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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mtbe ethyl tertiary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

State Restrictions on Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (released in AEO2006)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

By the end of 2005, 25 States had barred, or passed laws banning, any more than trace levels of MTBE in their gasoline supplies, and legislation to ban MTBE was pending in 4 others. Some State laws address only MTBE; others also address ethers such as ethyl tertiary butyl ether (ETBE) and tertiary amyl methyl ether (TAME). AEO2006 assumes that all State MTBE bans prohibit the use of all ethers for gasoline blending.

Information Center

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

MTBE Production Economics  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

MTBE Production MTBE Production Economics Tancred C. M. Lidderdale Contents 1. Summary 2. MTBE Production Costs 3. Relationship between price of MTBE and Reformulated Gasoline 4. Influence of Natural Gas Prices on the Gasoline Market 5. Regression Results 6. Data Sources 7. End Notes 1. Summary Last year the price of MTBE (methyl tertiary butyl ether) increased dramatically on two occasions (Figure 1) (see Data Sources at end of article.): 1. Between April and June 2000, the price (U.S. Gulf Coast waterborne market) of MTBE rose from $1.00 per gallon to over $1.60 per gallon. This represented an increase in the price premium for MTBE over the wholesale price of conventional gasoline from its normal (1995 though 2000 average) $0.26 per gallon to $0.60 per gallon. The MTBE

3

MTBE, Oxygenates, and Motor Gasoline  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

MTBE, Oxygenates, and MTBE, Oxygenates, and Motor Gasoline Contents * Introduction * Federal gasoline product quality regulations * What are oxygenates? * Who gets gasoline with oxygenates? * Which areas get MTBE? * How much has been invested in MTBE production capacity? * What does new Ethanol capacity cost? * What would an MTBE ban cost? * On-line information resources * Endnotes * Summary of revisions to this analysis Introduction The blending of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) into motor gasoline has increased dramatically since it was first produced 20 years ago. MTBE usage grew in the early 1980's in response to octane demand resulting initially from the phaseout of lead from gasoline and later from rising demand for premium gasoline. The oxygenated gasoline program stimulated an

4

Status and Impact of State MTBE Bans  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Status and Impact of State MTBE Bans Status and Impact of State MTBE Bans Background As a result of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90), the year-round use of reformulated gasoline (RFG) has been required in cities with the worst smog problems since 1995 (Figure 1). One of the requirements of RFG specified by CAAA90 is a 2- percent oxygen requirement, which is met by blending "oxygenates," 1 including methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) and ethanol, into the gasoline. MTBE is the oxygenate used in almost all RFG outside of the Midwest. Ethanol is currently used in the Midwest as an oxygenate in RFG and as an octane booster and volume extender in conventional gasoline. Several years ago, MTBE was detected in water supplies scattered throughout the country, but predominantly in areas using RFG. MTBE from RFG was apparently

5

Motor Gasoline Outlook and State MTBE Bans  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Motor Gasoline Outlook Motor Gasoline Outlook and State MTBE Bans Tancred Lidderdale Contents 1. Summary 2. MTBE Supply and Demand 3. Ethanol Supply 4. Gasoline Supply 5. Gasoline Prices A. Long-Term Equilibrium Price Analysis B. Short-Term Price Volatility 6. Conclusion 7. Appendix A. Estimating MTBE Consumption by State 8. Appendix B. MTBE Imports and Exports 9. Appendix C. Glossary of Terms 10. End Notes 11. References 1. Summary The U.S. is beginning the summer 2003 driving season with lower gasoline inventories and higher prices than last year. Recovery from this tight gasoline market could be made more difficult by impending State bans on the blending of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) into gasoline that are scheduled to begin later this year. Three impending State bans on MTBE blending could significantly affect gasoline

6

Eliminating MTBE in Gasoline in 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

02/22/2006 02/22/2006 Eliminating MTBE in Gasoline in 2006 Summary In 2005, a number of petroleum companies announced their intent to remove methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) from their gasoline in 2006. Companies' decisions to eliminate MTBE have been driven by State bans due to water contamination concerns, continuing liability exposure from adding MTBE to gasoline, and perceived potential for increased liability exposure due to the elimination of the oxygen content requirement for reformulated gasoline (RFG) included in the Energy Policy Act of 2005. EIA's informal discussions with a number of suppliers indicate that most of the industry is trying to move away from MTBE before the 2006 summer driving season. Currently, the largest use of MTBE is in RFG consumed on the East Coast outside of

7

Ethyl-tertiary-butyl-ether (ETBE) as an aviation fuel: Eleventh international symposium on alcohol fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses the preliminary flight testing of an aircraft using neat burning ethyl-tertiary-butyl-ether (ETBE) as a fuel. No additional changes were made to the fuel delivery systems which had previously been modified to provide the higher fuel flow rates required to operate the engine on neat ethanol. Air-fuel ratios were manually adjusted with the mixture control. This system allows the pilot to adjust the mixture to compensate for changes in air density caused by altitude, pressure and temperature. The engine was instrumented to measure exhaust gas temperatures (EGT), cylinder head temperatures (CHT), and fuel flows, while the standard aircraft instruments were used to collect aircraft performance data. Baseline engine data for ETBE and Avgas are compared. Preliminary data indicates the technical and economic feasibility of using ETBE as an aviation fuel for the piston engine fleet. Furthermore, the energy density of ETBE qualifies it as a candidate for a turbine engine fuel of which 16.2 billion gallons are used in the US each year.

Maben, G.D.; Shauck, M.E.; Zanin, M.G.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

8

Impact of Renewable Fuels Standard/MTBE Provisions of S. 517 Requested by Sens. Daschle & Murkowski  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Additional analysis of the impact of the Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS) and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) ban provisions of S. 517.

Information Center

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Impact of Renewable Fuels Standard/MTBE Provisions of S.1766  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

SR/OIAF/2002-06 Release date: March 2002 This report analyzes the Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS)/methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) provisions of S. 1766.

10

Preparations for Meeting New York and Connecticut MTBE Bans  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In response to a Congressional request, EIA examined the progress being made to meet the bans on the use of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) being implemented in New York and Connecticut at the end of 2003.

Joanne Shore

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Motor Gasoline Outlook and State MTBE Bans  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The U.S. is beginning the summer 2003 driving season with lower gasoline inventories and higher prices than last year. Recovery from this tight gasoline market could be made more difficult by impending State bans on the blending of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) into gasoline that are scheduled to begin later this year.

Information Center

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

MTBE, Oxygenates, and Motor Gasoline (Released in the STEO October 1999)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The blending of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) into motor gasoline has increased dramatically since it was first produced 20 years ago. MTBE usage grew in the early 1980's in response to octane demand resulting initially from the phaseout of lead from gasoline and later from rising demand for premium gasoline. The oxygenated gasoline program stimulated an increase in MTBE production between 1990 and 1994. MTBE demand increased from 83,000 in 1990 to 161,000 barrels per day in 1994. The reformulated gasoline (RFG) program provided a further boost to oxygenate blending. The MTBE contained in motor gasoline increased to 269,000 barrels per day by 1997.

Information Center

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

MTBE movements between Texas Gulf Coast plants to be enhanced  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that Texas Eastern Products Pipeline Co. (Teppco), Houston, has begun construction of its shuttle pipeline, a 10-mile, 6 and 8-in. line to move methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) between producers and refiners along the Houston Ship Channel. Funding for the project has been approved, rights-of-way are secured, and procurement of materials is under way, according to Teppco. The line will flow from the western edge of Shell's refinery eastward to storage facilities of Teppco's Baytown terminal. The shuttle pipeline anticipates the US requirement for oxygenated gasolines that takes effect Nov. 1. Approximately 70% of the available US merchant capacity for MTBE is located along the shuttle's path, Teppco says.

Not Available

1992-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

14

MTBE Production Economics - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... MTBE production declined from 210,000 barrels per day in October 2000, to ... the United States use this process ... ethane and propane) ...

15

Two US markets, or one? How the MTBE-gasoline relationship is evolving  

SciTech Connect

This issue of Energy Detente features the price sensitivity of Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether. Data is presented for US wholesale gasoline prices vs. MTBE for the 20-month period beginning in June 1994 and ending in January 1996, and the data is discussed. Also contained in this issue is the refining netback data and the fuel price/tax data for the period ending January 5, 1996.

1996-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

16

MTBE Prices Responded to Natural Gas Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: On top of the usual factors impacting gasoline prices, natural gas has had some influence recently. MTBE is an oxygenate used in most of the RFG consumed in the U.S. Generally, it follows gasoline prices and its own supply/demand balance factors. But this winter, we saw it respond strongly to natural gas prices. MTBE is made from methanol and isobutylene, which in turn come from methane and butane. Both methane and butane come from natural gas streams. Until this year, the price of natural gas has been so low that it had little effect. But the surge that occurred in December and January pulled MTBE up . Keep in mind that about 11% MTBE is used in a gallon of RFG, so a 30 cent increase in MTBE is only about a 3 cent increase in the price of RFG. While we look ahead at this summer, natural gas prices should be

17

Factors influencing biological treatment of MTBE contaminated ground water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) contamination has complicated the remediation of gasoline contaminated sites. Many sites are using biological processes for ground water treatment and would like to apply the same technology to MTBE. However, the efficiency and reliability of MTBE biological treatment is not well documented. The objective of this study was to examine the operational and environmental variables influencing MTBE biotreatment. A fluidized bed reactor was installed at a fuel transfer station and used to treat ground water contaminated with MTBE and gasoline hydrocarbons. A complete set of chemical and operational data was collected during this study and a statistical approach was used to determine what variables were influencing MTBE treatment efficiency. It was found that MTBE treatment was more sensitive to up-set than gasoline hydrocarbon treatment. Events, such as excess iron accumulation, inhibited MTBE treatment, but not hydrocarbon treatment. Multiple regression analysis identified biomass accumulation and temperature as the most important variables controlling the efficiency of MTBE treatment. The influent concentration and loading of hydrocarbons, but not MTBE, also impacted MTBE treatment efficiency. The results of this study suggest guidelines for improving MTBE treatment. Long cell retention times in the reactor are necessary for maintaining MTBE treatment. The onset of nitrification only occurs when long cell retention times have been reached and can be used as an indicator in fixed film reactors that conditions favorable to MTBE treatment exist. Conversely, if the reactor can not nitrify, it is unlikely to have stable MTBE treatment.

Stringfellow, William T.; Hines Jr., Robert D.; Cockrum, Dirk K.; Kilkenny, Scott T.

2001-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

18

Radiation Chemistry of MTBE in Aqueous Solution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methyl-tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE) in Aqueous Solution Stephen P. Mezyk, Jace Jones, William J. Cooper, Thomas Tobien, Michael G. Nickelsen, J. Wesley Adams, Kevin E. O'Shea, David M....

19

The Social Costs of an MTBE Ban in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Nation’s Natural Gas Demand. ” Washington DC, 1999.Effects of MTBE Ban on Natural Gas Demand Ethanol Tax CreditEffects of MTBE Ban on Natural Gas Demand Ethanol Tax Credit

Rausser, Gordon C.; Adams, Gregory D.; Montgomery, W. David; Smith, Anne E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Eliminating MTBE in Gasoline in 2006  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

A review of the market implications resulting from the rapid change from MTBE- to ethanol-blended RFG on the East Coast and in Texas. Strains in ethanol supply and distribution will increase the potential for price volatility in these regions this summer.

Joanne Shore

2006-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mtbe ethyl tertiary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Ecological hazards of MTBE exposure: A research agenda  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel oxygenates are used in metropolitan areas across the United States in order to reduce the amount of carbon monoxide released into the atmosphere during the winter. The most commonly used fuel oxygenate is Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). Its widespread use has resulted in releases into the environment. To date there has been only minimal effort to investigate ecological impacts caused by exposure to concentrations of MTBE typically found in environmental media. Research into the potential for MTBE to adversely affect ecological receptors is essential. Acquisition of such baselines data is especially critical in light of continuing inputs and potential accumulation of MTBE in environmental media. A research Agenda is included in this report and addresses: Assessing Ecological Impacts, Potential Ecological Impacts of MTBE (aquatic organisms, terrestrial organisms), Potential Ecological Endpoints, and A Summary of Research Needs.

Carlsen, T.; Hall, L.; Rice, D.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Characterizing MTBE Cometabolism and Propane Metabolism by Mycobacterium austroafricanum JOB5.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Characterizing MTBE Cometabolism and Propane Metabolism by Mycobacterium austroafricanum JOB5. (Under the direction of Michael R. Hyman.) Cometabolic transformations are unable to support cell growth.… (more)

House, Alan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Experimental Pathology Laboratories, Inc. Ethyl-Tertiary-Butyl Ether  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a plantation about 15-year-old in the Les Cedres area, near Montreal (45820H N, 73854H W). Trees in open

Bandettini, Peter A.

24

Development of Supported Polymeric Liquid Membrane Technology for Aqueous MTBE Mitigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of MTBE (methyl tert-butyl ether) as a gasoline additive has generated a serious, widespread groundwater contamination problem in California. This study evaluated the use of supported polymeric liquid membrane technology in the remediation of MTBE contaminated groundwater.

2002-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

25

U.S. Exports to Venezuela of MTBE (Thousand Barrels per Day)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Exports to Venezuela of MTBE (Thousand Barrels per Day) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 2005: 9: 10: 18: 9: 7: 8: 21: 2006: 18: 11: 20: 26 ...

26

The social costs of an MTBE ban in California (Condensed version)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an equivalent quantity (in energy terms), oil imports, sinceworld oil price times the equilibrium quantity of importsquantities of ethanol and MTBE were used there would be no impact on US oil

Rausser, Gordon C.; Adams, Gregory D.; Montgomery, W. David; Smith, Anne E.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

The social costs of an MTBE ban in California (Condensed version)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an equivalent quantity (in energy terms), oil imports, sinceworld oil price times the equilibrium quantity of importsquantities of ethanol and MTBE were used there would be no impact on US oil imports.

Rausser, Gordon C.; Adams, Gregory D.; Montgomery, W. David; Smith, Anne E.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Preparations for Meeting New York and Connecticut MTBE Bans  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Preparations for Meeting New York and Connecticut MTBE Bans October 2003 Office of Oil and Gas Energy Information Administration U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Contacts and Acknowledgments This report was prepared by the Office of Oil and Gas of the Energy Information Administration (EIA) under the direction of John Cook, Director, Petroleum Division. Questions concerning the report may be directed to Joanne Shore (202/586-4677),

29

Automobile proximity and indoor residential concentrations of BTEX and MTBE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Attached garages have been identified as important sources of indoor residential air pollution. However, the literature lacks information on how the proximity of cars to the living area affects indoor concentrations of gasoline-related compounds, and the origin of these pollutants. We analyzed data from the Relationships of Indoor, Outdoor, and Personal Air (RIOPA) study and evaluated 114 residences with cars in an attached garage, detached garage or carport, or without cars. Results indicate that homes with cars in attached garages were affected the most. Concentrations in homes with cars in detached garages and residences without cars were similar. The contribution from gasoline-related sources to indoor benzene and MTBE concentrations appeared to be dominated by car exhaust, or a combination of tailpipe and gasoline vapor emissions. Residing in a home with an attached garage could lead to benzene exposures ten times higher than exposures from commuting in heavy traffic.

Corsi, Dr. Richard [University of Texas, Austin; Morandi, Dr. Maria [University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston; Siegel, Dr. Jeffrey [University of Texas, Austin; Hun, Diana E [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Ethyl Lactate Solvents - Argonne National Laboratory  

Technology Development and Commemrcialization ETHYL LACTATE SOLVENTS: Low-Cost and Environmentally Friendly Argonne National Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy

31

Tertiary carbonate reservoirs in Indonesia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon production from Tertiary carbonate reservoirs accounted for ca. 10% of daily Indonesian production at the beginning of 1978. Environmentally, the reservoirs appear as parts of reef complexes and high-energy carbonate deposits within basinal areas situated mainly in the back arc of the archipelago. Good porosities of the reservoirs are represented by vugular/moldic and intergranular porosity types. The reservoirs are capable of producing prolific amounts of hydrocarbons: production tests in Salawati-Irian Jaya reaches maximum values of 32,000 bpd, and in Arun-North Sumatra tests recorded 200 MMCF gas/day. Significant hydrocarbon accumulations are related to good reservoir rocks in carbonates deposited as patch reefs, pinnacle reefs, and platform complexes. Exploration efforts expand continuously within carbonate formations which are extensive horizontally as well as vertically in the Tertiary stratigraphic column.

Nayoan, G.A.S.; Arpandi; Siregar, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Process for the preparation of ethyl benzene  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ethyl benzene is produced in a catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 50 C to 300 C, using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic by feeding ethylene to the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux to result in a molar excess present in the reactor to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene and diethyl benzene in the bottoms. The bottoms are fractionated, the ethyl benzene recovered and the bottoms are contacted with benzene in the liquid phase in a fixed bed straight pass reactor under conditions to transalkylate the benzene thereby converting most of the diethyl benzene to ethyl benzene which is again separated and recovered. 2 figs.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

1995-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

33

Process for the preparation of ethyl benzene  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ethyl benzene is produced in a catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 50.degree. C. to 300.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic by feeding ethylene to the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux to result in a molar excess present in the reactor to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene and diethyl benzene in the bottoms. The bottoms are fractionated, the ethyl benzene recovered and the bottoms are contacted with benzene in the liquid phase in a fixed bed straight pass reactor under conditions to transalkylate the benzene thereby converting most of the diethyl benzene to ethyl benzene which is again separated and recovered.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Houston, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Houston, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

FCC LPG olefinicity and branching enhanced by octane catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Refiners are increasingly recognizing the downstream opportunities for fluid catalytic cracking LPG olefins for the production of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), ethyl tertiary butyl ether (ETBE, if the ethanol subsidy is extended to the production of ETBE), and as petrochemical feedstocks. Some of new gasoline FCC octane-enhancing catalysts can support those opportunities because their low non-framework alumina (low NFA) preserve both LPG olefinicity and promote branching of the LPG streams from the FCCU. The combined effect results in more isobutane for alkylate feed, more propylene in the propane/propylene stream, and more isobutene - which makes the addition of an MTBE unit very enticing.

Keyworth, D.A.; Reid, T.A.; Kreider, K.R.; Yatsu, C.A.

1989-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

35

Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a volatile organic com-pound (VOC) derived from natural gas that is added to gas-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is a volatile organic com- pound (VOC) derived from natural gas Water in Urban and Agricultural Areas made from methanol, which is derived primarily from natural gas that is added to gas- oline either seasonally or year round in many parts of the United States to increase

36

Tertiary Storage: Current Status and Future Trends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report summarizes current state of the art in tertiary storage systems. We begin with a comprehensive discussion of magnetic tape and optical storage technologies. This is followed by a classification of commercial products based on their performance characteristics. Our analysis of product data indicates that in contrast to disk technology, tertiary storage products have significant variablility in terms of data transfer rates as well as other performance figures. We then summarize efforts in the areas of operating systems, databases and advanced applications to integrate tertiary storage. We point out that different assumptions about the underlying technology result in entirely different algorithms and system design. We conclude the report with a speculation of future trends. 1 Introduction With the recent improvements in network and processor speeds, several data intensive applications have become much more feasible than ever before. Examples of such applications include digit...

S. Prabhakar; D. Agrawal; A. El Abbadi; A. Singh; A. El; Abbadi A. Singh

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

SUMMARY OF TERTIARY COAL RESOURCES OF THE DENVER BASIN, COLORADO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter SD SUMMARY OF TERTIARY COAL RESOURCES OF THE DENVER BASIN, COLORADO By D. J. Nichols in U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1625-A 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones here or on this symbol in the toolbar to return. 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal

38

A SUMMARY OF COAL IN THE COALMONT FORMATION (TERTIARY),  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter SN A SUMMARY OF COAL IN THE COALMONT FORMATION (TERTIARY), NORTH PARK BASIN, COLORADO By S assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great

39

The Accurate Computer Simulation of Phase Equilibrium for Complex Fluid Mixtures. Application to Binaries Involving isobutene, methanol, MTBE, and n-butane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have developed a new method, called the Reaction Gibbs Ensemble Monte Carlo (RGEMC) method for the computer simulation of the phase equilibria for multicomponent mixtures, given an intermolecular potential model for the constituent molecular species. The approach treats the phase equilibrium conditions as a special type of chemical reaction, and incorporates knowledge of the pure-substance vapor pressure data into the simulations. Unlike macroscopic thermodynamic-based approaches like the Wilson and the UNIFAC approximations, no experimental information concerning the mixtures is required. In addition to the PTxy phase equilibrium data, the volumetric properties of the mixture are calculated. We developed intermolecular potential models based on the OPLS potential models of Jorgensen, and used the RGEMC method to predict phase equilibrium data for the binary systems isobutene+MTBE and the binaries formed by methanol with isobutene, MTBE, and n-butane. The predictions are excellent, ...

Martin Lísal; William R. Smith; Ivo Nezbeda

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Ultrasonic Relaxation in Ethanol?Ethyl Halide Mixtures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ultrasonic studies in mixtures of ethanol and various ethyl halides show that maxima exist in the plots of the absorption coefficient versus concentration. These maxima are located at relatively small ethanol concentrations. The measurements made include a detailed investigation of the temperature and frequency dependence of the absorption in the ethanol?ethyl chloride system and somewhat less complete studies of the ethanol?ethyl bromide and ethanol?ethyl iodide systems. In each of the systems the measurements were made as a function of concentration. The results in the ethanol?ethyl chloride mixtures indicate the presence of a single relaxation process occurring in the range of measurement (15?165 MHz). The mechanism for this relaxation process is considered both in terms of a quasichemical association theory and in terms of a fluctuating concentration theory. The suggestion is made that the relaxational behavior may be connected with the existence azeotropic concentrations in these mixtures.

V. A. Solovyev; C. J. Montrose; M. H. Watkins; T. A. Litovitz

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mtbe ethyl tertiary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Catalytic distillation for the synthesis of tertiary butyl alcohol.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Catalytic Distillation for the synthesis of tertiary butyl alcohol (TBA) is investigated in this thesis. The solvent, ethylene glycol, is proposed as a means of… (more)

Safinski, Tomasz

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Aqueous flooding methods for tertiary oil recovery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of aqueous flooding of subterranean oil bearing formation for tertiary oil recovery involves injecting through a well into the formation a low alkaline pH aqueous sodium bicarbonate flooding solution. The flooding solution's pH ranges from about 8.25 to 9.25 and comprises from 0.25 to 5 weight percent and preferably about 0.75 to 3.0 weight percent of sodium bicarbonate and includes a petroleum recovery surfactant of 0.05 to 1.0 weight percent and between 1 and 20 weight percent of sodium chloride. After flooding, an oil and water mixture is withdrawn from the well and the oil is separated from the oil and water mixture.

Peru, Deborah A. (Bartlesville, OK)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

A Brief Survey Of Tertiary Storage Systems And Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report summarizes current state of the art in tertiary storage systems. We also summarize the current technologies and research efforts to integrate tertiary storage in operating systems, databases and advanced applications. Appeared in ACM Symposium on Applied Computing, ACM SAC, San Jose Feb.-Mar. 1997 1 Introduction With the recent improvements in network and processor speeds, several data intensive applications have become much more feasible than ever before. These applications are characterized by very large computational and storage requirements. In the present commercial setting and most likely in the near future, the only practical solution for storing such enormous amounts of data is Work partially supported by a research grant from NSF/ARPA/NASA IRI9411330, and from NSF CDA9421978 and by a research gift from NEC Japan. tertiary storage. Although tertiary storage, in particular magnetic tapes, has been used solely for archiving or backup purposes, the exploding stora...

S. Prabhakar; D. Agrawal; A. El Abbadi; A. Singh; A. El; Abbadi A. Singh

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

North Burbank Unit Tertiary Recovery Pilot Test. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the last fifteen months of the project, fresh water injection was continued, while efforts were made to raise injection rates. Chemical analyses of fluids showed that production of surfactant components and polyacrylamide declined steadily almost to the vanishing point in all the producers. The oil production rate has declined slowly since reaching its peak level of 286 BPD in April 1978, and appears to be on an exponential decline curve which projects the continuation of tertiary oil production several years into the future. As of August 11, 1979 (expiration date), the total oil production rate was about 195 BPD at a water-oil ratio of about 66. At that time, a total of 153,500 barrels of tertiary oil had been recovered. It is predicted that 283,000 barrels of tertiary oil will be recovered if the pilot is operated to the economic limit of the wells. This will require an additional 9 years at present rates of injection.

Trantham, J.C. (ed.)

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

A SUMMARY OF COAL IN THE FORT UNION FORMATION (TERTIARY), BIGHORN BASIN,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter SB A SUMMARY OF COAL IN THE FORT UNION FORMATION (TERTIARY), BIGHORN BASIN, WYOMING assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U...........................................................................................................................SB-1 Coal Production History

46

A SUMMARY OF TERTIARY COAL RESOURCES OF THE WIND RIVER BASIN, WYOMING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter SW A SUMMARY OF TERTIARY COAL RESOURCES OF THE WIND RIVER BASIN, WYOMING By R.M. Flores of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great

47

A SUMMARY OF TERTIARY COAL RESOURCES OF THE RATON BASIN, COLORADO AND NEW MEXICO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter SR A SUMMARY OF TERTIARY COAL RESOURCES OF THE RATON BASIN, COLORADO AND NEW MEXICO By R of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great

48

Tertiary Containment in a Multi-Room Tritium Facility  

SciTech Connect

An experimental system to provide tertiary containment at Mound has been upgraded to support a new multi-room tritium handling facility. This system is used to remove tritium from room air in the event of primary (process) and secondary (glovebox) containment failure. The upgraded system includes a faster response time, piping and valves that are more leaktight, and a new control panel that better indicates the system status and operating conditions.

Kent, L. R.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

EXTRACTION OF HEXAVALENT PLUTONIUM FROM AQUEOUS ACIDIC SOLUTIONS WITH ETHYL SULFIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for extracting Pu>s6/sup > /om an aqueous ammonium nitrate-containing nitric acid solution with ethyl sulfide.

Seaborg, G.T.

1961-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

50

DISCOVERY OF METHYL ACETATE AND GAUCHE ETHYL FORMATE IN ORION  

SciTech Connect

We report on the discovery of methyl acetate, CH{sub 3}COOCH{sub 3}, through the detection of a large number of rotational lines from each one of the spin states of the molecule: AA species (A{sub 1} or A{sub 2}), EA species (E{sub 1}), AE species (E{sub 2}), and EE species (E{sub 3} or E{sub 4}). We also report, for the first time in space, the detection of the gauche conformer of ethyl formate, CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OCOH, in the same source. The trans conformer is also detected for the first time outside the Galactic center source SgrB2. From the derived velocity of the emission of methyl acetate, we conclude that it arises mainly from the compact ridge region with a total column density of (4.2 {+-} 0.5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. The derived rotational temperature is 150 K. The column density for each conformer of ethyl formate, trans and gauche, is (4.5 {+-} 1.0) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}. Their abundance ratio indicates a kinetic temperature of 135 K for the emitting gas and suggests that gas-phase reactions could participate efficiently in the formation of both conformers in addition to cold ice mantle reactions on the surface of dust grains.

Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Lopez, A.; Caro, G. M. Munoz [Department of Astrophysics, CAB, INTA-CSIC, Crta Torrejon-Ajalvir, km. 4, E-28850 Torrejon de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain); Kleiner, I.; Nguyen, H. V. L., E-mail: terceromb@cab.inta-csic.es, E-mail: jcernicharo@cab.inta-csic.es, E-mail: lopezja@cab.inta-csic.es, E-mail: munozcg@cab.inta-csic.es, E-mail: isabelle.kleiner@lisa.u-pec.fr, E-mail: nguyen@pc.rwth-aachen.de [Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systemes Atmospheriques, CNRS/IPSL UMR7583 et Universites Paris Diderot et Paris Est, 61 av. General de Gaulle, F-94010 Creteil (France)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

51

Scheduling Tertiary I/O in Database Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the problem of scheduling I/O requests for tertiary storage libraries to improve performance. The focus is on scheduling policies that process all requests on a loaded medium before unloading it. For single drive settings an efficient algorithm that produces optimal schedules is developed. For multiple drives the problem is shown to be NP-Complete. Efficient and effective heuristics are presented for the multiple drives case. The scheduling policies developed achieve significant performance gains over more naive first come first server policies. The study is general enough to be applicable to any storage library handling removable media, such as tapes or optical disks.

Sunil Prabhakar; Divyakant Agrawal; Amr El Abbadi; Ambuj Singh

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

NETL: Gasifipedia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

chemical feedstock for production of a range of important industrial chemicals, primarily acetic acid, formaldehyde, methyl methacrylate and methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE)....

53

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Ethanol Plant Production Ethanol Plant Production Definitions Key Terms Definition Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Fuel Ethanol An anhydrous alcohol (ethanol with less than 1% water) intended for gasoline blending as described in the Oxygenates definition. Oxygenates Substances which, when added to gasoline, increase the amount of oxygen in that gasoline blend. Ethanol, Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE), Ethyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (ETBE), and methanol are common oxygenates. Fuel Ethanol: Blends of up to 10 percent by volume anhydrous ethanol (200 proof) (commonly referred to as the "gasohol waiver"). Methanol: Blends of methanol and gasoline-grade tertiary butyl alcohol (GTBA) such that the total oxygen content does not exceed 3.5 percent by weight and the ratio of methanol to GTBA is less than or equal to 1. It is also specified that this blended fuel must meet ASTM volatility specifications (commonly referred to as the "ARCO" waiver).

54

EXTRACTION OF TETRAVALENT PLUTONIUM VALUES WITH METHYL ETHYL KETONE, METHYL ISOBUTYL KETONE ACETOPHENONE OR MENTHONE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for extracting tetravalent plutonium from an aqueous acid solution with methyl ethyl ketone, methyl isobutyl ketone, or acetophenone and with the extraction of either tetravalent or hexavalent plutonium into menthone. (AEC)

Seaborg, G.T.

1961-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

West Hackberry Tertiary Project. Annual report, September 3, 1997--September 2, 1998  

SciTech Connect

The following report is the Project Management Plan for the fifth year of the West Hackberry Tertiary Project. The West Hackberry Tertiary Project is one of four mid-term projects selected by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the DOE`s Class 1 Program for the development of advance recovery technologies in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs. The West Hackberry Tertiary Project is a field test of the idea that air injection can be combined with the Double Displacement Process to produce a low cost tertiary recovery process which is economic at current oil prices. The Double Displacement Process is the gas displacement of a water invaded oil column for the purpose of recovering tertiary oil by gravity drainage. The Double Displacement Process is based upon the concept that in fields such as West Hackberry waterdrive recoveries are typically 50%-60% of the original oil in place while gravity drainage recoveries average 80%-90% of the original oil in place. Therefore, by injecting a gas into a watered out reservoir, a gas cap will form an additional oil can be recovered due to gravity drainage. Although the Double Displacement Process has been shown to be successful in recovering tertiary oil in other fields, this project will be the first to utilize air injection in the Double Displacement Process. The use of air injection in this process combines the benefits of air`s low cost and universal accessibility with the potential for accelerated oil recovery due to the combustion process. If successful, this project will demonstrate that the use of air injection in the Double Displacement Process will result in an economically viable tertiary process in reservoirs where tertiary oil recovery is presently uneconomical.

Gillham, T.H.

1997-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

56

MTBE (Oxygenate) Imports from OPEC  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

57

A new antifouling hybrid CDP formulation with ethyl heptanoate: evaluation of AF performance at Ayajin harbor, east coast of Korea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Antifouling (AF) efficiency of a nontoxic aliphatic ester, ethyl heptanoate was evaluated against spores of a fouling alga Ulva pertusa and a ship fouling diatom Amphora coffeaeformis. Based on the nontoxic AF activity exhibited in the laboratory bioassays, ... Keywords: antifouling, ethyl heptanoate, fouling resistance, hybrid controlled depletion paint (CDP), zinc pyrithione

M. Sidharthan; Sang Mok Jung; Haridatta Bhatta Rai; Ji Hyun Lee; Chi Young Lim; Young-Kyu Kang; N. S. Park; H. W. Shin

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Combustion chemical kinetics of biodiesel and related compounds (methyl and ethyl esters): Experiments and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Combustion chemical kinetics of biodiesel and related compounds (methyl and ethyl esters and reduced exhaust emissions have led to the emergence of new fuels and combustion devices. Over the past ten years, considerable effort has gone into understanding combustion phenomena in relation to emerging fuel

59

Monitoring Electricity Consumption in the Tertiary Sector- A Project within the Intelligent Energy Europe Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electricity consumption in the tertiary sector in the EU is still increasing and a further increase is expected of more than 2 % per year during the next 15 years. This sector includes companies and institutions of public and private services with heterogeneous economic and energy-related characteristics. Building managers and decision-makers are not enough informed about the electricity consumption structure and electricity-saving potentials. Within the EU Intelligent Energy project EL-TERTIARY an overview of existing studies showed that the availability of disaggregated data on electricity consumption and its use by purpose (lighting, office equipment, ventilation, air conditioning, etc.) is poor. The methods of determining the types of end-uses are weak; most studies are based on calculations and estimations, only a few on measurement. In addition, many of the results are not published. EL-TERTIARY developed an internet-based methodology for monitoring electricity consumption. It was applied in more than 120 case studies in 12 EU countries. They cover various types of buildings: offices, schools, universities, kindergartens, hotels, supermarkets, and hospitals evaluating more than 900 technical systems. On the background of ongoing activities on EU level, such as directives, research and implementation projects the paper illustrates the concept of EL-TERTIARY, the newly developed methodology for the documentation of building audits and monitoring as well as selected results.

Plesser, S.; Fisch, M. N.; Gruber, E.; Schlomann, B.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Enhanced diisobutene production in the presence of methyl tertiary butyl ether  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In the liquid phase reaction of isobutene in the presence of resin cation exchange resins with itself in a C[sub 4] hydrocarbon stream to form dimers, the formation of higher polymers, oligomers, and co-dimer by-products is suppressed by the presence of 0.0001 to 1 mole per mole of isobutene of methyl tertiary butyl ether. 1 fig.

Smith, L.A. Jr.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mtbe ethyl tertiary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Field pilot tests for tertiary recovery using butane and propane injection  

SciTech Connect

This work describes a pilot project for tertiary recovery of liquid hydrocarbons through LPG injection in water-out sections of the Bolivar reservoir in La Pena Field, Santa Cruz, Boliva. The promising results obtained in the initial field miscibility tests, as well as the results from a mathematical model built to stimulate and evaluate the tertiary recovery project, directed subsequent work into a cyclic scheme for enhanced recovery. This scheme is explained and injection production data is presented. Field facilities built to handle both the injected LPG and the produced oil-LPG mixture are described. The oil/LPG ratio and the LPG recovered/injected fraction are the main factors measured in this to make further considerations for a full scale project.

Pacheco, E.F.; Garcia, A.I.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Tertiary application of a hydrocarbon miscible flood; Rainbow Keg River B Pool  

SciTech Connect

The Rainbow Keg River B pool EOR scheme calls for placement of a 12% (net after recycle)-original-HCPV miscible bank in the crestal region of the pool. This bank will be chased vertically downward with more than 1 PV of dry gas. The injected solvent and chase gas will push the oil/water contact (OWC) downward as the previously injected water is produced. A tertiary oil bank will be formed in the region previously occupied by the water. This paper reports tertiary flood performance, results of the 1987 reservoir simulation study, and the operational strategy and problems encountered in monitoring the flood. The well-completion technique implemented to operate the flood is described, and the scheme economics is reviewed.

Nagel, R.G.; Hunter, B.E.; Peggs, J.K.; Fong, D.K. (Husky Oil Operations Ltd., Calgary (CA)); Mazzocchi, E. (EBCO Auctioneers International Inc. (CA))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

PROPERTIES OF THE CLOSE-IN TERTIARY IN THE QUADRUPLE SYSTEM V401 CYG  

SciTech Connect

V401 Cyg is a quadruple system in which the spectroscopic signature of a close-in tertiary and a distant visual companion star were reported. Orbital properties of the close-in companion should provide valuable information on the formation of close binaries and stellar dynamical interaction. By analyzing new times of minimum light together with those collected from the literature, we discovered that the observed-calculated (O - C) curve of V401 Cyg shows a cyclic change with a short period of 3.5 yr and a semi-amplitude of 0.00436 days while it undergoes an upward parabolic variation. Those photoelectric and CCD data covered more than two cycles and were analyzed for the light-travel time effect via the presence of the tertiary companion. The mass of the third body was determined to be M{sub 3}sin i' = 0.65({+-} 0.08) M{sub Sun }, which is close to the value estimated from the spectroscopic data (M{sub 3} {approx} 0.64 M{sub Sun }). This reveals that the orbital inclination of the tertiary was about i' {approx} 90 Degree-Sign , indicating that the contact components of V401 Cyg have the possibility of being eclipsed by the tertiary at an orbital distance of about 3.0 AU, and it may be a triply eclipsing hierarchical triple system. The upward parabolic change indicates a period increase at a rate of (P-dot{sub 2} = 1.5 x 10{sup -7} revealing a mass transfer from the secondary to the primary (M-dot{sub 2} = 5.9 x 10{sup -8} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}). This is consistent with the predictions of the theory of thermal relaxation oscillation (TRO) suggesting that V401 Cyg is undergoing an expanding-orbit stage in the TRO cycles.

Zhu, L.-Y.; Qian, S.-B.; Zhou, X.; Li, L.-J.; Zhao, E.-G.; Liu, L.; Liu, N.-P., E-mail: qsb@ynao.ac.cn [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), P.O. Box 110, 650011 Kunming (China)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

OECD THEMATIC REVIEW OF TERTIARY EDUCATION COUNTRY BACKGROUND REPORT FOR SWEDEN Swedish National Agency for Higher Education  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Government as an input to the OECD Thematic Review of Tertiary Education. The document was prepared in response to guidelines the OECD provided to all participating countries. The guidelines encouraged the author(s) to canvass a breadth of views and priorities on tertiary education issues. The opinions expressed are not necessarily those of the Swedish Government, the OECD or its Member countries. Sweden has granted the

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Area: Period-Unit: Download Series History ... 51: 64: 59: 70: 70: 62: 2009-2013: Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) 41: 44: 49: 61: 49: 50: 2004-2013: Other ...

66

U.S. Oxygenate Production - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Area: Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History; Fuel Ethanol: 855: 877: 891: 868: 849: 852: 1981-2013: Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) 48: 55: 54: 51 ...

67

35461,"AECTRA REFG & MKTG",1,152,"MOTOR GAS, OTHER FINISHED"...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TERTIARY BUTYL ETHER (MTBE)",2809,"SANFRANCISCO, CA","CALIFORNIA",5,515,"KOREA, REPUBLIC OF",32,0,0,"WICKLAND OIL CO","SELBY TERM","CA","CALIFORNIA",5...

68

Enrichment, isolation and characterization of fungi tolerant to 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work aims to characterize microbial tolerance to 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2mim][OAc]), ionic liquid that has emerged as a novel biomass pretreatment for lignocellulosic biomass. Enrichment experiments performed using inocula treated with [C2mim][OAc] under solid and liquid cultivation yielded fungal populationsdominated by Aspergilli. Ionic liquid-tolerant Aspergillus isolates from these enrichments were capable of growing in a radial plate growth assay in the presence of 10% [C2mim][OAc]. When a [C2mim][OAc]-tolerant Aspergillus fumigatus strain was grown in the presence of switchgrass, endoglucanases and xylanases were secreted that retained residual enzymatic activity in the presence of 20% [C2mim][OAc]. The results of the study suggest tolerance to ionic liquids is a general property of Aspergilli. Tolerance to an industrially important ionic liquid was discovered in a fungal genera that is widely used in biotechnology, including biomass deconstruction.

Singer, S.W.; Reddy, A. P.; Gladden, J. M.; Guo, H.; Hazen, T.C.; Simmons, B. A.; VanderGheynst, J. S.

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

69

RNA tertiary interactions in the large ribosomal subunit: The A-minor motif  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analysis of the 2.4-{angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the large ribosomal subunit from Haloarcula marismortui reveals the existence of an abundant and ubiquitous structural motif that stabilizes RNA tertiary and quaternary structures. This motif is termed the A-minor motif, because it involves the insertion of the smooth, minor groove edges of adenines into the minor groove of neighboring helices, preferentially at C-G base pairs, where they form hydrogen bonds with one or both of the 2' OHs of those pairs. A-minor motifs stabilize contacts between RNA helices, interactions between loops and helices, and the conformations of junctions and tight turns. The interactions between the 3' terminal adenine of tRNAs bound in either the A site or the P site with 23S rRNA are examples of functionally significant A-minor interactions. The A-minor motif is by far the most abundant tertiary structure interaction in the large ribosomal subunit; 186 adenines in 23S and 5S rRNA participate, 68 of which are conserved. It may prove to be the universally most important long-range interaction in large RNA structures.

