. Devenish; M. V. Diwan; C. O. Escobar; J. J. Evans; E. Falk; G. J. Feldman; M. V. Frohne; H. R. Gallagher; R. A. Gomes; M. C. Goodman; P. Gouffon; N. Graf; R. Gran; K. Grzelak; A. Habig; S. R. Hahn; J. Hartnell; R. Hatcher; A. Holin; J. Huang; J. Hylen; G. M. Irwin; Z. Isvan; C. James; D. Jensen; T. Kafka; S. M. S. Kasahara; G. Koizumi; M. Kordosky; A. Kreymer; K. Lang; J. Ling; P. J. Litchfield; P. Lucas; W. A. Mann; M. L. Marshak; N. Mayer; C. McGivern; M. M. Medeiros; R. Mehdiyev; J. R. Meier; M. D. Messier; W. H. Miller; S. R. Mishra; S. Moed Sher; C. D. Moore; L. Mualem; J. Musser; D. Naples; J. K. Nelson; H. B. Newman; R. J. Nichol; J. A. Nowak; J. O Connor; M. Orchanian; R. B. Pahlka; J. Paley; R. B. Patterson; G. Pawloski; A. Perch; M. Pfutzner; S. Phan-Budd; R. K. Plunkett; N. Poonthottathil; X. Qiu; A. Radovic; B. Rebel; C. Rosenfeld; H. A. Rubin; M. C. Sanchez; J. Schneps; A. Schreckenberger; P. Schreiner; R. Sharma; A. Sousa; N. Tagg; R. L. Talaga; J. Thomas; M. A. Thomson; X. Tian; A. Timmons; S. C. Tognini; R. Toner; D. Torretta; J. Urheim; P. Vahle; B. Viren; J. J. Walding; A. Weber; R. C. Webb; C. White; L. Whitehead; L. H. Whitehead; S. G. Wojcicki; R. Zwaska

    2014-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Kinematic distributions from an inclusive sample of 1.41 x 10^6 charged-current nu_mu interactions on iron, obtained using the MINOS Near Detector exposed to a wide-band beam with peak flux at 3 GeV, are compared to a conventional treatment of neutrino scattering within a Fermi gas nucleus. Results are used to guide the selection of a subsample enriched in quasielastic nu_mu Fe interactions, containing an estimated 123,000 quasielastic events of incident energies 1 = 2.79 GeV. Four additional subsamples representing topological and kinematic sideband regions to quasielastic scattering are also selected for the purpose of evaluating backgrounds. Comparisons using subsample distributions in four-momentum transfer Q^2 show the Monte Carlo model to be inadequate at low Q^2. Its shortcomings are remedied via inclusion of a Q^2-dependent suppression function for baryon resonance production, developed from the data. A chi-square fit of the resulting Monte Carlo simulation to the shape of the Q^2 distribution for the quasielastic-enriched sample is carried out with the axial-vector mass M_A of the dipole axial-vector form factor of the neutron as a free parameter. The effective M_A which best describes the data is 1.23 +0.13/-0.09 (fit) +0.12/-0.15 (syst.) GeV.

  15. Transition dynamics for Mu acceptor states in Si{sub 1–x}Ge{sub x} alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jayarathna, G.; Lichti, R. L.; Mengyan, P. W.; Baker, B. B. [Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409-1051 (United States); Celebi, Y. G. [Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Carroll, B. R. [Arkansas State University, Jonesboro, AR 72410 (United States); Yonenaga, I. [Institute of Materials Research, Tohoku University (Japan)

    2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the longitudinal field muon spin relaxation technique to observe charge-state and site-change transitions of muonium in Si{sub 1–x}Ge{sub x} alloys. In this project, we examine the temperature and magnetic field dependences of the relaxation rates for Si{sub 1–x}Ge{sub x} samples (x = 0.77, 0.81, and 0.84), in the composition range where the acceptor level lies within the band gap. This study particularly focuses on the relaxation rates for Si{sub 0.19}Ge{sub 0.81} to identify various cyclic charge-state and site-change processes as a function of both temperature and magnetic field. We extract the paramagnetic hyperfine constant and the relevant transition rate parameters for site changes and charge-state transitions involving Mu acceptor states for this sample. At small x, a site change dominates the transition out of the neutral T-site acceptor state, while in higher Ge content alloys hole ionization becomes the dominant transition out of the Mu{sub T}{sup 0}.

  16. Enriching the exploration of the mUED model with event shape variables at the CERN LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amitava Datta; Anindya Datta; Sujoy Poddar

    2011-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new search strategy based on the event shape variables for new physics models where the separations among the masses of the particles in the spectrum are small. Collider signature of these models, characterised by low $p_T$ leptons/jets and low missing $p_T$, are known to be difficult to look for. The conventional search strategies involving hard cuts may not work in such situations. As a case study, we have investigated the hitherto neglected jets + missing $E_T$ signature -known to be a challenging one - arising from the pair productions and decay of $n =1$ KK-excitations of gluons and quarks in the minimal Universal Extra Dimension (mUED) model. Judicious use of the event shape variables, enables us to reduce the Standard Model backgrounds to a negligible level . We have shown that in mUED, $R^{-1}$ upto $850 ~\\rm GeV$, can be explored or ruled out with 12 fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity at the 7 TeV run of the LHC. We also discuss the prospects of employing these variables for searching other beyond standard model physics with compressed or partially compressed spectra.

  17. Kinetic deuterium isotope effects in the protonations of ((/mu/-H)M/sub 3/(CO)/sub 11/)/sup /minus// (M = Fe, Ru, Os)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pribich, D.G.; Rosenberg, E.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rates of low-temperature (/minus/90 to /minus/40/degree/C) protonation of the anions ((/mu/-H)M/sub 3/(CO)/sub 11/)/sup /minus// (M = Fe, Ru, Os) have been investigated with XSO/sub 3/F (X = H or D) in CD/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ by using /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C NMR techniques. No deuterium kinetic isotope effect is observed on the rate of protonation to give the initially formed oxygen-protonated species (/mu/-H)(COX)M/sub 3/(CO)/sub 10/ (M = Fe, Ru; X = H or D). However, in the case of ruthenium the rate of transformation of this species to the dihydrido species (/mu/-X)XRu/sub 3/(CO)/sub 11/ (X = H or D) shows a very large isotope effect (k/sub H//k/sub D/ = 47 at /minus/40/degree/C). In the case of osmium, the previously unobserved oxygen-deuteriated species (/mu/-H)(COD)Os/sub 3/(CO)/sub 10/ is seen at /minus/80/degree/C with DSO/sub 3/F. Under these conditions, protonation with HSO/sub 3/F yields only (/mu/-H)(H)Os/sub 3/(CO)/sub 11/. These large isotope effects on ligand to metal hydrogen transfer are discussed in connection with previously observed large isotope effects in cluster protonations.

  18. Study of thermosiphon cooling scheme for the production solenoid of the Mu2e experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dhanaraj, N.; Kashikhin, V.; Peterson, T.; Pronskikh, V.; Nicol, T. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P. O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermosiphon cooling scheme is envisioned for the Production Solenoid of the Mu2e experiment at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The thermosiphon cooling is achieved by indirect cooling with helium at 4.7 K. The siphon tubes are welded to the solenoid outer structure. The anticipated heat loads in the solenoid is presented as well as the cooling scheme design. A thermal model using ANSYS to simulate the temperature gradient is presented. The thermal analysis also makes provisions for including the heat load generated in the coils and structures by the secondary radiation simulated using the MARS 15 code. The impact of the heat loads from supports on the solenoid cooling is studied. The thermosiphon cooling scheme is also validated using pertinent correlations to study flow reversals and the cooling regime.

  19. FOUR DECADES OF IRC +10216: EVOLUTION OF A CARBON-RICH DUST SHELL RESOLVED AT 10 {mu}m WITH MMT ADAPTIVE OPTICS AND MIRAC4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Males, Jared R.; Close, Laird M.; Skemer, Andrew J.; Hinz, Philip M.; Hoffmann, William F. [Steward Observatory, Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Marengo, Massimo, E-mail: jrmales@email.arizona.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The evolved carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch star IRC +10216 (CW Leo) is the brightest mid-infrared source outside the solar system, as well as one of the closest examples of an evolved star losing mass. It has a complex and variable circumstellar structure on small scales in the near-infrared, and mid-infrared interferometry has revealed a dynamic dust formation zone. We have obtained diffraction-limited imaging and grism spectroscopy of IRC +10216 at the 6.5 m MMT in the N band ({approx}8-13 {mu}m). These new observations show that a change has occurred in the dust shell surrounding IRC +10216 over the last two decades, which is illustrated by a change in the apparent shape of the well-known SiC spectral feature at {approx}11 {mu}m and a reduction in the continuum at 13 {mu}m. As expected, our diffraction-limited spatial information shows an extended circumstellar envelope. We also demonstrate that the dusty envelope appears to be {approx}30% larger at the wavelengths of the SiC feature, likely due to the increased opacity of SiC. The deconvolved full width at half-maximum of the object increases from 0.''43 ({approx} 56 AU) for {lambda} < 10 {mu}m to 0.''58 ({approx}75 AU) at 11.8 {mu}m, then decreases to 0.''5 ({approx}65 AU) at 12.7 {mu}m. Our estimates of IRC +10216's size allow us to plausibly tie the change in the spectrum over the last 12.5 years to the evolution of the dusty circumstellar envelope at speeds of 12-17 km s{sup -1}.

  20. Atomic modelling of crystal/complex fluid/crystal contacts--Part II. Simulating AFM tests via the GenMol code for investigating the impact of CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luquot, Linda

    the GenMol code for investigating the impact of CO2 storage on kaolinite/brine/kaolinite adhesion G. Pepe Force Microscopy (AFM) tests at a kaolinite/brine/kaolinite contact, the confined fluid in sub). Two external solutions are tested. Solution S1 is a neutral brine (pH¼7.5) leading to a possible

  1. Experimental search for the radiative capture reaction d + d {yields} {sup 4}He + {gamma} from the dd{mu} muonic molecule state J = 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baluev, V. V. [All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics, Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Russian Federation); Bogdanova, L. N. [State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation 'Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics,' (Russian Federation); Bom, V. R. [Delft University of Technology (Netherlands); Demin, D. L., E-mail: demin@jinr.ru [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Eijk, C. W. E. van [Delft University of Technology (Netherlands); Filchenkov, V. V.; Grafov, N. N. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Grishechkin, S. K. [All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics, Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Russian Federation); Gritsaj, K. I.; Konin, A. D. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Mikhailyukov, K. L. [All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics, Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Russian Federation); Rudenko, A. I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Vinogradov, Yu. I. [All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics, Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Russian Federation); Volnykh, V. P. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Yukhimchuk, A. A. [All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics, Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Russian Federation); Yukhimchuk, S. A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for the muon-catalyzed fusion reaction d + d {yields} {sup 4}He + {gamma} in the dd{mu} muonic molecule was performed using the experimental installation TRITON with BGO detectors for {gamma}-quanta. A high-pressure target filled with deuterium was exposed to the negative muon beam of the JINR Phasotron to detect {gamma}-quanta with the energy 23.8 MeV. An experimental estimation for the yield of radiative deuteron capture from the dd{mu} state J = 1 was obtained at the level of {eta}{sub {gamma}} {<=} 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} per fusion.

  2. 3.6 and 4.5 $\\mu$m Phase Curves of the Highly-Irradiated Eccentric Hot Jupiter WASP-14b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Ian; Lewis, Nikole K; Kataria, Tiffany; Burrows, Adam; Fortney, Jonathan J; Schwartz, Joel; Agol, Eric; Cowan, Nicolas B; Deming, Drake; Désert, Jean-Michel; Fulton, Benjamin J; Howard, Andrew W; Langton, Jonathan; Laughlin, Gregory; Showman, Adam P; Todorov, Kamen

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present full-orbit phase curve observations of the eccentric ($e$~0.08) transiting hot Jupiter WASP-14b obtained in the 3.6 and 4.5 $\\mu$m bands using the $\\textit{Spitzer Space Telescope}$. We use two different methods for removing the intrapixel sensitivity effect and compare their efficacy in decoupling the instrumental noise. Our measured secondary eclipse depths of 0.1857%$\\pm$0.0104% and 0.2241%$\\pm$0.0087% at 3.6 and 4.5 $\\mu$m, respectively, are both consistent with a blackbody temperature of 2379$\\pm$55 K. We place a $2\\sigma$ upper limit on the nightside flux at 3.6 $\\mu$m and find it to be 10%$\\pm$1% of the dayside flux, corresponding to a 1322$\\pm$212 K difference in brightness temperature. At 4.5 $\\mu$m, the minimum planet flux is 30%$\\pm$3% of the maximum flux, corresponding to a 1016$\\pm$99 K difference in brightness temperature. We compare our measured phase curves to the predictions of one-dimensional radiative transfer and three-dimensional general circulation models. We find that WASP-14...

  3. Comment Policy The MU Counseling Center Facebook page is not intended as a crisis service and does not provide any clinical service or support.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Jerry

    Comment Policy The MU Counseling Center Facebook page is not intended as a crisis service and does relationship with any staff member or the Counseling Center. Our Facebook page is not continuously monitored and about relevant events on our campus. We encourage your comments on MUCC Facebook page, and hope you

  4. Simple qualitative description of EMC ratios {mu}{sup A} for 0.2 < or approx. x < or approx. 1.5 and some sample calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinat, A.S.; Taragin, M.F.; Viviani, M. [Weizmann Institute of Science, Department of Particle Physics, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); INFN, Sezione Pisa and Phys. Dept., University of Pisa, I-56100 (Italy)

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study EMC ratios on the basis of a relation between structure functions (SF) for a nucleus and for a nucleon, which is governed by a SF f{sup PN,A}(x,Q{sup 2}) of an unphysical nucleus, composed of point nucleons (PN). We demonstrate that the characteristic features of EMC ratios {mu}{sup A} are determined by the above f{sup PN,A} and the SF of free nucleons. We account for the positions of the points x{sub 1,2} in the interval 0.2 < or approx. x < or approx. 0.9, where {mu}{sup A}(x,Q{sup 2})=1 and also for the minimum x{sub m} in that interval. We similarly describe the oscillations in {mu}{sup A} for Q{sup 2} < or approx. 3.5-4.0 GeV{sup 2} in the quasielastic peak region 0.95 < or approx. x < or approx. 1.05 and for its subsequent continuous increase up to x{approx_equal}1.4. Finally we compute {mu}{sup A} over the entire range above for A= {sup 4}He, C, Fe, and Au and several Q{sup 2} values. The results are in reasonable agreement with both directly measured and indirectly extracted data.

  5. First Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson Using the Semileptonic Decay Channel: H --> WW --> mu bar nu jj

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zelitch, Shannon Maura; /Virginia U.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation presents the first search for the standard model Higgs boson (H) in decay topologies containing a muon, an imbalance in transverse momentum (E{sub T}) and jets, using p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with an integrated luminosity of 4.3 fb{sup -1} recorded with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. This analysis is sensitive primary to contributions from Higgs bosons produced through gluon fusion, with subsequent decay H {yields} WW {yields} {mu}{nu}jj where W represents a real or virtual W boson. In the absence of signal, limits are set at 95% confidence on the production and decay of the standard model Higgs boson for M{sub H} in the range of 115-200 GeV. For M{sub H} = 165 GeV, the observed and expected limits are factors of 11.2 larger than the standard model value. Combining this channel with e{nu}jj final states and including earlier data to increase the integrated luminosity to 5.4 fb{sup -1} produces observed(expected) limits of 5.5(3.8) times the standard model value.

  6. On the formation of {mu}- and {zeta}-phases in Ag-Al system by mechanical alloying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paruchuri, M.R.; Zhang, D.L.; Massalski, T.B. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pure silver and aluminum powders have been mechanically alloyed in a Spex mill. Four selected nominal compositions Ag{sub 1{minus}x}Al{sub x} (x = 0.20, 0.23, 0.26 and 0.37) were investigated by X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, after being subjected to different times of ball milling. In all four selected compositions, the close packed hexagonal intermediate {lambda}-phase and the fcc {alpha}-phase (Ag-based solid solution) formed together during the first hour of milling, but subsequently the {lambda}-phase disappeared during continued milling except in the two alloys corresponding to 26 at.%Al and 37 at.%Al where the {lambda}-phase is the equilibrium phase. With continued milling, the complex cubic {mu}-phase formed in the alloys of nominal composition 20, 23 and 26 at.%Al where it is expected in equilibrium alloys. No amorphous phases have been observed in the mechanically alloyed powders in this system.

  7. Diversity in extinction laws of Type Ia supernovae measured between $0.2$ and $2\\,\\mu\\mathrm{m}$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amanullah, R; Goobar, A; Ferretti, R; Papadogiannakis, S; Petrushevska, T; Brown, P J; Cao, Y; Contreras, C; Dahle, H; Elias-Rosa, N; Fynbo, J P U; Gorosabel, J; Guaita, L; Hangard, L; Howell, D A; Hsiao, E Y; Kankare, E; Kasliwal, M; Leloudas, G; Lundqvist, P; Mattila, S; Nugent, P; Phillips, M M; Sandberg, A; Stanishev, V; Sullivan, M; Taddia, F; Östlin, G; Asadi, S; Herrero-Illana, R; Jensen, J J; Karhunen, K; Lazarevi, S; Varenius, E; Santos, P; Sridhar, S Seethapuram; Wallström, S H J; Wiegert, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present ultraviolet (UV) observations of six nearby Type~Ia supernovae (SNe~Ia) obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope, three of which were also observed in the near-IR (NIR) with Wide-Field Camera~3. UV observations with the Swift satellite, as well as ground-based optical and near-infrared data provide complementary information. The combined data-set covers the wavelength range $0.2$--$2~\\mu$m. By also including archival data of SN 2014J, we analyse a sample spanning observed colour excesses up to $E(B-V)=1.4~$mag. We study the wavelength dependent extinction of each individual SN and find a diversity of reddening laws when characterised by the total-to-selective extinction $R_V$. In particular, we note that for the two SNe with $E(B-V)\\gtrsim1~$mag, for which the colour excess is dominated by dust extinction, we find $R_V=1.4\\pm0.1$ and $R_V=2.8\\pm0.1$. Adding UV photometry reduces the uncertainty of fitted $R_V$ by $\\sim50\\,$% allowing us to also measure $R_V$ of individual low-extinction objects whi...

  8. Communicating oscillatory networks: Frequency Domain Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ihekwaba, Adaoha E C; Sedwards, Sean

    2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    the quasi-deterministic and stochastic models the initial concentrations were multiplied by a constant (denoted alpha) having units of l mol-1 that was also used to transform the rate constants (see Additional file 1 supplementary methods for details...

  9. Minor Groove Deformability of DNA: A Molecular Dynamics Free...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    experimental DNA structures in complex with minor groove-binding proteins. The calculated free energy of minor groove deformation was 4–6 kcal mol-1 in the case of a central...

  10. Oxygen Isotope Effects on Electron Transfer to O2 Probed Using Chemically Modified Flavins Bound to Glucose Oxidase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roth, Justine P.

    -reaching consequences, possibly leading to improved biosensors1 and fuel cells2 and to the development of "green2 of ) 28 kcal mol-1 at optimal pH, which is similar to the value obtained earlier from temperature

  11. Catalysts 2013, 3, 922-941; doi:10.3390/catal3040922 ISSN 2073-4344

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    ; wavelet shrinkage denoising; time-varying flexible least squares OPEN ACCESS #12;Catalysts 2013, 3 923 and apparent prefactors Ei, E-i and Eapp intrinsic and apparent activation energies (kJ mol-1 ) Run 1, 2 and 3

  12. A Crossed Molecular Beam and Ab-Initio Investigation of the Reaction of Boron Monoxide (BO; X2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Ralf I.

    considerably more energy than conventional hydrocarbons such as JP-8 jet fuel, that is, 837 kJ mol-1 versus 230 than conventional hydrocarbon based jet propellants;3 therefore, boron is considered to be a potential

  13. CoMuEx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamosCharacterization2Climate, Ocean and

  14. Extending Primary-Copy Database Replication Paradigm J.R. Juarez-Rodriguez, J.E. Armendariz-I~nigo, F.D. Mu~noz-Escoi, J.R. Gonzalez de Mendivil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, Francesc

    ´ariz-I~nigo, F.D. Mu~noz-Esco´i, J.R. Gonz´alez de Mend´ivil Universidad P´ublica de Navarra, 31006 Pamplona.E. Armend´ariz-I~nigo, F.D. Mu~noz-Esco´i, J.R. Gonz´alez de Mend´ivil Universidad P´ublica de Navarra

  15. Stacking Effects on Local Structure in RNA: Changes in the Structure of Tandem GA Pairs when Flanking GC Pairs Are Replaced by isoG-isoC Pairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Gang

    /14, Poland ReceiVed: December 19, 2006; In Final Form: February 19, 2007 The Watson-Crick-like isoG-isoC (i in the symmetric contexts (CGAG)2 with a loop free energy of -0.7 kcal/mol1,3,8 and (UGAA)2 with a loop free energy in the symmetric context (GGAC)2 with a loop free energy of -2.5 kcal/mol.1,4,9 These results suggest that base

  16. Structural, magnetic, and mechanical properties of 5 {mu}m thick SmCo films suitable for use in microelectromechanical systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walther, A. [Institut Neel, CNRS-UJF, 25 rue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble (France); CEA Leti-MINATEC, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France); Givord, D.; Dempsey, N. M. [Institut Neel, CNRS-UJF, 25 rue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble (France); Khlopkov, K.; Gutfleisch, O. [IFW Dresden, Institute of Metallic Materials, Helmholtzstr. 20, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    5 {mu}m thick SmCo films were deposited onto Si substrates using triode sputtering. A study of the influence of deposition temperature (T{sub dep}{<=}600 deg. C) on the structural, magnetic, and mechanical properties has shown that optimum properties [highest degree of in-plane texture, maximum in-plane coercivity and remanence (1.3 and 0.8 T, respectively), and no film peel-off] are achieved for films deposited at the relatively low temperature of 350 deg. C. This temperature is compatible with film integration into microelectromechanical systems. The deposition rate was increased from 3.6 to 18 {mu}m/h by increasing the surface area of the target from 7 to 81 cm{sup 2} while keeping the target potential fixed. Mechanically intact films could be prepared by deposition onto prepatterned films or deposition through a mask.

  17. Characterization of catastrophic optical damage in Al-free InGaAs/InGaP 0.98 {mu}m high-power lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, K.H.; Lee, J.K.; Jang, D.H.; Cho, H.S.; Park, C.S.; Pyun, K.E. [Compound Semiconductor Research Department, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute, Yusong P.O. Box 106, Taejon 305-600 (Korea)] [Compound Semiconductor Research Department, Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute, Yusong P.O. Box 106, Taejon 305-600 (Korea); Jeong, J.Y. [Department of Radio Engineering, Korea University, 5-1 Ka, Anam-Dong, Sungbuk-ku, Seoul 136-701 (Korea)] [Department of Radio Engineering, Korea University, 5-1 Ka, Anam-Dong, Sungbuk-ku, Seoul 136-701 (Korea); Nahm, S. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Korea University, 5-1 Ka, Anam-Dong, Sungbuk-ku, Seoul 136-701 (Korea)] [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Korea University, 5-1 Ka, Anam-Dong, Sungbuk-ku, Seoul 136-701 (Korea); Jeong, J. [Department of Radio Engineering, Korea University, 5-1 Ka, Anam-Dong, Sungbuk-ku, Seoul 136-701 (Korea)] [Department of Radio Engineering, Korea University, 5-1 Ka, Anam-Dong, Sungbuk-ku, Seoul 136-701 (Korea)

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Catastrophic optical damage (COD) in Al-free InGaAs/InGaP 0.98 {mu}m lasers has been investigated using real-time electroluminescence (EL) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). From EL images, we observed that multiple bright spots initiated from one of the facets and then propagated to the center of the cavity during the COD process. It is clarified by the TEM analysis that the propagation of bright spots resulted in 60-nm-wide Moir{acute e} fringe along the cavity and the crystalline phase of the active area became polycrystalline. Highly nonradiative polycrystalline phase of the active area is the major cause of COD failure in the Al-free 0.98 {mu}m lasers. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. THE CARNEGIE HUBBLE PROGRAM: THE LEAVITT LAW AT 3.6 AND 4.5 {mu}m IN THE MILKY WAY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monson, Andrew J.; Freedman, Wendy L.; Madore, Barry F.; Persson, S. E.; Scowcroft, Victoria; Seibert, Mark [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Rigby, Jane R., E-mail: amonson@obs.carnegiescience.edu, E-mail: wendy@obs.carnegiescience.edu, E-mail: barry@obs.carnegiescience.edu, E-mail: persson@obs.carnegiescience.edu, E-mail: vs@obs.carnegiescience.edu, E-mail: mseibert@obs.carnegiescience.edu, E-mail: Jane.R.Rigby@nasa.gov [Observational Cosmology Lab, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Carnegie Hubble Program (CHP) is designed to calibrate the extragalactic distance scale using data from the post-cryogenic era of the Spitzer Space Telescope. The ultimate goal of the CHP is a systematic improvement in the distance scale leading to a determination of the Hubble constant to within an accuracy of 2%. This paper focuses on the measurement and calibration of the Galactic Cepheid period-luminosity (PL, Leavitt) relation using the warm Spitzer/IRAC 1 and 2 bands at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m. We present photometric measurements covering the period range 4-70 days for 37 Galactic Cepheids. Data at 24 phase points were collected for each star. Three PL relations of the form M = a(log (P) - 1) + b are derived. The method adopted here takes the slope a to be -3.31, as determined from the Spitzer Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) data of Scowcroft et al. Using the geometric Hubble Space Telescope guide-star distances to 10 Galactic Cepheids, we find a calibrated 3.6 {mu}m PL zero point of -5.80 {+-} 0.03. Together with our value for the LMC zero point, we determine a reddening-corrected distance modulus of 18.48 {+-} 0.04 mag to the LMC. The mid-IR period-color diagram and the [3.6]-[4.5] color variation with phase are interpreted in terms of CO absorption at 4.5 {mu}m. This situation compromises the use of the 4.5 {mu}m data for distance determinations.

  19. Bonding in transition-metal cluster compounds. 1. The M/sub 6/(. mu. /sub 3/-X)/sub 8/ cluster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woolley, R.G.

    1985-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The electronic structure of the transition-metal cluster moiety M/sub 6/(..mu../sub 3/-X)/sub 8/, with idealized O/sub h/ symmetry, is examined for X = chalcogen, halogen, and carbonyl ligands. The role of the metal d electrons in metal-metal bonding is emphasized, and the structure of the metal cluster d-band is described in detail. 54 references, 4 figures.

  20. SOFIA Observations of SN 2010jl: Another Non-Detection of the 9.7 $\\mu$m Silicate Dust Feature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brian J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present photometric observations from the {\\it Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA)} at 11.1 $\\mu$m of the Type IIn supernova (SN IIn) 2010jl. The SN is undetected by {\\it SOFIA}, but the upper limits obtained, combined with new and archival detections from {\\it Spitzer} at 3.6 \\& 4.5 $\\mu$m allow us to characterize the composition of the dust present. Dust in other Type IIn SNe has been shown in previous works to reside in a circumstellar shell of material ejected by the progenitor system in the few millenia prior to explosion. Our model fits show that the dust in the system shows no evidence for the strong, ubiquitous 9.7 $\\mu$m feature from silicate dust, suggesting the presence of carbonaceous grains. The observations are best fit with 0.01-0.05 $\\msun$ of carbonaceous dust radiating at a temperature of $\\sim 550-620$ K. The dust composition may reveal clues concerning the nature of the progenitor system, which remains ambiguous for this subclass. Most of the single star progeni...

  1. Sviluppo di un algoritmo per l'identificazione e la misura dell'energia di sciami elettromagnetici per la ricerca di oscillazioni nu_mu->nu_tau nel canale tau->e nell'esperimento OPERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esposito, L

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sviluppo di un algoritmo per l'identificazione e la misura dell'energia di sciami elettromagnetici per la ricerca di oscillazioni nu_mu->nu_tau nel canale tau->e nell'esperimento OPERA

  2. Measurement of ??-induced [nu subscript mu -induced] charged-current neutral pion production cross sections on mineral oil at E??0.5–2.0??[E subscript nu ?0.5–2.0?] GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bugel, Leonard G.

    Using a custom 3-?erenkov ring fitter, we report cross sections for ??-induced [nu subscript mu -induced] charged-current single ?0 production on mineral oil (CH2) [CH subscript 2] from a sample of 5810 candidate events ...

  3. Search for the rare decays B+-->mu+mu-K+, B-->mu+mu-K*(892), and Bs-->mu+mu- phi at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makhoul, K.

    We search for b?s?[superscript +]?[superscript -] transitions in B meson (B[superscript +], B[superscript 0], or B[subscript s][superscript 0]) decays with 924??pb[superscript -1] of pp[over -bar] collisions at sqrt ...

  4. SU-E-T-24: A Simple Correction-Based Method for Independent Monitor Unit (MU) Verification in Monte Carlo (MC) Lung SBRT Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pokhrel, D; Badkul, R; Jiang, H; Estes, C; Kumar, P; Wang, F [UniversityKansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Lung-SBRT uses hypo-fractionated dose in small non-IMRT fields with tissue-heterogeneity corrected plans. An independent MU verification is mandatory for safe and effective delivery of the treatment plan. This report compares planned MU obtained from iPlan-XVM-Calgorithm against spreadsheet-based hand-calculation using most commonly used simple TMR-based method. Methods: Treatment plans of 15 patients who underwent for MC-based lung-SBRT to 50Gy in 5 fractions for PTV V100%=95% were studied. ITV was delineated on MIP images based on 4D-CT scans. PTVs(ITV+5mm margins) ranged from 10.1- 106.5cc(average=48.6cc). MC-SBRT plans were generated using a combination of non-coplanar conformal arcs/beams using iPlan XVM-Calgorithm (BrainLAB iPlan ver.4.1.2) for Novalis-TX consisting of micro-MLCs and 6MV-SRS (1000MU/min) beam. These plans were re-computed using heterogeneity-corrected Pencil-Beam (PB-hete) algorithm without changing any beam parameters, such as MLCs/MUs. Dose-ratio: PB-hete/MC gave beam-by-beam inhomogeneity-correction-factors (ICFs):Individual Correction. For independent-2nd-check, MC-MUs were verified using TMR-based hand-calculation and obtained an average ICF:Average Correction, whereas TMR-based hand-calculation systematically underestimated MC-MUs by ?5%. Also, first 10 MC-plans were verified with an ion-chamber measurement using homogenous phantom. Results: For both beams/arcs, mean PB-hete dose was systematically overestimated by 5.5±2.6% and mean hand-calculated MU systematic underestimated by 5.5±2.5% compared to XVMC. With individual correction, mean hand-calculated MUs matched with XVMC by - 0.3±1.4%/0.4±1.4 for beams/arcs, respectively. After average 5% correction, hand-calculated MUs matched with XVMC by 0.5±2.5%/0.6±2.0% for beams/arcs, respectively. Smaller dependence on tumor volume(TV)/field size(FS) was also observed. Ion-chamber measurement was within ±3.0%. Conclusion: PB-hete overestimates dose to lung tumor relative to XVMC. XVMC-algorithm is much more-complex and accurate with tissues-heterogeneities. Measurement at machine is time consuming and need extra resources; also direct measurement of dose for heterogeneous treatment plans is not clinically practiced, yet. This simple correction-based method was very helpful for independent-2nd-check of MC-lung-SBRT plans and routinely used in our clinic. A look-up table can be generated to include TV/FS dependence in ICFs.

