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Sample records for mt simon sandstone

  1. CO2 flood tests on whole core samples of the Mt. Simon sandstone, Illinois Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connor, William K.; Rush, Gilbert E.

    2005-09-01

    Geological sequestration of CO2, whether by enhanced oil recovery (EOR), coal-bed methane (CBM) recovery, or saline aquifer injection is a promising near-term sequestration methodology. While tremendous experience exists for EOR, and CBM recovery has been demonstrated in existing fields, saline aquifer injection studies have only recently been initiated. Studies evaluating the availability of saline aquifers suitable for CO2 injection show great potential, however, the long-term fate of the CO2 injected into these ancient aqueous systems is still uncertain. For the subject study, a series of laboratory-scale CO2 flood tests were conducted on whole core samples of the Mt. Simon sandstone from the Illinois Basin. By conducting these tests on whole core samples rather than crushed core, an evaluation of the impact of the CO2 flood on the rock mechanics properties as well as the geochemistry of the core and brine solution has been possible. This empirical data could provide a valuable resource for the validation of reservoir models under development for these engineered CO2 systems.

  2. DOE Partnership Completes Successful CO2 Injection Test in the Mount Simon Sandstone

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership, one of seven partnerships in the U.S. Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, has successfully injected 1,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) into the Mount Simon Sandstone, a deep saline formation that is widespread across much of the Midwest.

  3. Simon Edelman

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Simon Edelman is Chief Creative Officer for the U.S. Department of Energy. He works with the digital content team to to develop, create, and expand visual content that tells the story of the Energy...

  4. Chern-Simons and WZW Anomaly Cancelations Across Dimensions ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Chern-Simons and WZW Anomaly Cancelations Across Dimensions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Chern-Simons and WZW Anomaly Cancelations Across Dimensions You are...

  5. CO{sub 2} Injectivity, Storage Capacity, Plume Size, and Reservoir and Seal Integrity of the Ordovician St. Peter Sandstone and the Cambrian Potosi Formation in the Illnois Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hannes Leetaru; Alan Brown; Donald Lee; Ozgur Senel; Marcia Coueslan

    2012-05-01

    The Cambro-Ordovician strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins underlie most of the states of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, and Michigan. This interval also extends through much of the Midwest of the United States and, for some areas, may be the only available target for geological sequestration of CO{sub 2}. We evaluated the Cambro-Ordovician strata above the basal Mt. Simon Sandstone reservoir for sequestration potential. The two targets were the Cambrian carbonate intervals in the Knox and the Ordovician St. Peter Sandstone. The evaluation of these two formations was accomplished using wireline data, core data, pressure data, and seismic data from the USDOE-funded Illinois Basin ?? Decatur Project being conducted by the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium in Macon County, Illinois. Interpretations were completed using log analysis software, a reservoir flow simulator, and a finite element solver that determines rock stress and strain changes resulting from the pressure increase associated with CO{sub 2} injection. Results of this research suggest that both the St. Peter Sandstone and the Potosi Dolomite (a formation of the Knox) reservoirs may be capable of storing up to 2 million tonnes of CO{sub 2} per year for a 20-year period. Reservoir simulation results for the St. Peter indicate good injectivity and a relatively small CO{sub 2} plume. While a single St. Peter well is not likely to achieve the targeted injection rate of 2 million tonnes/year, results of this study indicate that development with three or four appropriately spaced wells may be sufficient. Reservoir simulation of the Potosi suggest that much of the CO{sub 2} flows into and through relatively thin, high permeability intervals, resulting in a large plume diameter compared with the St. Peter.

  6. Utilization of the St. Peter Sandstone in the Illinois Basin for CO2 Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Will, Robert; Smith, Valerie; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    This project is part of a larger project co-funded by the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) under cooperative agreement DE-FE0002068 from 12/08/2009 through 9/31/2014. The study is to evaluate the potential of formations within the Cambro-Ordovician strata above the Mt. Simon Sandstone as potential targets for carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in the Illinois and Michigan Basins. This report evaluates the potential injectivity of the Ordovician St. Peter Sandstone. The evaluation of this formation was accomplished using wireline data, core data, pressure data, and seismic data acquired through funding in this project as well as existing data from two additional, separately funded projects: the US DOE funded Illinois Basin Decatur Project (IBDP) being conducted by the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) in Macon County, Illinois, and the Illinois Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration (ICCS) Project funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), which received a phase two award from DOE. This study addresses the question of whether or not the St. Peter Sandstone may serve as a suitable target for CO2 sequestration at locations within the Illinois Basin where it lies at greater depths (below the underground source of drinking water (USDW)) than at the IBDP site. The work performed included numerous improvements to the existing St. Peter reservoir model created in 2010. Model size and spatial resolution were increased resulting in a 3 fold increase in the number of model cells. Seismic data was utilized to inform spatial porosity distribution and an extensive core database was used to develop porosity-permeability relationships. The analysis involved a Base Model representative of the St. Peter at in-situ conditions, followed by the creation of two hypothetical models at in-situ + 1,000 feet (ft.) (300 m) and in-situ + 2,000 ft. (600 m) depths through systematic depthdependent adjustment of the Base Model parameters. Properties for the depth shifted models were based on porosity versus depth relationship extracted from the core database followed by application of the porosity-permeability relationship. Each of the three resulting models were used as input to dynamic simulations with the single well injection target of 3.2 million tons per annum (MTPA) for 30 years using an appropriate fracture gradient based bottom hole pressure limit for each injection level. Modeling results are presented in terms of well bottomhole pressure (BHP), injection rate profiles, and three-dimensional (3D) saturation and differential pressure volumes at selected simulation times. Results suggest that the target CO2 injection rate of 3.2 MTPA may be achieved in the St. Peter Sandstone at in-situ conditions and at the in-situ +1,000 ft. (300 m) depth using a single injector well. In the latter case the target injection rate is achieved after a ramp up period which is caused by multi-phase flow effects and thus subject to increased modeling uncertainty. Results confirm that the target rate may not be achieved at the in-situ +2,000 ft. (600 m) level even with multiple wells. These new modeling results for the in-situ case are more optimistic than previous modeling results. This difference is attributed to the difference in methods and data used to develop model permeability distributions. Recommendations for further work include restriction of modeling activity to the in-situ +1,000 ft. (300 m) and shallower depth interval, sensitivity and uncertainty analysis, and refinement of porosity and permeability estimates through depth and area selective querying of the available core database. It is also suggested that further modeling efforts include scope for evaluating project performance in terms of metrics directly related to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Class VI permit requirements for the area of review (AoR) definition and post injection site closure monitoring.

  7. Environmental Assessments (EA) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from Biofuels Production and Sequestration into the Mt. Simon Sandstone, Archer Daniels Midland Company Decatur, Illinois April 1, 2011 EA-1795: Final Environmental...

  8. Meet Tony Simon, Another Industrial Assessment Center Student Success Story

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Meet Tony Simon, Another Industrial Assessment Center Student Success Story Meet Tony Simon, Another Industrial Assessment Center Student Success Story June 16, 2011 - 6:05pm Addthis Tony Simon Tony Simon Rob Penney Senior Energy Engineer, WSU Energy Program How does it work? Assessments are performed by one of 26 local teams of engineering faculty and students. Assessments include a site visit where students take engineering measurements as a basis for

  9. Operation Sandstone: 1948. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berkhouse, L.H.; Hallowell, J.H.; McMullan, F.W.; Davis, S.E.; Jones, C.B.

    1983-12-19

    SANDSTONE was a three-detonation atmospheric nuclear weapon test series conducted during the spring of 1948 at Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands. Report emphasis is on the radiological safety of the personnel. Available records on personnel exposure are summarized.

  10. Extension of Chern-Simons forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konitopoulos, Spyros; Savvidy, George

    2014-06-15

    We investigate metric independent, gauge invariant, and closed forms in the generalized Yang-Mills (YM) theory. These forms are polynomial on the corresponding fields strength tensors curvature forms and are analogous to the Pontryagin-Chern densities in the YM gauge theory. The corresponding secondary characteristic classes have been expressed in integral form in analogy with the Chern-Simons form. Because they are not unique, the secondary forms can be dramatically simplified by the addition of properly chosen differentials of one-step-lower-order forms. Their gauge variation can also be found yielding the potential anomalies in the gauge field theory.

  11. Chern-Simons and WZW anomaly cancelations across dimensions (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Chern-Simons and WZW anomaly cancelations across dimensions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Chern-Simons and WZW anomaly cancelations across dimensions The WZW functional in D=4 can be derived directly from the Chern-Simons functional of a compactified D=5 gauge theory and the boundary fermions it supplants. A simple pedagogical model based on U(1) gauge groups illustrates how this works. A bulk-boundary system with the fermions eliminated manifestly

  12. Dirac matrices for Chern-Simons gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurieta, Fernando; Ramirez, Ricardo; Rodriguez, Eduardo

    2012-10-06

    A genuine gauge theory for the Poincare, de Sitter or anti-de Sitter algebras can be constructed in (2n- 1)-dimensional spacetime by means of the Chern-Simons form, yielding a gravitational theory that differs from General Relativity but shares many of its properties, such as second order field equations for the metric. The particular form of the Lagrangian is determined by a rank n, symmetric tensor invariant under the relevant algebra. In practice, the calculation of this invariant tensor can be reduced to the computation of the trace of the symmetrized product of n Dirac Gamma matrices {Gamma}{sub ab} in 2n-dimensional spacetime. While straightforward in principle, this calculation can become extremely cumbersome in practice. For large enough n, existing computer algebra packages take an inordinate long time to produce the answer or plainly fail having used up all available memory. In this talk we show that the general formula for the trace of the symmetrized product of 2n Gamma matrices {Gamma}{sub ab} can be written as a certain sum over the integer partitions s of n, with every term being multiplied by a numerical cofficient {alpha}{sub s}. We then give a general algorithm that computes the {alpha}-coefficients as the solution of a linear system of equations generated by evaluating the general formula for different sets of tensors B{sup ab} with random numerical entries. A recurrence relation between different coefficients is shown to hold and is used in a second, 'minimal' algorithm to greatly speed up the computations. Runtime of the minimal algorithm stays below 1 min on a typical desktop computer for up to n = 25, which easily covers all foreseeable applications of the trace formula.

  13. Petrologic and petrophysical evaluation of the Dallas Center Structure, Iowa, for compressed air energy storage in the Mount Simon Sandstone.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heath, Jason E.; Bauer, Stephen J.; Broome, Scott Thomas; Dewers, Thomas A.; Rodriguez, Mark Andrew

    2013-03-01

    The Iowa Stored Energy Plant Agency selected a geologic structure at Dallas Center, Iowa, for evaluation of subsurface compressed air energy storage. The site was rejected due to lower-than-expected and heterogeneous permeability of the target reservoir, lower-than-desired porosity, and small reservoir volume. In an initial feasibility study, permeability and porosity distributions of flow units for the nearby Redfield gas storage field were applied as analogue values for numerical modeling of the Dallas Center Structure. These reservoir data, coupled with an optimistic reservoir volume, produced favorable results. However, it was determined that the Dallas Center Structure cannot be simplified to four zones of high, uniform permeabilities. Updated modeling using field and core data for the site provided unfavorable results for air fill-up. This report presents Sandia National Laboratories' petrologic and petrophysical analysis of the Dallas Center Structure that aids in understanding why the site was not suitable for gas storage.

  14. Eolian sabkha sandstones in the Nugget Sandstone (Jurassic), Vernal area, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schenk, C.J.; Peterson, F. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

    1991-06-01

    The Jurassic Nugget Sandstone in the Vernal, Utah, area is characterized by thick (up to 25 m) sets of cross-stratified eolian dune sandstone separated by either erosional planar bounding surfaces or thin (mostly < 3 m) sandstones interpreted as sabkha sandstones. Structures in Nugget sabkha sandstones are predominantly wavy or irregular bedding and thin, remnant sets of dune cross-strata consisting of eolian ripple and avalanche strata. The types of sedimentary structures and erosional features in Nugget sabkha sandstones indicate a close relationship between sand deposition and erosion and fluctuations in the local water table. Thin, remnant eolian dune sets are common in Nugget sabkha sandstones. The remnant sets form when dunes migrating across a sabkha are partially wetted as the water table rises slightly (on a scale of tens of centimeters); the lower part of the dune with wetted sand remains on the sabkha as the rest of the dune continues to migrate. Typically, ripple strata of the dune apron and the toes of avalanche strata are preserved in dune remnants. The avalanche strata, being slightly coarser grained, are preferentially deflated, leaving microtopography. This topography is commonly filled in with ripple strata that form as dry sand again blows across the sabkha. Stacked sets of remnant dunes separated by erosional surfaces illustrate the control of sand deposition on eolian sabkhas by the local water table.

  15. Mt Poso Cogeneration | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Poso Cogeneration Jump to: navigation, search Name: Mt Poso Cogeneration Place: Bakersfield, California Zip: 93308 Product: California-based project developer for the Mt Poso...

  16. Mt. Baker Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mt. Baker Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Development Project: Mt. Baker Geothermal Project Project Location Information Coordinates...

  17. Chern-Simons and WZW Anomaly Cancelations Across Dimensions (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Chern-Simons and WZW Anomaly Cancelations Across Dimensions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Chern-Simons and WZW Anomaly Cancelations Across Dimensions Authors: Hill, Christopher T. ; Zachos, Cosmas K. Publication Date: 2008-02-01 OSTI Identifier: 1151584 Report Number(s): ANL-HEP-PR-08-8 arXiv eprint number arXiv:0802.1672 DOE Contract Number: AC02-07CH11359 Resource Type: Journal Article Research Org: Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL),

  18. Symplectic quantum mechanics and Chern-Simons gauge theory. I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey, Lisa C.

    2013-05-15

    In this article we describe the relation between the Chern-Simons gauge theory partition function and the partition function defined using the symplectic action functional as the Lagrangian. We show that the partition functions obtained using these two Lagrangians agree, and we identify the semiclassical formula for the partition function defined using the symplectic action functional.

  19. Radionuclide transport in sandstones with WIPP brine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weed, H.C.; Bazan, F.; Fontanilla, J.; Garrison, J.; Rego, J.; Winslow, A.M.

    1981-02-01

    Retardation factors (R) have been measured for the transport of /sup 3/H, /sup 95m/Tc, and /sup 85/Sr in WIPP brine using St. Peter, Berea, Kayenta, and San Felipe sandstone cores. If tritium is assumed to have R=1, /sup 95m/Tc has R=1.0 to 1.3 and therefore is essentially not retarded. Strontium-85 has R = 1.0 to 1.3 on St. Peter, Berea, and Kayenta, but R=3 on San Felipe. This is attributed to sorption on the matrix material of San Felipe, which has 45 volume % matrix compared with 1 to 10 volume % for the others. Retardation factors (R/sub s/) for /sup 85/Sr calculated from static sorption measurements are unity for all the sandstones. Therefore, the static and transport results for /sup 85/Sr disagree in the case of San Felipe, but agree for St. Peter, Berea, and Kayenta.

  20. Category:Billings, MT | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Billings, MT Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Billings, MT" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total....

  1. Continuity and internal properties of Gulf Coast sandstones and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    properties of Gulf Coast sandstones and their implications for geopressured fluid production Morton, R.A.; Ewing, T.E.; Tyler, N. 15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEOPRESSURED...

  2. Simon Teat | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies | Blandine Jerome Simon Teat Previous Next List Simon Teat Simon Teat Staff Scientist, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Email: sjteat [at] lbl.gov Phone: 510-486-4457 EFRC research: Within the CGS, the Teat group is developing environmental synchrotron-based crystallography methods to study MOFs in the presence of gasses. EFRC publications: Yuan, Shuai; Liu, Tian-Fu; Feng, Dawei; Tian, Jian; Wang, Kecheng; Qin, Junsheng; Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Ying-Pin; Bosch, Mathieu; Zou,

  3. Topological fermionic string representation for Chern-Simons non-Abelian gauge theories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Botelho, L.C.L. )

    1990-05-15

    We show that loop wave equations in non-Abelian Chern-Simons gauge theory are exactly solved by a conformally invariant topological fermionic string theory.

  4. Cory Simon | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    industrially relevant mixture of xenon and krypton. EFRC Publications Simon, Cory M.; Mercado, Rocio; Schnell, Sondre; Smit, Berend; and Haranczyk, Maciej. What Are the Best...

  5. Symplectic quantum mechanics and Chern-Simons gauge theory. II. Mapping tori of tori

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey, Lisa C.

    2013-05-15

    We compute the semiclassical formulas for the partition functions obtained using two different Lagrangians: the Chern-Simons functional and the symplectic action functional.

  6. Massive gravitational waves in Chern-Simons modified gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myung, Yun Soo; Moon, Taeyoon E-mail: tymoon@inje.ac.kr

    2014-10-01

    We consider the nondynamical Chern-Simons (nCS) modified gravity, which is regarded as a parity-odd theory of massive gravity in four dimensions. We first find polarization modes of gravitational waves for θ=x/μ in nCS modified gravity by using the Newman-Penrose formalism where the null complex tetrad is necessary to specify gravitational waves. We show that in the Newman–Penrose formalism, the number of polarization modes is one in addition to an unspecified Ψ{sub 4}, implying three degrees of freedom for θ=x/μ. This compares with two for a canonical embedding of θ=t/μ. Also, if one introduces the Ricci tensor formalism to describe a massive graviton arising from the nCS modified gravity, one finds one massive mode after making second-order wave equations, which is compared to five found from the parity-even Einstein–Weyl gravity.

  7. Simon Teat | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Ying-Pin; Bosch, Mathieu; Zou, Lanfang; Teat, Simon J.; Dalgarno, Scott J.; and Zhou, Hong-Cai. A Single Crystalline Porphyrinic Titanium Metal-organic...

  8. Geothermal Literature Review At Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Mt...

  9. Water Sampling At Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Mt...

  10. Isotopic Analysis At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 2000...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 2000) Exploration Activity Details Location Mt St Helens Area Exploration Technique...

  11. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 2000) Exploration Activity Details Location Mt St Helens Area Exploration Technique...

  12. Isotopic Analysis At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 1995...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Mt St Helens Area Exploration Technique...

  13. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 1995) Exploration Activity Details Location Mt St Helens Area Exploration Technique...

  14. Controlled Source Audio MT At Roosevelt Hot Springs Area (Combs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Audio MT At Roosevelt Hot Springs Area (Combs 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Controlled Source Audio MT At Roosevelt Hot...

  15. Mt Wheeler Power, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Mt Wheeler Power, Inc Place: Nevada Phone Number: 1-775-289-8981 Website: mwpower.net Facebook: https:www.facebook.com...

  16. Geological Carbon Sequestration Storage Resource Estimates for the Ordovician St. Peter Sandstone, Illinois and Michigan Basins, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, David; Ellett, Kevin; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    The Cambro-Ordovician strata of the Midwest of the United States is a primary target for potential geological storage of CO2 in deep saline formations. The objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive evaluation of the Cambro-Ordovician strata in the Illinois and Michigan Basins above the basal Mount Simon Sandstone since the Mount Simon is the subject of other investigations including a demonstration-scale injection at the Illinois Basin Decatur Project. The primary reservoir targets investigated in this study are the middle Ordovician St Peter Sandstone and the late Cambrian to early Ordovician Knox Group carbonates. The topic of this report is a regional-scale evaluation of the geologic storage resource potential of the St Peter Sandstone in both the Illinois and Michigan Basins. Multiple deterministic-based approaches were used in conjunction with the probabilistic-based storage efficiency factors published in the DOE methodology to estimate the carbon storage resource of the formation. Extensive data sets of core analyses and wireline logs were compiled to develop the necessary inputs for volumetric calculations. Results demonstrate how the range in uncertainty of storage resource estimates varies as a function of data availability and quality, and the underlying assumptions used in the different approaches. In the simplest approach, storage resource estimates were calculated from mapping the gross thickness of the formation and applying a single estimate of the effective mean porosity of the formation. Results from this approach led to storage resource estimates ranging from 3.3 to 35.1 Gt in the Michigan Basin, and 1.0 to 11.0 Gt in the Illinois Basin at the P10 and P90 probability level, respectively. The second approach involved consideration of the diagenetic history of the formation throughout the two basins and used depth-dependent functions of porosity to derive a more realistic spatially variable model of porosity rather than applying a single estimate of porosity throughout the entire potential reservoir domains. The second approach resulted in storage resource estimates of 3.0 to 31.6 Gt in the Michigan Basin, and 0.6 to 6.1 Gt in the Illinois Basin. The third approach attempted to account for the local-scale variability in reservoir quality as a function of both porosity and permeability by using core and log analyses to calculate explicitly the net effective porosity at multiple well locations, and interpolate those results throughout the two basins. This approach resulted in storage resource estimates of 10.7 to 34.7 Gt in the Michigan Basin, and 11.2 to 36.4 Gt in the Illinois Basin. A final approach used advanced reservoir characterization as the most sophisticated means to estimating storage resource by defining reservoir properties for multiple facies within the St Peter formation. This approach was limited to the Michigan Basin since the Illinois Basin data set did not have the requisite level of data quality and sampling density to support such an analysis. Results from this approach led to storage resource estimates of 15.4 Gt to 50.1 Gt for the Michigan Basin. The observed variability in results from the four different approaches is evaluated in the context of data and methodological constraints, leading to the conclusion that the storage resource estimates from the first two approaches may be conservative, whereas the net porosity based approaches may over-estimate the resource.

  17. A complex investigation of building sandstones from Saxony (Germany)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goetze, Jens Siedel, Heiner

    2007-11-15

    The present paper provides a methodology for the investigation and characterization of building sandstones. This analytical scheme was designed for distinguishing mature arenites, which in general show very similar properties and are difficult to distinguish. This is shown for Cretaceous sandstones from various occurrences in Saxony (Germany), which have been used for centuries as building materials. The procedure is mainly based on the combination of macroscopic rock description, thin section polarizing microscopy (phase composition, texture, grain-size distribution) and cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy (quartz types, feldspar and kaolinite content) coupled with image analysis, scanning electron microscopy (accessories, pore cement, diagenetic grain surface features), and analysis of pore space data. Sometimes, additional data from X-ray diffraction or chemical analyses (major and trace elements) can be used. Especially in the case of quartz rich arenites, CL is a powerful tool for provenance analysis. The detailed analysis of sandstone material in most cases allows us to assign historically used building material to a specific sandstone occurrence. These results are important for both interpreting the weathering behaviour of the building material and the conservation, reconstruction and stone replacement of historical monuments.

  18. Mt Wheeler Power, Inc (Utah) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mt Wheeler Power, Inc (Utah) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Mt Wheeler Power, Inc Place: Utah Phone Number: 1 775-289-8981 Website: mwpower.net Facebook: https:...

  19. Null geodesics and shadow of a rotating black hole in extended Chern-Simons modified gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amarilla, Leonardo; Eiroa, Ernesto F.; Giribet, Gaston

    2010-06-15

    The Chern-Simons modification to general relativity in four dimensions consists of adding to the Einstein-Hilbert term a scalar field that couples to the first-class Pontryagin density. In this theory, which has attracted considerable attention recently, the Schwarzschild metric persists as an exact solution, and this is why this model resists several observational constraints. In contrast, the spinning black hole solution of the theory is not given by the Kerr metric but by a modification of it, so far only known for slow rotation and small coupling constant. In the present paper, we show that, in this approximation, the null geodesic equation can be integrated, and this allows us to investigate the shadow cast by a black hole. We discuss how, in addition to the angular momentum of the solution, the coupling to the Chern-Simons term deforms the shape of the shadow.

  20. RAPID/Roadmap/18-MT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us Underground Storage Tank Permit (18-MT-a) A developer must obtain an Underground Storage Tank...

  1. Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in the area. Since 2007 Mt. Princeton Geothermal, LLC has been assessing the area for its geothermal energy production potential. The company has conducted several preliminary...

  2. Targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis Biotin Protein Ligase (MtBPL...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Protein Ligase (MtBPL) with Nucleoside-Based Bisubstrate Adenylation Inhibitors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis Biotin Protein ...

  3. RAPID/Roadmap/12-MT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    not in range. Flowchart Narrative 12-MT-a.1 - Consult Regarding Potential Impacts on Fish and Wildlife Building with Wildlife, a guide developed by private landowners,...

  4. Refraction Survey At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Location Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Refraction Survey Activity Date 2012 - 2012 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis...

  5. Aeromagnetic Survey At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Case, Et Al., 1984) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Aeromagnetic Survey At Mt Princeton...

  6. RAPID/Roadmap/1-MT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    RAPIDRoadmap1-MT-a < RAPID | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower...

  7. RAPID/Roadmap/11-MT-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    RAPIDRoadmap11-MT-c < RAPID | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal...

  8. Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations At Mt Princeton Hot...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Vertical Electrical Sounding Configurations At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Zohdy, Et Al.,...

  9. Water Sampling At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Olson...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Olson & Dellechaie, 1976)...

  10. Water Sampling At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 1995)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 1995) Exploration Activity Details...

  11. Geothermometry At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 1995)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff, 1995) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell & Goff,...

  12. 3D Mt Resistivity Imaging For Geothermal Resource Assessment...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mt Resistivity Imaging For Geothermal Resource Assessment And Environmental Mitigation At The Glass Mountain Kgra, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  13. RAPID/Roadmap/20-MT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Us Well Abandonment Process (20-MT-a) Montana requires the employment of particular engineering standards when abandoning wells. Developers may elect to abandon wells or...

  14. City of Mt Pleasant, Iowa (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Number: (319) 385-2121 Website: mountpleasantiowa.orgalliance Twitter: @MtPleasantIOWA Facebook: https:www.facebook.commountpleasantia Outage Hotline: (319) 385-2121...

  15. Magnetotelluric Techniques At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Techniques At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Held & Henderson, 2012) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Magnetotelluric...

  16. RAPID/Roadmap/14-MT-e | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us Groundwater Pollution Control System (14-MT-e) The Montana Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) regulates the...

  17. RAPID/Roadmap/14-MT-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us Underground Injection Control Permit (14-MT-c) The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has not...

  18. RAPID/Roadmap/3-MT-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us State Encroachment Process (3-MT-c) There are several...

  19. RAPID/Roadmap/11-MT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us State Cultural Considerations Overview (11-MT-a)...

  20. RAPID/Roadmap/6-MT-d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us Other State Construction Permits (6-MT-d)...

  1. RAPID/Roadmap/4-MT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us State Exploration Process (4-MT-a) 04MTAStateExploration...

  2. RAPID/Roadmap/11-MT-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us Human Remains Process (11-MT-b) 11MTBHumanRemainsProcess...

  3. RAPID/Roadmap/14-MT-d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us 401 Water Quality Certification (14-MT-d) A person may...

  4. Analysis of borehole temperature data from the Mt. Princeton...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    borehole temperature data from the Mt. Princeton Hot Springs area, Chaffee County, Colorado (abstract only) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  5. RAPID/Roadmap/15-MT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us Air Quality Permit (15-MT-a) The Montana Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ)...

  6. Thermal Gradient Holes At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Held & Henderson, 2012)...

  7. RAPID/Roadmap/5-MT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us Drilling and Well Development (5-MT-a) - 05MTADrillingAndWellDevelopment (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number...

  8. RAPID/Roadmap/18-MT-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (18-MT-b) The Montana Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ)...

  9. Controlled Source Audio MT At Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Combs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Controlled Source Audio MT At Cove Fort Area - Liquid (Combs 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Cove...

  10. Controlled Source Audio MT At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Controlled Source Audio MT At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Mccoy...

  11. WPA Omnibus Award MT Wind Power Outreach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian Spangler, Manager Energy Planning and Renewables

    2012-01-30

    The objective of this grant was to further the development of Montana??s vast wind resources for small, medium, and large scale benefits to Montana and the nation. This was accomplished through collaborative work with wind industry representatives, state and local governments, the agricultural community, and interested citizens. Through these efforts MT Dept Environmental Quality (DEQ) was able to identify development barriers, educate and inform citizens, as well as to participate in regional and national dialogue that will spur the development of wind resources. The scope of DEQ??s wind outreach effort evolved over the course of this agreement from the development of the Montana Wind Working Group and traditional outreach efforts, to the current focus on working with the state??s university system to deliver a workforce trained to enter the wind industry.

  12. Reservoir characterization of Pennsylvanian Sandstone Reservoirs. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelkar, M.

    1992-09-01

    This annual report describes the progress during the second year of a project on Reservoir Characterization of Pennsylvanian Sandstone Reservoirs. The report is divided into three sections: (i) reservoir description and scale-up procedures; (ii) outcrop investigation; (iii) in-fill drilling potential. The first section describes the methods by which a reservoir can be characterized, can be described in three dimensions, and can be scaled up with respect to its properties, appropriate for simulation purposes. The second section describes the progress on investigation of an outcrop. The outcrop is an analog of Bartlesville Sandstone. We have drilled ten wells behind the outcrop and collected extensive log and core data. The cores have been slabbed, photographed and the several plugs have been taken. In addition, minipermeameter is used to measure permeabilities on the core surface at six inch intervals. The plugs have been analyzed for the permeability and porosity values. The variations in property values will be tied to the geological descriptions as well as the subsurface data collected from the Glen Pool field. The third section discusses the application of geostatistical techniques to infer in-fill well locations. The geostatistical technique used is the simulated annealing technique because of its flexibility. One of the important reservoir data is the production data. Use of production data will allow us to define the reservoir continuities, which may in turn, determine the in-fill well locations. The proposed technique allows us to incorporate some of the production data as constraints in the reservoir descriptions. The technique has been validated by comparing the results with numerical simulations.

  13. Facies architecture of the Bluejacket Sandstone in the Eufaula Lake area, Oklahoma: Implications for the reservoir characterization of the Bartlesville Sandstone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Liangmiao; Yang, Kexian

    1997-08-01

    Outcrop studies of the Bluejacket Sandstone (Middle Pennsylvanian) provide significant insights to reservoir architecture of the subsurface equivalent Bartlesville Sandstone. Quarry walls and road cuts in the Lake Eufaula area offer excellent exposures for detailed facies architectural investigations using high-precision surveying, photo mosaics. Directional minipermeameter measurements are being conducted. Subsurface studies include conventional logs, borehole image log, and core data. Reservoir architectures are reconstructed in four hierarchical levels: multi-storey sandstone, i.e. discrete genetic intervals; individual discrete genetic interval; facies within a discrete genetic interval; and lateral accretion bar deposits. In both outcrop and subsurface, the Bluejacket (Bartlesville) Sandstone comprises two distinctive architectures: a lower braided fluvial and an upper meandering fluvial. Braided fluvial deposits are typically 30 to 80 ft thick, and are laterally persistent filling an incised valley wider than the largest producing fields. The lower contact is irregular with local relief of 50 ft. The braided-fluvial deposits consist of 100-400-ft wide, 5-15-ft thick channel-fill elements. Each channel-fill interval is limited laterally by an erosional contact or overbank deposits, and is separated vertically by discontinuous mudstones or highly concentrated mudstone interclast lag conglomerates. Low-angle parallel-stratified or trough cross-stratified medium- to coarse-grained sandstones volumetrically dominate. This section has a blocky well log profile. Meandering fluvial deposits are typically 100 to 150 ft thick and comprise multiple discrete genetic intervals.

  14. Effect of VSR invariant Chern-Simons Lagrangian on photon polarization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nayak, Alekha C.; Verma, Ravindra K.; Jain, Pankaj

    2015-07-21

    We propose a generalization of the Chern-Simons (CS) Lagrangian which is invariant under the SIM(2) transformations but not under the full Lorentz group. The generalized lagrangian is also invariant under a SIM(2) gauge transformation. We study the effect of such a term on radiation propagating over cosmological distances. We find that the dominant effect of this term is to produce circular polarization as radiation propagates through space. We use the circular polarization data from distant radio sources in order to impose a limit on this term.

  15. Sedimentology and cyclicity in the Lower Permian De Chelly sandstone on the Defiance Plateau: Eastern Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stanesco, J.D. (Geological Survey, Lakewood, CO (United States))

    1991-10-01

    Lithofacies in the De Chelly Sandstone consist of (1) a large-scale trough to tabular- and/or wedge-planar cross-stratified sandstone facies of large-scale eolian dune origin, (2) a small- to medium-scale, trough cross-stratified sandstone also of eolian dune origin, (3) a horizontally stratified, wind-rippled sandstone of sand sheet origin, (4) a wavy, horizontally stratified, wind-rippled sandstone of sabkha origin, and (5) a mud-draped ripple-laminated sandstone of mud-flat origin. The De Chelly Sandstone in the northern Defiance Plateau consists mainly of large-scale dune deposits. Stratigraphic sections in the middle of the plateau are dominated by small- to medium-scale dune and sand sheet deposits whereas those along the southern end of the plateau are composed largely of sabkha and supratidal mud-flat deposits. The lateral distribution of these facies suggests a north-south juxtaposition of central-erg, fore-erg, and mixed sabkha-supratidal depositional environments. Repetitive interbedding of facies in the De Chelly indicates at least twelve depositional cycles in which sabkha and/or supratidal to coastal-plain mud-flats were sequentially overridden by eolian sand sheets and cross-stratified dunes. Lateral and vertical facies relations within the lower and upper members of the De Chelly Sandstone record episodic expansion of the De Chelly erg southward. The comparative abundance of large-scale dune deposits in the upper member suggests that progradation was more extensive during latter stages of deposition. The intervening tongue of Supai Formation and the redbeds that overlie the upper member of the De Chelly at Bonito Canyon document northward transgression of sabkha and supratidal to coastal-plain mud-flat environments. Eolian dune deposition was restricted to the northern Defiance Plateau during deposition of these units.

  16. HERO Ski Trip to Mt. Hood Meadows February

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    If there is enough interest, we may be able to charter a bus to drive us up and back. Stay at the Best Western Plus Hood River Inn which is just 30 miles from Mt. Hood's largest...

  17. RAPID/Roadmap/17-MT-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Stream Protection Act (SPA 124 Permit) (17-MT-b) Montana has a policy to preserve fish and wildlife habitat as well as maintain Montana's streams and rivers in their natural...

  18. RAPID/Roadmap/13-MT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contribute Contact Us State Land Use Assessment (13-MT-a) 13MTALandUseAssessment.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number...

  19. RAPID/Roadmap/3-MT-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tools Contribute Contact Us State Land Lease (3-MT-b) 03MTBStateLandAccess (1).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number...

  20. RAPID/Roadmap/6-MT-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contact Us Drinking Water Permit (6-MT-c) Add Text 06MTCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number...

  1. Ground Gravity Survey At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lithologic distrubtions Notes Gravity low associated with Mt. Princeton Batholith; density contrast of -0.5 gcm3 of valley-fill sediments relative to batholith References J.E....

  2. RAPID/Roadmap/3-MT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resources & Conservation. The application requires an adequate description of the lands. The application fee is 10. 3-MT-a.2 - Does the Director Decide to Announce the Sale...

  3. MT Energie GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Saxony, Germany Zip: 27404 Sector: Services Product: MT-Energie provides both turn-key biogas plants and related components and services. Coordinates: 53.295765, 9.27964 Show...

  4. Mt. Wachusett Community College Makes Huge Investment in Wind Power |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Mt. Wachusett Community College Makes Huge Investment in Wind Power Mt. Wachusett Community College Makes Huge Investment in Wind Power March 14, 2011 - 1:14pm Addthis Mount Wachusett Community College staff Bill Swift, Bob LaBonte, Norm Boudreau, George Couillard and Vestas trainer Bill Fulkerson about to ascend the MWCC north wind turbine | Photo courtesy of GreenOnGreenStreet Mount Wachusett Community College staff Bill Swift, Bob LaBonte, Norm Boudreau, George

  5. Targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis Biotin Protein Ligase (MtBPL) with

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nucleoside-Based Bisubstrate Adenylation Inhibitors (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis Biotin Protein Ligase (MtBPL) with Nucleoside-Based Bisubstrate Adenylation Inhibitors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Targeting Mycobacterium tuberculosis Biotin Protein Ligase (MtBPL) with Nucleoside-Based Bisubstrate Adenylation Inhibitors Authors: Bockman, Matthew R. ; Kalinda, Alvin S. ; Petrelli, Riccardo ; De la Mora-Rey, Teresa ; Tiwari, Divya ; Liu,

  6. Primordial massive gravitational waves from Einstein-Chern-Simons-Weyl gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myung, Yun Soo; Moon, Taeyoon E-mail: tymoon@inje.ac.kr

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the evolution of cosmological perturbations during de Sitter inflation in the Einstein-Chern-Simons-Weyl gravity. Primordial massive gravitational waves are composed of one scalar, two vector and four tensor circularly polarized modes. We show that the vector power spectrum decays quickly like a transversely massive vector in the superhorizon limit z?0. In this limit, the power spectrum coming from massive tensor modes decays quickly, leading to the conventional tensor power spectrum. Also, we find that in the limit of m{sup 2}?0 (keeping the Weyl-squared term only), the vector and tensor power spectra disappear. It implies that their power spectra are not gravitationally produced because they (vector and tensor) are decoupled from the expanding de Sitter background, as a result of conformal invariance.

  7. Factors controlling reservoir quality in tertiary sandstones and their significance to geopressured geothermal production. Annual report, May 1, 1979-May 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loucks, R.G.; Richmann, D.L.; Milliken, K.L.

    1980-07-01

    Differing extents of diagenetic modification is the factor primarily responsible for contrasting regional reservoir quality of Tertiary sandstones from the Upper and Lower Texas Gulf Coast. Detailed comparison of Frio sandstones from the Chocolate Bayou/Danbury Dome area, Brazoria County, and Vicksburg sandstones from the McAllen Ranch Field area, Hidalgo County, reveals that extent of diagenetic modification is most strongly influenced by (1) detrital mineralogy and (2) regional geothermal gradients. Vicksburg sandstones from the McAllen Ranch Field area are less stable, chemically and mechanically, than Frio sandstones from the Chocolate Bayou/Danbury dome area. Vicksburg sandstones are mineralogically immature and contain greater proportions of feldspars and rock fragments than do Frio sandstones. Thr reactive detrital assemblage of Vicksubrg sandstones is highly susceptible to diagenetic modification. Susceptibility is enhanced by higher than normal geothermal gradients in the McAllen Ranch Field area. Thus, consolidation of Vicksburg sandstones began at shallower depth of burial and precipitation of authigenic phases (especially calcite) was more pervasive than in Frio sandstones. Moreover, the late-stage episode of ferroan calcite precipitation that occluded most secondary porosity in Vicksburg sandstones did not occur significantly in Frio sandstones. Therefore, regional reservoir quality of Frio sandstones from Brazoria County is far better than that characterizing Vicksburg sandstones from Hidalgo County, especially at depths suitable for geopressured geothermal energy production.

  8. Comparison of composition and texture of calcite-cemented concretions and host sandstones, northern Apennines, Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cibin, U. . Dept. de Scienze Geologiche); Cavazza, W. . Dept de Scienze Mineralogiche); Fontana, D. . Inst. di Geologia); Milliken, K.L.; McBride, E.F. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-09-01

    Compositional and textural characteristics of 13 calcite-cemented concretions are compared with those in adjacent but essentially uncemented host sandstones to test the belief that concretions better preserve original detrital compositions than do host rocks. Sandstones sampled are from five upper Eocene to Pliocene clastic units deposited in a piggy-back setting and from one Miocene unit in the foreland basin of the northern Apennines. The authors' data indicate that calcite-cemented concretions do not necessarily preserve unstable grains more readily than host sandstones, especially if cementation occurs late in the burial history of the sandstones. In the examined formations the main factors controlling the capability of concretions to preserve unstable framework grains seem to be (1) the types of unstable grains, (2) their susceptibility to dissolution by interstitial fluids or replacement by calcite, (3) burial depth and temperature during and after concretion development, and (4) time. Correct provenance reconstructions of sandstone units containing concretions must be preceded by assessment of any diagenetic alteration affecting the framework grains of both concretions and host rocks.