Nissen, Poul; Ippolito, Joseph A.; Ban, Nenad; Moore, Peter B.; Steitz, Thomas A. (Yale University); (Yale University); (Yale Unversity)

2009-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

70

Concentrating aqueous volatile fatty acid salt solutions using a tertiary amine mixture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lee (1993) has shown that tertiary amines are able to hics. extract water from low-concentration calcium acetate and sodium acetate solutions. This thesis extends the previous work to include calcium propionate and butyrate. Amine extraction may be used to selectively remove water from a fermentation broth thus concentrating calcium acetate, propionate, and butyrate. Compared to competing technologies that extract undissociated acids from a volatile fatty acid fermentation broth, extracting water with tertiary amines allows for higher pH levels in the broth resulting in greater productivity. Specifically, triethylamine and N,N-diethyl-methylamine in a 1:2 volumetric mixture are superior to any other examined mixture or single amine for extracting water at 40[]C, the proposed fermentation temperature (Lee, 1993; Davison et al., 1966, 1967). Once the acid salts have been concentrated, a variety of techniques are available to convert the concentrated salts into other products such as ketones, alcohols, and acids. At low temperatures, the low-molecular-weight amine mixture has a high affinity for water. By raising the temperature 20 to 25[]C, the water separates from the amine allowing for convenient solvent regeneration of the amine. The distribution coefficients, [] , measure the selectivity of concentrating calcium salts in the aqueous phase. The distribution coefficients generally vary as follows: [] thus, there is less selectivity as the aliphatic group increases in size. The amine mixture was used to extract water from actual fermentation broth to determine whether possible surfactants in the broth interfere with the extraction. Prior to extraction, the fermentation broth was adjusted to pH 11.5 by adding a small amount of lime. The high pH precipitate protein which can be recycled to the fermentor or collected for animal feed. Through 15 extraction runs, no degradation of the amine was observed.

Gaskin, David J

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Inhalation developmental toxicology studies: Teratology study of methyl ethyl ketone in mice: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) is a widely used industrial solvent which results in considerable human exposure. In order to assess the potential for MEK to cause developmental toxicity in rodents, four groups of Swiss (CD-1) mice were exposed to 0, 400, 1000 or 3000 ppM MEK vapors, 7 h/day, 7 dy/wk. Ten virgin females and approx.30 plug-positive females per group were exposed concurrently for 10 consecutive days (6--15 dg for mated mice). Body weights were obtained throughout the study period, and uterine and fetal body weights were obtained at sacrifice on 18 dg. Uterine implants were enumerated and their status recorded. Live fetuses were sexed and examined for gross, visceral, skeletal, and soft-tissue craniofacial defects. Exposure of pregnant mice to these concentrations of MEK did not result in apparent maternal toxicity, although there was a slight, treatment-correlated increase in liver to body weight ratios which was significant for the 3000-ppM group. Mild developmental toxicity was evident at 3000-ppM as a reduction in mean fetal body weight. This reduction was statistically significant for the males only, although the relative decrease in mean fetal body weight was the same for both sexes. 17 refs., 4 figs., 10 tabs.

Mast, T.J.; Dill, J.A.; Evanoff, J.J.; Rommereim, R.L.; Weigel, R.J.; Westerberg, R.B.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

MTBE Prices Responded to Natural Gas Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

On top of the usual factors impacting gasoline prices, natural gas has had some influence recently. ... Both methane and butane come from natural gas streams.

73

U.S. MTBE (Oxygenate) Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Singapore : 2005-2005: Taiwan : 2004-2004-= No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company ...

74

MTBE (Oxygenate) Imports from Non OPEC  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates. Totals may not equal sum of components due to independent rounding.

75

MTBE (Oxygenate) Imports from Korea, South  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: *Countries listed under ...

76

A project to improve the capabilities of minorities in energy fields and a cost benefit analysis of an ethyl alcohol plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project being reported in this document had three components: (1) a research project to carry out cost-benefit analysis of an ethyl alcohol plant at Tuskegee University, (2) seminars to improve the high-technology capabilities of minority persons, and (3) a class in energy management. The report provides a background on the three components listed above. The results from the research on the ethyl alcohol plant, are discussed, along with the seminars, and details of the energy management class.

Sara, T.S.; Jones, M. Jr.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

North and west central Texas. Mitchell EOR (enhanced oil recovery) projects yield tertiary oil in Wise and Jack counties  

SciTech Connect

An enhanced oil recovery project utilizing a miscible LPG process provides Mitchell Energy and Development Corp. engineers with a springboard for other miscible flood projects while yielding incremental tertiary oil that otherwise would remain in the ground. The LPG flood project is in the Alvord (3,000-ft Strawn) Unit in Wise County, Texas. The field had been waterflooded for 14 yr, and was producing near its economic limit under waterflood, the alternative to starting a tertiary project would have been to abandon the field. The LPG flood process was chosen because liquefied petroleum gases are miscible with oil at the low pressures that must be maintained in shallow reservoirs such as the Alvord Strawn. Propane was determined to be the suitable LPG for the project because of its availability and ease of handling.

Mickey, V.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Factors controlling reservoir quality in tertiary sandstones and their significance to geopressured geothermal production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Variable intensity of diagenesis is the factor primarily responsible for contrasting regional reservoir quality of Tertiary sandstones from the upper and lower Texas coast. Detailed comparison of Frio sandstone from the Chocolate Bayou/Danbury Dome area, Brazoria County, and Vicksburg sandstones from the McAllen Ranch Field area, Hidalgo County, reveals that extent of diagenetic modification is most strongly influenced by (1) detrital mineralogy and (2) regional geothermal gradients. The regional reservoir quality of Frio sandstones from Brazoria County is far better than that characterizing Vicksburg sandstones from Hidalgo County, especially at depths suitable for geopressured geothermal energy production. However, in predicting reservoir quality on a site-specific basis, locally variable factors such as relative proportions for porosity types, pore geometry as related to permeability, and local depositional environment must also be considered. Even in an area of regionally favorable reservoir quality, such local factors can significantly affect reservoir quality and, hence, the geothermal production potential of a specific sandstone unit.

Loucks, R.G.; Richmann, D.L.; Milliken, K.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Geometry and reservoir heterogeneity of tertiary sandstones: a guide to reservoir continuity and geothermal resource development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

External and internal continuity of Tertiary sandstones are controlled by various factors including structural trends, sand body geometry, and the distribution of mineral framework, matrix, and intersticies within the sand body. Except for the limits imposed by faults, these factors are largely inherited from the depositional environment and modified during sandstone compaction and cementation. Sandstone continuity affects energy exploration and production strategies. The strategies range in scope from regional to site-specific and closely parallel a sandstone hierarchy. The hierarchy includes subdivisions ranking from genetically related aquifer systems down to individual reservoirs within a fault-bounded sandstone. Volumes of individual reservoirs are 50% less to 200% more than estimated from conventional geologic mapping. In general, mapped volumes under-estimate actual volumes where faults are nonsealing and overestimate actual volumes where laterally continuous shale breaks cause reductions in porosity and permeability. Gross variations in these pore properties can be predicted on the basis of internal stratification and sandstone facies. Preliminary analyses indicate that large aquifers are found where barrier and strandplain sandstones parallel regional faults or where fluvial (meandering) channels trend normal to regional faults. Within these sand bodies, porosity and permeability are highest in large-scale crossbedded intervals and lowest in contorted, bioturbated, and small-scale ripple cross-laminated intervals.

Morton, R.A.; Ewing, T.E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Ethanol Demand in United States Production of Oxygenate-limited Gasoline  

SciTech Connect

Ethanol competes with methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) to satisfy oxygen, octane, and volume requirements of certain gasolines. However, MTBE has water quality problems that may create significant market opportunities for ethanol. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has used its Refinery Yield Model to estimate ethanol demand in gasolines with restricted use of MTBE. Reduction of the use of MTBE would increase the costs of gasoline production and possibly reduce the gasoline output of U.S. refineries. The potential gasoline supply problems of an MTBE ban could be mitigated by allowing a modest 3 vol percent MTBE in all gasoline. In the U.S. East and Gulf Coast gasoline producing regions, the 3 vol percent MTBE option results in costs that are 40 percent less than an MTBE ban. In the U.S. Midwest gasoline producing region, with already high use of ethanol, an MTBE ban has minimal effect on ethanol demand unless gasoline producers in other regions bid away the local supply of ethanol. The ethanol/MTBE issue gained momentum in March 2000 when the Clinton Administration announced that it would ask Congress to amend the Clean Air Act to provide the authority to significantly reduce or eliminate the use of MTBE; to ensure that air quality gains are not diminished as MTBE use is reduced; and to replace the existing oxygenate requirement in the Clean Air Act with a renewable fuel standard for all gasoline. Premises for the ORNL study are consistent with the Administration announcement, and the ethanol demand curve estimates of this study can be used to evaluate the impact of the Administration principles and related policy initiatives.

Hadder, G.R.

2000-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mtbe ethyl tertiary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater as Power Plant Cooling System Makeup Water: Tertiary Treatment versus Expanded Chemical Regimen for Recirculating Water Quality Management  

SciTech Connect

Treated municipal wastewater is a common, widely available alternative source of cooling water for thermoelectric power plants across the U.S. However, the biodegradable organic matter, ammonia-nitrogen, carbonate and phosphates in the treated wastewater pose challenges with respect to enhanced biofouling, corrosion, and scaling, respectively. The overall objective of this study was to evaluate the benefits and life cycle costs of implementing tertiary treatment of secondary treated municipal wastewater prior to use in recirculating cooling systems. The study comprised bench- and pilot-scale experimental studies with three different tertiary treated municipal wastewaters, and life cycle costing and environmental analyses of various tertiary treatment schemes. Sustainability factors and metrics for reuse of treated wastewater in power plant cooling systems were also evaluated. The three tertiary treated wastewaters studied were: secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to acid addition for pH control (MWW_pH); secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to nitrification and sand filtration (MWW_NF); and secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected nitrification, sand filtration, and GAC adsorption (MWW_NFG). Tertiary treatment was determined to be essential to achieve appropriate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control for use of secondary treated municipal wastewater in power plant cooling systems. The ability to control scaling, in particular, was found to be significantly enhanced with tertiary treated wastewater compared to secondary treated wastewater. MWW_pH treated water (adjustment to pH 7.8) was effective in reducing scale formation, but increased corrosion and the amount of biocide required to achieve appropriate biofouling control. Corrosion could be adequately controlled with tolytriazole addition (4-5 ppm TTA), however, which was the case for all of the tertiary treated waters. For MWW_NF treated water, the removal of ammonia by nitrification helped to reduce the corrosivity and biocide demand. Also, the lower pH and alkalinity resulting from nitrification reduced the scaling to an acceptable level, without the addition of anti-scalant chemicals. Additional GAC adsorption treatment, MWW_NFG, yielded no net benefit. Removal of organic matter resulted in pitting corrosion in copper and cupronickel alloys. Negligible improvement was observed in scaling control and biofouling control. For all of the tertiary treatments, biofouling control was achievable, and most effectively with pre-formed monochloramine (2-3 ppm) in comparison with NaOCl and ClO2. Life cycle cost (LCC) analyses were performed for the tertiary treatment systems studied experimentally and for several other treatment options. A public domain conceptual costing tool (LC3 model) was developed for this purpose. MWW_SF (lime softening and sand filtration) and MWW_NF were the most cost-effective treatment options among the tertiary treatment alternatives considered because of the higher effluent quality with moderate infrastructure costs and the relatively low doses of conditioning chemicals required. Life cycle inventory (LCI) analysis along with integration of external costs of emissions with direct costs was performed to evaluate relative emissions to the environment and external costs associated with construction and operation of tertiary treatment alternatives. Integrated LCI and LCC analysis indicated that three-tiered treatment alternatives such as MWW_NSF and MWW_NFG, with regular chemical addition for treatment and conditioning and/or regeneration, tend to increase the impact costs and in turn the overall costs of tertiary treatment. River water supply and MWW_F alternatives with a single step of tertiary treatment were associated with lower impact costs, but the contribution of impact costs to overall annual costs was higher than all other treatment alternatives. MWW_NF and MWW_SF alternatives exhibited moderate external impact costs with moderate infrastructure and chemical conditioner dosing, which makes them (especially

David Dzombak; Radisav Vidic; Amy Landis

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

82

Guiding optimal biofuels : a comparative analysis of the biochemical production of ethanol and fatty acid ethyl esters from switchgrass.  

SciTech Connect

In the current study, processes to produce either ethanol or a representative fatty acid ethyl ester (FAEE) via the fermentation of sugars liberated from lignocellulosic materials pretreated in acid or alkaline environments are analyzed in terms of economic and environmental metrics. Simplified process models are introduced and employed to estimate process performance, and Monte Carlo analyses were carried out to identify key sources of uncertainty and variability. We find that the near-term performance of processes to produce FAEE is significantly worse than that of ethanol production processes for all metrics considered, primarily due to poor fermentation yields and higher electricity demands for aerobic fermentation. In the longer term, the reduced cost and energy requirements of FAEE separation processes will be at least partially offset by inherent limitations in the relevant metabolic pathways that constrain the maximum yield potential of FAEE from biomass-derived sugars.

Paap, Scott M.; West, Todd H.; Manley, Dawn Kataoka; Dibble, Dean C.; Simmons, Blake Alexander; Steen, Eric J. [Joint BioEnergy Institute, Emeryville, CA; Beller, Harry R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA; Keasling, Jay D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA; Chang, Shiyan [Tsinghua University, Beijing, PR China

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Investigating Sequestration Potential of Carbonate Rocks during Tertiary Recovery from a Billion Barrel Oil Field, Weyburn, Saskatchewan: the Geoscience Framework (IEA Weyburn CO2 Monitoring Project)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequestration Potential of Carbonate Rocks during Tertiary Sequestration Potential of Carbonate Rocks during Tertiary Recovery from a Billion Barrel Oil Field, Weyburn, Saskatchewan: the Geoscience Framework (IEA Weyburn CO 2 Monitoring and Storage Project) G. Burrowes (Geoffrey_Burrowes@pancanadian.ca; 403-290-2796) PanCanadian Resources 150 - 9 th Avenue S.W., P.O. Box 2850 Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2P 2S5 C. Gilboy (cgilboy@sem.gov.sk.ca; 306-787-2573) Petroleum Geology Branch, Saskatchewan Energy and Mines 201 Dewdney Avenue East Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada S4N 4G3 Introduction In Western Canada the application of CO 2 injection for enhanced, 'tertiary' oil recovery is a relatively recent addition to the arsenal available to reservoir engineers. The first successful application of CO 2 as a miscible fluid in Western Canada began in 1984 at Joffre Field, a

84

RESULTS OF A DATING ATTEMPT -CHEMICAL AND PHYSICAL MEASUREMENTS RELEVANT TO THE CASE OF THE CRETACEOUS TERTIARY EXTINCTIONS  

SciTech Connect

In Gubbio, Italy, a l em layer of clay between extensive limestone formations marks the boundary between the Cretaceous and Tertiary Periods. This clay layer was known to have been deposited about 65 million years ago when many life forms became extinct, but the length of time associated with the deposition was not known. In an attempt to measure this time with normally deposited meteoritic material as a clock, extensive measurements of iridium abundances (and those of many other elements) were made on the Gubbio rocks. Neutron activation analysis was the principal tool used in these studies. About 50 elements are searched for in materials like the earth's crust, about 40 are detected and about 30 are measured with useful precision. We were not able to determine exactly how long the clay deposition took. Instead the laboratory studies on the chemical and physical nature of the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary led to the theory that an asteroid collision with the earth was responsible for the extinction of many forms of life including the dinosaurs.

Asaro, Frank; Michel, Helen V.; Alvarez, Luis W.; Alvarez, Walter

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Origin of gaseous hydrocarbons from Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary strata in the Piceance basin, western Colorado  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural gas samples were collected for geochemical analyses from Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary strata of the Piceance basin in western Colorado to: 1) determine the origin of gases (i.e., microbial versus thermogenic), 2) determine the thermogenic source rock(s) for the gas-rich Williams Fork Formation, and 3) assess the nature of gas migration. Mud logging gases were sampled approximately every 60 m between 350 and 2800 m and analyzed for "C compositions and CI/C,-3 ratios. Samples collected from low gas content intervals above 1950 m define two parallel trends of increasing "Cc, content with depth. Data from the first trend are based on eighteen analyses and range from-69.9 to-38.3%o (R 2 = 0.92). These data suggest a microbial and mixed microbial/thermogenic origin for methane. Only one sample from above 1950 m contained sufficient amounts of C2for isotopic analysis (813 CC2 =-27.0%o at 1718 m). Data from the second trend are based on seven analyses and are offset by approximately +20%o compared with the primary trend at comparable depths. These data range from-65.0 to-38.5%0 (R' = 0.84). 813c ci and C,/CI-3data from both trends are similar when viewed on a crossplot, thus suggesting that large-scale, vertical gas migration has occurred. Migration was probably aided by fractures that formed during maximum burial and peak gas generation. Except for one sample collected at 1718 m, "CC2compositions above 1950 m were not determined due to insufficient sample sizes. Below 1950 m, gas contents abruptly increase and approach 10-4' gas units. These gases have "C compositions indicative of thermogenic origin. Gases between 1950 and 2450 m have relatively uniform geochemistries (8"Cc, =-39.9 0?.3%ol 613C C2 =-27.4 I?.i%ol CI/Cl-3 = 0-91 0?.03), and are chemically distinct and therefore Renetically different from gases between 2450 and 2791 M (513C ci =-37.9 +-O.2%og 813C C2 =-26.4 0?.5%09 CI/Cl-3 = 0.88 0?.01). Gases of the latter group were probably derived from coalbeds that comprise the Cameo Group, as abundant coals are found between 2450 and 2630 m. Only three thin coalbeds occur within the Coal Ridge Group between 1950 and 2450 m, so gases from this interval were probably derived from interbedded shales. Core and cuttings samples were also collected and sealed in cans from several intervals for geochemical analyses. Canned methanes at or above 858 m are "C-enriched by 13 to 33%o compared with logging methanes at equivalent intervals. Below 1934 m, however, 813C ci values for core and cuttings are comparable to logging gas values. This observation suggests that 813 Cc, discrepancies above 858 m are related to low gas contents in the core and cutting samples. Therefore, geochemical data from core and cuttings were not used to assess migration or to interpret gas origin.

Katz, David Jonathan

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

BLAST BIOLOGY--A STUDY OF THE PRIMARY AND TERTIARY EFFECTS OF BLAST IN OPEN UNDERGROUND PROTECTIVE SHELTERS  

SciTech Connect

Dogs, pigs, rabbits, guinea pigs, and mice were exposed to nuclear detonatiors in two open underground pantitioned shelters. The shelters were of similar constructions and each was exposed to separate detonations. Each inner chamber filled through its own orifice; thus four separate pressure enviromments were obtained. An aerodynamic mound was placed over the escape hatch of each structure to determine its effect on the pressurecurve shape inside the chamber. In one test a sieve plate bolted across the top of the mound was evaluated. Wind protective baffles of solid plate and of heavy wire screen were installed in the shelters to compare primary and tertiary blast effects on dogs. The shelters also contained static and dynamic pressure gages, radiation detectors, telemetering devices, and, in one test, air-temperature measuring instruments, dustcollecting trays, and eight pigs for the biological assessment of thermal effects. One dog was severely injured from tertiary blast effects associated with a maximal dynamic pressure (Q) of 10.5 psi, and one was undamaged with a maximal Q of 2 psi. Primary blast effects resulting from peak overpressures of 30.3, 25.5, 9.5. and 4.1 psi were minimal. The mortality was 19 per cent of the mice exposed to a peak pressure of 30.3 psi and 5 and 3 per cent of the guinea pigs and mice exposed to a peak pressure of 25.5 psi. Many of the rabbits, guinea pigs, and mice sustained slight lung hemorrhages at maximum pressures of 25.5 and 30.3 psi. Eardrum perforation data for all species, except mice, were recorded. Following shot 2, thermal effects were noted. Animals of the groups saved for observation have died from ionizing-radiation effects. (auth)

Ricmond, D.R.; Taborelli, R.V.; Bowen, I.G.; Chiffelle, T.L.; Hirsch, F.G.; Longwell, B.B.; Riley, J.G.; White, C.S.; Sherping, F.; Goldizen, V.C.; Ward, J.D.; Wetherbe, M.B.; Clare, V.R.; Kuhn, M.L.; Sanchez, R.T.

1959-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

The Effect of Time dealumination and Solvent Concentration in Synthesis of Zeolite Catalyst and Catalytic Test for DiEthyl Ether Production Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ethanol is an alternative energy, but its has three distinct disadvantages as a transportation fuel. Its availability is currently limited, and it has a lower volumetric heating value and a lower Reid vapour pressure (RVP) than gasoline. This paper focuses for this disadvantages and to solve this problem can do with converts ethanol to DiEthyl Ether product. This research produced DiEthyl Ether by ethanol dehydration process with zeolite as catalyst. The catalyst synthesis from natural material from District Gunung Kidul, Indonesia. The catalyst produced with dealumination, neutralization, drying and calcination processes. The zeolite catalyst was analysed of Si/Al, X-ray Diffraction and specific surface area. The catalyst product then used for ethanol dehydration to produce DiEthyl Ether. The results shown the biggest surface area is 184,52 m{sup 2}/gram at catalyst production at 10 hours for time dealumination. The crystallite of catalyst product is similar like shown at diffractogram of XRD analysis. The ratio Si/Al biggest is 313.7 that obtaining at catalyst production with 7 hours for time dealumination. The catalytic test use fixed bed reactor with 1 inci diameter and ethanol fermentation both as feed. The operation condition is 150 deg. C at temperature and atmosphere pressure. The compounds product in liquid phase are diethyl ether, methanol and water.

Widayat [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering Diponegoro University, Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Industry Technology Institute of Technology Sepuluh Nopember Surabaya Indonesia, Kampus Sukolilo Surabaya Indonesia (Indonesia); Roesyadi, A.; Rachimoellah, M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Industry Technology Institute of Technology Sepuluh Nopember Surabaya Indonesia, Kampus Sukolilo Surabaya Indonesia (Indonesia)

2009-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

88

Protection against 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES) - induced cytotoxicity in human keratinocytes by an inducer of the glutathione detoxification pathway  

SciTech Connect

Sulfur mustard (SM or mustard gas) was first used as a chemical warfare agent almost 100 years ago. Due to its toxic effects on the eyes, lungs, and skin, and the relative ease with which it may be synthesized, mustard gas remains a potential chemical threat to the present day. SM exposed skin develops fluid filled bullae resulting from potent cytotoxicity of cells lining the basement membrane of the epidermis. Currently, there are no antidotes for SM exposure; therefore, chemopreventive measures for first responders following an SM attack are needed. Glutathione (GSH) is known to have a protective effect against SM toxicity, and detoxification of SM is believed to occur, in part, via GSH conjugation. Therefore, we screened 6 potential chemopreventive agents for ability to induce GSH synthesis and protect cultured human keratinocytes against the SM analog, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES). Using NCTC2544 human keratinocytes, we found that both sulforaphane and methyl-2-cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9-dien-28-oate (CDDO-Me) stimulated nuclear localization of Nrf2 and induced expression of the GSH synthesis gene, GCLM. Additionally, we found that treatment with CDDO-Me elevated reduced GSH content of NCTC2544 cells and preserved their viability by {approx} 3-fold following exposure to CEES. Our data also suggested that CDDO-Me may act additively with 2,6-dithiopurine (DTP), a nucleophilic scavenging agent, to increase the viability of keratinocytes exposed to CEES. These results suggest that CDDO-Me is a promising chemopreventive agent for SM toxicity in the skin. - Highlights: > CDDO-Me treatment increased intracellular GSH in human keratinocytes. > CDDO-Me increased cell viability following exposure to the half-mustard, CEES. > The cytoprotective effect of CDDO-Me was likely due to scavenging with endogenous GSH.

Abel, Erika L.; Bubel, Jennifer D.; Simper, Melissa S.; Powell, Leslie; McClellan, S. Alex [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States); Andreeff, Michael [Department of Leukemia, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); MacLeod, Michael C. [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States); DiGiovanni, John, E-mail: john.digiovanni@austin.utexas.edu [Department of Molecular Carcinogenesis, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Stratigraphy, petrology, and depositional environments of upper Cretaceous and Lower Tertiary Sabbath Creek section, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 9387-ft (2816-m) section of Upper Cretaceous-Lower Tertiary strata is exposed along Sabbath Creek in the northern ANWR of north-eastern Alaska and represents a regressive depositional sequence. The entire section is divided into four lithologic units (A-D), each characterized by distinct depositional assemblages. Unit A, at the base of the section, consists of several coarsening-upward sequences of alternating thick organic-rich siltstones an fine-grained litharenites, representing deposition in subaqueous to lower delta-plain environments. Unit B stratigraphically overlies Unit A and is characterized by multiple, mutually erosive, fining-upward sequences of fine to coarse pebble litharenites typical of point-bar sequences in a meandering stream environment (lower to upper delta plain). Unit C consists of multiple, poorly developed fining-upward sequences of dominantly clast- and matrix-supported pebble conglomerate interpreted as braided stream deposits. At the top of the section, Unit D is characterized by multiple fining- and a few coarsening-upward sequences of organic-rich shale with minor amounts of medium to coarse litharenite and pebble conglomerate representing meandering stream deposition. The Sabbath Creek section is lithologically dissimilar to coeval units to the west. The Sagavanirktok Formation and Colville Group contain pyroclastic material and thick coal beds not seen in the Sabbath Creek section. Instead, this section is lithologically similar to the Moose Channel formation - a regressive, fluvial, deltaic sequence exposed in the MacKenzie delta area of northwestern Canada. Consequently , detailed interpretation of the sabbath Creek section has important implications concerning the petroleum potential of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and offshore beaufort Sea.

Buckingham, M.L.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

U.S. Exports to Chile of MTBE (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 2000's: 21: 627: 930: 1,110: 2010's: 1,040: 1,115: 1,327-

91

The Social Costs of an MTBE Ban in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the world. Price of crude oil. Wellhead price of naturalfor natural gas. Supply of crude oil. Supply of natural gas.to an increased demand for crude oil. Ethanol also has lower

Rausser, Gordon C.; Adams, Gregory D.; Montgomery, W. David; Smith, Anne E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

The Social Costs of an MTBE Ban in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Montgomery. “Social Cost of Imported Oil and U.S. ImportCredit Change in Re?ning Cost, Oil Import Bill, and ConsumerCredit Change in Re?ning Cost, Oil Import Bill, and Consumer

Rausser, Gordon C.; Adams, Gregory D.; Montgomery, W. David; Smith, Anne E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

The Social Costs of an MTBE Ban in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gasoline Elasticity Natural Gas Supply Elasticity NaturalReduced demand for natural gas Supply of Imports Ethanol &alternative scenarios for natural gas supply and demand. By

Rausser, Gordon C.; Adams, Gregory D.; Montgomery, W. David; Smith, Anne E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

The Social Costs of an MTBE Ban in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

purchasing natural gas imports at a lower price. Natural gasin the price of natural gas imports is a net bene?t to thesocial cost of natural gas imports was consid- erably less

Rausser, Gordon C.; Adams, Gregory D.; Montgomery, W. David; Smith, Anne E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

U.S. Exports to Venezuela of MTBE (Thousand Barrels)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 2005: 271: 297: 551: 258: 223: 254: 663: 2006: 553: 311: 613: 766: 408: 755: 878: 1,099: 687: 775: 397: 488 ...

96

MTBE Pipeline Stocks by Type - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Crude oil stocks in the ...

97

The Social Costs of an MTBE Ban in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

equivalent quantity (in energy terms) since oil imports areU.S. oil imports calculated equilibrium quantity of importsworld oil price times the equilibrium quantity of imports

Rausser, Gordon C.; Adams, Gregory D.; Montgomery, W. David; Smith, Anne E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Ethanol and MTBE A Comparison  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmentally Sound Economic DevelopmentThe Institute for Local Self-Reliance (ILSR) is a nonprofit research and educational organization that provides technical assistance and information on environmentally sound economic development strategies. Since 1974, ILSR has worked with citizen groups, governments and private businesses in developing policies that extract the maximum value from local resources.

Irshad Ahmed; David Morris; Irshad Ahmed; David Morris

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

The Social Costs of an MTBE Ban in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and W.D. Montgomery. Oil Prices, Energy Security, and Importnew equilibrium world oil price and level of U.S. imports.to estimate the changes in oil prices that would result from

Rausser, Gordon C.; Adams, Gregory D.; Montgomery, W. David; Smith, Anne E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Preparations for Meeting New York and Connecticut MTBE Bans  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

analytical agency within the Department of Energy. ... their facilities as well, ... making changes to meet the requirements. The switchover to ethanol based-RFG,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mtbe ethyl tertiary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Supply Impact of Losing MTBE and Using Ethanol  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presented by: Joanne Shore Presented to: OPIS National Supply Summit San Antonio, Texas October 2002

Information Center

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Effects of in-phase and out-of-phase sediment supply responses to tectonic movement on the sequence development in the late Tertiary Southern Ulleung Basin, East (Japan) Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stratigraphic inverse modeling using the SEDPAK stratigraphic simulator established the size of the physical parameters that together controlled the development of the stratal patterns in the late Tertiary Ulleung Basin, East (Japan) Sea. The modeling ... Keywords: Back-arc, Eustatic sea level, Stratigraphic modeling, Tectonic subsidence, Ulleung Basin

Wonsuck Kim; Daekyo Cheong; Christopher G. St. C. Kendall

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model (Released in the STEO March 1998)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The blending of oxygenates, such as fuel ethanol and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), into motor gasoline has increased dramatically in the last few years because of the oxygenated and reformulated gasoline programs. Because of the significant role oxygenates now have in petroleum product markets, the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System (STIFS) was revised to include supply and demand balances for fuel ethanol and MTBE. The STIFS model is used for producing forecasts in the Short-Term Energy Outlook. A review of the historical data sources and forecasting methodology for oxygenate production, imports, inventories, and demand is presented in this report.

Information Center

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Blast biology: a study of the primary and tertiary effects of blast in open underground protective shelters. Project 33. 1 of Operation Plumbbob  

SciTech Connect

Dogs, pigs, rabbits, guinea pigs, and mice were exposed to nuclear detonations in two open underground partitioned shelters. The shelters were of similar construction, and each was exposed to separate detonations. Each inner chamber filled through its own orifice; thus four separate pressure environments were obtained. An aerodynamic mound was placed over the escape hatch of each structure to determine its effect on the pressure-curve shape inside the chamber. In one test a sieve plate bolted across the top of the mound was evaluated. Wind protective baffles of solid plate and of heavy wire screen were installed in the shelters to compare primary and tertiary blast effects on dogs. The shelters also contained static and dynamic pressure gages, radiation detectors, telemetering devices, and, in one test, air-temperature measuring instruments, dust-collecting trays, and eight pigs for the biological assessment of thermal effects. One dog was severely injured from tertiary blast effects associated with a maximal dynamic pressure (Q) of 10.5 psi, and one was undamaged with a maximal Q of 2 psi. Primary blast effects resulting from peak overpressures of 30.3, 25.5, 9.5, and 4.1 psi were minimal. The mortality was 19% of the mice exposed to a peak pressure of 30.3 psi and 5 and 3% of the guinea pigs and mice exposed to a peak pressure of 25.5 psi. Many of the rabbits, guinea pigs, and mice sustained slight lung hemorrhages at maximum pressues of 25.5 and 30.3 psi. Eardrum perforation data for all species, except mice, were recorded. Following shot 2, thermal effects were noted. Animals of the groups saved for observation have died from ionizing-radiation effects.

Ricmond, D.R.; Taborelli, R.V.; Bowen, I.G.

1959-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Expression of proliferative and inflammatory markers in a full-thickness human skin equivalent following exposure to the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sulfur mustard is a potent vesicant that induces inflammation, edema and blistering following dermal exposure. To assess molecular mechanisms mediating these responses, we analyzed the effects of the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide, on EpiDerm-FT{sup TM}, a commercially available full-thickness human skin equivalent. CEES (100-1000 {mu}M) caused a concentration-dependent increase in pyknotic nuclei and vacuolization in basal keratinocytes; at high concentrations (300-1000 {mu}M), CEES also disrupted keratin filament architecture in the stratum corneum. This was associated with time-dependent increases in expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, a marker of cell proliferation, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and phosphorylated histone H2AX, markers of DNA damage. Concentration- and time-dependent increases in mRNA and protein expression of eicosanoid biosynthetic enzymes including COX-2, 5-lipoxygenase, microsomal PGE{sub 2} synthases, leukotriene (LT) A{sub 4} hydrolase and LTC{sub 4} synthase were observed in CEES-treated skin equivalents, as well as in antioxidant enzymes, glutathione S-transferases A1-2 (GSTA1-2), GSTA3 and GSTA4. These data demonstrate that CEES induces rapid cellular damage, cytotoxicity and inflammation in full-thickness skin equivalents. These effects are similar to human responses to vesicants in vivo and suggest that the full thickness skin equivalent is a useful in vitro model to characterize the biological effects of mustards and to develop potential therapeutics.

Black, Adrienne T. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Hayden, Patrick J. [MatTek Corporation, Ashland, MA (United States); Casillas, Robert P. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States); Heck, Diane E. [Environmental Health Sciences, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY (United States); Gerecke, Donald R. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Sinko, Patrick J. [Pharmaceutics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D., E-mail: jlaskin@eohsi.rutgers.ed [Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Role of MAP kinases in regulating expression of antioxidants and inflammatory mediators in mouse keratinocytes following exposure to the half mustard, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dermal exposure to sulfur mustard causes inflammation and tissue injury. This is associated with changes in expression of antioxidants and eicosanoids which contribute to oxidative stress and toxicity. In the present studies we analyzed mechanisms regulating expression of these mediators using an in vitro skin construct model in which mouse keratinocytes were grown at an air-liquid interface and exposed directly to 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES), a model sulfur mustard vesicant. CEES (100-1000 {mu}M) was found to cause marked increases in keratinocyte protein carbonyls, a marker of oxidative stress. This was correlated with increases in expression of Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase, catalase, thioredoxin reductase and the glutathione S-transferases, GSTA1-2, GSTP1 and mGST2. CEES also upregulated several enzymes important in the synthesis of prostaglandins and leukotrienes including cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-2 (mPGES-2), prostaglandin D synthase (PGDS), 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), leukotriene A{sub 4} (LTA{sub 4}) hydrolase and leukotriene C{sub 4} (LTC{sub 4}) synthase. CEES readily activated keratinocyte JNK and p38 MAP kinases, signaling pathways which are known to regulate expression of antioxidants, as well as prostaglandin and leukotriene synthases. Inhibition of p38 MAP kinase suppressed CEES-induced expression of GSTA1-2, COX-2, mPGES-2, PGDS, 5-LOX, LTA{sub 4} hydrolase and LTC{sub 4} synthase, while JNK inhibition blocked PGDS and GSTP1. These data indicate that CEES modulates expression of antioxidants and enzymes producing inflammatory mediators by distinct mechanisms. Increases in antioxidants may be an adaptive process to limit tissue damage. Inhibiting the capacity of keratinocytes to generate eicosanoids may be important in limiting inflammation and protecting the skin from vesicant-induced oxidative stress and injury.

Black, Adrienne T.; Joseph, Laurie B. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Casillas, Robert P. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States); Heck, Diane E. [Environmental Health Sciences, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY (United States); Gerecke, Donald R. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Sinko, Patrick J. [Pharmaceutics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D., E-mail: jlaskin@eohsi.rutgers.ed [Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

Factors controlling reservoir quality in tertiary sandstones and their significance to geopressured geothermal production. Annual report, May 1, 1979-May 31, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Differing extents of diagenetic modification is the factor primarily responsible for contrasting regional reservoir quality of Tertiary sandstones from the Upper and Lower Texas Gulf Coast. Detailed comparison of Frio sandstones from the Chocolate Bayou/Danbury Dome area, Brazoria County, and Vicksburg sandstones from the McAllen Ranch Field area, Hidalgo County, reveals that extent of diagenetic modification is most strongly influenced by (1) detrital mineralogy and (2) regional geothermal gradients. Vicksburg sandstones from the McAllen Ranch Field area are less stable, chemically and mechanically, than Frio sandstones from the Chocolate Bayou/Danbury dome area. Vicksburg sandstones are mineralogically immature and contain greater proportions of feldspars and rock fragments than do Frio sandstones. Thr reactive detrital assemblage of Vicksubrg sandstones is highly susceptible to diagenetic modification. Susceptibility is enhanced by higher than normal geothermal gradients in the McAllen Ranch Field area. Thus, consolidation of Vicksburg sandstones began at shallower depth of burial and precipitation of authigenic phases (especially calcite) was more pervasive than in Frio sandstones. Moreover, the late-stage episode of ferroan calcite precipitation that occluded most secondary porosity in Vicksburg sandstones did not occur significantly in Frio sandstones. Therefore, regional reservoir quality of Frio sandstones from Brazoria County is far better than that characterizing Vicksburg sandstones from Hidalgo County, especially at depths suitable for geopressured geothermal energy production.

Loucks, R.G.; Richmann, D.L.; Milliken, K.L.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Update of Summer Reformulated Gasoline Supply Assessment for New York and Connecticut  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In October 2003, EIA published a review of the status of the methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) ban transition in New York (NY) and Connecticut (CT) that noted significant uncertainties in gasoline supply for those States for the summer of 2004. To obtain updated information, EIA spoke to major suppliers to the two States over the past several months as the petroleum industry began the switch from winter- to summer-grade gasoline.

Information Center

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

On the Role of Tertiary ?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

a solution of 45% acetic acid, 45% butylcellosolve and 10% perchloric acid at 263 K and 25 V. Constant load tensile creep tests were conducted in air at 700°C .

110

[CuCln](2-n) Ion-Pair Species in 1-Ethyl-3-Methylimidazolium Chloride Ionic Liquid-Water Mixtures: Ultraviolet-Visible, X-ray Absorbtion Fine Structure, and Density Functional Theory Characterization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report details of the coordination environment about Cu(II) in a pure ionic liquid, 1- ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([EMIM]Cl) and in mixtures containing varying amounts of water from 0-100% of the [EMIM]Cl. There are many stages in the ion pairing of the divalent cation, Cu(II) including the contact ion pairing of Cu2+ with multiple Cl- to form various CuCln (2-n) polyanions. Thereis also the subsequent solvation and ion pairing of the polychlorometallate anion with the EMIM+ cation. Using a combination of x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS), UV-Vis spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations (TDDFT) we are able to follow the detailed structural changes about Cu(II). Ion pair formation is strongly promoted in [EMIM]Cl by the low dielectric constant and by the extensive breakdown of the water hydrogen bond network in [EMIM]Cl/water mixtures. In the [EMIM]Cl solvent the CuCl4 2- species dominates and it’s geometry is quite similar to gas-phase structure. These results are important in understanding catalysis and separation processes involving transition metals in ionic liquid systems.

Li, Guosheng; Camaioni, Donald M.; Amonette, James E.; Zhang, Z. Conrad; Johnson, Timothy J.; Fulton, John L.