  5. Pulseshape characteristics of a 300 $\\mu$m PR03 R-measuring VELO sensor read out with a Beetle1.3 chip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palacios, A; Buytaert, J; Borel, J; Collins, P; Eckstein, D; Eklund, L; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Jans, E; Ketel, T; Petrie, D; Pivk, M; Tobin, M

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The signal-to-noise, overspill and undershoot characteristics of a VELO module equipped with Beetle1.3 read-out chips have been measured using 120 GeV pions from the SPS test beam facility at CERN. The module consists of a PR03 n-on-n 300 $\\mu$m R measuring prototype sensor and a fully populated K03 hybrid. Results are presented for a single Beetle1.3 chip with a variety of chip parameter settings controlling the pre-amplifier and shaper currents and feedback voltages, with the objective of establishing the performance of the module and understanding its dependence on the read-out chip settings.

  6. Mind the gap on Icecube: Cosmic neutrino spectrum and muon anomalous magnetic moment in the gauged L_{\\mu} - L_{\\tau} model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Araki, Takeshi; Konishi, Yasufumi; Ota, Toshihiko; Sato, Joe; Shimomura, Takashi

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy spectrum of cosmic neutrinos, which was recently reported by the IceCube collaboration, shows a gap between 400 TeV and 1 PeV. An unknown neutrino interaction mediated by a field with a mass of the MeV scale is one of the possible solutions to this gap. We examine if the leptonic gauge interaction L_{\\mu} - L_{\\tau} can simultaneously explain the two phenomena in the lepton sector: the gap in the cosmic neutrino spectrum and the unsettled disagreement in muon anomalous magnetic moment. We illustrate that there remains the regions in the model parameter space, which account for both the problems. Our results also provide a hint for the distance to the source of the high-energy cosmic neutrinos.

  7. Measurement of {nu}{sub {mu}} and {nu}{sub e} Events in an Off-Axis Horn-Focused Neutrino Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamson, P.; Brice, S. J.; Brown, B. C.; Choudhary, B. C.; Finley, D. A.; Ford, R.; Garcia, F. G.; Harris, D.; Hylen, J.; Kasper, P.; Kobilarcik, T.; Kourbanis, I.; Marchionni, A.; Marsh, W.; Mills, F.; Moore, C. D.; Prebys, E.; Russell, A. D.; Smart, W.; Spentzouris, P. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States)] (and others)

    2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first observation of off-axis neutrino interactions in the MiniBooNE detector from the NuMI beam line at Fermilab. The MiniBooNE detector is located 745 m from the NuMI production target, at 110 mrad angle (6.3 deg.) with respect to the NuMI beam axis. Samples of charged-current quasielastic {nu}{sub {mu}} and {nu}{sub e} interactions are analyzed and found to be in agreement with expectation. This provides a direct verification of the expected pion and kaon contributions to the neutrino flux and validates the modeling of the NuMI off-axis beam.

  8. Compositional dependence of the 1.8 {mu}m emission properties of Tm{sup 3+} ions in silicate glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Xin; Fan Sijun; Li Kefeng; Zhang Lei; Wang Shikai; Hu Lili [Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Jia Ding, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The compositional dependence of the 1.8 {mu}m emission properties of Tm{sup 3+} ion-doped lead silicate glasses is investigated. Judd-Ofelt parameters are calculated and their variation with different glass modifier ions is obtained. The Judd-Ofelt parameters increase with decreased modifier ionic radius. A large spontaneous emission probability and a large emission cross-section are found to be related with the strength of the modifier ion. Fluorescence spectra are analyzed using rate equations and compared with recorded data. The results are very close, indicating the reliability of this method. Non-radiative probability is deduced by fitting the fluorescence decay curve; it becomes smaller with increased ionic field strength. Energy transfer processes are studied using the extended overlap integral method.

  9. Leading order hadronic contributions to a{sub {mu}} and {alpha}{sub QED} from N{sub f} = 2 + 1 + 1 twisted mass fermions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Feng, Grit Hotzel, Karl Jansen, Marcus Petschlies, Dru B. Renner

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first four-flavour lattice calculation of the leading-order hadronic vacuum polarisation contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, a{sub {mu}}{sup hvp}, and the hadronic running of the QED coupling constant, {Delta}{alpha}{sup hvp}{sub QED}(Q{sup 2}). In the heavy sector a mixed-action setup is employed. The bare quark masses are determined from matching the K- and D-meson masses to their physical values. Several light quark masses are used in order to yield a controlled extrapolation to the physical pion mass by utilising a recently proposed improved method. We demonstrate that this method also works in the four-flavour case.

  10. WISE TF: A MID-INFRARED, 3.4 {mu}m EXTENSION OF THE TULLY-FISHER RELATION USING WISE PHOTOMETRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lagattuta, David J.; Mould, Jeremy R. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Staveley-Smith, Lister; Hong Tao; Springob, Christopher M. [ARC Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO), Redfern, NSW (Australia); Masters, Karen L. [Institute for Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Dennis Sciama Building, Burnaby Road, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Koribalski, Baerbel S. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility (ATNF) P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Jones, D. Heath, E-mail: dlagattu@astro.swin.edu.au [School of Physics, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800 (Australia)

    2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a mid-infrared Tully-Fisher (TF) relation using photometry from the 3.4 {mu}m W1 band of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) satellite. The WISE TF relation is formed from 568 galaxies taken from the all-sky 2MASS Tully-Fisher (2MTF) galaxy catalog, spanning a range of environments including field, group, and cluster galaxies. This constitutes the largest mid-infrared TF relation constructed to date. After applying a number of corrections to galaxy magnitudes and line widths, we measure a master TF relation given by M{sub corr} = -22.24 - 10.05[log (W{sub corr}) - 2.5], with an average dispersion of {sigma}{sub WISE} = 0.686 mag. There is some tension between WISE TF and a preliminary 3.6 {mu}m relation, which has a shallower slope and almost no intrinsic dispersion. However, our results agree well with a more recent relation constructed from a large sample of cluster galaxies. We additionally compare WISE TF to the near-infrared 2MTF template relations, finding a good agreement between the TF parameters and total dispersions of WISE TF and the 2MTF K-band template. This fact, coupled with typical galaxy colors of (K - W1) {approx} 0, suggests that these two bands are tracing similar stellar populations, including the older, centrally-located stars in the galactic bulge which can (for galaxies with a prominent bulge) dominate the light profile.

  11. 0. 98 [mu]m InGaAs-InGaAsP-InGaP GRIN-SCH SL-SQW lasers for coupling high optical power into single-mode fiber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohkubo, Michio; Namiki, Shu; Ijichi, Tetsuro; Iketani, Akira; Kikuta, Toshio (Furukawa Electric Co., Ltd., Yokohama (Japan))

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A CW coupled optical power of 75 mW into a single-mode fiber (SMF) at a driving current of 200 mA was achieved by InGaAs-InGaAsP-InGaP GRIN-SCH SL-SQW ridge waveguide lasers emitting at 0.98 [mu]m. The GRIN-SCH profile was optimized to minimize the series resistance due to spikes at GaAs-InGaP heterointerfaces. The other approach was proposed for high coupling efficiency into the SMF with cutoff wavelength of 0.88 [mu]m: The ridge mesa width was precisely controlled around 2 [mu]m, and an aspect ratio of far-field pattern ([theta][sub [perpendicular

  12. Search for sneutrino production in $e\\mu$ final states in 5.3 fb$^{-1}$ of $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt(s) =1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, Braden Keim; /Oklahoma U.; Abolins, Maris A.; /Michigan State U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; /Tata Inst.; Adams, Mark Raymond; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, Todd; /Florida State U.; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls; Alverson, George O.; /Northeastern U.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Nijmegen U.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results of a search for R parity violating (RPV) interactions leading to the production of supersymmetric sneutrinos decaying into e{mu} final states using 5.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Having observed no evidence for production of e{mu} resonances, we set direct bounds on the RPV couplings {lambda}{prime}{sub 311} and {lambda}{sub 312} as a function of sneutrino mass.

  13. Supporting Information Wiley-VCH 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theodorakis, Emmanuel

    dissolved in anhydrous THF (1000 ml), then allyl acetate (50.0 ml, 0.46 mol), 1,3-cyclopentadione (12, 45OH. #12; 2 Compound 13 was synthesized based on reported procedure with modification[1-3] : Allyl.0 g, 0.46 mol), N,O-bis (trimethylsilyl)acetamide (114 ml, 0.46 mol) and sodium acetate (1.10 g, 13

  14. 4.5 A Carnot cycle uses 1.00 mol of a monatomic perfect gas as the working substance from an initial state of 10.0 atm and 600 K. It expands isothermally to a pressure of 1.00 atm (step 1),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Findley, Gary L.

    4.5 A Carnot cycle uses 1.00 mol of a monatomic perfect gas as the working substance from, w, )U, )H, )S and )Stot for each stage of the cycle and for the cycle as a whole. Express your L, in three ways: (a) isothermally and reversibly, (b) isothermally against a constant external

  15. Two-chord interferometry using 3.39 {mu}m He-Ne laser on a flux-coil-generated FRC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gota, H.; Deng, B. H.; Gupta, D.; Kiyashko, V.; Knapp, K.; Mendoza, R.; Morehouse, M. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Bolte, N.; Roche, T.; Wessel, F. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-chord {lambda}{sub IR}{approx}3.39 {mu}m He-Ne laser interferometer system was developed for a flux-coil-generated field-reversed configuration to estimate the electron density and the total temperature of the field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma. This two-chord heterodyne interferometer system consists of a single {approx}2 mW infrared He-Ne laser, a visible ({lambda}{sub vis}{approx}632.8 nm) He-Ne laser for the alignment, a 40 MHz acousto-optic modulator, photodetectors, and quadrature phase detectors. Initial measurement was performed and the measured average electron densities were 2-10x10{sup 19} m{sup -3} at two different radial positions in the midplane. A time shift in density was observed as the FRC expands radially. The time evolution of the line-averaged density agrees with the density estimated from the in situ internal magnetic probes, based on a rigid-rotor profile model.

  16. Selection Tests of MnZn and NiZn Ferrites for Mu2e 300 kHz and 5.1 MHz AC Dipoles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourkland, K.; Elementi, L.; Feher, S.; Harding, D.J.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Makarov, A.; Pfeffer, H.; Velev, G.V.; /Fermilab; Mulushev, E.; /Institute of Automatics and Electrometry; Iedmeska, I.; /Moscow, MIPT; Venturini, M.; /Pisa U.

    2011-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Mu2e, a charged lepton flavor violation (CLFV) experiment is planned to start at Fermilab late in this decade. The proposed experiment will search for neutrinoless muon to electron conversions with unprecedented sensitivity, better than 6 x 10{sup -17 }at 90% CL. To achieve this sensitivity the incoming proton beam must be highly suppressed during the window for detecting the muon decays. The current proposal for beam extinction is based on a collimator design with two dipoles running at {approx}300 kHz and 5.1 MHz and synchronized to the proton bunch spacing. The appropriate choice of ferrite material for the magnet yoke is a critical step in the overall design of the dipoles and their reliable operation at such high frequencies over the life of the experiment. This choice, based on a series of the thermal and magnetic measurements of the ferrite samples, is discussed in the paper. Additionally, the first results from the testing at 300 kHz of a prototype AC dipole are presented.

  17. Experiment Profile: Mu2e

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1,Energy Consumers | Department

  18. Proton form factor ratio, {mu}{sub p}G{sub E}{sup P}/G{sub M}{sup P} from double spin asymmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habarakada Liyanage, Anusha Pushpakumari [Hampton U., JLAB] [Hampton U., JLAB

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The form factors are fundamental properties of the nucleon representing the effect of its structure on its response to electromagnetic probes such as electrons. They are functions of the four-momentum transfer squared Q{sup 2} between the electron and the proton. This thesis reports the results of a new measurement of the ratio of the electric and magnetic form factors of the proton up to Q{sup 2} = 5.66 (GeV/c){sup 2} using the double spin asymmetry with a polarized beam and target. Experiment E07-003 (SANE, Spin Asymmetries of the Nucleon Experiment) was carried out in Hall C at Jefferson Lab in 2009 to study the proton spin structure functions with a dynamically polarized ammonia target and longitudinally polarized electron beam. By detecting elastically scattered protons in the High-Momentum Spectrometer (HMS) in coincidence with the electrons in the Big Electron Telescope Array (BETA), elastic measurements were carried out in parallel. The elastic double spin asymmetry allows one to extract the proton electric to magnetic form factor ratio G{sup p}{sub E}/G{sup p}{sub M} at high-momentum transfer, Q{sup 2} = 5.66 (GeV/c){sup 2}. In addition to the coincidence data, inclusively scattered electrons from the polarized ammonia target were detected by HMS, which allows to measure the beam-target asymmetry in the elastic region with the target spin nearly perpendicular to the momentum transfer, and to extract G{sup p}{sub E}/G{sup p}{sub M} at low Q{sup 2} = 2.06 (GeV/c){sup 2}. This alternative measurement of G{sup p}{sub E}/G{sup p}{sub M} has verified and confirmed the dramatic discrepancy at high Q{sup 2} between the Rosenbluth and the recoil-polarization-transfer iv method with a different measurement technique and systematic uncertainties uncorrelated to those of the recoil-polarization measurements. The measurement of the form factor ratio at Q{sup 2} = 2.06 (GeV/c){sup 2} has been determined as {mu}{sub p}G{sup p}{sub E}/G{sup p}{sub M} = 0.605{+-}0.178{sub stat}{+-}0.033{sub sys} which is in agreement with an earlier measurement with the polarized target technique at similar kinematics. The measurement of the form factor ratio at Q{sup 2} = 5.66 (GeV/c){sup 2} has been determined as {mu}{sub p}G{sup p}{sub E}/G{sup p}{sub M} = 0.672 {+-} 0.362{sub stat} which represents the highest Q{sup 2} reach with the double spin asymmetry to date.

  19. HIGH-CONTRAST 3.8 {mu}m IMAGING OF THE BROWN DWARF/PLANET-MASS COMPANION TO GJ 758

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Currie, Thayne [NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Bailey, Vanessa; Rodigas, Timothy; Hinz, Phil [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Fabrycky, Daniel; Murray-Clay, Ruth [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present L'-band (3.8 {mu}m) MMT/Clio high-contrast imaging data for the nearby star GJ 758, which was recently reported by Thalmann et al. to have one -- possibly two -- faint comoving companions (GJ 758B and 'C', respectively). GJ 758B is detected in two distinct data sets. Additionally, we report a possible detection of the object identified by Thalmann et al. as 'GJ 758C' in our more sensitive data set, though it is likely a residual speckle. However, if it is the same object as that reported by Thalmann et al. it cannot be a companion in a bound orbit. GJ 758B has an H - L' color redder than nearly all known L-T8 dwarfs. Based on comparisons with the COND evolutionary models, GJ 758B has T {sub e} {approx} 560 K{sup +150K}{sub -90 K}{sup +150 K) and a mass ranging from {approx}10-20 M{sub J} if it is {approx}1 Gyr old to {approx} 25-40 M{sub J} if it is 8.7 Gyr old. GJ 758B is likely in a highly eccentric orbit, e {approx} 0.73{sup +0.12}{sub -0.21}, with a semimajor axis of {approx}44 AU{sup +32 AU){sub -14 AU}. Though GJ 758B is sometimes discussed within the context of exoplanet direct imaging, its mass is likely greater than the deuterium-burning limit and its formation may resemble that of binary stars rather than that of Jovian-mass planets.

  20. Measurement of transmission efficiency for 400 MeV proton beam through collimator at Fermilab MuCool Test Area using Chromox-6 scintillation screen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jana, M. R.; Chung, M.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Palmer, M.; Schwarz, T.; Tollestrup, A.; Yonehara, K. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Freemire, B.; Hanlet, P.; Torun, Y. [Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The MuCool Test Area (MTA) at Fermilab is a facility to develop the technology required for ionization cooling for a future Muon Collider and/or Neutrino Factory. As part of this research program, feasibility studies of various types of RF cavities in a high magnetic field environment are in progress. As a unique approach, we have tested a RF cavity filled with a high pressure hydrogen gas with a 400 MeV proton beam in an external magnetic field (B = 3 T). Quantitative information about the number of protons passing through this cavity is an essential requirement of the beam test. The MTA is a flammable gas (hydrogen) hazard zone. Due to safety reasons, no active (energized) beam diagnostic instrument can be used. Moreover, when the magnetic field is on, current transformers (toroids) used for beam intensity measurements do not work due to the saturation of the ferrite material of the transformer. Based on these requirements, we have developed a passive beam diagnostic instrumentation using a combination of a Chromox-6 scintillation screen and CCD camera. This paper describes details of the beam profile and position obtained from the CCD image with B = 0 T and B = 3 T, and for high and low intensity proton beams. A comparison is made with beam size obtained from multi-wires detector. Beam transmission efficiency through a collimator with a 4 mm diameter hole is measured by the toroids and CCD image of the scintillation screen. Results show that the transmission efficiency estimated from the CCD image is consistent with the toroid measurement, which enables us to monitor the beam transmission efficiency even in a high magnetic field environment.

  1. Flavor symmetry L{sub e}-L{sub {mu}}-L{sub {tau}}, atmospheric neutrino mixing, and CP violation in the lepton sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petcov, S.T.; Rodejohann, W. [Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati, Via Beirut 2-4, I-34014 Trieste, Italy and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34014 Trieste (Italy)

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata neutrino mixing matrix is given, in general, by the product of two unitary matrices associated with the diagonalization of the charged lepton and neutrino mass matrices. Assuming that the active flavor neutrinos possess a Majorana mass matrix which is diagonalized by a bimaximal mixing matrix, we give the allowed forms of the charged lepton mixing matrix and the corresponding implied forms of the charged lepton mass matrix. We then assume that the origin of bimaximal mixing is a weakly broken flavor symmetry corresponding to the conservation of the nonstandard lepton charge L{sup '}=L{sub e}-L{sub {mu}}-L{sub {tau}}. The latter does not predict, in general, the atmospheric neutrino mixing to be maximal. We study the impact of this fact on the allowed forms of the charged lepton mixing matrix and on the neutrino mixing observables, analyzing the case of CP violation in detail. When compared with the case of exact bimaximal mixing, the deviations from zero U{sub e3} and from maximal atmospheric neutrino mixing are typically more sizable if one assumes just L{sup '} conservation. In fact, |U{sub e3}|{sup 2} can be as small as 0.007 and atmospheric neutrino mixing can take any value inside its currently allowed range. We discuss under which conditions the atmospheric neutrino mixing angle is larger or smaller than {pi}/4. We present also a simple seesaw realization of the implied light neutrino Majorana mass matrix and consider leptogenesis in this scenario.

  2. Genetic Algorithm Based Improved Sub-Optimal Model Reduction in Nyquist Plane for Optimal Tuning Rule Extraction of PID and PI{\\lambda}D{\\mu} Controllers via Genetic Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Saptarshi; Das, Shantanu; Gupta, Amitava; 10.1109/PACC.2011.5978962

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Genetic Algorithm (GA) has been used in this paper for a new Nyquist based sub-optimal model reduction and optimal time domain tuning of PID and fractional order (FO) PI{\\lambda}D{\\mu} controllers. Comparative studies show that the new model reduction technique outperforms the conventional H2-norm based reduced order modeling techniques. Optimum tuning rule has been developed next with a test-bench of higher order processes via Genetic Programming (GP) with minimum value of weighted integral error index and control signal. From the Pareto optimal front which is a trade-off between the complexity of the formulae and control performance, an efficient set of tuning rules has been generated for time domain optimal PID and PI{\\lambda}D{\\mu} controllers.

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - alpha class glutathione Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Detoxification of 2-Phenylpropenal, a Reactive Summary: of the genotoxic aldehyde acrolein by human glutathione transferases of classes alpha, pi, and mu. Mol. Pharmacol......

  4. Spectroscopic investigation of 2.02 {mu}m emission in Ho{sup 3+}/Tm{sup 3+} codoped transparent glass ceramic containing CaF{sub 2} nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Q. J.; Zhang, W. J.; Qian, Q.; Yang, Z. M.; Zhang, Q. Y. [MOE Key Lab of Specially Functional Materials and Institute of Optical Communication Materials, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Tm{sup 3+} and Ho{sup 3+} codoped transparent glass ceramic (GC) containing CaF{sub 2} nanocrystals were fabricated by melt-quenching and subsequent thermal treatment. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy analysis confirmed the precipitation of CaF{sub 2} nanocrystals among the glass matrix. Energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy results evidenced the incorporation of Tm{sup 3+} and Ho{sup 3+} into the CaF{sub 2} nanocrystals. Judd-Ofelt parameters were calculated based on the absorption spectra, the smaller {Omega}{sub 2} and larger {Omega}{sub 6} imply that Tm{sup 3+} and Ho{sup 3+} ions has entered into a symmetrical ionic crystal field. 2.02 {mu}m emission spectral of the GC samples were recorded at room temperature with an excitation of 808 nm laser diode. The enhancement of the emission at 2.02 {mu}m in the GC samples could be attributed to more efficient cross relaxation process of Tm{sup 3+}:{sup 3}H{sub 4+}Tm{sup 3+}:{sup 3}H{sub 6}{yields}{sup 2}Tm{sup 3+}:{sup 3}H{sub 4}, and energy transfer from Tm{sup 3+} to Ho{sup 3+} benefited from the incorporation of rare earth ions into CaF{sub 2} nanocrystals.

  5. Probing the Electronic Structures of [Cmu(Mu-XR(2)]**N+ Diamond Cores As a Function of the Bridging X Atom (X = N Or P) And Charge (N=0, 1, 2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harkins, S.B.; Mankad, N.P.; Miller, A.J.M.; Szilagyi, R.K.; Peters, J.C.

    2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of dicopper diamond core complexes that can be isolated in three different oxidation states ([Cu{sub 2}({mu}-XR{sub 2})]{sup n+}, where n = 0, 1, 2 and X = N or P) is described. Of particular interest is the relative degree of oxidation of the respective copper centers and the bridging XR{sub 2} units, upon successive oxidations. These dicopper complexes feature terminal phosphine and either bridging amido or phosphido donors, and as such their metal-ligand bonds are highly covalent. Cu K-edge, Cu L-edge, and P K-edge spectroscopies, in combination with solid-state X-ray structures and DFT calculations, provides a complementary electronic structure picture for the entire set of complexes that tracks the involvement of a majority of ligand-based redox chemistry. The electronic structure picture that emerges for these inorganic dicopper diamond cores shares similarities with the Cu{sub 2}({mu}-SR){sub 2} Cu{sub A} sites of cytochrome c oxidases and nitrous oxide reductases.

  6. Geant4 simulation of the PSI LEM beam line: energy loss and muonium formation in thin foils and the impact of unmoderated muons on the $\\mu$SR spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khaw, Kim Siang; Crivelli, Paolo; Kirch, Klaus; Morenzoni, Elvezio; Salman, Zaher; Suter, Andreas; Prokscha, Thomas

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The PSI low-energy $\\mu$SR spectrometer is an instrument dedicated to muon spin rotation and relaxation measurements. Knowledge of the muon beam parameters such as spatial, kinetic energy and arrival-time distributions at the sample position are important ingredients to analyze the $\\mu$SR spectra. We present here the measured energy losses in the thin carbon foil of the muon start detector deduced from time-of-flight measurements. Muonium formation in the thin carbon foil (10 nm thickness) of the muon start detector also affect the measurable decay asymmetry and therefore need to be accounted for. Muonium formation and energy losses in the start detector, whose relevance increase with decreasing muon implantation energy ($<10$ keV), have been implemented in Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation to reproduce the measured time-of-flight spectra. Simulated and measured time-of-flight and beam spot agrees only if a small fraction of so called "unmoderated" muons which contaminate the mono-energetic muon beam of the $...

  7. All-optical remote monitoring of propane gas using a 5-km-long, low-loss optical fiber link and an InGaP light-emitting diode in the 1. 68-. mu. m region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, K.; Ito, H.; Inaba, H.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the fully optical remote detection of low-level propane (C/sub 3/H/sub 8/) gas realized by the scheme based on a long distance, very low-loss silica optical fiber link connected to a compact absorption cell in conjunction with a high radiant InGaP light-emitting diode at 1.68 ..mu..m. For this application, the near-infrared absorption spectrum of propane was measured and studied to find very complicated bands around 1.69, 1.53, and 1.38 ..mu..m. This simple system, employing a 5-km-long silica optical fiber link, was demonstrated to be capable of achieving reproducibly the detection sensitivity less than 2.4 Torr for propane gas in air, i.e., about 14% of the lower explosion limit of propane density. This result verifies a large capability for major applications to various strategic points within the environment, such as industrial complexes as well as urban and residential areas, with considerably increased reliability and safety over the existing techniques.

  8. Supporting Information Copyright Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, 69451 Weinheim, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theodorakis, Emmanuel

    CHCl3 or anhydrous MeOH. #12;2 11: Allyl palladium chloride dimer (1.69 g, 4.6 mmol) and 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane (9.20 g, 23 mmol) were dissolved in anhydrous THF (1000 ml), then allyl acetate (50.0 ml, 0.46 mol), 1,3-cyclopentadione (10, 45.0 g, 0.46 mol), N

  9. Insight into Proton Transfer in Phosphotungstic Acid Functionalized Mesoporous Silica-Based Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    University, Perth, Western Australia 6102, Australia Materials and Process Simulation Center, California 138632, Singapore § Fuels and Energy Technology Institute & Department of Chemical Engineering, Curtin humidity (RH) with a low activation energy of 14 kJ mol-1 . In order to determine the energetics associated

  10. Crystal ball 2011mbt_245 109..137 In this feature, leading researchers in the field of microbial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    , lowering the pH from ~7 to ~5.8, acetate (-26.9 kJ e-mol-1 ) accumulates because hydrogenotrophic metha methanogens as well, and will shift the fermentation end-product spectrum to a mixture of carboxylates (e cell residence times, n-butyrate is often found at high relative ratios within the fermentation product

  11. Surprising Roles of Electrostatic Interactions in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Loren

    Akankasha Nagpal Loren Dean Williams School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology deposited in the Nucleic Acid Database (NDB) (in progress) Biopolymers, Vol. 69, 87­99 (2003) © 2003 Wiley . The daunosamine con- tributes a large and favorable binding free energy (2 kcal mol 1 ). The 3 -amino group

  12. Properties of Diazocarbene [CNN] and the Diazomethyl Radical [HCNN] via Ion Chemistry and Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellison, Barney

    endothermic, rxnH0 ) 1.6 ( 0.7 kcal mol-1 . I. Introduction In an internal combustion engine, air known1 for some time that "thermal" NO is generated in the post- combustion region by the Zeldovich mechanism involving O atoms and N2. In most combustion processes, hydrocarbons are degraded to produce

  13. ORIGINAL PAPER Aragonite Kinetics in Dilute Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, Ethan L.

    ), geothermal energy production (Arnorsson 1979; Amjad 1987), and waste treatment (Reddy 1978). More recently. From these data, an Arrhenius activation energy of 71.2 kJ mol-1 is cal- culated for the heterogeneous Department of Oceanography, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, USA E. L. Grossman Department

  14. Antimicrobial activity of L. plantarum, isolated from a traditional lactic acid fermentation of table olives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of approximately 50 kg.mol­1. The presence of another compound of different properties and with a molecular mass) is due to the accumulation of main primary metabolites (lactic and acetic acids, ethanol and carbon dioxide) as well as to the production of other antimicrobial com- pounds, such as formic and benzoic acids

  15. Measurement of the W Gamma --> mu nu gamma Cross-Section, Limits on Anomalous Trilinear Vector Boson Couplings, and the Radiation Amplitude Zero in p anti-p Collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Askew, Andrew Warren

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis details the measurement of the p{bar p} {yields} W{gamma} + X {yields} {mu}{nu}{gamma} + X cross section at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using the D0 detector at Fermilab, in 134.5 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. From the photon E{sub T} spectrum limits on anomalous couplings of the photon to the W are obtained. At 95% confidence level, limits of -1.05 < {Delta}{kappa} < 1.04 for {lambda} = 0 and -0.28 < {lambda} < 0.27 for {Delta}{kappa} = 0 are obtained on the anomalous coupling parameters. The charge signed rapidity difference from the data is displayed, and its significance discussed.

