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1

Cameco UO3 Materials Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uranium trioxide (UO{sub 3}) was characterized using a variety of techniques to better understand its physical properties. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images were collected to examine particle morphology, which consisted of semi-spherical particles that tended to agglomerate before sonication. Particle size analysis revealed a singular mode distribution with a mean particle size of 43.0 {micro}m. After sonication a bimodal distribution was produced with peak particle sizes at 0.226 {micro}m and 9.43 {micro}m. The O/U ratio was measured to be 3.09 by Cameco in 2009, by gravimetric analysis. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that the sample was mostly {gamma}-UO{sub 3} (87.1%) with a small amount of UO{sub 3} {center_dot} 0.80 H{sub 2}O (12.9%). Bulk and tap densities were determined to be 3.678 {+-} 0.2 and 4.81 {+-} 0.2 g/cm{sup 3}, respectively (crystalline density is 7.3 g/cm{sup 3}). The stoichiometry was measured to be 2.99 in 2012.

Hill, Mary Ann [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nolen, Blake Penfield [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wermer, Joseph R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilkerson, Marianne P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fredenburg, David A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wagner, Gregory L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Papin, Pallas A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scott, Brian L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Guidry, Dennis Ray [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

2

Spectroscopic Studies of the Several Isomers of UO3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uranium trioxide is known to adopt seven different structural forms. While these structural forms have been well characterized using x-ray or neutron diffraction techniques, little work has been done to characterize their spectroscopic properties, particularly of the pure phases. Since the structural isomers of UO3 all have similar thermodynamic stabilities and most tend to hydrolyze under open atmospheric conditions, mixtures of UO3 phases and the hydrolysis products are common. Much effort went into isolating pure phases of UO3. Utilizing x-ray diffraction as a sample identification check, UV/Vis/NIR spectroscopic signatures of ?-UO3, ?-UO3, ?-UO3 and UO2(OH)2 products were obtained. The spectra of the pure phases can now be used to characterize typical samples of UO3, which are often mixtures of isomers.

Sweet, Lucas E.; Reilly, Dallas D.; Abrecht, David G.; Buck, Edgar C.; Meier, David E.; Su, Yin-Fong; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Szecsody, James E.; Blake, Thomas A.; Johnson, Timothy J.

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

3

EVALUATION OF FUSED UO$sub 2$  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The density and purity of fused UO/sub 2/ from several suppliers was evaluated. Densities of large pieces varied widely, but variations in pycnometer and bulk densities of crushed UO/sub 2/ powder were small. Average oxygen- touranium ratios ranged from 1.94 to 2.14. Impurities visible as microscopic inclusions were U/sub 4/O/sub 9/, metallic uranium, UC, and UN/sub 2/. The chief trace metallic contaminants were aluminum, iron, and silicon. Hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide were evolved during vacuum extraction. (auth)

Cole, G.R.

1963-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Effect of Additives on Diffusion Processes in UO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The oxygen and uranium Frenkel pairs and the uranium-oxygen Schottky defects regulate the O/U ratio, which in turn influence diffusion processes in UO2.

5

Damage Structure Evolution in Ion Irradiated UO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Radiation Effects in Oxide Ceramics and Novel LWR Fuels ... To better understand low dose irradiation effects on defect creation in UO2, helium ...

6

PREPARATION OF HIGH DENSITY UO$sub 2$  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is presented for the preparation of highdensity UO/sub 2/ from UF/sub 6/. In accordance with the invention, UF/sub 6/ is reacted with water and concentrated ammonium hydroxide is added to the resulting aqueous solution of UO/ sub 2/F/sub 2/. The resulting precipitate is calcined to U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ an d the U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ is reduced to UO/sub 2/ with a gaseous mixture comprised of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide at a temperature of from 1600 to 1900 deg C.

Googin, J.M.

1959-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

7

Simple but Stronger UO, Double but Weaker UNMe Bonds: The Tale Told by Cp2UO and Cp2UNR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The free energies of reaction and the activation energies are calculated, with DFT (B3PW91) and small RECP (relativistic core potential) for uranium, for the reaction of Cp2UNMe and Cp2UO with MeCCMe and H3Si-Cl that yields the corresponding addition products. CAS(2,7) and DFT calculations on Cp2UO and Cp2UNMe give similar results, which validates the use of DFT calculations in these cases. The calculated results mirror the experimental reaction of [1,2,4-(CMe3)3C5H2]2UNMe with dimethylacetylene and [1,2,4-(CMe3)3C5H2]2UO with Me3SiCl. The net reactions are controlled by the change in free energy between the products and reactants, not by the activation energies, and therefore by the nature of the UO and UNMe bonds in the initial and final states. A NBO analysis indicates that the U-O interaction in Cp2UO is composed of a single U-O bond with three lone pairs of electrons localized on oxygen, leading to a polarized U-O fragment. In contrast, the U-NMe interaction in Cp2UNMe is composed of a and component and a lone pairof electrons localized on the nitrogen, resulting in a less polarized UNMe fragment, in accord with the lower electronegativity of NMe relative to O. The strongly polarized U(+)-O(-) bond is calculated to be about 70 kcal mol-1 stronger than the less polarized U=NMe bond.

LPCNO, CNRS-UPS-INSA, INSA Toulouse; Institut Charles Gerhardt, CNRS, Universite Montpellier; Laboratoire de Chimie et Physique Quantiques, CNRS, IRSAMC, Universite Paul Sabatier; Andersen, Richard; Barros, Noemi; Maynau, Daniel; Maron, Laurent; Eisenstein, Odile; Zi, Guofu; Andersen, Richard

2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

8

Modifying Ceramic Fuel Pellets to Improve UO2 Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... UO2 fuel will provide manufacturers with tools to optimize fuel performance. ... Electronic Structure Calculations of Structure and Chemistry of the Y2O3/Fe Interface ... Impacts of Hydrogen in Unirradiated Zircaloy Nuclear Cladding under Dry ...

9

PUREX/UO{sub 3} deactivation project management plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From 1955 through 1990, the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant (PUREX) provided the United States Department of Energy Hanford Site with nuclear fuel reprocessing capability. It operated in sequence with the Uranium Trioxide (UO{sub 3}) Plant, which converted the PUREX liquid uranium nitrate product to solid UO{sub 3} powder. Final UO{sub 3} Plant operation ended in 1993. In December 1992, planning was initiated for the deactivation of PUREX and UO{sub 3} Plant. The objective of deactivation planning was to identify the activities needed to establish a passively safe, environmentally secure configuration at both plants, and ensure that the configuration could be retained during the post-deactivation period. The PUREX/UO{sub 3} Deactivation Project management plan represents completion of the planning efforts. It presents the deactivation approach to be used for the two plants, and the supporting technical, cost, and schedule baselines. Deactivation activities concentrate on removal, reduction, and stabilization of the radioactive and chemical materials remaining at the plants, and the shutdown of the utilities and effluents. When deactivation is completed, the two plants will be left unoccupied and locked, pending eventual decontamination and decommissioning. Deactivation is expected to cost $233.8 million, require 5 years to complete, and yield $36 million in annual surveillance and maintenance cost savings.

Washenfelder, D.J.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Sorption of 237Np by UO2 under Repository Conditions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

237 Np by UO 2 under Repository Conditions M. Jonathan Haire E. V. Zakharova T. V. Kazakovskaya Oak Ridge National Laboratory Institute of Physical Chemistry Institute of Experimental Physics Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6166 Moscow, Russia, 117915 Sarov, Russia, 607190 Phone: (865) 574-7141 Phone: 7 095 335 1742 Phone: 7 42796 73369 e-mail: hairemj@ornl.gov e-mail: zakharova@ipc.rssi.ru e-mail: kaz@astra.vniief.ru Abstract - The primary radioisotope contributor to the calculated long-term radiation dose to the public at the Yucca Mountain spent nuclear fuel (SNF) repository site boundary is neptunium-237 ( 237 Np). Russian experiments have shown that Np(V) and Np(IV) are sorbed onto UO 2 . If Np were sorbed by UO 2 in spent fuel rather than being transported to the site

11

The Temperature, Oxygen, and Fuel Chemistry Dependence of UO2 Dissolution Under Repository Conditions  

SciTech Connect

Description of results from single pass flowthrough tests showing the effect of dissolved oxygen and temperature on the dissolution of pure UO2 and UO2 with 8 wt% Gd2O3 doping.

Casella, Amanda J.; Hanson, Brady D.; Miller, William H.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Density Functional Theory Calculations of Mass Transport in UO2  

SciTech Connect

In this talk we present results of density functional theory (DFT) calculations of U, O and fission gas diffusion in UO{sub 2}. These processes all impact nuclear fuel performance. For example, the formation and retention of fission gas bubbles induce fuel swelling, which leads to mechanical interaction with the clad thereby increasing the probability for clad breach. Alternatively, fission gas can be released from the fuel to the plenum, which increases the pressure on the clad walls and decreases the gap thermal conductivity. The evolution of fuel microstructure features is strongly coupled to diffusion of U vacancies. Since both U and fission gas transport rates vary strongly with the O stoichiometry, it is also important to understand O diffusion. In order to better understand bulk Xe behavior in UO{sub 2{+-}x} we first calculate the relevant activation energies using DFT techniques. By analyzing a combination of Xe solution thermodynamics, migration barriers and the interaction of dissolved Xe atoms with U, we demonstrate that Xe diffusion predominantly occurs via a vacancy-mediated mechanism. Since Xe transport is closely related to diffusion of U vacancies, we have also studied the activation energy for this process. In order to explain the low value of 2.4 eV found for U migration from independent damage experiments (not thermal equilibrium) the presence of vacancy clusters must be included in the analysis. Next we investigate species transport on the (111) UO{sub 2} surface, which is motivated by the formation of small voids partially filled with fission gas atoms (bubbles) in UO{sub 2} under irradiation. Surface diffusion could be the rate-limiting step for diffusion of such bubbles, which is an alternative mechanism for mass transport in these materials. As expected, the activation energy for surface diffusion is significantly lower than for bulk transport. These results are further discussed in terms of engineering-scale fission gas release models. Finally, oxidation of UO{sub 2} and the importance of cluster formation for understanding thermodynamic and kinetic properties of UO{sub 2+x} are investigated.

Andersson, Anders D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dorado, Boris [CEA; Uberuaga, Blas P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stanek, Christopher R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

13

Migration Mechanisms of Oxygen Interstitial Clusters in UO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the migration kinetics of radiation-induced point defects and defect clusters is a key to predicting the microstructural evolution and mass transport in nuclear fuels. Although the diffusion kinetics of point defects in UO2 is well explored both experimentally and theoretically, the kinetics of defect clusters is not well understood. In this work the migration mechanisms of oxygen interstitial clusters of size one to five atoms (1Oi – 5Oi) in UO2 are investigated by temperature-accelerated dynamics simulations without any a priori assumptions of migration mechanisms. It is found that the migration paths of oxygen interstitial clusters are complex and non-intuitive and that multiple migration paths and barriers exist for some clusters. It is also found that the cluster migration barrier does not increase with increasing cluster size and its magnitude has the following order: 2Oi < 3Oi < 1Oi < 5Oi < 4Oi. Possible finite-size effects are checked with three different sized systems. The results show good agreement with other available experimental and theoretical data. In particular, the relatively large migration barriers of cuboctahedral clusters (4Oi and 5Oi) are in good agreement with the experimentally measured oxygen diffusion activation energy in U4O9, which is thought to contain many such clusters. The cluster migration sequence may explain the interesting relationship between the oxygen diffusivity and stoichiometry in UO2+x.