2010-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

111

VERY LOW MASS STELLAR AND SUBSTELLAR COMPANIONS TO SOLAR-LIKE STARS FROM MARVELS. II. A SHORT-PERIOD COMPANION ORBITING AN F STAR WITH EVIDENCE OF A STELLAR TERTIARY AND SIGNIFICANT MUTUAL INCLINATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the discovery via radial velocity (RV) measurements of a short-period (P = 2.430420 {+-} 0.000006 days) companion to the F-type main-sequence star TYC 2930-00872-1. A long-term trend in the RV data also suggests the presence of a tertiary stellar companion with P > 2000 days. High-resolution spectroscopy of the host star yields T{sub eff} = 6427 {+-} 33 K, log g = 4.52 {+-} 0.14, and [Fe/H] = -0.04 {+-} 0.05. These parameters, combined with the broadband spectral energy distribution (SED) and a parallax, allow us to infer a mass and radius of the host star of M{sub 1} = 1.21 {+-} 0.08 M{sub Sun} and R{sub 1} = 1.09{sup +0.15}{sub -0.13} R{sub Sun }. The minimum mass of the inner companion is below the hydrogen-burning limit; however, the true mass is likely to be substantially higher. We are able to exclude transits of the inner companion with high confidence. Further, the host star spectrum exhibits a clear signature of Ca H and K core emission, indicating stellar activity, but a lack of photometric variability and small vsin I suggest that the primary's spin axis is oriented in a pole-on configuration. The rotational period of the primary estimated through an activity-rotation relation matches the orbital period of the inner companion to within 1.5 {sigma}, suggesting that the primary and inner companion are tidally locked. If the inner companion's orbital angular momentum vector is aligned with the stellar spin axis as expected through tidal evolution, then it has a stellar mass of {approx}0.3-0.4 M{sub Sun }. Direct imaging limits the existence of stellar companions to projected separations <30 AU. No set of spectral lines and no significant flux contribution to the SED from either companion are detected, which places individual upper mass limits of M{sub {l_brace}2,3{r_brace}} {approx}< 1.0 M{sub Sun }, provided they are not stellar remnants. If the tertiary is not a stellar remnant, then it likely has a mass of {approx}0.5-0.6 M{sub Sun }, and its orbit is likely significantly inclined from that of the secondary, suggesting that the Kozai-Lidov mechanism may have driven the dynamical evolution of this system.

Fleming, Scott W.; Ge Jian; De Lee, Nathan; Jiang Peng; Lee, Brian; Nelson, Ben [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL 2611-2055 (United States); Barnes, Rory [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, P.O. Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Beatty, Thomas G.; Gaudi, B. Scott; Shappee, Benjamin J. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Crepp, Justin R. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Esposito, Massimiliano; Femenia, Bruno; Gonzalez Hernandez, Jonay I. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias (IAC), E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Ferreira, Leticia; Porto de Mello, Gustavo F. [Observatorio do Valongo, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ladeira do Pedro Antonio, 43, CEP: 20080-090, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Gary, Bruce; Hebb, Leslie; Stassun, Keivan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Ghezzi, Luan, E-mail: scfleming@psu.edu [Laboratorio Interinstitucional de e-Astronomia, LIneA, Rua Gal. Jose Cristino 77, Rio de Janeiro, RJ-20921-400 (Brazil); and others

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

Eliminating MTBE in Gasoline in 2006 - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

increased liability exposure due to the elimination of the oxygen content requirement for reformulated gasoline (RFG) included in the Energy Policy Act of 2005.

113

U.S. Net Imports from Chile of MTBE (Thousand Barrels per Day)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 2000's: 0-2-3-3: 2010's-3-3-4-

114

The social costs of an MTBE ban in California (Long version)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

58 Natural Gas Supply andalternative scenarios for natural gas supply and demand. Bya wide range for natural gas supply and demand elasticities,

Rausser, Gordon C.; Adams, Gregory D.; Montgomery, W. David; Smith, Anne E.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

The social costs of an MTBE ban in California (Condensed version)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demand and prices. NATURAL GAS SUPPLY AND DEMAND D N = A N *= B N * P, N eN S N Natural gas supply is a function of therest of the world Supply of natural gas in region X where X

Rausser, Gordon C.; Adams, Gregory D.; Montgomery, W. David; Smith, Anne E.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

The social costs of an MTBE ban in California (Condensed version)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technical Appendices, Refinery Modeling Task 3: SupplyStates is produced in refineries and merchant plants fromand other problems in the refinery. Separate storage tanks

Rausser, Gordon C.; Adams, Gregory D.; Montgomery, W. David; Smith, Anne E.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

The social costs of an MTBE ban in California (Long version)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

22 4.4.1 RefineryStates is produced in refineries and merchant plants fromand other problems in the refinery. Separate storage tanks

Rausser, Gordon C.; Adams, Gregory D.; Montgomery, W. David; Smith, Anne E.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

The social costs of an MTBE ban in California (Long version)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an equivalent quantity (in energy terms), oil imports, sinceworld oil price times the equilibrium quantity of importsDG Quantity of Gasoline Figure 3: Social Cost of Higher Oil

Rausser, Gordon C.; Adams, Gregory D.; Montgomery, W. David; Smith, Anne E.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

The social costs of an MTBE ban in California (Long version)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an equivalent quantity (in energy terms), oil imports, sinceQuantity of Gasoline Figure 3: Social Cost of Higher Oil Importsworld oil price times the equilibrium quantity of imports

Rausser, Gordon C.; Adams, Gregory D.; Montgomery, W. David; Smith, Anne E.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Assessment of Summer RBOB Supply for NY & CT  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Update of Summer Reformulated Gasoline Supply Update of Summer Reformulated Gasoline Supply Assessment for New York and Connecticut May 5, 2004 In October 2003, EIA published a review of the status of the methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) ban transition in New York (NY) and Connecticut (CT) 1 that noted significant uncertainties in gasoline supply for those States for the summer of 2004. To obtain updated information, EIA spoke to major suppliers to the two States over the past several months as the petroleum industry began the switch from winter- to summer-grade gasoline. As discussed on our earlier report, the NY and CT bans on MTBE mainly affect reformulated gasoline (RFG), which in recent years has been provided by domestic refineries on the East Coast (PADD 1) and imports. Our recent findings indicate that

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121

Regulation of Hsp27 and Hsp70 expression in human and mouse skin construct models by caveolae following exposure to the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dermal exposure to the vesicant sulfur mustard causes marked inflammation and tissue damage. Basal keratinocytes appear to be a major target of sulfur mustard. In the present studies, mechanisms mediating skin toxicity were examined using a mouse skin construct model and a full-thickness human skin equivalent (EpiDerm-FT{sup TM}). In both systems, administration of the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES, 100-1000 {mu}M) at the air surface induced mRNA and protein expression of heat shock proteins 27 and 70 (Hsp27 and Hsp70). CEES treatment also resulted in increased expression of caveolin-1, the major structural component of caveolae. Immunohistochemistry revealed that Hsp27, Hsp70 and caveolin-1 were localized in basal and suprabasal layers of the epidermis. Caveolin-1 was also detected in fibroblasts in the dermal component of the full thickness human skin equivalent. Western blot analysis of caveolar membrane fractions isolated by sucrose density centrifugation demonstrated that Hsp27 and Hsp70 were localized in caveolae. Treatment of mouse keratinocytes with filipin III or methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin, which disrupt caveolar structure, markedly suppressed CEES-induced Hsp27 and Hsp70 mRNA and protein expression. CEES treatment is known to activate JNK and p38 MAP kinases; in mouse keratinocytes, inhibition of these enzymes suppressed CEES-induced expression of Hsp27 and Hsp70. These data suggest that MAP kinases regulate Hsp 27 and Hsp70; moreover, caveolae-mediated regulation of heat shock protein expression may be important in the pathophysiology of vesicant-induced skin toxicity.

Black, Adrienne T. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Hayden, Patrick J. [MatTek Corporation, Ashland, MA (United States); Casillas, Robert P. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States); Heck, Diane E. [Environmental Health, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY (United States); Gerecke, Donald R. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Sinko, Patrick J. [Pharmaceutics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D., E-mail: jlaskin@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Very Low-mass Stellar and Substellar Companions to Solar-like Stars from MARVELS II: A Short-period Companion Orbiting an F Star with Evidence of a Stellar Tertiary And Significant Mutual Inclination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the discovery via radial velocity of a short-period (P = 2.430420 \\pm 0.000006 days) companion to the F-type main sequence star TYC 2930-00872-1. A long-term trend in the radial velocities indicates the presence of a tertiary stellar companion with $P > 2000$ days. High-resolution spectroscopy of the host star yields T_eff = 6427 +/- 33 K, log(g) = 4.52 +/- 0.14, and [Fe/H]=-0.04 +/- 0.05. These parameters, combined with the broad-band spectral energy distribution and parallax, allow us to infer a mass and radius of the host star of M_1=1.21 +/- 0.08 M_\\odot and R_1=1.09_{-0.13}^{+0.15} R_\\odot. We are able to exclude transits of the inner companion with high confidence. The host star's spectrum exhibits clear Ca H and K core emission indicating stellar activity, but a lack of photometric variability and small v*sin(I) suggest the primary's spin axis is oriented in a pole-on configuration. The rotational period of the primary from an activity-rotation relation matches the orbital period of the inner...

Fleming, Scott W; Barnes, Rory; Beatty, Thomas G; Crepp, Justin R; De Lee, Nathan; Esposito, Massimiliano; Femenia, Bruno; Ferreira, Leticia; Gary, Bruce; Gaudi, B Scott; Ghezzi, Luan; Hernández, Jonay I González; Hebb, Leslie; Jiang, Peng; Lee, Brian; Nelson, Ben; de Mello, Gustavo F Porto; Shappee, Benjamin J; Stassun, Keivan; Thompson, Todd A; Tofflemire, Benjamin M; Wisniewski, John P; Wood-Vasey, W Michael; Agol, Eric; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Brewington, Howard; Cargile, Phillip A; Coban, Louis; Costello, Korena S; da Costa, Luis N; Good, Melanie L; Hua, Nelson; Kane, Stephen R; Lander, Gary R; Liu, Jian; Ma, Bo; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Maia, Marcio A G; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Muna, Demitri; Nguyen, Duy Cuong; Oravetz, Daniel; Paegert, Martin; Pan, Kaike; Pepper, Joshua; Rebolo, Rafael; Roebuck, Eric J; Santiago, Basilio X; Schneider, Donald P; Shelden, Alaina; Simmons, Audrey; Sivarani, Thirupathi; Snedden, Stephanie; Vincent, Chelsea L M; Wan, Xiaoke; Wang, Ji; Weaver, Benjamin A; Weaver, Gwendolyn M; Zhao, Bo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Uranium favorability of tertiary sedimentary rocks of the Pend Oreille River valley, Washington. [Measurement and sampling of surface sections, collection of samples from isolated outcrops, chemical and mineralogical analyses of samples, and examination of available water logs  

SciTech Connect

Tertiary sedimentary rocks in the Pend Oreille River valley were investigated in a regional study to determine the favorability for potential uranium resources of northeastern Washington. This project involved measurement and sampling of surface sections, collection of samples from isolated outcrops, chemical and mineralogical analyses of samples, and examination of available water well logs. The Box Canyon Dam area north of Ione is judged to have very high favorability. Thick-bedded conglomerates interbedded with sandstones and silty sandstones compose the Tiger Formation in this area, and high radioactivity levels are found near the base of the formation. Uranophane is found along fracture surfaces or in veins. Carbonaceous material is present throughout the Tiger Formation in the area. Part of the broad Pend Oreille valley surrounding Cusick, Washington, is an area of high favorability. Potential host rocks in the Tiger Formation, consisting of arkosic sandstones interbedded with radioactive shales, probably extend throughout the subsurface part of this area. Carbonaceous material is present and some samples contain high concentrations of uranium. In addition, several other possible chemical indicators were found. The Tiger-Lost Creek area is rated as having medium favorability. The Tiger Formation contains very hard, poorly sorted granite conglomerate with some beds of arkosic sandstone and silty sandstone. The granite conglomerate was apparently derived from source rocks having relatively high uranium content. The lower part of the formation is more favorable than the upper part because of the presence of carbonaceous material, anomalously high concentrations of uranium, and other possible chemical indicators. The area west of Ione is judged to have low favorability, because of the very low permeability of the rocks and the very low uranium content. (auth)

Marjaniemi, D.K.; Robins, J.W.

1975-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Arco chimie focuses on PA at FOS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Arco Chimie France (Fos-sur-Mer), at a recent meeting at its southern France manufacturing site, emphasized that future strategy is strongly focused on its propylene oxide (PO) and derivatives activities. The F2.5 billion ($466 million)-Fe billion/year operation manufactures 200,000 m.t./year of PO, about 70% for captive use and the balance for the merchant market; 550,000 m.t./year of methyl tert butyl ether (MTBE); 97,000 m.t./year of polyols; and 70,000 m.t./year of propylene glycols. There has been talk of Arco modifying its Fos MTBE plant to make it flexible for ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE) output; the parent company already operates an MTBE/ETBE pilot unit at Corpus Christi, TX. But Arco Chimie notes there is insufficient bioethanol feedstock availability to convert all production to ETBE. The company would also require investment in new storage capacity for ethanol and ETBE. However, France's biofuels program is not yet clearly defined, and it is politically sensitive because it depends heavily on government subsidies offered to farmers. That, says Arco, makes it impossible to have an accurate idea of how much ethanol will be available.

Jackson, D.

1992-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

125

Catalyst and process development for synthesis gas conversion to isobutylene. Quarterly report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project are to develop a new catalyst; the kinetics for this catalyst; reactor models for trickle bed, slurry and fixed bed reactors; and to simulate the performance of fixed bed trickle flow reactors, slurry flow reactors, and fixed bed gas phase reactors for conversion of a hydrogen lean synthesis gas to isobutylene. A hydrogen-lean synthesis gas with a ratio of H{sub 2}/CO of 0.5 to 1.0 is produced from the gasification of coal, lignite, or biomass. Isobutylene is a key reactant in the synthesis of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) and of isooctanes. MTBE and isooctanes are high octane fuels used to blend with low octane gasolines to raise the octane number required for modern automobiles. The production of these two key octane boosters is limited by the supply of isobutylene. MTBE, when used as an octane enhancer, also decreases the amount of pollutants emitted from the exhaust of an automobile engine.

Anthony, R.G.; Akgerman, A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Heterogeneous catalytic process for alcohol fuels from syngas. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project has been the pursuit of a catalyst system which would allow the selective production from syngas of methanol and isobutanol. It is desirable to develop a process in which the methanol to isobutanol weight ratio could be varied from 70/30 to 30/70. The 70/30 mixture could be used directly as a fuel additive, while, with the appropriate downstream processing, the 30/70 mixture could be utilized for methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) synthesis. The indirect manufacture of MTBE from a coal derived syngas to methanol and isobutanol process would appear to be a viable solution to MTBE feedstock limitations. To become economically attractive, a process fro producing oxygenates from coal-derived syngas must form these products with high selectivity and good rates, and must be capable of operating with a low-hydrogen-content syngas. This was to be accomplished through extensions of known catalyst systems and by the rational design of novel catalyst systems.

Dombek, B.D.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Venezuela Gasoline Production & Demand  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Change and Uncertainty Today’s gasoline imports essential to meet ... Refinery-based MTBE production and some merchant MTBE facilities will be ...

128

IDENTIFYING THE USAGE PATTERNS OF METHYL TERT-BUTYL ETHER (MTBE) AND OTHER OXYGENATES IN GASOLINE USING GASOLINE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Energy Research (NIPER), 2) the Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Association (MVMA), and 3) the U interested in fuel comparisons Thousands each year Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Association (MVMA) National gasoline survey Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Association 23 cities throughout the U.S. Summer of 1988

129

Radiation chemistry of alternative fuel oxygenates -- Substituted ethers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The electron beam process, an advanced oxidation and reduction technology, is based in the field of radiation chemistry. Fundamental to the development of treatment processes is an understanding of the underlying chemistry. The authors have previously evaluated the bimolecular rate constants for the reactions of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) and with this study have extended their studies to include ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE), di-isopropyl ether (DIPE) and tert-amyl methyl ether (TAME) with the hydroxyl radical, hydrogen atom and solvated electron using pulse radiolysis. For all of the oxygenates the reaction with the hydroxyl radical appears to be of primary interest in the destruction of the compounds in water. The rates with the solvated electron are limiting values as the rates appear to be relatively low. The hydrogen atom rate constants are relatively low, coupled with the low yield in radiolysis, they concluded that these are of little significance in the destruction of the alternative fuel oxygenates (and MTBE).

Mezyk, S. P.; Cooper, W. J.; Bartels, D. M.; Tobien, T.; O'Shea, K. E.

1999-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

Total Refinery Net Input of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Input Product: Total Crude Oil & Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Plant Liquids Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Normal Butane Isobutane Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Hydrogen Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) All Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils (net) Unfinished Oils, Naphthas and Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components (MGBC) (net) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated - RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Ether MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Other Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blending Components (net) Alaskan Crude Oil Receipts Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

131

Comparative Environmental Performance of Two-Diesel-Fuel Oxygenates: Dibutyl Maleate (DBM) and Triproplyene Glycol Monomethyl Ether (TGME)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many studies have shown that the addition of oxygen bearing compounds to diesel fuel can significantly reduce particulate emissions. To assist in the evaluation of the environmental performance of diesel-fuel oxygenates, we have implemented a suite of diagnostic models for simulating the transport of compounds released to air, water, and soils/groundwater as well as regional landscapes. As a means of studying the comparative performance of DBM and TGME, we conducted a series of simulations for selected environmental media. Benzene and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) were also addressed because they represent benchmark fuel-related compounds that have been the subject of extensive environmental measurements and modeling. The simulations showed that DBM and TGME are less mobile in soil because of reduced vapor-phase transport and increased retention on soil particles. The key distinction between these two oxygenates is that DBM is predicted to have a greater potential than TGME for aerobic biodegradation, based on chemical structure.

Layton, D.W.; Marchetti, A.A.

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Appendix A - Acronyms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A - ACRONYMS A - ACRONYMS AASHTO American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials CNG Compressed Natural Gases CVO Commercial Vehicle Operation DOE Department of Energy DOT Department of Transportation E85 85% Ethanol, 15% Gasoline EPA Environmental Protection Agency ExFIRS Excise Files Information Retrieval System ExSTARS Excise Summary Terminal Activity Reporting System FHWA Federal Highway Administration FTA Federation of Tax Administrators GAO General Accounting Office HTF Highway Trust Fund IFTA International Fuel Tax Agreement IM Interstate Maintenance IRS Internal Revenue Service LNG Liquid Natural Gases LPG Liquefied Petroleum Gases M85 85% Methanol, 15% Gasoline MTBE Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether NHS National Highway System ORNL Oak Ridge National Laboratory STP Surface Transportation Program

133

Total Blender Net Input of Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Input Product: Total Input Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Pentanes Plus Liquid Petroleum Gases Normal Butane Isobutane Other Liquids Oxygenates/Renewables Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Unfinished Oils (net) Unfinished Oils, Naphthas and Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components (MGBC) (net) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated - RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Ether MGBC - Reformulated, GTAB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional, CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Other Conventional Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

134

Refinery & Blenders Net Input of Crude Oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Input Input Product: Total Crude Oil & Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane Normal Butane Isobutane Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Hydrogen Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) All Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils (net) Unfinished Oils, Naphthas and Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components (MGBC) (net) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated - RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB for Blending w/ Ether MGBC - Reformulated, GTAB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Other Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blending Components (net) Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

135

Refinery & Blenders Net Input of Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: RBOB with Ether, RBOB ...

136

Process for tertiary oil recovery using tall oil pitch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Compositions and process employing same for enhancing the recovery of residual acid crudes, particularly heavy crudes, by injecting a composition comprising caustic in an amount sufficient to maintain a pH of at least about 11, preferably at least about 13, and a small but effective amount of a multivalent cation for inhibiting alkaline silica dissolution with the reservoir. Preferably a tall oil pitch soap is included and particularly for the heavy crudes a polymeric mobility control agent.

Radke, Clayton J. (El Cerrito, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Process for tertiary oil recovery using tall oil pitch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and compositions for enhancing the recovery of acid crudes are disclosed. The process involves injecting caustic solutions into the reservoir to maintain a pH of 11 to 13. The fluid contains an effective amount of multivalent cation for inhibiting alkaline silica dissolution with the reservoir. A tall oil pitch soap is added as a polymeric mobility control agent. (DMC)

Radke, C.J.

1983-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

138

Efficient I/O Scheduling in Tertiary Libraries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the recent improvements in network and processor speeds, several data intensive applications have become much more feasible than ever before. The only practical solution for storing such enormous amounts of data is tertiarystorage. Automated access ...

Sunil Prabhakar; Divyakant Agrawal; Amr El Abbadi; Ambuj Singh

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Tertiary oxidation in Westwater Canyon member of Morrison formation  

SciTech Connect

Hematitic oxidation in the Westwater Canyon Sandstone Member of the Morrison Formation extends along the outcrop from the Pipeline fault northeast of Gallup, New Mexico, to the San Mateo fault north of Grants, New Mexico. The hematitic sandstone forms a broad lobe in the subsurface to a depth of 2,400 ft (730 m). The downdip edge of this sandstone arcs eastward from northeast Church Rock through Crownpoint, and southeastward to the west edge of the Ambrosia Lake district. The red sandstone is bordered on the downdip side by a band of limonitic oxidation, which interfingers with reduced sandstones basinward. The limonitic oxidation forms a relatively narrow band along the north and west sides of the hematitic lobe but expands progressively in an east and southeast direction. Weak limonitic oxidation, as indicated by the absence of pyrite and by a bleached to faint yellowish-gray color, appears to extend from the San Mateo fault eastward under Mount Taylor to the Rio Puerco of the east. The hematitic oxidation is epigenetic and is believed to be of early Miocene to late Pliocene age. The limonitic oxidation follows the present ground-water flow pattern and probably dates from late Pliocene to the Holocene. The oxidation patterns are important in uranium exploration because the hematitic area is essentially barren, whereas the limonitic areas contain ore deposits that are in the process of being destroyed by oxidation.

Saucier, A.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Evaluation of the North Burbank Unit tertiary recovery pilot test  

SciTech Connect

A review of the performance of the Phillips North Burbank micellar-polymer flood has been completed. The projected ultimate recovery is estimated to be ca 300,000 bbl, which is approximately one-half of the initial prediction made by Phillips. Although oil recovery has been less than expected, sufficient additional oil has been recovered to consider the project technically successful. The lower-than-expected oil recovery is attributed principally to high sulfonate losses. Loss of the sulfonate appears to be the result of significant adsorption to the oil-wet pore surfaces and mixing of micellar fluids with in-place water, which is of high salinity and hardness. Contact of the sulfonate with the high concentration of calcium ions creates calcium sulfonate, which either precipitates as an insoluble phase or partitions into the oil phase. Sulfonate partitioning would have created an upper-phase microemulsion, which cannot be displaced easily by water due to the relatively high interfacial tension. 11 references.

Tracy, G.W.; Dauben, D.L.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mtbe ethyl tertiary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Evaluation of the North Burbank unit tertiary recovery pilot test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review of the performance of the Phillips North Burbank micellar-polymer flood has been completed. The projected ultimate recovery is estimated to be about 300,000 barrels, which is about one half of the initial prediction made by Phillips. Although oil recovery has been less than expected, sufficient additional oil has been recovered to consider the project technically successful. The lower-than-expected oil recovery is attributed principally to high sulfonate losses. Loss of the sulfonate appears to be the result of significant adsorption to the oil-wet pore surfaces and mixing of micellar fluids with in-place water, which is of high salinity and hardness. Contact of the sulfonate with the high concentration of calcium ions creates calcium sulfonate, which either precipitates as an insoluble phase or partitions into the oil phase. Sulfonate partitioning would have created an upper-phase microemulsion, which cannot be easily displaced by water due to the relatively high interfacial tension. The following recommendations are made for improvement of the project: (1) Since preflushes may not always be effective or practical, use a surfactant system which is more tolerant of salinity and hardness. (2) A preflush, if needed, could be improved by designing the volume and salinity of injected fluids to efficiently remove divalent ions from reservoir clays and to displace excess salinity. (3) The surfactant system should be designed with the aid of displacement tests in field cores, conducted over the range of frontal velocities expected in the reservoir. It is particularly important to evaluate displacement at the lower velocity range. (4) Improve operational procedures by conducting workovers prior to pilot initiation and by careful control of injection pressures to insure that fracture extension does not occur.

Tracy, G.W.; Dauben, D.L.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Low Barrier Hydrogen Bonds in Acyclic Tertiary Diamines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Search of a Low Barrier Hydrogen Bond in Proton Bridgedand J.A. Gerlt, “The Low Barrier Hydrogen Bond in EnzymaticShow That Low-Barrier Hydrogen Bonds do not Offer a

Khodagholian, Sevana

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

The CretaceousTertiary Mass Extinction, Chicxulub Impact,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) and Meyerhoff et al. (1994) described Cretaceous assemblages in limestones over- lying breccias in Yucatan Pemex-examined the geophysical logs, sedimentology, and biostratigraphy of seven Pemex wells from northern Yucatan and concluded is often not available for study in PEMEX or UNAM wells. As noted earlier, Cretaceous planktic

Keller, Gerta

144

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #264: April 21, 2003 Production of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4: April 21, 4: April 21, 2003 Production of Ethanol and MTBE to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #264: April 21, 2003 Production of Ethanol and MTBE on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #264: April 21, 2003 Production of Ethanol and MTBE on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #264: April 21, 2003 Production of Ethanol and MTBE on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #264: April 21, 2003 Production of Ethanol and MTBE on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #264: April 21, 2003 Production of Ethanol and MTBE on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #264: April 21, 2003 Production of Ethanol and MTBE on AddThis.com... Fact #264: April 21, 2003 Production of Ethanol and MTBE

145

VarPetrRef 1 VARIETY AND THE EVOLUTION OF REFINERY PROCESSING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Catalytic reforming followed as a means of upgrading the octane of gasoline range materials principally): Catalytic reforming, Isomerization, Alkylation, Catalytic polymerization, MTBE and Hydrotreating. The last Distillation Visbreaking Hydrotreating Hydrocracking Thermal Reforming Alkylation MTBE Catalytic Reform ing

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

146

Enrichment, isolation and characterization of fungi tolerant to 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bourne, MA, USA). Carbon dioxide concentration was measuredOrangeburg, NY, USA). Carbon dioxide and ?ow data wereReddy et al. 2009). Carbon dioxide evolution rates (CER)

Singer, S.W.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

A theoretical analysis of the reaction between ethyl and molecular oxygen  

SciTech Connect

Using a combination of electronic-structure theory, variational transition-state theory, and solutions to the time-dependent master equation, the authors have studied the kinetics of the title reaction theoretically over wide ranges of temperature and pressure. The agreement between theory and experiment is quite good. By comparing the theoretical and experimental results describing the kinetic behavior, they have been able to deduce a value for the C{sub 2}H{sub 5}-O{sub 2} bond energy of {approximately}34 kcal/mole and a value for the exit-channel transition-state energy of {minus}4.3 kcal/mole (measured from reactants). These numbers compare favorably with the electronic-structure theory predictions of 33.9 kcal/mole and {minus}3.0 kcal/mole, respectively. The master-equation solutions show three distinct temperature regimes for the reaction, discussed extensively in the paper. Above T {approx} 700 K, the reaction can be written as an elementary step, C{sub 2}H{sub 5} + O{sub 2} {leftrightarrow} C{sub 2}H{sub 4} + HO{sub 2}, with the rate coefficient, k(T) = 3.19 x 10{sup {minus}17} T{sup 1.02} exp(2035/RT) cm{sup 3}/molec.-sec., independent of pressure even though the intermediate collision complex may suffer a large number of collisions.

James A. Miller; Stephen J. Klippenstein; Stuart H. Robertson

2000-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

148

U.S. Blender Net Input  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Input 1,184,435 1,522,193 1,850,204 2,166,784 2,331,109 2,399,318 2005-2012 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 3,445 5,686 6,538 7,810 10,663 2008-2012 Pentanes Plus 2,012 474 1,808 1,989 2,326 4,164 2005-2012 Liquid Petroleum Gases 2,971 3,878 4,549 5,484 6,499 2008-2012 Normal Butane 2,943 2,971 3,878 4,549 5,484 6,499 2005-2012 Isobutane 2005-2006 Other Liquids 1,518,748 1,844,518 2,160,246 2,323,299 2,388,655 2008-2012 Oxygenates/Renewables 234,047 274,974 286,837 295,004 2009-2012 Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) 2005-2006 Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) 234,047 274,974 286,837 295,004 2009-2012 Fuel Ethanol 131,810 182,772 232,677 273,107 281,507 287,433 2005-2012

149

U.S. Blender Net Input  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History Total Input 206,541 217,867 212,114 216,075 219,783 208,203 2005-2013 Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases 891 352 376 196 383 1,397 2008-2013 Pentanes Plus 261 301 313 67 287 393 2005-2013 Liquid Petroleum Gases 630 51 63 129 96 1,004 2008-2013 Normal Butane 630 51 63 129 96 1,004 2005-2013 Isobutane 2005-2006 Other Liquids 205,650 217,515 211,738 215,879 219,400 206,806 2008-2013 Oxygenates/Renewables 25,156 26,576 26,253 26,905 27,788 25,795 2009-2013 Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) 2005-2006 Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) 25,156 26,576 26,253 26,905 27,788 25,795 2009-2013 Fuel Ethanol 24,163 25,526 24,804 25,491 25,970 24,116 2005-2013

150

The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2000 - International  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

international energy module (IEM) consists of four submodules (Figure 4) that perform the following functions: international energy module (IEM) consists of four submodules (Figure 4) that perform the following functions: world oil market submodule—calculates the average annual world oil price (imported refiner acquisition cost) that is consistent with worldwide petroleum demand and supply availability crude oil supply submodule—provides im- ported crude oil supply curves for five crude oil quality classes petroleum products supply submodule—pro- vides imported refined product supply curves for eleven types of refined products oxygenates supply submodule—provides imported oxygenates supply curves for methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) and methanol. Figure 4. International Energy Module Structure The world oil price that is generated by the world oil market submodule is used by all the modules of NEMS as well as the other submodules of IEM. The import supply curves for crude oils, refined products, and oxygenates are used by the petroleum market module.

151

Refinery Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Petroleum Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) All Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Other Hydrocarbons Unfinished Oils Naphthas and Lighter Kerosene and Light Gas Oils Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Components MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated - RBOB MGBC - RBOB for Blending with Alcohol* MGBC - RBOB for Blending with Ether* MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional CBOB MGBC - Conventional GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Reformulated Blended with Fuel Ethanol Reformulated, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended with Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended with Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate Fuel Oil, 15 ppm and Under Distillate Fuel Oil, Greater than 15 ppm to 500 ppm Distillate Fuel Oil, Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Less than 0.31 Percent Sulfur 0.31 to 1.00 Percent Sulfur Greater than 1.00 Percent Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petrochemical Feedstock Use Other Oils for Petrochemical Feedstock Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Marketable Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Units: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

152

Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Exports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Exports Exports Product: Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil Natural Gas Plant Liquids and Liquefied Refinery Gases Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Isobutylene Other Liquids Hydrogen/Oxygenates/Renewables/Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excl. Fuel Ethanol) Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE) Other Oxygenates Renewable Fuels (incl. Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Biomass-Based Diesel Motor Gasoline Blend. Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Conventional Aviation Gasoline Blend. Comp. Finished Petroleum Products Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Residual Fuel Oil Naphtha for Petro. Feed. Use Other Oils Petro. Feed. Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

153

Hydrocarbons in New Guinea, controlled by basement fabric, Mesozoic extension and Tertiary convergent margin tectonics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most models for the tectonic evolution of New Guinea involve Early and Late Miocene arc-continent collisions, creating an orogenic belt. Structural trends and prospectivity are then analyzed in terms of belts across the country; the Fold Belt (with the discovered oil and gas fields), the Mobile Belt and the accreted arcs. This model inhibits realistic assessment of prospectivity. It now appears the Mobile Belt formed by Oligocene compression then by Early Miocene extension, related to slab-rollback, that unroofed metamorphic core complexes adjacent to starved half-grabens. The grabens filled in the Middle Miocene and were largely transported intact during the Pliocene arc-collision. Early Miocene reefs and hypothesized starved basin source rocks create a viable play throughout northern New Guinea as in the Salawati Basin. The Pliocene clastic section is locally prospective due to overthrusting and deep burial. Within the Fold Belt, the site and types of oil and gas fields are largely controlled by the basement architecture. This controlled the transfer zones and depocentres during Mesozoic extension and the location of major basement uplifts during compression. In PNG, the Bosavi lineament separates an oil province from a gas province. In Irian Jaya the transition from a relatively competent sequence to a rifted sequence west of [approx]139[degrees]E may also be a gas-oil province boundary. Understanding, in detail, the compartmentalization of inverted blocks and areas of thin-skinned thrusting, controlled by the basement architecture, will help constrain hydrocarbon prospectivity.

Hill, K.C.; Kendrick, R.D.; Crowhurst, P.V. (VIEPS, Melbourne (Australia) SAEFUDIN Ijep, GRDC (India))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Borehole gravity surveys in the Cretaceous-Tertiary Sagavanirktok Formation, Kuparuk River oil field, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

Detailed borehole gravity surveys (sponsored by the US Department of Energy) were made in three wells in the Kuparuk River and westernmost Prudhoe Bay oil fields, Alaska from depths as shallow as 15 m to as great as 1,340 m through permafrost and underlying heavy oil bearing sandstones of the Sagavanirktok Formation. A subbituminous coal-bearing sequence and the stability field for methane hydrate occur partly within and partly below the permafrost zone, whose base, defined by the 0{degree}C isotherm, varies from 464 to 564 m. The surveys provided accurate, large-volume estimates of in-situ bulk density from which equivalent porosity was calculated using independent grain and pore-fluid density information. This density and porosity data helped to define the rock mass properties within the hydrate stability field and the thermal conductivity, seismic character, and compaction history of the permafrost. Bulk density of the unconsolidated to poorly consolidated sections ranges mostly from 1.9 to 2.3 g/cm{sup 3}. The shallow permafrost section appears to be slightly overcompacted in comparison to similar sedimentary sequences in nonpermafrost regions. The cause of this apparent overcompaction is unknown but may be due to freeze-thaw processes that have similarly affected sea floor and surficial deposits elsewhere in the Arctic. Fluctuations of bulk density appear to be controlled principally by (1) textural variations of the sediments, possibly exaggerated locally within the permafrost zone by excess ice, (2) presence or absence of carbonaceous material, and (3) type of pore-fluid (water-ice vs. water vs. hydrocarbons). As hypothetical models predict bulk-density is slightly lower opposite one interval of possible methane hydrate. Porosity may be as high as 40-45% for selected coarser grained units within the permafrost zone, and as high as 30-35% in a series of well sorted, heavy oil-bearing sandstones.

Beyer, L.A. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Influence of provenance on detrital and diagenetic mineralogy of small tertiary fans in southwestern Montana  

SciTech Connect

In the North Boulder River basin in southwestern Montana, alluvial fans of the Renova (Oligocene-Miocene) and the Sixmile Creek (Miocene) Formations were deposited on the flanks of north-south-trending uplifts that also supplied the detritus. The Elkhorn Mountain volcanics (78 m.y.) overlying the Boulder batholith make up the western highlands, a small patch of Precambrian Belt Group rocks occur in the southwest and Paleozoic siliciclastic and carbonate rocks forming the eastern margin. The fan sediments thus allow adequate control for studying the influence of source rocks on detrital and diagenetic mineralogy. Modal analysis of 6228 grains in 31 thin sections shows a decrease of VRF away from the igneous sources (37% to 1% in a north-south transect; 37% to 7% in a west-east transect) along with an increase in quartz (8% to 24% and 3% to 13%) and plagioclase (2% to 16% and 2% to 10%); orthoclase abundance is low except in the southwest. Volcanic ash and glass shards are found in the younger sediments in the northern part of the basin. Their data show a positive correlation between the abundance of orthoclase and kaolinite (north-south transect); between SRF and carbonate cement (west-east transect) and between glass shards and smectite (both north-south and west-east transects). They infer that the diagenetic mineralogy of these sands was controlled essentially by the detrital particles, which were strongly controlled by source rocks in this area.

Olson, J.; Basu, A.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Tertiary nitrogen heterocyclic material to reduce moisture-induced damage in asphalt-aggregate mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Asphalt-aggregate roads crack when subjected to freezing and thawing cycles. Herein, the useful life of asphalts are substantially improved by a minor amount of a moisture damage inhibiting agent selected from compounds having a pyridine moiety, including acid salts of such compounds. A shale oil fraction may serve as the source of the improving agent and may simply be blended with conventional petroleum asphalts.

Plancher, Henry (Laramie, WY); Petersen, Joseph C. (Laramie, WY)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Exposure to, perceptions and levels of mental skills among tertiary institution field hockey players / Maryke Eloff.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The importance of mental skills training (MST) is emphasized by previous/available research findings which show that by combining MST with physical training it enhances players’… (more)

Eloff, Maryke

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

ThinkFree: using a visual Wiki for IT knowledge management in a tertiary institution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe ThinkFree, an industrial Visual Wiki application which provides a way for end users to better explore knowledge of IT Enterprise Architecture assets that is held within a large enterprise wiki. The application was motivated ... Keywords: knowledge management, visual wiki, visualization

Christian Hirsch; John Hosking; John Grundy; Tim Chaffe

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Secondary porosity in immature Late Cretaceous and Tertiary sandstones, northeast Alaska and northwest Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Petrographic and scanning electron microscope analysis of Upper Cretaceous to lower Eocene sandstone from outcrops west of the Mackenzie delta and in the central Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) reveals secondary porosity. Recognizing this secondary porosity is important for oil and gas exploration because early diagenesis has eliminated most primary porosity in these immature litharenites. The litharenites are dominated by grains of quartz, cherty argillite, chert, volcanic rock fragments, variable amounts of feldspar, and minor amounts of metamorphic rock fragments. Because of the abundance of ductile grains all deep burial (probable burial to depths in excess of 3,000 m), these sandstones have suffered the loss of most primary porosity. Additional reduction of primary porosity has occurred due to the formation of minor amount of precompaction rim cement (carbonate, chlorite, and illite/smectite) and syncompaction quartz overgrowths. Dissolution of framework grains and, to a lesser degree, matrix has resulted in secondary porosities of up to 8% in outcrop samples. Framework grains commonly dissolved include volcanic rock fragments, feldspar, chert, cherty argillite, argillite, and quartz. Two processes are responsible for the dissolution. The first process is the direct dissolution of grains. The second process involves two steps in which grains and matrix are initially replaced by carbonate cement followed by dissolution of the cement and creation of secondary porosity. Secondary porosity is reported to exceed 20% in subsurface samples in northwest Canada.

Myers, M.D. (Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks (USA)); Smith, T.N. (State Div. of Oil and Gas, Anchorage, AK (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

New surfactant classes for enhanced oil recovery and their tertiary oil recovery potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conditioned to residual waterflood oil saturation prior to surfactant slug injection. This was followed for more than 35 years, in particular in the USA in depleted oil reservoirs after waterflooding (Garrett., 2000; Jayanti et al., 2001; Berger and Lee, 2002; Endo et al., 2002). During a waterflood (which can

Goddard III, William A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mtbe ethyl tertiary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Multiple impacts across the CretaceousTertiary boundary G. Kellera,*, W. Stinnesbeckb  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the PEMEX well Soyalo 1. Bochil-2 is about 8 km from the intersection with the main road, whereas Bochil-1

Keller, Gerta

162

Petroleum systems of the Southeast Tertiary basins and Marbella area, Southeast Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This study was done in an area where insufficient organic-rich rocks were available for a reliable oil-source rock correlation. However, oil-rock correlations, molecular characteristics of key horizons, paleofacies maps, maturation and potential migration pathways suggest the Tithonian as a major source rock. Moreover, there is good evidence of high quality source rocks in Oxfordian, Kimmeridgian, Middle-Upper Cretaceous and Paleogene (mainly in the Eocene). Plays were identified in Upper Jurassic oolitic sequences, Early-Middle Cretaceus carbonate platform rocks and breccias, Late Cretaceous basinal fracture carbonates, Paleogene carbonates and breccias, Early-Middle Miocene mounds and submarine fans and isolated carbonate platform sediments and Miocene-Recent turbidites. Seal rocks are shaly carbonates and anhydrites from Tithonian, basinal carbonates and anhydrites from Middle-Upper Cretaceous, basinal carbonates and marls from Upper Cretaceous and Paleogene shales, and bathyal shales from Early Miocene-Recent. The first phase of oil migration from upper Jurassic-Early Cretaceous source rocks occurred in the Early-Middle Cretaceous. In the Upper Cretaceous the Chortis block collided with Chiapas, and as a result mild folding and some hydrocarbons were emplaced to the structural highs. The main phase of structuration and folding of the Sierra de Chiapas started in the Miocene, resulting in well-defined structural traps. Finally, in Plio-Pleistocene the Chortis block was separated, the major compressional period finished and the southern portion of Sierra de Chiapas was raised isostatically. As a result of major subsidence, salt withdrawal and increased burial depth, conditions were created for the generation of liquid hydrocarbons from the Paleogene shales.