  9. Stratigraphy and petroleum potential of Trout Creek and Twentymile sandstones (Upper Cretaceous), Sand Wash Basin, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siepman, B.R.

    1985-05-01

    The Trout Creek and Twentymile Sandstones (Mesaverde Group) in Moffat and Routt Counties, Colorado, are thick, upward-coarsening sequences that were deposited along the western margin of the Western Interior basin during Campanian time. These units trend northeast-southwest and undergo a facies change to coal-bearing strata on the northwest. Surface data collected along the southeastern rim of the Sand Wash basin were combined with well-log data from approximately 100 drill holes that have penetrated the Trout Creek or Twentymile in the subsurface. The sandstones exhibit distinctive vertical profiles with regard to grain size, sedimentary structures, and biogenic structures. A depositional model that incorporates the key elements of the modern Nile River (northeast Africa) and Nayarit (west-central Mexico) coastal systems is proposed for the Trout Creek and Twentymile sandstones and associated strata. The model depicts a wave-dominated deltaic, strand-plain, and barrier-island system. Depositional cycles are asymmetrical in cross section as they are largely progradational and lack significant transgressive deposits. Source rock-reservoir rock relationships are ideal as marine shales underlie, and coal-bearing strata overlie sheetlike reservoir sandstones. Humic coal, the dominant source of Mesaverde gas, generates major quantities of methane upon reaching thermal maturity. Existing Mesaverde gas fields are largely structural traps, but stratigraphic and combination traps may prove to be equally important. The sparsely drilled deeper part of the basin warrants testing as large, overpressured-gas accumulations in tight-sandstone reservoirs are likely to be found.

  10. Origins of relief along contacts between eolian sandstones and overlying marine strata

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eschner, T.B.; Kocurek, G.

    1988-08-01

    Origins of large-scale relief along eolian-marine unit contacts, which form significant stratigraphic traps for hydrocarbons, can be recognized as inherited, reworked, and/or erosional. The Permian Rotliegende-Weissliegende Sandstone and Yellow Sands of Europe may best exemplify inherited relief in that dunes are preserved largely intact. Reworked relief, which shows significant destruction of original dune topography but with remnants of the bedforms preserved, is shown by relict Holocene dunes of coastal Australia, the Jurassic Entrada Sandstone of the San Juan basin, and the Pennsylvanian-Permian Minnelusa Formation of Wyoming. Erosional relief results from post-eolian processes and is exemplified by the Jurassic Entrada Sandstone of northeastern Utah. 11 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Transport of Organic Contaminants Mobilized from Coal through Sandstone Overlying a Geological Carbon Sequestration Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong, Lirong; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Bacon, Diana H.; Shewell, Jesse L.

    2014-02-01

    Column experiments were conducted using a wetted sandstone rock installed in a tri-axial core holder to study the flow and transport of organic compounds mobilized by scCO2 under simulated geologic carbon storage (GCS) conditions. The sandstone rock was collected from a formation overlying a deep saline reservoir at a GCS demonstration site. Rock core effluent pressures were set at 0, 500, or 1000 psig and the core temperature was set at 20 or 50C to simulate the transport to different subsurface depths. The concentrations of the organic compounds in the column effluent and their distribution within the sandstone core were monitored. Results indicate that the mobility though the core sample was much higher for BTEX compounds than for naphthalene. Retention of organic compounds from the vapor phase to the core appeared to be primarily controlled by partitioning from the vapor phase to the aqueous phase. Adsorption to the surfaces of the wetted sandstone was also significant for naphthalene. Reduced temperature and elevated pressure resulted in greater partitioning of the mobilized organic contaminants into the water phase.

  12. Couplings between Chern-Simons gravities and 2p-branes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miskovic, Olivera; Zanelli, Jorge

    2009-08-15

    The interaction between Chern-Simons (CS) theories and localized external sources (2p-branes) is analyzed. This interaction generalizes the minimal coupling between a point charge (0-brane) and a gauge connection. The external currents that define the 2p branes are covariantly constant (D-2p-1)-forms coupled to (2p-1) CS forms. The general expression for the sources--charged with respect to the corresponding gauge algebra--is presented, focusing on two special cases: 0-branes and (D-3)-branes. In any dimension, 0-branes are constructed as topological defects produced by a surface deficit of (D-2)-sphere in anti-de Sitter space, and they are not constant curvature spaces for D>3. They correspond to dimensionally continued black holes with negative mass. On the other hand, in the case of CS (super) gravities, the (D-3)-branes are naked conical singularities (topological defects) obtained by identification of points with a Killing vector. In 2+1 dimensions, extremal spinning branes of this type are Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield states. Stable (D-3)-branes are shown to exist also in higher dimensions, as well. Classical field equations are also discussed, and in the presence of sources there is a large number of inequivalent and disconnected sectors in solution space.

  13. 3-D Density Model Of Mt Etna Volcano (Southern Italy) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Density Model Of Mt Etna Volcano (Southern Italy) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: 3-D Density Model Of Mt Etna Volcano (Southern...

  14. Www.deq.mt.gov/MFS/LawRules/Circular2 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Www.deq.mt.govMFSLawRulesCircular2 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Reference: Www.deq.mt.govMFSLawRulesCircular2 Published Publisher Not...

  15. fe0001547 | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1547 Recovery Act: CO2 Capture From Biofuels Production and Sequestration into the Mt. Simon Sandstone Reservoir Email Page email Print This Page print Performer: Archer Daniels Midland Corporation (ADM) fe0001547 ADM's Agricultural Processing and Biofuels Plant, Decatur, IL. Website: Archer Daniels Midland Corporation (ADM) Award Number: FE0001547 Project Duration: 11/16/2009 - 09/30/2017 Total Award Value: $207,942,199.00 DOE Share: $141,405,945.00 Performer Share: $66,536,254.00 Technology

  16. Microsoft Word - Final EA- ADM.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    28 Final Environmental Assessment Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration (ICCS) Area 1 Project "CO 2 Capture from Biofuels Production and Sequestration into the Mt. Simon Sandstone" Archer Daniels Midland Company Decatur, Illinois For U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory DE-FE0001547 April 2011 ACKNOWLEDGEMENT This report was prepared with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under Award No. DE-FE0001547 (Recovery Act - Industrial Carbon

  17. EA-1626: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    26: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1626: Final Environmental Assessment Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) Phase III Large-Scale Field Test DOE proposes to co-fund an $84,274,927 project located on property of the MGSC partner Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM). The overall objective of this project would be to demonstrate the ability of the Mt. Simon Sandstone, a major regional saline reservoir in the Illinois Basin, to accept and retain approximately 1.1 million short tons

  18. EA-1828: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Final Environmental Assessment EA-1828: Final Environmental Assessment Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration (ICCS) Area 1 Project : CO2 Capture from Biofuels Production and Sequestration into the Mt. Simon Sandstone, Archer Daniels Midland Company Decatur, Illinois DOE prepared this EA to evaluate the potential environmental consequences of providing a financial assistance grant under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) in a cooperative agreement with Archer Daniels

  19. DEFORMATION AND FRACTURE OF POORLY CONSOLIDATED MEDIA - Borehole Failure Mechanisms in High-Porosity Sandstone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bezalel c. Haimson

    2005-06-10

    We investigated failure mechanisms around boreholes and the formation of borehole breakouts in high-porosity sandstone, with particular interest to grain-scale micromechanics of failure leading to the hitherto unrecognized fracture-like borehole breakouts and apparent compaction band formation in poorly consolidated granular materials. We also looked at a variety of drilling-related factors that contribute to the type, size and shape of borehole breakouts. The objective was to assess their effect on the ability to establish correlations between breakout geometry and in situ stress magnitudes, as well as on borehole stability prediction, and hydrocarbon/water extraction in general. We identified two classes of medium to high porosity (12-30%) sandstones, arkosic, consisting of 50-70% quartz and 15 to 50% feldspar, and quartz-rich sandstones, in which quartz grain contents varied from 90 to 100%. In arkose sandstones critical far-field stress magnitudes induced compressive failure around boreholes in the form of V-shaped (dog-eared) breakouts, the result of dilatant intra-and trans-granular microcracking subparallel to both the maximum horizontal far-field stress and to the borehole wall. On the other hand, boreholes in quartz-rich sandstones failed by developing fracture-like breakouts. These are long and very narrow (several grain diameters) tabular failure zones perpendicular to the maximum stress. Evidence provided mainly by SEM observations suggests a failure process initiated by localized grain-bond loosening along the least horizontal far-field stress springline, the packing of these grains into a lower porosity compaction band resembling those discovered in Navajo and Aztec sandstones, and the emptying of the loosened grains by the circulating drilling fluid starting from the borehole wall. Although the immediate several grain layers at the breakout tip often contain some cracked or even crushed grains, the failure mechanism enabled by the formation of the compaction band is largely non-dilatant, a major departure from the dilatant mechanism observed in Tablerock sandstone. The experimental results suggest that unlike our previous assertion, the strength of grain bonding and the mineral composition, rather than the porosity, are major factors in the formation of compaction bands and the ensuing fracture-like breakouts. Some breakout dimensions in all rocks were correlatable to the far-field principal stresses, and could potentially be used (in conjunction with other information) as indicators of their magnitudes. However, we found that several factors can significantly influence breakout geometry. Larger boreholes and increased drilling-fluid flow rates produce longer fracture-like breakouts, suggesting that breakouts in field-scale wellbores could reach considerable lengths. On the other hand, increased drilling-fluid weight and increased drill-bit penetration rate resulted in a decrease in breakout length. These results indicate that breakout growth can be controlled to some degree by manipulating drilling variables. Realizing how drilling variables impact borehole breakout formation is important in understanding the process by which breakouts form and their potential use as indicators of the far-field in situ stress magnitudes and as sources of sand production. As our research indicates, the final breakout size and mechanism of formation can be a function of several variables and conditions, meaning there is still much to be understood about this phenomenon.

  20. RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION OF UPPER DEVONIAN GORDON SANDSTONE, JACKSONBURG STRINGTOWN OIL FIELD, NORTHWESTERN WEST VIRGINIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Ameri; K. Aminian; K.L. Avary; H.I. Bilgesu; M.E. Hohn; R.R. McDowell; D.L. Matchen

    2001-07-01

    The Jacksonburg-Stringtown oil field contained an estimated 88,500,000 barrels of oil in place, of which approximately 20,000,000 barrels were produced during primary recovery operations. A gas injection project, initiated in 1934, and a pilot waterflood, begun in 1981, yielded additional production from limited portions of the field. The pilot was successful enough to warrant development of a full-scale waterflood in 1990, involving approximately 8,900 acres in three units, with a target of 1,500 barrels of oil per acre recovery. Historical patterns of drilling and development within the field suggests that the Gordon reservoir is heterogeneous, and that detailed reservoir characterization is necessary for understanding well performance and addressing problems observed by the operators. The purpose of this work is to establish relationships among permeability, geophysical and other data by integrating geologic, geophysical and engineering data into an interdisciplinary quantification of reservoir heterogeneity as it relates to production. Conventional stratigraphic correlation and core description shows that the Gordon sandstone is composed of three parasequences, formed along the Late Devonian shoreline of the Appalachian Basin. The parasequences comprise five lithofacies, of which one includes reservoir sandstones. Pay sandstones were found to have permeabilities in core ranging from 10 to 200 mD, whereas non-pay sandstones have permeabilities ranging from below the level of instrumental detection to 5 mD; Conglomeratic zones could take on the permeability characteristics of enclosing materials, or could exhibit extremely low values in pay sandstone and high values in non-pay or low permeability pay sandstone. Four electrofacies based on a linear combination of density and scaled gamma ray best matched correlations made independently based on visual comparison of geophysical logs. Electrofacies 4 with relatively high permeability (mean value > 45 mD) was determined to be equivalent to the pay sandstone within the Gordon reservoir. Three-dimensional models of the electrofacies in the pilot waterflood showed that electrofacies 4 is present throughout this area, and the other electrofacies are more disconnected. A three-layer, back-propagation artificial neural network with three slabs in the middle layer can be used to predict permeability and porosity from gamma ray and bulk density logs, the first and the second derivatives of the log data with respect to depth, well location, and log baselines. Two flow units were defined based on the stratigraphic model and geophysical logs. A three-dimensional reservoir model including the flow units, values of permeability calculated through the artificial neural network and injection pressure-rate information were then used as inputs for a reservoir simulator to predict oil production performance for the center producers in the pilot area. This description of the reservoir provided significantly better simulation results than earlier results obtained using simple reservoir models. Bulk density and gamma ray logs were used to identify flow units throughout the field. As predicted by the stratigraphic analysis, one of the flow units crosses stratigraphic units in the reservoir. A neural network was used to predict permeability values for each flow unit in producer and injection wells. The reservoir simulator was utilized to predict the performance of two flood patterns located to the north of the pilot area. Considering the simple model utilized for simulation, the results are in very good agreement with the field history.

  1. Sweetgrass, MT Liquefied Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Liquefied Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Sweetgrass, MT Liquefied Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2012 2 2013 3 5 4 6 9 8 5 8 7 5 7 5 2014 8 11 10 8 8 5 6 6 6 6 6 7 2015 5 4 5 5 5 4 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 02/29/2016 Next Release Date: 03/31/2016 Referring

  2. Rock Sampling At Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995) | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploration Activity Details Location Mt Ranier Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes This paper relies...

  3. Controlled Source Audio MT At Pilgrim Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Controlled Source Audio MT At Pilgrim Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Pilgrim...

  4. The massive fermion phase for the U(N) Chern-Simons gauge theory in D=3 at large N

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bardeen, William A.

    2014-10-07

    We explore the phase structure of fermions in the U(N) Chern-Simons Gauge theory in three dimensions using the large N limit where N is the number of colors and the fermions are taken to be in the fundamental representation of the U(N) gauge group. In the large N limit, the theory retains its classical conformal behavior and considerable attention has been paid to possible AdS/CFT dualities of the theory in the conformal phase. In this paper we present a solution for the massive phase of the fermion theory that is exact to the leading order of ‘t Hooft’s large Nmore » expansion. We present evidence for the spontaneous breaking of the exact scale symmetry and analyze the properties of the dilaton that appears as the Goldstone boson of scale symmetry breaking.« less

  5. The massive fermion phase for the U(N) Chern-Simons gauge theory in D=3 at large N

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bardeen, William A.

    2014-10-07

    We explore the phase structure of fermions in the U(N) Chern-Simons Gauge theory in three dimensions using the large N limit where N is the number of colors and the fermions are taken to be in the fundamental representation of the U(N) gauge group. In the large N limit, the theory retains its classical conformal behavior and considerable attention has been paid to possible AdS/CFT dualities of the theory in the conformal phase. In this paper we present a solution for the massive phase of the fermion theory that is exact to the leading order of t Hoofts large N expansion. We present evidence for the spontaneous breaking of the exact scale symmetry and analyze the properties of the dilaton that appears as the Goldstone boson of scale symmetry breaking.

  6. Spontaneous breaking of scale invariance in a D = 3 U(N ) model with Chern-Simons gauge fields

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bardeen, William A.; Moshe, Moshe

    2014-06-18

    We study spontaneous breaking of scale invariance in the large N limit of three dimensional U(N )κ Chern-Simons theories coupled to a scalar field in the fundamental representation. When a λ6 ( ؆ · Ø)3 self interaction term is added to the action we find a massive phase at a certain critical value for a combination of the λ(6) and ’t Hooft’s λ = N/κ couplings. This model attracted recent attention since at finite κ it contains a singlet sector which is conjectured to be dual to Vasiliev’s higher spin gravity on AdS4. Our paper concentrates on the massive phasemore » of the 3d boundary theory. We discuss the advantage of introducing masses in the boundary theory through spontaneous breaking of scale invariance.« less

  7. Approximation of continuity of lenticular Mesaverde Group sandstone lenses utilizing close-well correlations, Piceance Basin, NW Colorado. SPE 11610

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, R.E.; Kohout, J.B.

    1982-01-01

    Mesaverde Group sandstone units in 13 closely-spaced wells in the central and southern Piceance Basin of Colorado were correlated utilizing wireline log response quantitatively and qualitatively. Based on these correlations, the environmental subdivisions of the Mesaverde Group were characterized as follows: (1) paralic (upper mixed-marine) zone, occurring in the uppermost Mesaverde Group, includes thick sandstone units which are interpreted to be regionally continuous, (2) fluvial zone, containing point-bars 20 to 30+ ft thick, is interpreted to be correlatable to a maximum of 6800 ft, and (3) paludal zone has insufficient data to adequately characterize the sand units. However, 63 percent of the units are correlatable across at least 139 ft. An approximation of the dimensional characteristics of Mesaverde sandstone units has potential applications in designing hydraulic fracturing treatments and estimating gas reserves more accurately. 15 figures, 2 tables.

  8. Reservoir heterogeneity in Carboniferous sandstone of the Black Warrior basin. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugler, R.L.; Pashin, J.C.; Carroll, R.E.; Irvin, G.D.; Moore, H.E.

    1994-04-01

    Although oil production in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama is declining, additional oil may be produced through improved recovery strategies, such as waterflooding, chemical injection, strategic well placement, and infill drilling. High-quality characterization of reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin is necessary to utilize advanced technology to recover additional oil and to avoid premature abandonment of fields. This report documents controls on the distribution and producibility of oil from heterogeneous Carboniferous reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. The first part of the report summarizes the structural and depositional evolution of the Black Warrior basin and establishes the geochemical characteristics of hydrocarbon source rocks and oil in the basin. This second part characterizes facies heterogeneity and petrologic and petrophysical properties of Carter and Millerella sandstone reservoirs. This is followed by a summary of oil production in the Black Warrior basin and an evaluation of seven improved-recovery projects in Alabama. In the final part, controls on the producibility of oil from sandstone reservoirs are discussed in terms of a scale-dependent heterogeneity classification.

  9. Three-dimensional analysis of eolian systems in Jurassic Wingate sandstone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nation, M.J.; Blakey, R.C.

    1989-03-01

    Regional bounding surfaces in ancient eolian sequences aid in establishing lateral profiles not previously obtainable using standard stratigraphic methods. Correlation of detailed measured sections permits three-dimensional analysis of erg dynamics in the Jurassic Wingate Sandstone on the Colorado Plateau. Four periods of erg development marked by contrasting styles of eolian architecture are documented in the Salt Anticline region (in ascending stratigraphic order): (1) discontinuous sand sheets, isolated dunes, and aqueous environments; (2) large compound dunes with decreasing amounts of dune margin material; (3) compound dunes and draas alternating with locally thick sandsheet deposits; and (4) widespread dunes and draas prior to erosion by Kayenta fluvial systems. Regional bounding surface characteristics reflect different mechanisms for erg stabilization, including deflation to the water table, climate change, and negative net sand budget. Lateral reconstruction and correlation of erg sequences indicate significant intrabasinal paleogeographic and tectonic controls on eolian systems. Localities removed from the Salt Anticline region contain much larger compound draa deposits and lack extensive accumulations of sand-sheet material. Regional comparison of these characteristics suggests that the salt uplifts modified eolian processes within the Wingate depositional basin. Existence of additional geographic variations not associated with salt tectonism is indicated by local accumulations of noneolian deposits in northeastern Arizona. The use of regional bounding surfaces to construct lateral profiles is a powerful method to establish three-dimensional models of eolian systems. Analysis of erg dynamics in other ancient eolian formations is possible utilizing the criteria documented in the Wingate Sandstone.

  10. Reservoir heterogeneity in carboniferous sandstone of the Black Warrior basin. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugler, R.L.; Pashin, J.C.; Carroll, R.E.; Irvin, G.D.; Moore, H.E.

    1994-06-01

    Although oil production in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama is declining, additional oil may be produced through improved recovery strategies, such as waterflooding, chemical injection, strategic well placement, and infill drilling. High-quality characterization of reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin is necessary to utilize advanced technology to recover additional oil and to avoid premature abandonment of fields. This report documents controls on the distribution and producibility of oil from heterogeneous Carboniferous reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. The first part of the report summarizes the structural and depositional evolution of the Black Warrior basin and establishes the geochemical characteristics of hydrocarbon source rocks and oil in the basin. This second part characterizes facies heterogeneity and petrologic and petrophysical properties of Carter and Millerella sandstone reservoirs. This is followed by a summary of oil production in the Black Warrior basin and an evaluation of seven improved-recovery projects in Alabama. In the final part, controls on the producibility of oil from sandstone reservoirs are discussed in terms of a scale-dependent heterogeneity classification.

  11. Effect of Temperature and Solution Composition on the Permeability of St. Peters Sandstone: Role of Iron (III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potter, J.M.; Nur, A.; Dibble, W.E. Jr.

    1980-12-16

    The purpose of this study was to systematically investigate effects of temperature and fluid composition on the permeability of quartz sandstones. We have concentrated our initial efforts on the time and flow dependence at 2 elevated temperatures (100C, 200C).

  12. Fossil vertebrate footprints in the Coconino Sandstone (Permian) of northern Arizona: Evidence for underwater origin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brand, L.R.; Thu Tang (Loma Linda Univ., CA (United States))

    1991-12-01

    Numerous fossil vertebrate trackways in the Coconino Sandstone of northern Arizona exhibit several features that imply that these trackways were not made in subaerial conditions. Some trackways begin or end abruptly on undisturbed bedding planes, and in other trackways the individual prints are oriented in a different direction from that of the trackway. These features indicate buoyancy of the animals in water. The animals were swimming in the water part of the time and at other times walking on the substrate, and they were sometimes orienting upslope on the surface of the underwater dunes, while being drifted sideways by lateral currents. Observations on salamander locomotion in a sedimentation tank with flowing water support this model.

  13. A Large Self-Potential Anomaly And Its Changes On The Quiet Mt...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Large Self-Potential Anomaly And Its Changes On The Quiet Mt Fuji, Japan Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Large Self-Potential...

  14. Effect of quartz overgrowth precipitation on the multiscale porosity of sandstone: A (U)SANS and imaging analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anovitz, Lawrence M.; Cole, David R.; Jackson, Andrew J.; Rother, Gernot; Littrell, Kenneth C.; Allard, Lawrence F.; Pollington, Anthony D.; Wesolowski, David J.

    2015-06-01

    We have performed a series of experiments to understand the effects of quartz overgrowths on nanometer to centimeter scale pore structures of sandstones. Blocks from two samples of St. Peter Sandstone with different initial porosities (5.8 and 18.3%) were reacted from 3 days to 7.5 months at 100 and 200 C in aqueous solutions supersaturated with respect to quartz by reaction with amorphous silica. Porosity in the resultant samples was analyzed using small and ultrasmall angle neutron scattering and scanning electron microscope/backscattered electron (SEM/BSE)-based image-scale processing techniques.Significant changes were observed in the multiscale pore structures. By three days much of the overgrowth in the low-porosity sample dissolved away. The reason for this is uncertain, but the overgrowths can be clearly distinguished from the original core grains in the BSE images. At longer times the larger pores are observed to fill with plate-like precipitates. As with the unreacted sandstones, porosity is a step function of size. Grain boundaries are typically fractal, but no evidence of mass fractal or fuzzy interface behavior was observed suggesting a structural difference between chemical and clastic sediments. After the initial loss of the overgrowths, image scale porosity (>~1 cm) decreases with time. Submicron porosity (typically ~25% of the total) is relatively constant or slightly decreasing in absolute terms, but the percent change is significant. Fractal dimensions decrease at larger scales, and increase at smaller scales with increased precipitation.

  15. Study on fine geological modelling of the fluvial sandstone reservoir in Daqing oilfield

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhoa Han-Qing

    1997-08-01

    These paper aims at developing a method for fine reservoir description in maturing oilfields by using close spaced well logging data. The main productive reservoirs in Daqing oilfield is a set of large fluvial-deltaic deposits in the Songliao Lake Basin, characterized by multi-layers and serious heterogeneities. Various fluvial channel sandstone reservoirs cover a fairly important proportion of reserves. After a long period of water flooding, most of them have turned into high water cut layers, but there are considerable residual reserves within them, which are difficult to find and tap. Making fine reservoir description and developing sound a geological model is essential for tapping residual oil and enhancing oil recovery. The principal reason for relative lower precision of predicting model developed by using geostatistics is incomplete recognition of complex distribution of fluvial reservoirs and their internal architecture`s. Tasking advantage of limited outcrop data from other regions (suppose no outcrop data available in oilfield) can only provide the knowledge of subtle changing of reservoir parameters and internal architecture. For the specific geometry distribution and internal architecture of subsurface reservoirs (such as in produced regions) can be gained only from continuous infilling logging well data available from studied areas. For developing a geological model, we think the first important thing is to characterize sandbodies geometries and their general architecture`s, which are the framework of models, and then the slight changing of interwell parameters and internal architecture`s, which are the contents and cells of the model. An excellent model should possess both of them, but the geometry is the key to model, because it controls the contents and cells distribution within a model.

  16. Secondary oil recovery from selected Carter sandstone oilfields--Black Warrior Basin, Alabama. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, J.C.

    1995-02-01

    Producibility problems, such as low reservoir pressure and reservoir heterogeneity, have severely limited oil production from the Central Bluff and North Fairview fields. Specific objectives for this project were: To successfully apply detailed geologic and engineering studies with conventional waterflood technologies to these fields in an effort to increase the ultimate economic recovery of oil from Carter sandstone fields; To extensively model, test and evaluate these technologies; thereby, developing a sound methodology for their use and optimization; and To team with Advanced Resources International and the US DOE to assimilate and transfer the information and results gathered from this study to other oil companies to encourage the widespread use of these technologies. At Central Bluff, water injection facilities were constructed and water injection into one well began in January 1993. Oil response from the waterflood has been observed at both producing wells. One of the producing wells has experienced early water breakthrough and a concomitant drop in secondary oil rate. A reservoir modeling study was initiated to help develop an appropriate operating strategy for Central Bluff. For the North Fairview unit waterflood, a previously abandoned well was converted for water injection which began in late June 1993. The reservoir is being re-pressurized, and unit water production has remained nil since flood start indicating the possible formation of an oil bank. A reservoir simulation to characterize the Carter sand at North Fairview was undertaken and the modeling results were used to forecast field performance. The project was terminated due to unfavorable economics. The factors contributing to this decision were premature water breakthrough at Central Bluff, delayed flood response at North Fairview and stalled negotiations at the South Bluff site.

  17. Experiment operations plan for the MT-4 experiment in the NRU reactor. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russcher, G.E.; Wilson, C.L.; Parchen, L.J.; Marshall, R.K.; Hesson, G.M.; Webb, B.J.; Freshley, M.D.

    1983-06-01

    A series of thermal-hydraulic and cladding materials deformation experiments were conducted using light-water reactor fuel bundles as part of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) Simulation Program. This report is the formal operations plan for MT-4 - the fourth materials deformation experiment conducted in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor, Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. A major objective of MT-4 was to simulate a pressurized water reactor LOCA that could induce fuel rod cladding deformation and rupture due to a short-term adiabatic transient and a peak fuel cladding temperature of 1200K (1700/sup 0/F).

  18. Operation Sandstone. Scientific Director's report of atomic-weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1948. Annex 8. Gamma-ray measurements. Parts 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. Sandstone report No. 29

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonka, F.R.; Pawlicki, G.S.

    1985-09-01

    Curves of absorption of gamma rays in boron carbide and a few points on the absorption curve in lead were obtained during the three atomic explosions of Operation Sandstone. Radiation was detected by integrating ionization chambers and by photographic emulsions. A few recording-type ionization chambers were used to give intensities as a function of time. Radiation detectors were located inside of shelters which protected them from blast and shielded them from scattered radiation. Because of geometry, scattered radiation was negligible and the analysis of absorption curves yields the true total absorption coefficient for the radiation.

  19. 2D Seismic Reflection Data across Central Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Valerie; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    In a continuing collaboration with the Midwest Geologic Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) on the Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins project, Schlumberger Carbon Services and WesternGeco acquired two-dimensional (2D) seismic data in the Illinois Basin. This work included the design, acquisition and processing of approximately 125 miles of (2D) seismic reflection surveys running west to east in the central Illinois Basin. Schlumberger Carbon Services and WesternGeco oversaw the management of the field operations (including a pre-shoot planning, mobilization, acquisition and de-mobilization of the field personnel and equipment), procurement of the necessary permits to conduct the survey, post-shoot closure, processing of the raw data, and provided expert consultation as needed in the interpretation of the delivered product. Three 2D seismic lines were acquired across central Illinois during November and December 2010 and January 2011. Traversing the Illinois Basin, this 2D seismic survey was designed to image the stratigraphy of the Cambro-Ordovician sections and also to discern the basement topography. Prior to this survey, there were no regionally extensive 2D seismic data spanning this section of the Illinois Basin. Between the NW side of Morgan County and northwestern border of Douglas County, these seismic lines ran through very rural portions of the state. Starting in Morgan County, Line 101 was the longest at 93 miles in length and ended NE of Decatur, Illinois. Line 501 ran W-E from the Illinois Basin Decatur Project (IBDP) site to northwestern Douglas County and was 25 miles in length. Line 601 was the shortest and ran N-S past the IBDP site and connected lines 101 and 501. All three lines are correlated to well logs at the IBDP site. Originally processed in 2011, the 2D seismic profiles exhibited a degradation of signal quality below ~400 millisecond (ms) which made interpretation of the Mt. Simon and Knox sections difficult. The data quality also gradually decreased moving westward across the state. To meet evolving project objectives, in 2012 the seismic data was re-processed using different techniques to enhance the signal quality thereby rendering a more coherent seismic profile for interpreters. It is believed that the seismic degradation could be caused by shallow natural gas deposits and Quaternary sediments (which include abandoned river and stream channels, former ponds, and swamps with peat deposits) that may have complicated or changed the seismic wavelet. Where previously limited by seismic coverage, the seismic profiles have provided valuable subsurface information across central Illinois. Some of the interpretations based on this survey included, but are not limited to: - Stratigraphy generally gently dips to the east from Morgan to Douglas County. - The Knox Supergroup roughly maintains its thickness. There is little evidence for faulting in the Knox. However, at least one resolvable fault penetrates the entire Knox section. - The Eau Claire Formation, the primary seal for the Mt. Simon Sandstone, appears to be continuous across the entire seismic profile. - The Mt. Simon Sandstone thins towards the western edge of the basin. As a result, the highly porous lowermost Mt. Simon section is absent in the western part of the state. - Overall basement dip is from west to east. - Basement topography shows evidence of basement highs with on-lapping patterns by Mt. Simon sediments. - There is evidence of faults within the lower Mt. Simon Sandstone and basement rock that are contemporaneous with Mt. Simon Sandstone deposition. These faults are not active and do not penetrate the Eau Claire Shale. It is believed that these faults are associated with a possible failed rifting event 750 to 560 million years ago during the breakup of the supercontinent Rodinia.

  20. Effect of quartz overgrowth precipitation on the multiscale porosity of sandstone: A (U)SANS and imaging analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Anovitz, Lawrence M.; Cole, David R.; Jackson, Andrew J.; Rother, Gernot; Littrell, Kenneth C.; Allard, Lawrence F.; Pollington, Anthony D.; Wesolowski, David J.

    2015-06-01

    We have performed a series of experiments to understand the effects of quartz overgrowths on nanometer to centimeter scale pore structures of sandstones. Blocks from two samples of St. Peter Sandstone with different initial porosities (5.8 and 18.3%) were reacted from 3 days to 7.5 months at 100 and 200 °C in aqueous solutions supersaturated with respect to quartz by reaction with amorphous silica. Porosity in the resultant samples was analyzed using small and ultrasmall angle neutron scattering and scanning electron microscope/backscattered electron (SEM/BSE)-based image-scale processing techniques.Significant changes were observed in the multiscale pore structures. By three days much ofmore » the overgrowth in the low-porosity sample dissolved away. The reason for this is uncertain, but the overgrowths can be clearly distinguished from the original core grains in the BSE images. At longer times the larger pores are observed to fill with plate-like precipitates. As with the unreacted sandstones, porosity is a step function of size. Grain boundaries are typically fractal, but no evidence of mass fractal or fuzzy interface behavior was observed suggesting a structural difference between chemical and clastic sediments. After the initial loss of the overgrowths, image scale porosity (>~1 cm) decreases with time. Submicron porosity (typically ~25% of the total) is relatively constant or slightly decreasing in absolute terms, but the percent change is significant. Fractal dimensions decrease at larger scales, and increase at smaller scales with increased precipitation.« less

  1. Analysis of Critical Permeabilty, Capillary Pressure and Electrical Properties for Mesaverde Tight Gas Sandstones from Western U.S. Basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Byrnes; Robert Cluff; John Webb; John Victorine; Ken Stalder; Daniel Osburn; Andrew Knoderer; Owen Metheny; Troy Hommertzheim; Joshua Byrnes; Daniel Krygowski; Stefani Whittaker

    2008-06-30

    Although prediction of future natural gas supply is complicated by uncertainty in such variables as demand, liquefied natural gas supply price and availability, coalbed methane and gas shale development rate, and pipeline availability, all U.S. Energy Information Administration gas supply estimates to date have predicted that Unconventional gas sources will be the dominant source of U.S. natural gas supply for at least the next two decades (Fig. 1.1; the period of estimation). Among the Unconventional gas supply sources, Tight Gas Sandstones (TGS) will represent 50-70% of the Unconventional gas supply in this time period (Fig. 1.2). Rocky Mountain TGS are estimated to be approximately 70% of the total TGS resource base (USEIA, 2005) and the Mesaverde Group (Mesaverde) sandstones represent the principal gas productive sandstone unit in the largest Western U.S. TGS basins including the basins that are the focus of this study (Washakie, Uinta, Piceance, northern Greater Green River, Wind River, Powder River). Industry assessment of the regional gas resource, projection of future gas supply, and exploration programs require an understanding of reservoir properties and accurate tools for formation evaluation. The goal of this study is to provide petrophysical formation evaluation tools related to relative permeability, capillary pressure, electrical properties and algorithms for wireline log analysis. Detailed and accurate moveable gas-in-place resource assessment is most critical in marginal gas plays and there is need for quantitative tools for definition of limits on gas producibility due to technology and rock physics and for defining water saturation. The results of this study address fundamental questions concerning: (1) gas storage; (2) gas flow; (3) capillary pressure; (4) electrical properties; (5) facies and upscaling issues; (6) wireline log interpretation algorithms; and (7) providing a web-accessible database of advanced rock properties. The following text briefly discusses the nature of these questions. Section I.2 briefly discusses the objective of the study with respect to the problems reviewed.

  2. Evaluating impacts of CO2 gas intrusion into a confined sandstone aquifer: Experimental results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Lawter, Amanda R.; Shao, Hongbo; Wang, Guohui; Brown, Christopher F.

    2014-12-31

    Deep subsurface storage and sequestration of CO2 has been identified as a potential mitigation technique for rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Sequestered CO2 represents a potential risk to overlying aquifers if the CO2 leaks from the deep storage reservoir. Experimental and modeling work is required to evaluate potential risks to groundwater quality and develop a systematic understanding of how CO2 leakage may cause important changes in aquifer chemistry and mineralogy by promoting dissolution/precipitation, adsorption/desorption, and redox reactions. Sediments from the High Plains aquifer in Kansas, United States, were used in this investigation, which is part of the National Risk Assessment Partnership Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy. This aquifer was selected to be representative of consolidated sand and gravel/sandstone aquifers overlying potential CO2 sequestration repositories within the continental US. In this paper, we present results from batch experiments conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure with four High Plains aquifer sediments. Batch experiments simulate sudden, fast, and short-lived releases of the CO2 gas as would occur in the case of well failure during injection. Time-dependent release of major, minor, and trace elements were determined by analyzing the contacting solutions. Characterization studies demonstrated that the High Plains aquifer sediments were abundant in quartz and feldspars, and contained about 15 to 20 wt% montmorillonite and up to 5 wt% micas. Some of the High Plains aquifer sediments contained no calcite, while others had up to about 7 wt% calcite. The strong acid extraction tests confirmed that in addition to the usual elements present in most soils, rocks, and sediments, the High Plains aquifer sediments had appreciable amounts of As, Cd, Pb, Cu, and occasionally Zn, which potentially may be mobilized from the solid to the aqueous phase during or after exposure to CO2. However, the results from the batch experiments showed that the High Plains sediments mobilized only low concentrations of trace elements (potential contaminants), which were detected occasionally in the aqueous phase during these experiments. Importantly, these occurrences were more frequent in the calcite-free sediment. Results from these investigations provide useful information to support site selection, risk assessment, and public education efforts associated with geological CO2 storage and sequestration.

  3. Evaluating Impacts of CO2 Gas Intrusion Into a Confined Sandstone aquifer: Experimental Results

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Lawter, Amanda R.; Shao, Hongbo; Wang, Guohui; Brown, Christopher F.

    2014-12-31

    Deep subsurface storage and sequestration of CO2 has been identified as a potential mitigation technique for rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Sequestered CO2 represents a potential risk to overlying aquifers if the CO2 leaks from the deep storage reservoir. Experimental and modeling work is required to evaluate potential risks to groundwater quality and develop a systematic understanding of how CO2 leakage may cause important changes in aquifer chemistry and mineralogy by promoting dissolution/precipitation, adsorption/desorption, and redox reactions. Sediments from the High Plains aquifer in Kansas, United States, were used in this investigation, which is part of the National Risk Assessment Partnershipmore » Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy. This aquifer was selected to be representative of consolidated sand and gravel/sandstone aquifers overlying potential CO2 sequestration repositories within the continental US. In this paper, we present results from batch experiments conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure with four High Plains aquifer sediments. Batch experiments simulate sudden, fast, and short-lived releases of the CO2 gas as would occur in the case of well failure during injection. Time-dependent release of major, minor, and trace elements were determined by analyzing the contacting solutions. Characterization studies demonstrated that the High Plains aquifer sediments were abundant in quartz and feldspars, and contained about 15 to 20 wt% montmorillonite and up to 5 wt% micas. Some of the High Plains aquifer sediments contained no calcite, while others had up to about 7 wt% calcite. The strong acid extraction tests confirmed that in addition to the usual elements present in most soils, rocks, and sediments, the High Plains aquifer sediments had appreciable amounts of As, Cd, Pb, Cu, and occasionally Zn, which potentially may be mobilized from the solid to the aqueous phase during or after exposure to CO2. However, the results from the batch experiments showed that the High Plains sediments mobilized only low concentrations of trace elements (potential contaminants), which were detected occasionally in the aqueous phase during these experiments. Importantly, these occurrences were more frequent in the calcite-free sediment. Results from these investigations provide useful information to support site selection, risk assessment, and public education efforts associated with geological CO2 storage and sequestration.« less

  4. Evaluating Impacts of CO2 Gas Intrusion Into a Confined Sandstone aquifer: Experimental Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Lawter, Amanda R.; Shao, Hongbo; Wang, Guohui; Brown, Christopher F.