  16. Synthesis and characterization by sup 1 H, sup 13 C, and sup 19 F NMR spectroscopy of (CH sub 3 CN) sub n (CO) sub 4 minus n (NO)W(. mu. -F)BF sub 3 and ((CH sub 3 CN) sub n+1 (CO) sub 4 minus n (NO)W)(BF sub 4 )(n = 0 minus 2), tungsten mononitrosyl carbonyl cations with labile acetonitrile and ((. mu. -F)BF sub 3 ) sup minus ligands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hersh, W.H. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (USA))

    1990-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Addition of (NO)(BF{sub 4}) to CH{sub 3}CNW(CO){sub 5} in CH{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} gives a mixture of five mononitrosyl compounds, mer-(cis-CH{sub 3}CN)(trans-NO)(CO){sub 3}W({mu}-F)BF{sub 3} (1), (mer,cis-(CH{sub 3}CN){sub 2}W(CO){sub 3}(NO))(BF{sub 4}) (2a), cis,cis,trans-(CH{sub 3}CN){sub 2}(CO){sub 2}(NO)W({mu}-F)BF{sub 3} (3), (fac-(CH{sub 3}CN){sub 3} W(CO){sub 2}(NO))(BF){sub 4} (4a), and trans-(NO)(CO){sub 4}W({mu}-F)BF{sub 3} (5); in a typical experiment the yield is 90%, and the ratio 1:2a:3:4a:5 is 47:14:11:1:27. Support for the identities of 1-5 is obtained by reaction of the mixture with Me{sub 3}P, giving (mer-(cis-CH{sub 3}CN)(trans-Me{sub 3}P)W(CO){sub 3}(NO))(BF{sub 4}) (7a), (cis,cis,trans-(CH{sub 3}CN){sub 2}(CO){sub 2}(NO)W(PMe{sub 3}))(BF{sub 4}) (8a), (trans-Me{sub 3}P(CO){sub 4}WNO)(BF{sub 4}) (9), and the previously reported compound (mer,cis-(Me{sub 3}P){sub 2}W(CO){sub 3}(NO))(BF{sub 4}) (10a). The reaction mixtures are analyzed by IR and {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 19}F NMR spectroscopy. In particular, the {sup 13}C NMR spectrum exhibits quintets for the carbonyl ligands of 1,3, 5 due to a dynamic spinning process of the (({mu}-F)BF{sub 3}){sup {minus}} ligand, and the {sup 19}F NMR spectrum exhibits doublets for the terminal fluorine atoms (which are further separated into {sup 10}B and {sup 11}B isotopomers) near {minus}153 ppM and quartets for the bridging fluorine atoms from {minus}203 to {minus}238 ppM. Independent synthesis and isolation in good yield of 2b-c, 4a-d, 7b-c, and 8b (where the anions for a-d are (BF{sub 4}){sup {minus}}, (SbF{sub 6}){sup {minus}}, ((C{sub 6}H{sub 5}){sub 4}B){sup {minus}}, and (PF{sub 6}){sup {minus}}{sup {minus}}, respectively) are described, as are the independent synthesis and spectroscopic characterization of 3, 5, and 6. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Low-threshold pulsed and cw InGaAsP/InGaP/GaAs double-heterojunction lasers emitting visible radiation in the 0. 73--0. 79. mu. range (T = 300 K, I/sub th/ = 3. 5--1. 3 kA/cm/sup 2/)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alferov, Z.I.; Arsent'ev, I.N.; Vavilova, L.S.; Garbuzov, D.Z.; Tulashvili, V.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of further investigations intended to construct InGaAsP/GaAs double-heterojunction structures with a much lower threshold current density and to achieve cw lasing at 300 K in stripe InGaAsP/GaAs lasers at 0.73--0.79 ..mu.. are reported. (AIP)

  18. Some conclusive considerations on the comparison of the ICARUS nu_mu to nu_e oscillation search with the MiniBooNE low-energy event excess

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Antonello; B. Baibussinov; P. Benetti; F. Boffelli; A. Bubak; E. Calligarich; S. Centro; A. Cesana; K. Cieslik; D. B. Cline; A. G. Cocco; A. Dabrowska; A. Dermenev; A. Falcone; C. Farnese; A. Fava; A. Ferrari; D. Gibin; S. Gninenko; A. Guglielmi; M. Haranczyk; J. Holeczek; M. Kirsanov; J. Kisiel; I. Kochanek; J. Lagoda; S. Mania; A. Menegolli; G. Meng; C. Montanari; S. Otwinowski; P. Picchi; F. Pietropaolo; P. Plonski; A. Rappoldi; G. L. Raselli; M. Rossella; C. Rubbia; P. Sala; A. Scaramelli; F. Sergiampietri; D. Stefan; R. Sulej; M. Szarska; M. Terrani; M. Torti; F. Varanini; S. Ventura; C. Vignoli; H. Wang; X. Yang; A. Zalewska; A. Zani; K. Zaremba

    2015-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensitive search for anomalous LSND-like nu_mu to nu_e oscillations has been performed by the ICARUS Collaboration exposing the T600 LAr-TPC to the CERN to Gran Sasso (CNGS) neutrino beam. The result is compatible with the absence of additional anomalous contributions giving a limit to oscillation probability of 3.4E-3 and 7.6E-3 at 90% and 99% confidence levels respectively showing a tension between these new limits and the low-energy event excess (200 < E_nu QE < 475 MeV) reported by MiniBooNE Collaboration. A more detailed comparison of the ICARUS data with the MiniBooNE low-energy excess has been performed, including the energy resolution as obtained from the official MiniBooNE data release. As a result the previously reported tension is confirmed at 90% C.L., suggesting an unexplained nature or an otherwise instrumental effect for the MiniBooNE low energy event excess

  19. Charter Members History of Pi Mu Epsilon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feingold, Alex

    Daniel Frey Jacob P. Gagnon Brittany Marie Grenzig James M Grippe Risa Gul Matthew Joseph Hems Nicholas S Guzman Matthew E. Hassell Kevin A. Kass Adam A. Sasson Prof. Dmytro Savchuk Jessica M. Tchorowski Prof Joining in 2014 Daniel Irmihaev Taylor Rose Juran Garreth Joshua Kaplan Navdep Kaur Colleen Kearney

  20. Joaquin Perez Mu~noz Geometria Riemanniana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Joaquin

    y de los lectores mejorarlos, un trabajo que nunca se termina. Si encuentras alg´un error, env´ia un. Variedades Riemannianas. 1 1.1. Longitudes y distancias. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.1.1. Curvas a distancia constante. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1.1.2. Billares

  1. RESEARCH PAPER Florin Iancu Norbert Mu ller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Norbert

    in 1995, with the MIT ``Micro Gas Turbine'' project, the engineering research world has explored F. Iancu in the 10­100 kW range), the concept of ultra-micro gas turbines (UlGT) has been introduced to define

  2. Tridiagonal pairs and the $\\mu$-conjecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nomura, Kazumasa

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Let $F$ denote a field and let $V$ denote a vector space over $F$ with finite positive dimension. We consider a pair of linear transformations $A:V \\to V$ and $A^*:V \\to V$ that satisfy the following conditions: (i) each of $A,A^*$ is diagonalizable; (ii) there exists an ordering $\\{V_i\\}_{i=0}^d$ of the eigenspaces of $A$ such that $A^* V_i \\subseteq V_{i-1} + V_{i} + V_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq d$, where $V_{-1}=0$ and $V_{d+1}=0$; (iii) there exists an ordering $\\{V^*_i\\}_{i=0}^\\delta$ of the eigenspaces of $A^*$ such that $A V^*_i \\subseteq V^*_{i-1} + V^*_{i} + V^*_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq \\delta$, where $V^*_{-1}=0$ and $V^*_{\\delta+1}=0$; (iv) there is no subspace $W$ of $V$ such that $AW \\subseteq W$, $A^* W \\subseteq W$, $W \

  3. MU(& Ge-+v,

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNewCF INDUSTRIES,L? .-IGYS,:?' _.JI' ; ,'fil

  4. JOURNAL OF MOLECULAR RECOGNITION J. Mol. Recognit. 2004; 17: 368375

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    on the equilibria and rates of protein folding and binding. Confinement is expected to significantly stabilize-volume effect; protein folding; protein binding; protein aggregation; chaperonin action Received 3 November 2003 and the rates of protein folding and protein­protein binding. The theoretical models presented here

  5. Unstructured Adaptive Mesh MOL Solvers for Atmospheric Reacting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    . Achieving high resolution in air pollution models is a difficult challenge because of the large number for the next generation of air pollution models in order to "capture important smaller scale atmospheric in understanding the complex processes which lead to the formation of pollutants such as greenhouse gases, acid

  6. J. Mol. Biol. (1995) 245, 151179 Structural and Mechanistic Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toney, Michael

    phenol-lyase; PPL-Cys-Hg, N-(5'-phosphopyridoxyl)-S-methylmercuri-L-cysteine; MIR, multiple isomorphous

  7. CafeMol (www.cafemol.org) Features are;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fukai, Tomoki

    /sh #PJM ­L "rscgrp=small" small, large, interactive #PJM ­L "node=1" small: 1-12nodes #PJM ­mpi "proc=1" # of mpi parallelization #PJM ­L "elapse=1:00:00" small: -3:00:00 #PJM ­j merge std output and stderr

  8. Progress on the design of a high luminosity {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, R.B.; Sessler, A.; Tollestrup, A.; Muon Collider Collaboration

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Parameters are presented for a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. The design is not optimized for performance, neither for cost; however, it does suffice to allow one to make a credible case that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics, that could open up the realm of physics above the 1 TeV scale, allowing, for example, copious production of supersymmetric particles or a detailed study of the strongly-interacting scenario of electroweak symmetry breaking.

  9. Thenature of marbled Terra Sigillata slips: a combined mu XRF and mu XRD investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leon, Yoanna; Sciau, Philippe; Goudeau, Philippe; Tamura, Nobumichi; Webb, Sam; Mehta, Apurva

    2009-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In addition to the red terra sigillata production, the largest Gallic workshop (La Graufesenque) made a special type of terra sigillata, called 'marbled' by the archaeologists. Produced exclusively on this site, this pottery is characterized by a surface finish made of a mixture of yellow and red slips. Because the two slips are intimately mixed, it is difficult to obtain the precise composition of one of the two constituents without contamination by the other. In order to obtain very precise correlation at the appropriate scale between the color aspect and the element and mineralogical phase distributions in the slip, combined electron microprobe, x-ray micro spectroscopies and micro diffraction on cross sectional samples were performed. The aim is to discover how potters were able to produce this unique type of terra sigillata and especially this slip showing an intense yellow color. Results show that the yellow component of marbled sigillata was made from a titanium-rich clay preparation. The color is related to the formation of a pseudobrookite (TiFe2O5) phase in the yellow part of the slip, the main characteristics of that structure being considered nowadays as essential for the fabrication of stable yellow ceramic pigments. Its physical properties such as high refractive indices and a melting point higher than that of most silicates widely used as ceramic colorants are indeed determinant for this kind of applications. Finally, the red parts have a similar composition (elementary and mineralogical) to the one of standard red slip.

  10. The nature of marbled Terra Sigillata slips: a combined mu XRF and mu XRD investigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leon, Yoanna

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sigillata slips: a combined µXRF and µXRD investigation Y.and micro x-ray fluorescence (µXRF), as it makes correlationthe highest quality µXRD and µXRF measurements we decided to

  11. ATOC/CHEM 5151 Problem 5 Converting Volume Mixing Ratio to Mass Density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    , 2014 In 2012, the dry mixing ratio volume of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) in the atmosphere was about 7.5 parts per trillion by volume ("pptv" or "ppt"). Convert this value into the mass density of SF6 in units of micrograms of SF6 per cubic meter of air ("g m-3" ). Source of information: MW(SF6)= 146 g mol-1 Methodology

  12. Formulas/Constants: Physics/Oceanography 4500/5500 A Atmospheric Physics In addition to these formulas, there are many thermodynamic concepts and interrelationships between

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Folkins, Ian

    at the lifting condensation level: TLCL = 9.8Tdo - 1.8To 8 Entropy S = S0 + CV ln( TV -1 T0V -1 0 ) where T0 weight of each consituent. R = 8.314 J mol-1 K-1 is the universal gas constant. p = RdTv (for moist air where Tv is the virtual temperature) Rv = 461.5 J/(kg K) (ideal gas constant for water vapor) = Mv

  13. NEWS & VIEWS nature materials | VOL 4 | DECEMBER 2005 | www.nature.com/naturematerials 883

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downs, Robert T.

    the sphalerite form. There is a free-energy difference of ~13 kJ mol­1 between the sphalerite and wurtzite forms. This is essential knowledge for preparing ZnS products of the desired structure, and suggests a strategy and defects, and can be up to several millimetres long. The local structure of both forms of ZnS is the same6

  14. The archaeomalacology of four middle to late preceramic (5000-1800 BC) sites on the central coast of Peru

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capps, Keith William

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ). Other sources in the literature classify molluscan use by geographical region. Molluscs as food resources are described in Australia (Bailey 1975), New Zealand (Shawcross 1967; Snow 1972), Europe (Clark 1966), the Near East (Flannery 1969) amd... of molluscan species as well as other marine and terrestrial resources to meet nutritional requirements, The mol 1 us- can faunal assembly indicates the mixed rocky/sandy littoral envir- onments of the middle preceramic shifted to more rocky littoral en...

  15. Microwaves in Photochemistry and Photocatalysis Vladimir Cirkva

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirkva, Vladimir

    563 14 Microwaves in Photochemistry and Photocatalysis Vladim´ir C´irkva 14.1 Introduction photocatalysis. The energy of MW radia- tion (e.g., E = 0.98 J mol-1 at = 2.45 GHz) is considerably lower than by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. #12;564 14 Microwaves in Photochemistry and Photocatalysis UV

  16. Heats of vaporization of room temperature ionic liquids by tunable vacuum ultraviolet photoionization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chambreau, Steven D.; Vaghjiani, Ghanshyam L.; To, Albert; Koh, Christine; Strasser, Daniel; Kostko, Oleg; Leone, Stephen R.

    2009-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The heats of vaporization of the room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bistrifluorosulfonylimide, N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium dicyanamide, and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide are determined using a heated effusive vapor source in conjunction with single photon ionization by a tunable vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron source. The relative gas phase ionic liquid vapor densities in the effusive beam are monitored by clearly distinguished dissociative photoionization processes via a time-of-flight mass spectrometer at a tunable vacuum ultraviolet beamline 9.0.2.3 (Chemical Dynamics Beamline) at the Advanced Light Source synchrotron facility. Resulting in relatively few assumptions, through the analysis of both parent cations and fragment cations, the heat of vaporization of N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bistrifluorosulfonylimide is determined to be Delta Hvap(298.15 K) = 195+-19 kJ mol-1. The observed heats of vaporization of 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide (Delta Hvap(298.15 K) = 174+-12 kJ mol-1) and N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium dicyanamide (Delta Hvap(298.15 K) = 171+-12 kJ mol-1) are consistent with reported experimental values using electron impact ionization. The tunable vacuum ultraviolet source has enabled accurate measurement of photoion appearance energies. These appearance energies are in good agreement with MP2 calculations for dissociative photoionization of the ion pair. These experimental heats of vaporization, photoion appearance energies, and ab initio calculations corroborate vaporization of these RTILs as intact cation-anion ion pairs.

  17. A SPRAY REACTOR CONCEPT FOR CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF P-XYLENE TO PRODUCE HIGH-PURITY TEREPHTHALIC ACID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LI, MENG

    2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    analyzing and solving problems, about perseverance and staying positive when research hits a snag. Prof. Subramaniam has been and will always be a great mentor and an invaluable asset to me. Special thanks are also due to Prof. Daryle Busch, Prof. Raghunath...: T = 200 °C, P = 15 bar; Initial pX = 25 mM, Co = 12.5 mM, Mn = 12.5 mM, Br = 32.5 mM; O2:CO2 (mol:mol) = 1:1) ....................................42 Figure 2.9 Figure 2.9: Color changes of the reaction solution due to the formation of various cobalt...

  18. PSI activity, MuCap, MuSun 1. P. Winter and MuCap collaboration. Muon Capture on the Proton. International

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Titov, Anatoly

    on 22 Apr 2011 arXiv:1104.4421. 15. R. Engels, R. Emmerich, K. Grigoryev, P. Kravtsov, L. Kochenda, M.Phys.Conf.Ser. 295 (2011) 012161 16. H. Seyfarth, V. Baryshevsky, C. Duweke, R. Emmerich, R. Engels, K. Grigoryev, A

  19. 1224 Mol. BioSyst., 2011, 7, 12241231 This journal is c The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011 Cite this: Mol. BioSyst., 2011, 7, 12241231

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Ming-Daw

    vancomycin against MRSA as they carry an extra aliphatic acyl side chain on glucosamine (Glm) at residue 4 (r the drugs of the last resort to treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections. Lipoglycopeptides, Tei and A40926 (3, Fig. 1) were reported to be more effective than vancomycin against MRSA

  20. This journal is c The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012 Mol. BioSyst., 2012, 8, 24612465 2461 Cite this: Mol. BioSyst., 2012, 8, 24612465

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Przulj, Natasa

    the antioxidant properties of flavonoids at the Biotech- nology Institute at University of Caxias do Sul, Brazil and metabolomics mass spectrometry data from endogenous and digested peptides, discovery and localization of post-translational modifica- tions, protein­protein interactions, sequencing of non-linear peptides with unknown amino acids

  1. Reconciling leptogenesis with observable mu --> e gamma rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steve Blanchet; Thomas Hambye; Francois-Xavier Josse-Michaux

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform a detailed analysis of thermal leptogenesis in the framework of seesaw models which approximately conserve lepton number. These models are known to allow for large Yukawa couplings and a low seesaw scale in agreement with neutrino mass constraints, and hence to lead to large lepton flavour violating rates that can be probed experimentally. Although large Yukawa couplings lead to (inverse) decay rates much larger than the Hubble expansion rate, we show that the leptogenesis washout induced is generically small if the mass splitting between the right-handed neutrinos is small enough. As a result, large lepton flavour violating rates are compatible with successful leptogenesis. We emphasize that this scenario does not require any particular flavour structure. A small splitting is natural and radiatively stable in this context because it is protected by the lepton number symmetry.

  2. NuMu Collaboration Friday Meeting, August 4th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    155 160 165 170 175 180 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 Time in Hrs MagnetTemperature #12;Shot Summary Date 7T shot of the day March 29 06 1060329005 88-89 7T Temp measured after series of 3 and 7 T shots motion of the bus bars and jumper cables. Stray Field Measurements were made by the MIT Safety Officer

  3. Games and Modal Mu-Calculus Colin Stirling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stirling, Colin

    of authors has noted that it is essentially game theoretic 3, 18, 16] (and 15] extends this description, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ, UK, email: cps@dcs.ed.ac.uk #12;112 Colin Stirling checking algorithms: furthermore

  4. NuMu Collaboration Friday Meeting, January 28th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    cooling between shots. Coolant flows through axial channels in the coil. Draft Test plan, Pictures. ­ This will be the first test on machinability of the outer rib geometry Coil Mold for Segment #1. Succesfully used for its channels Segment #1 being wound. Photo taken by Dave Rakos at Everson 09-08-04. Kapton layer spaced

  5. [NuMu Collaboration] Friday Meeting: January 28, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Meeting 1/28/05 System Overview - Baseline Solenoid Proton Beam Hg Delivery System Beam Stop #12;6 OAK/28/05 Alternative Hg Delivery System Hydraulic Fluid Cylinder (3000 psi) Hg Cylinder (1000 psi) Hg Discharge Hg/28/05 Syringe Pump Size Comparison Hydraulic System Pump & Reservoir #12;15 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S

  6. A Translator for ISIS and TRIUMF MuSR Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackie, John Morgan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ISIS data, fit byvii ISIS List of Tables Grouping rules for a transverse-The Hardware . . 3.3 The ISIS NeXus Data Format 3.4 The

  7. The meaning of nonsense Lukas Stalder and Oliver Mu hlemann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mühlemann, Oliver

    of genetic diseases. Trans-acting factors involved in NMD The NMD core factors Upf1p, Upf2p and Upf3p (for

  8. anti mu events: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in a secluded sector, leading to a final state with a dark photon U and a dark Higgs boson h', with the KLOE detector at DAFNE. We investigated the case of h' lighter than U,...

  9. MU student numberVISITING STUDENT APPLICATION UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Jerry

    (area code) Telephone number (area code) Cellphone number (area code) Fax number (if available) Student officials, and the completed application is to be sent to the Director of Admissions, University of Missouri, 230 Jesse Hall, Columbia, MO 65211-1300. Because this certification is in lieu of an official

  10. TB Testing Information MU HEALTH SERVICES, WITMER BUILDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardy, Christopher R.

    , if needed, will be permitted for paper-based requests of ACT 34. ACT 114 (FBI FEDERAL CRIMINAL HISTORY)* Request paper copy of the FBI Fingerprinting results and obtain Registration Identification Number (starts IDENTIFICATION NUMBER FOR YOUR ACT 114 (FBI FINGERPRINTING) clearance. You may present them in person, via fax

  11. A 350 mu W CMOS MSK Transmitter and 400 mu W OOK Super-Regenerative Receiver for Medical Implant Communications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Joel L.

    Recent advances in the medical field are spurring the need for ultra-low power transceivers for wireless communication with medical implants. To deal with the growing demand for medical telemetry, the FCC commissioned the ...

  12. Toxicity Profile and Pharmacokinetic Study of A Phase I Low-Dose Schedule-Dependent Radiosensitizing Paclitaxel Chemoradiation Regimen for Inoperable Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yuhchyau [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY (United States)], E-mail: yuhchyau_chen@urmc.rochester.edu; Pandya, Kishan J. [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY (United States); Feins, Richard [Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Johnstone, David W. [Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH (Lebanon); Watson, Thomas [Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY (United States); Smudzin, Therese; Keng, Peter C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY (United States)

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: We report the toxicity profile and pharmacokinetic data of a schedule-dependent chemoradiation regimen using pulsed low-dose paclitaxel for radiosensitization in a Phase I study for inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Paclitaxel at escalating doses of 15 mg/m{sup 2}, 20 mg/m{sup 2}, and 25 mg/m{sup 2} were infused on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday with daily chest radiation in cohorts of 6 patients. Daily radiation was delayed for maximal G2/M arrest and apoptotic effect, an observation from preclinical investigations. Plasma paclitaxel concentration was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Results: Dose-limiting toxicities included 3 of 18 patients with Grade 3 pneumonitis and 3 of 18 patients with Grade 3 esophagitis. There was no Grade 4 or 5 pneumonitis or esophagitis. There was also no Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, anemia or neuropathy. For Dose Levels I (15 mg/m{sup 2}), II (20 mg/m{sup 2}), and III (25 mg/m{sup 2}), the mean peak plasma level was 0.23 {+-} 0.06 {mu}mol/l, 0.32 {+-} 0.05 {mu}mol/l, and 0.52 {+-} 0.14 {mu}mol/l, respectively; AUC was 0.44 {+-} 0.09 {mu}mol/l, 0.61 {+-} 0.1 {mu}mol/l, and 0.96 {+-} 0.23 {mu}mol/l, respectively; and duration of drug concentration >0.05 {mu}mol/l (t > 0.05 {mu}mol/l) was 1.6 {+-} 0.3 h, 1.9 {+-} 0.2 h, and 3.0 {+-} 0.9 h, respectively. Conclusion: Pulsed low-dose paclitaxel chemoradiation is associated with low toxicity. Pharmacokinetic data showed that plasma paclitaxel concentration >0.05 {mu}mol/l for a minimum of 1.6 h was sufficient for effective radiosensitization.

  13. Theoretical Investigation of the Enzymatic Phosphoryl Transfer of ?-phosphoglucomutase: Revisiting Both Steps of the Catalytic Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elsasser, Brigitta M.; Dohmeier-Fischer, Silvia; Fels, Gregor

    2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Enzyme catalyzed phosphate transfer is a part of almost all metabolic processes. Such reactions are of central importance for the energy balance in all organisms and play important roles in cellular control at all levels. Mutases transfer a phosphoryl group while nucleases cleave the phosphodiester linkages between two nucleotides. The subject of our present study is the Lactococcus lactis ?-phosphoglucomutase (?-PGM), which effectively catalyzes the interconversion of ?-D-glucose-1-phosphate (?-G1P) to ?- D-glucose-6-phosphate (?-G6P) and vice versa via stabile intermediate ?-D-glucose-1,6-(bis)phosphate (?-G1,6diP) in the presence of Mg2+. In this paper we revisited the reaction mechanism of the phosphoryl transfer starting from the bisphosphate ?-G1,6diP in both directions (toward ?-G1P and ?-G6P) combining docking techniques and QM/MM theoretical method at the DFT/PBE0 level of theory. In addition we performed NEB (nudged elastic band) and free energy calculations to optimize the path and to identify the transition states and the energies involved in the catalytic cycle. Our calculations reveal that both steps proceed via dissociative pentacoordinated phosphorane, which is not a stabile intermediate but rather a transition state. In addition to the Mg2+ ion, Ser114 and Lys145 also play important roles in stabilizing the large negative charge on the phosphate through strong coordination with the phosphate oxygens and guiding the phosphate group throughout the catalytic process. The calculated energy barrier of the reaction for the ?-G1P to ?-G1,6diP step is only slightly higher than for the ?-G1,6diP to ?-G6P step (16.10 kcal mol-1 versus 15.10 kcal mol-1) and is in excellent agreement with experimental findings (14.65 kcal mol-1).

  14. 1. Physical constants 101 1. PHYSICAL CONSTANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with the Fermi coupling constant) comes from the Particle Data Group. The figures in parentheses after the values of 1 eV/c particle hc/(1 eV) 1.239 841 875(31)Ã?10-6 m 25 Rydberg energy hcR = mee4/2(4 0)2 2 = mec22 accel. gN 9.806 65 m s-2 exact Avogadro constant NA 6.022 141 79(30)Ã?1023 mol-1 50 Boltzmann constant k

  15. 1. Physical constants 1 1. PHYSICAL CONSTANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of constants (beginning with the Fermi coupling constant) comes from the Particle Data Group. The figures of 1 eV/c particle hc/(1 eV) 1.239 841 930(27)Ã?10-6 m 22 Rydberg energy hcR = mee4/2(40)2 2 = mec22 gravitational accel. gN 9.806 65 m s-2 exact Avogadro constant NA 6.022 141 29(27)Ã?1023 mol-1 44 Boltzmann

  16. Carbon nanotubes as near infrared laser susceptors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Amir

    2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    is endothermic with activation energy of 80kJ mol-1 [16], which means that the coke cools down during the reaction therefore energy is constantly supplied during the reaction to keep the coal hot. It is thought that the amounts of the carbon monoxide... ??? (1) In industry, water is blown through hot coke and the resulting gas is called water gas, which is a mixture of hydrogen (H2, 50%), carbon monoxide (CO, 40%), carbon dioxide (CO2, 5%), nitrogen and methane (N2 + CH4, 5%). This reaction...

  17. Thermochemical Insight into the Reduction of CO to CH3OH with [Re(CO)]+ and [Mn(CO)]+ Complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiedner, Eric S.; Appel, Aaron M.

    2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    To gain insight into thermodynamic barriers for reduction of CO into CH3OH, free energies for reduction of [CpRe(PPh3)(NO)(CO)]+ into CpRe(PPh3)(NO)(CH2OH) have been determined from experimental measurements. Using model complexes, the free energies for the transfer of H+, H–, and e– have been determined. A pKa of 10.6 was estimated for [CpRe(PPh3)(NO)(CHOH)]+ by measuring the pKa for the analogous [CpRe(PPh3)(NO)(CMeOH)]+. The hydride donor ability (?G°H–) of CpRe(PPh3)(NO)(CH2OH) was estimated to be 58.0 kcal mol1, based on calorimetry measurements of the hydride transfer reaction between CpRe(PPh3)(NO)(CHO) and [CpRe(PPh3)(NO)(CHOMe)]+ to generate the methylated analog, CpRe(PPh3)(NO)(CH2OMe). Cyclic voltammograms recorded on CpRe(PPh3)(NO)(CMeO), CpRe(PPh3)(NO)(CH2OMe), and [CpRe(PPh3)(NO)(CHOMe)]+ displayed either a quasireversible oxidation (neutral species) or reduction (cationic species). These potentials were used as estimates for the oxidation of CpRe(PPh3)(NO)(CHO) or CpRe(PPh3)(NO)(CH2OH), or the reduction of [CpRe(PPh3)(NO)(CHOH)]+. Combination of the thermodynamic data permits construction of three-dimensional free energy landscapes under varying conditions of pH and PH2. The free energy for H2 addition (?G°H2) to [CpRe(PPh3)(NO)(CO)]+ (+15 kcal mol1) was identified as the most significant thermodynamic impediment for the reduction of CO. DFT computations indicate that ?G°H2 varies by only 4.3 kcal mol1 across a series of [CpXRe(L)(NO)(CO)]+, while the experimental ?G°H– values for the analogous series of CpRe(PPh3)(NO)(CHO) varies by 12.9 kcal mol1. The small range of ?G°H2 values is attributed to a minimal change in the C–O bond polarization upon modification of the ancillary ligands, as determined from the computed atomic charges. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle.

  18. Mol Gen Genet (1985) 201:409-414 Springer-Verlag1985

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baillie, David

    by the deficiency sDf2 (Moerman and Baillie 1981). Previous genetic studies of the unc-22 region of linkage group IV of the region defined by sDf2. We expand and refine the existing unc-22 fine-structure map and position University: s7, s8, s12, s18 and s32 (Moerman and Baillie 1979), s35, s36, sDf2, sDf7, sDfS, sDf9, s

  19. Mol Gen Genet (1993)236:289-298 MGG Springer-Verlag 1993

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baillie, David

    -hand breakpoints of the deficiencies sDf9, sDfl9 and sDf65. This small interval at present contains a single breakpoint of sDfl9 and the left breakpoint of sDf65, between the essential genes let-653 and let-56. Key content of a specific region, the 2 map unit unc-22(IV) region, defined by the deficiency sDf2

  20. J Mol Cell Cardiol 29, 3175-3188 (1997) Feature Article

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Kevin P.

    d a ' ,Steven L. Roberds2,Emma ~older', Teresa ~ohlmeyer',James B. Young3and Kevin P. Campbell2,M. MAEDA,S. L. ROBERDS,E. HOLDER,T. BOHLMEYER,J. B. YOUNGAND K. P. CAMPBELL.A 5' Dystrophin Duplication associated amples where a mutation in the gene encoding the with a high mortality (Goldstein and Brown, 1988

  1. J. Mol. Biol. (1996) 259, 988994 Local Interactions Dominate Folding in a Simple

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unger, Ron

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unger1,2 * and John Moult2 Recent computational studies of simple models of protein folding have1 Press Limited Keywords: protein folding; lattice models; local interactions*Corresponding author Introduction What are the dominant contributions guiding the process of protein folding? The short life

  2. ExoMol molecular line lists: IX The spectrum of AlO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrascu, Andrei T; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate line lists are calculated for aluminium monoxide covering the pure rotation, rotation-vibration and electronic (B -- X blue-green and A -- X infrared bands) spectrum. Line lists are presented for the main isotopologue, $^{27}$Al$^{16}$O, as well as for $^{27}$Al$^{17}$O, $^{27}$Al$^{18}$O and $^{26}$Al$^{16}$O. These line lists are suitable for high temperatures (up to 8000 K) including those relevant to exoplanetary atmospheres and cool stars. A combination of empirical and \\textit{ab initio} methods is used: the potential energy curves were previously determined to high accuracy by fitting to extensive data from analysis of laboratory spectra; a high quality {\\it ab initio} dipole moment curve is calculated using quadruple zeta basis set and the multi-reference configuration interaction (MRCI) method. Partition functions plus full line lists of transitions are made available in an electronic form as supplementary data to this article and at \\url{www.exomol.com}.