Fuentes, F. [Pemex Exploration y Produccion, Mexico City (Mexico)]|[Joint Team, Pemex Exploration y Producion and BP Exploration, Mexico City (Mexico)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Tertiary Motifs Revealed in Analyses of Higher-Order RNA Junctions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Stahley, A. B. Kosek, J. Wang and S. A. Strobel, Nature, 2004, 430, 45; P. L. Adams, M. R. Stahley, M. L. Gill, A. B. Kosek, J. Wang and S. A. Strobel, RNA, 2004, 10, 1867. 13 F. Guo, A. R. Gooding and T. R

Schlick, Tamar

164

Benign nodular tertiary syphilis: A rare presenting manifestation of HIV infection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hospital, Bangalore Medical College and Research Institute,Hospital, Bangalore Medical College and Research Institute,

Revathi, TN; Bhat, Shilpa; Asha, GS

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

166

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

167

Whole-Genome Analysis of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether-Degrading Beta-Proteobacterium Methylibium petroleiphilum PM1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by pure cultures of butane-degrading bacteria. Appl.of K s values for MTBE by butane- degrading bacteria (52).

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Numerical and experimental studies of ethanol flames and autoignition theory for higher alkanes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

initiated ignition in methane-propane mixtures”, Combustiontemperature ignition of propane with MTBE as an additive:detonation in ethylene and propane mixtures”, Combustion and

Saxena, Priyank

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Fuel-Cycle energy and emission impacts of ethanol-diesel blends in urban buses and farming tractors.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

About 2.1 billion gallons of fuel ethanol was used in the United States in 2002, mainly in the form of gasoline blends containing up to 10% ethanol (E10). Ethanol use has the potential to increase in the U.S. blended gasoline market because methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), formerly the most popular oxygenate blendstock, may be phased out owing to concerns about MTBE contamination of the water supply. Ethanol would remain the only viable near-term option as an oxygenate in reformulated gasoline production and to meet a potential federal renewable fuels standard (RFS) for transportation fuels. Ethanol may also be blended with additives (co-solvents) into diesel fuels for applications in which oxygenation may improve diesel engine emission performance. Numerous studies have been conducted to evaluate the fuel-cycle energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission effects of ethanol-gasoline blends relative to those of gasoline for applications in spark-ignition engine vehicles (see Wang et al. 1997; Wang et al. 1999; Levelton Engineering et al. 1999; Shapouri et al. 2002; Graboski 2002). Those studies did not address the energy and emission effects of ethanol-diesel (E-diesel or ED) blends relative to those of petroleum diesel fuel in diesel engine vehicles. The energy and emission effects of E-diesel could be very different from those of ethanol-gasoline blends because (1) the energy use and emissions generated during diesel production (so-called ''upstream'' effects) are different from those generated during gasoline production; and (2) the energy and emission performance of E-diesel and petroleum diesel fuel in diesel compression-ignition engines differs from that of ethanol-gasoline blends in spark-ignition (Otto-cycle-type) engine vehicles. The Illinois Department of Commerce and Community Affairs (DCCA) commissioned Argonne National Laboratory to conduct a full fuel-cycle analysis of the energy and emission effects of E-diesel blends relative to those of petroleum diesel when used in the types of diesel engines that will likely be targeted first in the marketplace. This report documents the results of our study. The draft report was delivered to DCCA in January 2003. This final report incorporates revisions by the sponsor and by Argonne.

Wang, M.; Saricks, C.; Lee, H.

2003-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

170

Methods and techniques for disruption-free network  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

areas. The National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER) Survey reports MTBE content (as. The content of MTBE is seasonal, particularly in OXY areas, and can vary in many locations. However, NIPER. Using NIPER data, areas of the country where NAWQA has sampled surface and ground water were classified

Bonaventure, Olivier

171

Determination of Methyl tert-Butyl Ether and tert-Butyl Alcohol in Water by Solid-Phase Microextraction/Head Space Analysis in Comparison to EPA Method 5030/8260B  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is now one of the most common groundwater contaminants in the United States. Groundwater contaminated with MTBE is also likely to be contaminated with tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), because TBA is a component of commercial grade MTBE, TBA can also be used as a fuel oxygenate, and TBA is a biodegradation product of MTBE. In California, MTBE is subject to reporting at concentrations greater than 3 {micro}g/L. TBA is classified as a ''contaminant of current interest'' and has a drinking water action level of 12 {micro}g/L. In this paper, we describe the development and optimization of a simple, automated solid phase microextraction (SPME) method for the analysis of MTBE and TBA in water and demonstrate the applicability of this method for monitoring MTBE and TBA contamination in groundwater, drinking water, and surface water. In this method, the headspace (HS) of a water sample is extracted with a carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane SPME fiber, the MTBE and TBA are desorbed into a gas chromatograph (GC), and detected using mass spectrometry (MS). The method is optimized for the routine analysis of MTBE and TBA with a level of quantitation of 0.3 {micro}g/L and 4 {micro}g/L, respectively, in water. MTBE quantitation was linear for over two orders of concentration (0.3 {micro}g/L -80 {micro}g/L). TBA was found to be linear within the range of 4 {micro}g/L-7,900 {micro}g/L. The lower level of detection for MTBE is 0.03 {micro}g/L using this method. This SPME method using headspace extraction was found to be advantageous over SPME methods requiring immersion of the fiber into the water samples, because it prolonged the life of the fiber by up to 400 sample analyses. This is the first time headspace extraction SPME has been shown to be applicable to the measurement of both MTBE and TBA at concentrations below regulatory action levels. This method was compared with the certified EPA Method 5030/8260B (purge-and-trap/GC/MS) using split samples from laboratory bioreactors treating MTBE contaminated water and applied to environmental samples collected throughout the East Bay area of California. Results from the SPME-HS/GC/MS method were directly comparable to the EPA Method 5030/8260B. This method provides an simple, inexpensive, accurate, and sensitive alternative to EPA Method 5030/8260B for the analysis of MTBE and TBA in water samples.

Oh, Keun-Chan; Stringfellow, William T.

2003-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

172

Microsoft Word - BingQuestionOne1004.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Supply Impacts of an MTBE Ban Supply Impacts of an MTBE Ban September 2002 ii Energy Information Administration/Supply Impacts of An MTBE Ban Contacts This report was prepared by the Office of Oil and Gas of the Energy Information Administration. General questions concerning the report may be directed to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222, mhutzler@eia.doe.gov), Director, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, or Joanne Shore (202/586-4677, joanne.shore@eia.doe.gov), Team Leader, Petroleum Division. 1 Energy Information Administration/Supply Impacts of An MTBE Ban Supply Impacts of an MTBE Ban On June 17, 2002, Senator Jeff Bingaman, Chairman of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources, requested (Appendix A) that the Energy Information Administration (EIA) provide analysis of eight factors related to the Senate-passed fuels

173

Operational safety report for the cleaning of non-radioactive, sodium-wetted reactor components with ethyl alcohol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The safety aspects of the removal of sodium from nonradioactive reactor components by the alcohol process are described in detail. Pertinent properties of alcohol and hydrogen are presented. Relevant excerpts from the Occupational Safety and Health Act safety codes are presented, and a conceptual system is shown illustrating the application of these safety measures.

Humphrey, L.; Felton, L.; Goodman, L.; Pilicy, G.; Welch, F.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Task 4.9 -- Value-added products from syngas. Semi-annual report, July 1--December 31, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work on advanced fuel forms in 1996 focused on the synthesis of higher alcohols from mixtures of hydrogen and carbon dioxide (syngas) from coal gasification. Initial work in this project utilized a novel molybdenum sulfide catalyst previously shown to be active for hydrodesulfurization reactions of coal liquids. A pressurized fixed-bed flow-through reactor was constructed, and the MoS{sub 2} catalysts were tested with syngas under a variety of conditions. Unfortunately, the catalysts, even with higher molybdenum loading and addition of promoters, failed to give alcohol products. A batch reactor test of the catalyst was also conducted, but did not produce alcohol products. Group VIII metals have been used previously in catalysts for syngas reactions. Ruthenium and rhodium catalysts were prepared by impregnation of a hydrotalcite support. Tests with these catalysts in flow-through reactors also did not produce the desired alcohol products. The formation of higher alcohols from smaller ones, such as methanol and ethanol, could be commercially important if high selectivity could be achieved. The methanol and ethanol would be derived from syngas and fermentation, respectively. Based on previous work in other laboratories, it was hypothesized that the hydrotalcite-supported MoS{sub 2} or Ru or Rh catalysts could catalyze the formation of butyl alcohols. Although the desired 1-butanol was obtained in batch reactions with the promoted ruthenium catalyst, the reaction was not as selective as desired. Product suitable for a lower-vapor-pressure gasoline oxygenate additive was obtained, but it may not be economical to market such products in competition with methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE). Flow-through catalytic bed reactions were not successful.

Olson, E.S.; Sharma, R.K.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Dehydration of isobutanol to isobutene in a slurry reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The April 1990 Alternative Fuels Proposal to the Department of Energy involved the development of new technology, based on the liquid phase process, for conversion of coal-derived synthesis gas to oxygenated hydrocarbon fuels, fuel additives, and fuel intermediates. The objective of this work was to develop a slurry reactor based process for the dehydration of isobutanol to isobutene. The isobutene can serve as a feedstock for the high octane oxygenated fuel additive methyl tertiary-butyl either (MTBE). Alumina catalysts were investigated because of their wide use as a dehydration catalyst. Four commercially available alumina catalysts (Catapal B, Versal B, Versal GH, and Al-3996R) were evaluated for both activity and selectivity to the branched olefin. All four catalysts demonstrated conversions greater than 80% at 290 C, while conversions of near 100% could be obtained at 330 C. The reaction favors low pressures and moderate to low space velocities. A yield of 0.90 mole isobutene per mole reacted isobutanol or better was obtained at conversions of 60--70% and higher. From 75 to 98% conversion, the four catalysts all provide isobutene yields ranging from 0.92 to 0.94 with the maximum occurring around 90% conversion. At low conversions, the concentration of diisobutyl ether becomes significant while the concentration of linear butenes is essentially a linear function of isobutanol conversion. Doping the catalyst with up to 0.8 wt % potassium showed a modest increase in isobutene selectivity; however, this increase was more than offset by a reduction in activity. Investigations using a mixed alcohols feed (consistent with isobutanol synthesis from syngas) demonstrated a small increase in the C4 iso-olefin selectivity over that observed for a pure isobutanol feed. 55 refs.

Latshaw, B.E.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Fuel cycle evaluations of biomass-ethanol and reformulated gasoline. Volume 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is using the total fuel cycle analysis (TFCA) methodology to evaluate energy choices. The National Energy Strategy (NES) identifies TFCA as a tool to describe and quantify the environmental, social, and economic costs and benefits associated with energy alternatives. A TFCA should quantify inputs and outputs, their impacts on society, and the value of those impacts that occur from each activity involved in producing and using fuels, cradle-to-grave. New fuels and energy technologies can be consistently evaluated and compared using TFCA, providing a sound basis for ranking policy options that expand the fuel choices available to consumers. This study is limited to creating an inventory of inputs and outputs for three transportation fuels: (1) reformulated gasoline (RFG) that meets the standards of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) using methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE); (2) gasohol (E10), a mixture of 10% ethanol made from municipal solid waste (MSW) and 90% gasoline; and (3) E95, a mixture of 5% gasoline and 95% ethanol made from energy crops such as grasses and trees. The ethanol referred to in this study is produced from lignocellulosic material-trees, grass, and organic wastes -- called biomass. The biomass is converted to ethanol using an experimental technology described in more detail later. Corn-ethanol is not discussed in this report. This study is limited to estimating an inventory of inputs and outputs for each fuel cycle, similar to a mass balance study, for several reasons: (1) to manage the size of the project; (2) to provide the data required for others to conduct site-specific impact analysis on a case-by-case basis; (3) to reduce data requirements associated with projecting future environmental baselines and other variables that require an internally consistent scenario.

Tyson, K.S.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

The feasibility of ethanol production in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agricultural interests across Texas are looking at the possibility of an ethanol industry in Texas. Continued conflict in the Middle East, the ban of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) in California, and low commodity prices have all lead to increased interest in ethanol throughout the state of Texas. There have been several ethanol feasibility studies conducted. Most studies have been focused in other states, and only one incorporated risk on input and output prices. Very little research has been done in Texas. Previous studies are typically for a generic location and only looked at ethanol production from corn. This study looks at four different plant sizes in three different regions using corn and grain sorghum. This study incorporates risk on input prices (corn, grain sorghum, natural gas, and electricity) and the output prices of ethanol and dried distillers grain with solubles (DDGS). The regions that were analyzed in the study are the Texas Panhandle, the Central Texas region, and the Southeast Texas region. The results indicate that the only plants expected to generate a positive net present value (NPV) were the larger grain sorghum based plants in the Texas Panhandle. The smaller sorghum based plants in the Panhandle did not have a positive NPV. The only other plants that were close to having a positive net present value were the grain sorghum plants in the Central Texas Region. Sorghum in the Southeast Texas Region was not feasible. Using corn as the feedstock was not as feasible in any region. The results of a sensitivity analysis show that a small increase in the net income in the form of increased revenue or reduced costs would make all the plants profitable.

Herbst, Brian Keith

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

An empirical study of potentials of adoption of grid computing as a vehicle for tertiary institutions collaboration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Grid computing is emerging as the foundation upon which virtual collaborations can be built among large organisations with the aim of integrating and sharing computer resources, and thus offering performance and resource availability, which is unattainable ...

Faith-Michael E. Uzoka; B. A. Akinnuwesi; S. O. Olabiyisi; Alabi Demilade

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

INCREASED OIL PRODUCTION AND RESERVES UTILIZING SECONDARY/TERTIARY RECOVERY TECHNIQUES ON SMALL RESERVOIRS IN THE PARADOX BASIN, UTAH  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from shallow-shelf carbonate buildups or mounds within the Desert Creek zone of the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to four wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field at a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. Five fields in southeastern Utah were evaluated for waterflood or carbon-dioxide (CO{sub 2})-miscible flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. Geological characterization on a local scale focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity as well as possible compartmentalization within each of the five project fields. The Desert Creek zone includes three generalized facies belts: (1) open-marine, (2) shallow-shelf and shelf-margin, and (3) intra-shelf, salinity-restricted facies. These deposits have modern analogs near the coasts of the Bahamas, Florida, and Australia, respectively, and outcrop analogs along the San Juan River of southeastern Utah. The analogs display reservoir heterogeneity, flow barriers and baffles, and lithofacies geometry observed in the fields; thus, these properties were incorporated in the reservoir simulation models. Productive carbonate buildups consist of three types: (1) phylloid algal, (2) coralline algal, and (3) bryozoan. Phylloid-algal buildups have a mound-core interval and a supra-mound interval. Hydrocarbons are stratigraphically trapped in porous and permeable lithotypes within the mound-core intervals of the lower part of the buildups and the more heterogeneous supramound intervals. To adequately represent the observed spatial heterogeneities in reservoir properties, the phylloid-algal bafflestones of the mound-core interval and the dolomites of the overlying supra-mound interval were subdivided into ten architecturally distinct lithotypes, each of which exhibits a characteristic set of reservoir properties obtained from outcrop analogs, cores, and geophysical logs. The Anasazi and Runway fields were selected for geostatistical modeling and reservoir compositional simulations. Models and simulations incorporated variations in carbonate lithotypes, porosity, and permeability to accurately predict reservoir responses. History matches tied previous production and reservoir pressure histories so that future reservoir performances could be confidently predicted. The simulation studies showed that despite most of the production being from the mound-core intervals, there were no corresponding decreases in the oil in place in these intervals. This behavior indicates gravity drainage of oil from the supra-mound intervals into the lower mound-core intervals from which the producing wells' major share of production arises. The key to increasing ultimate recovery from these fields (and similar fields in the basin) is to design either waterflood or CO{sub 2}-miscible flood projects capable of forcing oil from high-storage-capacity but low-recovery supra-mound units into the high-recovery mound-core units. Simulation of Anasazi field shows that a CO{sub 2} flood is technically superior to a waterflood and economically feasible. For Anasazi field, an optimized CO{sub 2} flood is predicted to recover a total 4.21 million barrels (0.67 million m3) of oil representing in excess of 89 percent of the original oil in place. For Runway field, the best CO{sub 2} flood is predicted to recover a total of 2.4 million barrels (0.38 million m3) of oil representing 71 percent of the original oil in place. If the CO{sub 2} flood performed as predicted, it is a financially robust process for increasing the reserves in the many small fields in the Paradox Basin. The results can be applied to other fields in the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent.

Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Solvent-extraction and purification of uranium(VI) and molybdenum(VI) by tertiary amines from acid leach solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considering international interest in the yellow-cake price, Argentina is seeking to exploit new uranium ore bodies and processing plants. A study of similar plants would suggest that solvent- extraction with Alamine 336 is considered the best method for the purification and concentration of uranium present in leaching solutions. In order to study the purification of these leach liquors, solvent-extraction tests under different conditions were performed with simulated solutions which containing molybdenum and molybdenum-uranium mixtures. Preliminary extraction tests carried out on mill acid-leaching liquors are also presented. (authors)

La Gamma, Ana M.G.; Becquart, Elena T.; Chocron, Mauricio [Gerencia Quimica, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250 (1429), Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mtbe ethyl tertiary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Paleomagnetic and structural evidence for middle Tertiary counterclockwise block rotation in the Dixie Valley region, west-central Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Paleomagnetic data from late Oligocene to early Miocene ash-flow tuffs at four localities in the northern Dixie Valley region, west-central Nevada, indicate that parts of the crust have rotated counterclockwise by at least 25/sup 0/ and perhaps significantly more in late Cenozoic time. Field relations in White Rock Canyon, Stillwater Range, suggest that rotation (1) was accommodated by right-lateral slip on northwest-trending faults, (2) spanned ash-flow tuff emplacement, and (3) probably ceased before eruption of overlying middle Miocene basalts. Accurate estimates of Cenozoic extension, as well as evaluation of earlier Mesozoic structures, must include the strain partitioned into rotation in the area.

Hudson, M.R.; Geissman, J.W.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Volume and accessibility of entrained (solution) methane in deep geopressured reservoirs - tertiary formations of the Texas Gulf Coast. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to appraise the total volume of in-place methane dissolved in formation waters of deep sandstone reservoirs of the onshore Texas Gulf Coast within the stratigraphic section extending from the base of significant hydrocarbon production (8000 ft)* to the deepest significant sandstone occurrence. The area of investigation is about 50,000 mi/sup 2/. Factors that determine the total methane resource are reservoir bulk volume, porosity, and methane solubility; the latter is controlled by the temperature, pressure, and salinity of formation waters. Regional assessment of the volume and the distribution of potential sandstone reservoirs was made from a data base of 880 electrical well logs, from which a grid of 24 dip cross sections and 4 strike cross sections was constructed. Solution methane content in each of nine formations or divisions of formations was determined for each subdivision. The distribution of solution methane in the Gulf Coast was described on the basis of five reservoir models. Each model was characterized by depositional environment, reservoir continuity, porosity, permeability, and methane solubility.

Gregory, A.R.; Dodge, M.M.; Posey, J.S.; Morton, R.A.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by field demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced- oil-recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels (23,850,000-31,800,000 m3) of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon-dioxide-(CO2-) miscible flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place within the Navajo Nation, San Juan County, Utah.

Jr., Chidsey, Thomas C.; Allison, M. Lee

1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

184

Polymer floods: A case study of nonlinear wave analysis and of instability control in tertiary oil recovery  

SciTech Connect

Polymer flooding in oil reservoir simulation is considered in two space dimensions. The wave structures associated with such a process give rise to interesting phenomena in the nonlinear regime which have direct bearing on the efficiency of oil recovery. These waves influence and can prevent surface instabilities of the fingering mode. In this paper we resolve these waves by a front tracking method. We consider the fingering problem and the issue of oil recovery for the polymer flood. The details of these two phenomena depend on the separation between the waves and upon the viscosity contrast between the oil, water and polymer. We identify a nonlinear transfer of instability between adjacent waves and a nonlinear enhancement of recovery due to successive waves. The conclusions produced by this work are also pertinent to tracer flooding. One interesting conclusion applies to polymer injection followed by pure water injection. In this case the instability is transferred to the polymer-water interface, and the pure water region can break through the polymer to achieve direct contact with the oil. The polymer is left in narrow ribbons parallel to the main flow field and is by-passed by pure water. The effect of narrow regions of by-passed polymer can be simulated by the front tracking method and is not equivalent to numerical or physical diffusion, which would distribute the polymer more uniformly and retard the breakthrough of water through the polymer layer. 45 refs., 15 figs.

Daripa, P.; Glimm, J.; Lindquist, B.; McBryan, O.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Polymer floods: A case study of nonlinear wave analysis and of instability control in tertiary oil recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polymer flooding in oil reservoir simulation is considered in two space dimensions. The wave structures associated with such a process give rise to interesting phenomena in the nonlinear regime which have direct bearing on the efficiency of oil recovery. These waves influence and can prevent surface instabilities of the fingering mode. In this paper the authors resolve these waves by a front tracking method. They consider the fingering problem and the issue of oil recovery for the polymer flood. The details of these two phenomena depend on the separation between the waves and upon the viscosity contrast between the oil, water and polymer. They identify a nonlinear transfer of instability between adjacent waves and a nonlinear enhancement of recovery due to successive waves. The conclusions produced by this work are also pertinent to tracer flooding. One interesting conclusion applies to polymer injection followed by pure water injection. In this case the instability is transferred to the polymer-water interface, and the pure water region can break through the polymer to achieve direct contact with the oil. The polymer is left in narrow ribbons parallel to the main flow field and is by-passed by pure water. The effect of narrow regions of by-passed polymer can be simulated by the front tracking method and is not equivalent to numerical or physical diffusion, which would distribute the polymer more uniformly and retard the breakthrough of water through the polymer layer.

Daripa, P.; Glimm, J.; Lindquist, B.; McBryan, O.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mtbe ethyl tertiary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a
real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Synthesis of octane enhancers during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. Quarterly technical progress report No. 5, October 1, 1991--December 31, 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to investigate three possible routes to the formation of ethers, in particular methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), during slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The three reaction schemes to be investigated are: Addition of isobutylene during the formation of methanol and/or higher alcohols directly from CO and H{sub 2} during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. Addition of isobutylene to FT liquid products including alcohols in a slurry-phase reactor containing an MTBE or other acid catalyst. Addition of methanol to slurry phase FT synthesis making iso-olefins.

Marcelin, G.

1992-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

202

Synthesis of octane enhancers during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to investigate three possible routes to the formation of ethers, in particular methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), during slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The three reaction schemes to be investigated are: Addition of isobutylene during the formation of methanol and/or higher alcohols directly from CO and H{sub 2} during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. Addition of isobutylene to FT liquid products including alcohols in a slurry-phase reactor containing an MTBE or other acid catalyst. Addition of methanol to slurry phase FT synthesis making iso-olefins.

Marcelin, G.

1992-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

203

JOURNAL OF BACTERIOLOGY, 0021-9193/01/$04.00 0 DOI: 10.1128/JB.183.16.47184726.2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, catechol, ,2,5,6- dibenz(a)anthracene, ethyl benzene, furan, furfural, hydrogen peroxide, hydroquinone

Sheridan, Jennifer

205

Self-Assembly of Surfactant Vesicles that Transform into Viscoelastic Wormlike Micelles upon Heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

worms such as the above find use in industrial applications such as hydraulic fracturing for tertiary

Raghavan, Srinivasa

206

The Earth System Grid: Turning Climate Datasets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Download Data Search NERSC MSS, HPSS: Tertiary data storage systems First Generation ESG Architecture RLS

207

Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emission Impacts of Ethanol-Diesel Blends in Urban Buses and Farming Tractors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

...................................................................................................................................... 14 Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Nitrogen Fertilizer Applications in Corn Fields........................................................ 34 Appendix B: Nitrous Oxide Emissions from Nitrogen Fertilizer Applications in Corn Fields) LHV lower heating value LPG liquefied petroleum gas LS low-sulfur LSD low-sulfur diesel MTBE methyl

Argonne National Laboratory

208

he increasing frequency of detection of the widely used gasoline additive methyl tert-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/L. For the city's Char- nock well field, an initial review of known and sus- pected petroleum spill sites identified about 10 potential sources that lay within 1 km of the well field, lay above the hydrologic unit (LUFTs) and leaking pipelines, other sources of MTBE in groundwater include tank overfilling and faulty

209

Harnessing microbial activities for environmental cleanup Frank E Lo ffler1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Petroleum Institute, Depart- ment of Biotechnology of Petroleum, Eje Central LaÃ?zaro CaÃ?rdenas no. 152, Me; Hong et al., 1997). We described earlier the use of MTBE as sole organic carbon and energy source carbon sources The F- consortium could also use a wide range of hydrocarbons as sole carbon source

Löffler, Frank E.

210

Well-to-Wheels Energy and Emission Impacts of Vehicle/Fuel Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biodiesel Corn Cellulosic Biomass Soybean Various Sources Electricity Flared Gas Landfill Gas Crude Naphtha Petroleum Conv. & Reform. Gasoline Conv. & Reform. Diesel Liquefied Petroleum Gas Compressed Natural Gas vs. MTBE #12;Production and Compression Are Key Steps for Centralized G.H2 Pathways NA NG Recovery

Argonne National Laboratory

211

Well-to-Wheels Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Criteria Pollutant Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for a given facility were divided by its throughput to develop emissions factors Distribution curves were and Storage (99%) Transportation, Storage, and Distribution of Gasoline (99.5%) MTBE or EtOH for Gasoline.5%) Steam or Electricity Export NA: North American nNA: non-North American NG: natural gas G.H2 Compression

Argonne National Laboratory

212

Occurrence and Potential Human-Health Relevance of Volatile Organic Compounds in Drinking Water from Domestic Wells in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Laboratory Reporting Level MCL, Maximum Contaminant Level MRL, Maximum Reporting Level MTBE, Methyl tert Figures 3 #12;Abstract BACKGROUND: As the population and demand for safe drinking water from domestic concentrations to U.S. EPA Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) and Health-Based Screening Levels. RESULTS: VOCs

213

ORNL/TM-2000/165 Ethanol Demand in United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ORNL/TM-2000/165 Ethanol Demand in United States Regional Production of Oxygenate-limited Gasoline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 5. THE DEMAND FOR ETHANOL USED IN U.S. REGIONAL OXYGENATE- LIMITED GASOLINE PRODUCTON IN YEAR 2006+III, SUMMER WITH 3 PERCENT MAXIMUM MTBE . . . . . . . . . 54 5.4 PADD I+III, WINTER WITH 3 PERCENT MAXIMUM

214

Direct observation of surface ethyl to ethane interconversion upon C2H4 hydrogenation over Pt/Al2O3 catalyst by time-resolved FT-IR spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In-Situ Spectroscopy of Catalysts; Weckhuysen, B.M. , Ed. ;Hydrogenation over Pt/Al 2 O 3 Catalyst by Time-Resolved FT-over alumina-supported Pt catalyst were recorded at 25 ms

Wasylenko, Walter; Frei, Heinz

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Nickel-Catalyzed Enantioselective Negishi Cross-Couplings of Racemic Secondary alpha-Bromo Amides with Alkylzinc Reagents: (S)-N-Benzyl-7-cyano-2-ethyl-N-phenylheptanamide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Procedure: A. (5-Cyanopentyl)zinc(II) bromide (1). An oven-dried, 200-mL pear-shaped Schlenk flask equipped with a magnetic stirbar (egg shaped, 25.4 × 12.7 mm) and an argon line connected to the standard taper outer joint ...

Lou, Sha

216

Synthesis of N-formyl-3,4-di-t-butoxycarbonyloxy-6(trimethylstannyl)-L-phenylalanine ethyl ester and its regioselective radiofluorodestannylation to 6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-1-dopa  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is revealed for forming a 6-fluoro derivative of compounds in the L-Dopa family comprising the steps of protecting the groups attached to the benzene ring in the compound followed by serially reacting the protected compound with (a) iodine and silver trifluoroacetic acid; (b) Bb{sub 3}; (c) dit-butyldicarbonate; (d) hexamethyltin; (e) a fluoro compound; (f) hydrobromic acid; and (g) raising the pH to {<=}7. 1 fig.

Satyamurthy, N.; Barrio, J.R.; Bishop, A.J.; Namavari, M.; Bida, G.T.

1996-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

217

Synthesis of N-formyl-3,4-di-t-butoxycarbonyloxy-6-(trimethylstannyl)-L-phenylalanine ethyl ester and its regioselective radiofluorodestannylation to 6- .sup.18 F!fluoro-1-dopa  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for forming a 6-fluoro derivative of compounds in the L-Dopa family comprising the steps of protecting the groups attached to the benzene ring in the compound followed by serially reacting the protected compound with (a) iodine and silver trifluoroacetic acid; (b) Bb.sub.3 ; (c) dit-butyldicarbonate; (d) hexamethyltin; (e) a fluoro compound; (f) hydrobromic acid; and (g) raising the pH to .ltoreq.7.

Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar (Los Angeles, CA); Barrio, Jorge R. (Agoura Hills, CA); Bishop, Allyson J. (Wahnemuhle, DE); Namavari, Mohammad (Los Angeles, CA); Bida, Gerald T. (Shreveport, LA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Three-year Evaluation of Pre-employment Screening for Tuberculosis (TB) and Post-exposure Compliance with Therapy for Latent TB Infection Among Healthcare Workers Working in A Tertiary Care Hospital in Saudi Arabia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Background: Controlling tuberculosis (TB) among occupationally exposed healthcare workers (HCWs) is challenged by limited documentation of pre- employment tuberculin skin test (TST) screening and the… (more)

Kentenyants, Karine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Geochemistry, age and strontium isotope composition of late tertiary and quaternary basalts and andesites in western Nevada and their relation to geothermal potential. Final report, October 1, 1982-December 31, 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research was undertaken to characterize the late Cenozoic volcanic rocks associated with active geothermal systems in west-central Nevada. Petrographic and microprobe, geochemical and isotopic analysis and age dating techniques were used to characterize these young volcanic rocks. These data were combined with the limited data previously reported in the literature on these same volcanic areas to interpret their petrogenesis. The overall characterization resulted from integrating the petrogenesis with a structural-tectonic model of the region. Potassium-argon isotopic ages ranging up to 14 million years were determined for eight localities within the Reno 1 x 2/sup 0/ study region. These ages are consistent with the morphology of the volcanic landforms, the active geothermal systems associated with them, and with other isotopic ages reported in the literature for these and similar rocks within the study region. Petrographic analysis of hand specimens and thin-sections indicated mineralogic assemblages of the respective rock types and specific mineral textures and phenocryst compositions and characteristics. These identifications were further substantiated by microprobe analysis of selected phenocrysts and groundmass phases. Classification of the respective rock types was also based on chemical composition and normative calculations using the program PETCAL. Basaltic andesites are identified and described for Steamboat Hills, Table Mountain, Silver Springs, Churchill Butte, Cleaver Peak, Desert Peak and Carson City sites.

Fultz, L.A.; Bell, E.J.; Trexler, D.T.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Metal-Catalyzed Carbon-Carbon Bond Forming Reactions for the Synthesis of Significant Chiral Building Blocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Morita Baylis-Hillman (MBH) reaction a carbon-carbon bond forming reaction between an ?,?-unsaturated carbonyl and aldehydes or activated ketones in the presence of a nucleophilic catalyst. The MBH reaction is an atom-economical method of rapid increase of molecular complexity. The development of this process has received considerable attention in recent years. This dissertation presents the development of a new catalytic system for the symmetric and asymmetric MBH reaction. The new system for the racemic version of this reaction was accomplished employing a 1:1:1 ratio of catalytic amounts (10 mol%) of MgI2, TMEDA and DMAP and proved to be highly effective. For the asymmetric version was developed a highly enantio-selective system based on Fu’s planar chiral DMAP derivative (II) with ee´s up to 98%. Abnormal MBH adducts are obtained employing either ethyl 2,3-butadienoate or ethyl propiolate in good yields, in the presence if MgI2 and either a tertiary amine or phosphine as the nucleophile. The ?,?-unsaturated carbonyls where prepared by a modified direct ?- methylenation using paraformaldehyde, diisopropylammonium trifluoroacetate, and catalytic acid or base with excellent yields for several carbonyls compounds. The Negishi cross-coupling reaction is the Pd or Ni-catalyzed stereoselective cross-coupling or organozincs and aryl-, alkenyl-, or alkynyl halides. Enantioselective Negishi cross-coupling of aryl zincs and ?-bromo ketones was accomplished employing a NCN Pincer complex as the catalyst with ee´s up 99%. The required pincer complexes have been prepared by the oxidative addition of pincer ligands with palladium or nickel. Additionally, It has been developed a direct and highly active, (NCN)-Pd catalytic system for the ?-arylation of ketones with a variety of aryl bromides using the air and moisture stable [t-BuPheBox-Me2]PdBr (XVI) as the catalyst. The adducts are obtained in excellent yields (92% average for 20 examples) in only 1 hour using 1 mol% of catalyst loading. Perhaps more importantly, the work described here shows that XVI is highly reactive, highly selective, even on substrates bearing challenging functional groups such alkenes.

Bugarin Cervantes, Alejandro

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mtbe ethyl tertiary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

ReaxFF User Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Ethyl_radical Iter. ... Example 3.4: fort.58-output file generated from the same MM-run as used for Example 3.3. Ethyl_radical Iter. ...

2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

222

AOCS Official Method Tf 3a-64  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Percent Primary, Secondary, and Tertiary Amines in Fatty Amines AOCS Official Method Tf 3a-64 Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION The percentages of primary, secondary, and tertiary amines in the test s

223

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oxygenate Supply/Demand Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model By Tancred C.M. Lidderdale This article first appeared in the Short-Term Energy Outlook Annual Supplement 1995, Energy Information Administration, DOE/EIA-0202(95) (Washington, DC, July 1995), pp. 33-42, 83-85. The regression results and historical data for production, inventories, and imports have been updated in this presentation. Contents * Introduction o Table 1. Oxygenate production capacity and demand * Oxygenate demand o Table 2. Estimated RFG demand share - mandated RFG areas, January 1998 * Fuel ethanol supply and demand balance o Table 3. Fuel ethanol annual statistics * MTBE supply and demand balance o Table 4. EIA MTBE annual statistics * Refinery balances

224

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

hydrogen Go hydrogen Go Hydrogen-stations Hydrogen Fueling Station Locations by State Hydrogen-stations View Map Graph Hydrogen_li_by_state Hydrogen Incentives and Laws, by State Hydrogen_li_by_state View Map Graph Generated_thumb20130810-31804-1c5lrlb Commuter Responses to the 2008 Oil Price Spike Generated_thumb20130810-31804-1c5lrlb Ways that workers changed their commutes in response to high gasoline prices Last update May 2012 View Graph Graph Download Data Generated_thumb20130810-31804-f64ffe U.S. Consumption of Ethanol and MTBE Oxygenates Generated_thumb20130810-31804-f64ffe Trend of ethanol and MTBE consumption as oxygenates and gasohol blends from 1992-2009 Last update February 2012 View Graph Graph Download Data Generated_thumb20130810-31804-14nv4j5 AFV Acquisitions by Regulated Fleets (by Fuel Type)

225

“BEST VALUES” OF CUP-BURNER EXTINGUISHING ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... diesel no. 2 diethyl ether ethanol ethyl acetate ethylene glycol Exxon Turbo Oil gasoline (unleaded) heptane (commercial ...

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

226

unknown title  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combustion chemical kinetics of biodiesel and related compounds (methyl and ethyl esters): Experiments and modeling – Advances and future refinements

Lucie Coniglio; Hayet Bennadji; Pierre Alex; Re Glaude; Olivier Herbinet; Francis Billaud

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

7, 1164711683, 2007 VOC ratios as probes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chemistry, and [isobutane]/[n-butane] and [methyl ethyl ketone]/[n-5 butane] are used to study the extent

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

228

Bio-inspired Polymers for Nanoscience Research  

the kinetics and thermodynamics of folding polymer chains into stable tertiary structures are still not fully understood. Thus, ...

229

1995 world methanol conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 20 papers contained in this volume deal with the global markets for methanol, the production of MTBE, integrating methanol production into a coal-to-SNG complex, production of methanol from natural gas, catalysts for methanol production from various synthesis gases, combined cycle power plants using methanol as fuel, and economics of the methanol industry. All papers have been processed for inclusion on the data base.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

230

Saving Energy and Reducing Emissions from the Regeneration Air System of a Butane Dehydrogenation Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Petrochemicals operates a butane dehydrogenation unit producing MTBE for reformulated gasoline that was originally constructed when energy was cheap and prior to environmental regulation. The process exhausts 900,000 pounds per hour of air at 900 to 1100°F containing CO and VOC. By installing a furnace/heat recovery steam generator, Texas Petrochemicals achieved significant reductions of VOC, CO, and NOx, along with energy savings.

John, T. P.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Multiple Steady States in Azeotropic and Reactive Distillation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction . Motivation Overview on the Contributions MSS in Reactive Distillation Conclusions Outline Multiple Steady States (MSS) Overview on the Contributions . The Starting Point . Consolidation . Industrial Applications . Incorporating Reactions MSS in Reactive Distillation Conclusions Outline Multiple Steady States (MSS) Overview on the Contributions MSS in Reactive Distillation . Prediction Method . MTBE Process Conclusions Outline Multiple Steady States (MSS) Overview on the Contributions MSS in Reactive Distillation Conclusions Distillation Overview . Ideal binary / multicomponent distillation . Homogeneous azeotropic distillation -- Heavy entrainer (extractive distillation) -- Intermediate entrainer -- "Boundary scheme" (ligh

Thomas E. Güttinger

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Synthesis of octane enhancers during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. [801Methyl tert-butyl ether  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to investigate three possible routes to the formation of ethers, in particular methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), during slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The three reaction schemes to be investigated are: (1) Addition of isobutylene during the formation of methanol and/or higher alcohols directly from CO and H{sub 2} during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. (2) Addition of isobutylene to FT liquid products including alcohols in a slurry-phase reactor containing an MTBE or other acid catalyst. (3) Addition of methanol to slurry phase FT synthesis making iso-olefins. During the sixth quarter we completed the construction of the slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR), conducted initial shake-down experiments in a cold-flow mode, and finalized the selection process of the acid catalysts for conversion of syngas-produced alcohols and isobutylene to MTBE (scheme 2). Tasks 3, 4, and 5 are awaiting complete implementation of the SBCR system.

Marcelin, G.

1992-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

233

Synthesis of octane enhancers during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. Quarterly technical progress report No. 6, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to investigate three possible routes to the formation of ethers, in particular methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), during slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The three reaction schemes to be investigated are: (1) Addition of isobutylene during the formation of methanol and/or higher alcohols directly from CO and H{sub 2} during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. (2) Addition of isobutylene to FT liquid products including alcohols in a slurry-phase reactor containing an MTBE or other acid catalyst. (3) Addition of methanol to slurry phase FT synthesis making iso-olefins. During the sixth quarter we completed the construction of the slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR), conducted initial shake-down experiments in a cold-flow mode, and finalized the selection process of the acid catalysts for conversion of syngas-produced alcohols and isobutylene to MTBE (scheme 2). Tasks 3, 4, and 5 are awaiting complete implementation of the SBCR system.

Marcelin, G.

1992-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

234

Corporate Productivity and I/S Investment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ethyl Corp. EW Scripps Co. Exxon Corp. Farmland IndustriesRichfield Co. Chevron Corp. Exxon Corp. Kerr-McGee Corp.

Kraemer, Kenneth L.; Dunkle, Debbie

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

ThermoML Data for TCA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Title: Thermodynamic properties of ternary mixtures of 1-ethyl-3- methylimidazolium ... XML File: ThermoML Data (To download: right-click on ...

236

xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mtbe ethyl tertiary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a
real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Microsoft Word - S09339_RedWaterReport.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

been used to remove low-molecular-weight polar organic compounds from water, including acetic acid, acetaldehyde, butanol, 1,4-dioxane, ethyl acetate, chloroform,...

242

Argonne TDC: Vertec Biosolvents - Argonne National Laboratory  

Ethyl Lactate Solvents: Low-Cost and Environmentally Friendly. Millions of pounds of toxic industrial solvents could be replaced by environmentally friendly solvents ...