Xian-Ming Bai; Anter El-Azab; Jianguo Yu; Todd R. Allen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Multi-Scale Modeling of Fission Gas Evolution in UO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fission gases in uranium dioxide (UO2) nuclear fuels, of which Xe is one of the most prominent, influence fuel performance during reactor operation and have ...

15

UO 2 fission gas release rates from atomistic calculations of intrinsic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on DFT and empirical potential calculations, the diffusivity of fission gas atoms (Xe) in UO2 nuclear fuel has been calculated for a range of  ...

16

Doping d-UO 2 fuel pellets for improved hardness and fracture ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the effects of these oxide dopants on the fracture toughness of depleted uranium oxide (d-UO2) at temperatures between ...

17

PROCESS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF AN ACTIVATED FORM OF UO$sub 2$  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing a highly active form of UO/sub 2/ characterized both by rapid oxidation in air and by rapid chlorination with CCl/sub 4/ vapor at an elevated temperature is reported. In accordance with the process, commercial UO/sub 2/, is subjected to a series of oxidation-reduction operations to produce a form of UC/sub 2/ of enhanced reactivity. By treatimg commercial UO/sub 2/ at a temperature between 335 and 485 deg C with methane, then briefly with an oxygen containing gas and followimg this by a second treatment with a methane containing gas, the original relatively stable charge of UO/sub 2/ will be transformed into an active form of UO/sub 2/.

Polissar, M.J.

1957-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

18

Effect of Edge Dislocation on Thermal Transport in UO2  

SciTech Connect

Molecular-dynamics simulations are used to characterize the effects of dislocations on the thermal transport properties of UO{sub 2}. Microstructures with various dislocation densities of the order of 10{sup 16} m{sup ?2} are simulated at temperatures between 800 and 1600 K. The effects of dislocations on the thermal-transport properties are found to be independent on temperature, consistent with the classic Klemens–Callaway analysis. The effect of dislocation density is also quantified. The simulation results are also fit to the pertinent part of the empirical formula for the thermal conductivity used in the FRAPCON fuel-performance code, which gives the overall effects of temperature and dislocation effects on thermal conductivity. The fitted results can be well-described within this formalism, indicating that the results of molecular-dynamics simulations can be used as a reliable source of parameters for models at longer length scales.

Deng, B; Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr; Shukla, P; Sinnott, Susan B; Phillpot, Simon R.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

PUREX/UO{sub 3} facilities deactivation lessons learned history  

SciTech Connect

The Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility operated from 1956-1972, from 1983-1988, and briefly during 1989-1990 to produce for national defense at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The Uranium Trioxide (UO{sub 3}) Facility operated at the Hanford Site from 1952-1972, 1984-1988, and briefly in 1993. Both plants were ordered to permanent shutdown by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in December 1992, thus initiating their deactivation phase. Deactivation is that portion of a facility`s life cycle that occurs between operations and final decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). This document details the history of events, and the lessons learned, from the time of the PUREX Stabilization Campaign in 1989-1990, through the end of the first full fiscal year (FY) of the deactivation project (September 30, 1994).

Hamrick, D.G.; Gerber, M.S.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Preparation of UO/sub 2/ fragments for fuel-debris experiments  

SciTech Connect

A unique process was developed for preparing multi-kilogram quantities of > 90% dense fragments of enriched and depleted UO/sub 2/ sized 20 mm to 0.038 mm for fuel debris experiments. Precipitates of UO/sub 4/ . xH/sub 2/O were treated to obtain UO/sub 2/ powders that would yield large cohesive green pieces when isostatically pressed to 206 MPa. The pressed pieces were crushed into fragments that were about 30% oversized, and heated to 1800/sup 0/C for 24 h in H/sub 2/. Oversizing compensates for shrinkage during densification. Effort was dramatically reduced by working on a large scale and by presizing the green UO/sub 2/ instead of directly crushing densified pellets.

Tinkle, M.C.; Kircher, J.A.; Zinn, R.M.; Eash, D.T.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ms uo uo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Molecular dynamics simulation of UO2 nanocrystals melting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article we study melting of uranium dioxide (UO2) nanocrystals (NC) isolated in vacuum (i.e. non-periodic boundary conditions) using molecular dynamics (MD) in the approximation of pair potentials and rigid ions. We calculate the size dependence of the temperature and heat of melting, the density jump for crystals of cubic shape and volumes up to 1000 nm^3 (50000 particles). Linear and parabolic extrapolations of these dependences to macroscopic (infinite) size are considered, the parabolic is found to be better suited for the analysis of data on the temperature and the heat of melting. The closest to the modern experimental data estimates of the melting temperature of macrocrystals are obtained using the interaction potentials Goel-08 (2969K), Yakub-09 (3105K) and MOX-07 (3291K). The density jump at melting is well reproduced by Yakub-09 (8.66%) and MOX-07 (7.97%). The heat of fusion for all sets of the potentials considered is found to be underestimated by 50-75%, possibly because of the excluded he...

Boyarchenkov, A S; Nekrasov, K A; Kupryazhkin, A Ya

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Benchmarking of Graphite Reflected Critical Assemblies of UO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of experiments were carried out in 1963 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) for use in space reactor research programs. A core containing 93.2% enriched UO2 fuel rods was used in these experiments. The first part of the experimental series consisted of 253 tightly-packed fuel rods (1.27 cm triangular pitch) with graphite reflectors [1], the second part used 253 graphite-reflected fuel rods organized in a 1.506 cm triangular pitch [2], and the final part of the experimental series consisted of 253 beryllium-reflected fuel rods with a 1.506 cm triangular pitch. [3] Fission rate distribution and cadmium ratio measurements were taken for all three parts of the experimental series. Reactivity coefficient measurements were taken for various materials placed in the beryllium reflected core. The first part of this experimental series has been evaluated for inclusion in the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) [4] and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) Handbooks, [5] and is discussed below. These experiments are of interest as benchmarks because they support the validation of compact reactor designs with similar characteristics to the design parameters for a space nuclear fission surface power systems. [6

Margaret A. Marshall; John D. Bess

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of sintered UO2 and UO2-Gd2O3. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

The thermal diffusivity was measured using the laser flash method on sintered uranium dioxide (O/U=2.003, density=10.48X10 kg/m, from 300 to 2773 K), and urania and gadolinia mixed fuel (2,4 and 6 Wt% Gd2O3 content, from 600 to 1850 K). An equation was suggested for near-stoichiometric uranium dioxide over the temperature range 500-3100 K: K=(1-aP)(1/(A+BT)+DTxexp(-E/kT)x(1+H(E/kT+2)(sup 2))), where K in W/(m)(K), P is the fraction of porosity, a=2.74-5.8X10(sup 4-)T, A=3.68X10(sup 2-)(m)(K)/W, B=2.25X10(sup 4-)m/W, D=5.31X10(sup 3-)W/mXK2, H=0.264, E=1.15 ev, k is the Boltzmann constant. The thermal conductivity of UO2-Gd2O3 samples as a function of temperature and Gd2O3 content, X, could be expressed by phonon conduction; K=1/(A+BT) in the temperature range from 600 to 1700 K, where A=2.50 X+0.044(m)(K)/W.

Ying, S.; Ji, Z.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

DISPERSION ELEMENT CONSISTING OF CHROMIUM COATED UO$sup 2$ PARTICLES UNIFORMLY DISTRIBUTED IN A ZIRCALOY MATRIX  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear fuel element consisting of metal coated UO/sub 2/ particles dispersed in a matrix of Zircalloy and having a cladding of Zircalloy is presented. (AEC)

Cain, F.M. Jr.; Eck, J.E.

1963-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

PUREX/UO3 Facilities deactivation lessons learned history  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Disconnecting the criticality alarm permanently in June 1996 signified that the hazards in the PUREX (plutonium-uranium extraction) plant had been so removed and reduced that criticality was no longer a credible event. Turning off the PUREX criticality alarm also marked a salient point in a historic deactivation project, 1 year before its anticipated conclusion. The PUREX/UO3 Deactivation Project began in October 1993 as a 5-year, $222.5- million project. As a result of innovations implemented during 1994 and 1995, the project schedule was shortened by over a year, with concomitant savings. In 1994, the innovations included arranging to send contaminated nitric acid from the PUREX Plant to British Nuclear Fuels, Limited (BNFL) for reuse and sending metal solutions containing plutonium and uranium from PUREX to the Hanford Site tank farms. These two steps saved the project $36.9- million. In 1995, reductions in overhead rate, work scope, and budget, along with curtailed capital equipment expenditures, reduced the cost another $25.6 million. These savings were achieved by using activity-based cost estimating and applying technical schedule enhancements. In 1996, a series of changes brought about under the general concept of ``reengineering`` reduced the cost approximately another $15 million, and moved the completion date to May 1997. With the total savings projected at about $75 million, or 33.7 percent of the originally projected cost, understanding how the changes came about, what decisions were made, and why they were made becomes important. At the same time sweeping changes in the cultural of the Hanford Site were taking place. These changes included shifting employee relations and work structures, introducing new philosophies and methods in maintaining safety and complying with regulations, using electronic technology to manage information, and, adopting new methods and bases for evaluating progress. Because these changes helped generate cost savings and were accompanied by and were an integral part of sweeping ``culture changes,`` the story of the lessons learned during the PUREX Deactivation Project are worth recounting. Foremost among the lessons is recognizing the benefits of ``right to left`` project planning. A deactivation project must start by identifying its end points, then make every task, budget, and organizational decision based on reaching those end points. Along with this key lesson is the knowledge that project planning and scheduling should be tied directly to costing, and the project status should be checked often (more often than needed to meet mandated reporting requirements) to reflect real-time work. People working on a successful project should never be guessing about its schedule or living with a paper schedule that does not represent the actual state of work. Other salient lessons were learned in the PUREX/UO3 Deactivation Project that support these guiding principles. They include recognizing the value of independent review, teamwork, and reengineering concepts; the need and value of cooperation between the DOE, its contractors, regulators, and stakeholders; and the essential nature of early and ongoing communication. Managing a successful project also requires being willing to take a fresh look at safety requirements and to apply them in a streamlined and sensible manner to deactivating facilities; draw on the enormous value of resident knowledge acquired by people over years and sometimes decades of working in old plants; and recognize the value of bringing in outside expertise for certain specialized tasks.This approach makes possible discovering the savings that can come when many creative options are pursued persistently and the wisdom of leaving some decisions to the future. The essential job of a deactivation project is to place a facility in a safe, stable, low-maintenance mode, for an interim period. Specific end points are identified to recognize and document this state. Keeping the limited objectives of the project in mind can guide decisions that reduce risks with minimal manipul

Gerber, M.S.

1996-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

26

THE EMANATION OF RADON 220 FROM SINTERED UO$sub 2$ POWDERS AND PLATES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The emanation of thoron (Rn/sup 220/) from sintered UO/sub 2/ powders and plates was measured as a function of temperature. The uranium oxide samples were indexed with radiothorium by coprecipitation and coevaporation techniques. The emanation measurements were performed in a flow system, using an alpha scintillation detector and a helium-hydrogen carrier gas mixture. Both the radiothorium concentration (5 to 100 mu C/g UO/sub 2/) and the uranium oxide density (71 to 99 percent TD) were varied. The surface areas and densities of the UO/sub 2/ plates were measured by krypton gas adsorption and liquid immersion techniques, respectively. Assuming a diffusion mechanism, diffusion coefficients for thoron in sintered UO/sub 2/ were calculated as a function of temperature. The data were represented by an equation of the form, D = D/sub O/ exp (-Q/RT). An apparent increase in both activation energy (Q) and D/sub O/ with density was observed for the 1100 to 1450 deg C temperature range. For some samples the thoron emanating power could be measured at temperatures as low as 400 deg C. Log D versus 1/T plots from 400 to 1450 deg C gave intersecttng straight lines with different activation energies. One intersection occurred near the Tammann temperature. The emanation of Rn/sup 220/ from UO/sub 2/ apparently involves several types of diffusion processes. (auth)

Clayton, J.C.; Aronson, S.