  3. Cell. Mol. Life Sci. 62 (2005) 31063116 1420-682X/05/243106-11

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahana, Chaim

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for various cellular functions, but at high levels they are cytotoxic. Two yeast kinases, SKY1 and PTK2, have of YGL007W, an open reading frame located within the promoter of the membrane proton pump PMA1, de towards sper- mine. Despite the reduced uptake, the resistant strains ac- cumulated significant levels

  4. RADBOUD UNIVERSITY NIJMEGEN Test Formal Languages, Grammars and Automata, NWI-MOL090

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geuvers, Herman

    (e) = L1, where L1 = {w | w contains aba and abba} NB. Note that aba and abba can overlap. 2.(10) Give a DFA (deterministic finite automaton) that accepts the language L2 where L2 = {w {a, b, c, d} | all characters in w appear in alphabetic order}. So, abbcd L2 and bc L2, but abad / L2 and db / L2. 3. Consider

  5. .I. Mol. Biol. (1984) 179, 55-81 Microsecond Rotational Motions of Eosin-labeled Myosin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    of Biochemistry l!niversity of Minnesota Medical 8chool Minneapolis, MN 554.5.5. lT.S..A. ROBERT H. AUSTIN

  6. RasMol v2.5 A Molecular Visualisation Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meagher, Mary

    Incorporated. Alchemy and Sybyl are trademarks of Tripos Associates Inc. VAX is a trademark of Digital&S workstations, DEC Alpha (OSF/1, OpenVMS and Windows NT), IBM RS/6000, Cray, Sequent, VAX VMS (under DEC windows

  7. J. Mol. Model. 2000, 6, 65 66 Springer-Verlag 2000PREFACE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glaser, Rainer

    about structure and bonding. John Pople described his interaction with Paul at this stage, electronic properties, energies and a host of other information was the start of a new direc- tion and remark- able in the history of chemistry. I remember well the heady days of "STO-3G-lithium

  8. =5*10^19 Pa*s R=8.31 J/mol*K

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Ellis

    the role of viscoelastoplasticity, we numerically model subduction initiation at an extinct ridge-transform dependent Newtonian viscosity[4] and a temperature dependent power-law rheology[1] . Some models include the experimentalists. Inside the Subduction Factory, Eiler, J., ed., vol. 138 of Geophysical Monograph. 5. Schubert, G

  9. Mol Biosyst . Author manuscript Strong and oriented immobilization of single domain antibodies from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -Throughput Screening Assays ; economics ; methods ; Humans ; Immobilized Proteins ; metabolism ; Immunoassay ; Protein to monitor mRNA abundance from small amount of materials. However, this approach is biased by the lack of relation between mRNA and proteins abundance, and is not sufficient to understand complex cellular networks

  10. J. Mol. Biol. (1991) 220, 133-149 Analysis of Protein Loop Closure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerstein, Mark

    ). Next, there are hinge movements of domains, e.g. in the immunoglobulins (Bennet & Huber, 1984; Lesk

  11. J. Mol. Biol. (1985) 181, 423447 Protein Normal-mode Dynamics: Trypsin Inhibitor,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levitt, Michael

    , especiallv collective motion, is important for protein function (see review by Huber & Bennet!t, 1983). Bv

  12. MOL.19980331.0174 PARTICULATE MATTEX AMBIENT A I R QUALITY

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby/%2AOU1a Complex

  13. Routine production of copper-64 using 11.7MeV protons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffery, C. M.; Smith, S. V.; Asad, A. H.; Chan, S.; Price, R. I. [Medical Technology and Physics, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia, 6009 (Australia); Centre for Forensic Science, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia, 6009 (Australia) and ARC Centre of Excellence in A (Australia); ARC Centre of Excellence in Antimatter-Matter Studies, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia) and Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Medical Technology and Physics, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia, 6009 (Australia); ARC Centre of Excellence in Antimatter-Matter Studies, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia) and Imaging and Applied (Australia); Medical Technology and Physics, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia, 6009 (Australia); Medical Technology and Physics, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia, 6009 (Australia) and School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia, 6009 (Australia)

    2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Reliable production of copper-64 ({sup 64}Cu) was achieved by irradiating enriched nickel-64 ({sup 64}Ni, >94.8%) in an IBA 18/9 cyclotron. Nickel-64 (19.1 {+-} 3.0 mg) was electroplated onto an Au disc (125{mu}m Multiplication-Sign 15mm). Targets were irradiated with 11.7 MeV protons for 2 hours at 40{mu}A. Copper isotopes ({sup 60,61,62,64}Cu) were separated from target nickel and cobalt isotopes ({sup 55,57,61}Co) using a single ion exchange column, eluted with varying concentration of low HCl alcohol solutions. The {sup 64}Ni target material was recovered and reused. The {sup 64}Cu production rate was 1.46{+-}0.3MBq/{mu}A.hr/mg{sup 64}Ni(n = 10) (with a maximum of 2.6GBq of {sup 64}Cu isolated after 2hr irradiation at 40uA. Radionuclidic purity of the {sup 64}Cu was 98.7 {+-} 1.6 % at end of separation. Cu content was < 6mg/L (n = 21). The specific activity of {sup 64}Cu was determined by ICP-MS and by titration with Diamsar to be 28.9{+-}13.0GBq/{mu}mol[0.70{+-}0.35Ci/{mu}mol]/({mu}A.hr/mg{sup 64}Ni)(n = 10) and 13.1{+-}12.0GBq/{mu}mol[0.35{+-}0.32Ci/{mu}mol]/({mu}A.hr/mg{sup 64}Ni)(n 9), respectively; which are in agreement, however, further work is required.

  14. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Uranyl and Uranyl Carbonate Adsorption at Alumino-silicate Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Liu, Chongxuan

    2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Adsorption at mineral surfaces is a critical factor controlling the mobility of uranium(VI) in aqueous environments. Therefore, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to investigate uranyl(VI) adsorption onto two neutral alumino-silicate surfaces, namely the orthoclase (001) surface and the octahedral aluminum sheet of the kaolinite (001) surface. Although uranyl preferentially adsorbed as a bi-dentate innersphere complex on both surfaces, the free energy of adsorption at the orthoclase surface (-15 kcal mol-1) was significantly more favorable than that at the kaolinite surface (-3 kcal mol-1), which was attributed to differences in surface functional groups and to the ability of the orthoclase surface to dissolve a surface potassium ion upon uranyl adsorption. The structures of the adsorbed complexes compared favorably with X-ray absorption spectroscopy results. Simulations of the adsorption of uranyl complexes with up to three carbonate ligands revealed that uranyl complexes coordinated to up to 2 carbonate ions are stable on the orthoclase surface whereas uranyl carbonate surface complexes are unfavored at the kaolinite surface. Combining the MD-derived equilibrium adsorption constants for orthoclase with aqueous equilibrium constants for uranyl carbonate species indicates the presence of adsorbed uranium complexes with one or two carbonates in alkaline conditions, in support of current uranium(VI) surface complexation models.

  15. Observation of Exclusive Charmonium Production and gamma gamma -->mu+mu- in pp-bar Collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Si

    In CDF we have observed the reactions p+p? ?p+X+p? , with X being a centrally produced J/?, ?(2S), or ?[subscript c0], and ????[superscript +]?[superscript -] in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96??TeV. The event signature requires ...

  16. De Muyt, A., Jessop, L., Kolar, E., Sourirajan, A., Chen, J., Dayani, Y., and Lichten, M. (2012). Mol.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibson, Matt

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA 2Stowers Institute for Medical Research, Kansas City, KS 66160, USA *Correspondence: mg2@stowers.org DOI 10.1016/j.cell.2012.03.019 In both plants-rate heterogeneity. Genetic methods have been extraordi- narily powerful for the functional dis- section

  17. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2014, 15, 1096-1111; doi:10.3390/ijms15011096 International Journal of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wyss, Hans

    the applicability of the materials. In supramolecular systems, such spatiotemporal control has been proposed Sciences ISSN 1422-0067 www.mdpi.com/journal/ijms Article Mesoscale Characterization of Supramolecular 2014 Abstract: Hydrogels and, in particular, supramolecular hydrogels show promising properties

  18. J. Mol. Biol. (1979) 134, 595-620 Positions of Proteins SlO, Sll and S12 in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    between proteins in the 30 S subunit of Esch.&chia coli by neutron scattering was demonstratjed several). The neutron scattering profiles for solutions of both mixtures are measured and then differenced point. Y. 11973, U.S.A. (Received 9 April 1979) The results of 17 new neutron distance measurements

  19. J. Mol. Biol. (1981) 153, 739-760 Positions of Proteins S6, Sl 1 and S15 in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on neutron scattering, is presented and discussed. Estimates for the radii of gyration of these proteins in the neutron scattering pattern of the overall particle when the two are present in deuterated form. This alteration is measured as the difference between the neutron scattering profile of an equimolar mixture

  20. J. Mol. Biol. (1977) 112, 199-234 Triangulation of Proteins in the 30 S Ribosomal Subunit of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and in revised form 21 January 1977) Thermal neutron radiation has been used for solution scattering experiments are elongated. 1. Introduction Thermal neutron scattering is a powerful method to use in the study of the quater al., 1975a,b) demonstrated that the inter- ference ripple which results when neutrons are scattered

  1. Am. J. Respir. Cell Mol. Biol. Vol. 25, pp. 434438, 2001 Internet address: www.atsjournals.org

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    . Histopathologic evaluation of the lungs revealed massive alveolar edema and hemorrhage with inter- stitial edema around blood vessels in the lungs of mice treated with leukotoxin-diol, whereas the lungs of mice treated) is a descrip- tive term that has been applied to many acute, diffuse infil- trative lung lesions of diverse

  2. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2014, 15, 850-877; doi:10.3390/ijms15010850 International Journal of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decho, Alan

    community composition between Type-1 and Type-2 mats. Fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) coupled; FISH, fluorescence in-situ hybridization; GIS, geographical information systems; CSLM, confocal in microspatial proximity. The surface mats of open-water marine stromatolites (Highborne Cay, Bahamas) contain

  3. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2009, 10, 2763-2788; doi:10.3390/ijms10062763 International Journal of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , including architecture, metabolism and signalling, as well as the availability of cellular energy. Very. The more recent technological development of high-throughput methods for interactomics research of protein interactions in their native environment, as e.g. in the cytosol or bound to a membrane, by using

  4. Mol. Crysr. Liq.Cryst. 1990, Vol. 192, pp. 75-78 Reprints available directly from the publisher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lavrentovich, Oleg D.

    States of America TBSTING METHODS OB MEASUREMENTS OF LIQUID CRYSTAL- '20-SOLID SURFACE ANCHORING ENERGY O determined by the equality of the elastic and surface energy contrib&ions t o the energy balance. As- suming Photocopying permittedby license only O 1990 Gordon and Breach Science Publishers S.A. Rinted in the United

  5. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2011, 12, 1908-1920; doi:10.3390/ijms12031908 International Journal of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Texas, University of

    Electrospinning: The Effect of PET in Chitosan/Starch System Adolfo Espíndola-González 1,2 , Ana Laura Martínez and Carlos Velasco-Santos 3, * 1 College of Engineering, National Autonomous University of Mexico, Edificio Bernardo Quintana, Cd. Universitaria, CP. 04510, Mexico D.F., Mexico; E-Mail: ameg00@hotmail.com 2 Centre

  6. J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Phys. 19 (1986) L519-L525. Printed in Great Britain LETTER TO THE EDITOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cacciani, Patrice

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rydberg states of lithium in a uniform magnetic field have been excited from the ground state by v field, numerous theoretical studies have been devoted to the analysis of the properties the diamagnetic interaction El;;"' between states belonging to different manifolds. The existence

  7. JMB--MS 467 Cust. Ref. No. CAM 517/94 [SGML] J. Mol. Biol. (1995) 248, 402413

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dynamics (X-PLOR). The final model has an R-value of 18.1% for the 5.0 to 1.8 Å data shell and 19 bonds; 129 water molecules are included in the final model. We show structural comparisons confirming of many fungal hyphae. We previouslyTexas, Austin, TX 78712 U.S.A. reported the three

  8. J. Mol. Biol. (1976) 100, 179-195 The Structure of Triclinic Lysozyme at 2.5 .~ Resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yonath, Ada E.

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    7 July 1975) The gross similarity of the conformation of the hen egg-white lysozyme molecule appropriately weighted difference maps. An independent model of the triclinic structure has been obtained by use of hen egg-white lysozyme was the first enzyme structure to be determined at high resolution (Blake et al

  9. Threshold Photoelectron Photoion Coincidence (TPEPICO) Studies: The Road to ? 0.1 kJ/mol Thermochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baer, Tomas [University of North Carolina

    2013-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The threshold photoelectron photoion coincidence (TPEPICO) technique is utilized to investigate the dissociation dynamics and thermochemistry of energy selected medium to large organic molecular ions. The reactions include parallel and consecutive steps that are modeled with the statistical theory in order to extract dissociation onsets for multiple dissociation paths. These studies are carried out with the aid of molecular orbital calculations of both ions and the transition states connecting the ion structure to their products. The results of these investigations yield accurate heats of formation of ions, free radicals, and stable molecules. In addition, they provide information about the potential energy surface that governs the dissociation process. Isomerization reactions prior to dissociation are readily inferred from the TPEPICO data.

  10. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2011, 12, 8406-8414; doi:10.3390/ijms12128406 International Journal of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee Jr., Richard E.

    /MS) quantitative isobaric (iTRAQTM) peptide mapping to assess variation in the abundance of hepatic proteins in cytoprotection, including heat-shock proteins and an antioxidant, and a reduced abundance of proteins involved with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) quantitative isobaric (iTRAQTM) peptide mapping to investigate seasonal

  11. J. Mol. Biol. (1975) 99, 15-25 On the Interpretation of Small-angle X-ray Solution Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    scattering points of unit weight with angular co-ordinates 8t, ~b~,we have g, = Y..:,* (el,i,,) (2) t=1 since

  12. The Role of N-Acetylcysteine in the Prevention of Contrast-Induced Nephrotoxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandhu, Caron [Guy's and St. Thomas's Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)], E-mail: caron.sandhu@gstt.sthames.nhs.uk; Belli, Anna-Maria [St. George's Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Oliveira, David B. [St. George's Hospital, Department of Renal Medicine (United Kingdom)

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose. To determine the role of prophylactic N-acetylcysteine in the prevention of contrast-induced nephrotoxicity. Methods. One hundred and sixteen patients undergoing noncoronary angiography, with or without pre-existing renal impairment, were randomly assigned to receive prophylactic oral N-acetylcysteine or no treatment. Serum creatinine (sCr) was measured prior to angiography and 48 hr after the procedure. Urine samples were collected before and after the examination for measurement of malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration. Contrast-induced nephrotoxicity (CIN) was defined as a rise in serum creatinine of 0.5 mg/dl (44 mmol/l) at 48 hr. Results. Complete data were available on 106 patients, 53 of whom had received N-acetylcysteine. There were no significant differences between the two groups in baseline characteristics, type of angiogram, or volume and concentration of contrast used. Three patients (2.8%), all of whom had received N-acetylcysteine, developed CIN. In the N-acetylcysteine group, the mean serum creatinine in patients with renal impairment was 151.0 {+-} 44.2 {mu}mol/l prior to the procedure and 155.6 {+-} 48.6 {mu}mol/l (p = 0.49) after the procedure. Respective values for those without renal impairment were 79.6 {+-} 15.1 {mu}mol/l and 81.2 {+-} 20.0 {mu}mol/l (p = 0.65). In the group that had not received N-acetylcysteine, the mean serum creatinine levels before and after the procedure were 150.0 {+-} 58.1 and 141.4 {+-} 48.0 {mu}mol/l (p = 0.17) in patients with renal impairment and 79.7 {+-} 14.2 and 81.4 {+-} 15.4 {mu}mol/l (p = 0.34) in those without renal impairment. In both groups, no significant change in urinary MDA concentration was observed. Conclusion. There is no benefit to the prophylactic administration of N-acetylcysteine in patients undergoing peripheral angiography using current contrast media.

  13. The role of the coating and aggregation state in the interactions between iron oxide nanoparticles and 3T3 fibroblasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safi, Malak; 10.1016/j.phpro.2010.11.059

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent nanotoxicity studies revealed that the physico-chemical characteristics of engineered nanomaterials play an important role in the interactions with living cells. Here, we report on the toxicity and uptake of the iron oxide sub-10 nm nanoparticles by NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts. Coating strategies include low-molecular weight ligands (citric acid) and polymers (poly(acrylic acid), MW = 2000 g mol-1). We find that most particles were biocompatible, as exposed cells remained 100% viable relative to controls. The strong uptake shown by the citrate-coated particles is related to the destabilization of the dispersions in the cell culture medium and their sedimentation down to the cell membranes.

  14. Self-referenced 1.5 [mu]m fiber frequency combs at GHz repetition rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao, David, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tremendous advances in recent years to the optical frequency comb, particularly frequency combs deriving from solid-state and fiber architectures, have enabled a host of important new applications to emerge - applications ...

  15. PROLOG-LINDA : AN EMBEDDING OF LINDA IN muPROLOG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutcliffe, Geoff

    ,The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, 6009, Western Australia and JAMES PINAKIS Department of Computer Science,The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, 6009, Western Australia ABSTRACT This paper

  16. Nanostructured ceria based thin films ({<=}1 {mu}m) As cathode/electrolyte interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hierso, J. [Laboratoire de Chimie de la Matiere Condensee de Paris, Universite Paris 6-UMR 7574-College de France, 11 Place Marcelin Berthelot, 75005 Paris (France); Boy, P.; Valle, K. [CEA-Le Ripault, LSCG, BP 15, 37000 Monts (France); Vulliet, J.; Blein, F. [CEA-Le Ripault, LCCA, BP 15, 37000 Monts (France); Laberty-Robert, Ch., E-mail: christel.laberty@upmc.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie de la Matiere Condensee de Paris, Universite Paris 6-UMR 7574-College de France, 11 Place Marcelin Berthelot, 75005 Paris (France); Sanchez, C. [Laboratoire de Chimie de la Matiere Condensee de Paris, Universite Paris 6-UMR 7574-College de France, 11 Place Marcelin Berthelot, 75005 Paris (France)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Gadolinium doped cerium oxide (CGO: Ce{sub 0,9}Gd{sub 0,1}O{sub 2-{delta}}) films were used as an oxygen anion diffusion layer at the cathode/electrolyte interface of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs), between LSCF (lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite) and YSZ (yttria-stabilized zirconia). Thin ({approx}100 nm) and thick ({approx}700 nm) mesoporous CGO layers were synthesized through a sol-gel process including organic template coupled with the dip-coating method. Structural and microstructural characterizations were performed, highlighting a well-bonded crystalline CGO nanoparticles network which delineates a 3-D inter-connected mesoporous network. Their electrical behaviors were investigated by impedance spectroscopy analysis of YSZ/mesoporous-CGO/LSCF half-cell. Anode-supported SOFCs, operating at 800 Degree-Sign C, with either dense or mesoporous CGO dip-coated interlayers were also fabricated [NiO-YSZ anode/YSZ/CGO/LSCF cathode]. The impact of the mesoporous CGO interlayers on SOFCs performances was investigated by galvanostatic analysis and compared to the behavior of a dense CGO interlayer. The polarization curves revealed an enhancement in the electrical performance of the cell, which is assigned to a decrease of the polarization resistance at the cathode/electrolyte interface. The integrity and connectivity of the CGO nanoparticles bonded network facilitates O{sup 2-} transport across the interface. - Graphical abstract: Thin and thick CGO films have been prepared through a sol-gel process and their potential application as SOFC cathode/electrolyte interlayer in SOFC has been investigated. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mesoporous ceria based thin films exhibit interesting performances for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mesoporous films were synthesized through the sol-gel process combined with the dip-coating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrity and connectivity of the nanoparticles facilitates O{sup 2-} transport across the interface.

  17. Thermomechanical properties and performance of microfabricated solid oxide fuel cell ([mu]SOFC) structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamamoto, Namiko

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mechanical properties of a ceramic electrolyte, sputtered yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), in thin film (<1Clm) form were studied in order to design and fabricate thermomechanically stable microfabricated SOFCs (SOFCs) ...

  18. Mass spectrum analysis of K- pi+ from the semileptonic decay D+ --> K- pi+ mu+ nu

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massafferri Rodrigues, Andre

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Higgs mechanism preserves the gauge symmetries of the Standard Model while giving masses to the W, Z bosons. Supersymmetry, which protects the Higgs boson mass scale from quantum corrections, predicts at least 5 Higgs bosons, none of which has been directly observed. This thesis presents a search for neutral Higgs bosons, produced in association with bottom quarks. The production rate is greatly enhanced at large values of the Supersymmetric parameter tan {beta}. High-energy p{bar p} collision data, collected from Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron using the D0 detector, are analyzed. In the absence of a signal, values of tan {beta} > 80-120 are excluded at 95% Confidence Level (C.L.), depending on the (CP-odd) neutral Higgs boson mass (studied from 100 to 150 GeV/c{sup 2}).

  19. A 2 Gb/s Directly Driven Wireless Link Qianli Mu, Luke Sankey and Zoya Popovic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Popovic, Zoya

    antenna arrays that can perform radar, electronic warfare, information warfare and communication functions requirements on the electronic hardware in terms of digital clock rates [6]-[9]. This paper presents sim

  20. GR ADUATE CATALOG TEXAS A&MU N I V E R S I T Y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    engineering, biomedical, chemical, civil, computer, electrical, industrial, mechanical, nuclear, ocean of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). The engineering technology program is accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of ABET. The computer science program is accredited by the Computing

  1. GRADUATE CATALOG TEXAS A&MU N I V E R S I T Y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - gineering, biomedical, chemical, civil, computer, electrical, industrial, mechanical, nuclear, ocean of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). The engineer- ing technology program is accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of ABET. The computer science program is accredited by the Computing

  2. The Story of the Therac-25 in LOTOS Mu y Thomas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calder, Muffy

    of Canada Ltd. (AECL) during the 1980s and was used at hospitals and clinics in the U.S.A. and Canada

  3. Formal methods and their role in developing safe Mu y Thomas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calder, Muffy

    that safety-related systems have much in common with other classes of systems which must be reliable, par methods in relation to safety-related systems. Introduction The Institute of Electrical Engineers ll the safety requirements? does it ful ll the reliability requirements? The latter two concerns

  4. Tridiagonal pairs of $q$-Racah type and the $\\mu$-conjecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nomura, Kazumasa

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Let $\\K$ denote a field and let $V$ denote a vector space over $\\K$ with finite positive dimension. We consider a pair of linear transformations $A:V \\to V$ and $A^*:V \\to V$ that satisfy the following conditions: (i) each of $A,A^*$ is diagonalizable; (ii) there exists an ordering $\\lbrace V_i\\rbrace_{i=0}^d$ of the eigenspaces of $A$ such that $A^* V_i \\subseteq V_{i-1} + V_{i} + V_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq d$, where $V_{-1}=0$ and $V_{d+1}=0$; (iii) there exists an ordering $\\lbrace V^*_i\\rbrace_{i=0}^\\delta$ of the eigenspaces of $A^*$ such that $A V^*_i \\subseteq V^*_{i-1} + V^*_{i} + V^*_{i+1}$ for $0 \\leq i \\leq \\delta$, where $V^*_{-1}=0$ and $V^*_{\\delta+1}=0$; (iv) there is no subspace $W$ of $V$ such that $AW \\subseteq W$, $A^* W \\subseteq W$, $W \

  5. Scheduling Freight Trains Traveling on Complex etworks SHI MU and MAGED DESSOUKY*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dessouky, Maged

    , namely a simple look-ahead greedy heuristic and a global neighborhood search algorithm, in terms goods from other countries usually enter the United States through ports and then transported inland

  6. Remodeling protein complexes: Insights from the AAA+ unfoldase ClpX and Mu transposase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Briana

    BRIANA M. BURTON1,3 AND TANIA A. BAKER1,2 1 Department of Biology and 2 Howard Hughes Medical Institute; Guo et al. 2002; Kim and Kim 2003; Lee et al. 2003) (Fig. 1A). Reprint requests to: Tania A. Baker

  7. Mantid - Data Analysis and Visualization Package for Neutron Scattering and $\\mu SR$ Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, Owen [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (ISIS); Bilheux, Jean-Christophe [ORNL; Borreguero Calvo, Jose M [ORNL; Buts, Alex [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (ISIS); Campbell, Stuart I [ORNL; Doucet, Mathieu [ORNL; Draper, Nicholas J [ORNL; Ferraz Leal, Ricardo F [ORNL; Gigg, Martyn [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (ISIS); Lynch, Vickie E [ORNL; Mikkelson, Dennis J [ORNL; Mikkelson, Ruth L [ORNL; Miller, Ross G [ORNL; Perring, Toby G [ORNL; Peterson, Peter F [ORNL; Ren, Shelly [ORNL; Reuter, Michael A [ORNL; Savici, Andrei T [ORNL; Taylor, Jonathan W [ORNL; Taylor, Russell J [ORNL; Zhou, Wenduo [ORNL; Zikovsky, Janik L [ORNL

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mantid framework is a software solution developed for the analysis and visualization of neutron scattering and muon spin measurements. The framework is jointly developed by a large team of software engineers and scientists at the ISIS Neutron and Muon Facility and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The objective of the development is to improve software quality, both in terms of performance and ease of use, for the the user community of large scale facilities. The functionality and novel design aspects of the framework are described.

  8. Cold Dark Matter, Radiative Neutrino Mass, mu to e gamma, and Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jisuke Kubo; Ernest Ma; Daijiro Suematsu

    2006-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Two of the most important and pressing questions in cosmology and particle physics are: (1) What is the nature of cold dark matter? and (2) Will near-future experiments on neutrinoless double beta decay be able to ascertain that the neutrino is a Majorana particle, i.e. its own antiparticle? We show that these two seemingly unrelated issues are intimately connected if neutrinos acquire mass only because of their interactions with dark matter.

  9. Optimizing microalgal production in raceway systems Rafael Mu~noz-Tamayoa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    oxygenase (RuBisCO). In this phase, CO2 is5 incorporated into organic material, leading to the formation is characterized by the production of high value compounds. Optimization of the performance of microalgae culture the dynamics of environmental variables temperature and light intensity and their influence on microalgae

  10. Summer 2012Protecting MU's Health, Safety, and the Environment Laboratory Safety Incidents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Jerry

    causing a flash fire. Ms. Sangji was injured and died as a result of her injuries several days later after a high energy metal compound he was working with detonated. As a result of this explosion to laboratory accidents across the United States which included the June 2009 hydrogen explosion

  11. Erbium-ytterbium-yttrium compounds for light emission at 1.54[mu]m

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanhoutte, Michiel

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon microphotonics has emerged as the leading technology to overcome the interconnect bottleneck that limits a further increase of computation power following Moore's law. Optical interconnects between different ...

  12. MuSIC: Mobility-Aware Optimal Service Allocation in Mobile Cloud Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venkatasubramanian, Nalini

    interpretation) - despite advances in device technology, resources (energy, storage, processing) at the mobileS goals such application delay, device power consumption and user cost/price. In this paper, we propose consumption and cost at the user side. In contrast, Wi-Fi deployments, e.g. 802.11 hotspots, exhibit low

  13. Crystal structure of the[mu]-opioid receptor bound to a morphinan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution4 Department of WeeklyCrystal

  14. Enfmt Plaza. S. W.. Washingron, DC 200262174. Tekphonr: (202) 488~MU0

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNew 1325.8.Enaineer;/:4,4 (; ...)369s . I

  15. Quantification of Kinetic Rate Law Parameters of Uranium Release from Sodium Autunite as a Function of Aqueous Bicarbonate Concentrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gudavalli, Ravi; Katsenovich, Yelena; Wellman, Dawn M.; Lagos, Leonel; Tansel, Berrin

    2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT: Hydrogen carbonate is one of the most significant components within the uranium geochemical cycle. In aqueous solutions, hydrogen carbonate forms strong complexes with uranium. As such, aqueous bicarbonate may significantly increase the rate of uranium release from uranium minerals. Quantifying the relationship of aqueous hydrogen carbonate solutions to the rate of uranium release during dissolution is critical to understanding the long-term fate of uranium within the environment. Single-pass flow-through (SPTF) experiments were conducted to estimate the rate of uranium release from Na meta-autunite as a function of bicarbonate solutions (0.0005-0.003 M) under the pH range of 6-11 and temperatures of 5-60oC. Consistent with the results of previous investigation, the rate of uranium release from sodium autunite exhibited minimal dependency on temperature; but were strongly dependent on pH and increasing concentrations of bicarbonate solutions. Most notably at pH 7, the rate of uranium release exhibited 370 fold increases relative to the rate of uranium release in the absence of bicarbonate. However, the effect of increasing concentrations of bicarbonate solutions on the release of uranium was significantly less under higher pH conditions. It is postulated that at high pH values, surface sites are saturated with carbonate, thus the addition of more bicarbonate would have less effect on uranium release. Results indicate the activation energies were unaffected by temperature and bicarbonate concentration variations, but were strongly dependent on pH conditions. As pH increased from 6 to 11, activation energy values were observed to decrease from 29.94 kJ mol-1 to 13.07 kJ mol-1. The calculated activation energies suggest a surface controlled dissolution mechanism.