243

[Research and workshop on alternative fuels for aviation. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center (RAFDC) at Baylor University was granted U. S. Department of Energy (US DOE) and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) funds for research and development to improve the efficiency in ethanol powered aircraft, measure performance and compare emissions of ethanol, Ethyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (ETBE) and 100 LL aviation gasoline. The premise of the initial proposal was to use a test stand owned by Engine Components Inc. (ECI) based in San Antonio, Texas. After the grant was awarded, ECI decided to close down its test stand facility. Since there were no other test stands available at that time, RAFDC was forced to find additional support to build its own test stand. Baylor University provided initial funds for the test stand building. Other obstacles had to be overcome in order to initiate the program. The price of the emission testing equipment had increased substantially beyond the initial quote. Rosemount Analytical Inc. gave RAFDC an estimate of $120,000.00 for a basic emission testing package. RAFDC had to find additional funding to purchase this equipment. The electronic ignition unit also presented a series of time consuming problems. Since at that time there were no off-the-shelf units of this type available, one had to be specially ordered and developed. FAA funds were used to purchase a Super Flow dynamometer. Due to the many unforeseen obstacles, much more time and effort than originally anticipated had to be dedicated to the project, with much of the work done on a volunteer basis. Many people contributed their time to the program. One person, mainly responsible for the initial design of the test stand, was a retired engineer from Allison with extensive aircraft engine test stand experience. Also, many Baylor students volunteered to assemble the. test stand and continue to be involved in the current test program. Although the program presented many challenges, which resulted in delays, the RAFDC's test stand is an asset which provides an ongoing research capability dedicated to the testing of alternative fuels for aircraft engines. The test stand is now entirely functional with the exception of the electronic ignition unit which still needs adjustments.

NONE

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Phase selectively soluble polymers for homogeneously supported catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soluble polymer supports that could be used in thermomorphic and latent biphasic systems have been prepared and analyzed for their potential application as supports for facilitated synthesis and catalysis. Phase selective solubilities were evaluated using polymers tagged with either visible dyes or fluorescent probes. Heptane/DMF, heptane/90% ethanol-water, heptane/ethyl acetate, heptane/ ethanol and heptane/tert-butanol solvent mixtures were all studied as examples of thermomorphic or latent biphasic systems. A range of polymers, including poly-(tert-butylstyrene) (PTBS), poly(alkylsiloxanes) (PAS), poly(dodecylvinylpyrrolidone) (PDVP), poly(didodecylvinylpyrrolidone (PDDVP), poly(isobutylene) (PIB), poly(octadecyl acrylate)s (PODA), and poly(octadecyl methacrylate)s (PODMA), were tested for hydrophobic phase selective solubility. The results of these studies were compared to prior work with polar and nonpolar poly(N-alkylacrylamide)s and polystyrene. Together with this prior work, these results have indicated that a wide range of polymers and solvent mixtures can be used for the recycling of soluble polymer-bound catalysts, reagents and sequestrants using either thermomorphic or latent biphasic separation strategies.Synthetic routes to terminally functionalized polyisobutylene oligomers, useful as supports in synthesis and catalysis, are also discussed and described. Such hydrocarbon polymers serve as highly soluble nonpolar analogs of well known poly(ethylene glycol) supports for synthesis and catalysis with the difference that the polymers are separated after a reaction by an extraction with alkane solvent. The synthesis of two polyisobutylene-supported phase transfer catalysts (PTC) are also described. These PTCs utilize the robust triazole functionality as a key synthetic step towards the preparation of the catalytic species. N alkylation of a PIB-supported triazole provides a direct route to the preparation of a PTC. Preparation of a tertiary phosphoninium salt containing a terminal alkyne allows simple attachment of the PTC to a PIB-supported azide via a triazole linker using Sharpless' Cu (I) [3 + 2] cycloaddition. These materials are active in catalyzing solid-liquid PTC and can be easily recycled by liquid-liquid extraction techniques.

Sung, Shayna D

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

BMC Health Services Research BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research article Patients ' satisfaction and opinions of their experiences during admission in a tertiary care hospital in Pakistan – a cross sectional study

Sardar Zakariya Imam; Khezar Shahzada Syed; Syed Ahad Ali; Syed Umer Ali; Kiran Fatima; Marium Gill; Muhammad Ovais Hassan; Saad Hasan Hashmi; Maham T Siddiqi; Hadi Muhammad Khan; Omar Farooq Jameel; Maham T Siddiqi; Hadi Muhammad Khan; Omar Farooq Jameel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Retreat of the state and the market: liberalisation and education expansion in Sudan under the NCP.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis is an analysis of two concurrent processes - the liberalisation of the economy and the expansion of the tertiary education system - by… (more)

Mann, Laura Elizabeth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Coincident P and Sh reflections from basement rocks at Coso geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the steam field, (2) examining the Tertiary sedimentary basins in Rose Valley and Coso Wash, (3) testing the structural relationship of the Mesozoic Sierran basement to the...

248

Fluorination of Thermodynamically Unstable Nickel Fluorides ...  

... atoms at tertiary carbon sites in highly fluorinated molecules require the more powerful oxidizers, NiF 4 and NiF 3, for their oxidation. ...

249

Structural Analysis of the Desert Peak-Brady Geothermal Fields...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

mapping, delineation of Tertiary strata, analysis of faults and folds, and a new gravity survey have elucidated the structural controls on the Desert Peak and Brady...

250

Geologic And Geophysical Evidence For Intra-Basin And Footwall...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the TertiaryQuaternary basin-fill sediments. Correlation with seismic reflection and gravity surveys shows that some faults recognized by minor displacements at the surface...

251

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Kansas Author: Stan McCool, University of Kansas Center for Research Venue: Tertiary Oil Recovery Projects 18th Improved Oil Recovery Conference, Wichita, KS, April 12,...

252

A Seismic Attribute Study to Assess Well Productivity in the Ninilchik Field, Cook Inlet Basin, Alaska.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coal bed methane which has formed in the Tertiary Kenai Group strata has been produced from the Ninilchik field of Cook Inlet, Alaska since 2001.… (more)

Sampson, Andrew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Igneous intrusions and thermal evolution in the Raton Basin, CO-NM: contact metamorphism and coal-bed methane generation .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Tertiary mafic dikes and sills intrude coal-bearing formations of the Raton Basin. This study investigates the role of intrusions in generating methane from coal. Coal… (more)

Cooper, Jennifer Rebecca

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Mineralogy and organic petrology of oil shales in the Sangkarewang formation, Ombilin Basin, West Sumatra, Indonesia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Ombilin Basin, which lies in Sumatra Island, is one of the Tertiary basins in Indonesia. This basin contains a wide variety of rock units,… (more)

Fatimah, Fatimah

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

u42501.PDF  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Younger sedimentary rocks overlying the Wasatch Formation are the Tertiary sandstone, oil shale, and marlstone beds of the Green River Formation which crop out almost continuously...

256

GJO-99-112-TAR Rev.  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Younger sedimentary rocks overlying the Wasatch Formation are the Tertiary sandstone, oil shale, and marlstone beds of the Green River Formation which crop out almost continuously...

257

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Confinement Ventilation Systems) with the following titles: 1) BC Off-Gas Exhaust Standby Fan Autostart, 2) E-Wing Supply and Exhaust Interlocks, 3) BC Tertiary Exhaust...

258

Journal of Research Volume 41  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Dipole moments and molecular association of some picrates of primary, secondary, and tertiary amines in benzene and dioxane, p. 1 Maryott ...

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

259

--No Title--  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ventilation Systems) with the following titles: 1) BC Off-Gas Exhaust Standby Fan Autostart, 2) E-Wing Supply and Exhaust Interlocks, 3) BC Tertiary Exhaust Interlocks...

260

The Effects of Macroscopic Heterogeneities of Pore Structure and Wettability on Residual Oil Recovery Using the Gravity-Assisted Inert Gas Injection (GAIGI) Process.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??To recover oil remaining in petroleum reservoirs after waterflooding, the gravitationally stable mode of gas injection is recognized as a promising tertiary oil recovery process.… (more)

Parsaei, Rafat

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mtbe ethyl tertiary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Inversion of field-scale partitioning tracer response for characterizing oil saturation distribution: a streamline approach.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Identifying distribution of remaining oil in the reservoir is vital for evaluation of existing waterflood, design of tertiary recovery projects, and location of infill drilling… (more)

Iliassov, Pavel Alexandrovich

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Environmental Life Cycle Implications of Fuel Oxygenate Production from California Biomass  

SciTech Connect

Historically, more than 90% of the excess agricultural residue produced in California (approximately 10 million dry metric tons per year) has been disposed through open-field burning. Concerns about air quality have prompted federal, state, and local air quality agencies to tighten regulations related to this burning and to look at disposal alternatives. One use of this biomass is as an oxygenated fuel. This report focuses on quantifying and comparing the comprehensive environmental flows over the life cycles of two disposal scenarios: (1) burning the biomass, plus producing and using MTBE; and (2) converting and using ETBE.

Kadam, K. L. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Camobreco, V. J.; Glazebrook, B. E. (Ecobalance Inc.); Forrest, L. H.; Jacobson, W. A. (TSS Consultants); Simeroth, D. C. (California Air Resources Board); Blackburn, W. J. (California Energy Commission); Nehoda, K. C. (California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection)

1999-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

263

Improvement of TEOS-chemical mechanical polishing performance by control of slurry temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effects of slurry temperature on the chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) performance of tetra-ethyl ortho-silicate (TEOS) film with silica and ceria slurries were investigated. The change of slurry properties as a function of different slurry temperatures ... Keywords: Chemical mechanical polishing, Planarity, Removal rate, Slurry temperature, Tetra-ethyl ortho-silicate

Nam-Hoon Kim; Pil-Ju Ko; Yong-Jin Seo; Woo-Sun Lee

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

1452 J. Am. Chem. SOC. np K R Z -2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

values of AG*, AG1,and AG2,I4 there may be con- structed the averaged cartoon of Figure 2. Inspection, 79075-88-0; 0 2 , 7782-44-7. (19) Bunting, J. W. Adu. Heterocycl. Chem 1979, 25, 1. (20) (a) 5-Ethyl-l0

Boxer, Steven G.

265

COAL RESOURCES, POWDER RIVER BASIN By M.S. Ellis,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter PN COAL RESOURCES, POWDER RIVER BASIN By M.S. Ellis,1 G.L. Gunther,2 A.M. Ochs,2 S, Delaware 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky in the toolbar to return. 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky

266

DECKER COALFIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN, MONTANA: GEOLOGY, COAL QUALITY, AND COAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter PD DECKER COALFIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN, MONTANA: GEOLOGY, COAL QUALITY, AND COAL RESOURCES Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

267

COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter PQ COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA By G.D. Stricker Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

268

ASHLAND COALFIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN, MONTANA: GEOLOGY, COAL QUALITY, AND COAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter PA ASHLAND COALFIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN, MONTANA: GEOLOGY, COAL QUALITY, AND COAL of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great

269

FORT UNION COAL IN THE GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, EAST FLANK OF THE ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter GS FORT UNION COAL IN THE GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, EAST FLANK OF THE ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky in the toolbar to return. 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky

270

SHERIDAN COALFIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN: GEOLOGY, COAL QUALITY, AND COAL RESOURCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter PH SHERIDAN COALFIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN: GEOLOGY, COAL QUALITY, AND COAL RESOURCES By M assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great

271

FORT UNION COAL IN THE POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA: A SYNTHESIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter PS FORT UNION COAL IN THE POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA: A SYNTHESIS By R of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great

272

COAL RESOURCES OF THE HANNA AND CARBON By M.S. Ellis,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter HN COAL RESOURCES OF THE HANNA AND CARBON BASINS By M.S. Ellis,1 G.L. Gunther,2 A.M. Ochs,2, Delaware 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky in the toolbar to return. 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky

273

Petroleum Geologic Characteristics of Suprasalt Strata in Block 15/06, Angola  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Block 15/06 is located in the Angola deep sea, which belongs to Lower Congo basin. The primary source rock of the Block is the marine shale of Iabe and Landana formation of Upper Cretaceous & Lower Tertiary. The main reservior of supra-salt strata is ... Keywords: tertiary, suprasalt, source rock, salt dome, fault, accumulation model

Wang Lei, Shi Yanli, Fan Tailiang, Cai Xiyuan, Zhao Yan

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

FERRIS AND HANNA COAL IN THE HANNA AND CARBON BASINS, WYOMING: A SYNTHESIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter HS FERRIS AND HANNA COAL IN THE HANNA AND CARBON BASINS, WYOMING: A SYNTHESIS By R of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great

275

COLSTRIP COALFIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN, MONTANA: GEOLOGY, COAL QUALITY, AND COAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter PC COLSTRIP COALFIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN, MONTANA: GEOLOGY, COAL QUALITY, AND COAL 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky in the toolbar to return. 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky

276

COAL RESOURCES, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN By M.S. Ellis,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter GN COAL RESOURCES, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN By M.S. Ellis,1 G.L. Gunther,2 A.M. Ochs,2 J of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones here or on this symbol in the toolbar to return. 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal

277

High octane ethers from synthesis gas-derived alcohols  

SciTech Connect

The temperature dependence of ether synthesis, particularly unsymmetric methylisobutylether (MIBE), was carried out over the Nafion-H microsaddles (MS) catalyst. The principal product formed under the rather severe reaction conditions of 1100 psig pressure and temperatures in the range of 123--157{degree}C was the expected MIBE formed directly by coupling the methanol/isobutanol reactants. In addition, significantly larger quantities of the dimethylether (DME) and hydrocarbon products were observed than were obtained under milder reaction conditions. Deactivation of the Nafion-H MS catalyst was determined by periodically testing the catalyst under a given set of reaction conditions for the synthesis of MIBE and MTBE from methanol/isobutanol = 2/1, i.e. 123{degree}C, 1100 psig, and total GHSV = 248 mol/kg cat/hr. After carrying out various tests over a period of 2420 hr, with intermittant periods of standing under nitrogen at ambient conditions, the yields of MIBE and MTBE had decreased by 25% and 41%, respectively. In order to gain insight into the role of the surface acidity in promoting the selective coupling of the alcohols to form the unsymmetric ether, the strengths of the acid sites on the catalysts are still being probed by calorimetric titrations in non-aqueous solutions. 11 refs., 13 figs., 9 tabs.

Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; DeTavernier, S.; Johannson, M.; Kieke, M.; Bastian, R.D.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Catalytic conversion of light alkanes - phase V. Topical report, February 1993--October 1994  

SciTech Connect

We have made excellent progress toward a practical route from field butanes to MTBE, the oxygenate of choice for high-octane, clean-burning, environmentally acceptable reformulated gasoline. We have evaluated two proprietary process possibilities with a potential commercial partner and have conducted a joint catalyst evaluation program. The first of the two potential processes considered during the past quarter utilizes a two-step route from isobutane to tert-butyl alcohol, TBA. Not only is TBA an intermediate for MTBE production but is equally applicable for ETBE-an oxygenate which utilizes renewable ethanol in its` manufacture. In the two-step process, isobutane is oxidized in a non-catalytic reaction to a roughly equal mixture of TBA and tert-butyl hydroperoxide. TBHP, eq. 1. We have developed an inexpensive new catalyst system based on an electron-deficient macrocyclic metal complex that selectively converts TBHP to TBA, eq. 2, and meets or exceeds all of the process criteria that we have set.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

279

Tenth oil recovery conference  

SciTech Connect

The Tertiary Oil Recovery Project is sponsored by the State of Kansas to introduce Kansas producers to the economic potential of enhanced recovery methods for Kansas fields. Specific objectives include estimation of the state-wide tertiary oil resource, identification and evaluation of the most applicable processes, dissemination of technical information to producers, occasional collaboration on recovery projects, laboratory studies on Kansas applicable processes, and training of students and operators in tertiary oil recovery methods. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Sleeper, R. (ed.)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Corporate Productivity and Diffusion of Enduser Devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lauder 3 Ethyl 3 Exide 5 Exxon 12 Family Dollar 22 FamilyLyondell Petrochemical • Exxon • Mobil • Texaco • TesoroCentral Petroleum Diamond Shamrock Exxon Kerr McGee Lyondell

Kraemer, Kenneth L.; Gurbaxani, Viijay

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mtbe ethyl tertiary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

HFC-161 (ethyl fluoride) HFC-227ea (heptafluoropropane) HFC-236cb (1,1,1,2,2,3-hexafluoropropane) HFC-236ea (1,1,1,2,3,3-hexafluoropropane)

282

ThermoML Data for IJT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Title: Saturated Liquid Viscosity of Ethyl Fluoride (HFC161) from 233 K to 373 K. Pages: 2243-2250. DOI: 10.1007/s10765-012-1309-7. ...

283

Single and double stereoselective fluorination of (E)-allylsilanes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solution of ethyl-(E)-2-methyl-3-trimethylsilylhex-4-enoate (2.052g, 9.0mmol) in THF (4.5ml) was added via a syringe. The temperature was gradually raised to -40°C over a period of 2hrs. After which time iodomethane (0.735ml, 11.8mmol, 1.3 eq) was added... was added n-BuLi (2.5M, 2.9ml, 7.2mmol, 1.2eq.), the reaction was allowed to stir for 30 min. The solution was cooled to -78°C and a solution of ethyl-(E)-3-trimethylsilylhex-4-enoate (1.28g, 6.0mmol) in THF (5ml) was added via a syringe. The light yellow...

Sawicki, Marcin; Kwok, Angela; Tredwell, Matthew; Gouverneur, Veronique

2007-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

284

Energy Basics: Biofuels  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

The biomass-derived ethyl or methyl esters can be blended with conventional diesel fuel or used as a neat fuel (100% biodiesel). Learn more about biodiesel basics. Biofuel...

285

UCRL-ID-124563 LLNL Small-scale Friction Sensitivity (BAM) Test  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Salicylate Lead-2-ethyl hexaoate ' (56.431.77.71 .01 .61.6) Ammonium nitrate-Fuel oil 3-Amino-5-nitro-l,2,4-triazole Potassium Nitrate Sulfur charcoal (751015)...

286

Engineering of bacterial methyl ketone synthesis for biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ketone synthesis for biofuels Ee-Been Goh†† 1,3 , Edward E.microbes for use as biofuels, such as fatty acid ethylother fatty acid-derived biofuels, such as fatty acid ethyl

Goh, Ee-Been

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Preparation of 1-C14-Propene-1 and the Mechanism of Permanganate Oxidation of Propene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

propene, 9% butenes, 9% butanes and pentanes and 1% pentenes0.5/0 propane and 0.5% n-butane. The yield of propene waspropene, 16% butenes f 3% i-butane, 3% ethyl propy:i. ether

Fries, B.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Highly efficient blue polyfluorene-based polymer light-emitting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Physics Volume 42 Pagination 5 Abstract A highly efficient blue polymer light-emitting diode based on poly(9,9-di(2-(2-(2-methoxy-ethoxy)ethoxy)ethyl)fluorenyl-2,7-diyl)...

289

Genome-wide phenotype analysis in ES cells by regulated disruption of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the tetracycline analogue doxycycline. Indeed, a com- bination of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis and transient expression was examined by using the tetra- cycline analogue, doxycycline (dox). Addition of dox resulted

Cai, Long

290

Shear and Extensional Rheology of Cellulose/Ionic Liquid Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study, we characterize the shear and extensional rheology of dilute to semidilute solutions of cellulose in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate (EMIAc). In steady shear flow, the semidilute solutions ...

Haward, Simon J.

291

Method for the Collection and HPLC Analysis of Hydrogen Peroxide and Cl and C2 Hydroperoxides in the Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An HPLC (high-performance liquid chromatography) method was developed to quantify hydrogen peroxide, methyl hydroperoxide. Hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide, ethyl hydroperoxide, and peroxyaectic acid in the atmosphere. Gas-phase hydroperoxides are ...

Meehye Lee; Birgitta C. Noone; Daniel O'sullivan; Brian G. Heikes

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Novel pH Responsive Amphiphilic Diblock Copolymers with Reversible Micellization Properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Di-block copolymer of poly[methacrylic acid-block-2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] [P(MAA-b-DEA)] with narrow molecular weight distribution was synthesized using the atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) technique. ...

Palaniswamy, R.

293

The EMC Specimen Preparation Laboratory The Electron Microscopy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RCRA waste: F003, U159, ignitable. Methyl ethyl ketone RCRA waste: F005, U159, D035 (TCLP > 200 mgl), ignitable. MICRO cleaning solution Mineral oil 5 mgm 3 (mist) 5 mgm 3...

294

The Structure of Rene' 88DT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

etching for 3 to 5 seconds at 5 volts, in the same cycle, electrolyte and temperature. .... solvus for tertiary of y ' exists at this combination of time and temperature.

295

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Changing Technology of Polymeric-Surfactants for Tertiary Oil Sample collection of crude oil and brine water samples (sample size: 200 ml each) for producing oil wells. Gary L....

296

Re^Os evidence for replacement of ancient mantle lithosphere beneath the North China craton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

^Os data for peridotite xenoliths carried in Paleozoic kimberlites and Tertiary alkali basalts confirm, coupled with the presence of cold, refractory mantle xenoliths carried in kimberlite pipes that erupt

Mcdonough, William F.

297

F. Groeschel On behalf of the IFMIF-EVEDA Project Team  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

concept (2003) Quench Tank Deuteron Beams EM Pump HX(Li / Organic Oil) Dump Tank HX(Organic Oil / Water/10" Operating temperature 250-350C Heat to be removed 10 MW Secondary cooling oil Tertiary cooling water

McDonald, Kirk

298

Alternate Methods in Reservoir Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As time progresses, more and more oil fields and reservoirs are reaching maturity; consequently, secondary and tertiary methods of oil recovery have become increasingly important in the petroleum industry. This significance has added to the industry's ...

Guadalupe I. Janoski; Andrew H. Sung

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Abstract--Telerehabilitation is the provision of rehabilitation services at a distance, by a therapist at a remote location.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by therapists at a remote location. Telerehabilitation can be clinic- based or home-based (see Rosen [1) clinic is being coached by a therapist expert at a tertiary care (or university) setting. For home-based

New Jersey, University of Medicine and Dentistry of

300

Stabilizers for oil slurries of carbonaceous material  

SciTech Connect

Slurries of carbonaceous material in oil, particularly coal, are stabilized with particular tertiary amines. An example is tallow amine first condensed with two moles of propylene oxide and then condensed with thirteen moles of ethylene oxide.

Schick, M. J.

1985-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mtbe ethyl tertiary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

AOCS Official Method Tf 2b-64  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Primary, Secondary and Tertiary Amine Values of Fatty Amines, Indicator Method AOCS Official Method Tf 2b-64 Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION The primary amine value is the mg of potassium hydroxide

302

AOCS Official Method Tf 2a-64  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Primary, Secondary, and Tertiary Amine Values of Fatty Amines, Potentiometric Method AOCS Official Method Tf 2a-64 Methods Methods and Analyses Analytical Chemistry Methods Downloads Methods Downloads DEFINITION ...

303

Deformation, erosion and sedimentation in collisional orogens : case studies from eastern Tibet and southwestern China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation addresses aspects of the tectonics of regions adjacent to the eastern Himalayan syntaxis. The first chapter describes the Tertiary Gonjo basin, includes structural and sedimentologic observations, and ...

Studnicki-Gizbert, Christopher Terrance

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

FERMILAB-TM-XXXX-DO  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

T-979 Ultra-Fast Timing T-977 MINERA Experiment Detector Calibration T-953 U. Iowa Cerenkov Light Tests T-932 Diamond Detector 27 Developing a New Tertiary Low-Energy Beamline...

305

NERSC Users Group Meeting January 28-29, 1997 Presentations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Harvard Holmes | Download File: Tertiary-Storage.pdf | pdf | 173 KB Report on Graphics Packages January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Steve Lau | URL: http:www.nersc.govabout...

306

C-H functionalisation through singlet chlorocarbenes insertions – MP2 and DFT investigations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The insertion reactions of singlet mono and dichlorocarbenes (1CHCl and 1CCl2) into primary, secondary and tertiary C-H bonds of methane, ethane, propane, n-butane and iso-butane have been investigated at ...

M. Ramalingam; K. Ramasami; P. Venuvanalingam; V. Sethuraman

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Experimental development of a chemical flood and the geochemistry of novel alkalis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Surfactant-Polymer (SP) and Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer (ASP) floods are tertiary oil recovery processes that mobilize residual oil to waterflood. These Chemical EOR processes are most valuable when… (more)

Winters, Matthew Howard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Why sequence ethene and vinyl chloride-oxidizing Mycobacterium strains?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sequence ethene and vinyl sequence ethene and vinyl chloride-oxidizing Mycobacterium strains? Mycobacteria are known for causing human and animal diseases but they are also important degraders of hard-to-break-down water contaminants such as polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). So far the handful of bacterial species representing the Mycobacterium genus that have been sequenced all break down PAHs. In this project, researchers focus on the genomes of mycobacterial species isolated from soil, freshwater and marine environments that use the alkene compounds ethene and vinyl chloride as carbon sources. Chlorinated ethene compounds are difficult to remove from contaminated groundwater but necessary because of their toxicity. Additionally these compounds reduce the ozone levels in the atmosphere.

309

Slide 1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Howard Gruenspecht Howard Gruenspecht Deputy Administrator Energy Information Administration 2008 Energy Conference 30 Years of Energy Information and Analysis Washington, DC April 7, 2008 EIA's Mission and Budget: Priority-Setting in the Short Run EIA is the Primary Activity Within DOE Concerned with Current Energy Markets and Issues * When energy issues are front and center, the Nation looks to the Department of Energy to interpret the current energy market situation * EIA is the main DOE entity involved in current energy markets and issues * In many settings, such as the situation following the 2005 hurricanes, the MTBE/ethanol transition in the spring of 2006, and the current oil price increases, both the Congress and the Administration directly rely on and benefit from EIA's role as a trusted source of energy information and

310

Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Legislation and Regulations  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Legislation & Regulations Legislation & Regulations Nitrogen Oxide Emission Caps Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions and Diesel Fuel Quality Standards FERC Order 2000 Banning or Reducing the Use of MTBE in Gasoline Updates on State Renewable Portfolio Standards and Renewable Energy Mandates Proposed Changes to RFG Oxygen Standard FERC Order 637 Proposed Limits on Benzene in Gasoline Royalty Rules Low-Emission Vehicle Program Tier 2 Vehicle Emissions and Gasoline Sulfur Standards Appliance Efficiency Standards Petroleum Reserves Introduction Because analyses by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) are required to be policy-neutral, the projections in this Annual Energy Outlook 2001 (AEO2001) are based on Federal, State, and local laws and regulations in effect on July 1, 2000. The potential impacts of pending or

311

Environmental Regulations and Changes in Petroleum Refining Operations  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Environmental Regulations and Environmental Regulations and Changes in Petroleum Refining Operations By Tancred C.M. Lidderdale Contents * Introduction * Motor Gasoline Summer Volatility (RVP) Regulations o Table 1. Summer Volatility Regulations for Motor Gasoline o Table 2. Refinery Inputs and Production of Normal Butane o Figure 1. Refinery Inputs and Production of Normal Butane o Table 3. Price Relationship Between Normal Butane and Motor Gasoline o Table 4. Market Price Premium for Low Vapor Pressure (RVP) Gasoline * Oxygenate Content of Motor Gasoline o Figure 2. Oxygenate Content of Motor Gasoline o Table 5. Oxygenated and Conventional Motor Gasoline Price Relationship o Table 6. Reformulated and Conventional Motor Gasoline Price Relationship o Figure 3. Price Differences Between RFG or MTBE and Conventional Gasoline

312

Net Imports of Total Crude Oil and Products into the U.S. by Country  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude Oil and Products Crude Oil Products Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Unfinished Oils Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Conventional Motor Gasoline Blending Components Reformulated Gasoline Blend. Comp. Conventional Gasoline Blend. Comp. MTBE (Oxygenate) Other Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Biomass-Based Diesel Other Renewable Diesel Other Renewable Fuels Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 500 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas Residual Fuel Oil Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Lubricants Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

313

Microsoft Word - rfsreport.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Impact of Renewable Fuels Standard/MTBE Provisions of S. 1766 March 2002 This Service Report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special request and are based on assumptions specified by the requestor. ii Contacts This report was prepared by the staff of the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting of the Energy Information Administration. General questions concerning the report may be directed to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222, mhutzler@eia.doe.gov), Director,

314

Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Issues in Focus  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Issues in Focus Issues in Focus Macroeconomic Forecasting with the Revised National Income and Product Accounts (NIPA) Phasing Out MTBE in Gasoline World Oil Demand and Prices Distributed Electricity Generation Resources Natural Gas Supply Availability Restructuring of State Retail Markets for Electricity Carbon Dioxide Emissions in AEO2001 Macroeconomic Forecasting with the Revised National Income and Product Accounts (NIPA) The NIPA Comprehensive Revision Economic activity is a key determinant of growth in U.S. energy supply and demand. The derivation of the forecast of economic activity is therefore a critical step in developing the energy forecast presented in the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 (AEO2001). In turn, the forecast of economic activity is rooted fundamentally in the historical data series maintained by a

315

No Slide Title  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Summer Fuels Outlook Guy Caruso Administrator, Energy Information Administration 2006 Summer Transportation Fuels Outlook Conference April 11, 2006 Washington, DC Several Key Factors Drive the Short-Term Fuels Forecast 1) Rising world oil consumption; 2) Low global surplus production capacity and tight crude oil supply relative to demand; 3) Supply concerns in international oil markets (such as in Nigeria, Iraq, and Iran); 4) The challenges of:  Stricter sulfur standards under the Tier 2 Gasoline program;  MTBE phase-out;  A shift to ultra low sulfur diesel. All these factors contribute to higher prices for petroleum products, particularly in the coming months. World Oil Consumption Growth Slowed in 2005; Projected to Increase in 2006-2007 Source: EIA, Short-Term Energy Outlook, April 2006

316

Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

MTBE (Oxygenate) Other Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Biomass-Based Diesel (Renewable) Other Renewable Diesel Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 501 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual F.O., 0.31 to 1% Sulfur Residual F.O., Greater than 1% Sulfur Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Lubricants Miscellaneous Products Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

317

Environmental Energy Technologies Division News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2000: 2000: Vol. 2, No. 1 Electrochromic Window Tests in U.S. Office Show Promise CLASP Helps Developing Nations Implement Energy Standards EETD Scientists Aid Research Efforts Leading to MTBE Ban Power Outage Study Team Examines Electricity Reliability Research Highlights Sources and Credits PDF of EETD News Electrochromic Window Tests in U.S. Office Show Promise Electrochromic glazings promise to be the next major advance in energy-efficient window technology, helping to achieve the goal of transforming windows and skylights from an energy liability in buildings to an energy source for the nation's building stock. The glazing can be reversibly switched from clear to a transparent, colored state by applying a low voltage, resulting in dynamically controllable thermal and optical

318

Regional refining models for alternative fuels using shale and coal synthetic crudes: identification and evaluation of optimized alternative fuels. Annual report, March 20, 1979-March 19, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The initial phase has been completed in the project to evaluate alternative fuels for highway transportation from synthetic crudes. Three refinery models were developed for Rocky Mountain, Mid-Continent and Great Lakes regions to make future product volumes and qualities forecast for 1995. Projected quantities of shale oil and coal oil syncrudes were introduced into the raw materials slate. Product slate was then varied from conventional products to evaluate maximum diesel fuel and broadcut fuel in all regions. Gasoline supplement options were evaluated in one region for 10% each of methanol, ethanol, MTBE or synthetic naphtha in the blends along with syncrude components. Compositions and qualities of the fuels were determined for the variation in constraints and conditions established for the study. Effects on raw materials, energy consumption and investment costs were reported. Results provide the basis to formulate fuels for laboratory and engine evaluation in future phases of the project.

Sefer, N.R.; Russell, J.A.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Interaction between Titles 2 and 3 of the Clean Air Act as amended, 1990  

SciTech Connect

This report examines Some issues that would I affect the refining industry if the requirements for hazardous air pollutants set out in Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments were to impede the market entrance of oxygenated fuels, as me; required by Title II. It describes the mandate for reformulated gasoline; considers gasoline characteristics in light of component shifts in refining; examines the supply of, demand for, and cost of various feedstocks and blendstocks; and identifies the emissions and atmospheric impacts that might result from the production and use of reformulated gasoline. Attention is focused on methanol and MTBE, two potential blendstocks that are also hazardous air pollutants, and on maximum achievable control technology standards, which might be applied to the stationary sources that produce them.

Szpunar, C.B.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

APPLICATIONS OF LAYERED DOUBLE HYDROXIDES IN REMOVING OXYANIONS FROM OIL REFINING AND COAL MINING WASTEWATER  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute (WRI), in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), conducted a study of using the layered double hydroxides (LDH) as filter material to remove microorganisms, large biological molecules, certain anions and toxic oxyanions from various waste streams, including wastewater from refineries. Results demonstrate that LDH has a high adsorbing capability to those compounds with negative surface charge. Constituents studied include model bacteria, viruses, arsenic, selenium, vanadium, diesel range hydrocarbons, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), mixed petroleum constituents, humic materials and anions. This project also attempted to modify the physical structure of LDH for the application as a filtration material. Flow characterizations of the modified LDH materials were also investigated. Results to date indicate that LDH is a cost-effective new material to be used for wastewater treatment, especially for the treatment of anions and oxyanions.

Song Jin; Paul Fallgren

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mtbe ethyl tertiary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Fuel property effects on engine combustion processes. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A major obstacle to improving spark ignition engine efficiency is the limitations on compression ratio imposed by tendency of hydrocarbon fuels to knock (autoignite). A research program investigated the knock problem in spark ignition engines. Objective was to understand low and intermediate temperature chemistry of combustion processes relevant to autoignition and knock and to determine fuel property effects. Experiments were conducted in an optically and physically accessible research engine, static reactor, and an atmospheric pressure flow reactor (APFR). Chemical kinetic models were developed for prediction of species evolution and autoignition behavior. The work provided insight into low and intermediate temperature chemistry prior to autoignition of n-butane, iso-butane, n-pentane, 1-pentene, n-heptane, iso-octane and some binary blends. Study of effects of ethers (MTBE, ETBE, TAME and DIPE ) and alcohols (methanol and ethanol) on the oxidation and autoignition of primary reference fuel (PRF) blends.

Cernansky, N.P.; Miller, D.L.

1995-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

322

Motiva Refinery | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Refinery Refinery Motiva Refinery May 18, 2006 - 10:45am Addthis Remarks Prepared for Energy Secretary Bodman Much of my time lately has been devoted to explaining why the price of gasoline has risen so sharply. President Bush understands the pinch this is creating for American consumers and has come forward with a variety of steps to address the problem. Rapid economic growth in emerging economies like China and India-and the growth here in the U.S.-have pushed up demand. Political unrest in some oil-producing regions has tightened supply. The transition from winter gasoline to summer blends, and the phase out of the additive MTBE in favor of ethanol, have increased the pressure on the market. Most significantly, we have very little spare refining capacity in this

323

East Coast (PADD 1) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

MTBE (Oxygenate) Other Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Biomass-Based Diesel (Renewable) Other Renewable Diesel Other Renewable Fuels Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 501 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual F.O., 0.31 to 1% Sulfur Residual F.O., Greater than 1% Sulfur Naphtha for Petrochem. Feed. Use Other Oils for Petrochem. Feed. Use Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Lubricants Miscellaneous Products Period/Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

324

Multiple slug scaling of linear and pattern laboratory chemical floods  

SciTech Connect

Linear floods were conducted in a synthetic water-wet matrix. The multiple slug scaling approach used oil saturation distributions measured by microwave attenuation in one laboratory flood to predict accurately the tertiary residual oil saturation and tertiary oil breakthrough in another laboratory linear flood run with larger slug sizes. Oil saturation distributions at 0.11 V/V/sub p/ intervals during the flood, as well as at S/sub orc/, were also accurately predicted. A laboratory quarter five-spot pattern flood involving sequential injection of a small surfactant slug, a small polymer slug, and continuous drive water was run in a water-wet synthetic matrix. Linear flood oil saturation distributions were scaled to predict the oil saturation distributions in the pattern using a fixed twelve streamtube model for the flow. Details of this scaling procedure are given. Residual tertiary oil saturation, tertiary recovery, and oil saturation changes with time were predicted to within the experimental errors involved in the procedures. The observed tertiary oil breakthrough was later than predicted. Observed oil saturation distributions tended to show more oil left in the corners of the model than predicted by the scaling theory. These secondary effects and the overall behavior of the pattern flood are considered in terms of the chosen streamtube network and the assumptions of stable unit mobility flow. (JMT)

Haskin, H.K.; Davis, L.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Enzyme activity in dialkylphosphate ionic liquids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enzyme activity in dialkylphosphate ionic liquids Enzyme activity in dialkylphosphate ionic liquids M. F. Thomas, L. Li, J. Handley-Pendleton, D. van der Lelie, J. J. Dunn and J. F. Wishart Bioresource Technology 102, in press. [Find paper at Science Direct] Abstract: The activity of four metagenomic enzymes and an enzyme cloned from the straw mushroom, Volvariella volvacea were studied in the following ionic liquids, 1,3-dimethylimidazolium dimethyl phosphate, [mmim][dmp], 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dimethyl phosphate, [emim][dmp], 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium diethyl phosphate, [emim][dep] and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate, [emim][OAc]. Activity was determined by analyzing the hydrolysis of para-nitrobenzene carbohydrate derivatives. In general, the enzymes were most active in the dimethyl phosphate ionic

326

Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2011) 2011) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Conceptual Model Activity Date 2011 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Explore for development of an EGS demonstration project Notes The reservoir is developed in fractured Proterozoic schist and quartzite, and Archean quartz monzonite cut by younger diabase intrusions. The basement complex was deformed during the mid Tertiary and covered by approximately 5000 ft of late Tertiary sedimentary and volcanic deposits. Listric normal faults of Cenozoic age disrupt the Tertiary deposits but do not offset the basement rocks. RRG-9, the target well, was drilled southwest of the main well field to a measured depth (MD) of 6089 ft. The well is deviated to the west and cased to a depth of 2316 ft MD. It

327

Use of Advanced Oxidation and Aerobic Degradation for Remediation of Various Hydrocarbon Contaminates  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute in conjunction with Sierra West Consultants, Inc., Tetra Tech, Inc., and the U.S. Department of Energy conducted laboratory and field studies to test different approaches to enhance degradation of hydrocarbons and associated contaminants. WRI in conjunction with Sierra West Consultants, Inc., conducted a laboratory and field study for using ozone to treat a site contaminated with MTBE and other hydrocarbons. Results from this study demonstrate that a TOD test can be used to resolve the O{sub 3} dosage problem by establishing a site-specific benchmark dosage for field ozone applications. The follow-up testing of the laboratory samples provided indications that intrinsic biodegradation could be stimulated by adding oxygen. Laboratory studies also suggests that O3 dosage in the full-scale field implementation could be dialed lower than stoichiometrically designed to eliminate the formation of Cr(VI). WRI conducted a study involving a series of different ISCO oxidant applications to diesel-contaminated soil and determined the effects on enhancing biodegradation to degrade the residual hydrocarbons. Soils treated with permanganate followed by nutrients and with persulfate followed by nutrients resulted in the largest decrease in TPH. The possible intermediates and conditions formed from NOM and TPH oxidation by permanganate and activated persulfate favors microbial TPH degrading activity. A 'passive-oxidation' method using microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology was conducted by WRI in conjunction with Tetra Tech, Inc., to degrade MTBE in groundwater. These experiments have demonstrated that a working MFC (i.e., one generating power) could be established in the laboratory using contaminated site water or buffered media inoculated with site water and spiked with MTBE, benzene, or toluene. Electrochemical methods were studied by WRI with goal of utilizing low voltage and amperage electrical sources for 'geo-oxidation' of organic contaminants. The results from a study with TCE contaminated-clay indicate that electrochemically inducing reductive dechlorination of TCE in a saturated matrix may offer an effective and viable alternative to remediation TCE and other contaminants with potential of being reduced. Another study focused on steel wool oxidation to electrochemically increase population of hydrocarbon-degrading denitrifying bacteria. Significantly larger denitrifying activity was observed in the cathode chamber of a treatment unit setup like an MFC with steel wool as the anode. This enhanced nitrate reduction could be due to direct electron utilization by denitrifying bacteria on the cathode, thereby stimulating microbial denitrification or a combination of electron transfer directly to NO{sub 3}{sup -} and electron transfer to nitrate reducing bacteria, which may serve as a type of bio-catalyst on the cathode for nitrate reduction. Overall, the studies conducted under Task 72 demonstrated different innovative methods to enhance petroleum hydrocarbon degradation and associated contaminants.

Paul Fallgren

2009-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

328

CASTING SLIPS FOR FABRICATION OF REFRACTORY METAL WARE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition is given for slip casting tungsten metal. The composition consists essentially of tungsten metal with an average particle size of 0.9 micron, an organic vehicle such as methyl chloroform, o-xylene, n-butyl acetate, isobutyl acetate, and 1, 1, 2, 2-tetrachlorethane, and a suspending agent such as ethyl cellulose, with the approximate ratio of said vehicle to the tungsten metal being 12 cc of a solution containing from 5 to about 20 grams of said ethyl cellulose in 400 cc of said organic vehicle per 100 grams of metal. (AEC)

Stoddard, S.D.; Nuckolls, D.E.; Cowan, R.E.