1963-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

PREPARATION OF UO$sub 2$ FOR NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL PELLETS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for preparing high-density UO/sub 2/ compacts. An aqueous uranyl fluoride solution is contacted with an aqueous ammonium hydroxide solution at an ammonium to-uranium ratio of 25: 1 to 30:1 to form a precipitate. The precipitate is separated from the- mother liquor, dried, and contacted with steam at a uniform temperature within the range of 400 to 650 deg C to produce U/ sub 3/O/sub 8/. The U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ is red uced to UO/sub 2/ with hydrogen at a uniform temperature within the range of 550 to 600 deg C. The UO/sub 2/ is then compressed into compacts and sintered. High-density compacts are fabricated to close tolerances without use of a binder and without machining or grinding. (AEC)

Googin, J.M.

1962-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Oxygen diffusion in UO2+x and (U,Pu)O2+-x  

SciTech Connect

In the first part of this report we revisit an earlier study of oxygen diffusion in UO{sub 2+x}, in which we used density functional theory (DFT) calculations to parameterize a kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) model. The results from these earlier kMC simulations are reproduced in Fig. 1 and they indicate fairly good agreement with available experiments. This work was later expanded to include a larger temperature range. However, since the publication of this study there have been a number of advancements in DFT methodology for UO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2+x} providing increased accuracy. We have also gained better understanding of the oxygen clustering phenomena occurring in UO{sub 2+x}. For these two reasons, the DFT calculations of the migration barriers of single oxygen interstitials and di-interstitial clusters have been repeated using the LDA+U and GGA+U methodologies. The earlier study used regular GGA and, even though this method captures similar trends as the more advanced LDA+U and GGA+U techniques, it does not fulfill the quantitative requirements set by some applications. Additionally, we have identified a mechanism for the most stable quad-interstitial clusters to migrate and here we calculate the corresponding barriers within both the LDA+U and GGA+U methodologies. The new LDA+U and GGA+U data sets are analyzed in terms of available experiments. In the second part of this report we present initial results for the impact of Pu on oxygen diffusion in UO{sub 2}. The first step in understanding this process is to calculate the binding energies of oxygen vacancies and interstitials to a Pu ion in the UO{sub 2} matrix. Possible diffusion mechanisms are discussed for (U,Pu)O{sub 2-x}, (U,Pu)O{sub 2} and (U,Pu)O{sub 2+x}.

Andersson, Anders D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liu, Xiang-Yang [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

29

Theoretical investigation of the impact of grain boundaries and fission gases on UO2 thermal conductivity  

SciTech Connect

Thermal conductivity is one of the most important metrics of nuclear fuel performance. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the impact of microstructure features on thermal conductivity, especially since the microstructure evolves with burn-up or time in the reactor. For example, UO{sub 2} fuels are polycrystalline and for high-burnup fuels the outer parts of the pellet experience grain sub-division leading to a very fine grain structure. This is known to impact important physical properties such as thermal conductivity as fission gas release. In a previous study, we calculated the effect of different types of {Sigma}5 grain boundaries on UO{sub 2} thermal conductivity and predicted the corresponding Kapitza resistances, i.e. the resistance of the grain boundary in relation to the bulk thermal resistance. There have been reports of pseudoanisotropic effects for the thermal conductivity in cubic polycrystalline materials, as obtained from molecular dynamics simulations, which means that the conductivity appears to be a function of the crystallographic direction of the temperature gradient. However, materials with cubic symmetry should have isotropic thermal conductivity. For this reason it is necessary to determine the cause of this apparent anisotropy and in this report we investigate this effect in context of our earlier simulations of UO{sub 2} Kapitza resistances. Another source of thermal resistance comes from fission products and fission gases. Xe is the main fission gas and when generated in sufficient quantity it dissolves from the lattice and forms gas bubbles inside the crystalline structure. We have performed studies of how Xe atoms dissolved in the UO{sub 2} matrix or precipitated as bubbles impact thermal conductivity, both in bulk UO{sub 2} and in the presence of grain boundaries.

Du, Shiyu [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Andersson, Anders D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Germann, Timothy C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stanek, Christopher R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

30

Acoustic emission from thermal-gradient cracks in UO$sub 2$  

SciTech Connect

A feasibility study has been conducted to evaluate the potential use of acoustic emission to monitor thermal-shock damage in direct electrical heating of UO$sub 2$ pellets. In the apparatus used for the present tests, two acoustic- emission sensors were placed on extensions of the upper and lower electrical feedthroughs. Commercially available equipment was used to accumulate acoustic- emission data. The accumulation of events displayed on a cathode-ray-tube screen indicates the total number of acoustic-emission events at a particular location within the pellet stack. These tests have indicated that acoustic emission can be used to monitor thermal-shock damage in UO$sub 2$ pellets subjected to direct- electrical heating. 8 references. (auth)

Kennedy, C.R.; Kupperman, D.S.; Wrona, B.J.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF STAINLESS STEEL-UO$sub 2$ DISPERSION FUEL ELEMENTS  

SciTech Connect

Mechanical properties of stainless steel-- UO/sub 2/ dispersion fuel elements were determined on specimens fabricated (a) by the cold-binder extrusion and hot swaging technique, (b) by the single hot-coextrusion method, and (c) by the hotcoextrusion method followed by a second hot-extrusion, hot-rolling, swaging, or drawing. Tensile test results show that cold-binder material has very good tensile properties with the exception of ductility. Bend tests show thai coarse oxide material has better ductility than the fine oxide both before and after irradiation. Although the fuel element material is low in ductility, test results indicate that completed fuel elements composed of a dispersion of UO/ sub 2/ clad in stainless steel have fair mechanical properties for reactor use even after high burnups. (auth)

Valovage, W.D.; Siergiej, R.A.

1959-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

DEVELOPMENT OF FERRITIC STAINLESS STEEL-UO$sub 2$ DISPERSION FUEL ELEMENTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary definition of a fabrication process for ferritic stainless steel-UO/sub 2/ fuel clad with Type 430 stainiess steel has been achieved. The procedure is an adaptation of an earlier process for preparing austenitic fuel elements, and consists of the cold-binder extrusion of a plastic powder dispersion which is fired in dry hydrogen, fitted with welded end caps, and electroplated with nickel. This core is inserted into a length of type 430 stainless steel cladding and the assembly is bonded by hot-swaging at 800 C. The irradiation performance of such a fuel element was examined by means of an MTR test. The results of this test strongly indicated that the desired lowering of UO/sub 2/ particle operating temperature was realized and that ferritic stainless steel is not unduly susceptible to irradiation dannage. (auth)

Barney, W.K.; Ray, W.E.; Sowman, H.G.

1958-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

33

Sensitivity of UO2 Stability in a Reducing Environment on Radiolysis Model Parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results for a radiolysis model sensitivity study of radiolytically produced H2O2 are presented as they relate to Spent (or Used) Light Water Reactor uranium oxide (UO2) nuclear fuel (UNF) oxidation in a low oxygen environment. The model builds on previous reaction kinetic studies to represent the radiolytic processes occurring at the nuclear fuel surface. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is the dominant oxidant for spent nuclear fuel in an O2-depleted water environment.

Wittman, Richard S.; Buck, Edgar C.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

An Empirical Model of UO2 Thermal Conductivity Based on Laser Flash Measurements of Thermal Diffusivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal conductivity of irradiated fuel materials, which can be derived from measured thermal diffusivity (TD), is a key consideration in thermal performance and design of a fuel rod. However, without interpretation, the measured TD data cannot be used directly to calculate fuel temperatures during irradiation. This report provides such interpretation and presents an empirical model for the degradation of UO2 thermal conductivity with burn-up.

1998-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

35

Physics calculations for mixed PuO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2} NPR loadings  

SciTech Connect

At the request of NRD (NPR Physics Subsection) a study was initiated to determine the physics characteristics of various plutonium-uranium composites as fuel for the NPR. From this study, the PuO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2} fuel system was selected to receive major attention. The effect of adding a burnable poison, B-10, in intimate contact with the mixed oxide fuel was also is to be considered. The present report summarizes the results of these investigations.

Bennett, C.L.

1964-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

36

Recovery of UO.sub.2 /Pu O.sub.2 in IFR electrorefining process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for converting PuO.sub.2 and UO.sub.2 present in an electrorefiner to the chlorides, by contacting the PuO.sub.2 and UO.sub.2 with Li metal in the presence of an alkali metal chloride salt substantially free of rare earth and actinide chlorides for a time and at a temperature sufficient to convert the UO.sub.2 and PuO.sub.2 to metals while converting Li metal to Li.sub.2 O. Li.sub.2 O is removed either by reducing with rare earth metals or by providing an oxygen electrode for transporting O.sub.2 out of the electrorefiner and a cathode, and thereafter applying an emf to the electrorefiner electrodes sufficient to cause the Li.sub.2 O to disassociate to O.sub.2 and Li metal but insufficient to decompose the alkali metal chloride salt. The U and Pu and excess lithium are then converted to chlorides by reaction with CdCl.sub.2.

Tomczuk, Zygmunt (Lockport, IL); Miller, William E. (Naperville, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Recovery of UO[sub 2]/PuO[sub 2] in IFR electrorefining process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for converting PuO[sub 2] and UO[sub 2] present in an electrorefiner to the chlorides, by contacting the PuO[sub 2] and UO[sub 2] with Li metal in the presence of an alkali metal chloride salt substantially free of rare earth and actinide chlorides for a time and at a temperature sufficient to convert the UO[sub 2] and PuO[sub 2] to metals while converting Li metal to Li[sub 2]O. Li[sub 2]O is removed either by reducing with rare earth metals or by providing an oxygen electrode for transporting O[sub 2] out of the electrorefiner and a cathode, and thereafter applying an emf to the electrorefiner electrodes sufficient to cause the Li[sub 2]O to disassociate to O[sub 2] and Li metal but insufficient to decompose the alkali metal chloride salt. The U and Pu and excess lithium are then converted to chlorides by reaction with CdCl[sub 2].

Tomczuk, Z.; Miller, W.E.

1994-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

38

The determination of UO/sub 2/ and UF/sub 4/ in fused fluoride salts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The determination of uranium oxide solubilities in fused fluoride salts is important in the electrolytic preparation of uranium metal. This project was initiated to develop a method for the determination of UO/sub 2/ separately from UF/sub 4/ in UF/sub 4/-CaF/sub 2/-LiF fused salts. Previous methods used for the determination of UO/sub 2/ in fused fluoride salts involved inert gas fusions where oxygen was liberated as CO/sub 2/, and hydrofluorination where oxygen was released as H/sub 2/O; but the special equipment used for these procedures was no longer available. These methods assumed that all of the oxygen liberated was due to UO/sub 2/ and does not consider impurities from reagents and other oxygen sources that amount to a bias of approximately 0.3 wt %. This titrimetric method eliminates the bias by selectively extracting the UF/sub 4/ with a Na/sub 2/EDTA-H/sub 3/BO/sub 3/ solution. The remaining uranium oxide residue is treated and titrated gravimetrically to a potentiometric endpoint with NBS standard K/sub 2/Cr/sub 2/O/sub 7/. An aliquot of the Na/sub 2/EDTA-H/sub 3/BO/sub 3/ extract is also titrated gravimetrically to a potentiometric endpoint, this uranium component is determined and calculated as UF/sub 4/. 4 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Batiste, D.J.; Lee, D.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Feasibility of Partial ZrO[subscript 2] Coatings on Outer Surface of Annular UO[subscript 2] Pellets to Control Gap Conductance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The viability of depositing a thin porous coating of zirconia on the outer surface of an annular UO[subscript 2] pellet

Feinroth, H.