    2014-12-31

    Deep subsurface storage and sequestration of CO2 has been identified as a potential mitigation technique for rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Sequestered CO2 represents a potential risk to overlying aquifers if the CO2 leaks from the deep storage reservoir. Experimental and modeling work is required to evaluate potential risks to groundwater quality and develop a systematic understanding of how CO2 leakage may cause important changes in aquifer chemistry and mineralogy by promoting dissolution/precipitation, adsorption/desorption, and redox reactions. Sediments from the High Plains aquifer in Kansas, United States, were used in this investigation, which is part of the National Risk Assessment Partnership Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy. This aquifer was selected to be representative of consolidated sand and gravel/sandstone aquifers overlying potential CO2 sequestration repositories within the continental US. In this paper, we present results from batch experiments conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure with four High Plains aquifer sediments. Batch experiments simulate sudden, fast, and short-lived releases of the CO2 gas as would occur in the case of well failure during injection. Time-dependent release of major, minor, and trace elements were determined by analyzing the contacting solutions. Characterization studies demonstrated that the High Plains aquifer sediments were abundant in quartz and feldspars, and contained about 15 to 20 wt% montmorillonite and up to 5 wt% micas. Some of the High Plains aquifer sediments contained no calcite, while others had up to about 7 wt% calcite. The strong acid extraction tests confirmed that in addition to the usual elements present in most soils, rocks, and sediments, the High Plains aquifer sediments had appreciable amounts of As, Cd, Pb, Cu, and occasionally Zn, which potentially may be mobilized from the solid to the aqueous phase during or after exposure to CO2. However, the results from the batch experiments showed that the High Plains sediments mobilized only low concentrations of trace elements (potential contaminants), which were detected occasionally in the aqueous phase during these experiments. Importantly, these occurrences were more frequent in the calcite-free sediment. Results from these investigations provide useful information to support site selection, risk assessment, and public education efforts associated with geological CO2 storage and sequestration.

  5. MT71x: Multi-Temperature Library Based on ENDF/B-VII.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conlin, Jeremy Lloyd; Parsons, Donald Kent; Gray, Mark Girard; Lee, Mary Beth; White, Morgan Curtis

    2015-12-16

    The Nuclear Data Team has released a multitemperature transport library, MT71x, based upon ENDF/B-VII.1 with a few modifications as well as additional evaluations for a total of 427 isotope tables. The library was processed using NJOY2012.39 into 23 temperatures. MT71x consists of two sub-libraries; MT71xMG for multigroup energy representation data and MT71xCE for continuous energy representation data. These sub-libraries are suitable for deterministic transport and Monte Carlo transport applications, respectively. The SZAs used are the same for the two sub-libraries; that is, the same SZA can be used for both libraries. This makes comparisons between the two libraries and between deterministic and Monte Carlo codes straightforward. Both the multigroup energy and continuous energy libraries were verified and validated with our checking codes checkmg and checkace (multigroup and continuous energy, respectively) Then an expanded suite of tests was used for additional verification and, finally, verified using an extensive suite of critical benchmark models. We feel that this library is suitable for all calculations and is particularly useful for calculations sensitive to temperature effects.

  6. Conceptual Model Summary Report Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO{sub 2} Storage Along Arches Province of Midwestern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-06-30

    A conceptual model was developed for the Arches Province that integrates geologic and hydrologic information on the Eau Claire and Mt. Simon formations into a geocellular model. The conceptual model describes the geologic setting, stratigraphy, geologic structures, hydrologic features, and distribution of key hydraulic parameters. The conceptual model is focused on the Mt. Simon sandstone and Eau Claire formations. The geocellular model depicts the parameters and conditions in a numerical array that may be imported into the numerical simulations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage. Geophysical well logs, rock samples, drilling logs, geotechnical test results, and reservoir tests were evaluated for a 500,000 km{sup 2} study area centered on the Arches Province. The geologic and hydraulic data were integrated into a three-dimensional (3D) grid of porosity and permeability, which are key parameters regarding fluid flow and pressure buildup due to CO{sub 2} injection. Permeability data were corrected in locations where reservoir tests have been performed in Mt. Simon injection wells. The final geocellular model covers an area of 600 km by 600 km centered on the Arches Province. The geocellular model includes a total of 24,500,000 cells representing estimated porosity and permeability distribution. CO{sub 2} injection scenarios were developed for on-site and regional injection fields at rates of 70 to 140 million metric tons per year.

  7. Predictive modeling of CO{sub 2} sequestration in deep saline sandstone reservoirs: Impacts of geochemical kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balashov, Victor N.; Guthrie, George D.; Hakala, J. Alexandra; Lopano, Christina L. J.; Rimstidt, Donald; Brantley, Susan L.

    2013-03-01

    One idea for mitigating the increase in fossil-fuel generated CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere is to inject CO{sub 2} into subsurface saline sandstone reservoirs. To decide whether to try such sequestration at a globally significant scale will require the ability to predict the fate of injected CO{sub 2}. Thus, models are needed to predict the rates and extents of subsurface rock-water-gas interactions. Several reactive transport models for CO{sub 2} sequestration created in the last decade predicted sequestration in sandstone reservoirs of ~17 to ~90 kg CO{sub 2} m{sup -3|. To build confidence in such models, a baseline problem including rock + water chemistry is proposed as the basis for future modeling so that both the models and the parameterizations can be compared systematically. In addition, a reactive diffusion model is used to investigate the fate of injected supercritical CO{sub 2} fluid in the proposed baseline reservoir + brine system. In the baseline problem, injected CO{sub 2} is redistributed from the supercritical (SC) free phase by dissolution into pore brine and by formation of carbonates in the sandstone. The numerical transport model incorporates a full kinetic description of mineral-water reactions under the assumption that transport is by diffusion only. Sensitivity tests were also run to understand which mineral kinetics reactions are important for CO{sub 2} trapping. The diffusion transport model shows that for the first ~20 years after CO{sub 2} diffusion initiates, CO{sub 2} is mostly consumed by dissolution into the brine to form CO{sub 2,aq} (solubility trapping). From 20-200 years, both solubility and mineral trapping are important as calcite precipitation is driven by dissolution of oligoclase. From 200 to 1000 years, mineral trapping is the most important sequestration mechanism, as smectite dissolves and calcite precipitates. Beyond 2000 years, most trapping is due to formation of aqueous HCO{sub 3}{sup -}. Ninety-seven percent of the maximum CO{sub 2} sequestration, 34.5 kg CO{sub 2} per m{sup 3} of sandstone, is attained by 4000 years even though the system does not achieve chemical equilibrium until ~25,000 years. This maximum represents about 20% CO{sub 2} dissolved as CO{sub 2},aq, 50% dissolved as HCO{sub 3}{sup -}{sub ,aq}, and 30% precipitated as calcite. The extent of sequestration as HCO{sub 3}{sup -} at equilibrium can be calculated from equilibrium thermodynamics and is roughly equivalent to the amount of Na+ in the initial sandstone in a soluble mineral (here, oligoclase). Similarly, the extent of trapping in calcite is determined by the amount of Ca2+ in the initial oligoclase and smectite. Sensitivity analyses show that the rate of CO{sub 2} sequestration is sensitive to the mineral-water reaction kinetic constants between approximately 10 and 4000 years. The sensitivity of CO{sub 2} sequestration to the rate constants decreases in magnitude respectively from oligoclase to albite to smectite.

  8. Hazard assessment in geothermal exploration: The case of Mt. Parker, Southern Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delfin, F.G. Jr.; Salonga, N.D.; Bayon, F.E.B.

    1996-12-31

    Hazard assessment of the Mt. Parker geothermal prospect, conducted in parallel with the surface exploration from 1992 to 1994, was undertaken to determine the long-term suitability of the prospect for development. By comparison with other acidic magmatic-hydrothermal systems in the Philippines, the geochemical data indicated minimal input of acidic magmatic fluids into Mt. Parker`s hydrothermal system. This system was regarded to be a neutral-pH and high-enthalpy chloride reservoir with temperature of at least 200-250{degrees}C. These favorable geochemical indications contrasted sharply with the C-14 and volcanological data indicating a shallow magmatic body with a potential for future eruption. This hazard led PNOC EDC to discontinue the survey and abandon the prospect by late 1994. On September 6, 1995, a flashflood of non-volcanic origin from the caldera lake killed nearly 100 people on the volcano`s northwestern flank.

  9. Babb, MT Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Babb, MT Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2015 5 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 02/29/2016 Next Release Date: 03/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas

  10. Havre, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Million Cubic Feet) Havre, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's NA NA 2000's 1,309 NA NA 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S.

  11. Havre, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per Thousand

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Havre, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's NA NA 2000's 3.66 NA NA -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Price of

  12. EM SSAB NATIONAL CHAIRS MEETING Deer Creek State Park, Mt. Sterling, Ohio

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EM SSAB NATIONAL CHAIRS MEETING Deer Creek State Park, Mt. Sterling, Ohio November 5-7, 2013 DAY 1 - Tuesday, November 5, 2013 8:00 a.m. - 8:20 a.m. Welcome and Opening Remarks Cate Alexander, EM SSAB Designated Federal Officer Will Henderson, Chair, Portsmouth Site Specific Advisory Board William Murphie, Manager, Portsmouth Paducah Project Office, DOE-EM 8:20 a.m. - 8:30 a.m. Overview of Meeting Eric Roberts, Facilitator 8:30 a.m. - 9:30 a.m. EM Program Update Alice Williams, Associate

  13. Crustal models of the geothermal areas of Larderello and Mt. Amiata, Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gianelli, G.; Manzella, A.; Puxeddu, M.

    1996-12-31

    The study of core samples and geophysical data from the Larderello and Mt. Amiata geothermal areas indicate the presence of granite intrusions and granitic dykes as old as 3.8-2.9 Ma and widespread contact aureoles. Reflection seismic surveys reveal the presence of a highly reflective horizon (named K) in a depth range of 3-12 km in the two geothermal areas; seismic tomography and teleseismic studies show at Larderello a low velocity body, 30-40 km wide below the K horizon. Magnetotelluric surveys indicate the presence of a conductive body in good correlation with the anomalous tomographic and teleseismic body. The occurrence of shallow intrusive bodies, still partially molten and associated with saline brines is here considered a reliable model.

  14. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Mt. Hayes NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    Results of a hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance of the Mt. Hayes quadrangle, Alaska, are presented. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. In this data release are location data, field analyses, and Laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume. These data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A to D describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data were subsetted by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) sorting programs into groups of stream sediment, lake sediment, stream water, lake water, and ground water samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1000000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report.

  15. Basin Play State(s) Production Reserves Williston Bakken ND, MT, SD

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    tight oil plays: production and proved reserves, 2013-14 million barrels 2013 2013 Basin Play State(s) Production Reserves Williston Bakken ND, MT, SD 270 4,844 387 5,972 1,128 Western Gulf Eagle Ford TX 351 4,177 497 5,172 995 Permian Bone Spring, Wolfcamp NM, TX 21 335 53 722 387 Denver-Julesberg Niobrara CO, KS, NE, WY 2 17 42 512 495 Appalachian Marcellus* PA, WV 7 89 13 232 143 Fort Worth Barnett TX 9 58 9 47 -11 Sub-total 660 9,520 1,001 12,657 3,137 Other tight oil 41 523 56 708 185 U.S.

  16. EIS-0092: Conversion to Coal, Holyoke Water Power Company, Mt. Tom Generating Station Unit 1 Holyoke, Hampden County, Massachusetts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Economic Regulatory Administration prepared this statement to assess the environmental impacts of prohibiting Unit 1 of the Mt. Tom Generation Station Unit 1 from using either natural gas or petroleum products as a primary energy source, which would result in the utility burning low-sulfur coal.

  17. Reservoir Characterization of Bridgeport and Cypress Sandstones in Lawrence Field Illinois to Improve Petroleum Recovery by Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Flood

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seyler, Beverly; Grube, John; Huff, Bryan; Webb, Nathan; Damico, James; Blakley, Curt; Madhavan, Vineeth; Johanek, Philip; Frailey, Scott

    2012-12-21

    Within the Illinois Basin, most of the oilfields are mature and have been extensively waterflooded with water cuts that range up to 99% in many of the larger fields. In order to maximize production of significant remaining mobile oil from these fields, new recovery techniques need to be researched and applied. The purpose of this project was to conduct reservoir characterization studies supporting Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer Floods in two distinct sandstone reservoirs in Lawrence Field, Lawrence County, Illinois. A project using alkaline-surfactantpolymer (ASP) has been established in the century old Lawrence Field in southeastern Illinois where original oil in place (OOIP) is estimated at over a billion barrels and 400 million barrels have been recovered leaving more than 600 million barrels as an EOR target. Radial core flood analysis using core from the field demonstrated recoveries greater than 20% of OOIP. While the lab results are likely optimistic to actual field performance, the ASP tests indicate that substantial reserves could be recovered even if the field results are 5 to 10% of OOIP. Reservoir characterization is a key factor in the success of any EOR application. Reservoirs within the Illinois Basin are frequently characterized as being highly compartmentalized resulting in multiple flow unit configurations. The research conducted on Lawrence Field focused on characteristics that define reservoir compartmentalization in order to delineate preferred target areas so that the chemical flood can be designed and implemented for the greatest recovery potential. Along with traditional facies mapping, core analyses and petrographic analyses, conceptual geological models were constructed and used to develop 3D geocellular models, a valuable tool for visualizing reservoir architecture and also a prerequisite for reservoir simulation modeling. Cores were described and potential permeability barriers were correlated using geophysical logs. Petrographic analyses were used to better understand porosity and permeability trends in the region and to characterize barriers and define flow units. Diagenetic alterations that impact porosity and permeability include development of quartz overgrowths, sutured quartz grains, dissolution of feldspar grains, formation of clay mineral coatings on grains, and calcite cementation. Many of these alterations are controlled by facies. Mapping efforts identified distinct flow units in the northern part of the field showing that the Pennsylvanian Bridgeport consists of a series of thick incised channel fill sequences. The sandstones are about 75-150 feet thick and typically consist of medium grained and poorly sorted fluvial to distributary channel fill deposits at the base. The sandstones become indistinctly bedded distributary channel deposits in the main part of the reservoir before fining upwards and becoming more tidally influenced near their top. These channel deposits have core permeabilities ranging from 20 md to well over 1000 md. The tidally influenced deposits are more compartmentalized compared to the thicker and more continuous basal fluvial deposits. Fine grained sandstones that are laterally equivalent to the thicker channel type deposits have permeabilities rarely reaching above 250 md. Most of the unrecovered oil in Lawrence Field is contained in Pennsylvanian Age Bridgeport sandstones and Mississippian Age Cypress sandstones. These reservoirs are highly complex and compartmentalized. Detailed reservoir characterization including the development of 3-D geologic and geocellular models of target areas in the field were completed to identify areas with the best potential to recover remaining reserves including unswept and by-passed oil. This project consisted of tasks designed to compile, interpret, and analyze the data required to conduct reservoir characterization for the Bridgeport and Cypress sandstones in pilot areas in anticipation of expanded implementation of ASP flooding in Lawrence Field. Geologic and geocellular modeling needed for reservoir characterization and reservoir simulation were completed as prerequisites for design of efficient ASP flood patterns. Characterizing the complex reservoir geology that identifies the geologic conditions that will optimize oil recoveries for expansion of the ASP pilots in the Bridgeport and Cypress sandstones to other areas of Lawrence Field is the primary objective of this project. It will permit evaluation of efficiency of oil recovery from Bridgeport and Cypress sandstone reservoirs using ASP technology. Additionally evaluation of similar Pennsylvanian and Chesterian reservoirs shows that it is likely that ASP flood technology can be successfully applied to similar reservoirs in the Illinois Basin as well as to other U.S. reservoirs. Chemical flooding was introduced in stages with the first flood initiated in 2010 and a second offset pilot project initiated during 2011. Rex Energy Corporation is reporting a positive response on its ASP Middagh pilot project in the Pennsylvanian Bridgeport B reservoir, Lawrence Field. Oil response in the 15 acre flood has continued to show an increase in oil cut from 1% to 12%. Total pattern production increased from 16 BOPD and stabilized at a range of 65-75 BOPD in the last three months of 2011. Peak production rose to 100 + BOPD. Oil cut in the pilot increased for 1.0% to ~ 12.0% with an individual well showing oil cuts greater than 20%. A second, 58 acre pilot (Perkins-Smith) adjacent to and likely in communication with the Middagh pilot has been initiated. Preliminary brine injection has been implemented and ASP injection was initiated in mid-2012. Response is expected by mid-2013 with peak recovery expected by late 2013. Rex Energy is projecting full scale expansion with the next step of development being a 351 acre project scheduled to begin in mid-2013. Preliminary development has been initiated in this Delta Unit area located in the south half of section 32, T4N, R12W.

  18. Applications of stable isotopes in hydrological studies of Mt. Apo geothermal field, Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salonga, N.D.; Aragon, G.M.; Nogara, J.B.; Sambrano, B.G.

    1996-12-31

    The local precipitation in Mt. Apo is depleted of heavy isotopes owing to high elevation and landward location of the field. Rainwaters infiltrate the shallow grounds, circulate in short distances with almost no interaction with the host bed rocks, and effuse in the surface as cold springs. Lakes and rivers are affected by surface evaporation while the acid SO{sub 4} springs are affected by both evaporation and steam-heating. Only the neutral-pH Cl springs have the signature of the deep thermal fluids. The parent fluids of the deep thermal brine contain Cl of 4,800 to 5,000 mg/kg, {delta}{sup 18}O of -4.62 to -4.13 {per_thousand} and {delta}{sup 2}H of -60.0 to -57.8 {per_thousand}. Inside the Sandawa Collapse, boiling of the parent fluids resulted in a two-phase reservoir with lighter isotope contents. The thermal fluids laterally flow towards the west where they are affected by cooling and mixing of cold waters. Deep water recharge has {delta}{sup 18}O of -10.00 {per_thousand} and {delta}{sup 2}H = -61.20 {per_thousand} which come from the upper slopes of Sandawa Collapse (1580-1700 mASL).

  19. Four-year prospective study of the respiratory effects of volcanic ash from Mt. St. Helens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buist, A.S.; Vollmer, W.M.; Johnson, L.R.; Bernstein, R.S.; McCamant, L.E.

    1986-04-01

    This report describes the 4-yr follow-up of 712 loggers exposed over an extended period to varying levels of fresh volcanic ash from the 1980 eruptions of Mt. St. Helens. Concerns related to the irritant effect the ash might have on the airways and also to its fibrogenic potential if exposures were intense and continued over many years. Our subjects were divided into 3 groups: high, low, and no exposure. Baseline testing was begun in June 1980, 1 month after the major eruption, and follow-up testing continued on an annual basis through 1984; 88% of the loggers have been tested at least 3 times. Analysis of lung function data showed that a significant, exposure-related decline in FEV1 occurred during the first year after the eruption. The decline was short-lived, however, and by 1984 the differences between exposure groups were no longer significant. Self-reported symptoms of cough, phlegm, and wheeze showed a similar pattern. No ash-related changes were seen in chest roentgenograms taken in 1980 and in 1984. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the inhaled ash caused mucus hypersecretion and/or airway inflammation that reversed when the exposure levels decreased. The ash levels to which the loggers were exposed were low compared with permissible occupational levels for nuisance dusts, but generally higher than the total suspended particulate levels permissible in ambient air.

  20. Silurian "Clinton" Sandstone Reservoir Characterization for Evaluation of CO2-EOR Potential in the East Canton Oil Field, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald Riley; John Wicks; Christopher Perry

    2009-12-30

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of using CO2-enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in the East Canton oil field (ECOF). Discovered in 1947, the ECOF in northeastern Ohio has produced approximately 95 million barrels (MMbbl) of oil from the Silurian 'Clinton' sandstone. The original oil-in-place (OOIP) for this field was approximately 1.5 billion bbl and this study estimates by modeling known reservoir parameters, that between 76 and 279 MMbbl of additional oil could be produced through secondary recovery in this field, depending on the fluid and formation response to CO2 injection. A CO2 cyclic test ('Huff-n-Puff') was conducted on a well in Stark County to test the injectivity in a 'Clinton'-producing oil well in the ECOF and estimate the dispersion or potential breakthrough of the CO2 to surrounding wells. Eighty-one tons of CO2 (1.39 MMCF) were injected over a 20-hour period, after which the well was shut in for a 32-day 'soak' period before production was resumed. Results demonstrated injection rates of 1.67 MMCF of gas per day, which was much higher than anticipated and no CO2 was detected in gas samples taken from eight immediately offsetting observation wells. All data collected during this test was analyzed, interpreted, and incorporated into the reservoir characterization study and used to develop the geologic model. The geologic model was used as input into a reservoir simulation performed by Fekete Associates, Inc., to estimate the behavior of reservoir fluids when large quantities of CO2 are injected into the 'Clinton' sandstone. Results strongly suggest that the majority of the injected CO2 entered the matrix porosity of the reservoir pay zones, where it diffused into the oil. Evidence includes: (A) the volume of injected CO2 greatly exceeded the estimated capacity of the hydraulic fracture and natural fractures; (B) there was a gradual injection and pressure rate build-up during the test; (C) there was a subsequent, gradual flashout of the CO2 within the reservoir during the ensuing monitored production period; and (D) a large amount of CO2 continually off-gassed from wellhead oil samples collected as late as 3 1/2 months after injection. After the test well was returned to production, it produced 174 bbl of oil during a 60-day period (September 22 to November 21, 2008), which represents an estimated 58 percent increase in incremental oil production over preinjection estimates of production under normal, conditions. The geologic model was used in a reservoir simulation model for a 700-acre model area and to design a pilot to test the model. The model was designed to achieve a 1-year response time and a five-year simulation period. The reservoir simulation modeling indicated that the injection wells could enhance oil production and lead to an additional 20 percent recovery in the pilot area over a five-year period. The base case estimated that by injecting 500 MCF per day of CO2 into each of the four corner wells, 26,000 STBO would be produced by the central producer over the five-year period. This would compare to 3,000 STBO if a new well were drilled without the benefit of CO2 injection. This study has added significant knowledge to the reservoir characterization of the 'Clinton' in the ECOF and succeeded in identifying a range on CO2-EOR potential. However, additional data on fluid properties (PVT and swelling test), fractures (oriented core and microseis), and reservoir characteristics (relative permeability, capillary pressure, and wet ability) are needed to further narrow the uncertainties and refine the reservoir model and simulation. After collection of this data and refinement of the model and simulation, it is recommended that a larger scale cyclic-CO2 injection test be conducted to better determine the efficacy of CO2-EOR in the 'Clinton' reservoir in the ECOF.

  1. Silurian "Clinton" Sandstone Reservoir Characterization for Evaluation of CO2-EOR Potential in the East Canton Oil Field, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, Ronald; Wicks, John; Perry, Christopher

    2009-12-30

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of using CO2-enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in the East Canton oil field (ECOF). Discovered in 1947, the ECOF in northeastern Ohio has produced approximately 95 million barrels (MMbbl) of oil from the Silurian Clinton sandstone. The original oil-in-place (OOIP) for this field was approximately 1.5 billion bbl and this study estimates by modeling known reservoir parameters, that between 76 and 279 MMbbl of additional oil could be produced through secondary recovery in this field, depending on the fluid and formation response to CO2 injection. A CO2 cyclic test (Huff-n-Puff) was conducted on a well in Stark County to test the injectivity in a Clinton-producing oil well in the ECOF and estimate the dispersion or potential breakthrough of the CO2 to surrounding wells. Eighty-one tons of CO2 (1.39 MMCF) were injected over a 20-hour period, after which the well was shut in for a 32-day soak period before production was resumed. Results demonstrated injection rates of 1.67 MMCF of gas per day, which was much higher than anticipated and no CO2 was detected in gas samples taken from eight immediately offsetting observation wells. All data collected during this test was analyzed, interpreted, and incorporated into the reservoir characterization study and used to develop the geologic model. The geologic model was used as input into a reservoir simulation performed by Fekete Associates, Inc., to estimate the behavior of reservoir fluids when large quantities of CO2 are injected into the Clinton sandstone. Results strongly suggest that the majority of the injected CO2 entered the matrix porosity of the reservoir pay zones, where it diffused into the oil. Evidence includes: (A) the volume of injected CO2 greatly exceeded the estimated capacity of the hydraulic fracture and natural fractures; (B) there was a gradual injection and pressure rate build-up during the test; (C) there was a subsequent, gradual flashout of the CO2 within the reservoir during the ensuing monitored production period; and (D) a large amount of CO2 continually off-gassed from wellhead oil samples collected as late as 3 months after injection. After the test well was returned to production, it produced 174 bbl of oil during a 60-day period (September 22 to November 21, 2008), which represents an estimated 58 percent increase in incremental oil production over preinjection estimates of production under normal, conditions. The geologic model was used in a reservoir simulation model for a 700-acre model area and to design a pilot to test the model. The model was designed to achieve a 1-year response time and a five-year simulation period. The reservoir simulation modeling indicated that the injection wells could enhance oil production and lead to an additional 20 percent recovery in the pilot area over a five-year period. The base case estimated that by injecting 500 MCF per day of CO2 into each of the four corner wells, 26,000 STBO would be produced by the central producer over the five-year period. This would compare to 3,000 STBO if a new well were drilled without the benefit of CO2 injection. This study has added significant knowledge to the reservoir characterization of the Clinton in the ECOF and succeeded in identifying a range on CO2-EOR potential. However, additional data on fluid properties (PVT and swelling test), fractures (oriented core and microseis), and reservoir characteristics (relative permeability, capillary pressure, and wet ability) are needed to further narrow the uncertainties and refine the reservoir model and simulation. After collection of this data and refinement of the model and simulation, it is recommended that a larger scale cyclic- CO2 injection test be conducted to better determine the efficacy of CO2-EOR in the Clinton reservoir in the ECOF.

  2. Erosional remnants and adjacent unconformities along an eolian-marine boundary of the Page Sandstone and Carmel Formation, Middle Jurassic, south-central Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, L.S.; Blakey, R.C. (Univ. of Northern Arizona, Flagstaff, AZ (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1993-09-01

    Sandstone ridges along the marine-eolian boundary of the Middle Jurassic Page Sandstone (eolian) with the lower Carmel Formation (restricted marine) in south-central Utah have been identified as erosional remnants consisting of strata of siliciclastic sabkha and eolian origin. The ridges lie within two distinct units of the Thousand Pockets Tongue of the Page. Two equally plausible models explain the genesis of these ridges. One model involves (1) early cementation of eolian and sabkha strata, (2) wind erosion leading to development of yardangs and unconformities, (3) yardang tilting due to evaporite dissolution, and (4) renewed deposition and burial. The alternative model explains ridge development through (1) subsidence, with tilting, of eolian and sabkha strata into evaporites due to loading from linear dunes, (2) evaporite dissolution and unconformity development, and (3) renewed deposition and burial. These models provide important clues about the nature of a missing part of the rock record. Reconstruction of units that were deposited but later eroded improves paleogeographic interpretation and here indicates that the Carmel paleo-shoreline was considerably farther to the northwest than previously believed.

  3. Investigation of exfoliation joints in Navajo sandstone at the Zion National Park and in granite at the Yosemite National Park by tectonofractographic techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahat, D.; Grossenbacher, K.; Karasaki, K.

    1995-04-01

    Tectonofractographic techniques have been applied to the study of joint exfoliation in the Navajo sandstone at Zion National Park and in the granite at Yosemite National Park. New types of fracture surface morphologies have been observed which enabled the discerning of incipient joints and consequent fracture growth in these rocks. Incipient jointing in the sandstone is mostly manifested by elliptical and circular fractures (meters to tens meters across) initiating from independent origins. They interfere with each other and grow to larger circular fractures producing exfoliation surfaces up to hundreds of meters across. Less frequently, series of large concentric undulations demonstrate the propagation of a large fracture front producing exfoliation from an individual origin. One such fracture front reveals refraction of undulations at a layer boundary. Certain en echelon fringes surround the joint mirror plane with well defined rims of en echelons and hackles which enable the determination of the tensile fracture stress, {sigma}f. Arches in Zion National Park are ubiquitous in shape and size, revealing stages in their evolution by a mechanical process, which was associated with exfoliation, but independent of local faulting. Exfoliation and arching mostly occurred on vertical surfaces of N-NNW and NE sets of prominent joints, but there are also deviations from this general trend. In Yosemite National Park large exfoliations (hundreds of meters in size) developed on the El Capitan cliff by the interaction and merging of many previous smaller incipient joints that vary in size from meters to tens of meter.

  4. Geological and petrophysical characterization of the ferron sandstone for 3-D simulation of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir. Annual report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chidsey, T.C. Jr.; Allison, M.L.

    1996-05-01

    The objective of the Ferron Sandstone project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, quantitative characterization of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir to allow realistic interwell and reservoir-scale models to be developed for improved oil-field development in similar reservoirs world-wide. Quantitative geological and petrophysical information on the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in east-central Utah was collected. Both new and existing data is being integrated into a three-dimensional model of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for inter-well to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Simulation results could improve reservoir management through proper infill and extension drilling strategies, reduction of economic risks, increased recovery from existing oil fields, and more reliable reserve calculations. Transfer of the project results to the petroleum industry is an integral component of the project. This report covers research activities for fiscal year 1994-95, the second year of the project. Most work consisted of developing field methods and collecting large quantities of existing and new data. We also continued to develop preliminary regional and case-study area interpretations. The project is divided into four tasks: (1) regional stratigraphic analysis, (2) case studies, (3) reservoirs models, and (4) field-scale evaluation of exploration strategies.

  5. Preliminary study on mercury uptake by Rosmarinus officinalis L. (Rosemary) in a mining area (Mt. Amiata, Italy)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barghigiani, C.; Ristori, T.

    1995-04-01

    Among the different plants analyzed to assess environmental mercury contamination of mining areas, lichens are those most studied, followed by brooms together with pine, which was also used in other areas, and spruce. Other species, both naturally occurring and cultivated, have also been studied. This work reports on the results of mercury uptake and accumulation in rosemary in relation to metal concentrations in both air and soil. R. officinalis is a widespread endemic Mediterranean evergreen shrub, which in Italy grows naturally and is also cultivated as a culinary herb. This research was carried out in Tuscany (Italy), in the Mt. Amiata area, which is characterized by the presence of cinnabar (HgS) deposits and has been used for mercury extraction and smelting from Etruscan times until 1980, and in the country near the town of Pisa, 140 km away from Mt. Amiata. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Dark Matter Particle Spectroscopy at the LHC: Generalizing M(T2) to Asymmetric Event Topologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konar, Partha; Kong, Kyoungchul; Matchev, Konstantin T.; Park, Myeonghun; /Florida U.

    2012-04-03

    We consider SUSY-like missing energy events at hadron colliders and critically examine the common assumption that the missing energy is the result of two identical missing particles. In order to experimentally test this hypothesis, we generalize the subsystem M{sub T2} variable to the case of asymmetric event topologies, where the two SUSY decay chains terminate in different 'children' particles. In this more general approach, the endpoint M{sub T2(max)} of the M{sub T2} distribution now gives the mass {tilde M}p({tilde M}{sub c}{sup (a)}, {tilde M}{sub c}{sup (b)}) of the parent particles as a function of two input children masses {tilde M}{sub c}{sup (a)} and {tilde M}{sub c}{sup (b)}. We propose two methods for an independent determination of the individual children masses M{sub c}{sup (a)} and M{sub c}{sup (b)}. First, in the presence of upstream transverse momentum PUTM the corresponding function {tilde M}p({tilde M}{sub c}{sup (a)}, {tilde M}{sub c}{sup (b)}, P{sub UTM}) is independent of P{sub UTM} at precisely the right values of the children masses. Second, the previously discussed MT2 'kink' is now generalized to a 'ridge' on the 2-dimensional surface {tilde M}p({tilde M}{sub c}{sup (a)}, {tilde M}{sub c}{sup (b)}). As we show in several examples, quite often there is a special point along that ridge which marks the true values of the children masses. Our results allow collider experiments to probe a multi-component dark matter sector directly and without any theoretical prejudice.

  7. Uranium hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment reconnaissance of the Mt. Michelson NTMS quadrangle, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinkl, R.J.; Shettel, D.L. Jr.; Langfeldt, S.L.; Hardy, L.C.; D'Andrea, R.F. Jr.

    1982-04-01

    This report presents results of a Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) of the Mt. Michelson NTMS quadrangle, Alaska. In addition to this abbreviated data release, more complete data are available to the public in machine-readable form. These machine-readable data, as well as quarterly or semiannual program progress reports containing further information on the HSSR program in general, or on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) portion of the program in particular, are available from DOE's Technical Library at its Grand Junction Area Office. Presented in this data release are location data, field analyses, and laboratory analyses of several different sample media. For the sake of brevity, many field site observations have not been included in this volume; these data are, however, available on the magnetic tape. Appendices A and B describe the sample media and summarize the analytical results for each medium. The data have been subdivided by one of the Los Alamos National Laboratory sorting programs of Zinkl and others (1981a) into groups of stream-sediment and lake-sediment samples. For each group which contains a sufficient number of observations, statistical tables, tables of raw data, and 1:1,000,000 scale maps of pertinent elements have been included in this report. Also included are maps showing results of multivariate statistical analyses. Information on the field and analytical procedures used by the Los Alamos National Laboratory during sample collection and analysis may be found in any HSSR data release prepared by the Laboratory and will not be included in this report.

  8. Anisotropy and spatial variation of relative permeability and lithologic character of Tensleep Sandstone reservoirs in the Bighorn and Wind River basins, Wyoming. Final technical report, September 15, 1993--October 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, T.L.

    1996-10-01

    This multidisciplinary study was designed to provide improvements in advanced reservoir characterization techniques. This goal was accomplished through: (1) an examination of the spatial variation and anisotropy of relative permeability in the Tensleep Sandstone reservoirs of Wyoming; (2) the placement of that variation and anisotropy into paleogeographic, and depositional regional frameworks; (3) the development of pore-system imagery techniques for the calculation of relative permeability; and (4) reservoir simulations testing the impact of relative permeability anisotropy and spatial variation on Tensleep Sandstone reservoir enhanced oil recovery. Concurrent efforts were aimed at understanding the spatial and dynamic alteration in sandstone reservoirs that is caused by rock-fluid interaction during CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery processes. The work focused on quantifying the interrelationship of fluid-rock interaction with lithologic characterization and with fluid characterization in terms of changes in chemical composition and fluid properties. This work establishes new criteria for the susceptibility of Tensleep Sandstone reservoirs to formation alteration that results in wellbore scale damage. This task was accomplished by flow experiments using core material; examination of regional trends in water chemistry; examination of local water chemistry trends the at field scale; and chemical modeling of both the experimental and reservoir systems.

  9. GEOCHEMICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF CO?-BRINE-ROCK INTERACTIONS OF THE KNOX GROUP IN THE ILLINOIS BASIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoksoulian, Lois; Berger, Peter; Freiburg, Jared; Butler, Shane; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    Increased output of greenhouse gases, particularly carbon dioxide (CO?), into the atmosphere from anthropogenic sources is of great concern. A potential technology to reduce CO? emissions is geologic carbon sequestration. This technology is currently being evaluated in the United States and throughout the world. The geology of the Illinois Basin exhibits outstanding potential as a carbon sequestration target, as demonstrated by the ongoing Illinois Basin Decatur Project that is using the Mt. Simon Sandstone reservoir and Eau Claire Shale seal system to store and contain 1 million tonnes of CO?. The Knox Group-Maquoketa Shale reservoir and seal system, located stratigraphically above the Mt. Simon Sandstone-Eau Claire Shale reservoir and seal system, has little economic value as a resource for fossil fuels or as a potable water source, making it ideal as a potential carbon sequestration target. In order for a reservoir-seal system to be effective, it must be able to contain the injected CO? without the potential for the release of harmful contaminants liberated by the reaction between CO?-formation fluids and reservoir and seal rocks. This study examines portions of the Knox Group (Potosi Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, New Richmond Sandstone) and St. Peter Sandstone, and Maquoketa Shale from various locations around the Illinois Basin. A total of 14 rock and fluid samples were exposed to simulated sequestration conditions (91019860 kPa [13201430 psi] and 3242C [90 108F]) for varying amounts of time (6 hours to 4 months). Knox Group reservoir rocks exhibited dissolution of dolomite in the presence of CO? as indicated by petrographic examination, X-ray diffraction analysis, and fluid chemistry analysis. These reactions equilibrated rapidly, and geochemical modeling confirmed that these reactions reached equilibrium within the time frames of the experiments. Pre-reaction sample mineralogy and postreaction fluid geochemistry from this study suggests only limited potential for the release of United States Environmental Protection Agency regulated inorganic contaminants into potable water sources. Short-term core flood experiments further verify that the carbonate reactions occurring in Knox Group reservoir samples reach equilibrium rapidly. The core flood experiments also lend insight to pressure changes that may occur during CO? injection. The Maquoketa Shale experiments reveal that this rock is initially chemically reactive when in contact with CO? and brine. However, due to the conservative nature of silicate and clay reaction kinetics and the rapid equilibration of carbonate reactions that occur in the shale, these reactions would not present a significant risk to the competency of the shale as an effective seal rock.

  10. XRD micro-XANES EMPA and SIMS investigation on phlogopite single crystals from Mt. Vulture (Italy)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F Scordari; M Dyar; E Schingaro; M Lacalamita; L Ottolini

    2011-12-31

    Selected phlogopite flakes from Mt. Vulture in southern Italy were studied using a combination of single-crystal techniques: electron microprobe analysis (EMPA), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), single-crystal X-ray diffraction (SCXRD), and micro-X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES). The latter technique was employed to analyze the structure of the Fe-K absorption edge over the region from 7080-8100 eV and to determine Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe at a micrometer scale, albeit with large error bars due to known effects of orientation on pre-edge energy. The annite component, Fe/(Mg+Fe), of the samples studied ranged from 0.16 to 0.31, the Ti content from 0.11 to 0.27 atoms per formula unit (apfu) and the Ba content from 0.03 to 0.09 apfu. SIMS analysis showed H{sub 2}O (wt%) = 1.81-3.30, F (wt%) = 0.44-1.29, and Li{sub 2}O (wt%) = 0.001-0.027. The intra single-crystal chemical variability for major/minor elements (Mg, Fe, Al, Ba, Ti, and K) was found particularly significant for samples VUT191{_}11 and PG5{_}1, less significant for the other samples of the set. SIMS data relative to crystals VUT187{_}24, VUT191{_}10, VUT191{_}11, and VUT187{_}28 showed a noteworthy variation in the concentrations of some light elements (H, Li, and F) with coefficient of variation CV (as 1{sigma}%) up to {approx}18% for H{sub 2}O. The analyzed micas belong to the 1M polytype. Structure refinements using anisotropic displacement parameters were performed in space group C2/m and converged at 3.08 {<=} R {<=} 3.63, 3.32 {<=} R{sub w} {<=} 3.98%. Micro-XANES results yielded Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe from 51-93%. Previous Moessbauer data from powdered samples suggested Fe{sup 3+}/{Sigma}Fe values ranging from 49-87%. However, the Fe{sup 3+} content determined by both techniques is sometimes remarkably different, in part because of the large errors ({+-}10-15%) presently associated with the micro-XANES technique and in part because the Fe{sup 3+} content of a single crystal may significantly depart from the average value obtained from routine Moessbauer analysis. The combination of EMPA, SIMS, and micro-XANES resulted in the characterization of the samples at a comparable spatial scale. By means of in-situ data and the results of crystallographic investigations, the occurrence of different relative amounts of M{sup 3+}-oxy [{sup VI}M{sup 2+} + (OH){sup -} {leftrightarrow} {sup VI}M{sup 3+} + O{sup 2-} + {1/2}H{sub 2}{up_arrow}], Ti-oxy substitutions [{sup VI}M{sup 2+} + 2(OH){sup -} {leftrightarrow} {sup VI}Ti{sup 4+} + 2O{sup 2-} + H{sub 2}{up_arrow}], and Ti-vacancy ({open_square}) substitution (2{sup VI}M{sup 2+} {leftrightarrow} {sup VI}Ti{sup 4+} + {sup VI}{open_square}) was ascertained for the studied samples.