1962-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

.sup.18 F-4-Fluoroantipyrine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The novel radioactive compound .sup.18 F-4-fluoroantipyrine having high specific activity which can be used in nuclear medicine in diagnostic applications, prepared by the direct fluorination of antipyrine in acetic acid with radioactive fluorine at room temperature and purifying said radioactive compound by means of gel chromatography with ethyl acetate as eluent is disclosed. The non-radioactive 4-fluoroantipyrine can also be prepared by the direct fluorination of antipyrine in acetic acid with molecular fluorine at room temperature and purified by means of gel chromotography with ethyl acetate eluent.

Shiue, Chyng-Yann (Wading River, NY); Wolf, Alfred P. (Setauket, NY)

1984-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

330

RECOVERY OF URANIUM VALUES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid-liquid extraction method is presented for recovering uranium values from an aqueous acidic solution by means of certain high molecular weight amine in the amine classes of primary, secondary, heterocyclic secondary, tertiary, or heterocyclic tertiary. The uranium bearing aqueous acidic solution is contacted with the selected amine dissolved in a nonpolar water-immiscible organic solvent such as kerosene. The uranium which is substantially completely exiracted by the organic phase may be stripped therefrom by waters and recovered from the aqueous phase by treatment into ammonia to precipitate ammonium diuranate.

Brown, K.B.; Crouse, D.J. Jr.; Moore, J.G.

1959-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

331

Bifunctional anion-exchange resins with improved selectivity and exchange kinetics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed herein are a class of anion exchange resins containing two different exchange sites with improved selectivity and sorptive capability for chemical species in solution, such as heptavalent technetium (as pertechnetate anion, TcO.sub.4.sup.-). The resins are prepared by first reacting haloalkylated crosslinked copolymer beads with a large tertiary amine in a solvent in which the resin beads can swell, followed by reaction with a second, smaller, tertiary amine to more fully complete the functionalization of the resin. The resins have enhanced selectivity, capacity, and exchange kinetics.

Alexandratos, Spiro D. (Knoxville, TN); Brown, Gilbert M. (Knoxville, TN); Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN); Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Secondary battery containing zinc electrode with modified separator and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A battery containing a zinc electrode with a porous separator between the anode and cathode. The separator is a microporous substrate carrying therewith an organic solvent of benzene, toluene or xylene with a tertiary organic amine therein, wherein the tertiary amine has three carbon chains each containing from six to eight carbon atoms. The separator reduces the rate of zinc dentrite growth in the separator during battery operation prolonging battery life by preventing short circuits. A method of making the separator is also disclosed.

Poa, D.S.

1984-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

333

Secondary battery containing zinc electrode with modified separator and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A battery containing a zinc electrode with a porous separator between the anode and cathode. The separator is a microporous substrate carrying therewith an organic solvent of benzene, toluene or xylene with a tertiary organic amine therein, wherein the tertiary amine has three carbon chains each containing from six to eight carbon atoms. The separator reduces the rate of zinc dentrite growth in the separator during battery operation prolonging battery life by preventing short circuits. A method of making the separator is also disclosed.

Poa, David S. (Naperville, IL); Yao, Neng-Ping (Clarendon Hills, IL)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Metal-residence sites in mine tailings in the Magdalena District, New Mexico, USA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mineralization in the Kelly Mining Camp is hosted by the Mississippian Kelly Limestone and comprises Zn-Pb skarn, replacement, and vein deposits related to Tertiary intrusive activity. The ore consists of primary (hypogene) sulfide mineralization which has been oxidized near surface to form secondary (supergene) mineralization. A zone of secondary sulfide-enrichment separates the sulfide and oxide ores. Mine tailings in the camp contain primary sulfide, oxide and gangue minerals, secondary (supergene) minerals formed during weathering of the primary ore, and tertiary minerals formed by alteration of hypogene and supergene assemblages after deposition in the tailings impoundment.

Larocque, A.C.L. [Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada). Dept. of Geological Sciences; Chapin, C.E. [New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, Socorro, NM (United States); Laughlin, A.W. [ICF Kaiser Ltd., Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hickmott, D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Description Description At the Wastewater Treatment Plant: install dissolved oxygen controls, reprogram wetwell level controls for the tertiary filter pumps, install electric actuators on tertiary filter effluent lines, install power monitors on motors, install standby generator; at the Biosolids Processing Facility and Landfill: install timers or programmable logic controllers (PLC); at the Wastewater Flow Equalization Basin and Pumping Station at Landfill: install timers or PLC, install variable frequency drives on wastewater pumps; at the Water Treatment Plant: install power monitors on motors; at several of the wastewater treatment facilities replace existing interior and exterior lighting fixtures with high efficiency units and provide engineering services.

336

Self-Assembly of Stimuli-Responsive Water-Soluble [60]Fullerene End-Capped Ampholytic Block Copolymer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Well-defined, water-soluble, pH and temperature stimuli-responsive [60]fullerene (C??) containing ampholytic block copolymer of poly((methacrylic acid)-block-(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate))-block–C?? (P(MAA-b-DMAEMA)-b-C??) ...

Ravi, P.

337

PRODUCTION OF METALS AND THEIR COMPOUNDS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Zirconium nitrate can be separated from hafnium nitrate by mixing the nitrates with ethyl cellulose pulp, eluting the mass with diethyl ether containing nitric acid, and passing the eluent through a column of cellulose pulp the outflow of which is substantially free of hafnium.

Arden, T.V.; Burstall, F.H.; Davies, G.R.; Linstead, R.P.; Wells, R.A.

1958-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

338

JournalJoint Oceanographic Institutions for Deep Earth SamplingJoint Oceanographic Institutions for Deep Earth Sampling Vol. 25 No. 1-1999  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

properties of poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline) ­ Ayanna Bernard 17. Complex decision making in machine maintenance ­ Todd Spencer 35. Membranes for Olefin Paraffin Separations ­ Mita Das 36. High Aspect Ratio Mixed Matrix Membranes ­ JR Johnson 37. Cross-linkable Hollow Fiber Membranes for Natural Gas Purification

339

ORNL/TM-2000/191 ULTRA-CLEAN DIESEL FUEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coke 2.8 Electricity 39.0 Charcoal 1.8 Ethyl Alcohol 3.1 Petroleum Derivatives 35.2 Other Secondaries 0 to respond to the needs with reasonable costs and environmental impact. Among the options for the expansion will be the least-cost solution for this expansion and the net change in CO2 emissions? The answer

340

UNITED STATES Calendar Year 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coke 2.8 Electricity 39.0 Charcoal 1.8 Ethyl Alcohol 3.1 Petroleum Derivatives 35.2 Other Secondaries 0 to respond to the needs with reasonable costs and environmental impact. Among the options for the expansion will be the least-cost solution for this expansion and the net change in CO2 emissions? The answer

US Army Corps of Engineers

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mtbe ethyl tertiary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Soluble Synthetic Analogs of Malaria Pigment: Structure of Mesohematin Anhydride [FeIII(MP-IX)]2 and Solution Interaction with Chloroquine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changing the vinyl groups of hematin anhydride to either ethyl or hydrogen groups results in increased solubility (Por=porphyrin). Determination of the weak binding constants of the antimalarial drug chloroquine to dimers of these hematin anhydride analogues suggests that solution-phase heme/drug interactions alone are unlikely to be the origin of the action of the drug.

D Bohle; E Dodd; A Kosar; L Sharma; P Stephens; L Suarez; D Tazoo

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

342

Enhanced photovoltaic characteristics of solar cells based on n-type triphenodioxazine derivative  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polymer solar cells based on poly (2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethyl-hexyloxy)-1, 4-phenylene vinylene) (MEH-PPV):1-(3-methoxycarbonyl)-propyl-1-1-phenyl-(6,6)C61(PCBM):3, 10-di(trifluoromethane) triphenodioxazine (TFTD) was fabricated using spin coating technology. ... Keywords: Absorption spectra, Photoluminescence, Photovoltaics, Polymer

Fen Qiao; Aimin Liu; Yi Xiao; Yang Ping Ou; Ji quan Zhang; Yong chang Sang

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Deshusses, Johnson, and Leson Volume 49 August 1999 Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association 973  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- able medium and a mixture of wood chips and compost. Both were exposed to varying mixtures of ethyl (medium B) mixed from compost and polystyrene spheres (Bioton). Calcium carbonate (lime- stone) for p , comparable to values reported for other, compost-based, biofilter systems.7 Consistent with previously

344

Anisotropic membranes for gas separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas separation membrane has a dense separating layer about 10,000 Angstroms or less thick and a porous support layer 10 to 400 microns thick that is an integral unit with gradually and continuously decreasing pore size from the base of the support layer to the surface of the thin separating layer and is made from a casting solution comprising ethyl cellulose and ethyl cellulose-based blends, typically greater than 47.5 ethoxyl content ethyl cellulose blended with compatible second polymers, such as nitrocellulose. The polymer content of the casting solution is from about 10% to about 35% by weight of the total solution with up to about 50% of this polymer weight a compatible second polymer to the ethyl cellulose in a volatile solvent such as isopropanol, methylacetate, methanol, ethanol, and acetone. Typical nonsolvents for the casting solutions include water and formamide. The casting solution is cast in air from about zero to 10 seconds to allow the volatile solvent to evaporate and then quenched in a coagulation bath, typically water, at a temperature of 7--25 C and then air dried at ambient temperature, typically 10--30 C. 2 figs.

Gollan, A.Z.

1987-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

345

Quantitative Infrared Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Benzene, 2.1 %, Boxcar, 2 1 0.5 0.25 0.125. Triangular, 2 1 0.5 0.25 0.125. ... Ethyl benzene, 2.1 %, Boxcar, 2 1 0.5 0.25 0.125. ...

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

346

Udfordringer og muligheder  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, a natural gas component, hence a non-renewable energy. Ethanol, and particularly bioethanol from sugar cane. This trans- esterification leads to high conversion of triglycerides (TG) into ethyl esters (Marjanovic´ et, which involves a faster conversion of triglycerides and thus an increase of their transfer rate

Mosegaard, Klaus

347

WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's product requirements are met by blending feedstocks on hand at midnight. The volumes vary daily, depending, an NLP, an ILP, or a MILP, and is it single or multi-objective? Explain. Question 2 ­ LP Case Analysis ­ will be shipped that day. Both products are blended from 90-octane unleaded gasoline. Ethyl alcohol, the only

Chinnam, Ratna Babu

348

Introduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Designations and general electrical applications for elastomers...used for potting of electrical connectors EPR R Ethylene-propylene Good general-purpose electrical properties EPT R Ethyl-propylene terpolymer Good general-purpose electrical properties Hypalon (HYP) CSM Chlorosulfonated polyethylene Not outstanding electrically Silicone SIL Polysiloxane Among the best...

349

Alkali compounds catalyzed low temperature methanol synthesis over Cu-based catalyst  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel mixed catalyst system containing alkali compounds over Cu/MgO-Na catalyst was developed to synthesize methanol from syngas via ethyl formate in a slurry reactor. The results exhibited that among the used alkali formates (HCOOM, M=Li, Na, Cs, ... Keywords: CuMgO-Na/HCOONa/catalysis system, low temperature methanol synthesis, slurry phase

Baoshan Hu

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Preconceptual ABC design definition and system configuration layout  

SciTech Connect

This document is the conceptual design document for the follow-on to the Molten Salt Breeder Reactor, known as the ABC type reactor. It addresses blanket design options, containment options, off-gas systems, drainage systems, and components/layouts of the primary, secondary, and tertiary systems, and it contains a number of diagrams for the configuration of the major systems.

Barthold, W. [Barthold & Associates, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Original article: Power flow Petri Net modelling for building integrated multi-source power system with smart grid interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an energy management modelling of a multi-source power system composed of photovoltaic (PV) array, storage and power grid connection, and taking into account messages from smart grid. The designed system can supply a tertiary building ... Keywords: Energy management, Petri Net modelling, Photovoltaic, Smart grid, Stateflow

B. C. Wang, M. Sechilariu, F. Locment

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

A framework to enrich student interaction via cross-institutional microblogging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces a framework for collaborative microblogging that we believe is useful in enriching student interaction, both in-class and outside of contact hours. The framework is called Microblogging for Community of Inquiry (MiCoI). MiCoI is ... Keywords: community of inquiry, microblogging, tertiary institution, twitter

Suku Sinnappan; Samar Zutshi

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter GQ COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING By G.D. Stricker and M coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

354

COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, HANNA AND CARBON BASINS, WYOMING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter HQ COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, HANNA AND CARBON BASINS, WYOMING By G.D. Stricker and M coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

355

Selenium Bioaccumulation in Stocked Fish as an Indicator of Fishery Potential in Pit Lakes on Reclaimed Coal Mines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Reclaimed Coal Mines in Alberta, Canada L. L. Miller · J. B. Rasmussen · V. P. Palace · G. Sterling · A to selenium (Se) and other metals and metalloids in pit lakes formed by open pit coal mining in Tertiary (thermal coal) and in Cretaceous (metallurgical coal) bedrock. Juvenile hatchery rainbow trout

Hontela, Alice

356

COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, WILLISTON BASIN, NORTH DAKOTA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter WQ COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, WILLISTON BASIN, NORTH DAKOTA By G.D. Stricker and M coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

357

Strategies for communication skills development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the scope of computer science continues to expand and move further into inter-disciplinary research, we see communication skills development (CSD) gain prominence in tertiary courses. Employer groups, professional bodies and universities increasingly ... Keywords: communication across the curriculum, communication skills development, curriculum change

Paul Gruba; Reem Al-Mahmood

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Preliminary evaluation of geothermal resources of South Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies on the following are summarized: regional distribution of Frio sands, South Texas; depositional patterns, Gulf-Coast Tertiary; growth faults, mechanisms for downdip thickening; the approach to obtaining sand distribution; reliable correlations from regional cross sections; depositional systems from sand-percentage maps; geopressured Frio related to sand distribution; isothermal maps; and conclusons and potential geothermal fairways. (MHR)

Bebout, D.G.

1974-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Systematic literature reviews in software engineering - A systematic literature review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Background: In 2004 the concept of evidence-based software engineering (EBSE) was introduced at the ICSE04 conference. Aims: This study assesses the impact of systematic literature reviews (SLRs) which are the recommended EBSE method for aggregating ... Keywords: Cost estimation, Evidence-based software engineering, Systematic literature review, Systematic review quality, Tertiary study

Barbara Kitchenham; O. Pearl Brereton; David Budgen; Mark Turner; John Bailey; Stephen Linkman

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

A GMDH polynomial neural network-based method to predict approximate three-dimensional structures of polypeptides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tertiary Protein Structure Prediction is one of the most important problems in Structural Bioinformatics. Along the last 20years many algorithms have been proposed as to solve this problem. However, it still remains a challenging issue because of the ... Keywords: Artificial Neural Networks, Group Method of Data Handling, Multilayer Perceptron, Protein Structure Prediction

MáRcio Dorn; André L. S. Braga; Carlos H. Llanos; Leandro S. Coelho

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mtbe ethyl tertiary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY GEOLOGY STUDIES Volume 27, Part 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Spieker and Ree- side (1925, p. 443) for exposures near the Blackhawk coal mine On the eastern front Huntington Creek, just south of Little Swens Canyon. East of the mapped area, where coal is being mined fromTertiary floodplains. Nonmarine limestone and thin layen of coal occur in the lacustrine middle pan of the formation

Seamons, Kent E.

362

A studio-based approach to teaching information technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studio-based teaching is well-established in creative disciplines such as architecture and the arts, but it has been rarely used in the teaching of IT at a tertiary level. The wider use of the studio model for teaching, originally proposed by Schon (1983), ...

Kathy Lynch; Angela Carbone; David Arnott; Peter Jamieson

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

GLHN Architects & Engineers, Inc. Chilled Water System New Mexico State University Not For Construction 0874.00 Utility Development Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effect absorption chillers. Also included in the production manifold is a thermal storage facility Carrier 19XR electrically driven centrifugal chillers and two nominal 1570 ton Carrier 16JR-150L double-secondary-tertiary pumping arrangement, representative of dedicated constant speed chiller pumps, independent building

Castillo, Steven P.

364

Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater as Power Plant Cooling System...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PA 15213-3890 412-268-2946 dzombak@cmu.edu Use of TreaTed MUnicipal WasTeWaTer as poWer planT cooling sysTeM MakeUp WaTer: TerTiary TreaTMenT VersUs expanded cheMical regiMen...

365

Peak Oil Netherlands Foundation (PONL) was founded in May 2005 by a group of citizens who are concerned about the effects of a premature peak in oil and other fossil fuels production. The main aims of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

leverage and extend conventional oil and natural gas development for unconventional resource development high demand and higher potential for CO2 in existing oilfield tertiary enhanced oil recovery (EOR operations from merely commercial oil production operations to carbon storage operations requires

Keeling, Stephen L.

366

Development of techniques for optimizing selection and completion of western tight gas sands. Phase II report, 1 January Feb 1979--28 February 1979  

SciTech Connect

The Phase II work included the measurement of sandstone bed structural elements at 16 sites on Cretaceous Marine Marginal sandstone beds and at 16 sites on beds in a Lower Tertiary lacustrine sequence in eastern Utah. This work was aimed at defining the internal geometrical characteristics of these two types of reservoir rocks.

Knutson, C.F.; Boardman, C.R.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Wikis in teaching and assessment: the M/Cyclopedia project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a knowledge-based, networked economy, students leaving university need to have attained skills in collaborative and creative project-based work and to have developed critical, reflective practices. This paper outlines how a wiki can been used as part ... Keywords: assessment, pedagogy, social constructivism, tertiary education, wiki

Axel Bruns; Sal Humphreys

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

FORT UNION COAL IN THE WILLISTON BASIN, NORTH DAKOTA: A SYNTHESIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter WS FORT UNION COAL IN THE WILLISTON BASIN, NORTH DAKOTA: A SYNTHESIS By R.M. Flores and C coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

369

Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal research effort for the first six months of Year 2 of the project has been petroleum system characterization. Understanding the burial and thermal maturation histories of the strata in the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas is important in petroleum system characterization. The underburden and overburden rocks in these basins and subbasins are a product of their rift-related geohistory. Petroleum source rock analysis and thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling indicate that an effective regional petroleum source rock in the onshore interior salt basins, the North Louisiana Salt Basin, Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin, was the Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone. The Upper Cretaceous Tuscaloosa shale was an effective local petroleum source rock in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and a possible local source bed in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. Hydrocarbon generation and expulsion was initiated in the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin. Hydrocarbon generation and expulsion was initiated in the Late Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin. Reservoir rocks include Jurassic, Cretaceous and Tertiary siliciclastic and carbonate strata. Seal rocks include Jurassic, Cretaceous and Tertiary anhydrite and shale beds. Petroleum traps include structural and combination traps.

Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

370

Sulfonated polysulfone battery membrane for use in corrosive environments  

SciTech Connect

For batteries containing strong oxidizing electrolyte and a membrane separating two electrolyte solutions, e.g., a zinc ferricyanide battery, an improved membrane is provided comprising an oxidative resistant, conductive, ion-selective membrane fabricated from a catenated aromatic polymer having an absence of tertiary hydrogens, e.g., a sulfonated polysulfone.

Arnold, Jr., Charles (Albuquerque, NM); Assink, Roger (Albuquerque, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

International Conference on Computer Systems and Technologies -CompSysTech'10 An Experiment with Using Google Tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with Using Google Tools for Project Supervision at Tertiary Education Jií Srba Abstract: Problem oriented and coordination management tools for the support of group work. An experiment using a combination of Google Groups on, we chose to focus on Google Groups and other related technology. Google Groups is a service from

Srba, Jiri

372

Post-breakup tectonics in southeast Brazil from thermochronological data and combined inverse-forward thermal history modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Post-breakup tectonics in southeast Brazil from thermochronological data and combined inverse November 2012. [1] The continental margin of southeast Brazil is elevated. Onshore Tertiary basins and Late with Andean tectonics and those in NE Brazil leads us to assume a plate-wide compressional stress

373

Development of online instructional resources for Earth system science education: An example of current practice from China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Educators around the world are striving to make science more accessible and relevant to students. Online instructional resources have become an integral component of tertiary science education and will continue to grow in influence and importance over ... Keywords: Earth system science, Evaluation, Instructional resource, Online learning

Shaochun Dong; Shijin Xu; Xiancai Lu

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Measurements of Laminar Flame Velocity for Components of Natural Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurements of Laminar Flame Velocity for Components of Natural Gas Patricia Dirrenberger1 flame velocity of components of natural gas, methane, ethane, propane, and nbutane as well as of binary and tertiary mixtures of these compounds proposed as surrogates for natural gas. These measurements have been

375

Storage Hierarchy Management for Scientific Computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the driving forces behind the design of computer systems. As a result, many advances in CPU architecture were-terabyte tertiary storage system attached to a high- speed computer. The analysis finds that the number of files instead of the two separate views of the system studied. This finding was a major motivation of the design

Miller, Ethan L.

376

Symposium on enhanced oil recovery  

SciTech Connect

The Second Joint Symposium on Enhanced Oil Recovery was held in Tulsa, Oklahoma on April 5 to 8, 1981. Forty-four technical papers were presented which covered all phases of enhanced oil recovery. Field tests, laboratory investigations, and mathematical analyses of tertiary recovery methods such as microemulsion flooding, carbon dioxide injection, in-situ combustion, steam injection, and gas injection are presented.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Downhole steam generator with improved preheating, combustion, and protection features  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

For tertiary oil recovery, a downhole steam generator is designed which provides for efficient counterflow cooling of the combustion chamber walls and preheating of the fuel and water. Pressure-responsive doors are provided for closing and opening the outlet in response to flameout, thereby preventing flooding of the combustion chamber. (DLC)

Fox, R.L.

1981-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

378

of Canadian in the 20th  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WITH SURFACTANT-STABILIZED FOAMS As western Canada's oil fields age,the importance of secondary and tertiary- ary process injection wells. The potential economy of using foams creat- ed by greenhouse or natural gas injection was very attractive. However, since crude oils were known to be effective for foam

Schramm, Laurier L.

379

Research Output in Physics from Pakistani Universities 2004-2008 Although Higher Education Commission (HEC) in the previous years had  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the impact HEC had on the tertiary education in Pakistan, is to determine the number of research papers Pakistan. As Physics is a very broad ranging subject and also the analytical tool of ISI-Web of Science "Physics" is used it composed of following sub-categories. 1. Applied Physics 2. Nuclear Science

Siddiqi, Sajjad Ahmed

380

An overview of protein-folding techniques: issues and perspectives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The importance of protein folding has been recognised for many years. Almost a half century ago, Linus Pauling discovered two quite simple, regular arrangements of amino acids the ?-helix and the ?-sheet that are found ... Keywords: algorithms, bioinformatics, computational biology, folding mechanism, kinetics, protein folding, protein structure prediction, sequence, tertiary structure

Abdur Rahman; Albert Y. Zomaya

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mtbe ethyl tertiary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Total Stocks Stocks by Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil All Oils (Excluding Crude Oil) Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Propane/Propylene Normal Butane/Butylene Isobutane/Butylene Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excluding Fuel Ethanol) MTBE Other Oxygenates Renewables (including Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Unfinished Oils Unfinished Oils, Naphthas & Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene & Light Gas Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB w/ Ether MGBC - Reformulated, GTAB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional, CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Aviation Gasoline Blending Comp. Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Gasoline, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., than 1.00% Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petro. Feedstock Use Other Oils for Petro. Feedstock Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels

382

Cometabolic bioremediation  

SciTech Connect

Cometabolic bioremediation is probably the most under appreciated bioremediation strategy currently available. Cometabolism strategies stimulate only indigenous microbes with the ability to degrade the contaminant and cosubstrate e.g. methane, propane, toluene and others. This highly targeted stimulation insures that only those microbes that can degrade the contaminant are targeted, thus reducing amendment costs, well and formation plugging, etc. Cometabolic bioremediation has been used on some of the most recalcitrant contaminants, e.g. PCE, TCE, MTBE, TNT, dioxane, atrazine, etc. Methanotrophs have been demonstrated to produce methane monooxygense, an oxidase that can degrade over 300 compounds. Cometabolic bioremediation also has the advantage of being able to degrade contaminants to trace concentrations, since the biodegrader is not dependent on the contaminant for carbon or energy. Increasingly we are finding that in order to protect human health and the environment that we must remediate to lower and lower concentrations, especially for compounds like endocrine disrupters, thus cometabolism may be the best and maybe the only possibility that we have to bioremediate some contaminants.

Hazen, Terry C.

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

Economics of natural gas upgrading  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas could be an important alternative energy source in meeting some of the market demand presently met by liquid products from crude oil. This study was initiated to analyze three energy markets to determine if greater use could be made of natural gas or natural gas derived products and if those products could be provided on an economically competitive basis. The three markets targeted for possible increases in gas use were motor fuels, power generation, and the chemical feedstocks market. The economics of processes to convert natural gas to transportation fuels, chemical products, and power were analyzed. The economic analysis was accomplished by drawing on a variety of detailed economic studies, updating them and bringing the results to a common basis. The processes analyzed included production of methanol, MTBE, higher alcohols, gasoline, CNG, and LNG for the transportation market. Production and use of methanol and ammonia in the chemical feedstock market and use of natural gas for power generation were also assessed. Use of both high and low quality gas as a process feed stream was evaluated. The analysis also explored the impact of various gas price growth rates and process facility locations, including remote gas areas. In assessing the transportation fuels market the analysis examined production and use of both conventional and new alternative motor fuels.

Hackworth, J.H.; Koch, R.W.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Impact of the renewable oxygenate standard for reformulated gasoline on ethanol demand, energy use, and greenhouse gas emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To assure a place for renewable oxygenates in the national reformulated gasoline (RFG) program, the US Environmental Protection Agency has promulgated the renewable oxygenate standard (ROS) for RFG. It is assumed that ethanol derived from corn will be the only broadly available renewable oxygenate during Phase I of the RFG program. This report analyzes the impact that the ROS could have on the supply of ethanol, its transported volume, and its displacement from existing markets. It also considers the energy and crude oil consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that could result from the production and use of various RFGs that could meet the ROS requirements. The report concludes that on the basis of current and projected near-term ethanol capacity, if ethanol is the only available renewable oxygenate used to meet the requirements of the ROS, diversion of ethanol from existing use as a fuel is likely to be necessary. Year-round use of ethanol and ETBE would eliminate the need for diversion by reducing winter demand for ethanol. On an RFG-program-wide basis, using ethanol and ETBE to satisfy the ROS can be expected to slightly reduce fossil energy use, increase crude oil use, and have essentially no effect on GHG emissions or total energy use relative to using RFG oxygenated only with MTBE.

Stork, K.C.; Singh, M.K.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Development of a catalyst for conversion of syngas-derived materials to isobutylene. Quarterly report number 19, October 1--December 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goals of this project are to develop a catalyst and process for the conversion of syngas to isobutanol. After identification and optimization of key catalyst and process characteristics, the commercial potential of the process is to be evaluated by an economic analysis. From independent process variable studies to investigate the conversion of a methanol/ethanol feed to isobutanol, the best performance to date has been achieved with the 2% Pt on Zn/Mn/Zr oxide catalyst. Using Hyprotech Hysim v2.5 process simulation software, and considering both gas and liquid recycle loops in the process flow diagram, the overall carbon conversion is 98% with 22% selectivity to isobutanol. The expected production of isobutanol is 92 MT/day from 500 MT/day of methanol and 172 MT/day of ethanol feed. An additional 13 MT/day of isobutryaldehyde intermediate is recovered in the liquid product and vent streams. Because of the low selectivity (22%) of the methanol conversion catalyst to isobutanol, the process is uneconomical, even if the isobutanol is valued as a solvent ($903/MT) and not as isobutylene for MTBE production ($352/MT).

Spehlmann, B.C.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

ISOBUTANOL FROM SYNGAS IN A THREE PHASE SYSTEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With growing interest in oxygenates as octane booster for automotive fuels, various synthesis routes for these chemicals are being investigated. Among others, alternative routes to isobutene, the C4-components in MTBE-synthesis are under investigation. A promising path to isobutene is the heterogeneously catalyzed CO-hydrogenation to isobutanol with following dehydration (Fig. 1). As shown by thermodynamical studies, the heterogeneously catalyzed CO-hydrogenation to isobutanol is not expected to experience any thermodynamic constraints. However, heterogeneous hydrogenation of CO is a very exothermic process, a problem which can only be partly solved when being conducted in a plug flow reactor. When carried out in reaction vessels with moving catalyst bed (e.g. three phase stirred tank), heat transfer problems can be resolved, along with additional benefits connected with this reactor type. Several heterogeneous catalytic systems have been under investigation for their capability of isobutanol synthesis from syngas. Most promising catalysts for an active and selective isobutanol synthesis from CO are modified high temperature methanol catalysts.

Peter Tijrn

2002-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

387

The importance of FCC catalyst selection on LPG profitability  

SciTech Connect

Recently the value of LPG in chemical operations downstream of the FCC unit has increased. Such downstream operations utilize propylene not only in alkylate, but also in rapid growth petrochemical applications such as for a raw material in the manufacture of polypropylene and propylene oxide. Isobutane and the butenes (particularly butene-2 in sulfuric acid catalyzed alkylation units) are prized for alkylate feed. The profit potential and incentives to use other LPG components such as isobutene to make MTBE is now increased because of legislative actions and increased octane performance demand; and because of the greater isobutene content in the LPG from the new FCC octane catalysts. A low non-framework alumina (NFA) zeolite studied made a more olefinic LPG with higher iso-to normal C4 ratio than the other zeolites. Pilot plant data has also shown the new low NFA zeolite gave not only outstanding motor octane (MON) performance, but produced an LPG with better propylene to propane ratio, more isobutene, more n-butenes and more C4 branching than other RE promoted zeolite catalysts. Commercial results have verified the improved performance and profitability for the new low-NFA type zeolite catalysts. Three commercial examples are described.

Keyworth, D.A.; Gilman, R.; Pearce, J.R. (AKZO Catalysts, 13000 Bay Park Road, Pasadena, TX (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Ab initio Calculation of Thermodynamic Data for Oxygenated Hydrocarbon Fuels and Radial Breakdown Species: R(OMe)n  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There has long been interest in the use of oxygenated hydrocarbon additives to conventional fuels. These oxygenates have been shown to reduce soot emissions in diesel engines and CO emissions in spark-ignition engines; and often allow diesel operation with decreased NO{sub x}. The current widely used additive, MTBE is targeted for elimination as a gasoline additive due to its damaging effects on the environment. This creates a need for alternative oxygenated additives; and more importantly, amplifies the importance to fully understand the thermochemical and kinetic properties on these oxyhydrocarbons fuels and for their intermediate and radical breakdown products. We use CBS-Q and density-functional methods with isodesmic reactions (with group balance when possible) to compute thermodynamic quantities for these species. We have studied hydrocarbons with multiple substituted methoxy groups. In several cases, multioxygenated species are evaluated that may have potential use as new oxygenated fuel additives. Thermodynamic quantities (H{sub 298}{sup 0}, S{sub 298}{sup 0}, C{sub p}(T)) as well as group additivity contributions for the new oxygenated groups are reported. We also report trends in bond-energies with increasing methoxy substitution.

Kubota, A; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Bozzelli, J; Glaude, P-A

2001-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

389

Chemical-Specific Representation of Air-Soil Exchange and Soil Penetration in Regional Multimedia Models  

SciTech Connect

In multimedia mass-balance models, the soil compartment is an important sink as well as a conduit for transfers to vegetation and shallow groundwater. Here a novel approach for constructing soil transport algorithms for multimedia fate models is developed and evaluated. The resulting algorithms account for diffusion in gas and liquid components; advection in gas, liquid, or solid phases; and multiple transformation processes. They also provide an explicit quantification of the characteristic soil penetration depth. We construct a compartment model using three and four soil layers to replicate with high reliability the flux and mass distribution obtained from the exact analytical solution describing the transient dispersion, advection, and transformation of chemicals in soil with fixed properties and boundary conditions. Unlike the analytical solution, which requires fixed boundary conditions, the soil compartment algorithms can be dynamically linked to other compartments (air, vegetation, ground water, surface water) in multimedia fate models. We demonstrate and evaluate the performance of the algorithms in a model with applications to benzene, benzo(a)pyrene, MTBE, TCDD, and tritium.

McKone, T.E.; Bennett, D.H.

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

MARKETS: A COMPUTABLE GENERAL EQUILIBRIUM ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper introduces biofuels sectors as energy inputs into the GTAP data base and to the production and consumption structures of the GTAP-Energy model developed by Burniaux and Truong (2002), and further modified by McDougall and Golub (2008). We also incorporate Agro-ecological Zones (AEZs) for each of the land using sectors in line with Lee et al. (2005). The GTAP-E model with biofuels and AEZs offers a useful framework for analyzing the growing importance of biofuels for global changes in crop production, utilization, commodity prices, factor use, trade, land use change etc. We begin by validating the model over the 2001-2006 period. We focus on six main drivers of the biofuel boom: the hike in crude oil prices, replacement of MTBE by ethanol as a gasoline additive in the US, and subsidies for ethanol and biodiesel in the US and EU. Using this historical simulation, we calibrate the key elasticities of energy substitution between biofuels and petroleum products in each region. With these parameter settings in place, the model does a reasonably good job of predicting the share of feedstock in biofuels and related sectors in accordance with the historical evidence between 2001 and

Dileep K. Birur; Thomas W. Hertel; Wallace E. Tyner; Dileep K. Birur; Thomas W. Hertel; Wallace E. Tyner

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Comparative economics of NGV's and other vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The utilization of alternative fuels for transportation applications is now a certainty. The only real questions that remain to be answered involve the type of fuel (or fuels) to be adopted most extensively. While some alternative fuel advocates suggest that a niche will exist for all alternative fuels, the most likely scenario will involve widespread use of only a few major fuel types. Undoubtedly, reformulated gasoline will be a major force as an interim fuel, due to inertia and a predominant bias toward liquid fuels. The prospects for utilization of ethanol, methanol, MTBE, and ETBE appear to be most promising in the area of blending with gasoline to meet the needs of reformulated gasoline and flexible fueled vehicles (FFV's). Propane fueled vehicles will continue to grow in popularity, especially with fleets, but will never become a major force in the transportation market in the US due to unresolvable supply limitations. The clear winner in the alternative fuels transportation market appears to be natural gas. Either in compressed or liquefied form, natural gas enjoys low costs, tremendous availability, and impressive environmental benefits. As shown in this analysis, natural gas competes favorably with gasoline in terms of economics. Natural gas is also preferential to other alternative fuels in terms of safety and health issues as well as operational issues.

Biederman, R.T.; Blazek, C.F.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

U.S. Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Stocks by Type  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Crude Oil All Oils (Excluding Crude Oil) Pentanes Plus Liquefied Petroleum Gases Ethane/Ethylene Ethylene Propane/Propylene Propylene (Nonfuel Use) Normal Butane/Butylene Refinery Grade Butane Isobutane/Butylene Other Hydrocarbons Oxygenates (excluding Fuel Ethanol) MTBE Other Oxygenates Renewables (including Fuel Ethanol) Fuel Ethanol Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Unfinished Oils Unfinished Oils, Naphthas & Lighter Unfinished Oils, Kerosene & Light Gas Unfinished Oils, Heavy Gas Oils Residuum Motor Gasoline Blending Comp. (MGBC) MGBC - Reformulated MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB w/ Alcohol MGBC - Reformulated, RBOB w/ Ether MGBC - Reformulated, GTAB MGBC - Conventional MGBC - Conventional, CBOB MGBC - Conventional, GTAB MGBC - Conventional Other Aviation Gasoline Blending Comp. Finished Motor Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Reformulated Gasoline, Other Conventional Gasoline Conventional Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol Conventional Gasoline Blended Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 and Lower Conventional Other Gasoline Finished Aviation Gasoline Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and under Distillate F.O., Greater than 15 to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate F.O., Greater 500 ppm Sulfur Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., than 1.00% Sulfur Petrochemical Feedstocks Naphtha for Petro. Feedstock Use Other Oils for Petro. Feedstock Use Special Naphthas Lubricants Waxes Petroleum Coke Asphalt and Road Oil Miscellaneous Products

393

Fractionation of phenolic compounds from a purple corn extract and evaluation of antioxidant and antimutagenic activities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Qualitative and quantitative analysis of anthocyanins and other phenolic compounds from a purple corn extract was performed. The purple corn extract had cyanidin-3-glucoside, pelargonidin-3-glucoside, peonidin-3-glucoside and its respective acylated anthocyanin-glucosides. Cyadinin-3glucoside was the main constituent (44.4 ?? 4.7%) followed by the acylated cyanidin-3-glucoside (26.9 ?? 8.0%). Other phenolic compounds present in the purple corn corresponded to protocatechuic acid, vanillic acid, and p-coumaric acid. In addition, quercetin derivatives, a hesperitin derivative and pcoumaric and ferulic acid derivatives were found. Fractionation of phenolic compounds yielded two main fractions, an anthocyanin-rich water fraction (WF) and an ethyl acetate fraction (EAF). Evaluation of antimutagenic activity in both fractions revealed higher antimutagenic activity in the ethyl acetate fraction compared to the anthocyanin-rich fraction. On the other hand, antioxidant activity of the anthocyanin-rich fraction was higher compared to the ethyl acetate fraction. Further fractionation of the anthocyanin-rich fraction in a Toyopearl HW40 gel permeation column yielded five sub-fractions which showed no difference in antimutagenic activity except for the water sub-fraction WF-V. All the sub-fractions were active as antimutagens and antioxidants. Further fractionation of the ethyl acetate fraction yielded four sub-fractions that showed to be active as antimutagens and antioxidants. Ethyl acetate sub-fraction EAF-IV was the most active as an antimutagen. HPLC-DAD characterization of that sub-fraction revealed mainly the presence of a quercetin derivative with UV-visible spectral characteristics similar to rutin but with a little longer retention time. The mechanism of antimutagenic action by the phenolic compounds present either in the anthocyanin-rich fraction or the ethyl acetate fraction and sub-fraction EAFIV seems to be a contribution of a direct action on the enzymes involved in the activation of the mutagen and to the scavenging activity of the mutagen nucleophiles, as demonstrated by our assays.

Pedreschi, Romina Paola

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

APS Protocols for Handling, Storage, and Disposal of Untreated Foreign Soil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

APS Protocols for Handling, Storage, and Disposal of Untreated Foreign Soil APS Protocols for Handling, Storage, and Disposal of Untreated Foreign Soil and Regulated Domestic Soil Arrival of New Samples: Unpack shipping containers. Treat any ice/melted water immediately. Decontaminate any "blue ice" packets with 70% ethyl alcohol. Collect any loose soil from container and heat-treat immediately. Immediately decontaminate shipping containers. Heat-treat wooden, metal, or cardboard shipping containers (using lowest heat). Treat plastic containers and coolers with 70% ethyl alcohol. Storage of Samples: Store dry samples in the locked storage cabinet in Room 431Z021 until they can be delivered to the appropriate beamline for analysis. Label containers with origin and arrival date. Log samples into the APS Soil Inventory book maintained in 431Z021.

395

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Methanol Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

and Methanol and Methanol Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Methanol Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Methanol Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Methanol Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Methanol Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Methanol Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Methanol Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol and Methanol Tax Ethyl alcohol and methyl alcohol motor fuels are taxed at a rate of $0.08 per gallon when used as a motor fuel. Ethyl alcohol is defined as a motor

396

Health hazard evaluation report HETA 94-0253-2451, Pan American Health Organization, Bogota, Colombia, South America  

SciTech Connect

In response to a request from the Pan American Health Organization, an investigation was begun into possible hazardous working conditions at the ECOPETROL Oil Refinery in Barrancabermeja, Colombia. The study was to evaluate employee exposure to benzene, toluene, xylene, ethyl-benzene, and cyclohexane in various areas of the refinery. ECOPETROL was an integrated oil refinery with a refining capacity of 200,000 barrels per day. In the aromatics facility benzene, toluene, xylene, ethyl-benzene, and cyclohexane were refined from napththa. The author concludes that a hazard existed for some workers from exposure to benzene. The author recommends that benzene exposure be controlled through the use of personal protective equipment and environmental monitoring programs.