40

Preparation and Reactions of Base-Free Bis(1,2,4-tri-tert-butylcyclopentadienyl)uranium Oxide, Cp'2UO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tert-butylcyclopentadienyl)uranium Oxide, Cp’ 2 UO Guofu Zi,Abstract Reduction of the uranium metallocene, [ ? 5 -group is ubiquitous in uranium chemistry as shown by the

Zi, Guofu; Werkema, Evan L.; Walter, Marc D.; Gottfriedsen, Jochen P.; Andersen, Richard A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ms uo uo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Nuclear data uncertainties by the PWR MOX/UO{sub 2} core rod ejection benchmark  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rod ejection transient of the OECD/NEA and U.S. NRC PWR MOX/UO{sub 2} core benchmark is considered under the influence of nuclear data uncertainties. Using the GRS uncertainty and sensitivity software package XSUSA the propagation of the uncertainties in nuclear data up to the transient calculations are considered. A statistically representative set of transient calculations is analyzed and both integral as well as local output quantities are compared with the benchmark results of different participants. It is shown that the uncertainties in nuclear data play a crucial role in the interpretation of the results of the simulation. (authors)

Pasichnyk, I.; Klein, M.; Velkov, K.; Zwermann, W.; Pautz, A. [Boltzmannstr. 14, D-85748 Garching b. Muenchen (Germany)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Final Version: Orbital Specificity in the Unoccupied States of UO2 from Resonant Inverse Photoelectron Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

One of the crucial questions of all actinide electronic structure determinations is the issue of 5f versus 6d character and the distribution of these components across the density of states. Here, a break-though experiment is discussed, which has allowed the direct determination of the U5f and U6d contributions to the unoccupied density of states (UDOS) in Uranium Dioxide. A novel Resonant Inverse Photoelectron (RIPES) and X-ray Emission Spectroscopy (XES) investigation of UO{sub 2} is presented. It is shown that the U5f and U6d components are isolated and identified unambiguously.

Tobin, J G; Yu, S W

2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

43

Solar and Photovoltaic Data from the University of Oregon Solar Radiation Monitoring Laboratory (UO SRML)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The UO SRML is a regional solar radiation data center whose goal is to provide sound solar resource data for planning, design, deployment, and operation of solar electric facilities in the Pacific Northwest. The laboratory has been in operation since 1975. Solar data includes solar resource maps, cumulative summary data, daily totals, monthly averages, single element profile data, parsed TMY2 data, and select multifilter radiometer data. A data plotting program and other software tools are also provided. Shade analysis information and contour plots showing the effect of tilt and orientation on annual solar electric system perfomance make up a large part of the photovoltaics data.(Specialized Interface)

44

APS Long Range Schedule FY1999  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 Beamline Operations Schedule 9 Beamline Operations Schedule JAN Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Week 1 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 0000 - 0800 MS MS MS MS UO UO UO 0800 - 1600 MS MS MS UO UO UO UO 1600 - 2400 MS MS MS UO UO UO UO Week 2 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 0000 - 0800 UO UO UO UO UO UO UO 0800 - 1600 UO MS UO UO UO UO UO 1600 - 2400 UO UO UO UO UO UO UO FEB 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 0000 - 0800 UO MS MS UO UO UO UO 0800 - 1600 MS MS UO UO UO UO UO 1600 - 2400 MS MS UO UO UO UO UO Week 4 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 0000 - 0800 UO UO UO UO UO UO UO 0800 - 1600 UO MS UO UO* UO UO UO 1600 - 2400 UO UO UO UO UO UO UO Week 5 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 0000 - 0800 UO MS MS UO UO U O UO

45

Evaluation of Heterogeneous Options: Effects of MgO versus UO2 Matrix Selection for Minor Actinide Targets in a Sodium Fast Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary focus of this work was to compare MgO with UO2 as target matrix material options for burning minor actinides in a transmutation target within a sodium fast reactor. This analysis compared the transmutation performance of target assemblies having UO2 matrix to those having specifically MgO inert matrix.

M. Pope; S. Bays; R. Ferrer

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

POST-IRRADIATION EVALUATION OF A PLATE-TYPE UO$sub 2$ FUEL ELEMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The premature failure of fuel Element M22, which had six compartments of 0.100-in.-thick, 96% TD UO/sub 2/ + 6 wt% ZrO/sub 2/ fuel, was attributed to the large irradiation-induced solid volume swelling of the UO/sub 2/ fuels. This volume swelling was the result of incomplete homogenization during fabrication of the mixed and sintered U/sup E/O/sub 2/ and U/sup N/O/sub 2/ fuel s in Element M22. In addition, heavy hydriding of the Ni-free Zircaloy-2 cladding occurred in the relatively hot areas adjacent to the fuel and to a lesser extent at the external cladding surfaces. By postulation, H/sub 2/ was apparently formed by the radiolytic decomposition of water entrapped between fuel and cladding after formation of the initial cladding defect, and was absorbed by the cladding so rapidly that it could not diffuse adequately down the thermal gradient to the cold side of the cladding. The corrosion behavior of the cladding was as expected and did not contribute to the hydriding. Analysis of the CR-X-3 loop operating history indicates that no abnormal conditions external to Element M22 existed in the loop other than U from inpile intentionally defected fuel elements. (auth)

Meieran, H.B.

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Evaluation of sintering effects on SiC incorporated UO2 kernels under Ar and Ar-4%H2 environments  

SciTech Connect

Silicon carbide (SiC) is suggested as an oxygen getter in UO2 kernels used for TRISO particle fuels to lower oxygen potential and prevent kernel migration during irradiation. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry analyses performed on sintered kernels verified that internal gelation process can be used to incorporate SiC in urania fuel kernels. Sintering in either Ar or Ar-4%H2 at 1500 C lowered the SiC content in the UO2 kernels to some extent. Formation of UC was observed as the major chemical phase in the process, while other minor phases such as U3Si2C2, USi2, U3Si2, and UC2 were also identified. UC formation was presumed to be occurred by two reactions. The first was the SiC reaction with its protective SiO2 oxide layer on SiC grains to produce volatile SiO and free carbon that subsequently reacted with UO2 to form UC. The second process was direct UO2 reaction with SiC grains to form SiO, CO, and UC, especially in Ar-4%H2. A slightly higher density and UC content was observed in the sample sintered in Ar-4%H2, but the use of both atmospheres produced kernels with ~95% of theoretical density. It is suggested that incorporating CO in the sintering gas would prevent UC formation and preserve the initial SiC content.

Silva, Chinthaka M [ORNL] [ORNL; Lindemer, Terrence [Harbach Engineering and Solutions] [Harbach Engineering and Solutions; Hunt, Rodney Dale [ORNL] [ORNL; Collins, Jack Lee [ORNL] [ORNL; Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL] [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Talk to Language and Cognition Seminar, School of Psychology, UoB. 6 Nov 2009 Why the "hard" problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Talk to Language and Cognition Seminar, School of Psychology, UoB. 6 Nov 2009 Why the "hard" problem of consciousness is easy and the "easy" problem hard. (And how to make progress) Aaron Sloman Sem Birmingham 2009 Slide 1 Last revised: January 27, 2010 #12;Why? Because: 1. The "hard" problem can

Sloman, Aaron

49

High-precision molecular dynamics simulation of UO2-PuO2: pair potentials comparison  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our series of articles is devoted to high-precision molecular dynamics simulation of mixed actinide-oxide (MOX) fuel in the rigid ions approximation using high-performance graphics processors (GPU). In the first article we assess 10 most relevant interatomic sets of pair potentials (SPP) by reproduction of solid phase properties of uranium dioxide (UO2) - temperature dependences of the lattice constant, bulk modulus, enthalpy and heat capacity. Measurements were performed with 1K accuracy in a wide temperature range from 300K up to melting point. The best results are demonstrated by two recent SPPs MOX-07 and Yakub-09, which both had been fitted to the recommended thermal expansion in the range of temperatures 300-3100K. Compared with them, the widely used SPPs Basak-03 and Morelon-03 reproduce the experimental data noticeably worse at temperatures above 2500K.

Potashnikov, S I; Nekrasov, K A; Kupryazhkin, A Ya

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

FLUIDIZED-BED COATING OF UO$sub 2$ POWDER WITH NIOBIUM AND OTHER ELEMENTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The chemical vapor deposition of niobium, molybdenum, tungsten, chnomium, carbcn, and niobium--vanadium alloys in a fluidized bed of UO/sub 2/ powder particles wss used to provide uniform, dense, nonporous coatings on the individual particles. in the case of niobium, which received major attention, hydrogen reduction of niobium pentachloride vapor was used as the vapor- deposition reaction. The most serious problem was that of maintaining bed fluidity aad avoiding agglomeration. This problem was overcome to permit routine operation of the coating equipment. In the entire program of 68 experimental runs, only 1.1 per cent of the product was lost by agglomeration. In routine operation, this loss should be even lower. (auth)

Blocher, J.M. Jr.; Veigel, N.D.; Oxley, J.H.; Secrest, V.M.; Rose, E.E.

1960-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

51

Interim results from UO/sub 2/ fuel oxidation tests in air  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental program is being conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to extend the characterization of spent fuel oxidation in air. To characterize oxidation behavior of irradiated UO/sub 2/, fuel oxidation tests were performed on declad light-water reactor spent fuel and nonirradited UO/sub 2/ pellets in the temperature range of 135 to 250/sup 0/C. These tests were designed to determine the important independent variables that might affect spent fuel oxidation behavior. The data from this program, when combined with the test results from other programs, will be used to develop recommended spent fuel dry-storage temperature limits in air. This report describes interim test results. The initial PNL investigations of nonirradiated and spent fuels identified the important testing variables as temperature, fuel burnup, radiolysis of the air, fuel microstructure, and moisture in the air. Based on these initial results, a more extensive statistically designed test matrix was developed to study the effects of temperature, burnup, and moisture on the oxidation behavior of spent fuel. Oxidation tests were initiated using both boiling-water reactor and pressurized-water reactor fuels from several different reactors with burnups from 8 to 34 GWd/MTU. A 10/sup 5/ R/h gamma field was applied to the test ovens to simulate dry storage cask conditions. Nonirradiated fuel was included as a control. This report describes experimental results from the initial tests on both the spent and nonirradiated fuels and results to date on the tests in a 10/sup 5/ R/h gamma field. 33 refs., 51 figs., 6 tabs.

Campbell, T.K.; Gilbert, E.R.; Thornhill, C.K.; White, G.D.; Piepel, G.F.; Griffin, C.W.j

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

The Effect Of Ion Implantation Of Selected Dopants On Some Of The Electrical Properties Of UO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has {approx}1 billion pounds of surplus depleted uranium (i.e., uranium tails) from uranium gaseous diffusion enrichment facilities. Rather than treating this material as waste, DOE is investigating potential beneficial uses for this uranium. Of the many possible uses, uranium dioxide (UO2) has properties that make it an equal to or better than conventional photovoltaic (e.g., solar cell) materials. For example, the electronic bandgap of UO2 occurs at an efficiency equal to that of GaS and Si, and it has five radiation adsorption peaks instead of one. This paper describes the experimental work being conducted to develop urania photovoltaic devices.