  11. Searches for supersymmetry using the MT2 variable in hadronic events produced in pp collisions at 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-05-15

    Searches for supersymmetry (SUSY) are performed using a sample of hadronic events produced in 8 TeV pp collisions at the CERN LHC. The searches are based on the MT2 variable, which is a measure of the transverse momentum imbalance in an event. The data were collected with the CMS detector and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb?. Two related searches are performed. The first is an inclusive search based on signal regions defined by the value of the MT2 variable, the hadronic energy in the event, the jet multiplicity, and the number of jets identified as originating frommorebottom quarks. The second is a search for a mass peak corresponding to a Higgs boson decaying to a bottom quark-antiquark pair, where the Higgs boson is produced as a decay product of a SUSY particle. For both searches, the principal backgrounds are evaluated with data control samples. No significant excess over the expected number of background events is observed, and exclusion limits on various SUSY models are derived.less

  12. LOCA simulation in the national research universal reactor program: postirradiation examination results for the third materials experiment (MT-3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rausch, W.N.

    1984-04-01

    A series of in-reactor experiments were conducted using full-length 32-rod pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel bundles as part of the Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) Simulation Program. The third materials experiment (MT-3) was the sixth in the series of thermal-hydraulic and materials deformation/rutpure experiments conducted in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor, Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. The main objective of the experiment was to evaluate ballooning and rupture during active two-phase cooling in the temperature range from 1400 to 1500/sup 0/F (1030 to 1090 K). The 12 test rods in the center of the 32-rod bundle were initially pressurized to 550 psi (3.8 MPa) to insure rupture in the correct temperature range. All 12 of the rods ruptured, with an average peak bundle strain of approx. 55%. The UKAEA also funded destructive postirradiation examination (PIE) of several of the ruptured rods from the MT-3 experiment. This report describes the work performed and presents the PIE results. Information obtained during the PIE included cladding thickness measurements metallography, and particle size analysis of the cracked and broken fuel pellets.

  13. The Potosi Reservoir Model 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Valerie; Adushita, Yasmin; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    As a part of a larger project co-funded by the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) to evaluate the potential of formations within the Cambro-Ordovician strata above the Mt. Simon Sandstone as potential targets for carbon sequestration in the Illinois and Michigan Basins, the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS) requested Schlumberger to evaluate the potential injectivity and carbon dioxide (CO2) plume size of the Cambrian Potosi Formation. The evaluation of this formation was accomplished using wireline data, core data, pressure data, and seismic data from this project as well as two other separately funded projects: the United States Department of Energy-funded Illinois Basin Decatur Project (IBDP) being conducted by the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) in Macon County, Illinois, and the Illinois Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration (IL-ICCS) project funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

  14. The mitochondrial fatty acid synthesis (mtFASII) pathway is capable of mediating nuclear-mitochondrial cross talk through the PPAR system of transcriptional activation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parl, Angelika; Mitchell, Sabrina L.; Clay, Hayley B.; Reiss, Sara; Li, Zhen; Murdock, Deborah G.

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: The function of the mitochondria fatty acid synthesis pathway is partially unknown. Overexpression of the pathway causes transcriptional activation through PPARs. Knock down of the pathway attenuates that activation. The last enzyme in the pathway regulates its own transcription. Products of the mtFASII pathway are able to drive nuclear transcription. -- Abstract: Mammalian cells contain two fatty acid synthesis pathways, the cytosolic FASI pathway, and the mitochondrial FASII pathway. The selection behind the conservation of the mitochondrial pathway is not completely understood, given the presence of the cytosolic FAS pathway. In this study, we show through heterologous gene reporter systems and PCR-based arrays that overexpression of MECR, the last step in the mtFASII pathway, causes modulation of gene expression through the PPAR pathway. Electromobility shift assays (EMSAs) demonstrate that overexpression of MECR causes increased binding of PPARs to DNA, while cell fractionation and imaging studies show that MECR remains localized to the mitochondria. Interestingly, knock down of the mtFASII pathway lessens the effect of MECR on this transcriptional modulation. Our data are most consistent with MECR-mediated transcriptional activation through products of the mtFASII pathway, although we cannot rule out MECR acting as a coactivator. Further investigation into the physiological relevance of this communication will be necessary to better understand some of the phenotypic consequences of deficits in this pathway observed in animal models and human disease.

  15. A polymorphism in metallothionein 1A (MT1A) is associated with cadmium-related excretion of urinary beta 2‐microglobulin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lei, Lijian; Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Shanxi Medical University, Shanxi ; Chang, Xiuli; Rentschler, Gerda; Tian, Liting; Zhu, Guoying; Chen, Xiao; Jin, Taiyi; Broberg, Karin

    2012-12-15

    Objectives: Cadmium (Cd) toxicity of the kidney varies between individuals despite similar exposure levels. In humans Cd is mainly bound to metallothioneins (MT), which scavenge its toxic effects. Here we analyzed whether polymorphisms in MT genes MT1A and MT2A influence Cd-related kidney damage. Methods: In a cross-sectional study N = 512 volunteers were selected from three areas in South-Eastern China, which to varying degree were Cd-polluted from a smelter (control area [median Cd in urine U-Cd = 2.67 μg/L], moderately [U-Cd = 4.23 μg/L] and highly [U-Cd = 9.13 μg/L] polluted areas). U-Cd and blood Cd (B-Cd) concentrations were measured by graphite-furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. MT1A rs11076161 (G/A), MT2A rs10636 (G/C) and MT2A rs28366003 (A/G) were determined by Taqman assays; urinary N-Acetyl-beta-(D)-Glucosaminidase (UNAG) by spectrometry, and urinary β2-microglobulin (UB2M) by ELISA. Results: Higher B-Cd (natural log-transformed) with increasing number of MT1A rs11076161 A-alleles was found in the highly polluted group (p-value trend = 0.033; all p-values adjusted for age, sex, and smoking). In a linear model a significant interaction between rs11076161 genotype and B-Cd was found for UNAG (p = 0.001) and UB2M concentrations (p = 0.001). Carriers of the rs11076161 AA genotype showed steeper slopes for the associations between Cd in blood and natural log-transformed UB2M (β = 1.2, 95% CI 0.72–1.6) compared to GG carriers (β = 0.30, 95% CI 0.15–0.45). Also for UNAG (natural log-transformed) carriers of the AA genotype had steeper slopes (β = 0.55, 95% CI 0.27–0.84) compared to GG carriers (β = 0.018, 95% CI − 0.79–0.11). Conclusions: MT1A rs11076161 was associated with B-Cd concentrations and Cd-induced kidney toxicity at high exposure levels. -- Highlights: ► Cadmium is toxic to the kidney but the susceptibility differs between individuals. ► The toxic effect of cadmium is scavenged by metallothioneins. ► A common variant of metallothionein 1A was genotyped in 512 cadmium exposed humans. ► Variant carriers of this polymorphism showed more kidney damage from cadmium. ► The frequency of these variants needs to be taken into account in risk assessment.

  16. Monitoring of arsenic, boron and mercury by lichen and soil analysis in the Mt. Amiata geothermal area (central Italy)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loppi, S.

    1997-12-31

    Epiphytic lichens and top-soils from the Mt. Amiata geothermal field (central Italy) were analyzed for their As, B and Hg content. Three areas were selected: (1) Abbadia S. Salvatore, where a large Hg mine with smelting and roasting plant was located; (2) Piancastagnaio, where there are geothermal power plants; (3) a remote site far from mines and geothermal power plants. The results showed that the geothermal power plants do not represent a macroscopic source of arsenic and boron contamination in the area. As far as mercury is concerned, at the Hg mining area of Abbadia S. Salvatore concentrations were extremely high both in soil and epiphytic lichens, and the anomalous content in these organisms was due to the uptake of elemental mercury originating from soil degassing. At the geothermal area of Piancastagnaio, soil mercury was not different from that in the control area, but Hg in lichens was almost twice the control levels, suggesting that the gaseous emissions from the geothermal power plants are an important source of air contamination.

  17. Probing the Mechanism of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis [beta]-Ketoacyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Synthase III mtFabH: Factors Influencing Catalysis and Substrate Specificity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Alistair K.; Sridharan, Sudharsan; Kremer, Laurent; Lindenberg, Sandra; Dover, Lynn G.; Sacchettini, James C.; Besra, Gurdyal S.

    2010-11-30

    Mycolic acids are the dominant feature of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall. These {alpha}-alkyl, {beta}-hydroxy fatty acids are formed by the condensation of two fatty acids, a long meromycolic acid and a shorter C{sub 24}-C{sub 26} fatty acid. The component fatty acids are produced via a combination of type I and II fatty acid synthases (FAS) with FAS-I products being elongated by FAS-II toward meromycolic acids. The {beta}-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) synthase III encoded by mtfabH (mtFabH) links FAS-I and FAS-II, catalyzing the condensation of FAS-I-derived acyl-CoAs with malonyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP). The acyl-CoA chain length specificity of mtFabH was assessed in vitro; the enzyme extended longer, physiologically relevant acyl-CoA primers when paired with AcpM, its natural partner, than with Escherichia coli ACP. The ability of the enzyme to use E. coli ACP suggests that a similar mode of binding is likely with both ACPs, yet it is clear that unique factors inherent to AcpM modulate the substrate specificity of mtFabH. Mutation of proposed key mtFabH residues was used to define their catalytic roles. Substitution of supposed acyl-CoA binding residues reduced transacylation, with double substitutions totally abrogating activity. Mutation of Arg{sup 46} revealed its more critical role in malonyl-AcpM decarboxylation than in the acyl-CoA binding role. Interestingly, this effect was suppressed intragenically by Arg{sup 161} {yields} Ala substitution. Our structural studies suggested that His{sup 258}, previously implicated in malonyl-ACP decarboxylation, also acts as an anchor point for a network of water molecules that we propose promotes deprotonation and transacylation of Cys{sup 122}.

  18. EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF CHEMICAL SEQUESTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN DEEP AQUIFER MEDIA - PHASE II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neeraj Gupta; Bruce Sass; Jennifer Ickes

    2000-11-28

    In 1998 Battelle was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under a Novel Concepts project grant to continue Phase II research on the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in deep saline formations. The focus of this investigation is to conduct detailed laboratory experiments to examine factors that may affect chemical sequestration of CO{sub 2} in deep saline formations. Reactions between sandstone and other geologic media from potential host reservoirs, brine solutions, and CO{sub 2} are being investigated under high-pressure conditions. Some experiments also include sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) gases to evaluate the potential for co-injection of CO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} related gases in the deep formations. In addition, an assessment of engineering and economic aspects is being conducted. This current Technical Progress Report describes the status of the project as of September 2000. The major activities undertaken during the quarter included several experiments conducted to investigate the effects of pressure, temperature, time, and brine composition on rock samples from potential host reservoirs. Samples (both powder and slab) were taken from the Mt. Simon Sandstone, a potential CO{sub 2} host formation in the Ohio, the Eau Claire Shale, and Rome Dolomite samples that form the caprock for Mt. Simon Sandstone. Also, a sample with high calcium plagioclase content from Frio Formation in Texas was used. In addition, mineral samples for relatively pure Anorthite and glauconite were experimented on with and without the presence of additional clay minerals such as kaolinite and montmorillonite. The experiments were run for one to two months at pressures similar to deep reservoirs and temperatures set at 50 C or 150 C. Several enhancements were made to the experimental equipment to allow for mixing of reactants and to improve sample collection methods. The resulting fluids (gases and liquids) as well as the rock samples were characterized to evaluate the geochemical changes over the experimental period. Preliminary results from the analysis are presented in the report. More detailed interpretation of the results will be presented in the technical report at the end of Phase II.

  19. Simon Property Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration Partnership Year 2009 Link to project...

  20. Cosmology at the Beach Lecture: Simon White

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Simon White

    2010-01-08

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  1. Searches for supersymmetry using the M$_{T2}$ variable in hadronic events produced in pp collisions at 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-05-15

    Searches for supersymmetry (SUSY) are performed using a sample of hadronic events produced in 8 TeV pp collisions at the CERN LHC. The searches are based on the M$_{T2}$ variable, which is a measure of the transverse momentum imbalance in an event. The data were collected with the CMS detector and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb1. Two related searches are performed. The first is an inclusive search based on signal regions defined by the value of the M$_{T2}$ variable, the hadronic energy in the event, the jet multiplicity, and the number of jets identified as originating from bottom quarks. The second is a search for a mass peak corresponding to a Higgs boson decaying to a bottom quark-antiquark pair, where the Higgs boson is produced as a decay product of a SUSY particle. For both searches, the principal backgrounds are evaluated with data control samples. No significant excess over the expected number of background events is observed, and exclusion limits on various SUSY models are derived.

  2. Maquoketa Shale Caprock Integrity Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    The Knox Project objective is to evaluate the potential of formations within the Cambrian-Ordovician strata above the Mt. Simon Sandstone (St. Peter Sandstone and Potosi Dolomite) as potential targets for carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in the Illinois and Michigan Basins. The suitability of the St. Peter Sandstone and Potosi Dolomite to serve as reservoirs for CO2 sequestration is discussed in separate reports. In this report the data gathered from the Knox project, the Illinois Basin Decatur Project (IBDP) and Illinois Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration project (IL-ICCS) are used to make some conclusions about the suitability of the Maquoketa shale as a confining layer for CO2 sequestration. These conclusions are then upscaled to basin-wide inferences based on regional knowledge. Data and interpretations (stratigraphic, petrophysical, fractures, geochemical, risk, seismic) applicable to the Maquoketa Shale from the above mentioned projects was inventoried and summarized. Based on the analysis of these data and interpretations, the Maquoketa Shale is considered to be an effective caprock for a CO2 injection project in either the Potosi Dolomite or St. Peter Sandstone because it has a suitable thickness (~200ft. ~61m), advantageous petrophysical properties (low effective porosity and low permeability), favorable geomechanical properties, an absence of observable fractures and is regionally extensive. Because it is unlikely that CO2 would migrate upward through the Maquoketa Shale, CO2, impact to above lying fresh water aquifers is unlikely. Furthermore, the observations indicate that CO2 injected into the St. Peter Sandstone or Potosi Dolomite may never even migrate up into the Maquoketa Shale at a high enough concentrations or pressure to threaten the integrity of the caprock. Site specific conclusions were reached by unifying the data and conclusions from the IBDP, ICCS and the Knox projects. In the Illinois Basin, as one looks further away from these sites, the formation characteristics are expected to vary. The degree of how well this data can be extrapolated throughout the Basins (regionalized) is difficult to quantify because of the limited amount of data collected on the Maquoketa Shale away from IBDP, IL-ICCS and the Knox projects. Data gathered from the IBDP/IL-ICCS/Knox projects were used to make conclusions about the suitability of the Maquoketa shale as a confining layer for CO2 sequestration. This study indicates that the Maquoketa Shale would be a suitable caprock for a CO2 injection program in either the Potosi Dolomite or St. Peter Sandstone.

  3. Visualizing the Surface Infrastructure Used to Move 2 MtCO2/year from the Dakota Gasification Company to the Weyburn CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery Project: Version of July 1, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooley, James J.

    2009-07-09

    Google Earth Pro has been employed to create an interactive flyover of the worlds largest operational carbon dioxide capture and storage project. The visualization focuses on the transport and storage of 2 MtCO2/year which is captured from the Dakota Gasification Facility (Beula, North Dakota) and transported 205 miles and injected into the Weyburn oil field in Southeastern Saskatchewan.

  4. Recovery Act: Understanding the Impact of CO{sub 2} Injection on the Subsurface Microbial Community in an Illinois Basin CCS Reservoir: Integrated Student Training in Geoscience and Geomicrobiology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fouke, Bruce

    2013-03-31

    An integrated research and teaching program was developed to provide cross-?disciplinary training opportunities in the emerging field of carbon capture and storage (CCS) for geobiology students attending the University of Illinois Urbana-?Champaign (UIUC). Students from across the UIUC campus participated, including those from the departments of Geology, Microbiology, Biochemistry, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Animal Sciences and the Institute for Genomic Biology. The project took advantage of the unique opportunity provided by the drilling and sampling of the large-?scale Phase III CCS demonstration Illinois Basin -? Decatur Project (IBDP) in the central Illinois Basin at nearby Decatur, Illinois. The IBPD is under the direction of the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS, located on the UIUC campus) and the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC). The research component of this project focused on the subsurface sampling and identification of microbes inhabiting the subsurface Cambrian-?age Mt. Simon Sandstone. In addition to formation water collected from the injection and monitoring wells, sidewall rock cores were collected and analyzed to characterize the cements and diagenetic features of the host Mt. Simon Sandstone. This established a dynamic geobiological framework, as well as a comparative baseline, for future studies of how CO2 injection might affect the deep microbial biosphere at other CCS sites. Three manuscripts have been prepared as a result of these activities, which are now being finalized for submission to top-?tier international peer-?reviewed research journals. The training component of this project was structured to ensure that a broad group of UIUC students, faculty and staff gained insight into CCS issues. An essential part of this training was that the UIUC faculty mentored and involved undergraduate and graduate students, as well as postdocs and research scientists, at all stages of the project in order to develop CCS-?focused classroom and field courses, as well as seminars. This program provided an excellent opportunity for participants to develop the background necessary to establish longer-?term research in CCS-?related geology and microbial ecology. Further, the program provided an ongoing dynamic platform to foster long-?term collaboration with the regional ISGS and MGSC sequestration partnership, while offering hands-?on, applied learning experiences.

  5. Searches for supersymmetry using the M$$_{T2}$$ variable in hadronic events produced in pp collisions at 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-05-15

    Searches for supersymmetry (SUSY) are performed using a sample of hadronic events produced in 8 TeV pp collisions at the CERN LHC. The searches are based on the Mmore » $$_{T2}$$ variable, which is a measure of the transverse momentum imbalance in an event. The data were collected with the CMS detector and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb1. Two related searches are performed. The first is an inclusive search based on signal regions defined by the value of the M$$_{T2}$$ variable, the hadronic energy in the event, the jet multiplicity, and the number of jets identified as originating from bottom quarks. The second is a search for a mass peak corresponding to a Higgs boson decaying to a bottom quark-antiquark pair, where the Higgs boson is produced as a decay product of a SUSY particle. For both searches, the principal backgrounds are evaluated with data control samples. No significant excess over the expected number of background events is observed, and exclusion limits on various SUSY models are derived.« less

  6. EA-1828: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    28: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1828: Finding of No Significant Impact Carbon Dioxide Capture from Biofuels Production and Sequestration into the Mount Simon Sandstone Phase II Project in Decatur, Illinois Based on the analyses in the environmental assessment DOE determined that its proposed action-awarding a grant to Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM) to demonstrate an integrated system of carbon dioxide capture in an industrial setting and geologic sequestration in a sandstone

  7. Study on the reduction of atmospheric mercury emissions from mine waste enriched soils through native grass cover in the Mt. Amiata region of Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fantozzi, L.; Dini, F.; Tamburello, L.; Pirrone, N.; Sprovieri, F.

    2013-08-15

    Atmospheric mercury emissions from mine-waste enriched soils were measured in order to compare the mercury fluxes of bare soils with those from other soils covered by native grasses. Our research was conducted near Mt. Amiata in central Italy, an area that was one of the largest and most productive mining centers in Europe up into the 1980s. To determine in situ mercury emissions, we used a Plexiglas flux chamber connected to a portable mercury analyzer (Lumex RA-915+). This allowed us to detect, in real time, the mercury vapor in the air, and to correlate this with the meteorological parameters that we examined (solar radiation, soil temperature, and humidity). The highest mercury flux values (8000 ng m{sup −2} h{sup −1}) were observed on bare soils during the hours of maximum insulation, while lower values (250 ng m{sup −2} h{sup −1}) were observed on soils covered by native grasses. Our results indicate that two main environmental variables affect mercury emission: solar radiation intensity and soil temperature. The presence of native vegetation, which can shield soil surfaces from incident light, reduced mercury emissions, a result that we attribute to a drop in the efficiency of mercury photoreduction processes rather than to decreases in soil temperature. This finding is consistent with decreases in mercury flux values down to 3500 ng m{sup −2} h{sup −1}, which occurred under cloudy conditions despite high soil temperatures. Moreover, when the soil temperature was 28 °C and the vegetation was removed from the experimental site, mercury emissions increased almost four-fold. This increase occurred almost immediately after the grasses were cut, and was approximately eight-fold after 20 h. Thus, this study demonstrates that enhancing wild vegetation cover could be an inexpensive and effective approach in fostering a natural, self-renewing reduction of mercury emissions from mercury-contaminated soils. -- Highlights: ► Mercury air/surface exchange from grass covered soil is different from bare soil. ► Light enhances mercury emissions and is the main parameter driving the process. ► The presence of wild vegetation covering the soil reduces mercury emission. ► Vegetative covers could be a solution to reduce atmospheric mercury pollution.

  8. Evaluating the Suitability for CO2 Storage at the FutureGen 2.0 Site, Morgan County, Illinois, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonneville, Alain; Gilmore, Tyler J.; Sullivan, E. C.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Kelley, Mark E.; White, Signe K.; Appriou, Delphine; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Gerst, Jacqueline L.; Gupta, Neeraj; Horner, Jacob A.; McNeil, Caitlin; Moody, Mark A.; Rike, William M.; Spane, Frank A.; Thorne, Paul D.; Zeller, Evan R.; Zhang, Z. F.; Hoffman, Jeffrey; Humphreys, Kenneth K.

    2013-08-05

    FutureGen 2.0 site will be the first near-zero emission power plant with fully integrated long-term storage in a deep, non-potable saline aquifer in the United States. The proposed FutureGen 2.0 CO2 storage site is located in northeast Morgan County, Illinois, U.S.A., forty-eight kilometres from the Meredosia Energy Center where a large-scale oxy-combustion demonstration will be conducted. The demonstration will involve > 90% carbon capture, which will produce more than one million metric tons (MMT) of CO2 per year. The CO2 will be compressed at the power plant and transported via pipeline to the storage site. To examine CO2 storage potential of the site, a 1,467m characterization well (FGA#1) was completed in December 2011. The target reservoir for CO2 storage is the Mt. Simon Sandstone and Elmhurst Sandstone Member of the lower Eau Claire Formation for a combined thickness of 176 m. Confining beds of the overlying Lombard and Proviso Members (upper Eau Claire Formation) reach a thickness of 126 m. Characterization of the target injection zone and the overlying confining zone was based on wellbore data, cores, and geophysical logs, along with surface geophysical (2-D seismic profiles, magnetic and gravity), and structural data collected during the initial stage of the project . Based on this geological model, 3D simulations of CO2 injection and redistribution were conducted using STOMP-CO2, a multiphase flow and transport simulator. After this characterization stage, it appears that the injection site is a suitable geologic system for CO2 sequestration and that the injection zone is sufficient to receive up to 33 MMT of CO2 at a rate of 1.1 MMT/yr. GHGT-11 conference

  9. Cosmology on the Beach - Simon White, Lecture 3

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Simon White

    2010-01-08

    The lecture was delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  10. Manipulating and Visualizing Proteins Simon, Horst D. 59 BASIC...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ACIDS; CALIFORNIA; CHAINS; CHEMISTRY; DISEASES; FIBROSIS; FORECASTING; GENETICS; OPTIMIZATION; PROTEIN STRUCTURE; PROTEINS; QUEUES; SHAPE; SIMULATION PROTEIN STRUCTURE...

  11. Meet Tony Simon, Another Industrial Assessment Center Student...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Instead, he's continuing to challenge himself -- and finding great success -- by working ... But really, when it comes down to it, I'm putting my skills to work and love my job" ...

  12. Microsoft PowerPoint - Horst Simon.BitstoBuidings2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... on metrics http:www.thegreengrid.orgggcontent Energy Star Program http:... From Peter Kogge, DARPA gg , Exascale Study ... and the power costs will still be ...

  13. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - John Simon, Ph.D.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interests include development of low-cost III-V solar cells, high-efficiency multi-junction solar cells, III-V semiconductor epitaxy, and development of novel semiconductor...

  14. Chemical relationship between discharging fluids in the Siena-Radicofani Graben and the deep fluids produced by the geothermal fields of Mt Amiata, torre Afina and Latera (Central Italy)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duchi, V.; Paolieri, M.; Prati, F ); Minissale, A. Centro di Studio per Mineralogia e la Geochimica dei Sedimenti, Via La Pira 4, 50121 Firenze ); Valori, A )

    1992-06-01

    This paper reports that the thermal springs discharging in the Siena-Radicofani basin and the deep fluids within the geothermal systems of Piancastagnaio (Mt Amiata), Torre Alfina and Latera (Vulsini Mts) have a common origin. The chemical composition and evolution towards the low enthalpy of the springs as compared to the high enthalpy of the geothermal fluids are affected by both the structural setting of the region and the deep hydraulic conditions. Recharge of both the shallow thermal aquifer and the deep geothermal systems takes place in the outcrop areas of Mesozoic carbonate rocks, which constitute the main potential geothermal reservoir in central Italy. The waters of meteoric origin are heated at depth, as a consequence of anomalous heat flow in the region; these waters acquire a CO[sub 2]-rich rising gas phase, equilibrate with the reservoir rocks and, finally, assume their Ca--HCO[sub 3]--SO[sub 4] composition. If these waters discharge rapidly from the border fault systems of the Siena-Radicofani basin they maintain their original composition. If, instead, they emerge from the inner faults of the graben, their temperature and dissolved solids increase so that they become Na--Cl with a high content of NH[sub 4], and H[sub 3]BO[sub 3].

  15. Laboratory studies evaluating CO2 flood impact on the geomechanics of whole core samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connor, William K.

    2005-06-01

    Geological sequestration of CO2, whether by enhanced oil recovery (EOR), coal-bed methane (CBM) recovery, or saline aquifer injection is a promising near-term sequestration methodology. While tremendous experience exists for EOR, and CBM recovery has been demonstrated in existing fields, saline aquifer injection studies have only recently been initiated. Studies evaluating the availability of saline aquifers suitable for CO2 injection show great potential, however, the long-term fate of the injected CO2 in these ancient aqueous systems is still uncertain. Migration of the CO2 beyond the natural reservoir seals could become problematic, thus the identification of means to enhance the natural seals may help lead to the utilization of this sequestration methodology. Co-injection of a mineral reactant slurry, either with the CO2 or in separate, secondary injection wells, could provide a means to enhance the natural reservoir seals by providing the necessary cations for precipitation of mineral carbonates along the periphery of the injection plume. The subject study evaluates the merit of several mineral slurry co-injection strategies, by conduct of a series of laboratory-scale CO2 flood tests on whole core samples of the Mt. Simon sandstone from the Illinois Basin. By conducting these tests on whole core samples rather than crushed core, an evaluation of the impact of the CO2 flood on the rock mechanics properties as well as the geochemistry of the core and brine solution has been possible. This empirical data could provide a valuable resource for the validation of reservoir models under development for these engineered CO2 systems.

  16. Mt Signal Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    135C408.15 K 275 F 734.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 3 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 15 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  17. Marysville Mt Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Volume: Mean Capacity: USGS Mean Reservoir Temp: USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: USGS Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure...

  18. Mt Rainier Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    -121.75128794312 Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: USGS Mean Reservoir Temp: USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: USGS Mean...

  19. Marysville Mt Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEA Development Phase: Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: USGS Mean Reservoir Temp: USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: USGS Mean...

  20. Controlled Source Audio MT | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Telluric Survey Time-Domain Electromagnetics Self Potential Field Procedures The signal for a CSAMT survey is artificially generated through the installation of a long...

  1. Havre, MT Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 View History Pipeline Volumes NA NA 1,309 NA NA 0 1998-2003 Pipeline Prices NA NA 3.66 NA NA -- 1998-2003

  2. Havre, MT Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9,437 6,806 4,331 2,160 680 3 1998-2015 Pipeline Prices 4.05 3.82 2.40 3.09 4.22 2.30 1998

  3. Babb, MT Natural Gas Export to Canada

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6,671 12,807 15,525 17,235 17,421 20,708 1996-2015 Pipeline Prices 3.86 3.98 2.47 3.13 4.05 2.34 1996

  4. Babb, MT Natural Gas Export to Canada

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 20 0 0 122 1996-2014 Pipeline Prices -- 3.39 -- -- 4.90 1996-2014 Liquefied Natural Gas Volumes 5 2015-2015 Liquefied Natural Gas Prices 12.95 2015

  5. Mt Rainier Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Environmental Issues Click "Edit With Form" above to add content Exploration History First Discovery Well Completion Date: Well Name: Location: Depth: Initial Flow...

  6. A Submarine Welded Ignimbrite-Crystal-Rich Sandstone Facies Associatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of rhyolitic welded ignimbrite are intercalated within a submarine, below-storm-wave-base sedimentary succession in the Cambrian Tyndall Group, Mount Read Volcanics, western...

  7. An Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins: Part 1: Evaluation of Phase 2 CO{sub 2} Injection Testing in the Deep Saline Gunter Sandstone Reservoir (Cambro-Ordovician Knox Group), Marvin Blan No. 1 Hancock County, Kentucky Part 2: Time-lapse Three-Dimensional Vertical Seismic Profile (3D-VSP) of Sequestration Target Interval with Injected Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Bowersox; John Hickman; Hannes Leetaru

    2012-12-01

    Part 1 of this report focuses on results of the western Kentucky carbon storage test, and provides a basis for evaluating injection and storage of supercritical CO{sub 2} in Cambro-Ordovician carbonate reservoirs throughout the U.S. Midcontinent. This test demonstrated that the Cambro- Ordovician Knox Group, including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite in stratigraphic succession from shallowest to deepest, had reservoir properties suitable for supercritical CO{sub 2} storage in a deep saline reservoir hosted in carbonate rocks, and that strata with properties sufficient for long-term confinement of supercritical CO{sub 2} were present in the deep subsurface. Injection testing with brine and CO{sub 2} was completed in two phases. The first phase, a joint project by the Kentucky Geological Survey and the Western Kentucky Carbon Storage Foundation, drilled the Marvin Blan No. 1 carbon storage research well and tested the entire Knox Group section in the open borehole â?? including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite â?? at 1152â??2255 m, below casing cemented at 1116 m. During Phase 1 injection testing, most of the 297 tonnes of supercritical CO{sub 2} was displaced into porous and permeable sections of the lowermost Beekmantown below 1463 m and Gunter. The wellbore was then temporarily abandoned with a retrievable bridge plug in casing at 1105 m and two downhole pressure-temperature monitoring gauges below the bridge plug pending subsequent testing. Pressure and temperature data were recorded every minute for slightly more than a year, providing a unique record of subsurface reservoir conditions in the Knox. In contrast, Phase 2 testing, this study, tested a mechanically-isolated dolomitic-sandstone interval in the Gunter. Operations in the Phase 2 testing program commenced with retrieval of the bridge plug and long-term pressure gauges, followed by mechanical isolation of the Gunter by plugging the wellbore with cement below the injection zone at 1605.7 m, then cementing a section of a 14-cm casing at 1470.4â??1535.6. The resultant 70.1-m test interval at 1535.6â??1605.7 m included nearly all of the Gunter sandstone facies. During the Phase 2 injection, 333 tonnes of CO{sub 2} were injected into the thick, lower sand section in the sandy member of the Gunter. Following the completion of testing, the injection zone below casing at 1116 m in the Marvin Blan No. 1 well, and wellbore below 305 m was permanently abandoned with cement plugs and the wellsite reclaimed. The range of most-likely storage capacities found in the Knox in the Marvin Blan No. 1 is 1000 tonnes per surface hectare in the Phase 2 Gunter interval to 8685 tonnes per surface hectare if the entire Knox section were available including the fractured interval near the base of the Copper Ridge. By itself the Gunter lacks sufficient reservoir volume to be considered for CO{sub 2} storage, although it may provide up to 18% of the reservoir volume available in the Knox. Regional extrapolation of CO{sub 2} storage potential based on the results of a single well test can be problematic, although indirect evidence of porosity and permeability can be demonstrated in the form of active saltwater-disposal wells injecting into the Knox. The western Kentucky region suitable for CO{sub 2} storage in the Knox is limited updip, to the east and south, by the depth at which the base of the Maquoketa shale lies above the depth required to ensure storage of CO{sub 2} in its supercritical state and the deepest a commercial well might be drilled for CO{sub 2} storage. The resulting prospective region has an area of approximately 15,600 km{sup 2}, beyond which it is unlikely that suitable Knox reservoirs may be developed. Faults in the subsurface, which serve as conduits for CO{sub 2} migration and compromise sealing strata, may mitigate the area with Knox reservoirs suitable for CO{sub 2} storage. The results of the injection tests in the Marvin Blan No. 1, however, provide a basis for evaluating supercritical CO{sub 2} storage in Cambro-Ordovician carbonate reservoirs throughout the Midcontinent. Reservoir seals were evaluated in the Knox and overlying strata. Within the Knox, permeabilities measured in vertical core plugs from the Beekmantown and Copper Ridge suggest that intraformational seals may problematic. Three stratigraphic intervals overlying the Knox in the Marvin Blan No. 1 well may provide seals for potential CO{sub 2} storage reservoirs in western Kentucky: Dutchtown Limestone, Black River Group, and Maquoketa Shale. The Dutchtown and Black River had permeabilities suggest that these intervals may act as secondary sealing strata. The primary reservoir seal for the Knox, however, is the Maquoketa. Maximum seal capacity calculated from permeabilities measured in vertical core plugs from the Maquoketa exceeded the net reservoir height in the Knox by about two orders of magnitude. Rock strength measured in core plugs from the Maquoketa suggest that it is unlikely that any CO{sub 2} migrating from the Knox would have sufficient pressure to fracture the Maquoketa. Part 2 of this report reviews the results of vertical seismic profiling in the Marvin Blan No. 1 well to model post-injection CO{sub 2} plume migration. Two three-dimensional vertical seismic profiles (3D-VSPâ??s) were acquired at the Kentucky Geological Survey Marvin Blan No. 1 CO{sub 2} sequestration research well, Hancock County, Kentucky. The initial (pre-injection) survey was performed on September 15â??16, 2010. This was followed by the injection of 333 tonnes of supercritical CO{sub 2} and then 584 m3 of 2% KCl water (to displace the remaining CO{sub 2} in the wellbore) on September 22, 2010. After injection, the well was shut in with a downhole pressure of 17.5 MPa at the injected reservoir depth of 1545.3 m. The second 3D-VSP was acquired on September 25â??26, 2010. These two 3D-VSP's were combined to produce a time-lapse 3D-VSP data volume in an attempt to monitor and image the subsurface changes caused by the injection. Less than optimum surface access and ambient subsurface noise from a nearby active petroleum pipeline hampered quality of the data, resulting in the inability to image the CO{sub 2} plume in the subsurface. However, some changes in the seismic response post-injection (both wavelet character and an apparent seismic "pull-down" within the injection zone) are interpreted to be a result of the injection process and imply that the technique could still be valid under different circumstances.

  8. Leveraging Regional Exploration to Develop Geologic Framework for CO2 Storage in Deep Formations in Midwestern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neeraj Gupta

    2009-09-30

    Obtaining subsurface data for developing a regional framework for geologic storage of CO{sub 2} can require drilling and characterization in a large number of deep wells, especially in areas with limited pre-existing data. One approach for achieving this objective, without the prohibitive costs of drilling costly standalone test wells, is to collaborate with the oil and gas drilling efforts in a piggyback approach that can provide substantial cost savings and help fill data gaps in areas that may not otherwise get characterized. This leveraging with oil/gas drilling also mitigates some of the risk involved in standalone wells. This collaborative approach has been used for characterizing in a number of locations in the midwestern USA between 2005 and 2009 with funding from U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE award: DE-FC26-05NT42434) and in-kind contributions from a number of oil and gas operators. The results are presented in this final technical report. In addition to data collected under current award, selected data from related projects such as the Midwestern Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP), the Ohio River Valley CO{sub 2} storage project at and near the Mountaineer Plant, and the drilling of the Ohio Stratigraphic well in Eastern Ohio are discussed and used in the report. Data from this effort are also being incorporated into the MRCSP geologic mapping. The project activities were organized into tracking and evaluation of characterization opportunities; participation in the incremental drilling, basic and advanced logging in selected wells; and data analysis and reporting. Although a large number of opportunities were identified and evaluated, only a small subset was carried into the field stage. Typical selection factors included reaching an acceptable agreement with the operator, drilling and logging risks, and extent of pre-existing data near the candidate wells. The region of study is primarily along the Ohio River Valley corridor in the Appalachian Basin, which underlies large concentrations of CO{sub 2} emission sources. In addition, some wells in the Michigan basin are included. Assessment of the geologic and petrophysical properties of zones of interest has been conducted. Although a large number of formations have been evaluated across the geologic column, the primary focus has been on evaluating the Cambrian sandstones (Mt. Simon, Rose Run, Kerbel) and carbonates layers (Knox Dolomite) as well as on the Silurian-Devonian carbonates (Bass Island, Salina) and sandstones (Clinton, Oriskany, Berea). Factors controlling the development of porosity and permeability, such as the depositional setting have been explored. In northern Michigan the Bass Islands Dolomite appears to have favorable reservoir development. In west central Michigan the St. Peter sandstone exhibits excellent porosity in the Hart and Feuring well and looks promising. In Southeastern Kentucky in the Appalachian Basin, the Batten and Baird well provided valuable data on sequestration potential in organic shales through adsorption. In central and eastern Ohio and western West Virginia, the majority of the wells provided an insight to the complex geologic framework of the relatively little known Precambrian through Silurian potential injection targets. Although valuable data was acquired and a number of critical data gaps were filled through this effort, there are still many challenges ahead and questions that need answered. The lateral extent to which favorable potential injection conditions exist in most reservoirs is still generally uncertain. The prolongation of the characterization of regional geologic framework through partnership would continue to build confidence and greatly benefit the overall CO{sub 2} sequestration effort.

  9. An Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-12-01

    The studies summarized herein were conducted during 20092014 to investigate the utility of the Knox Group and St. Peter Sandstone deeply buried geologic strata for underground storage of carbon dioxide (CO2), a practice called CO2 sequestration (CCS). In the subsurface of the midwestern United States, the Knox and associated strata extend continuously over an area approaching 500,000 sq. km, about three times as large as the State of Illinois. Although parts of this region are underlain by the deeper Mt. Simon Sandstone, which has been proven by other Department of Energy-funded research as a resource for CCS, the Knox strata may be an additional CCS resource for some parts of the Midwest and may be the sole geologic storage (GS) resource for other parts. One group of studies assembles, analyzes, and presents regional-scale and point-scale geologic information that bears on the suitability of the geologic formations of the Knox for a CCS project. New geologic and geo-engineering information was developed through a small-scale test of CO2 injection into a part of the Knox, conducted in western Kentucky. These studies and tests establish the expectation that, at least in some locations, geologic formations within the Knox will (a) accept a commercial-scale flow rate of CO2 injected through a drilled well; (b) hold a commercial-scale mass of CO2 (at least 30 million tons) that is injected over decades; and (c) seal the injected CO2 within the injection formations for hundreds to thousands of years. In CCS literature, these three key CCS-related attributes are called injectivity, capacity, and containment. The regional-scale studies show that reservoir and seal properties adequate for commercial-scale CCS in a Knox reservoir are likely to extend generally throughout the Illinois and Michigan Basins. Information distinguishing less prospective subregions from more prospective fairways is included in this report. Another group of studies report the results of reservoir flow simulations that estimate the progress and outcomes of hypothetical CCS projects carried out within the Knox (particularly within the Potosi Dolomite subunit, which, in places, is highly permeable) and within the overlying St. Peter Sandstone. In these studies, the regional-scale information and a limited amount of detailed data from specific boreholes is used as the basis for modeling the CO2 injection process (dynamic modeling). The simulation studies were conducted progressively, with each successive study designed to refine the conclusions of the preceding one or to answer additional questions. The simulation studies conclude that at Decatur, Illinois or a geologically similar site, the Potosi Dolomite reservoir may provide adequate injectivity and capacity for commercial-scale injection through a single injection well. This conclusion depends on inferences from seismic-data attributes that certain highly permeable horizons observed in the wells represent laterally persistent, porous vuggy zones that are vertically more common than initially evident from wellbore data. Lateral persistence of vuggy zones is supported by isotopic evidence that the conditions that caused vug development (near-surface processes) were of regional rather than local scale. Other studies address aspects of executing and managing a CCS project that targets a Knox reservoir. These studies cover well drilling, public interactions, representation of datasets and conclusions using geographic information system (GIS) platforms, and risk management.