  16. Metal alkoxides. Models for metal oxides. 15. Carbon-carbon and carbon-hydrogen bond activation in the reactions between ethylene and ditungsten hexaalkoxides: W sub 2 (OCH sub 2 -t-Bu) sub 6 (. eta. sup 2 -C sub 2 H sub 4 ) sub 2 , W sub 2 (OR) sub 6 (CH sub 2 ) sub 4 (. eta. sup 2 -C sub 2 H sub 4 ), and W sub 2 (OR) sub 6 (. mu. -CCH sub 2 CH sub 2 CH sub 2 ) (where r = CH sub 2 -t-Bu, i-Pr, c-C sub 5 h sub 9 , and c-C sub 6 H sub 11 ). Preparations, properties, structures, and reaction mechanisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chisholm, M.H.; Huffman, J.C.; Hampden-Smith, M.J. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington (USA))

    1989-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    W{sub 2}(OR){sub 6} (M {triple bond}M) compounds and ethylene (1 atm, 22{degree}C) react in alkane and aromatic hydrocarbon solvents to give W{sub 2}(OR){sub 6}({mu}-CCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}) compounds and ethane, where R = i-Pr, c-C{sub 5}H{sub 9}, c-C{sub 6}H{sub 11}, and CH{sub 2}-t-Bu. Under comparable conditions, W{sub 2}(O-t-Bu){sub 6} and ethylene fail to react. In the formation of W{sub 2}(OR){sub 6}({mu}-CCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}) compounds, the intermediates W{sub 2}(OCH{sub 2}-t-Bu){sub 6}({eta}{sup 2}-C{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2} and W{sub 2}(OR){sub 6}(CH{sub 2}){sub 4}({eta}{sup 2}-C{sub 2}H{sub 4}), where R = C-C{sub 5}H{sub 9}, i-Pr, and CH{sub 2}-t-Bu, have been characterized. For R = i-Pr and CH{sub 2}-t-Bu, the intermediates are shown to be formed reversibly from W{sub 2}(OR){sub 6} and ethylene. The compound W{sub 2}(O-i-Pr){sub 6}(CH{sub 2}){sub 4}({eta}{sup 2}-C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) has been fully characterized by an X-ray study and found to contain a metallacyclopentane ring and a W-{eta}{sup 2}-C{sub 2}H{sub 4} moiety, one at each metal center. The pyridine adduct W{sub 2}(O-i-Pr){sub 6}({mu}-CCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}ch{sub 2})(py) has been fully characterized and shown to contain a novel 1,6-dimetallabicyclo(3.1.0)hex-1(5)-ene organometallic core. All compounds have been characterized by {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H NMR studies. Various aspects of the reaction pathway have been probed by the use of isotopically labeled ethylenes, and a proposed general scheme is compared to previous studies of ethylene activation at mononuclear metal centers and carbonyl dinuclear and cluster compounds.

  17. Vrme-och strmningsteknik / Thermal and flow engineering Massverfring & separationsteknik /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    till 0.05·a %-mol i en (2+½·d) mol/s stor luftström. Detta sker genom absorption i en (2+c) mol/s stor

  18. Recovery of propylene glycol from dilute aqueous solutions by reversible chemical complexation with organoboronates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broekhuis, R.R.; Lynn, S.; King, C.J.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extractants consisting of an ion-pair of Aliquat 336 with phenylboronate or 3-nitrophenylboronate were prepared in various diluents (2-ethylhexanol, toluene, o-xylene or diisobutylketone). In batch experiments propyleneglycol (1,2-PD) was effectively extracted even at low concentrations. Heterogeneous complexation constants {beta}{sub 11} calculated at 25 C were 45-120 (mol/1){sup {minus}1} in 2-ethylhexanol, 34.8 (mol/l){sup {minus}1} in toluene, 37.6 (mol/l){sup {minus}1} in o-xylene and 14.4 (mol/l){sup {minus}1} in diisobutylketone. In 2-ethythexanol, there was no significant effect of extractant concentration on the complexation constant. Equilibrium water concentration in the extractants was 8-12 wt %, decreasing with 1,2-PD uptake. Nearly all extractant/diluent systems exhibited overloading (more than stoichiometric uptake of 1,2-PD). Evidence for aggregation of the ion-pair extractant in organic phase was found from water solubilization studies (molar solubilization ratios up to 10) and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy studies. Solubilization of 1,2-PD within hydrophilic aggregate interiors may explain the observed overloading. The complexation constant decreased with increasing temperature, but not enough to make back extraction after a temperature change attractive. Back extraction may be achieved after acidification with carbon dioxide to convert the organoboronate anion to the corresponding organoboronic acid. Up to 80% of the extracted 1,2-PD was backextracted in a batch extraction using C0{sub 2}. The extractant could then be regenerated by stripping carbon dioxide from solution at temperatures exceeding 110 C. However, at these temperatures the extractant appears to undergo a transformation in which color changes and extraction capacity is reduced to about 60% of original value.

  19. The photosynthetic and stomatal response of Medicago sativa cv. saranac to free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment (F.A.C.E.) and nitrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bridson, N.P.

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plots of Medicago sativa cv. saranac were grown in the field at ambient (355 {mu}mol CO{sub 2} mol{sup -1} air) or elevated (600{mu}mol CO{sub 2} mol{sup -1} air) CO{sub 2} concentrations. High (200kg yr{sup -1}) or low (20kg yr{sup -1}) nitrogen levels were applied to two isogeneic lines, one able and one unable to use nitrogen fixing bacteria. Plants were in the second year of field growth. Exposure to elevated CO{sub 2} was via a Free-Air CO{sub 2} Enrichment System (FACE). Elevated CO{sub 2} increased diurnal assimilation by between 12% and 92%. Analysis of A/C{sub i} responses showed that effective nitrogen fertilisation was more important to rubisCO and RuBP activity than elevated CO{sub 2}. No acclimation was consistently observed. Leaves lower down the canopy were found to have lower Vc{sub max} and J{sub max} values, though age may be the cause of the latter effect. FACE conditions have only a small effect on these responses. There was some evidence found for the down-regulation of photosynthesis in the late afternoon. The FACE conditions had no affect on stomatal density but did increase epidermal cell density.

  20. The photosynthetic acclimation response of Lolium perenne to four years growth in a free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment (FACE) facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Creasey, R. [Univ. of Essex (United Kingdom)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, the photosynthetic responses of field grown Lolium perenne to ambient (354 {mu}mol mol{sup -1}) and elevated (600 {mu}mol mol{sup -1}) C{sub a} were measured. The experiment utilized the FACE facility at Eschikon, Switzerland; here the L. Perenne swards had been grown at two nitrogen treatments, with six cuts per year, for 4 years. The study revealed a significant decrease in Rubisco activity (Vcmax) in the low nitrogen FACE plots; this is consistent with the theories of source-sink imbalance resulting in feedback inhibition and down-regulation. Such negative acclimation was not wholly supported by diurnal investigations which revealed an average stimulation of 53.38% and 52.78% in the low and high nitrogen, respectively. However, light response curves and AI investigations also suggested down-regulation, especially in the low nitrogen. SI is expected to decrease in response to elevated C{sub a}, if any change is seen. This was indeed observed in the high nitrogen plots but for the low nitrogen a significant increase was found. Conclusions drawn from this project center around the implications of negative acclimation to future crop productivity. For instance, inter-specific differences in response to elevated C{sub a} may result in ecosystem changes and new management techniques may be necessary. However, real predictions cannot be made from leaf level studies alone as these may not represent the overall changes at the whole plant level.

  1. Urinary 1-hydroxypyrene concentrations in Chinese coke oven workers relative to job category, respirator usage, and cigarette smoking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bo Chen; Yunping Hu; Lixing Zheng; Qiangyi Wang; Yuanfen Zhou; Taiyi Jin [Fudan University, Shanghai (China). School of Public Health

    2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    1-Hydroxypyrene (1-OHP) is a biomarker of recent exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). We investigated whether urinary 1-OHP concentrations in Chinese coke oven workers (COWs) are modulated by job category, respirator usage, and cigarette smoking. The present cross-sectional study measured urinary 1-OHP concentrations in 197 COWs from Coking plant I and 250 COWs from Coking plant II, as well as 220 unexposed referents from Control plant I and 56 referents from Control plant II. Urinary 1-OHP concentrations (geometric mean, {mu}mol/mol creatinine) were 5.18 and 4.21 in workers from Coking plants I and II, respectively. The highest 1-OHP levels in urine were found among topside workers including lidmen, tar chasers, and whistlers. Benchmen had higher 1-OHP levels than other workers at the sideoven. Above 75% of the COWs exceeded the recommended occupational exposure limit of 2.3 {mu}mol/mol creatinine. Respirator usage and increased body mass index (BMI) slightly reduced 1-OHP levels in COWs. Cigarette smoking significantly increased urinary 1-OHP levels in unexposed referents but had no effect in COWs. Chinese COWs, especially topside workers and benchmen, are exposed to high levels of PAHs. Urinary 1-OHP concentrations appear to be modulated by respirator usage and BMI in COWs, as well as by smoking in unexposed referents.

  2. 41. K. J. Keeler and G. B. Gloor, Mol. Cell. Biol. 17, 627 42. Y. Bellaiche, V. Mogila, N. Perrimon, Genetics 152,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    . Jasin for plasmid pCMV/SCE1XNLS, P. Geyer for plasmid pS/G, E. Raff for the 5-kb genomic fragment of 2t

  3. Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging. Author manuscript Non-invasive estimation of hepatic blood perfusion from H2 15O PET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    perfusion from H2 15O PET images using tissue-derived arterial and portal input functions Kudomi Nobuyuki 1 Timo 2 , Knuuti Juhani 1 , Iida Hirokazu 3 , Nuutila Pirjo 1 4 , Iozzo Patricia 1 5 Turku PET Centre1 artery. When its perfusion is assessed using PET and O-labeled water15 (H O), calculations require a dual

  4. ./. Mol. Riol. (1988) 200, 65-87 Positions of S2, S13, S16, S17, S19 and S21 in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 June 1987, and in revised form 28 September 1987) Neutron scat,tering distance data are presented the mapping of its proteins by neutron scattering. Comparisons with other data suggest that, the neutron map can be measured by neutron t Present address: Biology Department. Brookhaven Xational Laboratory

  5. J. Mol. Biol. (1984) 174, 265284 Positions of Proteins S14, S18 and S20 in the 30 S Ribosomal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    scattering. Since then, a large number of pairwise distances have been estimated by the neutron method measuringinterprotein distancesby neutron scattering in the ribosome have been described at both the theoretical alld on the fact that, the substitution of `H for `H in a biopolymer substantially alters its neutron scattering

  6. nature structural & molecular biology volume 16 number 9 September 2009 907 24. Doyen, C.M. et al. Mol. Cell. Biol. 26, 11561164

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hertel, Klemens J.

    the nascent transcript efficiently.How,then, is the transcription and RNA processing unit able to deal

  7. The effect of 2 mMol glutamine supplementation on HSP70 and TNF-a release by LPS stimulated blood from healthy children

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marino, L.V.; Pathan, N.; Meyer, R.; Wright, V.J.; Habibi, P.

    2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    the efficiency of the mitochondrial respiratory chain contributing to the bioenergetics failure of the mitochondria (a feature of critical illness), where engorged mitochondria are not able to meet adenosine tri phos- phate demands of tissues, resulting in cell...

  8. Mol. Biol. Evol. 19(5):597607. 2002 2002 by the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. ISSN: 0737-4038

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small, Randall

    ribonuclease genes [Zhang, Rosenberg, and Nei 1998]; gastropod tox- in genes [Duda and Palumbi 1999]; plant

  9. J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 21 (1988) 3499-3521. Printed in the UK Rydberg atoms in parallel magnetic and electric fields: 11.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cacciani, Patrice

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the energy of the states to be calculated. The main properties of the spectra and their evolution when one of lithium (Cacciani er a1 1986a, I). The present paper aims to analyse the structure of an n manifold fields are supposed to be weak enough for the corresponding interactions to be considered as t Present

  10. glacial-scale enrichment would result in an air-to-sea flux of about 4.6 mol C m 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    an area of 225 km2 . Iron infusions in the north patch of 631 kg and 450 kg were repeated on 16 January, with repeated infusions on 29 January, 1 February, and 5 Feb- ruary. Each infusion involved 315 kg spread over a 225 km2 area. For both patches, initial iron infusions were supple- mented with infusions of SF6 and 3

  11. Mol. Biol. Evol. 17(9):12861293. 2000 2000 by the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. ISSN: 0737-4038

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palumbi, Stephen

    species, so it is unclear how gene families evolve during adaptive radiations of closely related taxa. The gastropod genus Conus greatly diversified dur- ing an explosive adaptive radiation in the Pleistocene (Kohn: Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Naos Marine Lab, Apartado 2072, Balboa, Ancon, Republic of Panama

  12. J Mol Cell Cardiol 33, 947956 (2001) doi:10.1006/jmcc.2001.1357, available online at http://www.idealibrary.com on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garlid, Keith

    dam- light/dark cycle schedule and were given standard laboratory chow and tap water ad libitum the mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K+ channel. The consequence is preservation of energy transfer processes from

  13. COMPETENT CELLS (based on Hanahan 1983 J Mol Biol 166, 557580) STREAK a fresh plate the day before inoculation from parent stock (NOT previous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cross, George

    before inoculation from parent stock (NOT previous · batch of competent cells: glycerol stock only antibiotic!!); grow in shaker incubator at 37°C, 225 rpm. · GROW until OD 550=0.5 (approximately 2.5 h); take, store at 4°C Make from autoclaved stocks to give final concentrations of 30 mM KOAc 50 mM MnCl2.4H20 100

  14. Mol. Biol. Evol. 17(2):292300. 2000 2000 by the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. ISSN: 0737-4038

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, King

    and reprints: I. King Jordan, National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine of duplicated genes was analyzed to evaluate the role of natural selection in the functional diversification groups of paralogs. These data point to a possible role for positive Darwinian selection in the evolution

  15. Mol. Biol. Evol. 17(12):17761788. 2000 2000 by the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. ISSN: 0737-4038

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollock, David

    and Evolution. ISSN: 0737-4038 A Case for Evolutionary Genomics and the Comprehensive Examination of Sequence; Department of Biological Sciences, Louisiana State University at Baton Rouge; Institute for Genomic Research, Gaithersburg, Maryland; §Genomics Group, Bioscience Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New

  16. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in p anti-p Interactions with the Decay Mode H --> W+W- --> mu+nu mu-anti-nu at the D0 Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, Dale Morgan; /Nebraska U.

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for the standard model Higgs boson in p{bar p} collisions resulting in two muons and large missing transverse energy is presented. The analysis uses 4.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected between April 2002 and December 2008 with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. No significant excess above the background estimation is observed and limits are derived on Higgs boson production.

  17. [(eta5-PentamethylcyclopentadienylYb(III)(5,5'-dimethyl-2,2-bipyridyl)mu-OH)2(mu 2-trifluoromethylsulfanato-O,O')][tetraphenylborate](5,5'-dimethyl-2,2-bipyridyl)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kazhdan, Daniel

    2008-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The title compound C{sub 81}H{sub 88}BF{sub 3}N{sub 6}O{sub 5}SYb{sub 2}, crystallizes as a half-sandwich complex with a bridging inner-sphere trifluoro-methane sulfonate as well as two bridging hydroxide groups. there is uncoordinated 5,5{prime}-dimethyl-2,2{prime}-bipyridine in the crystal structure. The bound bipyridine ligands have N-C-C{prime}-n{prime} torsion angles of 12-13{sup o}. The triply bridged Yb centers are 3.5990(4) Angstroms apart. The Yb-N bonds range from 2.389(6)-2.424(5) Angstroms.

  18. An engineering-economic analysis of combined heat and power technologies in a (mu)grid application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Owen; Ouaglal, Boubekeur; Bartholomew, Emily; Marnay, Chris; Bourassa, Norman

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    6 Figure 2: Capstone Microturbine with an Attached CHPload. Figure 2: Capstone Microturbine with an Attached CHPheat from the Capstone microturbine and allows the captured

  19. RF optimization and analysis of the 805-MHz cavity for the MuCool program using ACE3P

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Zenghai; Ge Lixin; Adolphsen, Chris; Li Derun; Bowring, Daniel [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An 805 MHz pillbox cavity tested at Fermilab's MTA facility showed significant degradation in gradient when operated in a several Tesla solenoidal magnetic field. We have used the advanced ACE3P simulation codes developed at SLAC to study the cavity dark current and multipacting characteristics to gain more insight into the gradient limitations. We also checked whether there is an optimal cavity length that minimizes the dark current impact energy. Finally, we have improved on the cavity design, significantly lowering the fields outside the beam area. These and other results are presented in this paper.

  20. An engineering-economic analysis of combined heat and power technologies in a (mu)grid application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, Owen; Ouaglal, Boubekeur; Bartholomew, Emily; Marnay, Chris; Bourassa, Norman

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes an investigation at Ernesto Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) of the potential for coupling combined heat and power (CHP) with on-site electricity generation to provide power and heating, and cooling services to customers. This research into distributed energy resources (DER) builds on the concept of the microgrid (mGrid), a semiautonomous grouping of power-generating sources that are placed and operated by and for the benefit of its members. For this investigation, a hypothetical small shopping mall (''Microgrid Oaks'') was developed and analyzed for the cost effectiveness of installing CHP to provide the mGrid's energy needs. A mGrid consists of groups of customers pooling energy loads and installing a combination of generation resources that meets the particular mGrid's goals. This study assumes the mGrid is seeking to minimize energy costs. mGrids could operate independently of the macrogrid (the wider power network), but they are usually assumed to be connected, through power electronics, to the macrogrid. The mGrid in this study is assumed to be interconnected to the macrogrid, and can purchase some energy and ancillary services from utility providers.

  1. muDog: Smart Monitoring Mechanism for Wireless Sensor Networks based on IEEE 802.15.4 MAC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    @univ-mlv.fr Abstract--The resources in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) are limited like energy and bandwidth which monitoring, objects localization, etc.). One of the main constraints of these networks is energy limitation protocol design and sensor network deployment. The energy limitation creates vulnerabilities

  2. Search for the Decays B(s)-->e+mu- and B(s)-->e+e- in CDF Run II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Si

    We report results from a search for the lepton flavor violating decays B[subscript s][superscript 0]?e[superscript +]?[superscript -] and B[superscript 0]?e[superscript +]?[superscript -], and the flavor-changing neutral-current ...

  3. High-quality source of fiber-coupled polarization-entangled photons at 1.56 [mu]m

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stelmakh, Veronika

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the development of a high-quality source of single-mode fibercoupled polarization-entangled photon pairs based on a collinear spontaneous parametric down-conversion process in a bidirectionally pumped ...

  4. Lab-on-a-chip flow cytometer and microfluidic fluorescence activated cell sorter ([Mu]FACS) for biomedical applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Sung Hwan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with highly integrated microfluidics, optics, acoustics, andactuation,” submitted to Microfluidics and Nanofluidics (S. Tsai, Yu- Hwa Lo, “Microfluidics and photonics for Bio-

  5. Math is a Discipline to Explain Knowledge in the Simplest Ways Dr. Mu,Shin-Cheng AssistantResearch Fellow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hsin-Min

    that period, gaming industry was strictly forbidden in Taiwan. Consequently, many factories began the computer as a gaming device. Programs at that time were recorded in cassettes, which had to be loaded into a computer through a tape player. After I got tired of playing games, I would read books and magazines

  6. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG EDITION 135 TEXAS A&MU N I V E R S I T Y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , electrical, industrial, mechanical, nuclear, ocean, petroleum and radiological health engineering for Engineering and Technology). The electronics, manufacturing and mechanical, and telecommunications engineering technology programs are accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of ABET, Inc. The computer

  7. UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG EDITION 137 TEXAS A&MU N I V E R S I T Y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , biomedical, chemical, civil, computer, electrical, industrial, mechanical, nuclear, ocean, petroleum.abet.org. The electronic systems engineering technology program and the manufacturing and mechanical engineering technology program are accredited by the Engineer- ing Technology Accreditation Commission of ABET, www

  8. Dmitri Babikov (dmitri.babikov@mu.edu; 288-3538) Quantum Origin of Anomalous Isotope Effect in Ozone Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Scott A.

    -Function Analyses of photocatalytic hybrid materials for solar energy conversion James Kincaid Effect in Ozone Formation · Mixed Quantum/Classical Theory for Collisional Energy Transfer: The Intriguing Story of the Iso-Halons Mark Steinmetz (mark

  9. Look at what is in this issue: 19Mu Add an internal 40MB hard drive to your 4P,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mann, Tim

    . Terwilliger uw An Environment for MC and LDOS/LS-DOS, by Richard N. Deglin and Roy Soltoff 00 ooO 0- 0 1) Pr

  10. MuSiC: a Multibunch and multiparticle Simulation Code with an alternative approach to wakefield effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Migliorati, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The simulation of beam dynamics in presence of collective effects requires a strong computational effort to take into account, in a self consistent way, the wakefield acting on a given charge and produced by all the others. Generally this is done by means of a convolution integral or sum. Moreover, if the electromagnetic fields consist of resonant modes with high quality factors, responsible, for example, of coupled bunch instabilities, a charge is also affected by itself in previous turns, and a very long record of wakefield must be properly taken into account. In this paper we present a new simulation code for the longitudinal beam dynamics in a circular accelerator, which exploits an alternative approach to the currently used convolution sum, reducing the computing time and avoiding the issues related to the length of wakefield for coupled bunch instabilities. With this approach it is possible to simulate, without the need of a large computing power, simultaneously, the single and multi-bunch beam dynamics...

  11. High-power, hybrid Er:fiber/Tm:fiber frequency comb source in the 2 {\\mu}m wavelength region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Florian

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a 2-\\mum frequency comb based on a reliable mode-locked Er:fiber laser with 100 MHz repetition rate. After shifting the spectrum of the amplified Er:fiber comb to longer wavelengths, a single-clad Tm/Ho:fiber is used as a self-pumped pre-amplifier to generate a coherent and broadband spectrum centered at 1.93 \\mum. Subsequently, a cladding-pumped Tm:fiber amplifier boosts the system to a maximum output power of 4.8 W at 1.96 \\mum. After compression in a compact grating compressor, our amplified Er:fiber/Tm:fiber hybrid system delivers as much as 2.9 W with a pulse duration of 141 fs. The system's comb properties are examined via heterodyne measurement.

  12. Poly[bis(N,N-dimethylformamide-[kappa]O)([mu]4-naphthalene-1,5-disulfonato)magnesium(II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borkowski, Lauren A.; Banerjee, Debasis; Parise, John B. (SBU)

    2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure of the title compound, [Mg(C{sub 10}H{sub 6}O{sub 6}S{sub 2})(C{sub 3}H{sub 7}NO){sub 2}]{sub n}, consists of MgO{sub 6} octahedra ({bar 1} symmetry) connected to naphthalene-1,5-disulfonate ligands ({bar 1} symmetry) in the equatoral plane, forming a two-dimensional network propagating parallel to (010). The coordination sphere of the Mg atom is completed by the O atoms of two N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) molecules in the axial positions. The title compound represents the first time the naphthalene-1,5-disulfonate anion is bound directly to a Mg{sup 2+} atom. Disorder over two positions was found in the DMF molecule in a 0.518 (8):0.482 (8) ratio.

  13. An engineering-economic analysis of combined heat and power technologies in a (mu)grid application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Owen; Ouaglal, Boubekeur; Bartholomew, Emily; Marnay, Chris; Bourassa, Norman

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reduction in the use of compressor cooling (kWe) Market Datawas used to displace compressor cooling. However, theincludes the load for compressor cooling and was input into

  14. Semiconductor lasers emitting at the 0.98 {mu}m wavelength with radiation coupling-out through the substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zvonkov, N B; Zvonkov, B N; Ershov, A V; Uskova, E A; Maksimov, G A [Scientific-Research Physicotechnical Institute at the Nizhnii Novgorod State University, Nizhnii Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    1998-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A semiconductor laser based on a new design of the InGaAs/GaAs/InGaP structure was developed and investigated experimentally. The radiation from this laser was coupled out through the substrate, which ensured a narrow angular distribution in a plane perpendicular to the p-n junction. An output power of 0.63 W in a beam with the radiation divergence of 1.2{sup 0} in this plane was obtained. (lasers, active media)

  15. THE EVOLUTION OF SOLAR FLUX FROM 0.1 nm TO 160 {mu}m: QUANTITATIVE ESTIMATES FOR PLANETARY STUDIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claire, Mark W. [School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom); Sheets, John; Meadows, Victoria S. [Virtual Planetary Laboratory and Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Cohen, Martin [Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Ribas, Ignasi [Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Facultat de Ciencies, Torre C5 parell, 2a pl, Campus UAB, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Catling, David C., E-mail: M.Claire@uea.ac.uk [Virtual Planetary Laboratory and Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Washington, Box 351310, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding changes in the solar flux over geologic time is vital for understanding the evolution of planetary atmospheres because it affects atmospheric escape and chemistry, as well as climate. We describe a numerical parameterization for wavelength-dependent changes to the non-attenuated solar flux appropriate for most times and places in the solar system. We combine data from the Sun and solar analogs to estimate enhanced UV and X-ray fluxes for the young Sun and use standard solar models to estimate changing visible and infrared fluxes. The parameterization, a series of multipliers relative to the modern top of the atmosphere flux at Earth, is valid from 0.1 nm through the infrared, and from 0.6 Gyr through 6.7 Gyr, and is extended from the solar zero-age main sequence to 8.0 Gyr subject to additional uncertainties. The parameterization is applied to a representative modern day flux, providing quantitative estimates of the wavelength dependence of solar flux for paleodates relevant to the evolution of atmospheres in the solar system (or around other G-type stars). We validate the code by Monte Carlo analysis of uncertainties in stellar age and flux, and with comparisons to the solar proxies {kappa}{sup 1} Cet and EK Dra. The model is applied to the computation of photolysis rates on the Archean Earth.

  16. Transjugular Insertion of Bare-Metal Biliary Stent for the Treatment of Distal Malignant Obstructive Jaundice Complicated by Coagulopathy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsauo Jiaywei, E-mail: 80732059@qq.com; Li Xiao, E-mail: simonlixiao@gmail.com; Li Hongcui, E-mail: lihongcui520@126.com; Wei Bo, E-mail: allyooking@tom.com; Luo Xuefeng, E-mail: luobo_913@126.com; Zhang Chunle, E-mail: sugar139000@163.com; Tang Chengwei, E-mail: 20378375@qq.com [West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology (China); Wang Weiping, E-mail: irjournalclub@gmail.com [Section of Interventional Radiology, Cleveland Clinic, Imaging Institute (United States)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was designed to investigate retrospectively the feasibility of transjugular insertion of biliary stent (TIBS) for the treatment of distal malignant obstructive jaundice complicated by coagulopathy. Between April 2005 and May 2010, six patients with distal malignant obstructive jaundice associated with coagulopathy that was unable to be corrected underwent TIBS at our institution for the palliation of jaundice. Patients' medical record and imaging results were reviewed to obtain information about demographics, procedure details, complications, and clinical outcomes. The intrahepatic biliary tract was successfully accessed in all six patients via transjugular approach. The procedure was technically successfully in five of six patients, with a bare-metal stent implanted after traversing the biliary strictures. One procedure failed, because the guidewire could not traverse the biliary occlusion. One week after TIBS, the mean serum bilirubin in the five successful cases had decreased from 313 {mu}mol/L (range 203.4-369.3) to 146.2 {mu}mol/L (range 95.8-223.3) and had further decreased to 103.6 {mu}mol/L (range 29.5-240.9) at 1 month after the procedure. No bleeding, sepsis, or other major complications were observed after the procedure. The mean survival of these five patients was 4.5 months (range 1.9-5.8). On imaging follow-up, there was no evidence of stent stenosis or migration, with 100 % primary patency. When the risks of hemorrhage from percutaneous transhepatic cholangiodrainage are high, TIBS may be an effective alternative for the treatment of distal malignant obstructive jaundice.

  17. Water stress, temperature, and light effects on isoprene emission and photosynthesis of Kudzu leaves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharkey, T.D.; Loreto, F. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States))

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kudzu (Pueraia lobata (Willd) Ohwi.) emits isoprene, a hydrocarbon which can significantly affect atmospheric chemistry. Isoprene emission under standard conditions of 1000 [mu]mol photons[center dot]M[sup [minus]2][center dot]S[sup [minus]1] and 30[degrees]C developed only after the leaf bad reached full expansion and was not maximal until up to two weeks past the point of full expansion of the leaf. Isoprene emission from kudzu was stimulated by increases in temperature and photon flux density (up to 3000 [mu]mol photons[center dot]m[sup [minus]2][center dot]s[sup [minus]1]). For unstressed plants, 20 % of the carbon fixed in photosynthesis was reemitted as isoprene at 1000 [mu]mol photons[center dot]m[sup [minus]2][center dot]S[sup [minus]1]. Following the relief of water stress, photosynthesis recovered to the prestress rate but isoprene emission increased up to five times the prestress rate. At 1000 [mu]mol photons[center dot]M[sup [minus]2][center dot]S[sup [minus]1] and 35[degrees]C, 67% of the carbon fixed in photosynthesis was reemitted as isoprene eight days after water stress. For some leaves the rate of isoprene emission exceeded 500 nmol[center dot]M[sup [minus]2][center dot]S[sup [minus]1], substantially higher than ever reported before. Leaves of plants grown at less than 20[degrees]C did not make isoprene until an inductive treatment was given. Withholding water from plants or keeping leaves at 30[degrees]C induced isoprene emission. The observation of rapid and dramatic changes in the rate of isoprene emission from leaves in response to water stress and temperature may indicate that isoprene emission improves the ability of plants to cope with these conditions. With the new information on temperature and water stress effects on isoprene emission we speculate on possible reasons for isoprene emission from plants.

  18. An Assessment of Density Functional Methods for Potential Energy Curves of Nonbonded Interactions: The XYG3 and B97-D Approximations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vazquez-Mayagoitia, Alvaro [ORNL; Sherrill, David [Georgia Institute of Technology; Apra, Edoardo [ORNL; Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A recently proposed double-hybrid functional called XYG3 and a semilocal GGA functional (B97-D) with a semiempirical correction for van der Waals interactions have been applied to study the potential energy curves along the dissociation coordinates of weakly bound pairs of molecules governed by London dispersion and induced dipole forces. Molecules treated in this work were the parallel sandwich, T-shaped, and parallel-displaced benzene dimer, (C6H6)2; hydrogen sulfide and benzene, H2S C6H6; methane and benzene, CH4 C6H6; the methane dimer, (CH4)2; and the pyridine dimer, (C5H5N)2. We compared the potential energy curves of these functionals with previously published benchmarks at the coupled cluster singles, doubles, and perturbative triplets [CCSD(T)] complete-basis-set limit. Both functionals, XYG3 and B97-D, exhibited very good performance, reproducing accurate energies for equilibrium distances and a smooth behavior along the dissociation coordinate. Overall, we found an agreement within a few tenths of one kcal mol-1 with the CCSD(T) results across the potential energy curves.