Haire, M. J.; von Roedern, R. J.; Meek, T. T.; Tesmer, J.; Wetteland, C.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

53

High temperature thermal conductivity measurements of UO/sub 2/ by Direct Electrical Heating. Final report. [MANTRA-III  

SciTech Connect

High temperature properties of reactor type UO/sub 2/ pellets were measured using a Direct Electrical Heating (DEH) Facility. Modifications to the experimental apparatus have been made so that successful and reproducible DEH runs may be carried out while protecting the pellets from oxidation at high temperature. X-ray diffraction measurements on the UO/sub 2/ pellets have been made before and after runs to assure that sample oxidation has not occurred. A computer code has been developed that will model the experiment using equations that describe physical properties of the material. This code allows these equations to be checked by comparing the model results to collected data. The thermal conductivity equation for UO/sub 2/ proposed by Weilbacher has been used for this analysis. By adjusting the empirical parameters in Weilbacher's equation, experimental data can be matched by the code. From the several runs analyzed, the resulting thermal conductivity equation is lambda = 1/4.79 + 0.0247T/ + 1.06 x 10/sup -3/ exp(-1.62/kT/) - 4410. exp(-3.71/kT/) where lambda is in w/cm K, k is the Boltzman constant, and T is the temperature in Kelvin.

Bassett, B

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Graphite and Beryllium Reflector Critical Assemblies of UO2 (Benchmark Experiments 2 and 3)  

SciTech Connect

INTRODUCTION A series of experiments was carried out in 1962-65 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) for use in space reactor research programs. A core containing 93.2 wt% enriched UO2 fuel rods was used in these experiments. The first part of the experimental series consisted of 252 tightly-packed fuel rods (1.27-cm triangular pitch) with graphite reflectors [1], the second part used 252 graphite-reflected fuel rods organized in a 1.506-cm triangular-pitch array [2], and the final part of the experimental series consisted of 253 beryllium-reflected fuel rods in a 1.506-cm-triangular-pitch configuration and in a 7-tube-cluster configuration [3]. Fission rate distribution and cadmium ratio measurements were taken for all three parts of the experimental series. Reactivity coefficient measurements were taken for various materials placed in the beryllium reflected core. All three experiments in the series have been evaluated for inclusion in the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) [4] and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) Handbooks, [5]. The evaluation of the first experiment in the series was discussed at the 2011 ANS Winter meeting [6]. The evaluations of the second and third experiments are discussed below. These experiments are of interest as benchmarks because they support the validation of compact reactor designs with similar characteristics to the design parameters for a space nuclear fission surface power systems [7].

Margaret A. Marshall; John D. Bess

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

APS Long Range Schedule FY1998  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Beamline Operations Schedule 8 Beamline Operations Schedule JAN Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Week 1 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 0000 - 0800 SM SM SM MS MS MS MS 0800 - 1600 SM SM* MS MS MS MS MS 1600 - 2400 SM SM MS MS MS MS MS Week 2 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 0000 - 0800 MS MS UO UO UO UO UO 0800 - 1600 MS* UO UO UO UO UO UO 1600 - 2400 MS UO UO UO UO UO UO Week 3 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 0000 - 0800 UO MS UO UO UO UO UO 0800 - 1600 MS UO UO UO UO UO UO 1600 - 2400 MS UO UO UO UO UO UO JAN/FEB 26 27 28 29 30 31 1 0000 - 0800 UO MS UO UO UO UO UO 0800 - 1600 MS SOM UO UO UO UO UO 1600 - 2400 MS UO UO UO UO UO UO Week 5 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 0000 - 0800 UO MS UO UO UO UO UO

56

WIMS/PANTHER analysis of UO{sub 2}/MOX cores using embedded super-cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a method of analysing PWR UO{sub 2}MOX cores with WIMS/PANTHER. Embedded super-cells, run within the reactor code, are used to correct the standard methodology of using 2-group smeared data from single assembly lattice calculations. In many other codes the weakness of this standard approach has been improved for MOX by imposing a more realistic environment in the lattice code, or by improving the sophistication of the reactor code. In this approach an intermediate set of calculations is introduced, leaving both lattice and reactor calculations broadly unchanged. The essence of the approach is that the whole core is broken down into a set of 'embedded' super-cells, each extending over just four quarter assemblies, with zero leakage imposed at the assembly mid-lines. Each supercell is solved twice, first with a detailed multi-group pin-by-pin solution, and then with the standard single assembly approach. Correction factors are defined by comparing the two solutions, and these can be applied in whole core calculations. The restriction that all such calculations are modelled with zero leakage means that they are independent of each other and of the core-wide flux shape. This allows parallel pre-calculation for the entire cycle once the loading pattern has been determined, in much the same way that single assembly lattice calculations can be pre-calculated once the range of fuel types is known. Comparisons against a whole core pin-by-pin reference demonstrates that the embedding process does not introduce a significant error, even after burnup and refuelling. Comparisons against a WIMS reference demonstrate that a pin-by-pin multi-group diffusion solution is capable of capturing the main interface effects. This therefore defines a practical approach for achieving results close to lattice code accuracy, but broadly at the cost of a standard reactor calculation. (authors)

Knight, M.; Bryce, P. [EDF Energy, Barnett Way, Barnwood, Gloucester (United Kingdom); Hall, S. [Advanced Modelling and Computation Group, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Enhanced Generic Phase-field Model of Irradiation Materials: Fission Gas Bubble Growth Kinetics in Polycrystalline UO2  

SciTech Connect

Experiments show that inter-granular and intra-granular gas bubbles have different growth kinetics which results in heterogeneous gas bubble microstructures in irradiated nuclear fuels. A science-based model predicting the heterogeneous microstructure evolution kinetics is desired, which enables one to study the effect of thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the system on gas bubble microstructure evolution kinetics and morphology, improve the understanding of the formation mechanisms of heterogeneous gas bubble microstructure, and provide the microstructure to macroscale approaches to study their impact on thermo-mechanical properties such as thermo-conductivity, gas release, volume swelling, and cracking. In our previous report 'Mesoscale Benchmark Demonstration, Problem 1: Mesoscale Simulations of Intra-granular Fission Gas Bubbles in UO2 under Post-irradiation Thermal Annealing', we developed a phase-field model to simulate the intra-granular gas bubble evolution in a single crystal during post-irradiation thermal annealing. In this work, we enhanced the model by incorporating thermodynamic and kinetic properties at grain boundaries, which can be obtained from atomistic simulations, to simulate fission gas bubble growth kinetics in polycrystalline UO2 fuels. The model takes into account of gas atom and vacancy diffusion, vacancy trapping and emission at defects, gas atom absorption and resolution at gas bubbles, internal pressure in gas bubbles, elastic interaction between defects and gas bubbles, and the difference of thermodynamic and kinetic properties in matrix and grain boundaries. We applied the model to simulate gas atom segregation at grain boundaries and the effect of interfacial energy and gas mobility on gas bubble morphology and growth kinetics in a bi-crystal UO2 during post-irradiation thermal annealing. The preliminary results demonstrate that the model can produce the equilibrium thermodynamic properties and the morphology of gas bubbles at grain boundaries for given grain boundary properties. More validation of the model capability in polycrystalline is underway.

Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Montgomery, Robert O.; Gao, Fei; Sun, Xin

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

58

APS Long Range Schedule 2000  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

APS FY2000 Beamline Operations Schedule APS FY2000 Beamline Operations Schedule JAN Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Week 1 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 0000-0800 SM SM SM SM SM MS MS 0800 - 1600 SM SM SM SM MS MS MS 1600 - 2400 SM SM SM SM MS MS MS Week 2 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 0000 - 0800 MS MS MS UO UO UO UO 0800 - 1600 MS MS UO UO UO UO UO 1600 - 2400 MS MS UO UO UO UO UO Week 3 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 0000 - 0800 UO UO UO UO UO UO UO 0800 - 1600 UO MS UO UO UO UO UO 1600 - 2400 UO UO UO UO UO UO UO JAN/FEB 31 1 2 3 4 5 6 0000 - 0800 UO MS MS UO UO UO UO 0800 - 1600 MS MS UO UO UO UO UO 1600 - 2400 MS MS UO UO UO UO UO Week 5 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 0000 - 0800 UO UO UO UO UO UO UO

59

Estimated Critical Conditions for UO(Sub 2)F(Sub 2)-H(Sub 2)O Systems in Fully Water-Reflected Spherical Geometry  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to document reference calculations performed using the SCALE-4.0 code system to determine the critical parameters of UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O spheres. The calculations are an extension of those documented in ORNL/CSD/TM-284. Specifically, the data for low-enriched UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O spheres have been extended to highly enriched uranium. These calculations, together with those reported in ORNL/CSD/TM-284, provide a consistent set of critical parameters (k{sub {infinity}}, volume, mass, mass of water) for UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} and water over the full range of enrichment and moderation ratio.

Jordan, W.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Uranium vacancy mobility at the sigma 5 symmetric tilt grain boundary in UO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important consequence of the fissioning process occurring during burnup is the formation of fission products. These fission products alter the thermo-mechanical properties of the fuel. They also lead to macroscopic changes in the fuel structure, including the formation of bubbles that are connected to swelling of the fuel. Subsequent release of fission gases increase the pressure in the plenum and can cause changes in the properties of the fuel pin itself. It is thus imperative to understand how fission products, and fission gases in particular, behave within the fuel in order to predict the performance of the fuel under operating conditions. Fission gas redistribution within the fuel is governed by mass transport and the presence of sinks such as impurities, dislocations, and grain boundaries. Thus, to understand how the distribution of fission gases evolves in the fuel, we must understand the underlying transport mechanisms, tied to the concentrations and mobilities of defects within the material, and how these gases interact with microstructural features that might act as sinks. Both of these issues have been addressed in previous work under NEAMS. However, once a fission product has reached a sink, such as a grain boundary, its mobility may be different there than in the grain interior and predicting how, for example, bubbles nucleate within grain boundaries necessitates an understanding of how fission gases diffuse within boundaries. That is the goal of the present work. In this report, we describe atomic level simulations of uranium vacancy diffusion in the pressence of a {Sigma}5 symmetric tilt boundary in urania (UO{sub 2}). This boundary was chosen as it is the simplest of the boundaries we considered in previous work on segregation and serves as a starting point for understanding defect mobility at boundaries. We use a combination of molecular statics calculations and kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) to determine how the mobility of uranium vacancies is altered at this particular grain boundary. Given that the diffusion of fission gases such as Xe are tied to the mobility of uranium vacancies, these results given insight into how fission gas mobility differs at grain boundaries compared to bulk urania.

Uberuaga, Blas P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

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61

RELAP5/MOD3.2 analysis of a VVER-1000 reactor with UO[2] fuel and MOX fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A RELAP5/MOD3.2 model of a VVER-1000/MODEL V320 nuclear power plant, Balakovo Unit 4, was updated, improved and validated on the basis of an input deck prepared by the Kurchatov Institute of Moscow. The RELAP5 model includes both the primary and the secondary systems. The Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) is modeled according to the plant configuration. The feedwater system, along with the emergency feedwater system, is included in the model. The point reactor kinetics model, in which the decay heat is calculated with ANS decay heat data, enables the model to be used for analysis of a large spectrum of transients and accidents. The plant model is used for analysis and prediction of a cold leg Large Break Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LBLOCA). The RELAP5/MOD3.2 results showed a good agreement with calculations obtained with TECH-M computer program. The cladding temperatures of the MOX assembly have been compared with that of the hot UO? assembly. The peak cladding temperature of MOX assembly is about 55 K higher than that of UO? assembly. An uncertainty analysis has been performed for the peak cladding temperature, in which Monte Carlo calculations have been performed using the response surface built up from fifteen sets of RELAP5 calculations. The result shows that the ECCS would be sufficient to keep the cladding temperature during the scenario of a LBLOCA well below the required licensing limit.