  10. Whitlash, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 586 518 591 564 622 539 612 629 604 606 591 599 2012 598 571 600 542 575 525 550 549 530 526 493 512 2013 511 452 475 485...

  11. Sweetgrass, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 71 62 68 68 70 68 68 67 64 57 53 64 2012 57 60 63 62 65 61 68 60 55 57 52 55 2013 52 46 46 25 991...

  12. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Mt Princeton Hot Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Date 2010 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Used to map fracture and fluid flow patterns. References K. Richards, A. Revil, A. Jardani, F. Henderson, M....

  13. RAPID/Roadmap/17-MT-d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to cross a stream or wetland; handling, storing, applying or disposing of hazardous or toxic material in a manner that pollutes streams, lakes or wetlands or that may cause damage...

  14. Geothermometry At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Pearl...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Celcius References R.H. Pearl, J.K. Barrett (1976) Geothermal resources of the Upper San Luis and Arkansas valleys, Colorado Additional References Retrieved from "http:...

  15. Integrated Dense Array and Transect MT Surveying at Dixie Valley...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Area, Nevada- Structural Controls, Hydrothermal Alteration and Deep Fluid Sources Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

  16. RAPID/Roadmap/19-MT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Kalispell, Missoula, Helena, Bozeman, Havre, Glasgow, Lewistown and Billings. Once an application is filed, its status may be tracked using the Montana Pending Water...

  17. Port of Morgan, MT Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2 2013 2014 View History Pipeline Volumes 0 123 0 1998-2014 Pipeline Prices -- 3.14 -- 1998-2014

  18. Sweetgrass, MT Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    09 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History Pipeline Volumes 1,109 932 781 716 1,160 0 1998-2014 Pipeline Prices 3.52 3.98 3.77 2.41 3.67 -- 1998-2014

  19. Whitlash, MT Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline from Canada

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    7,707 7,062 6,571 5,387 5,128 4,651 1996-2015 Pipeline Prices 3.88 3.65 2.35 3.07 4.04 2.13

  20. RAPID/Roadmap/17-MT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Along with protecting the aesthetic value, the policies protect water quality and fish habitat. An additional benefit of the policy is minimization of sedimentation....

  1. RAPID/Roadmap/6-MT-f | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    be obtained from the Department of Environmental Quality, or may be waived by Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks during its review process under the Natural Streambed and Land...

  2. Field Mapping At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    intrusive (outlined by the magnetic data) and the heat flow anomaly occupy a broad dome in the Precambrian rocks, the stock outcropping in the northwest portion of the dome,...

  3. 2007-mt-elbert | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Alaska North Slope Stratigraphic Test Well image showing Donyon Rig Photo courtesy Doyon Drilling Inc Project Background Maps of Research Area Photo Gallery Well log Data From BP-DOE-US "Mount Elbert" Test Is Now Available. Digital well log data acquired at the February 2007 gas hydrates test well at Milne Point, Alaska are now available. Data include Gamma ray, neutron porosity, density porosity, three-dimensional high resolution resistivity, acoustics including compressional- and

  4. RAPID/Roadmap/3-MT-e | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    on Montana Department of Transportation lands. 03MTEEncroachmentPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number...

  5. RAPID/Roadmap/3-MT-f | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    easements established before 1997. 03MTFRightOfWayEasementForUtilitiesProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number...

  6. Port of Morgan, MT Natural Gas Exports to Canada

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    485,026 690,466 658,934 730,988 695,152 518,386 1996-2014 Pipeline Prices 3.90 4.14 3.75 2.45 3.23 4.41...

  7. Aeromagnetic Survey At Mt St Helens Area (Towle, 1983) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    structure of Mount St. Helens in more detail. Electrical and electromagnetic methods would be especially useful in determining the actual electrical conductivity of...

  8. Self Potential At Mt Princeton Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Richards...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    groundwater flux patterns Notes Researchers collected 2700 SP measurements. Equilibrium temperature data from wells and shallow (305 cm) holes was correlated to geoelectrical...

  9. DC Resistivity Survey (Wenner Array) At Mt Princeton Hot Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and produced 12 resistivity profiles, each approximately 1.3 km in length. Equilibrium temperature data from wells and shallow (305 cm) holes was correlated to geoelectrical...

  10. Ground Magnetics At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    field of the effect of the stock. References D. D. Blackwell (Unknown) Exploration In A Blind Geothermal Area Near Marysville, Montana, Usa Additional References Retrieved from...

  11. Ground Gravity Survey At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and with the heat flow anomaly. References D. D. Blackwell (Unknown) Exploration In A Blind Geothermal Area Near Marysville, Montana, Usa Additional References Retrieved from...

  12. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    with the thermal anomaly. References D. D. Blackwell (Unknown) Exploration In A Blind Geothermal Area Near Marysville, Montana, Usa Additional References Retrieved from...

  13. Mt. Edgecumbe High School Wind Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - Yankton School District Wind Project

  14. RAPID/Roadmap/7-MT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    convenience, and necessity; Water and air quality decisions have already been issued; and Public lands and federal corridors were considered. The DEQ must approve a facility as...

  15. RAPID/Roadmap/14-MT-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    waters of the United States. Point sources are discrete conveyances such as pipes or man-made ditches. Individual homes that are connected to a municipal system, use a septic...

  16. Micro-Earthquake At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    observed in the geothermal areas in the Salton Sea between 1-10 Hz (in units of power density). Because of this very low background noise the micro-earthquake survey was possible...

  17. RAPID/Roadmap/3-MT-d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    lease, exchange and sell school lands" and other lands granted for the support of education. It has the authority to issue leases for agriculture, grazing, mineral production,...

  18. Mt St Helens Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    -122.04050509296 Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: USGS Mean Reservoir Temp: USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: USGS Mean...

  19. Mt St Helens Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: USGS Mean Reservoir Temp: USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: USGS Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With...

  20. RAPID/Roadmap/9-MT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (MEPA) is intended to protect the state from the cumulative affect of development on nature and human health, much in the same way the National Environmental Policy Act regulates...

  1. RAPID/Roadmap/6-MT-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    surface waters. The NOI must include a narrative description of: The location and nature of the activity; The total area of the site and the area within the site that is...

  2. RAPID/Roadmap/6-MT-e | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Anyone planning new development within a designated Special Flood Hazard Areas (SFHA). Check with local...

  3. RAPID/Roadmap/14-MT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    through the voluntary implementation of best management practices identified in science-based, community-supported watershed plans. 14MTANonpointSourcePollution (1).pdf...

  4. Mt Carmel Public Utility Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2008-04 388 3,487 4,603 146 1,267 856 104 2,826 104 638 7,580 5,563 2008-03 486 4,284 4,607 147 1,239 856 275 2,792 105 908 8,315 5,568 2008-02 418 4,603 4,612 127 1,318 855 226...

  5. RAPID/Roadmap/17-MT-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us Natural Streambed and Land Preservation Act (310 Permit)...

  6. Sweetgrass, MT Liquefied Natural Gas Exports Price (Dollars per Thousand

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's -- 13.29 14.38 14.95 13.48

  7. Sweetgrass, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's NA NA 2000's NA 1.94 NA 5.09 5.12 7.37 5.81 6.12 8.02 3.52 2010's 3.98 3.77 2.41 3.67 --

  8. Sweetgrass, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 4.08 3.79 3.87 3.96 4.08 4.18 3.94 3.78 3.71 3.37 3.24 2.96 2012 2.51 2.19 1.86 1.71 2.08 1.95 2.37 2.27 2.42 3.20 3.44 3.26 2013 3.14 3.12 3.42 3.69 3.73

  9. Sweetgrass, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's NA NA 2000's NA 121 NA 347 2,728 2,043 2,012 1,539 1,373 1,109 2010's 932 781 716 1,160 0

  10. Sweetgrass, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 71 62 68 68 70 68 68 67 64 57 53 64 2012 57 60 63 62 65 61 68 60 55 57 52 55 2013 52 46 46 25 991

  11. RAPID/Roadmap/8-MT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    That the facility will serve the public interest, convenience, and necessity; Water and air quality decisions have already been issued; and Public lands and federal corridors were...

  12. BWXT Pantex, LLC Route 726, Mt. Athos Road

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    9B. DATED (SEE E M 11) I 1 DE-ACO4-OOALO6020 10s. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) I . CONTRACT ID CODE PAGE I OF 2 PAGES 2. AMENDMENT/MODlFlCATlON NO. MO99 Offers must acknowledge receipt of this amendment priw to the hour and date specifid in the solicitation a s amended. by one of the fdlovving methods: (a) By completing Items 8 and 15, and returning - copies of the amendmmS (b) By acknwuledglng receipt of this amendment on each oopy of the offer submitted; or (c) By separate letttx or tdegram which

  13. BWXT Pantex, LLC Route 726, Mt. Athos Road

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    I I . CONTRACT ID CODE I I 9B. DATED (SEE ITEM 1 1 ) PAGE I OF 4 PAGES 10A. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACTIORDER NO. I 1 DEJCOCOOAL66620 106. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. MI00 extended. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE See Block 16C CODE I FACILITY CODE Offers must acknowledge receipt of this amendment prior to the hour and date specifled in the solicitation as amended, by one of the following methods: (a) By completing Items 8 and 15, and returning - copies of the amendment; (b) By

  14. BWXT Pantex, LLC Route 726, Mt. Athos Road

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Sol-lClTATlONlMODlFlCATlON OF CONTRACT I I . CONTRACT ID CODE PAGE I OF P PAGES 9B. DATED (SEE E M 11) 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. MI01 Offers must acknowledge receipt of this amendment prior to the hour and date specifmd in the solicitation as mended, by one of the following methods: (a) By completing Items 8 and 15, and returning - coples of the amendment; @) By acknowledging r d p t of this amendment on each copy of the offer submitted; or (c) By seperate letter or telegram whlch includes a

  15. BWXT Pantex, LLC Route 726, Mt. Athos Road

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    9B. DATED (SEE ITEM 11) I I DE-AC04-00AL66620 10B. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) CONTRACT ID CODE PAGE I OF 2 PAGES 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. MI18 extended. CODE I FACILITY CODE Offers must acknowledge receipt of this amendment prior to the hour and date specified in the solicitation as amended, by one of the following methods: (a) By completing Items 8 and 15, and returning - copies of the amendment; (b) By acknowledging receipt of this amendment on each copy of the offer submitted; or (c) By

  16. BWXT Pantex, LLC Route 726, Mt. Athos Road

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    I 1 CONTRACT ID CODE I I 9B. DATED (SEE ITEM 11) PAGE I OF 2 PAGES 10A. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACTIORDER NO. DE-AC04-00AL66620 1 1 1 0 B DATED (SEE ITEM 13) 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. M I 22 - . - extended. Offers must acknowledge receipt of this amendment prior to the hour and date specified in the solicitation as amended, by one of the following methods: (a) By completing Items 8 and 15, and returning - copies of the amendment; (b) By acknowledging receipt of this amendment on each copy of

  17. BWXT Pantex, LLC Route 726, Mt. Athos Road Lynchburg, V

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    V A 24506 AMENDMENT OF SOLlClTATlONlMODlFlCATlON OF CONTRACT ( A . CONTRACT ID CODE PAGE I OF 2 PAGES I 1 9B. DATED (SEE ITEM I ) I I I 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. M120 I 10A. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACTIORDER NO. DE-AC04-00AL66620 I 1 10B. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) 3. EFFECTIVE DATE See Block 16C 6. ISSUED BY CODE U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Service Center Property and M&O Contract Support Department P.O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 871 85-5400 7. ADMINISTERED

  18. RAPID/Roadmap/6-MT-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    well as ARM 18.8.5 govern the maximum dimensions, weights, and other characteristics of motor vehicles operating on highways in the state. Vehicles exceeding the maximum width,...

  19. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    D. Blackwell (Unknown) Exploration In A Blind Geothermal Area Near Marysville, Montana, Usa Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleDataAcqui...

  20. Northwest Distributed/Community Wind Workgroup Meeting- MT

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Northwest Wind Resource and Action Center, which is partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, will facilitate a workgroup meeting for stakeholders involved in the distributed and...

  1. File:INL-geothermal-mt.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    current 12:41, 16 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 12:41, 16 December 2010 5,100 4,200 (1.99 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated upload from NREL's "mapsearch"...

  2. Sweetgrass, MT Liquefied Natural Gas Exports (Million Cubic Feet...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Natural Gas Exports (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2014 8 11 10 8 8 5 6 6 6 6 6 7 2015 5 4 5 5 5 4 - No Data Reported; -- Not...

  3. Sweetgrass, MT Liquefied Natural Gas Exports Price (Dollars per...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2014 15.01 15.61 15.61 14.97 15.10 14.88 14.94 14.34 14.48 14.42 14.07 14.93 2015 13.77 13.30 13.27 12.89 13.25 14.56...

  4. Babb, MT Liquefied Natural Gas Exports (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Natural Gas Exports (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2015 5 - No Data Reported; -- Not Applicable; NA Not Available; W Withheld...

  5. Babb, MT Liquefied Natural Gas Exports Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2015 12.95 - No Data Reported; -- Not Applicable; NA Not Available; W ...

  6. Modeling basin- and plume-scale processes of CO2 storage for full-scale deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Mehnert, E.; Lin, Y.-F.; Zhang, K.

    2009-08-15

    Integrated modeling of basin- and plume-scale processes induced by full-scale deployment of CO{sub 2} storage was applied to the Mt. Simon Aquifer in the Illinois Basin. A three-dimensional mesh was generated with local refinement around 20 injection sites, with approximately 30 km spacing. A total annual injection rate of 100 Mt CO{sub 2} over 50 years was used. The CO{sub 2}-brine flow at the plume scale and the single-phase flow at the basin scale were simulated. Simulation results show the overall shape of a CO{sub 2} plume consisting of a typical gravity-override subplume in the bottom injection zone of high injectivity and a pyramid-shaped subplume in the overlying multilayered Mt. Simon, indicating the important role of a secondary seal with relatively low-permeability and high-entry capillary pressure. The secondary-seal effect is manifested by retarded upward CO{sub 2} migration as a result of multiple secondary seals, coupled with lateral preferential CO{sub 2} viscous fingering through high-permeability layers. The plume width varies from 9.0 to 13.5 km at 200 years, indicating the slow CO{sub 2} migration and no plume interference between storage sites. On the basin scale, pressure perturbations propagate quickly away from injection centers, interfere after less than 1 year, and eventually reach basin margins. The simulated pressure buildup of 35 bar in the injection area is not expected to affect caprock geomechanical integrity. Moderate pressure buildup is observed in Mt. Simon in northern Illinois. However, its impact on groundwater resources is less than the hydraulic drawdown induced by long-term extensive pumping from overlying freshwater aquifers.

  7. Geoscience Perspectives in Carbon Sequestration - Educational Training and Research Through Classroom, Field, and Laboratory Investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wronkiewicz, David; Paul, Varum; Abousif, Alsedik; Ryback, Kyle

    2013-09-30

    The most effective mechanism to limit CO{sub 2} release from underground Geologic Carbon Sequestration (GCS) sites over multi-century time scales will be to convert the CO{sub 2} into solid carbonate minerals. This report describes the results from four independent research investigations on carbonate mineralization: 1) Colloidal calcite particles forming in Maramec Spring, Missouri, provide a natural analog to evaluate reactions that may occur in a leaking GCS site. The calcite crystals form as a result of physiochemical changes that occur as the spring water rises from a depth of more than 190'?. The resultant pressure decrease induces a loss of CO{sub 2} from the water, rise in pH, lowering of the solubility of Ca{sup 2+} and CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, and calcite precipitation. Equilibrium modelling of the spring water resulted in a calculated undersaturated state with respect to calcite. The discontinuity between the observed occurrence of calcite and the model result predicting undersaturated conditions can be explained if bicarbonate ions (HCO{sub 3}{sup -}) are directly involved in precipitation process rather than just carbonate ions (CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}). 2) Sedimentary rocks in the Oronto Group of the Midcontinent Rift (MCR) system contain an abundance of labile Ca-, Mg-, and Fe-silicate minerals that will neutralize carbonic acid and provide alkaline earth ions for carbonate mineralization. One of the challenges in using MCR rocks for GCS results from their low porosity and permeability. Oronto Group samples were reacted with both CO{sub 2}-saturated deionized water at 90C, and a mildly acidic leachant solution in flow-through core-flooding reactor vessels at room temperature. Resulting leachate solutions often exceeded the saturation limit for calcite. Carbonate crystals were also detected in as little as six days of reaction with Oronto Group rocks at 90oC, as well as experiments with forsterite-olivine and augite, both being common minerals this sequence. The Oronto Group samples have poor reservoir rock characteristics, none ever exceeded a permeability value of 2.0 mD even after extensive dissolution of calcite cement during the experiments. The overlying Bayfield Group Jacobsville Formation sandstones averaged 13.4 4.3% porosity and a single sample tested by core-flooding revealed a permeability of ~340 mD. The high porosity-permeability characteristics of these sandstones will allow them to be used for GCS as a continuous aquifer unit with the overlying Mt. Simon Formation. 3) Anaerobic sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) can enhance the conversion rate of CO{sub 2} into solid minerals and thereby improve long-term storage. SRB accelerated carbonate mineralization reactions between pCO{sub 2} values of 0.0059 and 14.7 psi. Hydrogen, lactate and formate served as suitable electron donors for SRB metabolism. The use of a {sup 13}CO{sub 2} spiked gas source also produced carbonate minerals with ~53% of the carbon being derived from the gas phase. The sulfate reducing activity of the microbial community was limited, however, at 20 psi pCO{sub 2} and carbonate mineralization did not occur. Inhibition of bacterial metabolism may have resulted from the acidic conditions or CO{sub 2} toxicity. 4) Microbialite communities forming in the high turbidity and hypersaline water of Storrs Lake, San Salvador Island, The Bahamas, were investigated for their distribution, mineralogy and microbial diversity. Molecular analysis of the organic mats on the microbialites indicate only a trace amount of cyanobacteria, while anaerobic and photosynthetic non-sulfur bacteria of the phyla Chloroflexi and purple sulfur bacteria of class Gammaproteobacteria were abundant.

  8. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Characterization...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at SIRTA Haeffelin, Martial Institut Pierre Simon Laplace Chepfer, Helene IPSL LMD, France Protat, A. Institut Pierre Simon Laplace Morille, Y. Institut Pierre Simon Laplace...

  9. Valley-Fill Sandstones in the Kootenai Formation on the Crow Indian Reservation, South Central Montana.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, D.A.

    1997-10-01

    Subsurface data is being collected, organized, and a digital database is being prepared for the project. An ACCESS database and PC-Arcview will be used to manage and interpret the data. All of the four 30 X 60 geologic quadrangles have been scanned to produce a digital surface geologic data base for the Crow Reservation and all are nearing completion. Writing of the map explanations has begun. Field investigations were nearly completed during this quarter; only minor field checks remain. With the help of a student field assistant from the Crow Tribe, the entire project area was inventoried for the presence of valley-fill deposits in the Kootenai Formation. Field inventory has resulted in the identification of nine exposures of thick valley-fill deposits. These appear to represent at least four major westward-trending valley systems. All the channel localities have been measured and described in detail and paleocurrent data has been collected from all but one locality. In addition, two stratigraphic sections were measured in areas where channels are absent.

  10. Study on detailed geological modelling for fluvial sandstone reservoir in Daqing oil field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao Hanqing; Fu Zhiguo; Lu Xiaoguang

    1997-08-01

    Guided by the sedimentation theory and knowledge of modern and ancient fluvial deposition and utilizing the abundant information of sedimentary series, microfacies type and petrophysical parameters from well logging curves of close spaced thousands of wells located in a large area. A new method for establishing detailed sedimentation and permeability distribution models for fluvial reservoirs have been developed successfully. This study aimed at the geometry and internal architecture of sandbodies, in accordance to their hierarchical levels of heterogeneity and building up sedimentation and permeability distribution models of fluvial reservoirs, describing the reservoir heterogeneity on the light of the river sedimentary rules. The results and methods obtained in outcrop and modem sedimentation studies have successfully supported the study. Taking advantage of this method, the major producing layers (PI{sub 1-2}), which have been considered as heterogeneous and thick fluvial reservoirs extending widely in lateral are researched in detail. These layers are subdivided into single sedimentary units vertically and the microfacies are identified horizontally. Furthermore, a complex system is recognized according to their hierarchical levels from large to small, meander belt, single channel sandbody, meander scroll, point bar, and lateral accretion bodies of point bar. The achieved results improved the description of areal distribution of point bar sandbodies, provide an accurate and detailed framework model for establishing high resolution predicting model. By using geostatistic technique, it also plays an important role in searching for enriched zone of residual oil distribution.

  11. Thermal Expansion Behavior of Cerro Prieto Sandstones and Other Sedimentary Rocks Under Stress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Contreras, E.; Bermejo, F.

    1983-12-15

    This paper describes the experimental work and presents the results of a research program carried out to investigate the thermal expansion behavior of sedimentary rocks under high stress conditions. The aspects that were investigated include the effects of temperature, temperature cycling, and confining pressure. Furthermore, the validity of the usual assumption on thermal expansion isotropy was investigated. On the other hand, the matrix thermal expansion concept is analyzed and its physical meaning and aplications are discussed. The effect of temperature on porosity is also a subject investigated regarding experimental methods for its estimation and comparison of earlier results. The experiments carried out consisted basically of thermal strain versus temperature measurements on jacketed and unjacketed samples subjected to different confining pressures and covering the temperature range from 25 C to 280 C and the pressure range from 3.0 MPa to 34.4 MPa. A review of earlier work is included as a reference frame to discuss and compare the results of this work, as well as to emphasize the limited extent of the research on thermal expansion behavior of sedimentary rocks that had been accomplished. Results are presented by means of thermal strain versus temperature curves and tabular data of thermal expansion coefficients. Several important conclusions for laborarory and field applications are reached from each of the aspects investigated. The wide research scope of considerable amount of data reported may represent an important contribution to the knowledge of thermal expansion behavior of sedimentary rocks.

  12. Reservoir Characterization of Upper Devonian Gordon Sandstone, Jacksonburg, Stringtown Oil Field, Northwestern West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ameri, S.; Aminian, K.; Avary, K.L.; Bilgesu, H.I.; Hohn, M.E.; McDowell, R.R.; Patchen, D.L.

    2002-05-21

    This report gives results of efforts to determine electrofacies from logs; measure permeability in outcrop to study very fine-scale trends; find the correlation between permeability measured by the minipermeameter and in core plugs, define porosity-permeability flow units; and run the BOAST III reservoir simulator using the flow units defined for the Gordon reservoir.

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... ; Madey, Richard ; Semenov, Andrei ; Taylor, Simon ; Aghalaryan, Aram ; Crouse, Erick ... Madey, Richard ; Semenov, Andrei ; Taylor, Simon ; Aghalaryan, Aram ; Crouse, Erick ...

  14. Leakage Risk Assessment of CO{sub 2} Transportation by Pipeline at the Illinois Basin Decatur Project, Decatur, Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazzoldi, A.; Oldenburg, C. M.

    2013-12-17

    The Illinois Basin Decatur Project (IBDP) is designed to confirm the ability of the Mt. Simon Sandstone, a major regional saline-water-bearing formation in the Illinois Basin, to store 1 million tons of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injected over a period of three years. The CO{sub 2} will be provided by Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) from its Decatur, Illinois, ethanol plant. In order to transport CO{sub 2} from the capture facility to the injection well (also located within the ADM plant boundaries), a high-pressure pipeline of length 3,200 ft (975 m) has been constructed, running above the ground surface within the ADM plant footprint. We have qualitatively evaluated risks associated with possible pipeline failure scenarios that lead to discharge of CO{sub 2} within the real-world environment of the ADM plant in which there are often workers and visitors in the vicinity of the pipeline. There are several aspects of CO{sub 2} that make its transportation and potential leakage somewhat different from other substances, most notable is its non-flammability and propensity to change to solid (dry ice) upon strong decompression. In this study, we present numerical simulations using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methods of the release and dispersion of CO{sub 2} from individual hypothetical pipeline failures (i.e., leaks). Failure frequency of the various components of a pipeline transportation system over time are taken from prior work on general pipeline safety and leakage modeling and suggest a 4.65% chance of some kind of pipeline failure over the three-years of operation. Following the Precautionary Principle (see below), we accounted for full-bore leakage scenarios, where the temporal evolution of the mass release rate from the high-pressure pipeline leak locations was simulated using a state-of-the-art Pipe model which considers the thermodynamic effects of decompression in the entire pipeline. Failures have been simulated at four representative locations along the pipeline route within the ADM plant. Leakage scenarios at sites along the route of the pipeline, where plant operations (e.g., vehicular and train transportation) seem to present a higher likelihood of accidental failure, for example due to vehicles or equipment crashing into the pipeline and completely severing it, were modeled by allowing them to have a double source consistent with the pipeline releasing high-pressure CO{sub 2} from both ends of the broken pipe after a full-bore offset rupture. Simulation results show that the built environment of the plant plays a significant role in the dispersion of the gas as leaking CO{sub 2} can impinge upon buildings and other infrastructure. In all scenarios simulated, the region of very high-concentration of CO{sub 2} is limited to a small area around the pipeline failure, suggesting the likelihood of widespread harmful CO{sub 2} exposure to plant personnel from pipeline leakage is low. An additional risk is posed by the blast wave that emanates from a high-pressure pipeline when it is breached quickly. We estimate the blast wave risk as low because it occurs only for a short time in the immediate vicinity of the rupture, and requires an instantaneous large-scale rupture to occur. We recommend consideration of signage and guard rails and posts to mitigate the likelihood of vehicles crashing into the pipeline. A standardized emergency response plan applicable to capture plants within industrial sites could be developed based on the IBDP that would be useful for other capture plants. Finally, we recommend carrying out coupled wellbore-reservoir blowout scenario modeling to understand the potential for hazardous conditions arising from an unexpected blowout at the wellhead.

  15. Risk Evaluation for CO2 Geosequestration in the Knox Supergroup, Illinois Basin Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hnottavange-Telleen, Ken; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    This report describes a process and provides seed information for identifying and evaluating risks pertinent to a hypothetical carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and sequestration (CCS) project. In the envisioned project, the target sequestration reservoir rock is the Potosi Formation of the Knox Supergroup. The Potosi is identified as a potential target formation because (1) at least locally, it contains vuggy to cavernous layers that have very high porosity, and (2) it is present in areas where the deeper Mt. Simon Sandstone (a known potential reservoir unit) is absent or nonporous. The key report content is discussed in Section 3.3, which describes two lists of Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) that should be considered during the design stage of such a project. These lists primarily highlight risk elements particular to the establishment of the Potosi as the target formation in general. The lists are consciously incomplete with respect to risk elements that would be relevant for essentially all CCS projects regardless of location or geology. In addition, other risk elements specific to a particular future project site would have to be identified. Sources for the FEPs and scenarios listed here include the iconic Quintessa FEPs list developed for the International Energy Agency Greenhouse Gas (IEAGHG) Programme; previous risk evaluation projects executed by Schlumberger Carbon Services; and new input solicited from experts currently working on aspects of CCS in the Knox geology. The projects used as sources of risk information are primarily those that have targeted carbonate reservoir rocks similar in age, stratigraphy, and mineralogy to the Knox-Potosi. Risks of using the Potosi Formation as the target sequestration reservoir for a CCS project include uncertainties about the levels of porosity and permeability of that rock unit; the lateral consistency and continuity of those properties; and the ability of the project team to identify suitable (i.e., persistently porous and permeable) injection depths within the overall formation. Less direct implications include the vertical position of the Potosi within the rock column and the absence of a laterally extensive shale caprock immediately overlying the Potosi. Based on modeling work done partly in association with this risk report, risks that should also be evaluated include the ability of available methods to predict and track the development of a CO2 plume as it migrates away from the injection point(s). The geologic and hydrodynamic uncertainties present risks that are compounded at the stage of acquiring necessary drilling and injection permits. It is anticipated that, in the future, a regional geologic study or CO2-emitter request may identify a small specific area as a prospective CCS project site. At that point, the FEPs lists provided in this report should be evaluated by experts for their relative levels of risk. A procedure for this evaluation is provided. The higher-risk FEPs should then be used to write project-specific scenarios that may themselves be evaluated for risk. Then, actions to reduce and to manage risk can be described and undertaken. The FEPs lists provided as Appendix 2 should not be considered complete, as potentially the most important risks are ones that have not yet been thought of. But these lists are intended to include the most important risk elements pertinent to a Potosi-target CCS project, and they provide a good starting point for diligent risk identification, evaluation, and management.

  16. Risk Evaluation for CO{sub 2} Geosequestration in the Knox Supergroup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-01-31

    This report describes a process and provides seed information for identifying and evaluating risks pertinent to a hypothetical carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture and sequestration (CCS) project. In the envisioned project, the target sequestration reservoir rock is the Potosi Formation of the Knox Supergroup. The Potosi is identified as a potential target formation because (1) at least locally, it contains vuggy to cavernous layers that have very high porosity, and (2) it is present in areas where the deeper Mt. Simon Sandstone (a known potential reservoir unit) is absent or nonporous. The key report content is discussed in Section 3.3, which describes two lists of Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) that should be considered during the design stage of such a project. These lists primarily highlight risk elements particular to the establishment of the Potosi as the target formation in general. The lists are consciously incomplete with respect to risk elements that would be relevant for essentially all CCS projects regardless of location or geology. In addition, other risk elements specific to a particular future project site would have to be identified. Sources for the FEPs and scenarios listed here include the iconic Quintessa FEPs list developed for the International Energy Agency Greenhouse Gas (IEAGHG) Programme; previous risk evaluation projects executed by Schlumberger Carbon Services; and new input solicited from experts currently working on aspects of CCS in the Knox geology. The projects used as sources of risk information are primarily those that have targeted carbonate reservoir rocks similar in age, stratigraphy, and mineralogy to the Knox-Potosi. Risks of using the Potosi Formation as the target sequestration reservoir for a CCS project include uncertainties about the levels of porosity and permeability of that rock unit; the lateral consistency and continuity of those properties; and the ability of the project team to identify suitable (i.e., persistently porous and permeable) injection depths within the overall formation. Less direct implications include the vertical position of the Potosi within the rock column and the absence of a laterally extensive shale caprock immediately overlying the Potosi. Based on modeling work done partly in association with this risk report, risks that should also be evaluated include the ability of available methods to predict and track the development of a CO{sub 2} plume as it migrates away from the injection point(s). The geologic and hydrodynamic uncertainties present risks that are compounded at the stage of acquiring necessary drilling and injection permits. It is anticipated that, in the future, a regional geologic study or CO{sub 2}-emitter request may identify a small specific area as a prospective CCS project site. At that point, the FEPs lists provided in this report should be evaluated by experts for their relative levels of risk. A procedure for this evaluation is provided. The higher-risk FEPs should then be used to write project-specific scenarios that may themselves be evaluated for risk. Then, actions to reduce and to manage risk can be described and undertaken. The FEPs lists provided as Appendix 2 should not be considered complete, as potentially the most important risks are ones that have not yet been thought of. But these lists are intended to include the most important risk elements pertinent to a Potosi-target CCS project, and they provide a good starting point for diligent risk identification, evaluation, and management.

  17. Basin-Scale Leakage Risks from Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Impact on Carbon Capture and Storage Energy Market Competitiveness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Catherine; Fitts, Jeffrey; Wilson, Elizabeth; Pollak, Melisa; Bielicki, Jeffrey; Bhatt, Vatsal

    2013-03-13

    This three-year project, performed by Princeton University in partnership with the University of Minnesota and Brookhaven National Laboratory, examined geologic carbon sequestration in regard to CO{sub 2} leakage and potential subsurface liabilities. The research resulted in basin-scale analyses of CO{sub 2} and brine leakage in light of uncertainties in the characteristics of leakage processes, and generated frameworks to monetize the risks of leakage interference with competing subsurface resources. The geographic focus was the Michigan sedimentary basin, for which a 3D topographical model was constructed to represent the hydrostratigraphy. Specifically for Ottawa County, a statistical analysis of the hydraulic properties of underlying sedimentary formations was conducted. For plausible scenarios of injection into the Mt. Simon sandstone, leakage rates were estimated and fluxes into shallow drinking-water aquifers were found to be less than natural analogs of CO{sub 2} fluxes. We developed the Leakage Impact Valuation (LIV) model in which we identified stakeholders and estimated costs associated with leakage events. It was found that costs could be incurred even in the absence of legal action or other subsurface interference because there are substantial costs of finding and fixing the leak and from injection interruption. We developed a model framework called RISCS, which can be used to predict monetized risk of interference with subsurface resources by combining basin-scale leakage predictions with the LIV method. The project has also developed a cost calculator called the Economic and Policy Drivers Module (EPDM), which comprehensively calculates the costs of carbon sequestration and leakage, and can be used to examine major drivers for subsurface leakage liabilities in relation to specific injection scenarios and leakage events. Finally, we examined the competiveness of CCS in the energy market. This analysis, though qualitative, shows that financial incentives, such as a carbon tax, are needed for coal combustion with CCS to gain market share. In another part of the project we studied the role of geochemical reactions in affecting the probability of CO{sub 2} leakage. A basin-scale simulation tool was modified to account for changes in leakage rates due to permeability alterations, based on simplified mathematical rules for the important geochemical reactions between acidified brines and caprock minerals. In studies of reactive flows in fractured caprocks, we examined the potential for permeability increases, and the extent to which existing reactive transport models would or would not be able to predict it. Using caprock specimens from the Eau Claire and Amherstburg, we found that substantial increases in permeability are possible for caprocks that have significant carbonate content, but minimal alteration is expected otherwise. We also found that while the permeability increase may be substantial, it is much less than what would be predicted from hydrodynamic models based on mechanical aperture alone because the roughness that is generated tends to inhibit flow.

  18. Area of Interest 1, CO2 at the Interface. Nature and Dynamics of the Reservoir/Caprock Contact and Implications for Carbon Storage Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mozley, Peter; Evans, James; Dewers, Thomas

    2014-10-31

    We examined the influence of geologic features present at the reservoir/caprock interface on the transmission of supercritical CO2 into and through caprock. We focused on the case of deformation-band faults in reservoir lithologies that intersect the interface and transition to opening-mode fractures in caprock lithologies. Deformation-band faults are exceeding common in potential CO2 injection units and our fieldwork in Utah indicates that this sort of transition is common. To quantify the impact of these interface features on flow and transport we first described the sedimentology and permeability characteristics of selected sites along the Navajo Sandstone (reservoir lithology) and Carmel Formation (caprock lithology) interface, and along the Slickrock Member (reservoir lithology) and Earthy Member (caprock lithology) of the Entrada Sandstone interface, and used this information to construct conceptual permeability models for numerical analysis. We then examined the impact of these structures on flow using single-phase and multiphase numerical flow models for these study sites. Key findings include: (1) Deformation-band faults strongly compartmentalize the reservoir and largely block cross-fault flow of supercritical CO2. (2) Significant flow of CO2 through the fractures is possible, however, the magnitude is dependent on the small-scale geometry of the contact between the opening-mode fracture and the deformation band fault. (3) Due to the presence of permeable units in the caprock, caprock units are capable of storing significant volumes of CO2, particularly when the fracture network does not extend all the way through the caprock. The large-scale distribution of these deformation-bandfault-to-opening-mode-fractures is related to the curvature of the beds, with greater densities of fractures in high curvature regions. We also examined core and outcrops from the Mount Simon Sandstone and Eau Claire Formation reservoir/caprock interface in order to extend our work to a reservoir/caprock pair this is currently being assessed for long-term carbon storage. These analyses indicate that interface features similar to those observed at the Utah sites 3 were not observed. Although not directly related to our main study topic, one byproduct of our investigation is documentation of exceptionally high degrees of heterogeneity in the pore-size distribution of the Mount Simon Sandstone. This suggests that the unit has a greater-than-normal potential for residual trapping of supercritical CO2.

  19. SIMULATION FRAMEWORK FOR REGIONAL GEOLOGIC CO{sub 2} STORAGE ALONG ARCHES PROVINCE OF MIDWESTERN UNITED STATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sminchak, Joel

    2012-09-30

    This report presents final technical results for the project Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO{sub 2} Storage Infrastructure along Arches Province of the Midwest United States. The Arches Simulation project was a three year effort designed to develop a simulation framework for regional geologic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage infrastructure along the Arches Province through development of a geologic model and advanced reservoir simulations of large-scale CO{sub 2} storage. The project included five major technical tasks: (1) compilation of geologic, hydraulic and injection data on Mount Simon, (2) development of model framework and parameters, (3) preliminary variable density flow simulations, (4) multi-phase model runs of regional storage scenarios, and (5) implications for regional storage feasibility. The Arches Province is an informal region in northeastern Indiana, northern Kentucky, western Ohio, and southern Michigan where sedimentary rock formations form broad arch and platform structures. In the province, the Mount Simon sandstone is an appealing deep saline formation for CO{sub 2} storage because of the intersection of reservoir thickness and permeability. Many CO{sub 2} sources are located in proximity to the Arches Province, and the area is adjacent to coal fired power plants along the Ohio River Valley corridor. Geophysical well logs, rock samples, drilling logs, and geotechnical tests were evaluated for a 500,000 km{sup 2} study area centered on the Arches Province. Hydraulic parameters and historical operational information was also compiled from Mount Simon wastewater injection wells in the region. This information was integrated into a geocellular model that depicts the parameters and conditions in a numerical array. The geologic and hydraulic data were integrated into a three-dimensional grid of porosity and permeability, which are key parameters regarding fluid flow and pressure buildup due to CO{sub 2} injection. Permeability data were corrected in locations where reservoir tests have been performed in Mount Simon injection wells. The geocellular model was used to develop a series of numerical simulations designed to support CO{sub 2} storage applications in the Arches Province. Variable density fluid flow simulations were initially run to evaluate model sensitivity to input parameters. Two dimensional, multiple-phase simulations were completed to evaluate issues related to arranging injection fields in the study area. A basin-scale, multiple-phase model was developed to evaluate large scale injection effects across the region. Finally, local scale simulations were also completed with more detailed depiction of the Eau Claire formation to investigate to the potential for upward migration of CO{sub 2}. Overall, the technical work on the project concluded that injection large-scale injection may be achieved with proper field design, operation, siting, and monitoring. Records from Mount Simon injection wells were compiled, documenting more than 20 billion gallons of injection into the Mount Simon formation in the Arches Province over the past 40 years, equivalent to approximately 60 million metric tons CO2. The multi-state team effort was useful in delineating the geographic variability in the Mount Simon reservoir properties. Simulations better defined potential well fields, well field arrangement, CO{sub 2} pipeline distribution system, and operational parameters for large-scale injection in the Arches Province. Multiphase scoping level simulations suggest that injection fields with arrays of 9 to 50+ wells may be used to accommodate large injection volumes. Individual wells may need to be separated by 3 to 10 km. Injection fields may require spacing of 25 to 40 km to limit pressure and saturation front interference. Basin-scale multiple-phase simulations in STOMP reflect variability in the Mount Simon. While simulations suggest a total injection rate of 100 million metric tons per year (approximately to a 40% reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions from large point sources across the Arches Pr

  20. SIMULATION FRAMEWORK FOR REGIONAL GEOLOGIC CO{sub 2} STORAGE ALONG ARCHES PROVINCE OF MIDWESTERN UNITED STATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sminchak, Joel

    2012-09-30

    This report presents final technical results for the project Simulation Framework for Regional Geologic CO{sub 2} Storage Infrastructure along Arches Province of the Midwest United States. The Arches Simulation project was a three year effort designed to develop a simulation framework for regional geologic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage infrastructure along the Arches Province through development of a geologic model and advanced reservoir simulations of large-scale CO{sub 2} storage. The project included five major technical tasks: (1) compilation of geologic, hydraulic and injection data on Mount Simon, (2) development of model framework and parameters, (3) preliminary variable density flow simulations, (4) multi-phase model runs of regional storage scenarios, and (5) implications for regional storage feasibility. The Arches Province is an informal region in northeastern Indiana, northern Kentucky, western Ohio, and southern Michigan where sedimentary rock formations form broad arch and platform structures. In the province, the Mount Simon sandstone is an appealing deep saline formation for CO{sub 2} storage because of the intersection of reservoir thickness and permeability. Many CO{sub 2} sources are located in proximity to the Arches Province, and the area is adjacent to coal fired power plants along the Ohio River Valley corridor. Geophysical well logs, rock samples, drilling logs, and geotechnical tests were evaluated for a 500,000 km{sup 2} study area centered on the Arches Province. Hydraulic parameters and historical operational information was also compiled from Mount Simon wastewater injection wells in the region. This information was integrated into a geocellular model that depicts the parameters and conditions in a numerical array. The geologic and hydraulic data were integrated into a three-dimensional grid of porosity and permeability, which are key parameters regarding fluid flow and pressure buildup due to CO{sub 2} injection. Permeability data were corrected in locations where reservoir tests have been performed in Mount Simon injection wells. The geocellular model was used to develop a series of numerical simulations designed to support CO2 storage applications in the Arches Province. Variable density fluid flow simulations were initially run to evaluate model sensitivity to input parameters. Two dimensional, multiple-phase simulations were completed to evaluate issues related to arranging injection fields in the study area. A basin-scale, multiple-phase model was developed to evaluate large scale injection effects across the region. Finally, local scale simulations were also completed with more detailed depiction of the Eau Claire formation to investigate to the potential for upward migration of CO2. Overall, the technical work on the project concluded that injection large-scale injection may be achieved with proper field design, operation, siting, and monitoring. Records from Mount Simon injection wells were compiled, documenting more than 20 billion gallons of injection into the Mount Simon formation in the Arches Province over the past 40 years, equivalent to approximately 60 million metric tons CO2. The multi-state team effort was useful in delineating the geographic variability in the Mount Simon reservoir properties. Simulations better defined potential well fields, well field arrangement, CO2 pipeline distribution system, and operational parameters for large-scale injection in the Arches Province. Multiphase scoping level simulations suggest that injection fields with arrays of 9 to 50+ wells may be used to accommodate large injection volumes. Individual wells may need to be separated by 3 to 10 km. Injection fields may require spacing of 25 to 40 km to limit pressure and saturation front interference. Basin-scale multiple-phase simulations in STOMP reflect variability in the Mount Simon. While simulations suggest a total injection rate of 100 million metric tons per year (approximately to a 40% reduction of CO2 emissions from large point sources across the Arches Province) may be feasible,

  1. Valley-Fill Sandstones in the Koontenai Formation on the Crow Indian Reservation, South-Central Montana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, David A.