  19. Effects of Light and Temperature on Fatty Acid Production in Nannochloropsis Salina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Wagenen, Jonathan M.; Miller, Tyler W.; Hobbs, Samuel J.; Hook, Paul W.; Crowe, Braden J.; Huesemann, Michael H.

    2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate prediction of algal biofuel yield will require empirical determination of physiological responses to the climate, particularly light and temperature. One strain of interest, Nannochloropsis salina, was subjected to ranges of light intensity (5-850 {mu}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) and temperature (13-40 C); exponential growth rate, total fatty acids (TFA) and fatty acid composition were measured. The maximum acclimated growth rate was 1.3 day{sup -1} at 23 C and 250 {mu}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Fatty acids were detected by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID) after transesterification to corresponding fatty acid methyl esters (FAME). A sharp increase in TFA containing elevated palmitic acid (C16:0) and palmitoleic acid (C16:1) during exponential growth at high light was observed, indicating likely triacylglycerol accumulation due to photo-oxidative stress. Lower light resulted in increases in the relative abundance of unsaturated fatty acids; in thin cultures, increases were observed in palmitoleic and eicosapentaenoeic acids (C20:5{omega}3). As cultures aged and the effective light intensity per cell converged to very low levels, fatty acid profiles became more similar and there was a notable increase of oleic acid (C18:1{omega}9). The amount of unsaturated fatty acids was inversely proportional to temperature, demonstrating physiological adaptations to increase membrane fluidity. This data will improve prediction of fatty acid characteristics and yields relevant to biofuel production.

  20. Dissolution Behaviour of UO{sub 2} in Anoxic Conditions: Comparison of Ca-Bentonite and Boom Clay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mennecart, Thierry; Cachoir, Christelle; Lemmens, Karel [SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, MOL, 2400 (Belgium)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to determine in how far the clay properties influence the dissolution of spent fuel, experiments were carried out with depleted UO{sub 2} in the presence of either compacted dry Ca-bentonite with Boom Clay groundwater (KB-BCW) or compacted dry Boom Clay with Boom Clay groundwater (BC-BCW). The leach tests were performed at 25 deg. C in anoxic atmosphere for 2 years. The U concentrations in the clay water were followed during these 2 years, and the amount of U in the clay was determined after 2 years in order to determine the UO{sub 2} dissolution rate. The uranium concentration after 0.45 {mu}m filtration was 50 times higher in the Boom Clay with Boom Clay water (2.0 x 10{sup -7} mol.L{sup -1}) than in Ca-bentonite with Boom Clay water (6.5 x 10{sup -9} mol.L{sup -1}), probably due to colloid formation in the Boom Clay system. Most released uranium was found in the clay. The fraction of uranium, dissolved from the UO{sub 2} pellet and found on the clay represents about 42 % of total uranium release in the system BC-BCW and more than 76 % in the system KB-BCW. The higher uranium retention of Boom Clay goes together with a higher dissolution rate. Global dissolution rates were estimated at about 2.0 x 10{sup -2} {mu}g.cm{sup -2}.d{sup -1} for the BCBCW system and 3.4 x 10{sup -3} {mu}g.cm{sup -2}.d{sup -1} for the KB-BCW system. This is not much lower than for similar tests with spent fuel, reported in literature. (authors)

  1. 1424 VOLUME 18 NUMBER 12 DECEMBER 2011 NATURE STRUCTURAL & MOLECULAR BIOLOGY B R I E F COM MU N I CAT I ON S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandran, Kartik

    CAT I ON S A shared structural solution for neutralizing ebolaviruses João M Dias1,7, Ana I Kuehne2

  2. Design and construction of equipment for determining the zenith-angle dependence of the high-energy mu-meson intensity at sea level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Floyd Chris

    1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    field of a nucleus j ~? if they are energetio enough? znsezesons 4 can intezmct electromagnetically with nuclei to produce enezgetic pho toner ClasaioaLly the total energy radiated by a charged particle which is accelerated is proportional... to the souare of the aoceleration of the particle, This essential feature is zm flected in ohe quantum-eleotrodynsmic result that the probability for the emission of a photon of a given ener;y is proportional to the square of the accelezation suffered...

  3. Dynamics of hydrogen dissociation at the sulfurcovered Pd''100... surface PhysikDepartment T30, Technische Universita t Mu nchen, D85747 Garching, Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the gasoline has drawn a lot of atten­ tion. A number of surface science studies---experimental 1--3 as well ef­ forts were based on total­energy calculations in order to de­ termine the change of dissociation

  4. An Improved Optimistic and Fault-Tolerant Replication Luis Irun-Briz, Francesc D. Mu~noz-Escoi, Josep M. Bernabeu-Auban

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, Francesc

    databases, concurrency control, database replication £ This work has been partially supported by the EU problem to solve. The concurrency control can be solved[WSP 00,KR81,EGLT76] using different techniques in the propagation of the updates in models where a particular transaction is not executed in every node

  5. Systematic examination of the impact of pre-stimulus alpha- mu and gamma band oscillations on perception : correlative and causal manipulation in mouse and human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchett, Dominique L. (Dominique Leon)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The over-arching hypothesis that drives my work is that neural dynamics, fluctuating on millisecond to second time scales, powerfully impact perception. In this thesis, I employ correlative electrophysiological recording ...

  6. Star Formation and AGN activity in Galaxies classified using the 1.6 {\\mu}m Bump and PAH features at $z = 0.4-2$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanami, Hitoshi; Fujishiro, Naofumi; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Miyaji, Takamitsu; Krumpe, Mirko; Umetsu, Keiichi; Ohyama, Youichi; Shim, Hyun Jin; Im, Myungshin; Lee, Hyoung Mok; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Serjeant, Stephen; White, Glenn J; Willmer, Christopher N; Goto, Tomotsugu; Oyabu, Shinki; Takagi, Toshinobu; Wada, Takehiko; Matsuhara, Hideo

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the star-formation and AGN activity of massive galaxies in the redshift range $z=0.4-2$, which are detected in a deep survey field using the AKARI InfraRed (IR) astronomical satellite and {\\em Subaru} telescope toward the North Ecliptic Pole (NEP). The AKARI/IRC Mid-InfraRed (MIR) multiband photometry is used to trace their star-forming activities with the Polycyclic-Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) emissions, which is also used to distinguish star-forming populations from AGN dominated ones and to estimate the Star Formation Rate (SFR) derived from their total emitting IR (TIR) luminosities. In combination with analyses of their stellar components, we have studied the MIR SED features of star-forming and AGN-harboring galaxies.

  7. Infrared photorefractive passive phase conjugation with BaTiO/sub 3/: Demonstrations with GaAlAs and 1. 09-. mu. m Ar/sup +/ lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cronin-Golomb, M.; Lau, K.Y.; Yariv, A.

    1985-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report photorefractive passive phase conjugation of GaAlAs laser radiation at 815--865 nm and Ar/sup +/ laser radiation at 1090 nm. A ring passive phase conjugate mirror was used with BaTiO/sub 3/ as the real-time holographic gain medium. With GaAlAs lasers phase conjugate reflectivities of up to 16% uncorrected for Fresnel losses were recorded. Effects of the strong associated feedback to the laser and attempts at mode locking are described. At 1090 nm the reflectivity remains approximately the same, but with a significantly longer time constant.

  8. The mop1 (mediator of paramutation1) mutant progressively reactivates one of the two genes encoded by the MuDR transposon in maize

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodhouse, Margaret Roth; Freeling, Michael; Lisch, Damon

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Genomics 265: 82–94. Rudenko, G. N. , and V. Walbot,Chomet et al. 1991; Rudenko and Walbot 2001), these

  9. The Plant Cell, Vol. 13, 15871608, July 2001, www.plantcell.org 2001 American Society of Plant Biologists Somatic and Germinal Mobility of the RescueMu Transposon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raizada, Manish N.

    and Schnable, 1996; reviewed by Walbot and Rudenko, 2001) and MURB, a helper protein implicated in insertion allele per generation (Schnable et al., 1989; Walbot and Rudenko, 2001). Alterna- tive models to explain (Donlin et al., 1995; Hsia and Schnable, 1996) and (2) true replicative transposition (Walbot and Rudenko

  10. Nonlinear Elastomers: Modeling and Estimation \\Lambda H. T. Banks y N. J. Lybeck y B. C. Mu~noz z L. C. Yanyo z

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    constructed from polymer (long molecular chains of covalently bonded atoms often having cross­linking chains) composites such as elastomers filled with car­ bon black and/or silica or with active elements (i.e., piezoelectric, magnetic or conductive particles). These rubber based products (even without active elements

  11. Intermolecular C-H Bond Activation Promoted by a Titanium Alkylidyne Brad C. Bailey, Hongjun Fan, Erich W. Baum, John C. Huffman, Mu-Hyun Baik,* and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baik, Mu-Hyun

    Intermolecular C-H Bond Activation Promoted by a Titanium Alkylidyne Brad C. Bailey, Hongjun Fan to perform intermolecular activation of inert C-H bonds.3-7 We now report that transient titanium alkylidynes an energy profile for the C-H bond activation reaction. Recently, our group reported the synthesis

  12. Academic Exploration and Advising Services M110 Student Success Center 884-9700 http://aeas.missouri.edu October 2008 MU UNDERGRADUATE MAJORS, EMPHASIS AREAS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Jerry

    Engineering BS IE Information Technology BS Mechanical Engineering BS ME College of Human Environmental of Agriculture Food and Natural Resources Agribusiness Management BS Agricultural Economics BS Financial Planning BA Environmental Geology BA French BA General Studies BGS Geography BA General Geography, Geographic

  13. Photomagnetic Switching of the Complex [Nd(dmf)[subscript 4](H[subscript 2]O)[subscript 3]([mu]-CN)Fe(CN)[subscript 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svendsen, Helle; Overgaard, Jacob; Chevallier, Marie; Collet, Eric; Iversen, Bo B.; (Aarhus); (Universite de Rennes)

    2009-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Single-crystal XRD experiments (see picture) reveal the excited-state structure of the photomagnetic heterobimetallic title complex. The system shows a decrease in all the iron-ligand bond lengths, suggesting that photoexcitation involves a ligand-to-metal charge transfer or a change in the superexchange coupling between the metal centers.

  14. CLOUD SCREENING METHODOLOGY FOR MERIS/AATSR SYNERGY PRODUCTS Luis Gomez-Chova, Gustavo Camps-Valls, Jordi Mu~noz-Mari, Javier Calpe, and Jose Moreno

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camps-Valls, Gustavo

    CLOUD SCREENING METHODOLOGY FOR MERIS/AATSR SYNERGY PRODUCTS Luis G´omez-Chova, Gustavo Camps (Valencia), Spain. ABSTRACT This paper describes the current development status of a cloud-screening method to improve current cloud mask- ing products for both sensors. Preliminary results based on simulated TOA

  15. Visible Light-Induced Electron Transfer from Di-mu-oxo Bridged Dinuclear Mn Complexes to Cr Centers in Silica Nanopores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weare, Walter

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mg) was placed in 10 mL of acetonitrile buffered with 0.01 Mform a brown solid in pure acetonitrile. 32 Depending on thewashed with 5 x 20 mL acetonitrile, and dried in vacuo for 2

  16. Design framework of the MuA remodeling signal that confers preferential complex disassembly by the AAA+ unfoldase ClpX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ling, Lorraine, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cell employs many classes of molecular chaperones to facilitate proteins in adopting the proper structure and preventing non-functional and potentially toxic non-native states. The Clp/Hsp100 family of ATPases are ...

  17. IOP PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF PHYSICS B: ATOMIC, MOLECULAR AND OPTICAL PHYSICS J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 40 (2007) S283S298 doi:10.1088/0953-4075/40/11/S04

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seideman, Tamar

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    light sources [5] to single- molecule spectroscopy [6] and 3D atom probe technology [7]. We refer are applied to guide electromagnetic energy through metal nanoparticle junctions and control its branching Publishing Ltd Printed in the UK S283 #12;S284 M Sukharev and T Seideman particular, it provides potentially

  18. IOP PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF PHYSICS B: ATOMIC, MOLECULAR AND OPTICAL PHYSICS J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 42 (2009) 105201 (5pp) doi:10.1088/0953-4075/42/10/105201

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bapat, Bhas

    of core and valence electron excitation in molecules and the dissociation dynamics under such excitations- coincidence technique may permit reconstruction of the geometry of the excited molecular ion. As an example in excitation into a discrete molecular orbital as a function of the molecular alignment has been studied

  19. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF PHYSICS B: ATOMIC, MOLECULAR AND OPTICAL PHYSICS J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 36 (2003) 41274143 PII: S0953-4075(03)64763-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrison, Michael A.

    in molecular gases, focusing on collisional excitation of molecularrotationaland ro conservation and the vector dynamics associated with rotational excitation. It is pointed out. In particular, for swarms of electrons or ions in molecular gases, it is clear that excitation of rotational

  20. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF PHYSICS B: ATOMIC, MOLECULAR AND OPTICAL PHYSICS J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 37 (2004) R57R88 PII: S0953-4075(04)63251-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zajfman, Daniel

    of the high-energy storage rings used in high-energy particle physics, in particular LEAR [8], and use mainly, they are usually smaller and require neither high-energy (MeV) accelerators for injecting the beam, nor and nuclear physics, nonlinear dynamics, single component plasmas, mass spectrometry, biophysics, quantum

  1. IOP PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF PHYSICS B: ATOMIC, MOLECULAR AND OPTICAL PHYSICS J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 42 (2009) 154007 (6pp) doi:10.1088/0953-4075/42/15/154007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Holger

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    simulations show that a displacement of a subset of the radiofrequency electrodes can serve as an explanation. Introduction Multipole radiofrequency ion traps [1], in particular the 22-pole ion trap [2], are versatile that can be excited with radiation depends on the local density of ions in the interaction volume

  2. IOP PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF PHYSICS B: ATOMIC, MOLECULAR AND OPTICAL PHYSICS J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 41 (2008) 125401 (8pp) doi:10.1088/0953-4075/41/12/125401

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DROR schemes for different polarizations of the laser radiation. We find that the short-term stability with a broad spectrum is used, in comparison to the case of excitation by a narrow-band laser radiation. Introduction Resonant interaction of two electromagnetic waves (optical and radiofrequency) with atoms is known

  3. IOP PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF PHYSICS B: ATOMIC, MOLECULAR AND OPTICAL PHYSICS J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 43 (2010) 194004 (16pp) doi:10.1088/0953-4075/43/19/194004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kling, Matthias

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    experiments A Rudenko1, Y H Jiang2, M Kurka2, K U K¨uhnel2, L Foucar1, O Herrwerth3, M Lezius3, M F Kling3, C) 194004 A Rudenko et al matter have become one of the hottest topics in atomic, molecular and optical

  4. INSTITUTE OF PHYSICS PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF PHYSICS B: ATOMIC, MOLECULAR AND OPTICAL PHYSICS J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 37 (2004) 35513562 PII: S0953-4075(04)81883-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roach, Timothy

    in an accelerating potential Timothy M Roach Physics Department, The College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, MA 01610 #12;3552 T M Roach y gUBU U atoms grating(a) (b) y Figure 1. (a) Cloud of atoms accelerated towards

  5. IOP PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF PHYSICS B: ATOMIC, MOLECULAR AND OPTICAL PHYSICS J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 42 (2009) 055506 (7pp) doi:10.1088/0953-4075/42/5/055506

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris, Matteo G. A.

    interferometry Stefano Olivares1,2 and Matteo G A Paris1,2,3 1 CNISM, UdR Milano Universit`a, I-20133 Milano by means of Monte Carlo simulated experiments with a small number of homodyne data, thus giving

  6. IOP PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF PHYSICS B: ATOMIC, MOLECULAR AND OPTICAL PHYSICS J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 42 (2009) 035502 (6pp) doi:10.1088/0953-4075/42/3/035502

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris, Matteo G. A.

    -parameter qubit gates Berihu Teklu1, Stefano Olivares1,2 and Matteo G A Paris1,2,3 1 Dipartimento di Fisica and a comparison with the results of Monte Carlo simulated experiments, we show that asymptotic optimality

  7. Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 47 (2014) 075301 (12pp) doi:10.1088/0953-4075/47/7/075301

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gammal, Arnaldo

    for the analysis of such condensates [4]. The long-range and anisotropic character of the DDI leads to new physical (2014) 075301 (12pp) doi:10.1088/0953-4075/47/7/075301 Bright solitons in Bose­Einstein condensates-dimensional model of a bosonic gas of particles carrying collinear dipole moments which are induced by an external

  8. IOP PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF PHYSICS B: ATOMIC, MOLECULAR AND OPTICAL PHYSICS J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 46 (2013) 065303 (15pp) doi:10.1088/0953-4075/46/6/065303

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pelster, Axel

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade, Serbia 3 Institut f¨ur Theoretische Physik, Johann Wolfgang Goethe to achieve an energy transfer between modes at a rate [21] which is comparable to the collective mode

  9. Two Pathways for Electrocatalytic Oxidation of Hydrogen by a Nickel Bis(diphosphine) Complex with Pendant Amines in the Second Coordination Sphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Jenny Y.; Smith, Stuart E.; Liu, Tianbiao L.; Dougherty, William G.; Hoffert, Wesley A.; Kassel, W. S.; Rakowski DuBois, Mary; DuBois, Daniel L.; Bullock, R. Morris

    2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A nickel bis(diphosphine) complex containing pendant amines in the second coordination sphere, [Ni(PCy2Nt-Bu2)2](BF4)2 (PCy2Nt-Bu2 = 1,5-di(tert-butyl)-3,7-dicyclohexyl-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane), is an electrocatalyst for hydrogen oxidation. Under 1.0 atm H2 using NEt3 as a base and with added water, a turnover frequency of 45 s-1 is observed at 23 °C; this is the fastest observed for a molecular catalyst. The addition of hydrogen to the NiII complex gives thee isomers of the doubly protonated Ni0 complex [Ni(PCy2HNt-Bu2)2](BF4)2; these complexes have been studied by 1H and 31P NMR spectroscopy, and for one isomer, an X-ray diffraction study. Using the pKa values and NiII/I and NiI/0 redox potentials in a thermochemical cycle, the free energy of hydrogen addition to [Ni(PCy2Nt-Bu2)2]2+ was determined to be -7.9 kcal mol-1. The catalytic rate observed in dry acetonitrile for the oxidation of H2 at the NiII/I couple depends on base size, with larger bases (NEt3, tert-BuNH2) resulting in slower catalysis than n-BuNH2. Addition of water accelerates the rate of catalysis, especially for the larger bases. The results of these studies provide important insights into the design of catalysts for hydrogen oxidation that facilitate proton movement and operate at moderate potentials. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  10. Thermodynamic Features of Benzene-1,2-Diphosphonic Acid Complexes with Several Metal Ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syouhei Nishihama; Ryan P. Witty; Leigh R Martin; Kenneth L. Nash

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Among his many contributions to the advancement of f-element chemistry and separation science, Professor Gregory R. Choppin’s research group completed numerous investigations featuring the application of distribution techniques to the determination of metal complexation equilibrium quotients. Most of these studies focused on the chemistry of lanthanide and actinide complexes. In keeping with that tradition, this report discusses the complex formation equilibrium constants for complexes of trivalent europium (Eu3+) with benzene-1,2-diphosphonic acid (H4BzDP) determined using solvent extraction distribution experiments in 0.2 M (Na,H)ClO4 media in the temperature range of 5 – 45 degrees C. Protonation constants for HnBzDP4-n and stoichiometry and stability of BzDP4- complexes with Zn2+, Ni2+, and Cu2+ have also been determined using potentiometric titration (at I = 0.1 M) and 31P NMR spectroscopy. Heats of protonation of HnBzDPn-4 species have been determined by titration calorimetry. From the temperature dependence of the complex Eu3+-HnBzDPn-4 equilibrium constant, a composite enthalpy (?H = -15.1 (+/-1.0) kJ mol-1) of complexation has been computed. Comparing these thermodynamic parameters with literature reports on other diphosphonic acids and structurally similar carboxylic acids indicates that exothermic heats of complexation are unique to the Eu-BzDP system. Comparisons with thermodynamic data from the literature indicate that the fixed geometry imposed by the benzene ring enhances complex stability.

  11. APBS*: Implicit Solvation Calculations within theAPBS*: Implicit Solvation Calculations within the CMDF FrameworkCMDF Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    /mol) APBS(kcal/mol) · Compare APBS with Self Consistent Reaction Field (SCRF) ·APBS x20 times faster #12

  12. Vrme-och strmningsteknik / Thermal and flow engineering Massverfring & separationsteknik /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    till torkningsmedlet (i timmar) för: a. diffusion A (mol/s) av fukten (komponent A) genom stillastående

  13. Arsenic remediation of drinking water using iron-oxide coated coal bottom ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MATHIEU, JOHANNA L.; GADGIL, ASHOK J.; ADDY, SUSAN E.A.; KOWOLIK, KRISTIN

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe laboratory and field results of a novel arsenic removal adsorbent called 'Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash' (ARUBA). ARUBA is prepared by coating particles of coal bottom ash, a waste material from coal fired power plants, with iron (hydr)oxide. The coating process is simple and conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Material costs for ARUBA are estimated to be low (~;;$0.08 per kg) and arsenic remediation with ARUBA has the potential to be affordable to resource-constrained communities. ARUBA is used for removing arsenic via a dispersal-and-removal process, and we envision that ARUBA would be used in community-scale water treatment centers. We show that ARUBA is able to reduce arsenic concentrations in contaminated Bangladesh groundwater to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. Using the Langmuir isotherm (R2 = 0.77) ARUBA's adsorption capacity in treating real groundwater is 2.6x10-6 mol/g (0.20 mg/g). Time-to-90percent (defined as the time interval for ARUBA to remove 90percent of the total amount of arsenic that is removed at equilibrium) is less than one hour. Reaction rates (pseudo-second-order kinetic model, R2>_ 0.99) increase from 2.4x105 to 7.2x105 g mol-1 min-1 as the groundwater arsenic concentration decreases from 560 to 170 ppb. We show that ARUBA's arsenic adsorption density (AAD), defined as the milligrams of arsenic removed at equilibrium per gram of ARUBA added, is linearly dependent on the initial arsenic concentration of the groundwater sample, for initial arsenic concentrations of up to 1600 ppb and an ARUBA dose of 4.0 g/L. This makes it easy to determine the amount of ARUBA required to treat a groundwater source when its arsenic concentration is known and less than 1600 ppb. Storing contaminated groundwater for two to three days before treatment is seen to significantly increase ARUBA's AAD. ARUBA can be separated from treated water by coagulation and clarification, which is expected to be less expensive than filtration of micron-scale particles, further contributing to the affordability of a community-scale water treatment center.

  14. The effect of warm-season precipitation on the diel cycle of the surface energy balance and carbon dioxide at a Colorado subalpine forest site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burns, S. P.; Blanken, P. D.; Turnipseed, A. A.; Monson, R. K.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Precipitation changes the physical and biological characteristics of an ecosystem. Using a precipitation-based conditional sampling technique and a 14 year dataset from a 25 m micrometeorological tower in a high-elevation subalpine forest, we examined how warm-season precipitation affected the above-canopy diel cycle of wind and turbulence, net radiation Rnet, ecosystem eddy covariance fluxes (sensible heat H, latent heat LE, and CO2 net ecosystem exchange NEE) and vertical profiles of scalars (air temperature Ta, specific humidity q, and CO2 dry mole fraction ?c). This analysis allowed us to examine how precipitation modified these variables from hourly (i.e., the diel cycle) tomore »multi-day time-scales (i.e., typical of a weather-system frontal passage). During mid-day we found: (i) even though precipitation caused mean changes on the order of 50–70% to Rnet, H, and LE, the surface energy balance (SEB) was relatively insensitive to precipitation with mid-day closure values ranging between 70–80%, and (ii) compared to a typical dry day, a day following a rainy day was characterized by increased ecosystem uptake of CO2 (NEE increased by ≈ 10%), enhanced evaporative cooling (mid-day LE increased by ≈ 30 W m?2), and a smaller amount of sensible heat transfer (mid-day H decreased by ≈ 70 W m?2). Based on the mean diel cycle, the evaporative contribution to total evapotranspiration was, on average, around 6% in dry conditions and 20% in wet conditions. Furthermore, increased LE lasted at least 18 h following a rain event. At night, precipitation (and accompanying clouds) reduced Rnet and increased LE. Any effect of precipitation on the nocturnal SEB closure and NEE was overshadowed by atmospheric phenomena such as horizontal advection and decoupling that create measurement difficulties. Above-canopy mean ?c during wet conditions was found to be about 2–3 ?mol mol?1 larger than ?c on dry days. This difference was fairly constant over the full diel cycle suggesting that it was due to synoptic weather patterns (different air masses and/or effects of barometric pressure). In the evening hours during wet conditions, weakly stable conditions resulted in smaller vertical ?c differences compared to those in dry conditions. Finally, the effect of clouds on the timing and magnitude of daytime ecosystem fluxes is described.« less

  15. area iso survey: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the sky at 15mu and 90mu and subsets of this area at 6.75mu and 175mu using the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). This project was the largest single open time programme...

  16. $B^0_{s} \\rightarrow ?^+?^-$ at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flavio Archilli

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Rare leptonic decays of $B_{(s)}^0$ mesons are sensitive probes of New Physics effects. A combination of the CMS and LHCb analyses on the search of the rare decays $B_{s}^0 \\rightarrow \\mu^+\\mu^-$ and $B^0 \\rightarrow \\mu^+\\mu^-$ is presented. The branching fractions of $B_{s}^0 \\rightarrow \\mu^+\\mu^-$ and $B^0 \\rightarrow \\mu^+\\mu^-$ are measured to be $\\mathcal{B}(B_{s}^0 \\rightarrow \\mu^+\\mu^-) = (2.8 \\,^{+0.7}_{-0.6}) \\times 10^{-9}$ and $\\mathcal{B}(B^0 \\rightarrow \\mu^+\\mu^-) = (3.9 \\,^{+1.6}_{-1.4}) \\times 10^{-10}$ respectively. A statistical significances of $6.2\\,\\sigma$ is evaluated for $B_{s}^0 \\rightarrow \\mu^+\\mu^-$ from the Wilks' theorem while a significance of $3.0\\, \\sigma$ is measured for $B^0 \\rightarrow \\mu^+\\mu^-$ from the Feldman-Cousins procedure.

  17. Light and CO sub 2 effects on photosynthesis and growth in Kudzu

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweder, M.; Bowes, G. (Univ. of Florida, Gainesville (USA)); Cure, J. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (USA))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kudzu (Pueraria lobata Willd.) was grown for 28 days under four permutations of light (1,500 or 450 {mu}mol quanta m{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}) and CO{sub 2} (700 or 350 {mu}L L{sup {minus}1} CO{sub 2}). Total biomass and leaf area were up to 55% and 52% respectively greater in the high CO{sub 2} treatments. When measured at the growth CO{sub 2} concentration, photosynthetic rates showed little reduction over the 28 day period, and remained up to 29% higher in the high CO{sub 2} treatments. Under high light, soluble protein was 27% greater in the plants grown at high CO{sub 2}. Neither light nor CO{sub 2} had a significant effect on the initial or total rubisco activities. However, phosphoribulokinase activity was decreased under the high CO{sub 2} treatments. These data indicate that photosynthesis in kudzu shows little acclimation when grown at elevated CO{sub 2}.

  18. Microstructure, strengthening mechanisms and hot deformation behavior of an oxide-dispersion strengthened UFG Al6063 alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asgharzadeh, H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz, P.O. Box 51666-16471, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Tabriz, P.O. Box 51666-16471, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kim, H.S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 790-784, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 790-784, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Simchi, A., E-mail: simchi@sharif.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrafine-grained Al6063/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0.8 vol.%, 25 nm) nanocomposite was prepared via powder metallurgy route through reactive mechanical alloying and hot powder extrusion. Scanning electron microcopy, transmission electron microscopy, and back scattered electron diffraction analysis showed that the grain structure of the nanocomposite is trimodal and composed of nano-size grains (< 0.1 {mu}m), ultrafine grains (0.1-1 {mu}m), and micron-size grains (> 1 {mu}m) with random orientations. Evaluation of the mechanical properties of the nanocomposite based on the strengthening-mechanism models revealed that the yield strength of the ultrafine-grained nanocomposite is mainly controlled by the high-angle grain boundaries rather than nanometric alumina particles. Hot deformation behavior of the material at different temperatures and strain rates was studied by compression test and compared to coarse-grained Al6063 alloy. The activation energy of the hot deformation process for the nanocomposite was determined to be 291 kJ mol{sup -1}, which is about 64% higher than that of the coarse-grained alloy. Detailed microstructural analysis revealed that dynamic recrystallization is responsible for the observed deformation softening in the ultrafine-grained nanocomposite. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The strengthening mechanisms of Al6063/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite were evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hot deformation behavior of the nanocomposite was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hot deformation activation energy was determined using consecutive models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The restoration mechanisms and microstructural changes are presented.