Fu, Chun

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

E&nr Ph. S. W.. Wahhgt~n. D.C. 200242174, TIkpbnc (202) 48a60uo  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

75' 75' 00.955 L' E&nr Ph. S. W.. Wahhgt~n. D.C. 200242174, TIkpbnc (202) 48a60uo 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 CR CA.d M r. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decoaunissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear M r. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES M /4.0-03 kl 77.0% I - The attached elimination reconunendation was prepared in accordance rlL.0~ with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September. The recommendation flO.o-02 includes 26 colleges and universities identified.in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated N0.03. 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, rJCDCJ/ and the University of Washington) currently identified on the FUSRAP

63

HEAVY ELEMENT ISOTOPIC ANALYSIS OF UO$sub 2$ FUEL IRRADIATED IN THE VBWR. Report No. 1  

SciTech Connect

Slightly enriched UO/sub 2/ fuel, irradiated in the Vallecitos Boiling Water Reactor (VBWR), with exposures ranging from 100 Mwd/t to 3200 Mwd/t was analyzed for heavy element isotopic composition and compared with computed data. The primary objective of this program is to obtain improved data on the changes in nuclear characteristics with burnup of UO/sub 2/ fuel in a boiling water reactor. This information is important in both evaluating the economics of a given reactor design and also in providing a sounder physics basis for improving reactor designs to minimize the resuiting fuel costs. Uranium oxide pellets, with an enrichment of 2.8 atom percent, were analyzed at several axial positions along the fuel rod, spanning the void (steam fraction) range of 0 to 30%. The isotopic composition for each pellet was computed, utilizing a general fuel cycle depletion code. Results of the analysis of the comparison of the measured and computed data indicate that the total amount of Pu computed is consistently lower than that implied from the measurement by approximately 10%, and the percentage difference between the measured and computed data increases slightly with exposure. One rod was irradiated near a control rod which was approximately 25% inserted. As expected, since no control rod effects were included in the calcuiation, the measured data in that region of the rod shows a greater Pu production per Mwd/t than computed. Physical effects which might explain the small, but apparentiy consistent, differences between the measured and computed data were postulated. It is concluded that the observed differences are the result of a substantial underestimate of void fraction and small uncertainties in fuel exposure and cross sections. (auth)

Hackney, M.R.; Ruiz, C.P.

1962-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

64

COMPARATIVE COST STUDY OF PROCESSING STAINLESS STEEL-JACKETED UO$sub 2$ FUEL: MECHANICAL SHEAR-LEACH VS SULFEX-CORE DISSOLUTION  

SciTech Connect

The economics of mechanical shear-leach and Sulfex decladding-core dissolution head end treatments for processing typical tubular bundles of stainless steel-jacketed UO/sub 2/ nuclear fuels were compared. A 2.66 metric ton U/day head end portion of a plant was designed for each process and capital and operating costs were developed. For plants of this size and larger, mechanical shear-leach processing has the advantage of ~20% lower capital cost and 50% lower operating cost. Processing costs of stainless steel-jacketed UO/ sub 2/ by the Sulfex and shear-leach methods, including amortization and waste disposal but excluding solvent extraction, were .78 and 7l/kg U, respectively. Storage of stainless steel waste produced by the shear-leach method is less costly by a factor of 20 than for Sulfex. (auth)

Adams, J.B.; Benis, A.M.; Watson, C.D.

1962-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

65

Charge distribution and local structure and speciation in the UO{sub 2+x} and PuO{sub 2+x} binary oxides for x=<0.25  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The local structure and chemical speciation of the mixed valence, fluorite-based oxides UO{sub 2+x} (0.00=U-O distances consistent with U(VI) concomitant with a large range of U displacements that reduce the apparent number of U neighbors and (2) that the UO{sub 2} fraction remains intact implying that these O defects interact to form clusters and give the heterogeneous structure consistent with the diffraction patterns. The PuO{sub 2+x} system, which does not show a separate phase at its x=0.25 endpoint, also displays (1) oxo groups at longer 1.9A distances consistent with Pu(V+{delta}), (2) a multisite Pu-O distribution even when x is close to zero indicative of the formation of stable species with H{sub 2}O and its hydrolysis products with O{sup 2-}, and (3) a highly disordered, spectroscopically invisible Pu-Pu component. The structure and bonding in AnO{sub 2+x} are therefore more complicated than have previously been assumed and show both similarities but also distinct differences among the different elements.

Conradson, Steven D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Chemistry Division, Materials Science and Technology Division and Nuclear Materials Technology Division, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)]. E-mail: conradson@lanl.gov; Begg, Bruce D. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technolgy Organisation, Menai, NSW 2234 (Australia); Clark, David L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Chemistry Division, Materials Science and Technology Division and Nuclear Materials Technology Division, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)] [and others

2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

APS Long Range Schedule FY1997  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Beamline Operations Schedule 7 Beamline Operations Schedule January Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 00:00-08:00 MS MS UO UO UO UO UO 08:00-16:00 MS UO UO UO SV UO UO 16:00-24:00 MS UO UO UO UO UO UO 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 00:00-08:00 UO UO UO UO UO MS MS 08:00-16:00 UO SV SV Contingency UO MS MS MS 16:00-24:00 UO UO UO UO MS MS MS 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 00:00-08:00 MS UO UO UO UO UO MS 08:00-16:00 UO UO SV Contingency UO UO MS MS 16:00-24:00 UO UO UO UO UO MS MS 27 28 29 30 31 1 2 00:00-08:00 MS SM SM SM SM SM SM 08:00-16:00 MS SM SM SM SM SM SM 16:00-24:00 MS SM SM SM SM SM SM FEB Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday

67

THE HGCR-1, A DESIGN STUDY OF A NUCLEAR POWER STATION EMPLOYING A HIGH- TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR WITH GRAPHITE-UO$sub 2$ FUEL ELEMENTS  

SciTech Connect

The preliminary design of a 3095-Mw(thermal), helium-cooled, graphite- moderated reactor employing sign conditions, 1500 deg F reactor outlet gas would be circulated to eight steam generators to produce 1050 deg F, 1450-psi steam which would be converted to electrical power in eight 157-Mw(electrical) turbine- generators. The over-all efficiency of this nuclear power station is 36.5%. The significant activities released from the unclad graphite-UO/sub 2/ fuel appear to be less than 0.2% of those produced and would be equivalent to 0.002 curie/ cm/ sup 3/ in the primary helium circuit. The maintenance problems associated with this contamination level are discussed. A cost analysis indicates that the capital cost of this nuclear station per electrical kilowatt would be around 0, and that the production cost of electrical power would be 7.8 mills/kwhr. (auth)

Cottrell, W.B.; Copenhaver, C.M.; Culver, H.N.; Fontana, M.H.; Kelleghan, V.J.; Samuels, G.

1959-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

68

Critical experiments with 4. 31 wt % /sup 235/U-enriched UO/sub 2/ rods in highly borated water lattices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of critical experiments were performed with 4.31 wt % /sup 235/U enriched UO/sub 2/ fuel rods immersed in water containing various concentrations of boron ranging up to 2.55 g/l. The boron was added in the form of boric acid (H/sub 3/BO/sub 3/). Critical experimental data were obtained for two different lattice pitches wherein the water-to-uranium oxide volume ratios were 1.59 and 1.09. The experiments provide benchmarks on heavily borated systems for use in validating calculational techniques employed in analyzing fuel shipping casks and spent fuel storage systems that may utilize boron for criticality control.

Durst, B.M.; Bierman, S.R.; Clayton, E.D.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Framatome-ANP France UO{sub 2} fuel fabrication - criticality safety analysis in the light of the 1999' Tokay Mura accident  

SciTech Connect

In France the 1999' Tokai Mura criticality accident in Japan had a big impact on the nuclear fuel manufacturing facility community. Moreover this accident led to a large public discussion about all the nuclear facilities. The French Safety Authorities made strong requirements to the industrials to revisit completely their safety analysis files mainly those concerning nuclear fuels treatments. The Framatome-ANP production of its French low enriched (5 w/o) UO{sub 2} fuel fabrication plant (FBFC/Romans) exceeds 1000 metric tons a year. Special attention was given to the emergency evacuation plan that should be followed in case of a criticality accident. If a criticality accident happens, site internal and external radioprotection requirements need to have an emergency evacuation plan showing the different routes where the absorbed doses will be as low as possible for people. The French Safety Authorities require also an update of the old based neutron source term accounting for state of the art methodology. UO{sub 2} blenders units contain a large amount of dry powder strictly controlled by moderation; a hypothetical water leakage inside one of these apparatus is simulated by increasing the water content of the powder. The resulted reactivity insertion is performed by several static calculations. The French IRSN/CEA CRISTAL codes are used to perform these static calculations. The kinetic criticality code POWDER simulates the power excursion versus time and determines the consequent total energy source term. MNCP4B performs the source term propagation (including neutrons and gamma) used to determine the isodose curves needed to define the emergency evacuation plant. This paper deals with the approach Framatome-ANP has taken to assess Safety Authorities demands using the more up to date calculation tools and methodology. (authors)

Doucet, M.; Zheng, S. [Framatome-ANP Fuel Technology Service (France); Mouton, J.; Porte, R. [Framatome-ANP Fuel Fabrication Plant - FBFC (France)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Comet whole-core solution to a stylized 3-dimensional pressurized water reactor benchmark problem with UO{sub 2}and MOX fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A stylized pressurized water reactor (PWR) benchmark problem with UO{sub 2} and MOX fuel was used to test the accuracy and efficiency of the coarse mesh radiation transport (COMET) code. The benchmark problem contains 125 fuel assemblies and 44,000 fuel pins. The COMET code was used to compute the core eigenvalue and assembly and pin power distributions for three core configurations. In these calculations, a set of tensor products of orthogonal polynomials were used to expand the neutron angular phase space distribution on the interfaces between coarse meshes. The COMET calculations were compared with the Monte Carlo code MCNP reference solutions using a recently published an 8-group material cross section library. The comparison showed both the core eigenvalues and assembly and pin power distributions predicated by COMET agree very well with the MCNP reference solution if the orders of the angular flux expansion in the two spatial variables and the polar and azimuth angles on the mesh boundaries are 4, 4, 2 and 2. The mean and maximum differences in the pin fission density distribution ranged from 0.28%-0.44% and 3.0%-5.5%, all within 3-sigma uncertainty of the MCNP solution. These comparisons indicate that COMET can achieve accuracy comparable to Monte Carlo. It was also found that COMET's computational speed is 450 times faster than MCNP. (authors)

Zhang, D.; Rahnema, F. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, 770 State Street, Atlanta, GA 30332-0745 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Mesoscale Benchmark Demonstration Problem 1: Mesoscale Simulations of Intra-granular Fission Gas Bubbles in UO2 under Post-irradiation Thermal Annealing  

SciTech Connect

A study was conducted to evaluate the capabilities of different numerical methods used to represent microstructure behavior at the mesoscale for irradiated material using an idealized benchmark problem. The purpose of the mesoscale benchmark problem was to provide a common basis to assess several mesoscale methods with the objective of identifying the strengths and areas of improvement in the predictive modeling of microstructure evolution. In this work, mesoscale models (phase-field, Potts, and kinetic Monte Carlo) developed by PNNL, INL, SNL, and ORNL were used to calculate the evolution kinetics of intra-granular fission gas bubbles in UO2 fuel under post-irradiation thermal annealing conditions. The benchmark problem was constructed to include important microstructural evolution mechanisms on the kinetics of intra-granular fission gas bubble behavior such as the atomic diffusion of Xe atoms, U vacancies, and O vacancies, the effect of vacancy capture and emission from defects, and the elastic interaction of non-equilibrium gas bubbles. An idealized set of assumptions was imposed on the benchmark problem to simplify the mechanisms considered. The capability and numerical efficiency of different models are compared against selected experimental and simulation results. These comparisons find that the phase-field methods, by the nature of the free energy formulation, are able to represent a larger subset of the mechanisms influencing the intra-granular bubble growth and coarsening mechanisms in the idealized benchmark problem as compared to the Potts and kinetic Monte Carlo methods. It is recognized that the mesoscale benchmark problem as formulated does not specifically highlight the strengths of the discrete particle modeling used in the Potts and kinetic Monte Carlo methods. Future efforts are recommended to construct increasingly more complex mesoscale benchmark problems to further verify and validate the predictive capabilities of the mesoscale modeling methods used in this study.

Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Montgomery, Robert; Gao, Fei; Sun, Xin; Tonks, Michael; Biner, Bullent; Millet, Paul; Tikare, Veena; Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Andersson , David

2012-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

72

IN-PILE RADIATION CORROSION EXPERIMENTS WITH ZIRCONIUM, TITANIUM, AND STEEL ALLOYS IN 0.17 m UO$sub 2$SO$sub 4$ SOLUTIONS AT 280 C  

SciTech Connect

In-pile loop experiments L-2-15 and L-4-16 were designed to test the radiation corrosion of Zircaloy-2 and other possible reactor construction materials in UO/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ solutions. The solutions employed were 0.17 m UO/ sub 2/SO/sub 4/, 0.015 m CuSO/sub 4/, and 0.03 m H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ in H/sub 2/O for experiment L-2-15, and 0.17 m UO/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, 0.015 m CuSO/sub 4/, and 0.025 m H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ in H/sub 2/O for experiment L-4-16. The mainstream temperature in the experiments ranged from 278 to 280 deg C. Construction material for the loops was type 347 stainless steel. Specimens of types 347 and 309SCb stainless steels titanium-55A and -110AT, platinum, Zircaloy-2, crystalbar zirconium, and a variety of other zirconium alloys were tested. The power density at core specimens ranged from 19.8 to 4.6 w/ml in L-2-15 and from 5.7 to 1.3 w/ml in L-4-16. For loop L-2-15, the total time of hightemperature operation with UO/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ was 792 hr, during in-pile exposure, and the reactor energy was 1632 Mwh; for loop L-4-16, 1032 hr and 2325 Mwh. During both experiments most of the reactor energy was accumulated at 3-Mw power level. In general, stainless steel corrosion results from these experiments were comparable to those observed in other in-pile loop experiments. Corrosion was confined primarily to the core areas and was power-density dependent. Some variations in attack, both positive and negative, with velocity of solution flow past specimens have been observed in other experiments, but there was no apparent effect of varying velocities in the range 10 to 40 fps on either the core-channel or in- line channel specimens in the present experiments. The coreannulus steel specimens in L-2-15 corroded at rates very much greater than those in the channel. This difference may have resulted, in part, from the differences in velocities, however, it may have also been a result of galvanic actton between the steel annulus specimens and adjacent platinum specimens. In previous 250 deg C experiments the occurrence of a change in the stainless steel corrosion rate was correlated with a decrease in acidity and/or increase in the nickel concentration. The results for the oxygen consumption rates on steel during radiation exposure in the present experiments varied with radiation time in a manner qualitatively similar to that observed at the lower temperature. However, the concentration of excess acid in the present experiments probably remained fairly constant throughout the radiation exposures, and correlations similar to those obtained at the lower temperature could not be established. The acid concentration in the 280 deg C experiments was greater than the concentrations prevailing when corrosion rate changes occurred in the 250 deg C experiments. The difference in acid tolerance is probably a result of the increased temperature, since a similar beneficial effect of temperature occurs out-ofpile No overall correlation has been established for the various factors found to have influenced steel corrosion in previous experiments. Results of the present experiments provide additional evidence in support of previous findings but do not further their interpretation. Zircaloy-2 corrosion results from both loops have been discussed and correlated elsewhere in terms of the 280 deg C relationship between the corrosion rate R (mils per year, mpy), power density P (w/ml), and uranium sorption factor alpha : 1/R = 2.23/P alpha + 1/40. The data from these experiments obey this relationship. (This is only a portion of the Author abstract.)

Jenks, G.H.; Baker, J.E.

1963-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

73

Electrochemistry of Defects in Irradiated UO 2 - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research was supported as a part of the EFRC on Materials Science of Nuclear Fuel funded by the U.S. DOE, BES under subcontract #00091538 from INL ...

74

Atomistic Studies of Defect Cluster Migration mechanisms in UO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... phase field modeling. This work is supported by the EFRC program funded by DOE BES under Award Number FWP 1356. Proceedings Inclusion? Planned: ...

75

PUREX/UO{sub 3} facilities deactivation lessons learned: History  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In May 1997, a historic deactivation project at the PUREX (Plutonium URanium EXtraction) facility at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State concluded its activities (Figure ES-1). The project work was finished at $78 million under its original budget of $222.5 million, and 16 months ahead of schedule. Closely watched throughout the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex and by the US Department of Defense for the value of its lessons learned, the PUREX Deactivation Project has become the national model for the safe transition of contaminated facilities to shut down status.

Gerber, M.S.

1997-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

76

Computer Simulation of Radiation Effects and Defects in UO 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, There is renewed interest in nuclear power due to rising global energy demand, concerns about energy security and the adverse environmental

77

CHARTER RESERVATION / BILLING FORM UOS Transportation Services -Passenger Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

= _________________________ R/V Nucella (daily rate) # of days x $390.50/day = _________________________ Nucella fuel surcharge = _________________________ Ira C. fuel surcharge* _________________________ * At current fuel prices plan on $50 per day within offshore trips we can help you estimate fuel costs. Budget Darling Marine Center Visiting Graduate Student

Needleman, Daniel

78

UO 2 Mixed Oxide System Using Atomic Level Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thorium-based nuclear materials offer the promise of increased proliferation resistance, longer fuel cycles, higher burnup and improved wasteform ...

79

Crack tip plasticity in single crystal UO2: Atomistic simulations  

SciTech Connect

The fracture behavior of single crystal uranium dioxide is studied using molecular dynamics simulations at room temperature. Initially, an elliptical notch is created on either {111} or {110} planes, and tensile loading is applied normal to the crack planes. For cracks on both planes, shielding of crack tips by plastic deformation is observed, and crack extension occurs for crack on {111} planes only. Two plastic processes, dislocation emission and phase transformation are identified at crack tips. The dislocations have a Burgers vector of ?110?/2, and glide on {100} planes. Two metastable phases, the so-called Rutile and Scrutinyite phases, are identified during the phase transformation, and their relative stability is confirmed by separate density- functional-theory calculations. Examination of stress concentration near crack tips reveals that dislocation emission is not an effective shielding mechanism. The formation of new phases may effectively shield the crack provided all phase interfaces formed near the crack tips are coherent, as in the case of cracks residing on {110} planes.

Yongfeng Zhang; Paul C. Millett; Michael Tonks; Bulent Biner; Xiang-Yang Liu; David A. Andersson

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

UoS PhD Studentship! A University of Sheffield PhD studentship within the framework of Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sunshine is available, held jointly at the Solar Physics and Space Plasma Research Centre (SP2 RC), School

Dixon, Peter

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ms uo uo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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81

Random-Walk Monte Carlo Simulation of Intergranular Gas Bubble Nucleation in UO2 Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a random-walk particle algorithm, we investigate the clustering of fission gas atoms on grain bound- aries in oxide fuels. The computational algorithm implemented in this work considers a planar surface representing a grain boundary on which particles appear at a rate dictated by the Booth flux, migrate two dimensionally according to their grain boundary diffusivity, and coalesce by random encounters. Specifically, the intergranular bubble nucleation density is the key variable we investigate using a parametric study in which the temperature, grain boundary gas diffusivity, and grain boundary segregation energy are varied. The results reveal that the grain boundary bubble nucleation density can vary widely due to these three parameters, which may be an important factor in the observed variability in intergranular bubble percolation among grain boundaries in oxide fuel during fission gas release.

Yongfeng Zhang; Michael R. Tonks; S. B. Biner; D.A. Andersson

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Comparison of Point-Defect Evolution in Irradiated UO2 and Ceo2 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Corrosion Inhibition for Hydrochloric Acid Pickling · Using Resistance Heating to Create Full-Scale API RP2Z CTOD Samples ...

83

Recovery of UO{sub 2}/PuO{sub 2} in IFR electrorefining process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a process for converting PuO{sub 2} and U0{sub 2} present in an electrorefiner to the chlorides, by contacting the PuO{sub 2} and U0{sub 2} with Li metal in the presence of an alkali metal chloride salt substantially free of rare earth and actinide chlorides for a time and at a temperature sufficient to convert the U0{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2} to metals while converting Li metal to Li{sub 2}O. Li{sub 2}O is removed either by reducing with rare earth metals or by providing an oxygen electrode for transporting 0{sub 2} out of the electrorefiner and a cathode, and thereafter applying an emf to the electrorefiner electrodes sufficient to cause the Li{sub 2}O to disassociate to 0{sub 2} and Li metal but insufficient to decompose the alkali metal chloride salt. The U and Pu and excess lithium are then converted to chlorides by reaction with CdCl{sub 2}.

Tomczuk, Z.; Miller, W.E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Modeling of grain growth in UO2 under a temperature gradient  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterization of MOX fuel pellets by Photothermal microscopy · Correlation Between Thermal Conductivity and Microstructural Evolutions in CeO2 Upon ...

85

A brief history of the PUREX and UO{sub 3} facilities  

SciTech Connect

The Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant, conceived during the early Cold War years, was a vehicle to increase significantly US nuclear weapons production capacity. The original PUREX Plant was a concrete rectangle 1,005 feet long and 61.5 feet wide. The shielding capacity of the concrete was designed so that personnel in non-regulated service areas would not receive radiation in excess of 0.1 millirem per hour. This report discusses the design of the PUREX Plant, the production chronology, projects and equipment changes, equipment decontamination and reuse, waste management, and contamination events that have occurred during the operation of the plant. Additionally, the development and history of the Uranium Trioxide Plant are also covered.

Gerber, M.S.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Evaluation of UF6 to UO2 Conversion Capability at Commercial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 2.2.7 Korea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

87

ZeptoOS: Operating Systems for Petascale | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kamil Iskra Kazutomo Yoshii Other Contributors Ivan Beschastnikh (UW) Susan Coghlan (ALCF) Cameron Cooper (OSU) Aroon Nataraj (UO) Al Malony (UO) Sameer Shende (UO) Suravee...

88

Calculational note for the radiological and toxicological effects of a UO3 release from the T-Hopper storage pad  

SciTech Connect

The radiological and toxicological consequences of a hypothetical release of U03 powder from the T-hopper storage pad adjacent the 2714-U building were calculated.

GOLDBERG, H.J.

1999-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

89

Inductive Double-Contingency Analysis of UO2 Powder Bulk Blending Operations at a Commercial Fuel Plant (U)  

SciTech Connect

An inductive double-contingency analysis (DCA) method developed by the criticality safety function at the Savannah River Site, was applied in Criticality Safety Evaluations (CSEs) of five major plant process systems at the Westinghouse Electric Corporation`s Commercial Nuclear Fuel Manufacturing Plant in Columbia, South Carolina (WEC-Cola.). The method emphasizes a thorough evaluation of the controls intended to provide barriers against criticality for postulated initiating events, and has been demonstrated effective at identifying common mode failure potential and interdependence among multiple controls. A description of the method and an example of its application is provided.