    1999-10-28

    Subsurface data continues to be collected, organized, and a digital database is being prepared for the project. An ACCESS database and PC-Arcview is being used to manage and interpret the data. Well data and base map data have been successfully imported into Arcview and customized to meet the needs of this project. Log tops and other data from most of the exploration wells in the area have been incorporated into the data base; only a few wells outside the reservation remain to be incorporated.

  2. Investigation of gas hydrate-bearing sandstone reservoirs at the "Mount Elbert" stratigraphic test well, Milne Point, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boswell, R.M.; Hunter, R.; Collett, T.; Digert, S. Inc., Anchorage, AK); Hancock, S.; Weeks, M. Inc., Anchorage, AK); Mt. Elbert Science Team

    2008-01-01

    In February 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy, BP Exploration (Alaska), Inc., and the U.S. Geological Survey conducted an extensive data collection effort at the "Mount Elbert #1" gas hydrates stratigraphic test well on the Alaska North Slope (ANS). The 22-day field program acquired significant gas hydrate-bearing reservoir data, including a full suite of open-hole well logs, over 500 feet of continuous core, and open-hole formation pressure response tests. Hole conditions, and therefore log data quality, were excellent due largely to the use of chilled oil-based drilling fluids. The logging program confirmed the existence of approximately 30 m of gashydrate saturated, fine-grained sand reservoir. Gas hydrate saturations were observed to range from 60% to 75% largely as a function of reservoir quality. Continuous wire-line coring operations (the first conducted on the ANS) achieved 85% recovery through 153 meters of section, providing more than 250 subsamples for analysis. The "Mount Elbert" data collection program culminated with open-hole tests of reservoir flow and pressure responses, as well as gas and water sample collection, using Schlumberger's Modular Formation Dynamics Tester (MDT) wireline tool. Four such tests, ranging from six to twelve hours duration, were conducted. This field program demonstrated the ability to safely and efficiently conduct a research-level openhole data acquisition program in shallow, sub-permafrost sediments. The program also demonstrated the soundness of the program's pre-drill gas hydrate characterization methods and increased confidence in gas hydrate resource assessment methodologies for the ANS.

  3. Valley-Fill Sandstones in the Kootenai Formation on the Crow Indian Reservation, South-Central Montana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Lopez

    1998-07-03

    Subsurface data continues to be collected, organized, and a digital database is being prepared for the project. An ACCESS database and PC-Arcview is being used to manage and interpret the data. Well data and base map data have been successfully imported into Arcview and customized to meet the needs of this project. Log tops and other data from about of the exploration wells in the area have been incorporated into the data base. All of the four 30? X 60? geologic quadrangles have been scanned to produce a digital surface geologic data base for the Crow Reservation and all are nearing completion. Formal technical review prior to publication has been completed for all the quadrangles; Billings, Bridger; Hardin, and Lodge Grass. Final GIS edits are being made before being forwarded to the Bureau?s Publications Department. Field investigations were completed during the third quarter, 1997. With the help of a student field assistant from the Crow Tribe, the entire project area was inventoried for the presence of valley-fill deposits in the Kootenai Formation. Field inventory has resulted in the identification of nine exposures of thick valley-fill deposits. These appear to represent at least four major westward-trending valley systems. All the channel localities have been measured and described in detail and paleocurrent data has been collected from all but one locality. In addition, two stratigraphic sections were measured in areas where channels are absent. One channel has bee traced over a distance of about 60 miles and exhibits definite paleostructural control. An abstract describing this channel has been submitted and accepted for presentation at the Williston Basin Symposium in October, 1998.

  4. Sequence Stratigraphy of the Dakota Sandstone, Eastern San Juan Basin, New Mexico, and its Relationship to Reservoir Compartmentalization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varney, Peter J.

    2002-04-23

    This research established the Dakota-outcrop sequence stratigraphy in part of the eastern San Juan Basin, New Mexico, and relates reservoir quality lithologies in depositional sequences to structure and reservoir compartmentalization in the South Lindrith Field area. The result was a predictive tool that will help guide further exploration and development.

  5. Port of Del Bonita, MT Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline from Canada

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    10 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Pipeline Volumes 424 265 257 241 200 206 1996-2015 Pipeline Prices 4.19 4.21 2.85 3.46 4.39 2.16 1996-2015

  6. Port of Del Bonita, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 23 20 20 21 23 17 24 21 25 25 23 23 2012 21 21 22 21 21 19 22 22 21 21 23 22 2013 21 19 21 20 22 18 20 21 21 21 20 18 2014 18 13 17 8 19 14 18 19 18 18 18 19 2015 18 16 17 17 18 16 18 18 18 18 18 1

  7. Port of Morgan, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 15 108

  8. Port of Morgan, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 59,930 46,941 51,604 51,763 53,799 49,169 57,061 57,865 55,624 56,602 56,887 61,687 2012 64,584 60,810 65,859 60,128 60,217 58,046 60,098 61,187 58,223 61,897 61,202 58,739 2013 62,146 54,658 61,395 55,965 58,896 59,252 59,822 61,514 57,958 50,249 51,376 61,921 2014 60,833 53,863 48,212 31,877 35,378 33,288 37,338 38,727 36,826 44,792 48,924 48,328 2015 49,450 45,765 44,412 39,382 38,378 43,864 45,040 44,035 44,184 42,407 35,719

  9. DC Resistivity Survey (Dipole-Dipole Array) At Mt Princeton Hot...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Yielded valley-fill thicknesses up to 1400 m References Zohdy, A.A., Hershey, L.A., Emery, P.A., & Stanley, W.D. (1971) Resistivity sections, Upper Arkansas River Basin,...

  10. Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Mt Ranier Area (Frank, 1995)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    a representative pattern of heat emission from the summit area (Fig. 5). References David Frank (1995) Surficial Extent And Conceptual Model Of Hydrothermal System At Mount...

  11. Building America Case Study: Lancaster County Career and Technology Center Green Home 3, Mt Joy, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-12-01

    Transitioning from standard light frame to a thermal mass wall system in a high performance home will require a higher level of design integration with the mechanical systems. The much higher mass in the ICF wall influences heat transfer through the wall and affects how the heating and cooling system responds to changing outdoor conditions. This is even more important for efficient, low-load homes with efficient heat pump systems in colder climates where the heating and cooling peak loads are significantly different from standard construction.This report analyzes a range of design features and component performance estimates in an effort to select practical, cost-effective solutions for high performance homes in a cold climate. Of primary interest is the influence of the ICF walls on developing an effective air sealing strategy and selecting an appropriate heating and cooling equipment type and capacity. The domestic water heating system is analyzed for costs and savings to investigate options for higher efficiency electric water heating. A method to ensure mechanical ventilation air flows is examined. The final solution package includes high-R mass walls, very low infiltration rates, multi-stage heat pump heating, solar thermal domestic hot water system, and energy recovery ventilation. This solution package can be used for homes to exceed 2012 International Energy Conservation Code requirements throughout all climate zones and achieves the DOE Challenge Home certification.

  12. A Demonstration Project for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives. Demonstrate performance of heat pumps in a large HVAC system in a heating-dominated climate.

  13. Havre, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 640 555 634 583 587 562 607 581 512 553 498 495 2012 433 406 398 390 389 373 366 347 334 314 295 286 2013 271 230 232 184 188 174 177 183 166 173 116 68 2014 79 35 73 110 68 62 59 65 59 62 9 1 2015 1 1

  14. Port of Del Bonita, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 1.04 1.04 1.37 2.66 2000's 4.52 4.64 2.66 4.68 -- 9.18 -- 6.86 9.43 3.39 2010's 4.19 4.21 2.85 3.46 4.39 2.16

  15. Port of Del Bonita, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 4.48 4.22 4.48 4.63 4.77 4.39 4.51 4.22 4.23 3.76 3.74 3.29 2012 3.00 2.70 2.42 2.48 2.47 2.08 2.60 2.64 2.80 3.54 3.74 3.60 2013 3.45 3.45 3.77 3.93 3.85 3.43 2.97 2.73 2.50 3.66 3.72 4.14 2014 4.71 7.60 5.12 4.74 4.57 4.62 4.28 4.01 4.00 3.64 3.79 2.87 2015 2.38 2.31 2.23 2.14 2.37 2.09 2.23 2.27 2.19 2.01 1.95 1.69

  16. Port of Del Bonita, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 72 58 25 89 2000's 107 141 234 257 0 1,796 0 152 140 402 2010's 424 265 257 241 200 20

  17. Port of Del Bonita, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 23 20 20 21 23 17 24 21 25 25 23 23 2012 21 21 22 21 21 19 22 22 21 21 23 22 2013 21 19 21 20 22 18 20 21 21 21 20 18 2014 18 13 17 8 19 14 18 19 18 18 18 19 2015 18 16 17 17 18 16 18 18 18 18 18 1

  18. Port of Morgan, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's NA NA 2000's NA NA 3.47 -- -- -- -- 2010's -- 3.14 --

  19. Port of Morgan, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 1.65 3.35

  20. Port of Morgan, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's NA NA 2000's NA NA 1 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 123 0

  1. Port of Morgan, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 15 108

  2. Port of Morgan, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 1.91 2.18 1.83 2.03 2000's 3.73 4.01 3.02 5.22 5.73 7.77 6.78 6.67 8.23 3.90 2010's 4.14 3.75 2.45 3.23 4.41 2.40

  3. Port of Morgan, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 3.97 3.89 3.73 4.04 4.06 4.14 4.05 3.87 3.70 3.41 3.23 3.02 2012 2.70 2.31 1.89 1.75 1.89 2.10 2.29 2.50 2.37 2.82 3.34 3.42 2013 3.20 3.10 3.23 3.62 3.69 3.50 3.06 2.72 2.58 3.10 3.38 3.62 2014 4.18 6.02 6.22 4.54 4.39 4.44 4.20 3.70 3.78 3.63 3.61 3.71 2015 2.87 2.66 2.55 2.37 2.33 2.35 2.35 2.45 2.40 2.27 2.05 1.98

  4. Port of Morgan, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 553,073 548,022 556,215 790,427 2000's 784,583 648,400 768,533 699,288 730,512 713,459 665,804 763,912 650,848 485,026 2010's 690,466 658,934 730,988 695,152 518,386 509,242

  5. Port of Morgan, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 59,930 46,941 51,604 51,763 53,799 49,169 57,061 57,865 55,624 56,602 56,887 61,687 2012 64,584 60,810 65,859 60,128 60,217 58,046 60,098 61,187 58,223 61,897 61,202 58,739 2013 62,146 54,658 61,395 55,965 58,896 59,252 59,822 61,514 57,958 50,249 51,376 61,921 2014 60,833 53,863 48,212 31,877 35,378 33,288 37,338 38,727 36,826 44,792 48,924 48,328 2015 49,450 45,765 44,412 39,382 38,378 43,864 45,040 44,035 44,184 42,407 35,719

  6. Price of Babb, MT Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's

  7. Price of Babb, MT Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2015

  8. Price of Sweetgrass, MT Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Dollars

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's -- 13.29 14.38 14.95 13.48

  9. Price of Sweetgrass, MT Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Canada (Dollars

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2012 13.29 2013 13.09 16.14 13.87 14.55 14.55 14.60 15.01 14.01 13.94 13.91 14.22 14.25 2014 15.01 15.61 15.61 14.97 15.10 14.88 14.94 14.34 14.48 14.42 14.07 14.93 2015 13.77 13.30 13.27 12.89 13.25 14.56

  10. Babb, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 20 2014 47 75

  11. Babb, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 10 164 251 1,367 1,953 1,897 1,872 2,240 1,262 884 623 285 2012 217 406 580 1,533 1,373 2,243 2,223 1,846 1,913 1,680 867 642 2013 359 477 1,016 1,028 931 1,946 2,200 2,103 2,386 2,610 1,073 1,107 2014 966 835 945 1,817 2,587 2,030 1,931 1,322 1,076 1,162 1,070 1,680 2015 1,205 1,117 1,480 1,951 1,816 1,851 2,155 2,344 1,804 1,898 1,313 1,774

  12. Babb, MT Liquefied Natural Gas Exports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's

  13. Babb, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Dollars per Thousand Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 1.53 NA NA 2000's NA 3.55 2.28 6.48 4.98 -- -- -- -- -- 2010's -- 3.39 -- -- 4.90

  14. Babb, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Dollars per Thousand Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 3.39 2014 3.99 5.46

  15. Babb, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 91 NA NA 2000's NA 549 143 38 1,429 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 20 0 0 122

  16. Babb, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 20 2014 47 75

  17. Babb, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per Thousand

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 1.16 1.40 1.65 2.00 2000's 5.83 2.74 2.24 4.70 5.21 7.32 5.44 6.46 7.49 3.26 2010's 3.86 3.98 2.47 3.13 4.05 2.34

  18. Babb, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per Thousand

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 4.21 4.18 4.17 4.17 4.23 4.30 4.08 3.91 3.82 3.40 3.25 3.12 2012 2.71 2.22 1.93 1.85 2.18 2.02 2.46 2.36 2.50 3.31 3.50 3.33 2013 3.08 3.11 3.45 3.66 3.74 3.45 2.94 2.65 2.44 3.17 3.38 3.68 2014 3.79 4.94 5.31 4.37 4.29 4.34 4.05 3.73 3.75 3.53 3.58 3.06 2015 2.67 2.46 2.28 2.30 2.53 2.42 2.47 2.46 2.41 2.03 2.21 1.92

  19. Babb, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 16,545 18,477 17,776 3,841 2000's 295 2,571 6,326 4,645 4,333 396 7,343 4,580 4,057 6,702 2010's 6,671 12,807 15,525 17,235 17,421 20,708

  20. Babb, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 10 164 251 1,367 1,953 1,897 1,872 2,240 1,262 884 623 285 2012 217 406 580 1,533 1,373 2,243 2,223 1,846 1,913 1,680 867 642 2013 359 477 1,016 1,028 931 1,946 2,200 2,103 2,386 2,610 1,073 1,107 2014 966 835 945 1,817 2,587 2,030 1,931 1,322 1,076 1,162 1,070 1,680 2015 1,205 1,117 1,480 1,951 1,816 1,851 2,155 2,344 1,804 1,898 1,313 1,774

  1. Havre, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Dollars per Thousand

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's NA 2.05 2000's 3.25 3.40 2.74 4.80 5.32 7.33 6.05 6.16 8.14 3.63 2010's 4.05 3.82 2.40 3.09 4.22 2.30

  2. Havre, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Dollars per Thousand

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 4.06 3.88 3.86 3.97 4.09 4.18 4.03 3.83 3.76 3.44 3.31 3.30 2012 2.95 2.46 2.08 1.82 1.73 2.02 2.05 2.43 2.27 2.62 3.43 3.34 2013 3.16 3.08 3.27 3.61 3.64 3.36 2.86 2.45 2.19 3.00 3.14 3.25 2014 3.71 4.12 5.47 4.36 4.41 4.30 4.42 3.75 3.78 3.73 3.42 3.75 2015 2.37 2.23

  3. Havre, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's NA 1,510 2000's 1,606 2,428 15,892 8,851 21,950 19,159 21,245 20,420 16,399 12,504 2010's 9,437 6,806 4,331 2,160 680 3

  4. Havre, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Exports to Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 640 555 634 583 587 562 607 581 512 553 498 495 2012 433 406 398 390 389 373 366 347 334 314 295 286 2013 271 230 232 184 188 174 177 183 166 173 116 68 2014 79 35 73 110 68 62 59 65 59 62 9 1 2015 1 1

  5. Whitlash, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per Thousand

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 1.14 1.61 1.57 2.05 2000's 3.09 2.71 2.42 4.86 5.06 7.40 5.59 6.00 7.63 3.45 2010's 3.88 3.65 2.35 3.07 4.04 2.13

  6. Whitlash, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per Thousand

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 3.57 3.80 3.68 3.81 3.94 4.01 3.95 3.73 3.65 3.37 3.20 3.10 2012 2.71 2.37 1.93 1.71 1.79 1.90 2.07 2.29 2.22 2.71 3.29 3.34 2013 3.32 3.02 3.10 3.47 3.59 3.41 2.93 2.50 2.22 2.57 3.31 3.26 2014 3.70 4.70 5.27 4.29 4.29 4.25 4.19 3.64 3.67 3.53 3.36 3.47 2015 2.70 2.14 2.14 2.07 2.10 2.15 2.05 2.15 2.18 2.09 1.91 1.78

  7. Whitlash, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 6,820 6,420 6,533 12,767 2000's 13,733 11,428 12,558 14,475 20,069 11,157 9,120 8,945 9,834 9,195 2010's 7,707 7,062 6,571 5,387 5,128 4,651

  8. Whitlash, MT Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 586 518 591 564 622 539 612 629 604 606 591 599 2012 598 571 600 542 575 525 550 549 530 526 493 512 2013 511 452 475 485 465 466 468 470 438 383 368 407 2014 454 380 460 437 435 420 442 450 412 438 402 397 2015 416 363 391 380 389 389 395 391 388 398 365 387

  9. Self Potential At Mt St Helens Area (Bedrosian, Et Al., 2007...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technique Self Potential Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Paul A. Bedrosian, Martyn J. Unsworth, Malcolm J. S. Johnston (2007) Hydrothermal...

  10. ASC_RdMap7.7.55.10_MT.indd

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    on The CoVer: Dynamic void collapse in single crystal copper by dislocation emission. Shown is a small section of a 2.13-billion atom molecular dynamics simulation of a shock-compressed copper single crystal with a 0.41% preexisting void density. The simulation was performed using the SPaSM application running on BlueGene/L. Atoms in pristine fcc lattice sites are not shown, atoms in hcp stacking faults are grey, and other atoms (including surfaces and dislocation cores) are red. Untouched voids

  11. Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Marysville Mt Area (Blackwell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    D. Blackwell (Unknown) Exploration In A Blind Geothermal Area Near Marysville, Montana, Usa Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleThermalAn...

  12. A Portable Elf-Mt System For Shallow Resistivity Sounding | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Calculations of the apparent resistivity, the phase, etc. are made by a small HC-20 computer, which also controls data acquisition. We made performance tests of this system and...

  13. Overview of physical oceanographic measurements taken during the Mt. Mitchell Cruise to the ROPME Sea Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, R.M.

    1993-03-31

    The ROPME Sea Area (RSA) is one of the most important commercial waterways in the world. However, the number of direct oceanographic observations is small. An international program to study the effect of the Iraqi oil spill on the environment was sponsored by the ROPME, the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

  14. About the Deputy Director: Short Scientific Biography

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab Deputy Director Horst Simon Horst Simon is an internationally recognized expert in computer science and applied mathematics and the Deputy Director of Lawrence Berkeley...

  15. Experimental Characterization | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Experimental Characterization Previous Next List CraigBrown Craig Brown Jeff Kortright Jeffrey Kortright Queen Wendy Queen HewlittAugust2013 Jeffrey Reimer Simon Teat Simon Teat...

  16. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Y., Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, Laboratoire de Mtorologie Dynamique, Palaiseau, France (a), University of California at Santa Barbara, USA (b) Institut Pierre Simon...

  17. ALSNews Vol. 294

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to thank our outgoing members for their service and their involvement: Elke Arenholz, Tony van Buuren (past chair), Alessandra Lanzara, and Simon Morton. Simon, however, will...

  18. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Biotechnolog...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Simon (Simon Allen) - School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh Allen, Stewart (Stewart Allen) - Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research, Bureau of Meteorology ...

  19. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Geosciences...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Simon (Simon Allen) - School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh Allen, Stewart (Stewart Allen) - Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research, Bureau of Meteorology ...

  20. VA VT CT RI MT WY CO ID UT OR NV CA AZ NM WA TN WV NC AR OK

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 1 Locations of Smart Grid Demonstration and Large-Scale Energy Storage Projects NH 32 Awards Support Projects in 24 States 6 11 MA...

  1. VA VT CT RI MT WY CO ID UT OR NV CA AZ NM WA TN WV NC AR OK

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 1 Locations of Smart Grid Demonstration and Large-Scale Energy Storage Projects NH 32 Awards Support Projects in 24 States 6 11 MA

  2. VA VT CT RI MT WY CO ID UT OR NV CA AZ NM WA TN WV NC AR OK

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 1 Smart Grid Demonstration Project Locations NH MA 16 Awards Support Projects in 21 States

  3. VA VT CT RI MT WY CO ID UT OR NV CA AZ NM WA TN WV NC AR OK

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7 2 1 Energy Storage Demonstration Project Locations NH 16 Awards Support Projects in 9 States MA

  4. Predicting and validating the tracking of a Volcanic Ash Cloud during the 2006 Eruption of Mt. Augustine Volcano

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webley, Peter W.; Atkinson, D.; Collins, Richard L.; Dean, K.; Fochesatto, J.; Sassen, Kenneth; Cahill, Catherine F.; Prata, A.; Flynn, Connor J.; Mizutani, K.

    2008-11-01

    On 11 January 2006, Mount Augustine volcano in southern Alaska began erupting after 20-year repose. The Anchorage Forecast Office of the National Weather Service (NWS) issued an advisory on 28 January for Kodiak City. On 31 January, Alaska Airlines cancelled all flights to and from Anchorage after multiple advisories from the NWS for Anchorage and the surrounding region. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) had reported the onset of the continuous eruption. AVO monitors the approximately 100 active volcanoes in the Northern Pacific. Ash clouds from these volcanoes can cause serious damage to an aircraft and pose a serious threat to the local communities, and to transcontinental air traffic throughout the Arctic and sub-Arctic region. Within AVO, a dispersion model has been developed to track the dispersion of volcanic ash clouds. The model, Puff, was used operational by AVO during the Augustine eruptive period. Here, we examine the dispersion of a volcanic ash cloud from Mount Augustine across Alaska from 29 January through the 2 February 2006. We present the synoptic meteorology, the Puff predictions, and measurements from aerosol samplers, laser radar (or lidar) systems, and satellites. UAF aerosol samplers revealed the presence of volcanic aerosols at the surface at sites where Puff predicted the ash clouds movement. Remote sensing satellite data showed the development of the ash cloud in close proximity to the volcano and a sulfur-dioxide cloud further from the volcano consistent with the Puff predictions. Lidars showed the presence of volcanic aerosol with consistent characteristics aloft over Alaska and were capable of detecting the aerosol, even in the presence of scattered clouds and where the cloud is too thin/disperse to be detected by remote sensing satellite data. The lidar measurements revealed the different trajectories of ash consistent with the Puff predictions. Dispersion models provide a forecast of volcanic ash cloud movement that might be undetectable by any other means but are still a significant hazard. Validation is the key to assessing the accuracy of any future predictions. The study highlights the use of multiple and complementary observations used in detecting the trajectory ash cloud, both at the surface and aloft within the atmosphere.

  5. THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY CO2 STORAGE PROJECT - PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT OF DEEP SALINE RESERVOIRS AND COAL SEAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael J. Mudd; Howard Johnson; Charles Christopher; T.S. Ramakrishnan, Ph.D.

    2003-08-01

    This report describes the geologic setting for the Deep Saline Reservoirs and Coal Seams in the Ohio River Valley CO{sub 2} Storage Project area. The object of the current project is to site and design a CO{sub 2} injection facility. A location near New Haven, WV, has been selected for the project. To assess geologic storage reservoirs at the site, regional and site-specific geology were reviewed. Geologic reports, deep well logs, hydraulic tests, and geologic maps were reviewed for the area. Only one well within 25 miles of the site penetrates the deeper sedimentary rocks, so there is a large amount of uncertainty regarding the deep geology at the site. New Haven is located along the Ohio River on the border of West Virginia and Ohio. Topography in the area is flat in the river valley but rugged away from the Ohio River floodplain. The Ohio River Valley incises 50-100 ft into bedrock in the area. The area of interest lies within the Appalachian Plateau, on the western edge of the Appalachian Mountain chain. Within the Appalachian Basin, sedimentary rocks are 3,000 to 20,000 ft deep and slope toward the southeast. The rock formations consist of alternating layers of shale, limestone, dolomite, and sandstone overlying dense metamorphic continental shield rocks. The Rome Trough is the major structural feature in the area, and there may be some faults associated with the trough in the Ohio-West Virginia Hinge Zone. The area has a low earthquake hazard with few historical earthquakes. Target injection reservoirs include the basal sandstone/Lower Maryville and the Rose Run Sandstone. The basal sandstone is an informal name for sandstones that overlie metamorphic shield rock. Regional geology indicates that the unit is at a depth of approximately 9,100 ft below the surface at the project site and associated with the Maryville Formation. Overall thickness appears to be 50-100 ft. The Rose Run Sandstone is another potential reservoir. The unit is located approximately 1,100 ft above the basal sandstone and is 100-200 ft thick. The storage capacity estimates for a 20-mile radius from the injection well ranged from 39-78 million tons (Mt) for each formation. Several other oil and gas plays have hydraulic properties conducive for injection, but the formations are generally only 5-50 ft thick in the study area. Overlying the injection reservoirs are thick sequences of dense, impermeable dolomite, limestone, and shale. These layers provide containment above the potential injection reservoirs. In general, it appears that the containment layers are much thicker and extensive than the injection intervals. Other physical parameters for the study area appear to be typical for the region. Anticipated pressures at maximum depths are approximately 4,100 psi based on a 0.45 psi/ft pressure gradient. Temperatures are likely to be 150 F. Groundwater flow is slow and complex in deep formations. Regional flow directions appear to be toward the west-northwest at less than 1 ft per year within the basal sandstone. Vertical gradients are downward in the study area. A review of brine geochemistry indicates that formation fluids have high salinity and dissolved solids. Total dissolved solids ranges from 200,000-325,000 mg/L in the deep reservoirs. Brine chemistry is similar throughout the different formations, suggesting extensive mixing in a mature basin. Unconsolidated sediments in the Ohio River Valley are the primary source of drinking water in the study area.

  6. Novel CO2 Foam Concepts and Injection Schemes for Improving CO2 Sweep Efficiency in Sandstone and Carbonate Hydrocarbon Formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Quoc; Hirasaki, George; Johnston, Keith

    2015-02-05

    We explored cationic, nonionic and zwitterionic surfactants to identify candidates that have the potential to satisfy all the key requirements for CO2 foams in EOR. We have examined the formation, texture, rheology and stability of CO2 foams as a function of the surfactant structure and formulation variables including temperature, pressure, water/CO2 ratio, surfactant concentration, salinity and concentration of oil. Furthermore, the partitioning of surfactants between oil and water as well as CO2 and water was examined in conjunction with adsorption measurements on limestone by the Hirasaki lab to develop strategies to optimize the transport of surfactants in reservoirs.

  7. Drilling, Completion, and Data Collection Plans An Assessment of Geological Carbon Sequestration Options in the Illinois Basin: Phase III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malkewicz, Nicholas; Kirksey, Jim; Finley, Robert

    2015-05-01

    Executive Summary The Illinois Basin – Decatur Project (IBDP) is managed by the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) and is led by the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS) at the University of Illinois. The project site is located on the Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM) property in Decatur, Illinois, and is a fully integrated carbon capture and storage (CCS) project that uses CO₂ captured from the ethanol-producing fermentation process at the ADM corn-processing plant (Finley et. al., 2013). IBDP has a goal of injecting one million tonnes of CO₂ into the basal sands of the Mt. Simon Sandstone over a three-year period. This is a multifaceted project, and this report details the planning and results of the drilling, completions, well testing, log data acquisition, and the Health, Safety, and Environment (HSE) aspects of the project. Three deep wells were planned for the IBDP: • The injection well: Injection Well #1 (CCS1); • The monitoring well (both in-zone and above seal): Verification Well #1 (VW1); and • The geophone monitoring well: Geophysical Monitoring Well #1 (GM1). The detailed plans for these wells are attached to the appendices of this document. The wells were drilled successfully with little deviation from the original plans. The biggest change from the plan to execution was the need to adjust for larger-than-expected loss of circulation in the Potosi section of the Knox Formation. The completions reports also attached to this document detail the well constructions as they were actually built. Injectivity testing was carried out, and the perforating plans were adjusted based on the results. Additional perforations and acidizing were performed as a result of the injectivity testing. The testing plans are detailed in this report along with the actual testing results. The injectivity testing results were used in the modeling and simulation efforts. Detailed HSE plans were developed and implemented during the planning and execution phases of the project. The implementation included an HSE Bridging Document, which served to unify the HSE policies of the project partners and key subcontractors. The HSE plan and actual HSE results are presented in this document. There were no recordable HSE incidents during the project. A detailed logging program was developed based on project needs. The log data were acquired in accordance with the plan, and both the plan and log results are presented in this report. Log data were heavily utilized by the research staff, modelers, reservoir engineers, and for technical and permitting efforts. 5 Several key lessons were learned during the project: • Safety in operations and execution is paramount and is only achieved through proper planning and behavior control. The certainty of this was reinforced through implementation of this lesson and the resultant flawless HSE performance during the project. • Losses of drilling fluid circulation were larger than anticipated within the Potosi Formation. Circulation was only recovered through cementing the loss zones. • When possible, minimizing complexity in permit requirements and well designs is preferable. • The size of the wells were outside of the standard experience and expertise typical within the basin, and therefore required substantial planning and ramp-up of contractors and partners to meet project objectives. • With multiple stakeholders and research partners, establishing objectives and requirements early and adhering to change request procedures throughout the project are critical to manage competing data and sampling objectives that may be detrimental to overall progress. The well construction and completion operations were successfully executed, with all wells built in a manner that achieved excellent wellbore integrity. Log planning involved a number of stakeholders and technical specialists. Data collection from logging, coring, and testing was excellent. Time and effort spent with the associated contractors and suppliers to develop a well plan beyond normal scope proved highly successful, resulting in a well-construction and completion project that surpassed expectations. The world-class HSE results also demonstrate the commitment of all stakeholders in the project. The details follow in the body of this document

  8. Exploring the effects of data quality, data worth, and redundancy of CO2 gas pressure and saturation data on reservoir characterization through PEST Inversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Zhufeng; Hou, Zhangshuan; Lin, Guang; Engel, David W.; Fang, Yilin; Eslinger, Paul W.

    2014-04-01

    This study examined the impacts of reservoir properties on CO2 migration after subsurface injection and evaluated the possibility of characterizing reservoir properties using CO2 monitoring data such as saturation distribution. The injection reservoir was assumed to be located 1400-1500 m below the ground surface such that CO2 remained in the supercritical state. The reservoir was assumed to contain layers with alternating conductive and resistive properties, which is analogous to actual geological formations such as the Mount Simon Sandstone unit. The CO2 injection simulation used a cylindrical grid setting in which the injection well was situated at the center of the domain, which extended up to 8000 m from the injection well. The CO2 migration was simulated using the PNNL-developed simulator STOMP-CO2e (the water-salt-CO2 module). We adopted a nonlinear parameter estimation and optimization modeling software package, PEST, for automated reservoir parameter estimation. We explored the effects of data quality, data worth, and data redundancy on the detectability of reservoir parameters using CO2 saturation monitoring data, by comparing PEST inversion results using data with different levels of noises, various numbers of monitoring wells and locations, and different data collection spacing and temporal sampling intervals. This study yielded insight into the use of CO2 saturation monitoring data for reservoir characterization and how to design the monitoring system to optimize data worth and reduce data redundancy.

  9. Montana/Geothermal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    14-MT-b: MPDES Permit 14-MT-c: Underground Injection Control Permit 14-MT-d: 401 Water Quality Certification 14-MT-e: Groundwater Pollution Control System 15-MT-a: Air...

  10. Radiation doses for Marshall Islands Atolls Affected by U.S. Nuclear Testing:All Exposure Pathways, Remedial Measures, and Environmental Loss of 137Cs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W L; Hamilton, T F

    2009-04-20

    The United States conducted 24 nuclear tests at Bikini Atoll with a total yield of 76.8 Megatons (MT). The Castle series produced about 60% of this total and included the Bravo test that was the primary source of contamination of Bikini Island and Rongelap and Utrok Atolls. One of three aerial drops missed the atoll and the second test of the Crossroads series, the Baker test, was an underwater detonation. Of the rest, 17 were on barges on water and 3 were on platforms on an island; they produced most of the contamination of islands at the atoll. There were 42 tests conducted at Enewetak Atoll with a total yield of 31.7 MT (Simon and Robison, 1997; UNSCEAR, 2000). Of these tests, 18 were on a barge over wateror reef, 7 were surface shots, 2 aerial drops, 2 under water detonations, and 13 tower shots on either land or reef. All produced some contamination of various atoll islands. Rongelap Atoll received radioactive fallout as a result of the Bravo test on March 1, 1954 that was part of the Castle series of tests. This deposition was the result of the Bravo test producing a yield of 15 MT, about a factor of three to four greater than the predicted yield that resulted in vaporization of more coral reef and island than expected and in the debris-cloud reaching a much higher altitude than anticipated. High-altitude winds were to the east at the time of detonation and carried the debris-cloud toward Rongelap Atoll. Utrok Atoll also received fallout from the Bravo test but at much lower air and ground-level concentrations than at Rongelap atoll. Other atolls received Bravo fallout at levels below that of Utrok [other common spellings of this island and atoll (Simon, et al., 2009)]. To avoid confusion in reading other literature, this atoll and island are spelled in a variety of ways (Utrik, Utirik, Uterik or Utrok). Dose assessments for Bikini Island at Bikini Atoll (Robison et al., 1997), Enjebi Island at Enewetak Atoll (Robison et al., 1987), Rongelap Island at Rongelap Atoll (Robison et al., 1994; Simon et al., 1997), and Utrok Island at Utrok Atoll (Robison, et al., 1999) indicate that about 95-99% of the total estimated dose to people who may return to live at the atolls today (Utrok Island is populated) is the result of exposure to {sup 137}Cs. External gamma exposure from {sup 137}Cs in the soil accounts for about 10 to 15% of the total dose and {sup 137}Cs ingested during consumption of local food crops such as drinking coconut meat and fluid (Cocos nucifera L.), copra meat and milk, Pandanus fruit, and breadfruit accounts for about 85 to 90%. The other 1 to 2% of the estimated dose is from {sup 90}Sr, {sup 239+240}Pu, and {sup 241}Am. The {sup 90}Sr exposure is primarily through the food chain while the exposure to {sup 239+240}Pu, and {sup 241}Am is primarily via the inhalation pathway as a result of breathing re-suspended soil particles.

  11. Experimental Characterization | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Experimental Characterization Previous Next List CraigBrown Craig Brown Jeff Kortright Jeffrey Kortright Queen Wendy Queen HewlittAugust2013 Jeffrey Reimer Simon Teat Simon Teat

  12. Selected Recent Publications and Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tim Mattson, Alice Koniges, Simon McIntosh-Smith, Portable Programs for Heterogeneous ... Tim Mattson, Alice Koniges, Simon McIntosh-Smith, OpenCL: A Hands-on Introduction, SC14 ...

  13. Indiana's 5th congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alliance Indianapolis Power Light National Renewables Cooperative Organization NRCO Simon Property Group Utility Companies in Indiana's 5th congressional district...

  14. Deputy-Director

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deputy-Director Director Deputy Director Leadership Team Advisory Board Directorate Staff Org Chart ⇒ Navigate Section Director Deputy Director Leadership Team Advisory Board Directorate Staff Org Chart Berkeley Lab Deputy Director Horst Simon horst-simon Horst Simon is an internationally recognized expert in computer science and applied mathematics and the Deputy Director of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab). Simon joined Berkeley Lab in early 1996 as director of the newly

  15. Local Sensitivity of Predicted CO2 Injectivity and Plume Extent to Model Inputs for the FutureGen 2.0 site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. Fred; White, Signe K.; Bonneville, Alain; Gilmore, Tyler J.