Kelly, J.; Echt, A.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Surface modified coals for enhanced catalyst dispersion and liquefaction. Semiannual progress report, September 1, 1995--February 29, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this work is to enhance catalyst loading and dispersion in coal for improved liquefaction by preadsorption of surfactants onto coal. The application of surfactants to coal beneficiation and coal-water slurry preparation is well known. However, the effects of surfactants on catalyst loading and dispersion prior to coal liquefaction have not been investigated. The current work is focused on the influence of the cationic surfactant dodecyl dimethyl ethyl ammonium bromide (DDAB) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS, anionic) on the surface properties of a bituminous coal and its molybdenum uptake from solution. The results show that DDAB created positively charged sites on the coal and increased molybdenum loading compared to the original coal. In contrast, SDS rendered the coal surface negative and reduced molybdenum uptake. The results show that efficient loading of molybdenum catalyst onto coal can be achieved by pretreatment of the coal with dodecyl dimethyl ethyl ammonium bromide.

Abotsi, G.M.K.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Gas chromatographic determination of microamounts of glycols and their esters in aqueous medium using adsorption on activated charcoal  

SciTech Connect

Rapid growth of production of glycols and their derivatives, especially methyl and ethyl esters, and wide use of these substances in various branches of the national economy (1) inevitably necessitate analytical monitoring of their content in waste waters and various water bodies. The authors studied the scope of gas-chromatographic determination of microamounts of glycols and their esters in aqueous media at the sanitary standards level (10/sup -5/%) using activated charcoal for their adsorption concentration from aqueous solutions, desorption from the charcoal by ethanol, and evaporationconcentration of the alcoholic solutions. The quantitative concentration characteristics were studied with reference to ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, diethylene glycol, dipropylene glycol, triethyleneglycol, tripropylene glycol, tetraethylene glycol, ethylcellosolve, ethyl carbitol, and monoethyl ester of triethylene glycol.

Begunov, G.A.; Titovskaya, V.N.; Galenko, A.V.

1987-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

399

Binding of stereognostically designed ligands to trivalent, pentavalent, and hexavalent f-block elements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stability constants were determined for the complexes formed from two stereognostically designed ligands and the f-block elements Nd(III), Np(V), and Pu(VI). The ligands investigated were tris[3-(2-carboxyphenoxy)propyl]amine (NPB) and tris-N,N',N''-[2-(2-carboxy-4-ethyl-phenoxy)ethyl]-1,4,7-triazacyclononane (EETAC). A stereognostically blind ligand, nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), was also investigated for comparison. The results suggest that there is no significant stereognostic effect for complexation of NPB or EETAC to Np(V). On the other hand, a modest stereognostic effect is seen for the NPB ligand when complexed to Pu(VI), leading to an approximately 8-fold increase in the binding strength. A more significant effect is observed for the EETAC system in which a 250-fold increase in binding is observed for Pu(VI) versus Nd(III).

Sinkov, Sergey I.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Warner, Marvin G.; Pittman, Jonathan W.

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

400

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 figures.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

1993-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mtbe ethyl tertiary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

402

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

Smith, L.A. Jr.

1989-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

403

A Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanism for Oxidation of Four Small Alkyl Esters in Laminar Premixed Flames  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism has been developed for a group of four small alkyl ester fuels, consisting of methyl formate, methyl acetate, ethyl formate and ethyl acetate. This mechanism is validated by comparisons between computed results and recently measured intermediate species mole fractions in fuel-rich, low pressure, premixed laminar flames. The model development employs a principle of similarity of functional groups in constraining the H atom abstraction and unimolecular decomposition reactions in each of these fuels. As a result, the reaction mechanism and formalism for mechanism development are suitable for extension to larger oxygenated hydrocarbon fuels, together with an improved kinetic understanding of the structure and chemical kinetics of alkyl ester fuels that can be extended to biodiesel fuels. Variations in concentrations of intermediate species levels in these flames are traced to differences in the molecular structure of the fuel molecules.

Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Westmoreland, P R; Dryer, F L; Chaos, M; Osswald, P; Kohse-Hoinghaus, K; Cool, T A; Wang, J; Yang, B; Hansen, N; Kasper, T

2008-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

404

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Houston, TX)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

ET Kinetics of Bifunctional Redox Protein Maquettes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kinetics of Bifunctional Redox Protein Maquettes Kinetics of Bifunctional Redox Protein Maquettes Mitchell W. Mutz, James F. Wishart and George L. McLendon Adv. Chem Ser. 254, Ch. 10, pp. 145-159 Abstract: We prepared three bifunctional redox protein maquettes based on 12-, 16-, and 20-mer three-helix bundles. In each case, the helix was capped with a Co(III) tris-bipyridyl electron acceptor and also functionalized with a C-terminal viologen (1-ethyl-1'-ethyl-4,4'-bipyridinium) donor. Electron transfer (ET) was initiated by pulse radiolysis and flash photolysis and followed spectrometrically to determined average, concentration-independent, first-order rates for the 16-mer and 20-mer maquettes. For the 16-mer bundle, the alpha-helical content was adjusted by the addition of urea or trifluoroethanol to solutions containing the metalloprotein. This

408

CX-003574: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3574: Categorical Exclusion Determination 3574: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003574: Categorical Exclusion Determination North Carolina-County-Johnston CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 08/26/2010 Location(s): Johnston County, North Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program. At the Wastewater Treatment Plant: install dissolved oxygen controls, reprogram wet well level controls for the tertiary filter pumps, install electric actuators on tertiary filter effluent lines, install power monitors on motors, install standby generator; at the Biosolids Processing Facility and Landfill: install timers or programmable logic controllers (PLC); at the Wastewater Flow Equalization Basin and Pumping Station at Landfill: install timers or

409

A Geological And Geophysical Appraisal Of The Baca Geothermal Field, Valles  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geological And Geophysical Appraisal Of The Baca Geothermal Field, Valles Geological And Geophysical Appraisal Of The Baca Geothermal Field, Valles Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Geological And Geophysical Appraisal Of The Baca Geothermal Field, Valles Caldera, New Mexico Details Activities (10) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: The Baca location #1 geothermal field is located in north-central New Mexico within the western half of the Plio-Pleistocene Valles Caldera. Steam and hot water are produced primarily from the northeast-trending Redondo Creek graben, where downhole temperatures exceed 260°C at depths of less than 2 km. Stratigraphically the reservoir region can be described as a five-layer sequence that includes Tertiary and Quaternary volcanic rocks, and Mesozoic and Tertiary sediments overlying Precambrian granitic

410

Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geology and Mineral Deposits of Churchill County, Nevada Abstract Churchill County, in west-central Nevada, is an area of varied topography and geology that has had a rather small total mineral production. The western part of the county is dominated by the broad low valley of the Carson Sink, which is underlain by deposits of Lake Lahontan. The bordering mountain ranges to the west and south are of low relief and underlain largely by Tertiary volcanic and sedimentary units. Pre-Tertiary rocks are extensively exposed east of the Carson Sink in the Stillwater Range, Clan Alpine Mountains, Augusta Mountains, and New Pass Mountains. The eastern

411

Core Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2011) 2011) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Core Analysis Activity Date 2011 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Explore for development of an EGS demonstration project Notes Core was obtained from RRG-3C. The sample is a brecciated and altered siltstone from the base of the Tertiary sequence and is similar to rocks at the base of the Tertiary deposits in RRG-9. The results of thermal and quasi-static mechanical property measurements that were conducted on the core sample are presented. References Jones, C.; Moore, J.; Teplow, W.; Craig, S. (1 January 2011) GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, IDAHO Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Core_Analysis_At_Raft_River_Geothermal_Area_(2011)&oldid=473834

412

NERSC Users Group Meeting January 28-29, 1997 Presentations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview of NERSC at LBNL Overview of NERSC at LBNL January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Bill Kramer | Tertiary Storage January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Keith Fitzgerald, Harvard Holmes | Download File: Tertiary-Storage.pdf | pdf | 173 KB Report on Graphics Packages January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Steve Lau | DOE 2000 January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Jim McGraw | Download File: DOE-2000.pdf | pdf | 48 KB The Scientific Computing Group January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Tammy Welcome | Download File: The-Scientific-Computing-Group.pdf | pdf | 67 KB Report on Users' Questions about NERSC 1997 January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Ricky Kendall | Download File: Questions-for-the-ERSUG-Meeting.pdf | pdf | 80 KB Report on Graphics Packages January 28, 1997 | Author(s): Stephen Lau, Nancy Johnston, Terry Ligocki | Download File: NERSC1.pdf | pdf | 85 KB

413

Microsoft Word - Document6  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tertiary Storage Tertiary Storage Keith Fitzgerald - Harvard Holmes NERSC File Storage Group Storage Charging: Questions and Answers Why charge for storage? The answer is for the same reason we charge for CPU time on our compute servers. Our resources have limitations and we have the responsibility to provide a deterministic, automated mechanism which insures that the resources are utilized as DOE desires. Our experience has led us to believe that the most critical resources in the storage environment are: 1. Bandwidth. This limitation can show up in many areas .... network, disk cache, archive, etc. but the bottom line is that when you approach a limit, users suffer. 2. The name server. When this is overloaded, service degrades. 3. The archive. We've already experienced and fixed this problem. l> A good management scheme should provide a deterministic mechanism which will encourage users to optimize their utilization of the storage

414

Exploration In A Blind Geothermal Area Near Marysville, Montana, Usa | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

In A Blind Geothermal Area Near Marysville, Montana, Usa In A Blind Geothermal Area Near Marysville, Montana, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Exploration In A Blind Geothermal Area Near Marysville, Montana, Usa Details Activities (7) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Extensive geological and geophysical studies were carried out during the summer of 1973 in a blind geothermal area near Marysville, Montana. Earlier studies of regional heat flow resulted in the discovery of the area (BLACKWELL 1969; BLACKWELL, BAAG 1973). The area is blind in the sense that there are no surface manifestations of high heat flow (recent volcanics, hot springs, etc.) within the area. The country rocks are Precambrian sedimentary rocks and Mesozoic and Tertiary intrusive rocks. The most recent Tertiary igneous event took place approximately 37 M.Y.

415

Alaska Coal Geology: GIS Data | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coal Geology: GIS Data Coal Geology: GIS Data Dataset Summary Description Estimated Alaska coal resources are largely in Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks distributed in three major provinces. Northern Alaska-Slope, Central Alaska-Nenana, and Southern Alaska-Cook Inlet. Cretaceous resources, predominantly bituminous coal and lignite, are in the Northern Alaska-Slope coal province. Most of the Tertiary resources, mainly lignite to subbituminous coal with minor amounts of bituminous and semianthracite coals, are in the other two provinces. The combined measured, indicated, inferred, and hypothetical coal resources in the three areas are estimated to be 5,526 billion short tons (5,012 billion metric tons), which constitutes about 87 percent of Alaska's coal and surpasses the total coal resources of the conterminous United States by 40 percent. Available here: GIS shapefiles of relevant faults and geology, associated with the following report: http://pubs.usgs.gov/dds/dds-077/pdf/DDS-77.pdf

416

Tuscarora area, Nevada: geothermal reservoir assessment case history, northern basin and range. Final report, 1 October 1978-9 September 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Tuscarora prospect is located at the north end of Independence Valley approximately 90 km north-northwest of Elko, Nevada. Geothermal exploration on the prospect consisted of an integrated program of geologic, hydrogeochemical and soil geochemistry studies. Geophysical exploration included heatflow studies, aeromagnetic, self-potential, gravity, dipole-dipole resistivity and magnetotelluric surveys. Exploration drilling includes thirty-two shallow thermal gradient holes, six intermediate depth temperature gradient wells and one 5454 foot test for discovery well. Shallow low-temperature reservoirs were encountered in the Tertiary rocks and in the Paleozoic rocks immediately beneath the Tertiary. Drilling problems forced the deep well to be stopped before the high-temperature reservoir was reached.

Pilkington, H.D.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Gravity and subsurface investigation of the Presidio Bolson area, Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An integrated geophysical-geologic study of the Presidio Bolson area was undertaken primarily using gravity measurements and deep drilling data. Over 2000 gravity readings were used to construct maps of the area and two-dimensional computer modeling of gravity profiles was used to derive earth models. These data outlined the major geologic features of the area and were dominated by Tertiary block faulting and volcanism. The main feature of interest was the Presidio Bolson, which is located in a major graben (Presidio Graben) over 1 km deep in the area near Ruidosa, Texas. These data also suggest that hot springs associated with the Presidio Graben derive their heat from buried Tertiary intrusions associated with this graben or by deep circulation along the boundary faults of the graben.

Mraz, J.R.; Keller, G.R.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Alvord (3,000-ft strawn) LPG flood - design and performance evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Mitchell Energy Corporation has implemented a LPG-dry gas miscible process in the Alvord (3000' Strawn) Unit in Wise County, Texas utilizing the DOE tertiary incentive program. The field had been waterflooded for 14 years and was producing near its economic limit at the time this project was started. This paper presents the results of the reservoir simulation study that was conducted to evaluate pattern configuration and operating alternatives so as to maximize LPG containment and oil recovery performance. Several recommendations resulting from this study were implemented for the project. Based on the model predictions, tertiary oil recovery is expected to be between 100,000 and 130,000 bbls, or about 7 percent of the oil originally in place in the Unit. 12 refs.

Frazier, G.D.; Todd, M.R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Thoughts Regarding the Dimensions of Faults at Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas, Nye County, Nevada, Based on Surface and Underground Mapping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The geologic setting and history, along with observations through 50 years of detailed geologic field work, show that large-displacement (i.e., greater than 30 meters of displacement) syn- to post-volcanic faults are rare in the Rainier Mesa area. Faults observed in tunnels and drill holes are mostly tight, with small displacements (most less than 1.5 meters) and small associated damage zones. Faults are much more abundant in the zeolitized tuffs than in the overlying vitric tuffs, and there is little evidence that faults extend downward from the tuff section through the argillic paleocolluvium into pre-Tertiary rocks. The differences in geomechanical characteristics of the various tuff lithologies at Rainier Mesa suggest that most faults on Rainer Mesa are limited to the zeolitic units sandwiched between the overlying vitric bedded tuffs and the underlying pre-Tertiary units (lower carbonate aquifer–3, lower clastic confining unit–1, and Mesozoic granite confining unit).

Drellack, S.L.; Prothro, L.B.; Townsend, M.J.; Townsend, D.R.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Enhanced oil recovery. Byron Field polymer waterflood will achieve two important firsts  

SciTech Connect

When Marathon Oil Co. starts up its long-awaited, Byron Field Tensleep-Embar Unit polymer waterflood this December 2, firsts will have been achieved: the Big-Horn basin will see its first full-field commercial tertiary flood, and Marathon also will see its first full-field commercial tertiary flood. Marathon's flood will use a massive amount of polymer. Seventy percent of pore volume will be injected. Big Horn basin fields usually have been subjected only to infill drilling and waterflood because the thicker than average crude lies in heterogeneous formations, yielding a situation whereby, even 60 to 70 yr after discovery, simple infill drilling can cause virgin oil to flow to the well bore. In some cases, 20-, 10-, or 5-acre spacing might be required to drain a reservoir adequately, giving long effective lift to simple primary production techniques. In addition, a natural water drive often is present.

Gill, D.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mtbe ethyl tertiary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Preliminary study of the uranium favorability of the Jornada Del Muerto Basin and adjacent areas, South Central New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Data indicate that possible uranium host rocks include the Precambrian rocks, the Ordovician Bat Cave Formation and Cable Canyon Sandstone, the Permian Abo Formation, Lower Cretaceous Dakota Sandstone, and the Upper Cretaceous-lower Tertiary McRae Formation. The Cenozoic sequence contains possible host beds; little is known, however, about its stratigraphy. Secondary uranium mineralization is found associated with faults in the Jornada area. All fault zones there are possible sites for uranium deposition. Possible sources for uranium in the Jornada del Muerto area include uraniferous Precambrian rocks, tuffaceous beds in the McRae Formation, and the Tertiary Datil and Thurman Formations. Hydrothermal solutions may have deposited the veinlike fluorite deposits, of which the purple varieties were found to be radioactive during this study.

Templain, C.J.; Dotterrer, F.E.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Genetic Engineering of Plants to Improve Phytoremediation of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons in Groundwater  

SciTech Connect

I. Mechanism of halogenated hydrocarbon oxidation We are using poplar culture cells to determine the pathway of TCE metabolism. In our earlier work, we found that trichloroethanol (TCEOH) is a major early intermediate. Our studies this year have focused on the steps that follow this toxic intermediate. We did several experiments to track the disappearance of TCEOH after the cells were removed from TCE. We could conclude that TCEOH is not an end-product but is rapidly degraded. Six flasks of poplar liquid suspension cells were exposed to a level of 50 {micro}g/ml TCE for three days. Three of the cultures were subjected to MTBE extractions to quantify the levels of TCEOH produced. The cells of the remaining three cultures were then pelleted and resuspended in fresh medium. After three more days, these were also subjected to MTBE extractions. The samples were analyzed by GC-ECD. After the three days of further metabolism, an average of 91% of the trichloroethanol was gone. When similar experiments were done with intact plants and both free and conjugated TCEOH were quantified, a similar rapid decline in both forms was seen (Shang, 2001). Therefore, it seems probable that similar mechanisms are taking place in both poplar suspension cells and whole poplar plants, so we continued to do our studies with the suspension cells. Metabolism of trichloroethanol may go through trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) prior to dehalogenation. To test this possibility, we exposed cells to TCE and analyzed for TCAA over time. The cultures were analyzed after 4, 5, 6, and 14 days from TCE exposure. We did not detect any significant amount of TCAA above the background in undosed cells. To determine if trichloroethanol itself is directly dehalogenated, we analyzed TCE-exposed cells for the presence of dichloroethanol. Undosed cells did not have any of the DCEOH peak but TCE-dosed cells that produced the highest levels of trichloroethanol did have a small DCEOH peak. Cultures that did not produce high levels of TCEOH did not have the DCEOH peak. This result repeated in two independent experiments. We decided to expose cells directly to TCEOH and look for DCEOH in the cell extracts. After one week of exposure, the culture cells produced consistent levels of DCEOH of approximately 0.02% of the TCEOH dose. However, when we did a control reaction with no cells, DCEOH was present, indicating that the TCEOH degrades in the absence of cells. We are currently conducting the same experiments with newly-purchased chemicals and in darkness (by wrapping the culture flasks in foil). We have had success using tribromoethanol as a surrogate for trichloroethanol in studying the dehalogenation reaction in poplar cells. We had previously shown that tribromoethanol is steadily metabolized over time in poplar culture cells, producing free bromide ion. TBEOH-dosed dead cells and no cell controls did not have any bromide ion production. We are currently using this system to test P450 inhibitors to determine if dehalogenation of TBEOH is through this mechanism. We have recently purchased tribromoethylene as a more easily monitored surrogate for TCE. We will conduct mass balance experiments to determine what percentage of the bromide is released from tribromoethylene.

Strand, Stuart E.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Effects of 2-Ethylhexyl Nitrate on Diesel-Spray Processes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Diesel fuel ignition-enhancing additives, such as 2-ethylhexyl nitrate, are known to reduce emissions from diesel engines; however, the mechanisms by which the emissions reduction occur are not understood. This report covers the first phase of a research project supported by Ethyl Corporation that is aimed at developing a detailed understanding of how 2-ethylhexyl nitrate alters in-cylinder injection, ignition, and combustion processes to reduce diesel engine emissions.

Higgins, B.; Mueller, C.; Siebers, D.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Measuring Total Dissolved Methylmercury: Comparison of a Novel Method With a Standard Method for Extracting and Quantitating Methylmercury in Stream Water Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In most environmental systems, mercury (Hg) occurs in one or more of the following distinct chemical forms: elemental (Hg0), divalent (Hg2+), monomethyl (MMHg), methyl (MeHg), and dimethyl (DMHg). The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) standard method of measuring dissolved MMHg uses distillation to extract MeHg from freshwater samples in preparation for Hg speciation analysis by aqueous ethylation and gas chromatography. Recently, a novel method of Hg ...

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

425

Low toxicity method of inhibiting sickling of sickle erythrocytes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A low toxicity method of inhibiting sickling of sickle erythrocytes which comprises intermixing the erythrocytes with an effective anti-sickling amount of a water-soluble imidoester of the formula RC(=NH)OR' wherein R is an alkyl group of 1 - 8 carbon atoms, particularly 1 - 4 carbon atoms, and R' is an alkyl group of 1 - 4 carbon atoms, specifically methyl or ethyl acetimidate.

Packer, Lester (Orinda, CA); Bymun, Edwin N. (Oakland, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Tape Formulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 6   Typical nonaqueous formulations of tape systems...g oz Oxidizing sintering atmospheres Menhaden fish oil (dispersant) 1.8 0.06 Xylene (solvent) 21.0 0.74 Anhydrous ethyl alcohol (solvent) 13.7 0.48 Aluminum oxide (ceramic powder) 100.0 3.5 Mixed phthalates (plasticizer) 3.6 0.13 Polyalkylene glycol (plasticizer) 4.3 0.15 Polyvinyl butyral (binder)...

427

Synthesis of acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid from 5-bromo levulinic acid esters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of preparing an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinc acid comprising: a) dissolving a lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate and hexamethylenetetramine in a solvent selected from the group consisting of water, ethyl acetate, chloroform, acetone, ethanol, tetrahydrofuran and acetonitrile, to form a quaternary ammonium salt of the lower alkyl 5-bromolevulinate; and b) hydrolyzing the quaternary ammonium salt with an inorganic acid to form an acid addition salt of delta-aminolevulinic acid.

Moens, Luc (Lakewood, CO)

2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

428

Poly(2-oxazolines) in Biological and Biomedical Application Contexts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

theoretically be accessed, as the synthesis of 2-substituted monomers can be conveniently accomplished via condensation of a primary nitrile and 2-aminoethanol.[9, 12] Commercially, however, only 2-methyl, 2-ethyl, 2-isopropyl and 2-phenyl oxazoline... are currently available. Although the use of poly(2-oxazolines) in adhesive and coating formulations,[13-15] as pigment dispersants in inks,[16] and drug delivery applications[17] has been documented, the polymers have not found widespread commercial application...

Adams, Nico; Schubert, Ulrich

2007-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

429

Simplified distillation column controls  

SciTech Connect

A simple, energy efficient method of controlling single or double distillation columns for the production of ethyl alcohol is described. The control system is based on a material balance scheme centered around a thermostat actuated control valve to regulate reflux rate and product purity. Column bottom's levels are automatically regulated by vented suction lines on the pump inlets. Methods of minimizing control input variations are used including column insulation, stillage-to-beer heat exchanger, and a steam pressure regulator.

Badger, P.; Pile, R.; Lightsey, G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Batteries using molten salt electrolyte  

SciTech Connect

An electrolyte system suitable for a molten salt electrolyte battery is described where the electrolyte system is a molten nitrate compound, an organic compound containing dissolved lithium salts, or a 1-ethyl-3-methlyimidazolium salt with a melting temperature between approximately room temperature and approximately 250.degree. C. With a compatible anode and cathode, the electrolyte system is utilized in a battery as a power source suitable for oil/gas borehole applications and in heat sensors.

Guidotti, Ronald A. (Albuquerque, NM)

2003-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

431

An approach to catalytic asymmetric electrocyclization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

petroleum ether 40-60 Ph phenyl ppm parts per million Pr propyl q quartet Rf retention factor rt room temperature s singlet sept septet t triplet t tertiary TBAF tetrabutylammonium fluoride TBS tert... demonstrated by Nelson.73 In this case, we observed the formation of lactone 75 by vinyl nucleophile addition to the corresponding aldehydes 71 and 72. We require a less basic source of vinyl anion, or a bulkier ester such as tert-butyl, to prevent any...

Kothari, Abhishek

2010-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

432

Weekly Petroleum Status Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Alcohol. The family name of a group of organic chemical compounds composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. The series of molecules vary in chain length and are composed of a hydrocarbon plus a hydroxyl group; CH3-(CH2)n-OH (e.g., methanol, ethanol, and tertiary butyl alcohol). Alkylate. The product of an alkylation reaction. It usually refers to the high octane product from alkylation units. This alkylate is used in

433

TORIS Data Preparation Guidelines  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this manual is to present guidelines and procedures for the preparation of new data for the Tertiary Oil Recovery Information System (TORIS) data base. TORIS is an analytical system currently maintained by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Bartlesville Project Office. It uses an extensive field- and reservoir-level data base to evaluate the technical and economic recovery potential of specific crude oil reservoirs.

Guinn, H.; Remson, D.

1999-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

434

Stochastic Equilibrium Models for Generation Capacity Expansion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in household and tertiary and hence reduction of demand. The second reason is that the increasing interest for de- mand side management and the development of new technologies of the smart grid type will progressively introduce a true price response... , for the integrability property). This variant of the equilibrium model can be stated as follows. Let D(?) = (d(`, ?), ` ? L) and P (?) = (p(`, ?), ` ? L) denote the vectors of demand and price in the different time segments. Smart grid technologies aim, among other...

Ehrenmann, Andreas; Smeers, Yves

435

Fractured reservoir discrete feature network technologies. Final report, March 7, 1996 to September 30, 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes research conducted for the Fractured Reservoir Discrete Feature Network Technologies Project. The five areas studied are development of hierarchical fracture models; fractured reservoir compartmentalization, block size, and tributary volume analysis; development and demonstration of fractured reservoir discrete feature data analysis tools; development of tools for data integration and reservoir simulation through application of discrete feature network technologies for tertiary oil production; quantitative evaluation of the economic value of this analysis approach.

Dershowitz, William S.; Einstein, Herbert H.; LaPoint, Paul R.; Eiben, Thorsten; Wadleigh, Eugene; Ivanova, Violeta

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Oil shale deposits of Thailand  

SciTech Connect

Oil-shale deposits occur in several areas of Thailand. Perhaps the most important deposit occurs at Mae Sod in Tak Province, West Thailand. Other well-known deposits are Li in Lamphum Province, Ko Kha District, Lampang Province, and Krabi in the southern peninsular region. The geological age of all these deposits is late Tertiary, as demonstrated by the presence of the fossils from the oil shale of the Mae Sod series, e.g., fish of the Ostariophysian family Cyprinidae.

Chakrabarti, A.K.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Middle East oil show: Proceedings. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This is a book of conference proceedings which deal with critical issues and technologies being used to maximize recovery of the oil and gas resources of the Middle East. Papers include information on horizontal drilling techniques, corrosion control, offshore technologies, uses of flexible tubing in drilling and completion, scale control technologies, enhanced recovery techniques, and waste management. Other topics include performance testing for drilling fluids and new computer codes for simulating well performance during both tertiary and secondary recovery.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Downhole steam generator using low-pressure fuel and air supply  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

For tertiary oil recovery, an apparatus for downhole steam generation is designed in which water is not injected directly onto the flame in the combustor, the combustion process is isolated from the reservoir pressure, the fuel and oxidant are supplied to the combustor at relatively low pressures, and the hot exhaust gases is prevented from entering the earth formation but is used to preheat the fuel and oxidant and water. The combustion process is isolated from the steam generation process. (DLC)

Fox, R.L.

1981-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

439

Downhole steam generator having a downhole oxidant compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Am improved apparatus is described for the downhole injection of steam into boreholes, for tertiary oil recovery. It includes an oxidant supply, a fuel supply, an igniter, a water supply, an oxidant compressor, and a combustor assembly. The apparatus is designed for efficiency, preheating of the water, and cooling of the combustion chamber walls. The steam outlet to the borehole is provided with pressure-responsive doors for closing the outlet in response to flameout. (DLC)

Fox, R.L.

1981-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

440

Greece licensing round to focus on western sedimentary basins  

SciTech Connect

New opportunities for international oil companies to explore for hydrocarbons in Greece will emerge shortly. Parliament ratified a new petroleum law in January 1995, and DEP-EKY SA will undertake an international licensing round for offshore-onshore areas mainly in western Greece during second half 1995. The paper describes the fold and thrust belt of western Greece; the Katakolon oil field; the tertiary basins of eastern Greece; the Prinos and Prinos North oil fields; and the Epanomi gas field.

Roussos, N.; Marnelis, F. (Public Petroleum Corp. of Greece, Athens (Greece))

1995-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mtbe ethyl tertiary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Rockies flood projects add to production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nine new polymer waterfloods in the Rockies in the past year shows that tertiary recovery needn't be impeded by a $29/bbl oil price, so long as costs are held to a minimum. The uncertain fate faced by several expensive carbon dioxide pilots - even though recoveries have been or promise to be at or well above predictions - points up the overwhelming importance of keeping costs down.

Gill, D.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

The economical production of alcohol fuels from coal-derived synthesis gas. Quarterly technical progress report Number 8, 1 July, 1993--30 September, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Task 1, the preparation of catalyst materials, is proceeding actively. At WVU, catalysts based on Mo are being prepared using a variety of approaches to alter the oxidation state and environment of the Mo. At UCC and P, copper-based zinc chromite spinel catalysts will be prepared and tested. The modeling of the alcohol-synthesis reaction in a membrane reactor is proceeding actively. Under standard conditions, pressure drop in the membrane reactor has been shown to be negligible. In Task 2, base case designs had previously been completed with a Texaco gasifier. Now, similar designs have been completed using the Shell gasifier. A comparison of the payback periods or production cost of these plants shows significant differences among the base cases. However, a natural gas only design, prepared for comparison purposes, gives a lower payback period or production cost. Since the alcohol synthesis portion of the above processes is the same, the best way to make coal-derived higher alcohols more attractive economically than natural gas-derived higher alcohols is by making coal-derived syngas less expensive than natural gas-derived syngas. The maximum economically feasible capacity for a higher alcohol plant from coal-derived syngas appears to be 32 MM bbl/yr. This is based on consideration of regional coal supply in the eastern US, coal transportation, and regional product demand. The benefits of economics of scale are illustrated for the base case designs. A value for higher alcohol blends has been determined by appropriate combination of RVP, octane number, and oxygen content, using MTBE as a reference. This analysis suggests that the high RVP of methanol in combination with its higher water solubility make higher alcohols more valuable than methanol.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

A novel process for methanol synthesis. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of methanol (MeOH) as a fuel additive and in MTBE production has renewed interest in the search for improved MeOH processes. Commercial processes are characterized by high pressures and temperatures with low per pass conversion (10--12%). Efforts are underway to find improved MeOH synthesis processes. A slurry phase ``concurrent`` synthesis of MeOH/methyl formate (MeF) which operates under relatively mild conditions (100{degrees}C lower than present commercial processes) was the subject of investigation in this work. Evidence for a reaction scheme involving the carbonylation of MeOH to MeF followed by the hydrogenolysis of MeF to two molecules of MeOH -- the net result being the reaction of H{sub 2} with CO to give MeOH via MeF, is presented. Up to 90% per pass conversion and 98% selectivity to methanol at rates comparable to commercial processes have been obtained in spite of the presence of as much as 10,000 ppM CO{sub 2} and 3000 ppM H{sub 2}O in the gas and liquid respectively. The effect of process parameters such as temperature, pressure, H{sub 2}/CO ratio in the reactor, flow rate and catalyst loading were also investigated. The use of temperatures above 170{degrees}C at a pressure of 50 atm results in MeF being the limiting reactant. Small amounts of CH{sub 4} are also formed. Significant MeOH synthesis rates at a pressure in the range of 40--50 atm makes possible the elimination of an upstream shift reactor and the use of an air-blown syngas generator. The nature of the catalysts was studied and correlated with the behavior of the various species in the concurrent synthesis.

Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.

1994-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

444

Impacts of ethanol fuel level on emissions of regulated and unregulated pollutants from a fleet of gasoline light-duty vehicles  

SciTech Connect

The study investigated the impact of ethanol blends on criteria emissions (THC, NMHC, CO, NOx), greenhouse gas (CO2), and a suite of unregulated pollutants in a fleet of gasoline-powered light-duty vehicles. The vehicles ranged in model year from 1984 to 2007 and included one Flexible Fuel Vehicle (FFV). Emission and fuel consumption measurements were performed in duplicate or triplicate over the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) driving cycle using a chassis dynamometer for four fuels in each of seven vehicles. The test fuels included a CARB phase 2 certification fuel with 11% MTBE content, a CARB phase 3 certification fuel with a 5.7% ethanol content, and E10, E20, E50, and E85 fuels. In most cases, THC and NMHC emissions were lower with the ethanol blends, while the use of E85 resulted in increases of THC and NMHC for the FFV. CO emissions were lower with ethanol blends for all vehicles and significantly decreased for earlier model vehicles. Results for NOx emissions were mixed, with some older vehicles showing increases with increasing ethanol level, while other vehicles showed either no impact or a slight, but not statistically significant, decrease. CO2 emissions did not show any significant trends. Fuel economy showed decreasing trends with increasing ethanol content in later model vehicles. There was also a consistent trend of increasing acetaldehyde emissions with increasing ethanol level, but other carbonyls did not show strong trends. The use of E85 resulted in significantly higher formaldehyde and acetaldehyde emissions than the specification fuels or other ethanol blends. BTEX and 1,3-butadiene emissions were lower with ethanol blends compared to the CARB 2 fuel, and were almost undetectable from the E85 fuel. The largest contribution to total carbonyls and other toxics was during the cold-start phase of FTP.

Karavalakis, Georgios; Durbin, Thomas; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Zheng, Zhongqing; Villella, Phillip M.; Jung, Hee-Jung

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

445

Fuel property effects on engine combustion processes. Annual report, January 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our engine studies have concentrated on 2 areas of interest to autoignition and emissions from engines. In the first, we investigated the effect of nitric oxide (NO) on the reactivity and autoignition behavior of 87 PRF. In the second study, we continued work on the effects of blending ethers on the reactivity and autoignition of a primary reference fuel blend, 87 PRF, with emphasis placed on the chemical interactions between ethers and the baseline fuel. The effects of nitric oxide (NO) on the reactivity and autoignition behavior of 87 PRF were examined in our research engine under motored conditions at compression ratios of 5.2 and 8.2. The most significant conclusions of our study are: (1) nitric oxide does interact with the hydrocarbon oxidation at conditions typically experienced by the end gas in a fired engine; (2) the effect is complex and, depending on the reaction environment, the same concentration of NO can produce dramatically different results. These results are particularly important given the fact that residual fractions and recycled exhaust gases in spark ignited engines typically result in about 200--600 ppm of NO in the unburned charge. The octane enhancing ethers, MTBE, ETBE, TAME, and DIPE, were blended into 87 PRF at a constant 0 atom fraction of 1.94% in the fuel mixtures and the mixtures were tested under motored conditions at our new compression ratio of 8.2. This new compression ratio allows studies on autoignition behaviors of 87 PRF with and without ethers. The results showed that, when using 87 PRF/ether mixtures, reactivity was significantly reduced as indicated by the higher inlet temperature required to initiate reactivity, significantly lower maximum CO concentration and the significantly higher inlet temperature required for autoignition.

Cernansky, N.P.

1994-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

446

Superacid catalysis of light hydrocarbon conversion. Final report, August 26, 1993--August 26, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Motivated by the goal of finding improved catalysts for low- temperature conversion of light alkanes into fuel components or precursors of fuel components, the researchers have investigated sulfated zirconia and promoted sulfated zirconia for conversion of butane, propane, and ethane. Catalyst performance data for sulfated zirconia promoted with iron and manganese show that it is the most active noncorrosive, nonhalide catalyst known for n-butane isomerization, and it is an excellent candidate catalyst for new low- temperature n-butane isomerization processes to make isobutane, which can be converted by established technology into methyl t-butyl ether (MTBE). Various transition metals have been found to work as promoters of sulfated zirconia for n-butane isomerization. The combination of iron and manganese is the best known combination of promoters yet discovered. The iron- and manganese-promoted sulfated zirconia is also a catalyst for conversion of propane and of ethane. Ethane is converted into ethylene and butanes in the presence of the iron- and manganese-promoted sulfated zirconia; propane is also converted into butane, among other products. However, the activities of the catalyst for these reactions are orders of magnitude less than the activity for n-butane conversion, and there is no evidence that the catalyst would be of practical value for conversion of alkanes lighter than butane. The product distribution data for ethane and propane conversion provide new insights into the nature of the catalyst and its acidity. These data suggest the involvement of Olah superacid chemistry, whereby the catalyst protonates the alkane itself, giving carbonium ions (as transition states). The mechanism of protonation of the alkane may also pertain to the conversion of butane, but there is good evidence that the butane conversion also proceeds via alkene intermediates by conventional mechanisms of carbenium ion formation and rearrangement.

Gates, B.C.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

447

High-speed four-color infrared digital imaging for study in-cylinder processes in a di diesel engine  

SciTech Connect

The study was to investigate in-cylinder events of a direct injection-type diesel engine by using a new high-speed infrared (IR) digital imaging systems for obtaining information that was difficult to achieve by the conventional devices. For this, a new high-speed-dual-spectra infrared digital imaging system was developed to simultaneously capture two geometrically identical (in respective spectral) sets of IR images having discrete digital information in a (64x64) matrix at rates as high as over 1,800 frames/sec each with exposure period as short as 20 usec. At the same time, a new advanced four-color IR imaging system was constructed. The first two sets of spectral data were the radiation from water vapor emission bands to compute the distributions of temperature and specie in the gaseous mixture and the remaining two sets of data were to find the instantaneous temperature distribution over the cylinder surface. More than eight reviewed publications have been produced to report many new findings including: Distributions of Water Vapor and Temperature in a Flame; End Gas Images Prior to Onset of Knock; Effect of MTBE on Diesel Combustion; Impact of Oxygen Enrichment on In-cylinder Reactions; Spectral IR Images of Spray Plume; Residual Gas Distribution; Preflame Reactions in Diesel Combustion; Preflame Reactions in the End Gas of an SI Engine; Postflame Oxidation; and Liquid Fuel Layers during Combustion in an SI Engine. In addition, some computational analysis of diesel combustion was performed using KIVA-II program in order to compare results from the prediction and the measurements made using the new IR imaging diagnostic tool.

Rhee, K.T.

1995-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

448

from Tucum Oil via an Alkaline Route  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. A simple, fast, and complete route for the production of methylic and ethylic biodiesel from tucum oil is described. Aliquots of the oil obtained directly from pressed tucum (pulp and almonds) were treated with potassium methoxide or ethoxide at 40 ? Cfor 40 min. The biodiesel form was removed from the reactor and washed with 0.1 M HCl aqueous solution. A simple distillation at 100 ? C was carried out in order to remove water and alcohol species from the biodiesel. The oxidative stability index was obtained for the tucum oil as well as the methylic and ethylic biodiesel at 6.13, 2.90, and 2.80 h, for storage times higher than 8 days. Quality control of the original oil and of the methylic and ethylic biodiesels, such as the amount of glycerin produced during the transesterification process, was accomplished by the TLC, GC-MS, and FT-IR techniques. The results obtained in this study indicate a potential biofuel production by simple treatment of tucum, an important Amazonian fruit. 1.

Characterization Of Methylic; Ethylic Biodiesels; Marcelo Firmino De Oliveira; Andressa Tironi Vieira; Antônio Carlos Ferreira Batista; Hugo De Souza Rodrigues; Nelson Ramos Stradiotto

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Preparation of brightness stabilization agent for lignin containing pulp from biomass pyrolysis oils  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing a brightness stabilization mixture of water-soluble organic compounds from biomass pyrolysis oils comprising: a) size-reducing biomass material and pyrolyzing the size-reduced biomass material in a fluidized bed reactor; b) separating a char/ash component while maintaining char-pot temperatures to avoid condensation of pyrolysis vapors; c) condensing pyrolysis gases and vapors, and recovering pyrolysis oils by mixing the oils with acetone to obtain an oil-acetone mixture; d) evaporating acetone and recovering pyrolysis oils; e) extracting the pyrolysis oils with water to obtain a water extract; f) slurrying the water extract with carbon while stirring, and filtering the slurry to obtain a colorless filtrate; g) cooling the solution and stabilizing the solution against thermally-induced gelling and solidification by extraction with ethyl acetate to form an aqueous phase lower layer and an organic phase upper layer; h) discarding the upper organic layer and extracting the aqueous layer with ethyl acetate, and discarding the ethyl acetate fraction to obtain a brown-colored solution not susceptible to gelling or solidification upon heating; i) heating the solution to distill off water and other light components and concentrating a bottoms fraction comprising hydroxyacetaldehyde and other non-volatile components having high boiling points; and j) decolorizing the stabilized brown solution with activated carbon to obtain a colorless solution.