  19. PET 424304 2013 Exercises 1+2 of 4 12 Feb + 14 Feb 2013 1. ideal gas: s = s2-s1 = cpln(T2/T1) -R ln(p2/p1) (T << Tcrit; p << pcrit)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    /mol = 31,25 mol/s s = - R· ln(1/20) = 24,9 J/(molK) x = ·T°· s = 31,25·293·24,9 = 228,1 kW 2. 1 kg AlJ/mol Flash e-balance (lever rule) : 22,1 8,244,40 4,400,53 1 1 1 1 LF FG HH HH G L & L1 + G1 = 1 mol/s L1 = 0,45 mol/s, G1 = 0,55 mol/s Condenser: 50/50 split G2 = L2 = 0,55/2 = 0,275 mol/s HG2 + HL2

  20. Fabrication of silica aerogel with $n$ = 1.08 for $e^+/\\mu ^+$ separation in a threshold Cherenkov counter of the J-PARC TREK/E36 experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabata, Makoto; Kawai, Hideyuki; Igarashi, Youichi; Imazato, Jun; Shimizu, Suguru; Yamazaki, Hirohito

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents the development of hydrophobic silica aerogel for use as a radiator in threshold-type Cherenkov counters. These counters are to be used for separating positrons and positive muons produced by kaon decay in the J-PARC TREK/E36 experiment. We chose to employ aerogel with a refractive index of 1.08 to identify charged particles with momenta of approximately 240 MeV/$c$, and the radiator block shape was designed with a trapezoidal cross-section to fit the barrel region surrounding the kaon stopping target in the center of the TREK/E36 detector system. Including spares, we obtained 30 crack-free aerogel blocks segmented into two layers, each layer having a thickness of 2 cm and a length of 18 cm, to fill 12 counter modules. Optical measurements showed that the produced aerogel tiles had the required refractive indices and transparency.

  1. OC$78@MU%3!<%Q%9$N7ABVAG2r@O Fb85 @65. y LnH* <~ y ;3ED FF y 4X:, Ao z 0f:486 6Q y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekine, Satoshi

    $rkJ}K! (Nc$($P (3) $J$I) $G$"$j!"$b$&0l$D$O L$CN8l$G$b2r@O$G$­$k$h$&$J%b%G%k$r:n@.$9$kJ}K! (Nc$( $P (4, 5) $J$I) $G$"$k!#$3$3$G!"A0

  2. A 1Gsample/s 6-bit flash A/D converter with a combined chopping and averaging technique for reduced distortion in 0.18(mu)m CMOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanou, Nikolaos

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    will give an introduction to RNGs and present a technique to produce many high speed uncorrelated truly binary random number generators (RNGs) utilizing least area and power. The technique relies on the phase noise and jitter of voltage controlled... oscillators (VCOs) to generate RNGs using the oscillator sampling technique. To obtain true randomness, the frequency of oscillation of the VCOs is controlled by other RNGs in the array, increasing the jitter spread much more than conventional designs...

  3. First measurement of the ratio of branching fractions BR(Lambda(b) to Lambda(c) mu nu)/BR(Lambda(b) to Lambda(c) pi) at CDF II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Shin-shan; /Pennsylvania U.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this dissertation, we measure the properties of the lowest-mass beauty baryon, {Lambda}{sub b}. Baryons are the bound states of three quarks. Protons and neutrons, constituents of atomic nuclei, are the most common baryons. Other types of baryons can be produced and studied in the high-energy collider environment. Three-body dynamics makes baryons composed of low mass quarks difficult to study. On the other hand, baryons with one heavy quark simplify the theoretical treatment of baryon structure, since the heavy quark can be treated the same way as the nucleus in the atom. The {Lambda}{sub b} is composed of u, d, and b quarks, where the b quark is much heavier than the other two. Although, it is accessible, little is known about {Lambda}{sub b}. In 1991, UA1 [1] reconstructed 9 {+-} 1 {Lambda}{sub b} {yields} J/{Psi}{Lambda} candidates. In 1996, ALEPH and DELPHI reconstructed the decay {Lambda}{sub b} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and found only 3-4 candidates [2, 3]. ALEPH measured a {Lambda}{sub b} mass of 5614 {+-} 21 MeV/c{sup 2}, while DELPHI measured 5668 {+-} 18 MeV/c{sup 2}, about 2 {sigma} higher. Subsequently, CDF-I observed 20 {Lambda}{sub b} {yields} J/{Psi}{Lambda} events [4], confirmed the existence of {Lambda}{sub b} unambiguously and made a more precise measurement of {Lambda}{sub b} mass, 5621 {+-} 5 MeV/c{sup 2}. A recent CDF-II measurement by Korn [5] yields 5619.7 {+-} 1.7 MeV/c{sup 2}, which will significantly improve the current world average, 5624 {+-} 9 MeV/c{sup 2}, and resolve the discrepancy of ALEPH and DELPHI.

  4. A 78 dB SNDR 87 mW 20 MHz Bandwidth Continuous-Time Delta Sigma ADC With VCO-Based Integrator and Quantizer Implemented in 0.13 mu m CMOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Matthew

    The use of a VCO-based integrator and quantizer within a continuous-time (CT) \\Delta \\Sigma analog-to-digital converter (ADC) structure is explored, and a custom prototype in a 0.13 \\mum CMOS with a measured performance ...

  5. Classifying Three-way Seismic Volcanic Data by Dissimilarity Representation Diana Porro-Mu~noz , Isneri Talavera, Robert P.W. Duin, Mauricio Orozco-Alzate and John Makario Londo~no-Bonilla

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duin, Robert P.W.

    Classifying Three-way Seismic Volcanic Data by Dissimilarity Representation Diana Porro in a natural way. As an example, the classification of seismic volcanic events is used. It is shown features. Keywords-volcanic seismic data, three-way representation, dissimilarity representation

  6. Genetic interactions between a phospholipase A2 and the Rim101 pathway components in S. cerevisiae reveal a role for this pathway in response to changes in membrane composition and shape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mattiazzi, M.; Jambhekar, A.; Kaferle, P.; DeRisi, J. L.; Križaj, I.; Petrovi?, U.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mol Genet Genomics (2010) 283:519–530 DOI 10.1007/s00438-products that Mol Genet Genomics (2010) 283:519–530 remainRim13p. Mol Genet Genomics (2010) 283:519–530 Materials and

  7. A correlation between short range smectic-like ordering and the elastic constants of nematic liquid crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    :01984004501015700 #12;158 Table I. - Terminally cyano substituted nematogens. Table II. - Hybrid mixtures (A + B) A. Terminally cyano substituted nematogens El PCH analogue of EI 5 CB 59 mol % 5 PCH 59 mol % 7 CB 41 mol % 7

  8. The YEATS domain of Taf14 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has a negative impact on cell growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schulze, Julia M.; Kane, Caroline M.; Ruiz-Manzano, Ana

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and osmolarity, Mol Genet Genomics (2010) 283:365–380 Fig. 7Mol Genet Genomics (2010) 283:365–380 DOI 10.1007/s00438-thought to play a Mol Genet Genomics (2010) 283:365–380 role

  9. Ty1 integrase overexpression leads to integration of non-Ty1 DNA fragments into the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedl, Anna A.; Kiechle, Markus; Maxeiner, Horst G.; Schiestl, Robert H.; Eckardt-Schupp, Friederike

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mol Genet Genomics (2010) 284:231–242 DOI 10.1007/s00438-by ordered Mol Genet Genomics (2010) 284:231–242 proteolyticexperiments. Mol Genet Genomics (2010) 284:231–242 In RSY12

  10. The highly attenuated oncolytic recombinant vaccinia virus GLV-1h68: comparative genomic features and the contribution of F14.5L inactivation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Qian; Liang, Chunguang; Yu, Yong A.; Chen, Nanhai; Dandekar, Thomas; Szalay, Aladar A.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mol Genet Genomics (2009) 282:417–435 DOI 10.1007/s00438-DQ121394) Mol Genet Genomics (2009) 282:417–435 VacciniaU ml ¡1 , Mol Genet Genomics (2009) 282:417–435 amphotericin

  11. Experimental Media, Component List Component MW g/mol Ames mg/L Ames mM L-15 mg/L L-15 mM BME mg/L BME mM Locke's mg/L Locke's mM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rieke, Fred

    -Pantothenic acid · ½Ca Pyridoxal · HCl Riboflavin Riboflavin 5'-phophate Na Thiamine · HCl Thiamine monophosphate

  12. PubMed contains all of MEDLINE (1966-present), OLDMEDLINE (1946-1965), PubMed in-process records (new citations not yet fully indexed) and some additional non-MEDLINE citations. It is the primary database for researchers in the fields of biochemistry, mol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    BASIC SEARCH TECHNIQUES PubMed searching is easy. Just enter your search terms in the search box to additional searching options. Keyword Searching Enter one or more keywords (e.g., molecular motors) in the search box and click Search. PubMed automatically combines (ANDs) significant terms together using

  13. Carbon dioxide, hydrographic, and chemical data obtained in the Central South Pacific Ocean (WOCE sections P17S and P16S) during the tunes-2-expedition of the R/V Thomas Washington, July--August 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This data documentation discusses the procedures and methods used to measure total carbon dioxide (TCO{sub 2}), discrete partial pressure of TCO{sub 2} (pCO{sub 2}), and total alkalinity (TALK), during the Research Vessel (R/V) Thomas Washington TUNES Leg 2 Expedition in the central South Pacific Ocean. Conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), the cruise began in Papeete, Tahiti, French Polynesia, on July 16, 1991, and returned to Papeete on August 25, 1991. WOCE Meridional Sections P17S along 135{degrees} W and P16S along 150{degrees} W were completed during the 40-day expedition. A total of 97 hydrographic stations were occupied. Hydrographic and chemical measurements made along WOCE Sections P17S and P16S included pressure, temperature, salinity, and oxygen measured by conductivity, temperature and depth sensor; bottle salinity; oxygen; phosphate; nitrate; nitrite; silicate; CFC-12; CFC- 11; TCO{sub 2}; TALK; and pCO{sub 2} measured at 20{degrees}C. The TCO{sub 2} concentration in 1000 seawater samples was determined with a coulometric analysis system, the pCO{sub 2} in 940 water samples was determined with an equilibrator/gas chromatograph system, while the TALK concentration in 139 samples was determined on shore at the laboratory of C. Goyet of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution with an alkalinity titration system. In addition, 156 coulometric measurements for the Certified Reference Material (Batch {number_sign}6) were made and yielded a mean value of 2303.2 {plus_minus} 1.5 {mu}mol/kg. This mean value agrees within a standard deviation of the 2304.6 {plus_minus} 1.6 {mu}mol/kg (N=9) value determined with the manometer of C. D. Keeling at Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO). Replicate samples from 11 Niskin bottles at 4 stations were also collected for later shore-based reference analyses of TCO{sub 2} and TALK by vacuum extraction and manometry in the laboratory of C. D. Keeling of SIO.

  14. Silica and boron-containing ultraphosphate laser glass with low concentration quenching and improved thermal shock resistance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cook, Lee M. (Duryea, PA); Stokowski, Stanley E. (Danville, CA)

    1987-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Neodymium-doped phosphate glasses having a refractive index, nd>1.520; an Abbe number, Vd, <60; a density <3.0 g/cm.sup.3, a thermal expansion coefficient, .alpha., .ltoreq.110.times.10.sup.-7 .degree.C..sup.-1 ; a Young's Modulus, E, <70.times.10.sup.3 N/mm.sup.2 ; a Poisson's Ratio, .nu., <0.28; a thermal conductivity, K, >0.5 W/m.multidot.K, a thermal FOM=(1-.nu.).multidot.K/.alpha.E>0.7, consisting essentially of, in mol. %: P.sub.2 O.sub.5 : 40-70% SiO.sub.2 : 0-20% B.sub.2 O.sub.3 : 5-20% Sum SiO.sub.2 +B.sub.2 O.sub.3 : 5-35% Sum Li.sub.2 O+Na.sub.2 O+K.sub.2 O: 5-20% Sum La.sub.2 O.sub.3 +Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3 : 3-10% Sum MgO+CaO+SrO+BaO+ZnO: 0-10% and preferably containing an amount of Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3 effective for laser activity having an emission cross-section, .sigma., >3.5.times.10.sup.-20 cm.sup.2 ; a fluorescence linewidth (.DELTA..lambda..sub.f1)<23.5 nm; a first e-folding time of the Nd.sup.3+ fluorescence at 0.5 wt. % Nd.sub.2 O.sub.3 >375 .mu.sec, and a first e-folding time of the Nd.sup.3+ fluorescence at 10 wt. % >175 .mu.sec at 10 wt. %, have very low self-concentration quenching rates.

  15. Cell wide responses to low oxygen exposure in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    antioxidant systems of Helicobacter pylori. Mol Microbiolincluding Helicobacter pylori (56) and Bacteroides

  16. Low-melting point heat transfer fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel (Oakland, CA); Bradshaw, Robert W. (Livermore, CA)

    2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-melting point, heat transfer fluid made of a mixture of five inorganic salts including about 29.1-33.5 mol % LiNO.sub.3, 0-3.9 mol % NaNO.sub.3, 2.4-8.2 mol % KNO.sub.3, 18.6-19.9 mol % NaNO.sub.2, and 40-45.6 mol % KNO.sub.2. These compositions can have liquidus temperatures below 80.degree. C. for some compositions.

  17. Development of a gene cloning system for the hydrogen-producing marine photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsunaga, T.; Matsunaga, N.; Tsubaki, K.; Tanaka, T.

    1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seventy-six strains of marine photosynthetic bacteria were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis for plasmid DNA content. Among these strains, 12 carried two to four different plasmids with sizes ranging from 3.1 to 11.0 megadaltons. The marine photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sp. NKPB002106 had two plasmids, pRD06S and pRD06L. The smaller plasmid, pRD06S, had a molecular weight of 3.8 megadaltons and was cut at a single site by restriction endonucleases SalI, SmaI, PstI, XhoI, and BglII. Moreover, the marine photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas sp. NKPB002106 containing plasmid pRD06 had a satisfactory growth rate (doubling time, 7.5 h), a hydrogen-producing rate of 0.96 ..mu..mol/mg (dry weight) of cells per h, and nitrogen fixation capability. Plasmid pRD06S, however, had neither drug resistance nor heavy-metal resistance, and its copy number was less than 10. Therefore, a recombinant plasmid consisting of pRD06S and Escherichia coli cloning vector pUC13 was constructed and cloned in E. coli. The recombinant plasmid was transformed into Rhodopseudomonas sp. NKPB002106. As a result, Rhodopseudomonas sp. NKPB002106 developed ampicillin resistance. Thus, a shuttle vector for gene transfer was constructed for marine photosynthetic bacteria.

  18. Radiofrequency Ablation in Combination with Embolization in Metachronous Recurrent Renal Cancer in Solitary Kidney after Contralateral Tumor Nephrectomy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gebauer, Bernhard, E-mail: bernhard.gebauer@charite.de; Werk, Michael; Lopez-Haenninen, Enrique; Felix, Roland [Charite, Universitaetsmedizin Berlin Campus Virchow-Clinic, Department of Radiology (Germany); Althaus, Peter [Evangelisches Krankenhaus Koenigin Elisabeth Herzberge, Department of Urology (Germany)

    2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose. To evaluate the feasibility and safety of minimally invasive, percutaneous techniques in metachronous recurrent renal cell cancers (RCCs) in solitary kidneys. Methods. In 4 patients, recurrent RCC was treated by radiofrequency ablation (RFA) (RITA, StarBurst) alone, and in 2 patients by RFA in combination with superselective transarterial particle-lipiodol embolization using 3 Fr microcatheters. RFA was guided by computed tomography in 5 patients, and by magnetic resonance imaging in 1 patient. Mean tumor diameter was 26.7 mm (range 10-45 mm). All interventions were technically successful; during follow-up 1 patient developed recurrent RCC, which was retreated by RFA after embolization. Results. No major peri- or postprocedural complications occurred. Changes in creatinine (pre- vs. post-intervention, 122 vs. 127 {mu}mol/l) and calculated creatinine clearance (pre- vs. post-intervention, 78 vs. 73 ml/min) after ablation were minimal. Conclusion. In single kidneys, percutaneous, minimally invasive techniques are safe and feasible. In large tumors, or where there are adjacent critical structures, we prefer a combination of embolization and thermal ablation (RFA)

  19. Interaction of P-aminobenzoic acid with normal and sickel erythrocyte membrane: photoaffinity labelling of the binding sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Premachandra, B.R.

    1986-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron microscopic studies revealed that P-Amino benzoic acid (PABA) could prevent eichinocytosis of red cells in vitro. Equilibrium binding studies with right side out membrane vesicles (ROV) revealed a similar number of binding sites (1.2-1.4 ..mu..mol/mg) and Kd (1.4-1.6 mM) values for both normal and sickle cell membranes. /sup 14/C-Azide analogue of PABA was synthesized as a photoaffinity label to probe its sites of interaction on the erythrocyte membranes. Competitive binding studies of PABA with its azide indicated that both the compounds share common binding sites on the membrane surface since a 20 fold excess of azide inhibited PABA binding in a linear fashion. The azide was covalently incorporated into the membrane components only upon irradiation (52-35% of the label found in the proteins and the rest in lipids). Electrophoretic analysis of photolabelled ROV revealed that the azide interacts chiefly with Band 3 protein. PABA inhibited both high and low affinity calcium (Ca) binding sites situated on either surface of the membrane in a non-competitive manner; however, Ca binding stimulated by Mg-ATP was not affected. Ca transport into inside out vesicles was inhibited by PABA; but it did not affect the calcium ATP-ase activity. The authors studies suggest that the mechanism of action of PABA is mediated by its interaction with Band 3 protein (anion channel), calcium channel and calcium binding sites of erythrocyte membrane.

  20. Polyacrylamide medium for the electrophoretic separation of biomolecules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Madabhushi, Ramakrishna S.; Gammon, Stuart A.

    2003-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A polyacryalmide medium for the electrophoretic separation of biomolecules. The polyacryalmide medium comprises high molecular weight polyacrylamides (PAAm) having a viscosity average molecular weight (M.sub.v) of about 675-725 kDa were synthesized by conventional red-ox polymerization technique. Using this separation medium, capillary electrophoresis of BigDye DNA sequencing standard was performed. A single base resolution of .about.725 bases was achieved in .about.60 minute in a non-covalently coated capillary of 50 .mu.m i.d., 40 cm effective length, and a filed of 160 V/cm at 40.degree. C. The resolution achieved with this formulation to separate DNA under identical conditions is much superior (725 bases vs. 625 bases) and faster (60 min. vs. 75 min.) to the commercially available PAAm, such as supplied by Amersham. The formulation method employed here to synthesize PAAm is straight-forward, simple and does not require cumbersome methods such as emulsion polymerizaiton in order to achieve very high molecular weights. Also, the formulation here does not require separation of PAAm from the reaction mixture prior to reconstituting the polymer to a final concentration. Furthermore, the formulation here is prepared from a single average mol. wt. PAAm as opposed to the mixture of two different average mo. wt. PAAm previously required to achieve high resolution.

  1. Elevated sulfate reduction in metal-contaminated freshwater lake sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gough, H.L.; Dahl, A.L.; Tribou, E.; Noble, P.A.; Gaillard, J.-F.; Stahl, D.A. (UWASH); (NWU)

    2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Although sulfate-reducing prokaryotes have long been studied as agents of metals bioremediation, impacts of long-term metals exposure on biologically mediated sulfur cycling in natural systems remains poorly understood. The effects of long-term exposure to metal stress on the freshwater sulfur cycle were studied, with a focus on biologic sulfate reduction using a combination of microbial and chemical methods. To examine the effects after decades of adaptation time, a field-based experiment was conducted using multiple study sites in a natural system historically impacted by a nearby zinc smelter (Lake DePue, Illinois). Rates were highest at the most metals-contaminated sites (-35 {mu}mol/cm{sup 3}/day) and decreased with decreased pore water zinc and arsenic contamination levels, while other environmental characteristics (i.e., pH, nutrient concentrations and physical properties) showed little between-site variation. Correlations were established using an artificial neural network to evaluate potentially non-linear relationships between sulfate reduction rates (SRR) and measured environmental variables. SRR in Lake DePue were up to 50 times higher than rates previously reported for lake sediments and the chemical speciation of Zn was dominated by the presence of ZnS as shown by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). These results suggest that long-term metal stress of natural systems might alter the biogeochemical cycling of sulfur by contributing to higher rates of sulfate reduction.

  2. Biodegradation of nickel-citrate and modulation of nickel toxicity by iron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francis, A.; Joshi-Tope, G.A.; Dodge, C.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biodegradation of 1:1 nickel:citric acid by Pseudomonas fluorescens proceeded after a lag (nearly 17h) at the rate of 11{+-}1 {mu}mol h{sup -1}, with only partial mineralization of the complex. The incomplete degradation of the complex was not attributed to changes in its structure, but was due to the toxicity of the Ni released. Addition of 1:1 Ni:citric acid inhibited glucose metabolism by the bacterium. The toxicity of the released Ni was evident only when it attained a threshold concentration of > 0.3 mM in the culture medium. Speciation calculations showed that Ni released after metabolism of the complex was present as Ni{sup 2+} ion and nickel carbonate. Addition of iron as a ferric hydroxide or 1:1 Fe:citric acid to 1:1 Ni:citric acid resulted in the complete metabolism of the Ni-citrate complex, with concurrent removal of the released Ni from solution by coprecipitation with iron. 29 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Diffusion of benzene confined in the oriented nanochannels of chrysotile asbestos fibers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mamontov, E. [NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Dr., MS 8562, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8562 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-2115 (United States); Kumzerov, Yu.A.; Vakhrushev, S.B. [Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We used quasielastic neutron scattering to study the dynamics of benzene that completely fills the nanochannels of chrysotile asbestos fibers with a characteristic diameter of about 5 nm. The macroscopical alignment of the nanochannels in fibers provided an interesting opportunity to study anisotropy of the dynamics of confined benzene by means of collecting the data with the scattering vector either parallel or perpendicular to the fibers axes. The translational diffusive motion of benzene molecules was found to be isotropic. While bulk benzene freezes at 278.5 K, we observed the translational dynamics of the supercooled confined benzene on the time scale of hundreds of picoseconds even below 200 K, until at about 160 K its dynamics becomes too slow for the {mu}eV resolution of the neutron backscattering spectrometer. The residence time between jumps for the benzene molecules measured in the temperature range of 260 K to 320 K demonstrated low activation energy of 2.8 kJ/mol.

  4. Cutoff Effects on Energy-Momentum Tensor Correlators in Lattice Gauge Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey B. Meyer

    2009-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the discretization errors affecting correlators of the energy-momentum tensor $T_{\\mu\

  5. Cell Stem Cell Induction of Multipotential Hematopoietic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, James J.

    patients with hematologic diseases, including Fanconi anemia (Mu¨ ller et al., 2012), sickle cell anemia

  6. Rare decays at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrington, S.M.; /Liverpool U.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The confidence level limits of the CDF and D0 searches for the B{sub s}{sup 0}, B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}{phi} rare decays are presented.

  7. Phenomenology of some rare and forbidden. eta. -decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herczeg, P.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the contribution from possible new physics to the decays {eta} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}}, {eta} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}, {eta} {yields} {mu}e and {eta} {pi}{mu}e, and assess the sensitivities required for experimental studies of these decays to extend our knowledge about the new interactions. 61 refs.

  8. Investigation into the Nazarov Cyclization of Aryl Dienyl Ketones and Synthetic Studies Toward Tetrapetalone A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcus, Andrew Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nones were exposed to 25 mol % AlCl 3 in toluene. ?-Methyl-2.9 was exposed to 10 mol % AlCl 3 in toluene at 80 ºC to

  9. Fixation of CO2 by chrysotile in low-pressure dry and moist carbonation: Ex-situ and in-situ characterizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    . Emitted in large proportions, especially from (stationary) fossil-fuel based power plants, carbon dioxide­1200 °C), humidity (0­10 mol %) and CO2 partial pressure (20­67 mol %), thermal preconditioning

  10. Computer Supporting Diaspora Knowledge Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, William

    ; Gerhardt, Nadia; Siciliano, Florencia; Rosa Marano, Maria] Univ Nacl Rosario, Inst Biol Mol & Celular Biol Mol & Celular Rosario, CONICET, Fac Ciencias Bioquim & Farmaceut,Area Virol, RA-2000 Rosario

  11. DNA tethering characterization, enzyme-mediated DNA looping under tension, and nucleosome stability in the force measuring optical tweezers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gemmen, Gregory John

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    enzyme is functional as a tetramer. J Mol. Biol. 291: 1105-enzyme is functional as a tetramer. J. Mol. Biol. 291: 1105-Endonuclease BspMI is a Tetramer that Acts Concertedly at

  12. Study of collisons of supersymmetric top Quark in the channel stop anti-stop -> e+- mu-+ sneutrino anti-sneutrino b anti-b with the experience of D0 at the Tevatron. Callibration of the electromagnetic calorimeter at D0.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendes, Aurelien; /Marseille U., Luminy

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supersymmetry is one of the most natural extensions of the Standard Model. At low energy it may consist in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model which is the framework chosen to perform the search of the stop with 350 pb{sup -1} of data collected by D0 during the RunIIa period of the TeVatron. They selected the events with an electron, a muon, missing transverse energy and non-isolated tracks, signature for the stop decay in 3-body ({bar t} {yields} bl{bar {nu}}). Since no significant excess of signal is seen, the results are interpreted in terms of limit on the stop production cross-sections, in such a way that they extend the existing exclusion region in the parameter space (m{sub {bar t}},m{sub {bar {nu}}}) up to stop masses of 168 (140) GeV for sneutrino masses of 50 (94) GeV. Finally because of the crucial role of the electromagnetic calorimeter, a fine calibration was performed using Z {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} events, which improved significantly the energy resolution.

  13. Transition metal chemistry of main group hydrazides. 11. Synthesis and coordination chemistry of novel tetraphosphano phosphorinanes. X-ray crystal structure of [(W(CO){sub 4}){sub 2}({mu}-[PhPN(Me)N(P(OCH{sub 2}CF{sub 3}){sub 2})]{sub 2})

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reddy, V.S.; Katti, K.V.; Barnes, C.L. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New main group compounds which can combine the reactivities of >P-N(R)-P< and also >P-N(R)-N(R)-P< frameworks in a single compound via a tetraphosphane network are important in the context of studying the coordination chemistry of multiphosphine ligands. The coordination chemistry of such multifunctional phosphanes may offer an important insight on the preferred mode of coordinations (viz., C vs D) and also provide unique opportunities for the construction of new bi- and multimetallic organometallic compounds. Herein, the authors report the first example of a novel tetraphosphane which contains both >P-N-P< and >P-N-N-P< functionalities in a cyclic network. The fundamental coordination chemistry of this new class of ligands is discussed in terms of its reactions with the group 6 transition metal carbonyl precursors and also through an X-ray crystal structure of a W(0) representative.

  14. Dppm-Assisted synthesis and reactivity of bimetallic M-Mo, M-W, M-Co, and M-Mn (M = Pt, Pd) complexes. Crystal structure of [([eta][sup 2]-dppm)[ovr Pt([mu]-dppm)W](CO)[sub 2]Cp][PF[sub 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braunstein, P.; de Meric de Bellefon, C.; Oswald, B.; Ries, M. (Universite Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg (France)); Lanfranchi, M.; Tiripicchio, A. (Universita di Parma (Italy))

    1993-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Heterometallic carbonyl complexes and clusters were prepared by reaction of dppm (dppm = Ph[sub 2]PCH[sub 2]PPh[sub 2]) with linear trinuclear chain complexes trans-[Pt(or Pd)[l brace]m(CO)[r brace][sub 2](NCPh)[sub 2

  15. Acetylation and glycation of fibrinogen in vitro occur at specific lysine residues in a concentration dependent manner: A mass spectrometric and isotope labeling study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svensson, Jan, E-mail: jan.svensson@ki.se [Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital (Solna), SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden) [Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital (Solna), SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, SE-182 88 Stockholm (Sweden); Bergman, Ann-Charlotte [Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital (Solna), SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)] [Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital (Solna), SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Adamson, Ulf [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, SE-182 88 Stockholm (Sweden)] [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, SE-182 88 Stockholm (Sweden); Blombaeck, Margareta [Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital (Solna), SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)] [Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital (Solna), SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Wallen, Hakan; Joerneskog, Gun [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, SE-182 88 Stockholm (Sweden)] [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, SE-182 88 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fibrinogen was incubated in vitro with glucose or aspirin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acetylations and glycations were found at twelve lysine sites by mass spectrometry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The labeling by aspirin and glucose occurred dose-dependently. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No competition between glucose and aspirin for binding to fibrinogen was found. -- Abstract: Aspirin may exert part of its antithrombotic effects through platelet-independent mechanisms. Diabetes is a condition in which the beneficial effects of aspirin are less prominent or absent - a phenomenon called 'aspirin resistance'. We investigated whether acetylation and glycation occur at specific sites in fibrinogen and if competition between glucose and aspirin in binding to fibrinogen occurs. Our hypothesis was that such competition might be one explanation to 'aspirin resistance' in diabetes. After incubation of fibrinogen in vitro with aspirin (0.8 mM, 24 h) or glucose (100 mM, 5-10 days), we found 12 modified sites with mass spectrometric techniques. Acetylations in the {alpha}-chain: {alpha}K191, {alpha}K208, {alpha}K224, {alpha}K429, {alpha}K457, {alpha}K539, {alpha}K562, in the {beta}-chain: {beta}K233, and in the {gamma}-chain: {gamma}K170 and {gamma}K273. Glycations were found at {beta}K133 and {gamma}K75, alternatively {gamma}K85. Notably, the lysine 539 is a site involved in FXIII-mediated cross-linking of fibrin. With isotope labeling in vitro, using [{sup 14}C-acetyl]salicylic acid and [{sup 14}C]glucose, a labeling of 0.013-0.084 and 0.12-0.5 mol of acetylated and glycated adduct/mol fibrinogen, respectively, was found for clinically (12.9-100 {mu}M aspirin) and physiologically (2-8 mM glucose) relevant plasma concentrations. No competition between acetylation and glycation could be demonstrated. Thus, fibrinogen is acetylated at several lysine residues, some of which are involved in the cross-linking of fibrinogen. This may mechanistically explain why aspirin facilitates fibrin degradation. We find no support for the idea that glycation of fibrin(ogen) interferes with acetylation of fibrinogen.