    2014-12-31

    Numerical simulations have been used for estimating CO2 injectivity, CO2 plume extent, pressure distribution, and Area of Review (AoR), and for the design of CO2 injection operations and monitoring network for the FutureGen project. The simulation results are affected by uncertainties associated with numerous input parameters, the conceptual model, initial and boundary conditions, and factors related to injection operations. Furthermore, the uncertainties in the simulation results also vary in space and time. The key need is to identify those uncertainties that critically impact the simulation results and quantify their impacts. We introduce an approach to determine the local sensitivity coefficient (LSC), defined as the response of the output in percent, to rank the importance of model inputs on outputs. The uncertainty of an input with higher sensitivity has larger impacts on the output. The LSC is scalable by the error of an input parameter. The composite sensitivity of an output to a subset of inputs can be calculated by summing the individual LSC values. We propose a local sensitivity coefficient method and applied it to the FutureGen 2.0 Site in Morgan County, Illinois, USA, to investigate the sensitivity of input parameters and initial conditions. The conceptual model for the site consists of 31 layers, each of which has a unique set of input parameters. The sensitivity of 11 parameters for each layer and 7 inputs as initial conditions is then investigated. For CO2 injectivity and plume size, about half of the uncertainty is due to only 4 or 5 of the 348 inputs and 3/4 of the uncertainty is due to about 15 of the inputs. The initial conditions and the properties of the injection layer and its neighbour layers contribute to most of the sensitivity. Overall, the simulation outputs are very sensitive to only a small fraction of the inputs. However, the parameters that are important for controlling CO2 injectivity are not the same as those controlling the plume size. The three most sensitive inputs for injectivity were the horizontal permeability of Mt Simon 11 (the injection layer), the initial fracture-pressure gradient, and the residual aqueous saturation of Mt Simon 11, while those for the plume area were the initial salt concentration, the initial pressure, and the initial fracture-pressure gradient. The advantages of requiring only a single set of simulation results, scalability to the proper parameter errors, and easy calculation of the composite sensitivities make this approach very cost-effective for estimating AoR uncertainty and guiding cost-effective site characterization, injection well design, and monitoring network design for CO2 storage projects.

  16. Local Sensitivity of Predicted CO2 Injectivity and Plume Extent to Model Inputs for the FutureGen 2.0 site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Z. Fred; White, Signe K.; Bonneville, Alain; Gilmore, Tyler J.

    2014-12-31

    Numerical simulations have been used for estimating CO2 injectivity, CO2 plume extent, pressure distribution, and Area of Review (AoR), and for the design of CO2 injection operations and monitoring network for the FutureGen project. The simulation results are affected by uncertainties associated with numerous input parameters, the conceptual model, initial and boundary conditions, and factors related to injection operations. Furthermore, the uncertainties in the simulation results also vary in space and time. The key need is to identify those uncertainties that critically impact the simulation results and quantify their impacts. We introduce an approach to determine the local sensitivity coefficientmore » (LSC), defined as the response of the output in percent, to rank the importance of model inputs on outputs. The uncertainty of an input with higher sensitivity has larger impacts on the output. The LSC is scalable by the error of an input parameter. The composite sensitivity of an output to a subset of inputs can be calculated by summing the individual LSC values. We propose a local sensitivity coefficient method and applied it to the FutureGen 2.0 Site in Morgan County, Illinois, USA, to investigate the sensitivity of input parameters and initial conditions. The conceptual model for the site consists of 31 layers, each of which has a unique set of input parameters. The sensitivity of 11 parameters for each layer and 7 inputs as initial conditions is then investigated. For CO2 injectivity and plume size, about half of the uncertainty is due to only 4 or 5 of the 348 inputs and 3/4 of the uncertainty is due to about 15 of the inputs. The initial conditions and the properties of the injection layer and its neighbour layers contribute to most of the sensitivity. Overall, the simulation outputs are very sensitive to only a small fraction of the inputs. However, the parameters that are important for controlling CO2 injectivity are not the same as those controlling the plume size. The three most sensitive inputs for injectivity were the horizontal permeability of Mt Simon 11 (the injection layer), the initial fracture-pressure gradient, and the residual aqueous saturation of Mt Simon 11, while those for the plume area were the initial salt concentration, the initial pressure, and the initial fracture-pressure gradient. The advantages of requiring only a single set of simulation results, scalability to the proper parameter errors, and easy calculation of the composite sensitivities make this approach very cost-effective for estimating AoR uncertainty and guiding cost-effective site characterization, injection well design, and monitoring network design for CO2 storage projects.« less

  17. Sauk structural elements and depositional response in Ohio and northern Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coogan, A.H.; Peng, Shengfeng (Kent State Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Three area structural elements were inherited from Precambrian events--the Rome Trough, Middle Run trough at the Grenville Line, and the Ohio platform on part of the more stable Grenville Province. They strongly influence the type of basal Sauk clastic and non-clastic deposits as documented from hundreds of wells in Ohio and adjacent northern Kentucky. These elements and the topography resulting from erosion during the Lipalian Interval most directly influence sedimentation during the onlap phase of the basal Sauk Sequence. Clastic wedge-base deposits are the Mt. Simon, Rome'', and Eau Claire formations. Deposition of the middle Cambrian Conasauga Shale coincides with the maximum marine onlap and wedge middle position. Upper Sauk Sequence deposition of the Knox Group carbonate rocks (Cooper Ridge Dolomite, Beekmantown Dolomite) and their interbedded clastic units (Steam Corners and Rose Run formations) represents the shallowing upward, pulsating clastic depositional events which anticipate the differential uplift and erosion that occurred later during the Taconic Orogeny and Early Ordovician hiatus. New Taconic structural elements involve the uplift of the central Ohio platform on the western part of the Grenville Province along reactivated, pre-Grenville sutures identified by CoCorp seismic lines. Platform uplift exposes lower Knox rocks to erosion. Younger Knox rocks are preserved east of the fault line zone. The Appalachian Basin's western edge is marked at this time by the trend of the Rose Run and Beekmantown subcrop below the Knox Unconformity surface and by the edge of the high magnetic intensity basement.

  18. FRAMES-2.0 Software System: Linking to the Groundwater Modeling System (GMS) RT3D and MT3DMS Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whelan, Gene; Castleton, Karl J.; Pelton, Mitch A.

    2007-08-08

    Linkages to the Groundwater Modeling System have been developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to enable the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to more realistically assess the risk to the public of radioactive contaminants at NRC-licensed sites. Common software tools presently in use are limited in that they cannot assess contaminant migration through complex natural environments. The purpose of this initiative is to provide NRC with a licensing safety-analysis tool with sufficient power, flexibility, and utility that it can serve as the primary software platform for analyzing the hazards associated with licensing actions at those complex sites at which the traditional tools are inappropriate. As a tool designed to realistically approximate prospective doses to the public, this initiative addresses NRCs safety-performance goal by confirming that licensing actions do not result in undue risk to the public.

  19. Eruptive history and petrochemistry of the Bulusan volcanic complex: Implications for the hydrothermal system and volcanic hazards of Mt. Bulusan, Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delfin, F.G. Jr.; Panem, C.C.; Defant, M.J.

    1993-10-01

    Two contrasting conceptual models of the postcaldera magmatic system of the Bulusan volcanic complex are constructed on the basis of a synthesis of volcanological, petrochemical, and petrologic data. These models predict that hydrothermal convection below the complex will occur either in discrete, structurally-focused zones or over a much broader area. Both models, however, agree that hydrothermal fluids at depth will be highly acidic and volcanic-related. Future ash-fall eruptions and mudflows are likely to affect the area previously chosen for possible drilling. Such risks, combined with the expected acidic character of the hydrothermal system, argue against drilling into this system.

  20. SOLAR MERIDIONAL CIRCULATION FROM DOPPLER SHIFTS OF THE Fe I LINE AT 5250 A AS MEASURED BY THE 150-FOOT SOLAR TOWER TELESCOPE AT THE MT. WILSON OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulrich, Roger K.

    2010-12-10

    Doppler shifts of the Fe I spectral line at 5250 A from the full solar disk obtained over the period 1986 to 2009 are analyzed to determine the circulation velocity of the solar surface along meridional planes. Simultaneous measurements of the Zeeman splitting of this line are used to obtain measurements of the solar magnetic field that are used to select low field points and impose corrections for the magnetically induced Doppler shift. The data utilized is from a new reduction that preserves the full spatial resolution of the original observations so that the circulation flow can be followed to latitudes of 80{sup 0} N/S. The deduced meridional flow is shown to differ from the circulation velocities derived from magnetic pattern movements. A reversed circulation pattern is seen in polar regions for three successive solar minima. A surge in circulation velocity at low latitudes is seen during the rising phases of cycles 22 and 23.

  1. MT3FT-15OR0204122: Report on the acquisition and installation of FEI Talos F200X S/TEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parish, Chad M.

    2015-09-01

    This document describes the installation, performance, and early results from the FCRD-funded acquisition of a new advanced analytical scanning / transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Low Activation Materials Development and Analysis (LAMDA) facility.

  2. Video: Recovery Act by the Numbers | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Recovery Act by the Numbers Video: Recovery Act by the Numbers February 17, 2016 - 11:30am Addthis Watch this video to learn how the Recovery Act helped jumpstart America's clean energy economy. | Video by Simon Edelman and graphics by Carly Wilkins, Energy Department. Paul Lester Paul Lester Digital Content Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Simon Edelman Simon Edelman Chief Creative Officer Carly Wilkins Carly Wilkins Multimedia Designer MORE ON THE RECOVERY ACT MAP: Learn about the impact

  3. Watch Energy Highlights from the 2016 State of the Union | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy 2016 State of the Union Watch Energy Highlights from the 2016 State of the Union January 13, 2016 - 3:19pm Addthis Watch the Energy highlights from President Obama's final State of the Union delivered January 12, 2016. | Video by Simon Edelman, Energy Department. Simon Edelman Simon Edelman Chief Creative Officer Allison Lantero Allison Lantero Digital Content Specialist, Office of Public Affairs From climate change to wind and solar power to electric vehicles, President Obama touched

  4. Nanoscale coherent intergrowths in a crystal ofLa?.?Ca?...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    1 ; Tranquada, John M. 1 ; Billinge, Simon J. L. 2 + Show Author Affiliations Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States) Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL),...

  5. Search for: kondo effect | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Interferometers Dias Da Silva, Luis G ; Sandler, Nancy ; Simon, Pascal ; ... K. ; Bauer, E. D. ; Ronning, F. ; Thompson, J. D. ; De Souza, N. R. ; et al We ...

  6. Sudip Dosanjh: Select Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of International Conference on Parallel Programming - ParCo 2013, ( March 26, 2014) 2013 Richard A. Barrett, Shekhar Borkar, Sudip S. Dosanjh, Simon D. Hammond, Michael A. Heroux,...

  7. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES FORUM

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Director, Energy Accounts 14 Craig, Jack R. Savannah River Site Site Manager 15 Daniel, Anamary Inspection Experts, Inc. Vice President 16 DeSimone, Michael SCI...

  8. Underground and Ventilation System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on NMED environmental monitoring - Dr. Martin Simon * Audience Questions * In house * Internet * Closing Comments - Joe Franco 2 UPDATE ON CBFO AND WIPP ACTIVITIES Joe Franco, CBFO...

  9. Colorado State University Hydrodynamics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Hydro | Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities Name Colorado State University Address Daryl B. Simons Building, Engineering Research Center, 1320 Campus...

  10. QER- Comment of National Wildlife Foundation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mollie Simon Climate and Energy National Wildlife Federation - National Advocacy Center 901 E. Street, NW Suite 400 Washington, DC 20004 +1 202.797.6651

  11. Indiana's 4th congressional district: Energy Resources | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Indianapolis Power Light Megawatt Energy Systems Simon Property Group Solarvest BioEnergy Utility Companies in Indiana's 4th congressional district Indianapolis Power & Light...

  12. S.Van der Meer tribute

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Plusieurs intervenants rendent hommage à Simon Van der Meer né en 1925 à La Haye NL et prix nobel de physique en 1984

  13. Microsoft Word - EM SSAB Chairs Public Meeting Agenda - Spring...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Simon, Chair, Savannah River Site Citizens Advisory Board 8:20 am Meeting Overview * Eric Roberts, Facilitator 8:30 am EM Program Update * Mark Whitney, Acting Assistant...

  14. Underground and Ventilation System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Results - Dr. Martin Simon & Susan Lucas Kamat * Closing Comments - Joe Franco * Audience Questions * One question at a time please OVERVIEW OF RECOVERY ACTIVITIES Joe...

  15. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Cosmology from Galaxy Clusters...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ; Battistelli, Elia S. ; Bond, J.Richard ; Brown, Ben ; Burger, Bryce ; Chervenak, Jay ; Das, Sudeep ; Devlin, Mark J. ; Dicker, Simon R. ; Doriese, W.Bertrand ; Dunkley,...

  16. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Biotechnolog...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... - Department of Earth Sciences, Simon Fraser University Williford, Kenneth H. (Kenneth H. Williford) - Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wisconsin at ...

  17. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Patent Program Document Software Manual Technical Report ThesisDissertation ... ; Goodman, Simon L. ; Arnaout, M. Amin ; Merck) ; Harvard-Med) November 2015 Death Domain ...

  18. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Universal solvent restructuring induced by colloidal nanoparticles Zobel, Mirijam ; Neder, Reinhard B. ; Kimber, Simon A.J. ; ESRF) January 2015 Room-temperature sol-gel synthesis ...

  19. Detecting regular sound changes in linguistics as events of concerted...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    other evolving group. less Authors: Hruschka, Daniel J. 1 ; Branford, Simon 2 ; Smith, Eric D. 3 ; Wilkins, Jon 4 ; Meade, Andrew 2 ; Pagel, Mark 5 ; Bhattacharya,...

  20. EM SSAB CHAIRS Bi-Monthly Conference Call

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Pete Osborne, Dave Adler, Spencer Gross, Melyssa Noe Paducah Ben Peterson Robert Smith, Eric Roberts, Jim Ethridge Portsmouth Greg Simonton Savannah River Harold Simon ...

  1. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Lax, Simon" Name Name ORCID Search Authors Type: All BookMonograph ConferenceEvent Journal Article Miscellaneous Patent Program Document Software Manual Technical Report Thesis...

  2. Working with NREL | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Generation Siemens Solar Simon Property Group Sinton Consulting Inc SkyFuel Inc Skyline Solar SmartDwell Solar Systems Solarex Solargenix Energy Solarmer Energy Solasta Solexel...

  3. What Are the Best Materials to Separate a Xenon/Krypton Mixture...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Best Materials to Separate a XenonKrypton Mixture? Previous Next List Simon, Cory M.; Mercado, Rocio; Schnell, Sondre; Smit, Berend; and Haranczyk, Maciej. What Are the Best...

  4. Notes and Action Items

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rick Kendall, Tom Kitchens, Horst Simon SubCommittee on Visualization and Graphics Software Responsibility: JN Leboeuf, Judy Giarrusso, Steve Jardin, and Steve Lau Actions:...

  5. SSRL HEADLINES June 2003

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Russ Chianelli (UTEP), the panel included Franz Himpsel (Univ. of Wisconsin), Bennett Larson (ORNL), Simon Mochrie (Yale Univ.), Cyrus Safinya (UCSB), Sarah Tolbert (UCLA) and Don...

  6. NERSC Staff Publications & Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... in the experimental hall furthest from the reactors. ... In-Advance Computing for Fast Scientific Discovery", ... Herczeg Simon, Variable Sodium Absorption in a ...

  7. Thermal Conductivity in Nanocrystalline Ceria Thin Films (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Marat Khafizov ; In-Wook Park ; Aleksandr Chernatynskiy ; Lingfeng He ; Jianliang Lin ; John J. Moore ; David Swank ; Thomas Lillo ; Simon R. Phillpot ; Anter El-Azab ; ...

  8. Harmonizing Technological Innovation and End-of-Life Strategy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Mangold & R. Simon 2015 Pearson Economics 2013 7 Launch Growth Maturity Decline Time Revenue Product Life Span Technology Pulse Estimated U.S. consumer electronic sales 1980 to...

  9. Berkeley Lab Joins DOE's New HPC4Manufacturing Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    At the 2015 ACME summit: From left, Horst Simon (LBNL), Trish Damkroger (LLNL), John Turner (ORNL), Peg Folta (LLNL), David Skinner (LBNL), Dona Crawford (LLNL), Jeff Roberts...

  10. Nanoscale coherent intergrowthlike defects in a crystal ofLa1...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    1 ; Shi, Xiaoya 1 ; Li, Qiang 1 ; Zhong, Ruidan 1 ; Schneeloch, John A. 1 ; Gu, Genda 1 ; Tranquada, John M. 1 ; Billinge, Simon J. L. 2 + Show Author...

  11. mom_sc99

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    between NERSC and GFDL R. Pacanowski, V. Balaji, S. Griffles, J. Shelton, B. Ross Geophyisical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory R.K Owen, H. Anand, S. Luzmoor, H. Simon...

  12. January 28, 2015 | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cory Simon (Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, UC Berkeley) Screening the Nanoporous Materials Genome for XenonKrypton Separations using Machine Learning...

  13. Microsoft PowerPoint - TWPICE_SAlexander.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with Radiosondes Preliminary Results Simon Alexander & Toshitaka Tsuda Kyoto University Japan Radiosonde Launch Sites * Radiosondes launched every three hours except Darwin (six...

  14. Miguel I. Gonzalez | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Miguel I.; Lee, Jason S.; Gygi, David; Howe, Joshua D.; Lee, Kyuho; Darwish, Tamim A.; Michael, James; Peterson, Vanessa K; Teat, Simon J.; Smit, Berend; Neaton, Jeffrey B.;...

  15. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Horst Simon | Scheduled for Monday, November 18, 2002 at the Marriot Inner Harbor Hotel West Ballroom, in Baltimore, Maryland. The meeting will coincide with SC2002, the...

  16. OrgChart-151218a.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of WI Simone Raugei, PNNL Governance Board Doug Ray, PNNL Bruce Garrett, PNNL Michael Thompson, PNNL Morris Bullock, Director Aaron Appel, Deputy Director Center for Molecular...

  17. U.S. Natural Gas Exports to Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MI St. Clair, MI Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Buffalo, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY...

  18. Hanford Facility Beryllium Fact Sheet Building Number/Name:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    36Z Plutonium Reclamation Building June 30, 2004 February 9, 2012 CHPRC Kristy Kimmerle, CIH PAST OPERATIONS Beryllium brought in facility: YES Form of beryllium: VARIES Period of beryllium operations (dates): Start: 1973 End: 2004 Location(s) in facility that contained beryllium materials: Miscellaneous Treatment (MT) gloveboxes MT-1, MT-3, MT-4, MT-5, MT-6 and the connecting conveyor glovebox in Room 41. These enclosures and downstream ventilation systems in Room 26 are indicated with a

  19. Training Students to Analyze Spatial and Temporal Heterogeneities in Reservoir and Seal Petrology, Mineralogy, and Geochemistry: Implications for CO{sub 2} Sequestration Prediction, Simulation, and Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowen, Brenda

    2013-09-30

    The objective of this project was to expose and train multiple students in geological tools that are essential to reservoir characterization and geologic sequestration including but not limited to advanced petrological methods, mineralogical methods, and geochemical methods; core analysis, and geophysical well-log interpretation. These efforts have included training of multiple students through geologically based curriculum and research using advanced petrological, mineralogical, and geochemical methods. In whole, over the last 3+ years, this award has supported 5,828 hours of student research, supporting the work of several graduate and undergraduate students. They have all received training directly related to ongoing CO{sub 2} sequestration demonstrations. The students have all conducted original scientific research on topics related to understanding the importance of lithological, textural, and compositional variability in formations that are being targeted as CO{sub 2} sequestration reservoirs and seals. This research was linked to the Mount Simon Sandstone reservoir and overlying Eau Claire Formation seal in the Illinois Basin- a system where over one million tons of CO{sub 2} are actively being injected with the first large-scale demonstration of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} storage in the U.S. Student projects focused specifically on 1) reservoir porosity characterization and evaluation, 2) petrographic, mineralogical, and geochemical evidence of fluid-related diagenesis in the caprock, 3) textural changes in reservoir samples exposed to experimental CO{sub 2} + brine conditions, 4) controls on spatial heterogeneity in composition and texture in both the reservoir and seal, 5) the implications of small-scale fractures within the reservoir, and 6) petrographic and stable isotope analyses of carbonates in the seal to understand the burial history of the system. The student-led research associated with this project provided real-time and hands-on experience with a relevant CO{sub 2} system, provided relevant information to the regional partnerships who are working within these formations, and provides more broadly applicable understanding and method development for other carbon capture and storage systems.

  20. Modeling and Evaluation of Geophysical Methods for Monitoring and Tracking CO2 Migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, Jeff

    2012-11-30

    Geological sequestration has been proposed as a viable option for mitigating the vast amount of CO{sub 2} being released into the atmosphere daily. Test sites for CO{sub 2} injection have been appearing across the world to ascertain the feasibility of capturing and sequestering carbon dioxide. A major concern with full scale implementation is monitoring and verifying the permanence of injected CO{sub 2}. Geophysical methods, an exploration industry standard, are non-invasive imaging techniques that can be implemented to address that concern. Geophysical methods, seismic and electromagnetic, play a crucial role in monitoring the subsurface pre- and post-injection. Seismic techniques have been the most popular but electromagnetic methods are gaining interest. The primary goal of this project was to develop a new geophysical tool, a software program called GphyzCO2, to investigate the implementation of geophysical monitoring for detecting injected CO{sub 2} at test sites. The GphyzCO2 software consists of interconnected programs that encompass well logging, seismic, and electromagnetic methods. The software enables users to design and execute 3D surface-to-surface (conventional surface seismic) and borehole-to-borehole (cross-hole seismic and electromagnetic methods) numerical modeling surveys. The generalized flow of the program begins with building a complex 3D subsurface geological model, assigning properties to the models that mimic a potential CO{sub 2} injection site, numerically forward model a geophysical survey, and analyze the results. A test site located in Warren County, Ohio was selected as the test site for the full implementation of GphyzCO2. Specific interest was placed on a potential reservoir target, the Mount Simon Sandstone, and cap rock, the Eau Claire Formation. Analysis of the test site included well log data, physical property measurements (porosity), core sample resistivity measurements, calculating electrical permittivity values, seismic data collection, and seismic interpretation. The data was input into GphyzCO2 to demonstrate a full implementation of the software capabilities. Part of the implementation investigated the limits of using geophysical methods to monitor CO{sub 2} injection sites. The results show that cross-hole EM numerical surveys are limited to under 100 meter borehole separation. Those results were utilized in executing numerical EM surveys that contain hypothetical CO{sub 2} injections. The outcome of the forward modeling shows that EM methods can detect the presence of CO{sub 2}.

  1. EERE PowerPoint 97-2004 Template: Green Version

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & MT data - Krafla volcano, Iceland * Producing Geothermal field * First Iceland Deep Drilling Project (IDDP) well * Use existing MEQ and MT datasets - Coso Hot Springs, USA *...

  2. Rough order of magnitude cost estimate for immobilization of 18.2 MT of plutonium using existing facilities at the Savannah River site: alternatives 3A/5A/6A/6B/7A/9A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiSabatino, A., LLNL

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this Cost Estimate Report is to identify preliminary capital and operating costs for a facility to immobilize 18.2 metric tons (nominal) of plutonium using ceramic in a new facility at Savannah River Site (SRS).

  3. An Investigation for Disposal of Drill Cuttings into Unconsolidated

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sandstones and Clayey Sands (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: An Investigation for Disposal of Drill Cuttings into Unconsolidated Sandstones and Clayey Sands Citation Details In-Document Search Title: An Investigation for Disposal of Drill Cuttings into Unconsolidated Sandstones and Clayey Sands This project include experimental data and a set of models for relating elastic moduli/porosity/texture and static-to-dynamic moduli to strength and failure relationships for

  4. Characteristics of seal formations (confining units) for CO2 injection in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the Lower Tuscaloosa Sandstones in Southeastern Mississippi. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Characteristics of seal formations (confining units) for CO2 injection in the Lower Tuscaloosa Sandstones in Southeastern Mississippi. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Characteristics of seal formations (confining units) for CO2 injection in the Lower Tuscaloosa Sandstones in Southeastern Mississippi. No abstract prepared. Authors: Esposito, Richard [1] ; Goad, Patricia [2] ;

  5. I I

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... J. W. Nunziato, 5511 F. G. Blottner, 5512 R. H. Nilson, 5512 T. B. Lane, 5520 W. Herrrnann, 5530 R. A. LaFarge, 5631 G. J. SImons, 5640 R. J. Thompson, 5641 L. F. Shampine, 5642 . ...

  6. Inspiration of Music | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Inspiration of Music Inspiration of Music November 8, 2011 - 5:34am Addthis Ernie Tucker Editor, National Renewable Energy Laboratory As Paul Simon began singing "Here Comes the...

  7. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Gibbons, Sean M. (1) Gilbert, Jack A. (1) Hampton-Marcell, Jarrad T. (1) Lax, Simon (1) Smith, Daniel (1) Save Results Excel (limit 2000) CSV (limit 5000) XML (limit 5000) Have...

  8. Charmless B Decays at BaBar and Belle (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Charmless B Decays at BaBar and Belle Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Charmless B Decays at BaBar and Belle Authors: Sitt, Simon ; Ecole Polytechnique Publication Date:...

  9. NUG 2003

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9:15 Opening Remarks Horst Simon 9:30 Performance Evaluation Activites at NERSC Adrian Wong 10:00 Seaborg Code Scalability Project Richard Gerber 10:30 Green's function Monte...

  10. 2011 User Meeting Workshops

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nobumichi Tamura , Simon Teat (LBNL), and Oliver Tschauner (UNLV) 80-234* (Tues.) Soft X-Ray Characterization of Organic Devices and Energy Materials Harald Ade (NCSU) and Dean...

  11. Beamline 8.2.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Berkeley Center for Structural Biology Office phone: (510) 495-2594 Cell: (510) 813-4148 fax: (510) 486-5664 Simon Morton...

  12. Radiative Processes Working Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J-C. Dupont, M. Haeffelin Institut Pierre et Simon Laplace, Ecole Polytechnique, France The authors would like to thank the Office National d'Etudes et de Recherche en...

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Jeon, Sangyong (39) Gale, Charles (19) Schenke, Bjrn (7) Moore, Guy D. (5) Venugopalan, ... to QCD Huot, Simon C. ; Jeon, Sangyong ; Moore, Guy D. We compute the shear viscosity of ...

  14. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Schenke, Bjoern (5) Turbide, Simon (5) Heinz, Ulrich (4) Majumder, Abhijit (4) Paquet, Jean-Franois (4) Moore, Guy D. (3) Young, Clint (3) Bass, Steffen A. (2) Bourque, Alex (2) ...

  15. Attendee List

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OSF Sep 17 Yes Richard Saykally Department of Chemistry, UC Berkeley OSF Sep 17-20 No John Shalf LBNL OSF Sep 17 No Horst Simon LBNL OSF Sep 17 Yes David Skinner LBLNERSC OSF...

  16. ALSNews Vol. 341

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for the Berkeley Center for Structural Biology, Simon Morton has been a member of the Physical Biosciences Division, but he is now transitioning to work 60% time for the ALS....

  17. Presentation: QER Energy Topics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A briefing to the Secretary's Energy Advisory Board on QER Energy Topics (Energy Flows, Water Flows, and Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison) prepared by: A.J. Simon, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

  18. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    properties of Gulf Coast sandstones and their implications for geopressured fluid production Morton R A Ewing T E Tyler N GEOTHERMAL ENERGY GEOPRESSURED SYSTEMS...

  19. Verification of Geothermal Tracer Methods in Highly Constrained...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the problem can be fully constrained. In a shallow horizontal sandstone fracture surface ground penetrating radar (GPR) is used to map the flow paths in the fracture independently...

  20. An Investigation for Disposal of Drill Cuttings into Unconsolidated...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 02 PETROLEUM; DRILLING FLUIDS; MINERAL WASTES; ROCK MECHANICS; SANDSTONES; CLAYS; DISPOSAL WELLS; ABANDONED WELLS; GROUND WATER; WATER POLLUTION CONTROL; WASTE MANAGEMENT ...

  1. Thermal Gradient Holes At Waunita Hot Springs Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    crust. The boreholes which exhibited the lowest average gradient were several kilometers from the hot springs and up-dip. None of them penetrated the Dakota Sandstone ....

  2. Petrography Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    flows, tuffaceous siltstone, greywacke, and sandstone. References Clay Jones, Joseph Moore, William Teplow, Seth Craig (2011) Geology and Hydrothermal Alteration of the Raft...

  3. An Investigation for Disposal of Drill Cuttings into Unconsolidated...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 02 PETROLEUM; DRILLING FLUIDS; MINERAL WASTES; ROCK MECHANICS; SANDSTONES; CLAYS; DISPOSAL WELLS; ABANDONED WELLS; ...

  4. SAND2011-0845

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1-0845 Unlimited Release February 2011 Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation ... compaction and cementation in clean sandstones, Geochimica et Cosmochimica ...

  5. Summer interns present research findings in poster session | Princeton

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Physics Lab Summer interns present research findings in poster session By Raphael Rosen August 31, 2015 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook New Jersey Assemblywoman Donna Simon Talks With SULI Intern Cara Bagley (Photo by Elle Starkman) New Jersey Assemblywoman Donna Simon Talks With SULI Intern Cara Bagley Gallery: Physicist Charles Skinner and Intern Amanda Lewis (Photo by Elle Starkman) Physicist Charles Skinner and Intern Amanda Lewis Interns Matthew Lotocki, Zack

  6. Secrets of superconductivity revealed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Secrets of superconductivity revealed Secrets of superconductivity revealed The superconducting material Cerium-Colbalt-Indium5 reveals new secrets about how superconductivity and magnetism can be related. January 3, 2014 Simon Gerber, first author of the publication on the superconducting properties of CeCoIn5 at the Morpheus instrument of the Spallation Neutron Source SINQ in Switzerland. (Photo: Paul Scherrer Institute/Markus Fischer) Simon Gerber, first author of the publication on the

  7. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Power

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Transmission, Distribution and Plants -- Energy, science, and technology for the research community -- hosted by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, U.S. Department of Energy R S T U V W X Y Z Quan, Xiaowei (Xiaowei Quan) - NOAA-CIRES Climate Diagnostics Center, University of Colorado at Boulder Quartly, Graham (Graham Quartly) - National Oceanography Centre Southampton Queenborough, Simon A. (Simon A. Queenborough) - National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis,

  8. PNNL: Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis - Research Team

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Team Morris Bullock Morris Bullock Director Aaron Appel Aaron Appel Deputy Director Dan DuBois Dan DuBois Scientific Advisor Monte L. Helm Monte L. Helm Mike Mock Mike Mock Molly O'Hagan Molly O'Hagan Simone Raugei Simone Raugei Eric Wiedner Eric Wiedner Collaborators Sharon Hammes-Schiffer Sharon Hammes-Schiffer University of Illinois Jim Mayer Jim Mayer Yale University Shannon Stahl Shannon Stahl University of Wisconsin - Madison Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis Home Scientific

  9. Human Resources at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | Critical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Institute Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Careers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Main contacts in Human Resources for recruitment and hiring: Jennifer Brizel Recruitment & Staffing Group Leader 925-422-9388 brizel1@llnl.gov Teri Kobayashi Senior Staffing Specialist 925-422-9050 kobayashi3@llnl.gov Daphne Simons Recruitment and Staffing Coordinator 925-422-7511 simons3@llnl.gov Careers

  10. Microsoft Word - Document1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of NERSC Address Horst Simon Director, NERSC Division Bill Kramer Director, High Performance Computing Department NERSC Accomplishments in 1996 Horst Simon - 1/28/97 http://www.nersc.gov/research/whitepaper/whitepaper.html NERSC Mission Statement Provide reliable, high quality, state of the art computing resources and client support in a timely manner-- independent of client location--while wisely advancing the state of computational and computer science. Major Milestones Feb 96 Four NERSC

  11. U.S. Total Exports

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    International Falls, MN Noyes, MN Warroad, MN Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Del Bonita, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sweetgrass, MT Whitlash, MT Portal, ND Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Champlain, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Highgate Springs, VT North Troy, VT U.S. Pipeline Total from Mexico Ogilby, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX El Paso, TX Galvan Ranch, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX LNG Imports from Algeria Cove Point, MD Everett, MA Lake Charles, LA LNG

  12. Raft River Idaho Magnetotelluric Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory Nash

    2015-05-13

    Raw magnetotelluric (MT) data covering the geothermal system at Raft River, Idaho. The data was acquired by Quantec Geoscience. This is a zipped file containing .edi raw MT data files.

  13. arm08_UVRSS-TUV.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1097 Intercomparison, Table Mt., CO Prototype NMOS: 512 pixels 0901 Diffuse IOP, SPG, OK 0503 Aerosols IOP, SPG, OK 0603 Intercomparison, Table Mt., CO UV-RSS Optics Design...

  14. disposition

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    MT of surplus HEU has been down-blended for use as fuel in Tennessee Valley Authority reactors (completed in October 2011);

  15. 22 MT of surplus HEU has been set aside for...

  16. fmd

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    MT of surplus HEU has been down-blended for use as fuel in Tennessee Valley Authority reactors (completed in October 2011);

  17. 22 MT of surplus HEU has been set aside for...

  18. fissile material

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    MT of surplus HEU has been down-blended for use as fuel in Tennessee Valley Authority reactors (completed in October 2011);

  19. 22 MT of surplus HEU has been set aside for...

  20. A Systems Approach to Identifying Exploration and Development Opportunities in the Illinois Basin: Digital Portifolio of Plays in Underexplored Lower Paleozoic Rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beverly Seyler; David Harris; Brian Keith; Bryan Huff; Yaghoob Lasemi

    2008-06-30

    This study examined petroleum occurrence in Ordovician, Silurian and Devonian reservoirs in the Illinois Basin. Results from this project show that there is excellent potential for additional discovery of petroleum reservoirs in these formations. Numerous exploration targets and exploration strategies were identified that can be used to increase production from these underexplored strata. Some of the challenges to exploration of deeper strata include the lack of subsurface data, lack of understanding of regional facies changes, lack of understanding the role of diagenetic alteration in developing reservoir porosity and permeability, the shifting of structural closures with depth, overlooking potential producing horizons, and under utilization of 3D seismic techniques. This study has shown many areas are prospective for additional discoveries in lower Paleozoic strata in the Illinois Basin. This project implemented a systematic basin analysis approach that is expected to encourage exploration for petroleum in lower Paleozoic rocks of the Illinois Basin. The study has compiled and presented a broad base of information and knowledge needed by independent oil companies to pursue the development of exploration prospects in overlooked, deeper play horizons in the Illinois Basin. Available geologic data relevant for the exploration and development of petroleum reservoirs in the Illinois Basin was analyzed and assimilated into a coherent, easily accessible digital play portfolio. The primary focus of this project was on case studies of existing reservoirs in Devonian, Silurian, and Ordovician strata and the application of knowledge gained to future exploration and development in these underexplored strata of the Illinois Basin. In addition, a review of published reports and exploration in the New Albany Shale Group, a Devonian black shale source rock, in Illinois was completed due to the recent increased interest in Devonian black shales across the United States. The New Albany Shale is regarded as the source rock for petroleum in Silurian and younger strata in the Illinois Basin and has potential as a petroleum reservoir. Field studies of reservoirs in Devonian strata such as the Geneva Dolomite, Dutch Creek Sandstone and Grassy knob Chert suggest that there is much additional potential for expanding these plays beyond their current limits. These studies also suggest the potential for the discovery of additional plays using stratigraphic concepts to develop a subcrop play on the subkaskaskia unconformity boundary that separates lower Devonian strata from middle Devonian strata in portions of the basin. The lateral transition from Geneva Dolomite to Dutch Creek Sandstone also offers an avenue for developing exploration strategies in middle Devonian strata. Study of lower Devonian strata in the Sesser Oil Field and the region surrounding the field shows opportunities for development of a subcrop play where lower Devonian strata unconformably overlie Silurian strata. Field studies of Silurian reservoirs along the Sangamon Arch show that opportunities exist for overlooked pays in areas where wells do not penetrate deep enough to test all reservoir intervals in Niagaran rocks. Mapping of Silurian reservoirs in the Mt. Auburn trend along the Sangamon Arch shows that porous reservoir rock grades laterally to non-reservoir facies and several reservoir intervals may be encountered in the Silurian with numerous exploration wells testing only the uppermost reservoir intervals. Mapping of the Ordovician Trenton and shallower strata at Centralia Field show that the crest of the anticline shifted through geologic time. This study illustrates that the axes of anticlines may shift with depth and shallow structure maps may not accurately predict structurally favorable reservoir locations at depth.

  21. Combined Heat and Power Systems (CHP): Capabilities (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-07-01

    D&MT Capabilities fact sheet that describes the NREL capabilities related to combined heat and power (CHP).

  22. EIS-0092: Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Conversion to Coal, Holyoke Water Power Company, Mt. Tom Generating Station Unit 1 Holyoke, Hampden County, Massachusetts

  23. Business Excellence Consulting | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Excellence Consulting Jump to: navigation, search Name: Business Excellence Consulting Place: Bozeman, MT Website: www.businessexcellenceconsulti References: Business Excellence...

  1. EA-1886: Draft Environmental Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Kevin Dome Carbon Storage Project, Shelby, Toole County, MT

  2. The Potosi Reservoir Model 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adushita, Yasmin; Smith, Valerie; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    As a part of a larger project co-funded by the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) to evaluate the potential of formations within the Cambro-Ordovician strata above the Mt. Simon as potential targets for carbon sequestration in the Illinois and Michigan Basins, the Illinois Clean Coal Institute (ICCI) requested Schlumberger to evaluate the potential injectivity and carbon dioxide (CO2) plume size of the Cambrian Potosi Formation. The evaluation of this formation was accomplished using wireline data, core data, pressure data, and seismic data from the US DOE-funded Illinois Basin–Decatur Project (IBDP) being conducted by the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium in Macon County, Illinois. In 2010, technical performance evaluations on the Cambrian Potosi Formation were performed through reservoir modeling. The data included formation tops from mud logs, well logs from the VW1 and the CCS1 wells, structural and stratigraphic formation from three dimensional (3D) seismic data, and field data from several waste water injection wells for Potosi Formation. Intention was for two million tons per annum (MTPA) of CO2 to be injected for 20 years. In the preceding, the 2010 Potosi heterogeneous model (referred to as the "Potosi Dynamic Model 2010" in this topical report) was re-run using a new injection scenario; 3.2 MTPA for 30 years. The extent of the Potosi Dynamic Model 2010, however, appeared too small for the new injection target. It was not sufficiently large enough to accommodate the evolution of the plume. The new model, Potosi Dynamic Model 2013a, was built by extending the Potosi Dynamic Model 2010 grid to 30 miles x 30 miles (48.3km x48.3km), while preserving all property modeling workflows and layering. This model was retained as the base case of Potosi Dynamic Model 2013a. The Potosi reservoir model was updated to take into account the new data from the verification well VW2 which was drilled in 2012. The new porosity and permeability modeling was performed to take into account the log data from the new well. Revisions of the 2010 modeling assumptions were also done on relative permeability, capillary pressures, formation water salinity, and the maximum allowable well bottomhole pressure. Dynamic simulations were run using the injection target of 3.2 MTPA for 30 years. This new dynamic model was named Potosi Dynamic Model 2013b. Due to the major uncertainties on the vugs permeability, two models were built; the Pessimistic and Optimistic Cases. The Optimistic Case assumes vugs permeability of 9,000 mD, which is analog to the vugs permeability identified in the pressure fall off test of a waste water injector in the Tuscola site, approx. 40 miles (64.4km) away from the IBDP area. The Pessimistic Case assumes that the vugs permeability is equal to the log data, which does not take into account the permeability from secondary porosity. The probability of such case is deemed low and could be treated as the worst case scenario, since the contribution of secondary porosity to the permeability is neglected and the loss circulation events might correspond to a much higher permeability. It is considered important, however, to identify the range of possible reservoir performance since there are no rigorous data available for the vugs permeability. The Optimistic Case gives an average CO2 injection rate of 0.8 MTPA and cumulative injection of 26 MT in 30 years, which corresponds to 27% of the injection target. The injection rate is approx. 3.2 MTPA in the first year as the well is injecting into the surrounding vugs, and declines rapidly to 0.8 MTPA in year 4 once the surrounding vugs are full and the CO2 start to reach the matrix. This implies that according to this preliminary model, a minimum of four (4) wells could be required to achieve the injection target. This result is lower than the injectivity estimated in the Potosi Dynamic Model 2013a (43 MT in 30 years), since the permeability model applied in the Potosi Dynamic Model 2013b is more conservative. This revision was deemed necessary to treat the uncertainty in a more appropriate manner. As the CO2 follows the paths where vugs interconnection exists, a reasonably large and irregular plume extent was created. For the Optimistic Case, the plume extends 17 miles (27.4km) in E-W and 14 miles (22.5km) in N-S directions after 30 years. After injection is completed, the plume continues to migrate laterally, mainly driven by the remaining pressure gradient. After 100 years post injection, the plume extends 20 miles (32.2km) in E-W and 15.5 miles (24.9km) in N-S directions. Should the targeted cumulative injection of 96 MT be achieved; a much larger plume extent could be expected. For the Optimistic Case, the increase of reservoir pressure at the end of injection is approximately 1200 psia (8,274 kPa) around the injector and gradually decreases away from the well. The reservoir pressure increase is less than 30 psia (206.8 kPa) beyond 14 miles (22.5km) away from injector. Should the targeted cumulative injection of 96 MT be achieved; a much larger areal pressure increase could be expected. The initial reservoir pressure is nearly restored after approximately 100 years post injection. The presence of matrix slows down the pressure dissipations. The Pessimistic Case gives an average CO2 injection rate of 0.2 MTPA and cumulative injection of 7 MT in 30 years, which corresponds to 7% of the injection target. This implies that in the worst case scenario, a minimum of sixteen (16) wells could be required to achieve the injection target. The present evaluation is mainly associated with uncertainty on the vugs permeability, distribution, and interconnectivity. The different results indicated by the Optimistic and Pessimistic Cases signify the importance of vugs permeability characterization. Therefore, injection test and pressure interference test among the wells could be considered to evaluate the local vugs permeability, extent, and interconnectivity. Porosity mapping derived from the seismic inversion could also be used in the succeeding task to characterize the lateral porosity distribution within the reservoir. With or without seismic inversion porosity mapping, it is worth exploring whether increased lateral heterogeneity plays a significant role in Potosi injectivity. Investigations on vugular, dolomitic outcrops suggest that there may be significantly greater lateral heterogeneity than what has been modeled here. Facies modeling within the Potosi has yet to be thoroughly addressed. The carbonates during the time of deposition are believed to be regionally extensive. However, it may be worth delineating the reservoir with other regional wells or modern day analogues to understand the extent of the Potosi. More specifically, the model could incorporate lateral changes or trends if deemed necessary to represent facies transition. Data acquisitions to characterize the fracture pressure gradient, the formation water properties, the relative permeability, and the capillary pressure could also be considered in order to allow a more rigorous evaluation of the Potosi storage performance. A simulation using several injectors could also be considered to determine the required number of wells to achieve the injection target while taking into account the pressure interference.