Agblevor, Foster A. (Blacksburg, VA); Besler-Guran, Serpil (Flemington, NJ)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Transition metal ion-assisted photochemical generation of alkyl halides and hydrocarbons from carboxylic acids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Near-UV photolysis of aqueous solutions of propionic acid and aqueous Fe3+ in the absence of oxygen generates a mixture of hydrocarbons (ethane, ethylene and butane), carbon dioxide, and Fe2+. The reaction becomes mildly catalytic (about five turnovers) in the presence of oxygen which converts a portion of alkyl radicals to oxidizing intermediates that reoxidize Fe2+. The photochemistry in the presence of halide ions (X? = Cl?, Br?) generates ethyl halides via halogen atom abstraction from FeXn3?n by ethyl radicals. Near-quantitative yields of C2H5X are obtained at ?0.05 M X?. Competition experiments with Co(NH3)5Br2+ provided kinetic data for the reaction of ethyl radicals with FeCl2+ (k = (4.0 ± 0.5) × 106 M?1 s?1) and with FeBr2+ (k = (3.0 ± 0.5) × 107 M?1 s?1). Photochemical decarboxylation of propionic acid in the presence of Cu2+ generates ethylene and Cu+. Longer-chain acids also yield alpha olefins as exclusive products. These reactions become catalytic under constant purge with oxygen which plays a dual role. It reoxidizes Cu+ to Cu2+, and removes gaseous olefins to prevent accumulation of Cu+(olefin) complexes and depletion of Cu2+. The results underscore the profound effect that the choice of metal ions, the medium, and reaction conditions exert on the photochemistry of carboxylic acids.

Carraher, Jack; Pestovsky, Oleg; Bakac, Andreja

2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

451

Reconnaissance geological and mineral resource map of northern Sierra Madre Occidental, Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The northern Sierra Madre Occidental (SMO) map (scale 1:500,000) comprises 305,000 km/sup 2/ in the states of Chihuahau and Sonora. The centrally-located plateau section is divided into an upper, predominantly rhyolitic sequence, overlying an andesite-rich interval, directly correlatable with Tertiary volcanic units in central and southern SMO, respectively (Clark, 1983; 1984). Precambrian rocks occur in both flanks of SMO, either in the subsurface or surface exposures. They are succeeded by Early and Late Paleozoic sedimentary strata in Sonora and by a more discontinuous sequence in western Chihuahua. Mesozoic strata are dominated by Cretaceous carbonate sequences in central Chihuahua, and by late Triassic - Early Jurassic continental and Jurassic magmatic arc deposits in Sonora. Late Mesozoic - Early Cenozoic batholiths were emplaced in numerous localities in Sonora, whereas only isolated granitoid stocks are exposed in Chihuahua. Widespread lavas of basaltic composition are Late Tertiary to Quaternary in age. Late Cenozoic unconsolidated clastic deposits fill basins and constitute the coastal plain on the west. The main mineralizing epoch occurred in Late Cretaceous - Early Tertiary time, is aligned in northwesterly-trending belts and included numerous porphyry (Cu-Mo) deposits, scattered contact metasomatic (Cu-W) ores and a fissure-vein (Ag-Au) assemblage in the western margin; a (Pb-Zn-Ag) assemblage in fissure-veins and manto-chimney deposits, manganese and volcanogenic uranium ores in the eastern flank. Important industrial minerals and rocks include graphite, fluorspar and building materials.

Clark, K.F.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

The role of Cretaceous seal to the hydrocarbon potential of the Salawati and Bintuni basins, Irian Jaya, Indonesia  

SciTech Connect

The Salawati and Bintuni basins are late Tertiary depocenters located in the westernmost part of Irian Jaya, Indonesia. The two basins are closely located and only separated by a 50-km-wide structural high known as the Ajamaru Plateau. Petroleum exploration results in the Salawati basin are very successful. This basin has produced around 300 Mbbl of oil from the Miocene carbonates of the Kais Formation. Exploration with similar objectives in the Bintuni basin, however, gave only little success. Some oil was obtained from small Wasian and Mogoi fields, which jointly produced around 7 Mbbl of oil between 1951 and 1960. Extensive exploration campaigns between 1970 and 1980 with Miocene Kais Limestone as the objective resulted only in the discovery of the small Wiriagar field. The big difference in petroleum potentially of the Salawati and Bintuni basins has attracted explorationists to evaluate what significant geological factors had influenced it. Evaluation on available exploration data of the basins had some interesting results. In terms of geologic factors controlling hydrocarbon accumulation (presence of mature source rock, migration pathway, good reservoir quality, valid trap, and effective seal), it seems that shales of Cretaceous age have played the most important role. If this regional seal is absent or noneffective, oil could migrate vertically from pre-Tertiary sources to the Tertiary reservoirs. On the contrary, if the Cretaceous shales are present and sealing, then the underlying Mesozoic sequence is attractive and may trap hydrocarbon, if supported by the other geologic factors.

Samuel, L.; Kartanegara, L. (PERTAMINA, Jakarta (Indonesia))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Completion Report for Well Cluster ER-6-1  

SciTech Connect

Well Cluster ER-6-1 was constructed for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Division at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This work was initiated as part of the Groundwater Characterization Project, now known as the Underground Test Area Project. The well cluster is located in southeastern Yucca Flat. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments for Well Cluster ER-6-1 are included in this report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters and conventional core samples taken below 639 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed petrographic, chemical, and mineralogical studies of rock samples were conducted on 11 samples to resolve complex interrelationships between several of the Tertiary tuff units. Additionally, paleontological analyses by the U.S. Geological Survey confirmed the stratigraphic assignments below 539 meters within the Paleozoic sedimentary section. All three wells in the Well ER-6-1 cluster were drilled within the Quaternary and Tertiary alluvium section, the Tertiary volcanic section, and into the Paleozoic sedimentary section.

Bechtel Nevada

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Coanda injection system for axially staged low emission combustors  

SciTech Connect

The low emission combustor includes a combustor housing defining a combustion chamber having a plurality of combustion zones. A liner sleeve is disposed in the combustion housing with a gap formed between the liner sleeve and the combustor housing. A secondary nozzle is disposed along a centerline of the combustion chamber and configured to inject a first fluid comprising air, at least one diluent, fuel, or combinations thereof to a downstream side of a first combustion zone among the plurality of combustion zones. A plurality of primary fuel nozzles is disposed proximate to an upstream side of the combustion chamber and located around the secondary nozzle and configured to inject a second fluid comprising air and fuel to an upstream side of the first combustion zone. The combustor also includes a plurality of tertiary coanda nozzles. Each tertiary coanda nozzle is coupled to a respective dilution hole. The tertiary coanda nozzles are configured to inject a third fluid comprising air, at least one other diluent, fuel, or combinations thereof to one or more remaining combustion zones among the plurality of combustion zones.

Evulet, Andrei Tristan (Clifton Park, NY); Varatharajan, Balachandar (Cincinnati, OH); Kraemer, Gilbert Otto (Greer, SC); ElKady, Ahmed Mostafa (Niskayuna, NY); Lacy, Benjamin Paul (Greer, SC)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

455

Process for stabilization of coal liquid fractions  

SciTech Connect

Coal liquid fractions to be used as fuels are stabilized against gum formation and viscosity increases during storage, permitting the fuel to be burned as is, without further expensive treatments to remove gums or gum-forming materials. Stabilization is accomplished by addition of cyclohexanol or other simple inexpensive secondary and tertiary alcohols, secondary and tertiary amines, and ketones to such coal liquids at levels of 5-25% by weight with respect to the coal liquid being treated. Cyclohexanol is a particularly effective and cost-efficient stabilizer. Other stabilizers are isopropanol, diphenylmethanol, tertiary butanol, dipropylamine, triethylamine, diphenylamine, ethylmethylketone, cyclohexanone, methylphenylketone, and benzophenone. Experimental data indicate that stabilization is achieved by breaking hydrogen bonds between phenols in the coal liquid, thereby preventing or retarding oxidative coupling. In addition, it has been found that coal liquid fractions stabilized according to the invention can be mixed with petroleum-derived liquid fuels to produce mixtures in which gum deposition is prevented or reduced relative to similar mixtures not containing stabilizer.

Davies, Geoffrey (Boston, MA); El-Toukhy, Ahmed (Alexandria, EG)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Completion Report for Well Cluster ER-5-4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well Cluster ER-5-4 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The cluster consists of two wells, positioned about 30 meters apart on the same drill pad, constructed as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for Frenchman Flat at the Nevada Test Site. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments for the well cluster are included in this report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 156 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 192 meters in both boreholes, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed petrographic, chemical, and mineralogical studies of rock samples were conducted on 122 samples. Well ER-5-4 penetrated approximately 1,120 meters of Quaternary and Tertiary alluvium before reaching total depth in Tertiary volcanic rocks at 1,137.5 meters. The deeper Well ER-5-4 No.2 penetrated 1,120.4 meters of alluvial sediments, and was terminated within Tertiary volcanic rocks at a depth of 2,133.6 meters, indicating that Paleozoic rocks are deeper than expected at this site.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been petroleum system characterization and modeling. Understanding the burial, thermal maturation, and hydrocarbon expulsion histories of the strata in the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas is important in hydrocarbon resource assessment. The underburden and overburden rocks in these basins and subbasins are a product of their rift-related geohistory. Petroleum source rock analysis and initial thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling indicated that an effective regional petroleum source rock in the onshore interior salt basins and subbasins, the North Louisiana Salt Basin, Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin, was Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone. The initial modeling also indicated that hydrocarbon generation and expulsion were initiated in the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and that hydrocarbon generation and expulsion were initiated in the Late Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin. Refined thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling and additional petroleum source rock analysis have confirmed that the major source rock in the onshore interior salt basins and subbasins is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone. Hydrocarbon generation and expulsion were initiated in the Early to Late Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary.

Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

2005-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

458

Microfossils from Cerro Prieto geothermal wells, Baja California, Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To aid in a paleoenvironmental and age reconstruction of the Cerro Prieto reservoir system, 59 samples of well cuttings were analyzed for microfossils. The cuttings were obtained at depths from 351 to 3495 m in 14 geothermal wells in the Cerro Prieto field, Baja California, Mexico. We found foraminifera in 6 samples, ostracodes in 19 samples, and nannoplankton as coccoliths in 24 samples. Other groups, such as molluscs, insects, fish skeletal parts, and plant material were occasionally present. Detailed interpretations are not possible at this time because of poor preservation of samples. This is primarily due to causes: dissolution by geothermal fluids that reach 350{sup 0}C, and the extensive mixing of filled Cretaceous forms (reworked from the Colorado Plateau region) with Tertiary species during drilling. Further studies of ostracodes and foraminifera from colder portions of the wells are needed. The abundant and well-preserved ostracodes indicate marine to brackish water environments that correspond, in part, to lagoonal or estuarine facies. The presence of the mid-Tertiary (15-My-old) marine foraminifera, Cassigerinela chipolensis, in wells M-11 and M-38, 350 to 500 m deep, is perplexing. These are not laboratory contaminates and, as yet, have not been found in the drilling mud. If further studies confirm their presence at Cerro Prieto, established ideas about the opening of the Gulf of California and about Pacific Coast mid-Tertiary history will need to be rewritten.

Cotton, M.L.; Vonder Haar, S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Reactive Distillation for Esterification of Bio-based Organic Acids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following is the final report of the three year research program to convert organic acids to their ethyl esters using reactive distillation. This report details the complete technical activities of research completed at Michigan State University for the period of October 1, 2003 to September 30, 2006, covering both reactive distillation research and development and the underlying thermodynamic and kinetic data required for successful and rigorous design of reactive distillation esterification processes. Specifically, this project has led to the development of economical, technically viable processes for ethyl lactate, triethyl citrate and diethyl succinate production, and on a larger scale has added to the overall body of knowledge on applying fermentation based organic acids as platform chemicals in the emerging biorefinery. Organic acid esters constitute an attractive class of biorenewable chemicals that are made from corn or other renewable biomass carbohydrate feedstocks and replace analogous petroleum-based compounds, thus lessening U.S. dependence on foreign petroleum and enhancing overall biorefinery viability through production of value-added chemicals in parallel with biofuels production. Further, many of these ester products are candidates for fuel (particularly biodiesel) components, and thus will serve dual roles as both industrial chemicals and fuel enhancers in the emerging bioeconomy. The technical report from MSU is organized around the ethyl esters of four important biorenewables-based acids: lactic acid, citric acid, succinic acid, and propionic acid. Literature background on esterification and reactive distillation has been provided in Section One. Work on lactic acid is covered in Sections Two through Five, citric acid esterification in Sections Six and Seven, succinic acid in Section Eight, and propionic acid in Section Nine. Section Ten covers modeling of ester and organic acid vapor pressure properties using the SPEAD (Step Potential Equilibrium and Dynamics) method.

Fields, Nathan; Miller, Dennis J.; Asthana, Navinchandra S.; Kolah, Aspi K.; Vu, Dung; Lira, Carl T.

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

460

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater as Power Plant Cooling System Makeup Water: Tertiary Treatment versus Expanded Chemical Regimen for Recirculating Water Quality Management Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater as Power Plant Cooling System Makeup Water: Tertiary Treatment versus Expanded Chemical Regimen for Recirculating Water Quality Management Carnegie Mellon University, in a joint effort with the University of Pittsburgh, is conducting a study of the use of treated municipal wastewater as cooling system makeup for coal fired power plants. This project builds upon a study sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy entitled, "Reuse of Treated Internal or External Wastewaters in the Cooling Systems of Coal-Based Thermoelectric Power Plants," which showed that treated municipal wastewater is the most common and widespread source in the United States. Data analysis revealed that 81 percent of power plants proposed for construction by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) would have sufficient cooling water supply from one to two publicly owned treatment works (POTW) within a 10-mile radius, while 97 percent of the proposed power plants would be able to meet their cooling water needs with one to two POTWs within 25 miles of these plants. Thus, municipal wastewater will be the impaired water source most likely to be locally available in sufficient and reliable quantities for power plants. Results of initial studies indicate that it is feasible to use secondary treated municipal wastewater as cooling system makeup. The biodegradable organic matter, ammonia-nitrogen, and phosphorus in the treated wastewater pose challenges with respect to enhanced biofouling, corrosion, and scaling, although current research is demonstrating that these problems can be controlled through aggressive chemical management. It is currently unclear whether tertiary treatment of municipal waste water prior to its re-use can be a cost-effective option to aggressive chemical management of the bulk cooling water volume.

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461

Verification of Allowable Stresses In ASME Section III Subsection NH For Grade 91 Steel & Alloy 800H  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The database for the creep-rupture of 9Cr-1Mo-V (Grade 91) steel was collected and reviewed to determine if it met the needs for recommending time-dependent strength values, S{sub t}, for coverage in ASME Section III Subsection NH (ASME III-NH) to 650 C (1200 F) and 600,000 hours. The accumulated database included over 300 tests for 1% total strain, nearly 400 tests for tertiary creep, and nearly 1700 tests to rupture. Procedures for analyzing creep and rupture data for ASME III-NH were reviewed and compared to the procedures used to develop the current allowable stress values for Gr 91 for ASME II-D. The criteria in ASME III-NH for estimating S{sub t} included the average strength for 1% total strain for times to 600,000 hours, 80% of the minimum strength for tertiary creep for times to 600,000 hours, and 67% of the minimum rupture strength values for times to 600,000 hours. Time-temperature-stress parametric formulations were selected to correlate the data and make predictions of the long-time strength. It was found that the stress corresponding to 1% total strain and the initiation of tertiary creep were not the controlling criteria over the temperature-time range of concern. It was found that small adjustments to the current values in III-NH could be introduced but that the existing values were conservative and could be retained. The existing database was found to be adequate to extend the coverage to 600,000 hours for temperatures below 650 C (1200 F).

R. W. Swindeman; M. J. Swindeman; B. W. Roberts; B. E. Thurgood; D. L. Marriott

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

462

Completion Report for Well ER-12-3 Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa - Shoshone Mountain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well ER-12-3 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in March and April 2005 as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for the Rainier Mesa-Shoshone Mountain Corrective Action Unit. The overall purpose of the well was to gather subsurface data to better characterize the hydrogeology of central Rainier Mesa, especially in the older Tertiary volcanic rocks and Paleozoic sedimentary rocks. The main 47.0-centimeter hole was drilled to a depth of 799.2 meters and cased with 33.97-centimeter casing to 743.1 meters. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters, and the well was drilled to a total depth of 1,496.0 meters. The completion string consisted of 13.97-centimeter stainless steel casing, with two slotted intervals open to the lower carbonate aquifer, suspended from 19.37-centimeter carbon steel casing. A piezometer string was installed outside the 33.97-centimeter casing to a depth of 467.1 meters to monitor a zone of perched water within the Tertiary volcanic section. Data gathered during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3 meters (extra cuttings samples were collected from the Paleozoic rocks for paleontological analyses), sidewall core samples from 35 depths, various geophysical logs, and water level measurements. These data indicate that the well penetrated 674.2 meters of Tertiary volcanic rocks and 821.7 meters of Paleozoic dolomite and limestone. Forty-nine days after the well was completed, but prior to well development and testing, the water level inside the main hole was tagged at the depth of 949.1 meters, and the water level inside the piezometer string was tagged at 379.9 meters.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Bechtel Nevada Corporation

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Uranium potential of southwestern New Mexico (southern Hidalgo County), including observations on crystallization history of lavas and ash tuffs and the release of uranium from them. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Geological environments present in southwestern New Mexico include thick sequences of sedimentary rock including limestone, conglomerates, sandstone, and shale: igneous intrusions with associated metal deposits; caldera centers, margins, and outflow facies; and basins with marginal faults and thick late Cenozoic sedimentary fillings. Predominant rock types are Paleozoic carbonates, Mesozoic terrigeneous rocks and carbonates, and Cenozoic volcanic rocks and basin-filling terrigeneous rocks. Consideration of information available in Preliminary Reconnaissance Reports and in Hydrogeochemical and Stream Reconnaissance Reports together with 347 new whole rock chemical analyses points to three areas of anomalous uranium abundance in Hidalgo County, New Mexico. The area has experienced three major periods of igneous activity in Phanerozoic time: one associated with the Laramide cycle of the Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary, mid-Tertiary cycle of silicic volcanism with abundant calderas, and a late Tertiary cycle of mafic volcanism. Silicic volcanic rocks are the most common exposed rock type in the area, and the most enriched in uranium (range, 0.4 to 19 ppM). The most likely source for any uranium ore-forming solutions lies with this cycle of volcanism. Solutions might have been introduced during volcanism or formed later by groundwater leaching of cooled volcanic rocks. Results indicate that groundwater leaching of cooled volcanic rocks was not an effective means of mobilizing uranium in the area. Study of several rhyolite lava flows indicates that they were emplaced in supercooled condition and may have crystallized completely at temperatures well below their liquids, or they may have warmed as crystallization released latent heat. Statistical comparison of the uranium concentration revealed no differences between vitrophyres and associated felsites.

Walton, A.W.; Salter, T.L.; Zetterlund, D.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What's New What's New November 2013 Updates ECO mammalian SSLs were updated for cadmium, antimony , arsenic, inorganic, barium, Beryllium, chromium VI, cobalt, copper, lead, silver, vanadium, cyanide (total complex), methyl mercury, sulfide, thallium and tin. October 2013 Updates The biota intake rates for the radionuclide PRG and risk tools were updated to correct an improper units conversion. September 2013 Updates IRIS updates for 1,4-Dioxane and Biphenyl were completed. PPRTV values have been updated for Biphenyl, 3,4-Dichlorobenzotrifluoride, Trinitrophenylmethylnitramine (Tetryl), Endosulfan Sulfate, 1,1,2,2-Tetrachloroethane, Nitromethane, Dibenzothiophene, 2-Ethoxyethanol, 3,3'-Dimethoxybenzidine, Butylated hydroxytoluene, Ethyl Acetate, tert-Amyl Alcohol, 2,2-Difluoropropane,

465

Viscosity of aqueous solutions of n-methyldiethanolamine and of diethanolamine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aqueous solutions of alkanolamines such as monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA), N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), di-2-propanolamine (DIPA), and bis[2-(hydroxyamino)ethyl] ether (DGA) are good solvents for the removal of acid gases such as CO[sub 2] and H[sub 2]S from the gas streams of many processes in the natural gas, petroleum, ammonia synthesis, and some chemical industries. The viscosity of aqueous solutions of methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) and of diethanolamine (DEA) have been measured at five temperatures in the range 25--80 C throughout the whole concentration range. The viscosity has been correlated as a function of composition for use in industrial calculations.

Teng, T.T.; Maham, Y.; Hepler, L.G.; Mather, A.E. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada))

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

List of Reproductive Toxins and Highly Acute Toxic Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reproductive Toxins and Highly Acute Toxic Materials Reproductive Toxins and Highly Acute Toxic Materials Reproductive Toxins Acrylonitr ile Aniline Arsenic and its compounds Benzene Benzo(a)pyrene Beryllium Boric acid (Boron) Cadmium and its compounds Carbon monoxide Chlordecone (Kepone) Chloroform Chloroprene Dibromochloropropane (DBCP) Dichlorobenzene 1,1-Dichloroethane Dichloromethane Dioxane Epichlorohydrin Ethylene Dibromide Ethylene Dichloride Ethylene Oxide Fluorocarbons Formaldehyde Formamides Lead (Organic) Manganese and its compounds Mercury and its compounds (Inorganic) Methyl n-butyl ketone Methyl chloroform Methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) Nitrogen Dioxide Ozone Platinum and its compounds Polybrominated biphenyls (PBB) Polychlorinated bipenyls (PCB) Selenium and its compounds Styrene Tellurium and its compounds Tetr achloroethylene

467

Systems and economic analysis of microalgae ponds for conversion of CO{sub 2} to biomass. 4th Quarterly technical progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Microalgae cultivation in large open ponds is the only photosynthetic process likely to directly utilize power plant flue gas CO{sub 2} for production of biomass. The algal biomass can be converted into substitutes for fossil fuels, in particular liquid fuels such as biodiesel (vegetable oil methyl or ethyl esters), thus reducing atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels and the potential for global warming. This concept is being investigated, among others, at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory at Golden, Colorado, with support from PETC.

Benemann, J.R.

1994-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

468

Spectroscopic investigation of fluorescence quenching agents. Part IV: Selectivity of nitromethane for discriminating between alternant versus nonalternant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in solvents of differing polarities  

SciTech Connect

To further assess the applicability of nitromethane as a selective quenching agent for alternant vs. nonalternant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in HPLC analysis, the authors measured the effect that it has non the fluorescence emission behavior of 96 different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons dissolved in a binary ethyl acetate/acetonitrile solvent mixture. Nitromethane quenching results are compared with previously reported acetonitrile, aqueous/acetonitrile, and toluene/acetonitrile solvent mixtures. Results of these measurements revealed that the {open_quotes}selective quenching{close_quotes} rule is obeyed for the vast majority of PAHs in all solvents considered thus far, with the coronene derivatives being the only major exceptions. 31 refs., 1 tab.

Tucker, S.A.; Bates, H.C.; Acree, W.E. Jr. [Univ. of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States); Fetzer, J.C. [Chevron Research and Technology Center, Richmond, CA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

A metabolomic strategy defines the regulation of lipid content and global metabolism by Delta-9 desaturases in Caenorhabditis elegans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of these mutant strains has been measured by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) [27], show- ing a 1.4-fold decrease in the expression level of neutral lipid droplets for the fat-5;fat-6 double mutant. One rea- son for this discrepancy between the Oil Red... Methyl Ester (BAME) Mix solution (Supelco 47080). For LC-MS 5 ?l of each sample was analysed on a Waters Q-Tof Ultima mass spectrometer combined with an Acquity Ultra Performance LC (UPLC). The sample was injected onto a 1.7 ?m bridged ethyl hybrid C8 col...

Castro, Cecilia; Sar, Funda; Shaw, W. Robert; Mishima, Masanori; Miska, Eric A; Griffin, Julian L

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

470

Exposure Evaluation for Benzene, Lead and Noise in Vehicle and Equipment Repair Shops  

SciTech Connect

An exposure assessment was performed at the equipment and vehicle maintenance repair shops operating at the U. S. Department of Energy Hanford site, in Richland, Washington. The maintenance shops repair and maintain vehicles and equipment used in support of the Hanford cleanup mission. There are three general mechanic shops and one auto body repair shop. The mechanics work on heavy equipment used in construction, cranes, commercial motor vehicles, passenger-type vehicles in addition to air compressors, generators, and farm equipment. Services include part fabrication, installation of equipment, repair and maintenance work in the engine compartment, and tire and brake services. Work performed at the auto body shop includes painting and surface preparation which involves applying body filler and sanding. 8-hour time-weighted-average samples were collected for benzene and noise exposure and task-based samples were collected for lead dust work activities involving painted metal surfaces. Benzene samples were obtained using 3M™ 3520 sampling badges and were analyzed for additional volatile organic compounds. These compounds were selected based on material safety data sheet information for the aerosol products used by the mechanics for each day of sampling. The compounds included acetone, ethyl ether, toluene, xylene, VM&P naphtha, methyl ethyl ketone, and trichloroethylene. Laboratory data for benzene, VM&P naphtha, methyl ethyl ketone and trichloroethylene were all below the reporting detection limit. Airborne concentrations for acetone, ethyl ether, toluene and xylene were all less than 10% of their occupational exposure limit. The task-based samples obtained for lead dusts were submitted for a metal scan analysis to identify other metals that might be present. Laboratory results for lead dusts were all below the reporting detection limit and airborne concentration for the other metals observed in the samples were less than 10% of the occupational exposure limit. Noise dosimetry sampling was performed on a random basis and was representative of the different work activities within the four shops. Twenty three percent of the noise samples exceeded the occupational exposure limit of 85 decibels for an 8-hour time-weightedaverage. Work activities where noise levels were higher included use of impact wrenches and grinding wheels.

Sweeney, Lynn C.

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

471

Process for the production of ethylene and other hydrocarbons from coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the production of economically significant amounts of ethyl and other hydrocarbon compounds, such as benzene, from coal is disclosed wherein coal is reacted with methane at a temperature in the approximate range of 500.degree. C. to 1100.degree. C. at a partial pressure less than about 200 psig for a period of less than 10 seconds. Ethylene and other hydrocarbon compounds may be separated from the product stream so produced, and the methane recycled for further production of ethylene. In another embodiment, other compounds produced, such as by-product tars, may be burned to heat the recycled methane.

Steinberg, Meyer (Huntington Station, NY); Fallon, Peter (East Moriches, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

DIMENSION STABILIZED FIXED PHOTOGRAPHIC TYPE EMULSION AND A METHOD FOR PRODUCING SAME  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is given for stabilizing the dimensions of fixed gelatin-base photographic type emulsions containing silver halide, and particularly to such emulsions containing large amounts of silver chloride for use as nuclear track emulsions, so that the dimensions of the final product are the same as or in a predetermined fixed ratio to the dimensions of the emulsions prior to exposure. The process comprises contacting an exposed, fixed emulsion with a solution of wood rosin dissolved in ethyl alcohol for times corresponding to the dimensions desired, and thereafter permitting the alcohol to evaporate. (AEC)

Gilbert, F.C.

1962-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

473

Dual-circuit, multiple-effect refrigeration system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dual circuit absorption refrigeration system comprising a high temperature single-effect refrigeration loop and a lower temperature double-effect refrigeration loop separate from one another and provided with a double-condenser coupling therebetween. The high temperature condenser of the single-effect refrigeration loop is double coupled to both of the generators in the double-effect refrigeration loop to improve internal heat recovery and a heat and mass transfer additive such as 2-ethyl-1-hexanol is used in the lower temperature double-effect refrigeration loop to improve the performance of the absorber in the double-effect refrigeration loop.

DeVault, Robert C. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Hydrogen-bond equilibria and life times in a supercooled monohydroxy alcohol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dielectric loss spectra covering 13 decades in frequency were collected for 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, a monohydroxy alcohol that exhibits a prominent Debye-like relaxation, typical for several classes of hydrogen-bonded liquids. The thermal variation of the dielectric absorption amplitude agrees well with that of the hydrogen-bond equilibrium population, experimentally mapped out using near infrared (NIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements. Despite this agreement, temperature-jump NIR spectroscopy reveals that the hydrogen-bond switching rate does not define the frequency position of the prominent absorption peak. This contrasts with widespread notions and models based thereon, but is consistent with a recent approach.

C. Gainaru; S. Kastner; F. Mayr; P. Lunkenheimer; S. Schildmann; H. J. Weber; W. Hiller; A. Loidl; R. Böhmer

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

475

Responsive copolymers for enhanced petroleum recovery. Quarterly technical progress report, June 22, 1993 through September 22, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes technical progress on advanced copolymer synthesis and characterization of the molecular structure of copolymers to be used to enhanced recovery of petroleum. Polymers examined are acrylamide/acrylamido-3-methylbutanoic acid/N-(4-butyl)phenylacrylamide (AM/AMBA/BPAM) terpolymers, sodium 2-(acrylamido)-2-methylpropanesulfonate and (2-(acrylamido)-2-methylpropyl)trimethylammonium chloride (NaAMPS/AMPTAC) copolymers, AM/NaAMPS/AMPTAC terpolymers, and AM/APS (APS is 2-(1-pyrenylsulfonamido) ethyl acrylamide) copolymers. Polymer associative behavior and polymer solution behavior is characterized.

McCormick, C.; Hester, R.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

A Hydrostratigraphic Model and Alternatives for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat-Climax Mine, Lincoln and Nye Counties, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

A new three-dimensional hydrostratigraphic framework model for the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit was completed in 2005. The model area includes Yucca Flat and Climax Mine, former nuclear testing areas at the Nevada Test Site, and proximal areas. The model area is approximately 1,250 square kilometers in size and is geologically complex. Yucca Flat is a topographically closed basin typical of many valleys in the Basin and Range province. Faulted and tilted blocks of Tertiary-age volcanic rocks and underlying Proterozoic and Paleozoic sedimentary rocks form low ranges around the structural basin. During the Cretaceous Period a granitic intrusive was emplaced at the north end of Yucca Flat. A diverse set of geological and geophysical data collected over the past 50 years was used to develop a structural model and hydrostratigraphic system for the basin. These were integrated using EarthVision? software to develop the 3-dimensional hydrostratigraphic framework model. Fifty-six stratigraphic units in the model area were grouped into 25 hydrostratigraphic units based on each unit's propensity toward aquifer or aquitard characteristics. The authors organized the alluvial section into 3 hydrostratigraphic units including 2 aquifers and 1 confining unit. The volcanic units in the model area are organized into 13 hydrostratigraphic units that include 8 aquifers and 5 confining units. The underlying pre-Tertiary rocks are divided into 7 hydrostratigraphic units, including 3 aquifers and 4 confining units. Other units include 1 Tertiary-age sedimentary confining unit and 1 Mesozoic-age granitic confining unit. The model depicts the thickness, extent, and geometric relationships of these hydrostratigraphic units (''layers'' in the model) along with the major structural features (i.e., faults). The model incorporates 178 high-angle normal faults of Tertiary age and 2 low-angle thrust faults of Mesozoic age. The complexity of the model area and the non-uniqueness of some of the interpretations incorporated into the base model made it necessary to formulate alternative interpretations for some of the major features in the model. Five of these alternatives were developed so they could be modeled in the same fashion as the base model. This work was done for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Underground Test Area subproject of the Environmental Restoration Project.

Geotechnical Sciences Group Bechtel Nevada

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Geology and alteration of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

alteration of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho alteration of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Geology and alteration of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: analcime; Cassia County Idaho; Cenozoic; chlorite; chlorite group; clay minerals; economic geology; exploration; framework silicates; geothermal energy; Idaho; illite; kaolinite; laumontite; montmorillonite; Neogene; Precambrian; Raft Formation; Raft River KGRA; Salt Lake Formation; sheet silicates; silicates; Tertiary; United States; wairakite; wells; zeolite group Author(s): Blackett, R.E.; Kolesar, P.T. Published: Geothermal Resource Council Transactions 1983, 1/1/1983 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable

478

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 December 2011 Alcohol. The family name of a group of organic chemical compounds composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. The series of molecules vary in chain length and are composed of a hydrocarbon plus a hydroxyl group; CH3-(CH2)n-OH (e.g., methanol, ethanol, and tertiary butyl alcohol). Alkylate. The product of an alkylation reaction. It usually refers to the high octane product from alkylation units. This alkylate is used in blending high octane gasoline. Alkylation. A refining process for chemically combining isobutane with olefin hydrocarbons (e.g., propylene, butylene) through the control of temperature and pressure in the presence of an acid catalyst,

479

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

September 2013 September 2013 Alcohol. The family name of a group of organic chemical compounds composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. The series of molecules vary in chain length and are composed of a hydrocarbon plus a hydroxyl group; CH3-(CH2)n-OH (e.g., methanol, ethanol, and tertiary butyl alcohol). Alkylate. The product of an alkylation reaction. It usually refers to the high octane product from alkylation units. This alkylate is used in blending high octane gasoline. Alkylation. A refining process for chemically combining isobutane with olefin hydrocarbons (e.g., propylene, butylene) through the control of temperature and pressure in the presence of an acid catalyst,

480

Calcium-tolerant N-substituted acrylamides as thickeners for aqueous systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A water-soluble ionically-charged random copolymer of acrylamide and an alkaline or alkali metal 3-acrylamido-3-methylbutanoate having an average molecular weight of greater than about 50,000 has been found to maintain unusually stable and effective viscosities in the presence of salts such as NaCl and CaCl[sub 2] when added to water in minor amounts, thus making it a highly effective mobility control agent for secondary and tertiary oil recovery methods. Also within the scope of the invention are terpolymers which additionally contain olefinically unsaturated monomers such as acrylic acid or sodium acrylate.

McCormick, C.L.; Blackmon, K.P.

1986-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mtbe ethyl tertiary" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Exploring nonlinear regression methods, with application to association studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Glossary of Symbols Below is an outline of the notation I use throughout this thesis. Data Variables n - number of samples, indexed by the variable i. N - number of predictors, indexed by the variable g. X - predictor matrix (size n×N). Y - response vector... can also be applied to non-tertiary predictors, carries out MCMC sampling with the addition of Sampling Stage Four. iv Contents Summary i Glossary of Symbols ii List of Abbreviations iii Algorithm Schematic iv 1 Introduction 1 1.1 Regression Notation...

Speed, Douglas Christopher

2011-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

482

Regenerable solid imine sorbents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Two new classes of amine-based sorbents are disclosed. The first class comprises new polymer-immobilized tertiary amine sorbents; the second class new polymer-bound amine sorbents. Both classes are tailored to facilitate removal of acid anhydrides, especially carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2), from effluent gases. The amines adsorb acid anhydrides in a 1:1 molar ratio. Both classes of amine sorbents adsorb in the temperature range from about 20.degree. C. upwards to 90.degree. C. and can be regenerated by heating upwards to 100.degree. C.

Gray, McMahan; Champagne, Kenneth J.; Fauth, Daniel; Beckman, Eric

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

483

Evaluation of the pollution abatement technologies available for treatment of wastewater from oil shale processing  

SciTech Connect

A review covers the conventional and in-situ oil shale processing technologies and their status of development; the sources and characteristics of the wastewaters from oil shale retorting operation, from leaching of spent shale, from cooling tower and boiler blowdowns, from oil refining operations, from saline aquifer, and from minor sources, such as from air pollution control equipment, runoff from dust control, and sanitary wastewaters; and wastewater treatment methods applicable for treating wastewater from oil shale processes including physical, chemical, biological, and tertiary treatment methods and specific processes for removing specific pollutants (e.g., phenols, cyanides, heavy metals) from wastewaters. 31 references.

Sung, R.D.; Prien, C.H.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

FGD wastewater treatment still has a way to go  

SciTech Connect

The power industry should jointly address questions about FGD water treatment and share the lessons it has learned so far. The article describes a scheme developed by CH2M Hill to treat FGD wastewater and remove heavy metals. The process desaturates the waste water of sulfates and removes the bulk of the insoluble suspended solids prior to tertiary treatment of heavy metals using a chemical/physical treatment process. Additional treatment could be provided (for example, anoxic biological treatment) for selenium, nitrates and organics. 2 figs.

Higgins, T.; Givens, S.; Sandy, T. [CH2M Hill (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

485

Method for providing a low density high strength polyurethane foam  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed is a method for making a polyurethane closed-cell foam material exhibiting a bulk density below 4 lbs/ft.sup.3 and high strength. The present embodiment uses the reaction product of a modified MDI and a sucrose/glycerine based polyether polyol resin wherein a small measured quantity of the polyol resin is "pre-reacted" with a larger quantity of the isocyanate in a defined ratio such that when the necessary remaining quantity of the polyol resin is added to the "pre-reacted" resin together with a tertiary amine catalyst and water as a blowing agent, the polymerization proceeds slowly enough to provide a stable foam body.

Whinnery, Jr., Leroy L.; Goods, Steven H.; Skala, Dawn M.; Henderson, Craig C.; Keifer, Patrick N.

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

486

Substituent Effects In a Series of 1,7-C60(RF)2 Compounds (RF = CF3, C2F5, n-C3F7, i-C3F7, n-C4F9, s-C4F9, n-C8F17): Electron Affinities, Reduction Potentials, and E(LUMO) Values Are Not Always Correlated  

SciTech Connect

Substituent effects are of paramount importance in virtually all fields of fundamental and applied chemistry. Classical and modern examples can be found in organic chemistry (Hammett parameters and Charton steric parameters), inorganic chemistry (trans effect and trans influence), organometallic chemistry (phosphine cone angles), physical chemistry (linear free energy relationships and DFT), biochemistry (protein tertiary structure), medicinal chemistry (SAR maps and BioMAP analysis), polymer chemistry (nonlinear optical and permeation properties and glass transition temperatures), and materials chemistry (stability and luminescent properties of electroluminescent devices and light-to-power conversion efficiencies of fullerene-derivative-based OPV devices).

Kuvychko, Igor V.; Whitaker, James B.; Larson, Bryon W.; Folsom, Travis; Shustova, Natalia; Avdoshenko, Stanislav; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Wen, Hui; Wang, Xue B.; Dunsch, Lothar; Popov, Alexey A.; Boltalina, Olga V.; Strauss, Steven H.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Completion Report for Well ER-20-4 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-20-4 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in August and September 2010 as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of the well was to investigate the possibility of radionuclide transport from up-gradient underground nuclear tests conducted in central Pahute Mesa. This well also provided detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section that will help reduce uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

488

Environmental regulations handbook for enhanced oil recovery. 1983 update  

SciTech Connect

This handbook is intended to serve owners and operators of enhanced oil recovery operations as a guidebook to the environmental laws and regulations which have special significance for enhanced oil recovery (EOR). EOR, as used in this handbook, refers to what is also called tertiary recovery. There are three major categories of EOR processes - thermal (including both steam injection and in-situ combustion), miscible gas, and chemical. These processes are used only after a well or reservoir has ceased to produce oil economically through primary or secondary methods. The primary emphasis in the handbook is on laws and regulations for the control or prevention of pollution. 3 figures, 14 tables.

Wilson, T.D.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Completion Report for Wells ER-20-8 and ER-20-8#2 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa  

SciTech Connect

Wells ER-20-8 and ER-20-8#2 were drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The holes were drilled in July and August 2009, as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of these wells was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section that will help address uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa–Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model. They may also be used as long-term monitoring wells.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

490

Degradation problems with the solvent extraction organic at Roessing uranium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Roessing Uranium Ltd recovers uranium from a low-grade ore in Namibia. Uranium is recovered and purified from an ion-exchange eluate in a solvent-extraction plant. The solvent-extraction plant uses Alamine 336 as the extractant for uranium, with isodecanol used as a phase modifier in Sasol SSX 210, an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent. Since the plant started in the mid 1970's, there have been a few episodes where the tertiary amine has been quickly and severely degraded when the plant was operated outside certain operating parameters. The Rossing experience is discussed in more detail in this paper. (authors)

Munyungano, Brodrick [Roessing Uranium Ltd, Private Bag 5005, Swakopmund (Namibia); Feather, Angus [Cognis, P. O. Box 361, Honeydew, 2040 (South Africa); Virnig, Michael [Cognis Corporation, 2430 N. Huachuca Dr, Tucson, Az (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Method and system for ethanol production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A transition metal carbonyl and a tertiary amine are employed as a homogeneous catalytic system in methanol or a less volatile solvent to react methanol with carbon monoxide and hydrogen gas producing ethanol and carbon dioxide. The gas contains a high carbon monoxide to hydrogen ratio as is present in a typical gasifier product. The reaction has potential for anhydrous ethanol production as carbon dioxide rather than water is produced. The only other significant by product is methane. Selected transition metal carbonyls include those