  16. Wohletz, McQueen, and Morrissey 1 LA-UR 94-0370

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with mol- ten thermite (Al2O3 + Fe) in contact with water have been used to simulate hydrovolcanic eruption

  17. Use of a promiscuous, constitutively-active bacterial enhancer-binding protein to define the Ï?54 (RpoN) regulon of Salmonella Typhimurium LT2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    flagellar system of Helicobacter pylori. Mol Microbiol 2004,JW, Hoover TR: Helicobacter pylori FlgR is an enhancer-

  18. Use of a promiscuous, constitutively-active bacterial enhancer-binding protein to define the ?54 (RpoN) regulon of Salmonella Typhimurium LT2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    flagellar system of Helicobacter pylori. Mol Microbiol 2004,JW, Hoover TR: Helicobacter pylori FlgR is an enhancer-

  19. in the snl-1 compared with wild-type cells. Western blots (Fig. 1b) of total cell lysates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schnaufer, Achim

    ­2121 (1991). 11.Blundell, P., Rudenko, G. & Borst, P. Mol. Biochem. Parasitol. 76, 215­229 (1996). 12.Sherwin

  20. DOI: 10.1126/science.1191864 , 86 (2010);330Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feschotte, Cedric

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Microbiol. Mol. Biol. Rev. 66, 506 (2002). 6. Y. Sun, J. Cheng, Bioresour. Technol. 83, 1 (2002). 7. Z. Xin

  1. The underlined four questions shall be discussed, for the other questions the answer is enclosed here.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    isopropanol (komponent B, kokpunkt 82°C vid 1 atm, MB = 60 g/mol) ska genom kontinuerlig destillation

  2. Structure and properties of YbZnSn, YbAgSn, and Yb{sub 2}Pt{sub 2}Pb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poettgen, R.; Arpe, P.E.; Kussmann, D.; Kuennen, B.; Kotzyba, G.; Muellmann, R.; Mosel, B.D. [Univ. Muenster (Germany)] [Univ. Muenster (Germany); Felser, C. [Johannes Gutenberg Univ., Mainz (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische Chemie] [Johannes Gutenberg Univ., Mainz (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische Chemie

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    YbZnSn, YbAgSn, and Yb{sub 2}Pt{sub 2}Pb were synthesized by reacting the elements in sealed tantalum tubes in a high-frequency furnace. The structures of YbAgSn and Yb{sub 2}Pt{sub 2}Pb were refined from single crystal X-ray data: YbAgPb type, P{bar 6}m2, a = 479.2(2) pm, c = 1087.3(3) pm, wR2 = 0.050, BASF = 0.34(8), 509 F{sup 2} values, 18 variables for Yb{sub 2}Pt{sub 2}Pb. The lattice constants of YbZnSn are confirmed: NdPtSb type, P6{sub 3}mc, a = 464.7(1) pm, c = 747.7(2) pm. The stannides YbZnSn and YbAgSn crystallize with superstructures of the AlB{sub 2} type. The zinc (silver) and tin atoms form ordered Zn{sub 3}Sn{sub 3} and Ag{sub 3}Sn{sub 3} hexagons, respectively. Magnetic susceptibility measurements on YbZnSn and YbAgSn show Pauli paramagnetism with room temperature susceptibilities of 2.5(1) {times} 10{sup {minus}9} and 4.6(1) {times} 10{sup {minus}9} m{sup 3}/mol. Electrical resistivity measurements indicate metallic conductivity with specific resistivities of 440 {+-} 40 {mu}{Omega}cm (YbZnSn) and 490 {+-} 40 {mu}{Omega}cm (YbAgSn) at 300 K. {sup 119}Sn Moessbauer spectra of YbZnSn show a single signal at room temperature with an isomer shift of {delta} = 1.85(1) mm/s. YbAgSn shows two superimposed signals at 78 K: a singlet at {delta} = 1.94(1) mm/s and a second signal at {delta} = 1.99(1) mm/s subjected to quadrupole splitting of {Delta}E{sub Q} = 1.35(1) mm/s, in agreement with the two crystallographically different tin sites.

  3. Name:_____________________________ (Web Exercise)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, David

    Name:_____________________________ (Web Exercise) Model quality, validation exercise. You will need a web link to MolProbity (with Java), and the file 1JIRon1S83_Arg66_supr.kin download- ed from the kinemage.biochem.duke.edu BCH681 web site, or from Sakai. Part 1: MolProbity Go to the MolProbity web

  4. High hydrogen production from glycerol or glucose by electrohydrogenesis using microbial electrolysis cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    if acetate is the main soluble fermentation end product. Further conver- sion to hydrogen without additional of 3.9 mol-H2/mol was obtained using glycerol, which is higher than that possible by fermentation by anaerobic fermentation [2­4]. However, only a maximum of 3 mol of H2 can be produced per mole of glycerol

  5. Intestinal metabolism of lineoleic acid during its intestinal absorption in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    was de- tected at the peak of absorption of !4C linoleic acid infused intraduodenally in the rat (Bernard, we investigated to what extent the intra- duodenally infused 14C linoleate taken up from the portal/30/30 mol/ mol/ mol) emulsified with 1 ml bile and 0.5 ml Ringer's solution were infused intraduodenally

  6. Plant lectins: the ties that bind in root symbiosis and plant defense

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Hoff, Peter L.; Brill, Laurence M.; Hirsch, Ann M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CA 92037, USA Mol Genet Genomics (2009) 282:1–15 Lis 2004;Mol Genet Genomics (2009) 282:1–15 DOI 10.1007/s00438-009-Etzler 1995). Mol Genet Genomics (2009) 282:1–15 ? Fig. 1

  7. Characterization of the maintained vegetative phase deletions from diploid wheat and their effect on VRN2 and FT transcript levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Distelfeld, Assaf; Dubcovsky, Jorge

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    100:6263–6268 Mol Genet Genomics (2010) 283:223–232 Yan L,Mol Genet Genomics (2010) 283:223–232 DOI 10.1007/s00438-jdubcovsky@ucdavis.edu Mol Genet Genomics (2010) 283:223–232

  8. ture National Research Initiative 1. Beckage NE (ed) (1996): Parasites and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vargo, Ed

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , Larsen N, Woese CR (1994) Microbiol Rev 58:10 30. Crozier RH, Crozier YC (1993) Genet- ics 133:97 31) Mol Biol Evol 11:459 38. Gaut BS, Lewis PO (1995) Mol Biol Evol 12:152 39. Yang Z (1993) Mol Biol Evol

  9. Above- and below-ground methane fluxes and methanotrophic activity in a landfill-cover soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroth, M.H., E-mail: martin.schroth@env.ethz.ch [Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, ETH Zuerich, Universitaetstrasse 16, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Eugster, W. [Institute of Agricultural Sciences, ETH Zuerich, Universitaetstrasse 2, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Gomez, K.E. [Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, ETH Zuerich, Universitaetstrasse 16, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Gonzalez-Gil, G. [Laboratory for Environmental Biotechnology, EPF Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Niklaus, P.A. [Institute of Agricultural Sciences, ETH Zuerich, Universitaetstrasse 2, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Oester, P. [Oester Messtechnik, Bahnhofstrasse 3, 3600 Thun (Switzerland)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We quantify above- and below-ground CH{sub 4} fluxes in a landfill-cover soil. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We link methanotrophic activity to estimates of CH{sub 4} loading from the waste body. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Methane loading and emissions are highly variable in space and time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Eddy covariance measurements yield largest estimates of CH{sub 4} emissions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Potential methanotrophic activity is high at a location with substantial CH{sub 4} loading. - Abstract: Landfills are a major anthropogenic source of the greenhouse gas methane (CH{sub 4}). However, much of the CH{sub 4} produced during the anaerobic degradation of organic waste is consumed by methanotrophic microorganisms during passage through the landfill-cover soil. On a section of a closed landfill near Liestal, Switzerland, we performed experiments to compare CH{sub 4} fluxes obtained by different methods at or above the cover-soil surface with below-ground fluxes, and to link methanotrophic activity to estimates of CH{sub 4} ingress (loading) from the waste body at selected locations. Fluxes of CH{sub 4} into or out of the cover soil were quantified by eddy-covariance and static flux-chamber measurements. In addition, CH{sub 4} concentrations at the soil surface were monitored using a field-portable FID detector. Near-surface CH{sub 4} fluxes and CH{sub 4} loading were estimated from soil-gas concentration profiles in conjunction with radon measurements, and gas push-pull tests (GPPTs) were performed to quantify rates of microbial CH{sub 4} oxidation. Eddy-covariance measurements yielded by far the largest and probably most representative estimates of overall CH{sub 4} emissions from the test section (daily mean up to {approx}91,500 {mu}mol m{sup -2} d{sup -1}), whereas flux-chamber measurements and CH{sub 4} concentration profiles indicated that at the majority of locations the cover soil was a net sink for atmospheric CH{sub 4} (uptake up to -380 {mu}mol m{sup -2} d{sup -1}) during the experimental period. Methane concentration profiles also indicated strong variability in CH{sub 4} loading over short distances in the cover soil, while potential methanotrophic activity derived from GPPTs was high (v{sub max} {approx} 13 mmol L{sup -1}(soil air) h{sup -1}) at a location with substantial CH{sub 4} loading. Our results provide a basis to assess spatial and temporal variability of CH{sub 4} dynamics in the complex terrain of a landfill-cover soil.

  10. Electroweak penguin decays at LHCb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Blake

    2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Promising ways to search for New Physics effects in radiative penguin decays are in the angular analysis of $B_{d} \\rightarrow K^{*0} \\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$, in the measurement of direct CP violation in $\\B_{d} \\rightarrow K^{*0}\\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$ and a time dependent analysis of $B_{s} \\rightarrow \\phi \\gamma$. All of these studies are being pursued at LHCb. First results will be shown from the 2010 and early 2011 data, with particular emphasis on $B_{d} \\rightarrow K^{*0} \\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$.

  11. Harmonic oscillator in twisted Moyal plane: eigenvalue problem and relevant properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahouton Norbert Hounkonnou; Dine Ousmane Samary

    2010-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper reports on a study of a harmonic oscillator (ho) in the twisted Moyal space, in a well defined matrix basis, generated by the vector fields $X_{a}=e_{a}^{\\mu}(x)\\partial_{\\mu}=(\\delta_{a}^{\\mu}+\\omega_{ab}^{\\mu}x^{b})\\partial_{\\mu}$, which induce a dynamical star product. The usual multiplication law can be hence reproduced in the $\\omega_{ab}^{\\mu}$ null limit. The star actions of creation and annihilation functions are explicitly computed. The ho states are infinitely degenerate with energies depending on the coordinate functions.

  12. Thermoterrabacterium ferrireducens gen. nov., sp. nov., a thermophilic anaerobic dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium from a continental hot spring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slobodkin, A.; Wiegel, J. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Reysenbach, A.L. [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A strain of a thermophilic, anaerobic, dissimilatory, Fe(III)-reducing bacterium, Thermoterrabacterium ferrireducens gen. nov., sp. nov. (type strain JW/AS-Y7{sup T}; DSM 11255), was isolated from hot springs in Yellowstone National Park and New Zealand. The gram-positive-staining cells occurred singly or in pairs as straight to slightly curved rods, 0.3 to 0.4 by 1.6 to 2.7 {mu}m, with rounded ends and exhibited a tumbling motility. Spores were not observed. The temperature range for growth was 50 to 74{degrees}C with an optimum at 65{degrees}C. The pH range for growth at 65{degrees}C was from 5.5 to 7.6, with an optimum at 6.0 to 6.2. The organism coupled the oxidation of glycerol to reduction of amorphous Fe(III) oxide or Fe(III) citrate as an electron acceptor. In the presence as well as in the absence of Fe(III) and in the presence of CO{sub 2}, glycerol was metabolized by incomplete oxidation to acetate as the only organic metabolic product; no H{sub 2} was produced during growth. The organism utilized glycerol, lactate, 1,2-propanediol, glycerate, pyruvate, glucose, fructose, mannose, and yeast extract as substrates. In the presence of Fe(III) the bacterium utilized molecular hydrogen. The organism reduced 9,10-anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic acid, fumarate (to succinate), and thiosulfate (to elemental sulfur) but did not reduce MnO{sub 2}, nitrate, sulfate, sulfite, or elemental sulfur. The G+C content of the DNA was 41 mol% (as determined by high-performance liquid chromatography). The 16S ribosomal DNA sequence analysis placed the isolated strain as a member of a new genus within the gram-type positive Bacillus-Clostridium subphylum.

  13. Expression of kidney injury molecule-1 (Kim-1) in relation to necrosis and apoptosis during the early stages of Cd-induced proximal tubule injury

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prozialeck, Walter C. [Department of Pharmacology, Midwestern University, 555 31st Street, Downers Grove, IL 60515 (United States)], E-mail: wprozi@midwestern.edu; Edwards, Joshua R.; Lamar, Peter C. [Department of Pharmacology, Midwestern University, 555 31st Street, Downers Grove, IL 60515 (United States); Liu, Jie [Inorganic Carcinogenesis Section, Laboratory of Comparative Carcinogenesis, NCI at NIEHS, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Vaidya, Vishal S. [Renal Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Bonventre, Joseph V. [Renal Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology (United States)

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cadmium (Cd) is a nephrotoxic industrial and environmental pollutant that causes a generalized dysfunction of the proximal tubule. Kim-1 is a transmembrane glycoprotein that is normally not detectable in non-injured kidney, but is up-regulated and shed into the urine during the early stages of Cd-induced proximal tubule injury. The objective of the present study was to examine the relationship between the Cd-induced increase in Kim-1 expression and the onset of necrotic and apoptotic cell death in the proximal tubule. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with 0.6 mg (5.36 {mu}mol) Cd/kg, subcutaneously, 5 days per week for up to 12 weeks. Urine samples were analyzed for levels of Kim-1 and the enzymatic markers of cell death, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and alpha-glutathione-S-transferase ({alpha}-GST). In addition, necrotic cells were specifically labeled by perfusing the kidneys in situ with ethidium homodimer using a procedure that has been recently developed and validated in the Prozialeck laboratory. Cryosections of the kidneys were also processed for the immunofluorescent visualization of Kim-1 and the identification of apoptotic cells by TUNEL labeling. Results showed that significant levels of Kim-1 began to appear in the urine after 6 weeks of Cd treatment, whereas the levels of total protein, {alpha}-GST and LDH were not increased until 8-12 weeks. Results of immunofluorescence labeling studies showed that after 6 weeks and 12 weeks, Kim-1 was expressed in the epithelial cells of the proximal tubule, but that there was no increase in the number of necrotic cells, and only a modest increase in the number of apoptotic cells at 12 weeks. These results indicate that the Cd-induced increase in Kim-1 expression occurs before the onset of necrosis and at a point where there is only a modest level of apoptosis in the proximal tubule.

  14. 3{alpha}-6{alpha}-Dihydroxy-7{alpha}-fluoro-5{beta}-cholanoate (UPF-680), physicochemical and physiological properties of a new fluorinated bile acid that prevents 17{alpha}-ethynyl-estradiol-induced cholestasis in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clerici, Carlo [Clinica di Gastroenterologia ed Epatologia, Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica e Sperimentale Universita degli Studi di Perugia, 06122 Perugia (Italy)]. E-mail: clerici@unipg.it; Castellani, Danilo [Clinica di Gastroenterologia ed Epatologia, Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica e Sperimentale Universita degli Studi di Perugia, 06122 Perugia (Italy); Asciutti, Stefania [Clinica di Gastroenterologia ed Epatologia, Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica e Sperimentale Universita degli Studi di Perugia, 06122 Perugia (Italy); Pellicciari, Roberto [Istituto di Chimica e Tecnologia del Farmaco, Universita degli Studi di Perugia, via del Liceo, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Setchell, Kenneth D.R. [Division of Pathology, Clinical Mass Spectrometry, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States)]|[Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati, College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States); O'Connell, Nancy C. [Division of Pathology, Clinical Mass Spectrometry, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States)]|[Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati, College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH 45229 (United States); Sadeghpour, Bahman; Camaioni, Emidio [Istituto di Chimica e Tecnologia del Farmaco, Universita degli Studi di Perugia, via del Liceo, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Fiorucci, Stefano; Renga, Barbara; Nardi, Elisabetta; Sabatino, Giuseppe; Clementi, Mattia; Giuliano, Vittorio; Baldoni, Monia; Orlandi, Stefano; Mazzocchi, Alessandro; Morelli, Antonio; Morelli, Olivia [Clinica di Gastroenterologia ed Epatologia, Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica e Sperimentale Universita degli Studi di Perugia, 06122 Perugia (Italy)

    2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    3{alpha}-6{alpha}-Dihydroxy-7{alpha}-fluoro-5{beta}-cholanoate (UPF-680), the 7{alpha}-fluorine analog of hyodeoxycholic acid (HDCA), was synthesized to improve bioavailability and stability of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). Acute rat biliary fistula and chronic cholestasis induced by 17{alpha}-ethynyl-estradiol (17EE) models were used to study and compare the effects of UPF-680 (dose range 0.6-6.0 {mu}mol/kg min) with UDCA on bile flow, biliary bicarbonate (HCO{sub 3} {sup -}), lipid output, biliary bile acid composition, hepatic enzymes and organic anion pumps. In acute infusion, UPF-680 increased bile flow in a dose-related manner, by up to 40.9%. Biliary HCO{sub 3} {sup -} output was similarly increased. Changes were observed in phospholipid secretion only at the highest doses. Treatment with UDCA and UPF-680 reversed chronic cholestasis induced by 17EE; in this model, UDCA had no effect on bile flow in contrast to UPF-680, which significantly increased bile flow. With acute administration of UPF-680, the biliary bile acid pool became enriched with unconjugated and conjugated UPF-680 (71.7%) at the expense of endogenous cholic acid and muricholic isomers. With chronic administration of UPF-680 or UDCA, the main biliary bile acids were tauro conjugates, but modification of biliary bile acid pool was greater with UPF-680. UPF-680 increased the mRNA for cytochrome P450 7A1 (CYP7A1) and cytochrome P450 8B (CYP8B). Both UDCA and UPF-680 increased the mRNA for Na{sup +} taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NCTP). In conclusion, UPF-680 prevented 17EE-induced cholestasis and enriched the biliary bile acid pool with less detergent and cytotoxic bile acids. This novel fluorinated bile acid may have potential in the treatment of cholestatic liver disease.

  15. Modeling the infiltration kinetics of molten aluminum into porous titanium carbide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muscat, D. (Univ. of Malta, Msida (Malta). Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering); Drew, R.A.L. (McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada))

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Capillary-induced melt infiltration is an attractive method of fabricating metal/ceramic composites, as it offers the advantage of producing material with a high ceramic content and near-net-shape fabrication, without the use of an external force. In this work, the kinetics of infiltration of molten Al in TiC preforms, having a pore size of approximately 1[mu]m and porosity ranging from 20 to 40 pct, were investigated. The rate of infiltration was continuously monitored using a Thermo-Gravimetric analyzer (TGA), which measured the weight change of the preform as the metal intruded the sample. Infiltration profiles were generated over a temperature range of 860 C to 1,085 C. At lower temperatures, an incubation period was evident in the profiles. The average activation energy for the different preforms was 90 kJ/mol, indicating that some form of mass-transfer mechanisms was involved in driving the process. Furthermore, sessile drop tests showed an unstable wetting angle over a long period of time. Such wetting kinetics were responsible for the incubation period during the infiltration. The infiltration rate was also seen to be slower as the preform density increased. This was due to the tortuous nature of the channels and was characterized using curves obtained for liquids infiltrating the same preforms at room temperature. Both the tortuosity and the unstable contact angle have to be considered when modeling the infiltration kinetics of such a system. The existing model was therefore modified by incorporating terms to describe the process more accurately. A good correlation with the experimental data was seen to exist.

  16. Cinfony - combining Open Source cheminformatics toolkits behind a common interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Boyle, Noel M; Hutchison, Geoffrey R

    2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    on molecules Atom Wraps an atom instance of the underlying toolkit MoleculeData Provides dictionary-like access to the information contained in the tag fields in SDF and MOL2 files Outputfile Handles multimolecule output file formats Smarts Wraps the SMARTS... .calcfp() output = cdk.Outputfile("sdf", "similar mols.sdf") for mol in cdk.readfile("sdf", "input file.sdf"): fp = mol.calcfp() if fp | targetfp >= 0.7: output.write(mol) output.close() Alternatively, we could just have made a single change to the original script...

  17. Process Engineering Thermodynamics 424304 E (4 sp)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    /mol) and calcium carbonate CaCO3 (M=100 g/mol) react to produce solid solution mineral dolomite MgCO3·CaCO3 (M=184 for the species, use the values fG298 = -1202.1 kJ/mol for MgCO3, fG298 = -1259.4 kJ/mol for CaCO3, fG298 = -2415.1 kJ/mol for MgCO3·CaCO3. See course material section 1.8 for more information. b. What

  18. QCD phase diagram at finite baryon and isospin chemical potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sasaki, Takahiro; Sakai, Yuji; Yahiro, Masanobu [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Kouno, Hiroaki [Department of Physics, Saga University, Saga 840-8502 (Japan)

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The phase structure of two-flavor QCD is explored for thermal systems with finite baryon- and isospin-chemical potentials, {mu}{sub B} and {mu}{sub iso}, by using the Polyakov-loop extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (PNJL) model. The PNJL model with the scalar-type eight-quark interaction can reproduce lattice QCD data at not only {mu}{sub iso}={mu}{sub B}=0, but also {mu}{sub iso}>0 and {mu}{sub B}=0. In the {mu}{sub iso}-{mu}{sub B}-T space, where T is temperature, the critical endpoint of the chiral phase transition in the {mu}{sub B}-T plane at {mu}{sub iso}=0 moves to the tricritical point of the pion-superfluidity phase transition in the {mu}{sub iso}-T plane at {mu}{sub B}=0 as {mu}{sub iso} increases. The thermodynamics at small T is controlled by {radical}({sigma}{sup 2}+{pi}{sup 2}) defined by the chiral and pion condensates, {sigma} and {pi}.

  19. Managing internode data communications for an uninitialized process in a parallel computer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J; Blocksome, Michael A; Miller, Douglas R; Parker, Jeffrey J; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian E

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A parallel computer includes nodes, each having main memory and a messaging unit (MU). Each MU includes computer memory, which in turn includes, MU message buffers. Each MU message buffer is associated with an uninitialized process on the compute node. In the parallel computer, managing internode data communications for an uninitialized process includes: receiving, by an MU of a compute node, one or more data communications messages in an MU message buffer associated with an uninitialized process on the compute node; determining, by an application agent, that the MU message buffer associated with the uninitialized process is full prior to initialization of the uninitialized process; establishing, by the application agent, a temporary message buffer for the uninitialized process in main computer memory; and moving, by the application agent, data communications messages from the MU message buffer associated with the uninitialized process to the temporary message buffer in main computer memory.

  20. Towards the Next Generation of Model-Driven Cloud Platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, Francesc

    Towards the Next Generation of Model-Driven Cloud Platforms Javier Esparza-Peidro, Francesc D. Mu~noz-Esco of Model-Driven Cloud Platforms Javier Esparza-Peidro, Francesc D. Mu~noz-Esco´i Institut Universitari Mixt

  1. Transaction Abort Rate Reduction with Prioritized Atomic Multicast Protocols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, Francesc

    and Francesc D. Mu~noz-Esco´i Instituto Tecnol´ogico de Inform´atica Universitat Polit`ecnica de Val Abort Rate Reduction with Prioritized Atomic Multicast Protocols Emili Miedes and Francesc D. Mu~noz-Esco

  2. The design and characterization of a microcalorimeter to aid drug discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McEuen, Scott Jacob

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the design and characterization of a microcalorimeter used to aid drug discovery. There are four key functional requirements for the device: (1.) 8.4 [mu]J energy resolution, (2.) 20 [mu]L reactant ...

  3. Experimental investigation of muon-catalyzed t + t fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogdanova, L. N. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, State Scientific Center of Russian Federation (Russian Federation); Bom, V. R. [Delft University of Technology (Netherlands); Demin, A. M. [All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics, Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Russian Federation); Demin, D. L. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dzhelepov Laboratory of Nuclear Problems (Russian Federation); Eijk, C. W. E. van [Delft University of Technology (Netherlands); Filchagin, S. V. [All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics, Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Russian Federation); Filchenkov, V. V.; Grafov, N. N. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dzhelepov Laboratory of Nuclear Problems (Russian Federation)], E-mail: grafov@nusun.jinr.ru; Grishechkin, S. K. [All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics, Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Russian Federation); Gritsaj, K. I.; Konin, A. D. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dzhelepov Laboratory of Nuclear Problems (Russian Federation); Kuryakin, A. V. [All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics, Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Russian Federation); Medved', S. V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dzhelepov Laboratory of Nuclear Problems (Russian Federation); Musyaev, R. K. [All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics, Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Russian Federation); Rudenko, A. I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dzhelepov Laboratory of Nuclear Problems (Russian Federation); Tumkin, D. P.; Vinogradov, Yu. I.; Yukhimchuk, A. A. [All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics, Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Russian Federation); Yukhimchuk, S. A.; Zinov, V. G. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dzhelepov Laboratory of Nuclear Problems (Russian Federation)] (and others)

    2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The muon-catalyzed fusion ({mu}CF) process in tritium was studied by the {mu}CF collaboration on the muon beam of the JINR Phasotron. The measurements were carried out with a liquid tritium target at the temperature 22 K and density approximately 1.25 of the liquid hydrogen density (LHD). Parameters of the {mu}CF cycle were determined: the tt{mu} muonic molecule formation rate {lambda}{sub tt{mu}} = 2.84(0.32) {mu}s{sup -1}, the tt{mu} fusion reaction rate {lambda}{sub f} = 15.6(2.0) {mu}s{sup -1}, and the probability of muon sticking to helium {omega}{sub tt}= 13.9(1.5)%. The results agree with those obtained earlier by other groups, but better accuracy was achieved due to our unique experimental method.

  4. Biochemistry and Structure-Function Relationships in the Proteinaceous Egg Capsules of Busycotypus canaliculatus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wasko, Stephen S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the MuSpot beamline at the BESSY synchrotron source (Berlinthe MuSpot beamline at the BESSY synchrotron source (Berlinusing a high intensity synchrotron source at BESSY (Berlin

  5. anomalous retroesophageal left: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mu+mu-gamma, through a t-channel exchange of an additional charged triplet Higgs boson. The DM is leptophilic which is useful for explaining the non-observation of any...

  6. analysis babar experiment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Experiment (arXiv) Summary: We search for a new light non-Standard Model CP-odd Higgs boson, A0, decaying to tau+tau-, mu+mu-, and invisible in radiative...

  7. Ceramic Mugs & Dishes Incandescent Light Bulbs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamamoto, Keith

    , MU East Rock Hall/19-B CELL PHONES - EYEGLASSES 654 Minnesota Street Room 208, copy room CVRI Helen. Zion Cancer Research Building N423 Parnassus Campus: eyeglasses "I" level, Optometry Store, MU West

  8. Design and development of a high-altitude, in-flight-deployable micro-UAV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tao, Tony S

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A micro-UAV ([mu] UAV) system was developed to provide maximum endurance for a small atmospheric sensing payload. The system, composed of a ([mu] UAV) and protective case, folds and fits into a MJU-10/B flare cartridge ...

  9. Search for High Mass Resonances Decaying to Muon Pairs in ?s=1.96??TeV pp? Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Gerry P.

    We present a search for a new narrow, spin-1, high mass resonance decaying to ?+?-+X [mu superscript + mu superscript - + X], using a matrix-element-based likelihood and a simultaneous measurement of the resonance mass and ...

  10. Univerzita Karlova v Praze Matematickofyzik#ln# fakulta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savicky, Petr

    #kladn#ch funkc#ch : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 83 7 Implementace automatick#ho derivov#n# v syst#mu UFO 84 7.1 Stru#n# popis syst#mu UFO : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 84 7.2 N#vrh implementace

  11. Lepton flavor violation decays with the fourth generation neutrino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu-Jun Huo; Tai-Fu Feng

    2002-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the lepton flavor violation decays, $\\tau \\to \\mu\\gamma$, $\\tau \\to e\\gamma$ and $\\mu \\to e\\gamma$, in the framwork of a squential fourth generation model with a heavy fourth neutrino, $\

  12. Role of Collaborative Academic Partnerships in Surgical Training, Education, and Provision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riviello, Robert; Ozgediz, Doruk; Hsia, Renee Y.; Azzie, Georges; Newton, Mark; Tarpley, John

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    members visited MU for didactics and collaborative research,are expected to give didactics for students and residents,

  13. $B_s \\to ?^+ ?^-$ and the upward-going muon flux from the WIMP annihilation in the sun or the earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seungwon Baek; Yeong Gyun Kim; P. Ko

    2005-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the upward-going muon flux due to the WIMP annihilations in the cores of the sun and the earth, including the upper bound on the branching ratio for $B_s \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ decay. We find that the constraint from $B_s \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ is very strong in most parameter space, and exclude the supergravity parameter space regions where the expected upward-going muon fluxes are within the expected reach of AMANDA II.

  14. ICCF 18 Statistics July 26, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    , not only is Prelas revisiting the potential of low-energy nuclear reactions -- or LENR -- but next week, MU

  15. One-loop phi-MHV amplitudes using the unitarity bootstrap: the general helicity case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. W. N. Glover; Pierpaolo Mastrolia; Ciaran Williams

    2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a Higgs boson coupled to gluons via the five-dimensional effective operator H tr G_{\\mu\

  16. A Survey of Residuated Lattices P. Jipsen and C. Tsinakis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jipsen, Peter

    for example [AF88], [Mu86], [Ha98] and [NPM99]. We conclude the introduction by summarizing the contents

  17. Translational Invariance and Noncommutative Field Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orfeu Bertolami

    2004-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Implications of noncommutative field theories with commutator of the coordinates of the form $[x^{\\mu},x^{\

  18. Homo-dimerization and ligand binding by the leucine-rich repeat domain at RHG1/RFS2 underlying resistance to two soybean pathogens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    change in free energy between the wild type protein (Pekingfree energy differences between the 3 mu- tants and the wild

  19. A FIRST ACCOUNT OF FRESHWATER POTAMOLEPID SPONGES (DEMOSPONGIAE, SPONGILLINA, POTAMOLEPIDAE) FROM THE MIDDLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Alexander P.

    documented from European sites including the famous Messel oil shales (Mu¨ller et al., 1982; Richter

  20. Search for the Higgs boson in H -> WW(*) decays in p(p)over-bar collisions at root(s)=1.96 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Christofek, L.; Coppage, Don; Gardner, J.; Hensel, Carsten; Jabeen, S.; Moulik, Tania; Wilson, Graham Wallace

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson in H -> WW(*) decays with e(+)e(-), e(+/-)mu(-/+), and mu(+)mu(-) final states in p (p) over bar collisions at a center-of-mass-energy of root s = 1.96 TeV. The data, collected from April 2002...