  3. Reactivity of iron-bearing minerals and CO2 sequestration: A multi-disciplinary experimental approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoonen, Martin A.

    2014-12-22

    The reactivity of sandstones was studied under conditions relevant to the injection of supercritical carbon dioxide in the context of carbon geosequestration. The emphasis of the study was on the reactivity of iron-bearing minerals when exposed to supercritical CO2 (scCO2) and scCO2 with commingled aqueous solutions containing H2S and/or SO2. Flow through and batch experiments were conducted. Results indicate that sandstones, irrespective of their mineralogy, are not reactive when exposed to pure scCO2 or scCO2 with commingled aqueous solutions containing H2S and/or SO2 under conditions simulating the environment near the injection point (flow through experiments). However, sandstones are reactive under conditions simulating the edge of the injected CO2 plume or ahead of the plume (batch experiments). Sandstones containing hematite (red sandstone) are particularly reactive. The composition of the reaction products is strongly dependent on the composition of the aqueous phase. The presence of dissolved sulfide leads to the conversion of hematite into pyrite and siderite. The relative amount of the pyrite and siderite is influenced by the ionic strength of the solution. Little reactivity is observed when sulfite is present in the aqueous phase. Sandstones without hematite (grey sandstones) show little reactivity regardless of the solution composition.

  4. Comparison of hydrocarbon production trends in Middle and Upper members of Minnelusa formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reel, C.L.; Horne, J.C.; Kelly, A.O.

    1985-05-01

    The main reservoir rocks in the upper and middle members of the Minnelusa Formation consist of wind blown dunal sands in the area surrounding the Lusk embayment. Changes in the local depositional setting, tectonic framework, and eustatic sea level controlled the distribution and reservior quality of these sandstones. The middle member exhibits two production trends. Age-equivalent Tensleep rocks deposited along the western margin of the embayment produce from sandstones accumulated in a sand sea paleoenvironment. Structure is atnececessary for trapping owing to permeability continuity. Along the eastern margin of the embayment, production comes from isolated accumulations of sandstone deposited as dunes on broad coastal sabkhas. Fields in these sandstones define a linear trend due to the coast-parallel alignment of these dunes. Production from the upper member defines four major trends. Upper member sandstones in the southern part of the basin, similar to Leo reservoirs, produce from sediments deposited as coast-parallel dunes in a northwest-southeast alignment. In the northern portion of the basin, production is from sandstones deposited in broad, flat eolian sand seas. Because of the permeability continuity of these sandstones, structural closure is necessary for trapping hydrocarbons. Upper member production has been influenced by the unconformity developed at the top of the Minnelusa. Movement along the Rosebud arch resulted in a southwest-northeast production trend apparent in each sandstone unit reflecting their northwestward erosional limits. The last, and most apparent, production trend, results from the Opeche Shale infilling of northwest-southeast-oriented stream valleys. Most production to date has been from sandstones following this alignment juxta-posed downdip of these impermeable shales.

  5. Absence of higher order corrections to the non-Abelian topological mass term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, F. T.; Das, Ashok; Frenkel, J.

    2001-04-15

    We study the Yang-Mills-Chern-Simons theory systematically in an effort to generalize the Coleman-Hill result to the non-Abelian case. We show that, while the Chern-Simons coefficient is in general gauge dependent in a non-Abelian theory, it takes on a physical meaning in the axial gauge. Using the non-Abelian Ward identities as well as the analyticity of the amplitudes in the momentum variables, we show that, in the axial gauge, the Chern-Simons coefficient does not receive any quantum correction beyond one loop. This allows us to deduce that the ratio 4{pi}m/g{sup 2} is unrenormalized, in a non-Abelian theory, beyond one loop in any infrared safe gauge. This is the appropriate generalization of the Coleman-Hill result to non-Abelian theories. Various other interesting properties of the theory are also discussed.

  6. National Radon Database. Volume 4. The EPA/state residential radon surveys: CA, HI, ID, LA, NE, NV, NC, OK, SC, the Navajo Nation, and the Billings, MT IHS Area 1989-1990 (5 1/4 inch, 1. 2mb) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The National Radon Database (NRDB) was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to distribute information in two recent radon surveys: the EPA/State Residential Radon Surveys and the National Residential Radon Survey. The National Residential Radon Surveys collected annual average radon measurements on all levels of approximately 5,700 homes nationwide. Information collected during survey includes a detailed questionnaire on house characteristics, as well as radon measurements. The radon survey data for Volume 6 is contained on two diskettes. The data diskettes are accompanied by comprehensive documentation on the design and implementation of the survey, the development and use of sampling weights, a summary of survey results, and information concerning the household questionnaire.

  7. National Radon Database. Volume 4. The EPA/state residential radon survey: CA, HI, ID, LA, NE, NV, NC, OK, SC, the Navajo Nation, and the Billings, MT IHS Area 1989-1990 (3 1/2 inch, 1. 44mb) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The National Radon Database (NRDB) was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to distribute information in two recent radon surveys: the EPA/State Residential Radon Surveys and the National Residential Radon Survey. The National Residential Radon Surveys collected annual average radon measurements on all levels of approximately 5,700 homes nationwide. Information collected during survey includes a detailed questionnaire on house characteristics, as well as radon measurements. The radon survey data for Volume 6 is contained on two diskettes. The data diskettes are accompanied by comprehensive documentation on the design and implementation of the survey, the development and use of sampling weights, a summary of survey results, and information concerning the household questionnaire.

  8. Big Bang Day: 5 Particles - 5. The Next Particle

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Simon Singh looks at the stories behind the discovery of 5 of the universe's most significant subatomic particles: the Electron, the Quark, the Anti-particle, the Neutrino and the "next particle". 5. The Next Particle The "sparticle" - a super symmetric partner to all the known particles could be the answer to uniting all the known particles and their interactions under one grand theoretical pattern of activity. But how do researchers know where to look for such phenomena and how do they know if they find them? Simon Singh reviews the next particle that physicists would like to find if the current particle theories are to ring true.

  9. Agenda

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Agenda Agenda Energy Research Scientific Computing Users Group (ERSUG) Schedule April 6, 1998 Monday April 6, 1998 Berkeley Lab - Perseverance Hall Time Scheduled Event Speaker / Session Leader 08:00 Continental Breakfast 08:30 Welcome Ricky Kendall 08:35 View From Washington Tom Kitchens 08:55 New NERSC Staff Introductions Horst Simon 09:00 NERSC Research Efforts (Leverage to the NERSC Program) Horst Simon 09:30 Strategic Computing Initiative Bill McCurdy 10:00 ERCAP Changes Tom Kitchens 10:20

  10. Microsoft Word - S04902_LetterReport Cover Letter.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    to fracture the tight gas-bearing sandstone formations in the Piceance Basin for enhanced natural gas production. A 43 kiloton device was detonated on September 10, 1969, at a...

  11. K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole Vc-2B, Valles...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (765 m) gives an age of 6.74 Ma. Two dates on illite from sandstones in Permian red beds (1008 and 1187 m) are 4.33 and 4.07 Ma, respectively. Surprisingly, three dates on...

  12. DOE Showcases Websites for Tight Gas Resource Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Two U.S. Department of Energy projects funded by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory provide quick and easy web-based access to sought after information on tight-gas sandstone plays.

  13. DOE-Funded Research at Stanford Sees Results in Reservoir Characteriza...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    effects. To investigate these issues, a nanofluid was created by suspending SiO2 nanoparticles in a liquid solution, and then injecting into a Berea sandstone core. The...

  14. Resolving the tips of the tree of life: How much mitochondrialdata doe we need?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonett, Ronald M.; Macey, J. Robert; Boore, Jeffrey L.; Chippindale, Paul T.

    2005-04-29

    Mitochondrial (mt) DNA sequences are used extensively to reconstruct evolutionary relationships among recently diverged animals,and have constituted the most widely used markers for species- and generic-level relationships for the last decade or more. However, most studies to date have employed relatively small portions of the mt-genome. In contrast, complete mt-genomes primarily have been used to investigate deep divergences, including several studies of the amount of mt sequence necessary to recover ancient relationships. We sequenced and analyzed 24 complete mt-genomes from a group of salamander species exhibiting divergences typical of those in many species-level studies. We present the first comprehensive investigation of the amount of mt sequence data necessary to consistently recover the mt-genome tree at this level, using parsimony and Bayesian methods. Both methods of phylogenetic analysis revealed extremely similar results. A surprising number of well supported, yet conflicting, relationships were found in trees based on fragments less than {approx}2000 nucleotides (nt), typical of the vast majority of the thousands of mt-based studies published to date. Large amounts of data (11,500+ nt) were necessary to consistently recover the whole mt-genome tree. Some relationships consistently were recovered with fragments of all sizes, but many nodes required the majority of the mt-genome to stabilize, particularly those associated with short internal branches. Although moderate amounts of data (2000-3000 nt) were adequate to recover mt-based relationships for which most nodes were congruent with the whole mt-genome tree, many thousands of nucleotides were necessary to resolve rapid bursts of evolution. Recent advances in genomics are making collection of large amounts of sequence data highly feasible, and our results provide the basis for comparative studies of other closely related groups to optimize mt sequence sampling and phylogenetic resolution at the ''tips'' of the Tree of Life.

  15. The Potosi Reservoir Model 2013c, Property Modeling Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adushita, Yasmin; Smith, Valerie; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    As part of a larger project co-funded by the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) to evaluate the potential of formations within the Cambro-Ordovician strata above the Mt. Simon as potential targets for carbon sequestration in the Illinois and Michigan Basins, the Illinois Clean Coal Institute (ICCI) requested Schlumberger to evaluate the potential injectivity and carbon dioxide (CO2) plume size of the Cambrian Potosi Formation. The evaluation of this formation was accomplished using wireline data, core data, pressure data, and seismic data from this project as well as two other separately funded projects: the US DOE-funded Illinois Basin–Decatur Project (IBDP) being conducted by the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) in Macon County, Illinois, and the Illinois Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration (ICCS) project funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. In 2010, technical performance evaluations on the Cambrian Potosi Formation were performed through reservoir modeling. The data included formation tops from mud logs, well logs from the Verification Well #1 (VW1) and the Injection Well (CCS1), structural and stratigraphic formation from three dimensional (3D) seismic data, and field data from several waste water injection wells for Potosi Formation. The intention was for 2.2 million tons per annum (2 million tonnes per annum [MTPA]) of CO2 to be injected for 20 years. In the Task Error! Reference source not found., the 2010 Potosi heterogeneous model (referred to as the "Potosi Dynamic Model 2010") was re-run using a new injection scenario of 3.5 million tons per annum (3.2 MTPA) for 30 years. The extent of the Potosi Dynamic Model 2010, however, appeared too small for the new injection target. The models size was insufficient to accommodate the evolution of the plume. The new model, Potosi Dynamic Model 2013a, was built by extending the Potosi Dynamic Model 2010 grid to 30 by 30 mi (48 by 48 km), while preserving all property modeling workflows and layering. This model was retained as the base case. In the preceding Task [1], the Potosi reservoir model was updated to take into account the new data from the Verification Well #2 (VW2) which was drilled in 2012. The porosity and permeability modeling was revised to take into account the log data from the new well. Revisions of the 2010 modeling assumptions were also done on relative permeability, capillary pressures, formation water salinity, and the maximum allowable well bottomhole pressure. Dynamic simulations were run using the injection target of 3.5 million tons per annum (3.2 MTPA) for 30 years. This dynamic model was named Potosi Dynamic Model 2013b. In this Task, a new property modeling workflow was applied, where seismic inversion data guided the porosity mapping and geobody extraction. The static reservoir model was fully guided by PorosityCube interpretations and derivations coupled with petrophysical logs from three wells. The two main assumptions are: porosity features in the PorosityCube that correlate with lost circulation zones represent vugular zones, and that these vugular zones are laterally continuous. Extrapolation was done carefully to populate the vugular facies and their corresponding properties outside the seismic footprint up to the boundary of the 30 by 30 mi (48 by 48 km) model. Dynamic simulations were also run using the injection target of 3.5 million tons per annum (3.2 MTPA) for 30 years. This new dynamic model was named Potosi Dynamic Model 2013c. Reservoir simulation with the latest model gives a cumulative injection of 43 million tons (39 MT) in 30 years with a single well, which corresponds to 40% of the injection target. The injection rate is approx. 3.2 MTPA in the first six months as the well is injecting into the surrounding vugs, and declines rapidly to 1.8 million tons per annum (1.6 MTPA) in year 3 once the surrounding vugs are full and the CO2 start to reach the matrix. After, the injection rate declines gradually to 1.2 million tons per annum (1.1 MTPA) in year 18 and stays constant. This implies that a minimum of three (3) wells could be required in the Potosi to reach the injection target. The injectivity evaluated in this Task was higher compared to the preceding Task, since the current facies modeling (guided by the porosity map from the seismic inversion) indicated a higher density of vugs within the vugular zones. 5 As the CO2 follows the paths where vugs interconnection exists, a reasonably large and irregular plume extent was created. After 30 years of injection, the plume extends 13.7 mi (22 km) in E-W and 9.7 mi (16 km) in N-S directions. After injection finishes, the plume continues to migrate laterally, mainly driven by the remaining pressure gradient. After 60 years post-injection, the plume extends 14.2 mi (22.8 km) in E-W and 10 mi (16 km) in N-S directions, and remains constant as the remaining pressure gradient has become very low. Should the targeted cumulative injection of 106 million tons (96 MT) be achieved; a much larger plume extent could be expected. The increase of reservoir pressure at the end of injection is approximately 1,200 psia (8,274 kPa) around the injector and gradually decreases away from the well. The reservoir pressure increase is less than 10 psia (69 kPa) beyond 14 mi (23 km) away from injector. Should the targeted cumulative injection of 106 million tons (96 MT) be achieved; a much larger areal pressure increase could be expected. The reservoir pressure declines rapidly during the first 30 years post injection and the initial reservoir pressure is nearly restored after 100 years post-injection. The present evaluation is mainly associated with uncertainty on the vugs permeability and interconnectivity. The use of porosity mapping from seismic inversion might have reduced the uncertainty on the lateral vugs body distributions. However, major uncertainties on the Potosi vugs permeability remains. Therefore, injection test and pressure interference test among the wells could be considered to evaluate the local vugs permeability, extent, and interconnectivity. Facies modeling within the Potosi has yet to be thoroughly addressed. The carbonates during the time of deposition are believed to be regionally extensive. However, it may be worth delineating the reservoir with other regional wells or modern day analogues to understand the extent of the Potosi. More specifically, the model could incorporate lateral changes or trends if deemed necessary to represent facies transition. Data acquisitions to characterize the fracture pressure gradient, the formation water properties, the relative permeability, and the capillary pressure could also be considered in order to allow a more rigorous evaluation of the Potosi storage performance. A simulation using several injectors could also be considered to determine the required number of wells and appropriate spacing to achieve the injection target while taking into account the pressure interference.

  16. Summer 2012 Working Groups

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3158 H H D ow Simon H uang ( Goldman g roup) June 15 1:30pm 3158 H H D ow Jimmy Chen (Phillips g roup) July 6 1:30pm 3158 H H D ow Sung J oo K im ( Pan g roup) July 20 1:30pm 3150...

  17. August 28, 2013 | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies | Blandine Jerome August 28, 2013 Previous Next List Joseph Chen (Dept. of Chemical & Biomolecular Eng., UC Berkeley) NMR Relaxometry of Metal-Organic Frameworks for Rapid Surface Area Screening Cory Simon (Dept. of Chemical & Biomolecular Eng., UC Berkeley) Insights for Optimizing Materials for Methane Storage

  18. Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Biology...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Dashtgard, Shahin (Shahin Dashtgard) - Department of Earth Sciences, Simon Fraser University Datta-Gupta, Akhil (Akhil Datta-Gupta) - ...

  19. Attendee List

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Samtaney PPPL, Princeton University OSF Oct. 2-3 Yes Yukiko Sekine DOE OSF Oct. 2-3 No John Shalf NERSC OSF Oct. 2-3 No Horst Simon LBNL OSF Oct. 2-3 Yes David Skinner NERSC OSF...

  20. The outlook for the economic and environmental performance of australia's national electricity market in 2030

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simshauser, Paul; Doan, Thao; Lacey, Ben

    2007-07-15

    CO{sub 2} emissions in Australia's NEM have increased from 117 Mt in 1990 to 169 Mt in 2002. Without policy intervention, emissions are forecast to further rise to 265 Mt by 2030. An analysis of the economic and environmental impact of various generation technology options suggests that the most likely technology glide path will be gas-fired generation in the medium term, with IGCC + CCS or nuclear being the dominant baseload technology over the long run. (author)

  1. Magnetotellurics At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    potential of Coso Geothermal Region Notes A dense grid of magnetotelluric (MT) stations plus contiguous bipole array profiling centered over the east flank of the Coso geothermal...

  2. EERE PowerPoint 97-2004 Template: Green Version

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MT Gravity Radar Geology Geothermal Technologies Office 2015 Peer Review Kelly Rose, NETL Scott Urquhart, Zonge Int. Adam Schultz, OSU Paul Vincent, OSU Track 3 EGS1 This...

  3. Other Participants 2006 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    School , Mansfield , CT Fergus High School , Lewistown , MT Hillcrest High School , Dallas , TX Iolani High School , Honolulu , HI Irmo High School , Columbia , SC James E. ...

  4. MILACRON, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    W MAIN ST Place: Mt. Orab, Ohio Zip: 45154 Sector: Services, Wind energy Product: Manufacturing Phone Number: 513-536-2800 Website: MilacronMachining.com Coordinates:...

  5. Missoula, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Missoula, Montana: Energy Resources (Redirected from Missoula, MT) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 46.872146, -113.9939982 Show Map Loading...

  6. Butte, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Butte, Montana: Energy Resources (Redirected from Butte, MT) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 46.003917, -112.534446 Show Map Loading map......

  7. EIS-0379: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to Bonner Ferry 115-kilovolt Transmission Line Project EIS No. 20070305, Draft EIS, BPA, MT, Libby (FEC) to Troy Section of BPA's Libby to Bonner Ferry 115-kilovolt...

  8. Property:FuturePlans | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Area F Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area K Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area L Lightning Dock Geothermal Area Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area M Mt Princeton Hot...

  9. Property:Geothermal/FundingSource | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 + A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Geothermal Project + American...

  10. Property:Geothermal/FundingOpportunityAnnouncemt | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Co., NV Geothermal Project + DE-FOA-0000109 + A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Geothermal Project + DE-FOA-0000116 +...

  11. Property:Geothermal/TargetsMilestones | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    reservoir models and define drilling targets. A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Geothermal Project + Mine waters will...

  12. Property:Geothermal/Impacts | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    fluid pathways in fracture-dominated systems. A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Geothermal Project + Successful...

  13. Property:Geothermal/AwardeeWebsite | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + http:www.magmaenergycorp.comsHome.asp + A Demonstration System for Capturing Geothermal Energy from Mine Waters beneath Butte, MT Geothermal Project + http:...

  14. A Resource Conceptual Model for the Ngatamariki Geothermal Field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    After initial access was obtained in 2004, RJV conducted MT surveys and completed risk assessments based on a range of conceptual models that supported relatively...

  15. Great Plains The Camelina Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The Camelina Company Jump to: navigation, search Name: Great Plains (The Camelina Company) Place: Montana Zip: MT 59911 Product: Manufacturer and marketer of biodiesel from...

  16. Horseshoe Bend Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Developer Exergy Development Group Energy Purchaser Idaho Power Location West of Great Falls MT Coordinates 47.497516, -111.432567 Show Map Loading map......

  17. California's 20th congressional district: Energy Resources |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California. Registered Energy Companies in California's 20th congressional district BioEnergy Solutions BES Castle Cooke Inc Great Valley Ethanol LLC Mt Poso Cogeneration Pacific...

  18. Beneficial Use of Carbon Dioxide in Precast Concrete Production...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    carbon utilization in these two markets alone could consume more than 2 Mt COsub 2year. ... DOE Contract Number: FE0004285 Resource Type: Technical Report Research Org: Institution ...

  19. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Pub

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    (Figure MT-4). The AEO2014 price cases included varying assumptions about: (1) investment and production decisions by the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries...

  20. EECBG Success Story: Getting CFLs Home in Longview, Texas | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Treatment Plant A volunteer canvasses the Mt. Washington neighborhood in Ohio to spread awareness about home energy audits in the area. | Photo Courtesy GCEA EECBG Success...

  1. PowerPoint Presentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of DOE's National Recycling Policies Impacts on Portsmouth of Potential Changes to DOE Policies EM SSAB NATIONAL CHAIRS MEETING Deer Creek State Park, Mt. Sterling, Ohio November...

  2. USAJobs Search | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Upper Great Plains Region, Montana Maintenance Office, System Protection (B5140), Fort Peck, MT. Find out more about living conditions at this duty station . Pay Range GS-11:...

  3. Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies for Newberry...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    fluid. This approach applies gravity and MT surveys, although at much higher density than typically used in exploration. The plan involves using innovative patent...

  4. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Baker, DOENETL Methane Hydrate Federal Advisory Committee May 7, 2015 DOE'S NATURAL GAS HYDRATES PROGRAM Mt Elbert Test Site, ANS, 2007 Photo courtesy ECA Gas Hydrate...

  5. Billings, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (Redirected from Billings, MT) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 45.7832856, -108.5006904 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice"...

  6. Microsoft Word - Cover Page - Exhibit 8

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    White Mountain National Forest Smarts Mt Realty Franklin Falls Reservoir Lyme Timber Co ... Paugus Bay State Forest Wellington State Park Welton Falls State Forest Church Hill WMA ...

  7. Category:Utility Rate Impacts on PV Economics By Location | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MI Traverse City, MI International Falls, MN Minneapolis, MN Kansas City, MO Jackson, MS Billings, MT Greensboro, NC Wilmington, NC Bismarck, ND Minot, ND Omaha, NE...

  8. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Pub

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions In the AEO2015 Reference case projection, U.S. energy-related CO2 emissions are 5,549 million metric tons (mt) in 2040. Among the alternative cases, emissions totals show the greatest sensitivity to levels of economic growth (Figure 36), with 2040 totals varying from 5,979 million mt in the High Economic Growth case to 5,160 million mt in the Low Economic Growth case. In all the AEO2015 cases, emissions remain below the 2005 level of 5,993 million mt. As

  9. Audio-Magnetotellurics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    natural source predominantly resulting from equatorial lightning discharge as the signal for the MT measurement. The typical period range for an AMT survey is 0.0001...

  10. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surface Meteorological Measurements M.T. Ritsche and D.J. Holdridge Environmental Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, Illinois Introduction The surface...

  11. U.S. Total Exports

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Warroad, MN Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Buffalo, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Egypt Freeport, TX Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan Cameron, LA Freeport, TX Kenai, AK Port Nikiski, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Mexico Douglas, AZ Nogales, AZ Sasabe, AZ Calexico, CA Ogilby Mesa, CA Otay Mesa, CA San

  12. U.S. Total Exports

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Morgan, MT Sherwood, ND Pittsburg, NH Buffalo, NY Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Egypt Freeport, TX Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan Cameron, LA Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Mexico Douglas, AZ Nogales, AZ Sasabe, AZ Calexico, CA Ogilby Mesa, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX Clint, TX Del Rio, TX Eagle Pass,

  13. Montana Department of Transportation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Transportation Name: Montana Department of Transportation Address: 2701 Prospect Avenue P.O. Box 201001 Place: Helena, Montana Zip: 59620 Website: www.mdt.mt.gov Coordinates:...

  14. SREL Reprint #3189

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    samples compared to those from the US, suggesting that during the last century, demographic declines or a recent evolutionary bottleneck reduced the levels of mtDNA...

  15. A Numerical Evaluation Of Electromagnetic Methods In Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the electric charge at conductivity boundaries rather than electromagnetic induction. This means that, for detection of the reservoir, methods such as MT, which rely on...

  16. The Future of Information Storage. (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Relation: Conference: IEEE Aerospace Conference held March 2-9, 2013 in Big Sky, MT.; Related Information: Proposed for presentation at the IEEE Aerospace Conference held ...

  17. Magnetotellurics At Stillwater Area (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Structural Controls, Alteration, Permeability and Thermal Regime of Dixie Valley from New-Generation MtGalvanic Array Profiling,...

  18. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Stillwater Area (Laney,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Structural Controls, Alteration, Permeability and Thermal Regime of Dixie Valley from New-Generation MtGalvanic Array Profiling,...

  19. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Journal Reference: Street LE, GR Shaver, EB Rastetter, MT van Wijk, BA Kaye, and M Williams. 2012. "Incident radiation and the allocation of nitrogen within Arctic plant...

  20. A Multidisciplinary Approach To Detect Active Pathways For Magma...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Multidisciplinary Approach To Detect Active Pathways For Magma Migration And Eruption At Mt Etna (Sicily, Italy) Before The 2001 And 2002-2003 Eruptions Jump to: navigation, search...

  1. CX-010422: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mt. Richmond Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 06/10/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration

  2. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Results Cohort 1, Year 1 Brown Bag April 8, 2013 Agenda * Energy Savings Validation Methodology - Monitoring, Targeting & Reporting (MT&R) - Cadmus Savings Estimation Approach -...

  3. Other Participants 2004 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    ... School , Washington , DC Skyline High School , Idaho Falls, ID Skyview High School , Billings , MT Smoky Hill High School, Aurora, CO Southside High School , Fort Smith , AR St. ...

  4. Musselshell I | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Goldwind Developer Volkswind USA Energy Purchaser NorthWestern Energy Location Ryegate MT Coordinates 46.282969,...

  5. Musselshell II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Goldwind Developer Volkswind USA Energy Purchaser NorthWestern Energy Location Ryegate MT Coordinates 46.26733,...

  6. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Improved discovery of a nearly degenerate model: Minimal universal extra dimension model using MT2 at the LHC Murayama, Hitoshi ; Nojiri, Mihoko M. ; Tobioka, Kohsaku Full Text ...

  7. Property:EnvironmentalMitigation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    plane, helicopter, etc.) Magnetotelluric Techniques + MT surveys have very minimal impacts on the environment. The small holes dug for the electrodes should be refilled when...

  8. Sedimentology of the Mesaverde Formation at Rifle Gap, Colorado and implications for gas-bearing intervals in the subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorenz, J.C.

    1982-03-01

    The exposures of the Mesaverde Formation at Rifle Gap, Colorado, are of a regressive series of marine to fluvial deposits about 1650 m (5000 ft) thick. Grading up out of the marine Mancos Shale, the blanket shoreline sandstones of the Corcoran, Cozzette, and Rollins Sandstones record substages of the regression as delta lobes were activated and abandoned in northwestern Colorado during Late Cretaceous time. The overlying coals, sandstones, and carbonaceous mudstones were deposited on the paludal lower delta plain behind the shoreline. Meandering fluvial systems prograded over the paludal deposits. These systems deposited point-bar sandstones and overbank mudstones and siltstones in composite meander-belt trends, some of which are now gas-bearing, low-permeability reservoirs. Reorientation of the paleogeography during the Laramide orogeny (contemporaneous with fluvial deposition) probably changed the orientation of the meander belt trends. The uppermost sandstones at Rifle Gap, including the Ohio Creek conglomerate, are interpreted as shoreline deposits of a transgression that has been previously unrecognized in the area. Most of the record of this transgression has been destroyed by pre-Eocene erosion. The outcrops at Rifle Gap provide a basis for interpreting subsurface deposis in the Department of Energy's Western Gas Sands Project Multi-Well Experiment, 12 miles away.

  9. Reservoir compartmentalization and management strategies: Lessons learned in the Illinois basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grube, J.P.; Crockett, J.E.; Huff, B.G.

    1997-08-01

    A research project jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the Illinois State Geological Survey focused on the Cypress and Aux Vases Formations (Mississippian), major clastic reservoirs in the Illinois Basin. Results from the research showed that understanding the nature and distribution of reservoir compartments, and using effective reservoir management strategies, can significantly improve recovery efficiencies from oil fields in this mature basin. Compartments can be most effectively drained where they are geologically well defined and reservoir management practices are coordinated through unified, compartment-wide, development programs. Our studies showed that the Cypress and Aux Vases reservoirs contain lateral and vertical permeability barriers forming compartments that range in size from isolated, interlaminated sandstone and shale beds to sandstone bodies tens of feet in thickness and more than a mile in length. Stacked or shingled, genetically similar sandstone bodies are commonly separated by thin impermeable intervals that can be difficult to distinguish on logs and can, therefore, cause correlation problems, even between wells drilled on spacing of less than ten acres. Lateral separation of sandstone bodies causes similar problems. Reservoir compartmentalization reduces primary and particularly secondary recovery by trapping pockets of by-passed or banked oil. Compartments can be detected by comparing recovery factors of genetically similar sandstone bodies within a field; using packers to separate commingled intervals and analyzing fluid recoveries and pressures; making detailed core-to-log calibrations that identify compartment boundaries; and analyzing pressure data from waterflood programs.

  10. GEOLOGIC CHARACTERIZATION AND CARBON STORAGE RESOURCE ESTIMATES FOR THE KNOX GROUP, ILLINOIS BASIN, ILLINOIS, INDIANA, AND KENTUCKY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, David; Ellett, Kevin; Rupp, John; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    Research documented in this report includes (1) refinement and standardization of regional stratigraphy across the 3-state study area in Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky, (2) detailed core description and sedimentological interpretion of Knox cores from five wells in western Kentucky, and (3) a detailed calculation of carbon storage volumetrics for the Knox using three different methodologies. Seven regional cross sections document Knox formation distribution and thickness. Uniform stratigraphic nomenclature for all three states helps to resolve state-to-state differences that previously made it difficult to evaluate the Knox on a basin-wide scale. Correlations have also refined the interpretation of an important sandstone reservoir interval in southern Indiana and western Kentucky. This sandstone, a CO2 injection zone in the KGS 1 Blan well, is correlated with the New Richmond Sandstone of Illinois. This sandstone is over 350 ft (107 m) thick in parts of southern Indiana. It has excellent porosity and permeability at sufficient depths, and provides an additional sequestration target in the Knox. The New Richmond sandstone interval has higher predictability than vuggy and fractured carbonates, and will be easier to model and monitor CO2 movement after injection.

  11. U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    OH 1. NE 3. S1 4. S2 5. GF 6. OH 7. EN AL,MS MN,ND,SD IA,NE,MO,KS TX,LA,OK,AR MT,WY,ID CO,UT,NV AZ,NM 9. AM 11. C2 12. WS 13. MT 14. CU 15. ZN WV,MD,DC,DE 2. YP...

  12. Section 81

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mq Mt '&LC(Vq)& M Mp (Tq)%P LCV% MT Mp '0 Mq Mt '&VCLq&T Mq Mp %P. Mq Mt '&VCLq&T Mq Mp %P% (qobs&q) J , Mq Mt '&VCLq&qLCV& M Mp (Tq)%P. LCV &VC(Lq) &VCLq &T Mq Mp VCLq LCV LCV &LCVq&qVCL &LCVq &VCL Session Papers 355 (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) Prescribing Advection in Single-Column Models D. A. Randall and D. Cripe Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University Ft. Collins, Colorado Introduction Both single-column models

  13. Seismic-stratigraphic analysis of Hollingsworth field, Fall River County, South Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morel, J.A.; Bursk, P.H.; Finch, J.W.

    1986-08-01

    Hollingsworth field produces from a preserved dune in the second bench of the Leo member, Minnelusa Formation. It was discovered in 1984 by Citation Oil and Gas using high-resolution seismic data. The field was fully developed on the basis of seismic data and consists of five wells, all of which encountered the dune. Four wells produce oil, and one is used to reinject produced water. Both the Converse and Leo members consist of interbedded sandstones, shales, carbonates, and anhydrites with occasional preserved dunes. Hydrocarbon traps are formed by structural closure over the top of preserved dunes or by the occurrence of isolated sandstones encased in impermeable facies. The sandstone isopach anomalies occur in several benches of the Converse and Leo members. These are evidenced in outcrops and well logs. High-resolution seismic data can be used to locate these anomalies efficiently and economically.

  14. Spatially Modulated Phase in the Holographic Description of Quark-Gluon Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ooguri, Hirosi; Park, Chang-Soon

    2011-02-11

    We present a string theory construction of a gravity dual of a spatially modulated phase. Our earlier work shows that the Chern-Simons term in the five-dimensional Maxwell theory destabilizes the Reissner-Nordstroem black holes in anti-de Sitter space if the Chern-Simons coupling is sufficiently high. In this Letter, we show that a similar instability is realized on the world volume of 8-branes in the Sakai-Sugimoto model in the quark-gluon plasma phase. Our result suggests a new spatially modulated phase in quark-gluon plasma when the baryon density is above 0.8N{sub f} fm{sup -3} at temperature 150 MeV.

  15. Western Gas Sands Project: stratigrapy of the Piceance Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, S.

    1980-08-01

    The Western Gas Sands Project Core Program was initiated by US DOE to investigate various low permeability, gas bearing sandstones. Research to gain a better geological understanding of these sandstones and improve evaluation and stimulation techniques is being conducted. Tight gas sands are located in several mid-continent and western basins. This report deals with the Piceance Basin in northwestern Colorado. This discussion is an attempt to provide a general overview of the Piceance Basin stratigraphy and to be a useful reference of stratigraphic units and accompanying descriptions.

  16. ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER FLOODING AND RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION OF THE BRIDGEPORT AND CYPRESS RESERVOIRS OF THE LAWRENCE FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malcolm Pitts; Ron Damm; Bev Seyler

    2003-04-01

    Feasibility of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood for the Lawrence Field in Lawrence County, Illinois is being studied. Two injected formulations are being designed; one for the Bridgeport A and Bridgeport B reservoirs and one for Cypress and Paint Creek reservoirs. Fluid-fluid and coreflood evaluations have developed a chemical solution that produces incremental oil in the laboratory from the Cypress and Paint Creek reservoirs. A chemical formulation for the Bridgeport A and Bridgeport B reservoirs is being developed. A reservoir characterization study is being done on the Bridgeport A, B, & D sandstones, and on the Cypress sandstone. The study covers the pilot flood area and the Lawrence Field.

  17. ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER FLOODING AND RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION OF THE BRIDGEPORT AND CYPRESS RESERVOIRS OF THE LAWRENCE FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malcolm Pitts; Ron Damm; Bev Seyler

    2003-03-01

    Feasibility of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood for the Lawrence Field in Lawrence County, Illinois is being studied. Two injected formulations are being designed; one for the Bridgeport A and Bridgeport B reservoirs and one for Cypress and Paint Creek reservoirs. Fluid-fluid and coreflood evaluations have developed a chemical solution that produces incremental oil in the laboratory from the Cypress and Paint Creek reservoirs. A chemical formulation for the Bridgeport A and Bridgeport B reservoirs is being developed. A reservoir characterization study is being done on the Bridgeport A, B, & D sandstones, and on the Cypress sandstone. The study covers the pilot flood area and the Lawrence Field.

  18. FE0005902-UTA | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Novel CO2 Foam Concepts and Injection Schemes for Improving CO2 Sweep Efficiency in Sandstone and Carbonate Hydrocarbon Formations Last Reviewed 6/12/2015 DE-FE0005902 Goal The goal of this project is to develop mobility control agents using surfactants injected with carbon dioxide (CO2) rather than with water for CO2 enhanced oil recovery (CO2-EOR) in heterogeneous carbonate and sandstone reservoirs. Objectives are to (1) reduce CO2 mobility in CO2 swept portions of the reservoir-but not at the

  19. New interpretations of Paleozoic stratigraphy and history in the northern Laramie Range and vicinity, Southeast Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sando, W.J.; Sandberg, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    Biostratigraphic and lithostratigraphic studies of the Paleozoic sequence in Southeast Wyoming indicate the need for revision of the ages and nomenclature of Devonian, Mississippian, and Pennsylvanian formations. The Paleozoic sequence begins with a quartzarenite of Devonian age referred to the newly named Fremont Canyon Sandstone, which is overlain by the Englewood Formation of Late Devonian and Early Mississippian age. The Englewood is succeeded by the Madison Limestone of Early and Late Mississippian age, which is overlain disconformably by the Darwin Sandstone Member (Pennsylvanian) of the Casper and Hartville formations. This sequence represents predominantly marine deposition in near-shore environments marginal to the ancient Transcontinental Arch.

  20. Application of Advanced Reservoir Characterization, Simulation, and Production Optimization Strategies to Maximize Recovery in Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin), Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutton, Shirley P.; Flanders, William A.

    2001-11-04

    The objective of this Class III project was demonstrate that reservoir characterization and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by CO2 flood can increase production from slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico. Phase 1 of the project, reservoir characterization, focused on Geraldine Ford and East Ford fields, which are Delaware Mountain Group fields that produce from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey sandstone). The demonstration phase of the project was a CO2 flood conducted in East Ford field, which is operated by Orla Petco, Inc., as the East Ford unit.