Skiles, S. K. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States)

1994-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

90

Effect of Highly Enriched/Highly Burnt UO2 Fuels on Fuel Cycle Costs, Radiotoxicity, and Nuclear Design Parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Advances in Nuclear Fuel Management - Increased Enrichment/High Burnup and Light Water Reactor Fuel Cycle Optimization

Robert Gregg; Andrew Worrall

91

High-precision molecular dynamics simulation of UO2-PuO2: superionic transition in uranium dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our series of articles is devoted to high-precision molecular dynamics simulation of mixed actinide-oxide (MOX) fuel in the rigid ions approximation using high-performance graphics processors (GPU). In this article we assess the 10 most relevant interatomic sets of pair potential (SPP) by reproduction of the Bredig superionic phase transition (anion sublattice premelting) in uranium dioxide. The measurements carried out in a wide temperature range from 300K up to melting point with 1K accuracy allowed reliable detection of this phase transition with each SPP. The {\\lambda}-peaks obtained are smoother and wider than it was assumed previously. In addition, for the first time a pressure dependence of the {\\lambda}-peak characteristics was measured, in a range from -5 GPa to 5 GPa its amplitudes had parabolic plot and temperatures had linear (that is similar to the Clausius-Clapeyron equation for melting temperature).

Potashnikov, S I; Nekrasov, K A; Kupryazhkin, A Ya

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

A QM/MM Study on the Aqueous Solvation of the Tetrahydroxouranylate [UO?(OH)?]˛? Complex Ion  

SciTech Connect

We report a QM augmented QM/MM study on the coordination of the tetrahydroxouranylate ion in aqueous solution. QM/MM geometry optimizations followed by full QM single-point calculations on the optimized structures show that a hexa-coordinated structure is more stable than the hepta-coordinated structure by 43 kJ/mol. Charge transfer of the tetrahydroxouranylate to the solvating water molecules is relatively modest, and can be modeled by including a solvation layer consisting of 12 explicit water molecules.

Infante, Ivan A.; van Stralen, Bas; Visscher, Lucas

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Tungsten Cladding of Tungsten-Uranium Dioxide (W-UO2) Composites by Deposition from Tungsten Hexafluoride (WF6)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

?A program is being conducted to develop a process for cladding tungsten and tungsten cermet fuels with tungsten deposited from the vapor state by the hydrogen reduction of tungsten hexafluoride. Early work was performed using recrystallized, high purity, commercial tungsten as the substrate material. Temperatures in the range 660 to 12950F (350 to 1700°C) and pressures from 10 to 350 mm Hg were investigated. Hydrogen to WF 6 ratios of 10: 1 to 150: 1 were utilized. Efforts were directed toward optimizing deposition process parameters to attain control of qualities such as coating thickness, uniformity, density, impurity content, and surface quality. Substrate penetration methods have been investigated in the interest of completely eliminating the interface between the fueled substrate and cladding. In addition, the effects of process parameters and post-cladding heat treatments on the fuel retention properties of clad composites at 4500 degrees F (2480 degrees C) in hydrogen for 2 hours have been evaluated. As a result of work performed during the first phase of the program it has been shown that the rate of deposition of tungsten from WF 6 and the uniformity of the deposit can be varied in a predictable and reproducible manner by exercising control over the temperature, pressure, and gas flow rates at which the deposits are produced. A significant result of the study is the discovery that substrate nucleation and epitaxial growth in deposits made on both unfueled tungsten and fueled substrates may be effected by pretreating the substrates in hydrogen. High temperature fuel retention testing of tungsten clad W-U02 at 45000F (2480 degrees C) in hydrogen for 2 hours has demonstrated that the vapor deposited layer effectively and consistently restricts fuel loss.

Lamartine, J.T.; Hoppe, A.W.

1965-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

E&nr Ph. S. W.. Wahhgt~n. D.C. 200242174, TIkpbnc (202) 48a60uo  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

under consideration; and six institutions recently iden- tq .o-OS tified during a search of Hanford records. p1,6-01 I '1. 2 8 The attached was prepared to document the...

95

A literature review on the chemical and physical properties of uranyl fluoride (UO sub 2 F sub 2 )  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews the preparation and properties of uranyl fluoride. Data are given on the crystal structure, solubility in water, specific gravity, density, specific heat, enthalpy, entropy, acidity, corrosion properties, and refractive indices. Empirical formulas are given to calculate specific gravity, density of aqueous solutions, molal volume, and refractive indices. 13 refs., 3 figs., 11 tabs.

Myers, W.L. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA) Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (USA). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Mr. J. C. Delaney  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

UO2 Dissolution ... 5-a 3: High Density UO2 Dissolution ... 6-a 4. Allowable Interactions With U02 Feed ... 6-a ., Table 1' .:...

97

Issues in the use of Weapons-Grade MOX Fuel in VVER-1000 Nuclear Reactors: Comparison of UO2 and MOX Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to quantify the differences between mixed oxide (MOX) and low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuels and to assess in reasonable detail the potential impacts of MOX fuel use in VVER-1000 nuclear power plants in Russia. This report is a generic tool to assist in the identification of plant modifications that may be required to accommodate receiving, storing, handling, irradiating, and disposing of MOX fuel in VVER-1000 reactors. The report is based on information from work performed by Russian and U.S. institutions. The report quantifies each issue, and the differences between LEU and MOX fuels are described as accurately as possible, given the current sources of data.

Carbajo, J.J.

2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

98

Raman Investigation of The Uranium Compounds U3O8, UF4, UH3 and UO3 under Pressure at Room Temperature  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our current state-of-the-art X-ray diffraction experiments are primarily sensitive to the position of the uranium atom. While the uranium - low-Z element bond (such as U-H or U-F) changes under pressure and temperature the X-ray diffraction investigations do not reveal information about the bonding or the stoichiometry. Questions that can be answered by Raman spectroscopy are (i) whether the bonding strength changes under pressure, as observed by either blue- or red-shifted peaks of the Raman active bands in the spectrum and (ii) whether the low-Z element will eventually be liberated and leave the host lattice, i.e. do the fluorine, oxygen, or hydrogen atoms form dimers after breaking the bond to the uranium atom. Therefore Raman spectra were also collected in the range where those decomposition products would appear. Raman is particularly well suited to these types of investigations due to its sensitivity to trace amounts of materials. One challenge for Raman investigations of the uranium compounds is that they are opaque to visible light. They absorb the incoming radiation and quickly heat up to the point of decomposition. This has been dealt with in the past by keeping the incoming laser power to very low levels on the tens of milliWatt range consequently affecting signal to noise. Recent modern investigations also used very small laser spot sizes (micrometer range) but ran again into the problem of heating and chemical sensitivity to the environment. In the studies presented here (in contrast to all other studies that were performed at ambient conditions only) we employ micro-Raman spectroscopy of samples situated in a diamond anvil cell. This increases the trustworthiness of the obtained data in several key-aspects: (a) We surrounded the samples in the DAC with neon as a pressure transmitting medium, a noble gas that is absolutely chemically inert. (b) Through the medium the sample is thermally heat sunk to the diamond anvils, diamond of course possessing the very best heat conductivity of any material. Therefore local heating and decomposition are avoided, a big challenge with other approaches casting doubts on their results. (c) This in turn benefits the signal/noise ratio tremendously since the Raman features of uranium-compounds are very small. The placement of the samples in DACs allows for higher laser powers to impinge on the sample spot while keeping the spot-size larger than in previous studies and keep the samples from heating up. Raman spectroscopy is a very sensitive non-invasive technique and we will show that it is even possible to distinguish the materials by their origin / manufacturer as we have studied samples from Cameco (Canada) and IBI-Labs (US-Florida) and can compare with ambient literature data for samples from Strem (US-MA) and Areva (Pierrelatte, France).

Lipp, M J; Jenei, Z; Park-Klepeis, J; Evans, W J

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

LA-11224-MS  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

11224-MS 11224-MS UC-66a and UC-70 Issued: March 1988 LA--112 2 4-MS DE88 005902 FEHM: Finite Element Heat and Mass Transfer Code George Zyvoloski Zora Dash Sharad Kelkar DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsi- bility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Refer- ence herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recom-

100

LA-10256-MS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

10256-MS 10256-MS Los Alamos National Laboratory is operated by the University of California for the United States Department of Energy under contract W-7405-ENG-36. Radiological Survey and Evaluation of the Fallout Area fom the Trinity Test: Chupadera Mesa and White Sands Misile Range, New Mexco - ~ ~S1S' :ts rV T Los Alamos National Laboratory Ly© /.aU U UwHjm ©,Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 An Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer Prepared by Kathy Derouin, Group HSE-8 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ms uo uo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

M&S methodological challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

M&S provides a formal way to generate or test existing knowledge. Like mathematics, M&S provides an apparatus for deduction while generating data that can be used for statistical inference. However, unlike mathematics, M&S's formal approach varies from ... Keywords: epistemology, methodology, philosophy

Jose J. Padilla, Andreas Tolk, Saikou Y. Diallo

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Is LA-12152-MS  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Is Is LA-12152-MS DE91 016813 A Weibull Brittle Material Failure Model for the ABAQUS Computer Program Joel Bennett L ('r^^r5' /A\ n^rnr?i/'7^(^ '-°s Alamos National Laboratory l y j ^ /AAUCSILI LI U i y j ^ LOS Alamos.New Mexico 87545 ^ _ . * i - DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product,

103

MS, II-J  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

I' ; ,' I' ; ,' Departm&th of Energy 1 MS, II-J Washington. DC 20585 ' . I I The Honorable John Gallagher ,)fl', /',' ' 103 E. Michigan Avenue .i., ,.' Battle Creek, Michigan 49016 _. Dear Mayor Gallagheri d,---, " '/ approachto openness i.n: with the: public. In (FUSRAP)i.is responsible agencies, determining ~author~ity, performing remedial action to cleanup sites to meet current radiological protection requirements.. A conservative set of technical evaluation guidelines is used in these investigations to assure protection of public health,,~safety and then environment. Where.DQE does not,have .authority for proceeding; the available site information is forwarded to the appropriate Federal or State Agency. DOE studied the historical records of the former Oliver Corp. site, and it

104

Ms. Sharon M. Fiorillo  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sharon M. Fiorillo Sharon M. Fiorillo 6927 Wilson Street West Mifflin, PA 15122 Dear Ms. Fiorillo: Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 MAR - 5 2008_ Re: OHA Case No. TBB-0070 This letter concerns the complaint of retaliation that you filed with the Department of Energy (DOE) under 10 C.F.R. Part 708. On August 20, 2007, the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) received your petition for Secretarial review of the July 16, 2007, jurisdictional appeal decision issued by the OHA Acting Director. You filed a statement of arguments in support of your position on September 4, 2007. 'Onder the Part 708 regulations, the Secretary will reverse or revise an appeal decision by the OHA Director only in extraordinary circumstances. 10 C.F.R. § 708.19. The basis of this proceeding is your contention that you made a

105

Workshops: MS&T '04  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 26, 2004 ... Office of Legislative and Public Affairs National Science Foundation Ms. Hanson has worked in the media and public affairs business for more ...

106

METLIN: MS/MS metabolite data from the MAGGIE Project  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

METLIN is a metabolite database for metabolomics containing over 50,000 structures, it also represents a data management system designed to assist in a broad array of metabolite research and metabolite identification by providing public access to its repository of current and comprehensive MS/MS metabolite data. An annotated list of known metabolites and their mass, chemical formula, and structure are available on the METLIN website. Each metabolite is conveniently linked to outside resources such as the the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) for further reference and inquiry. MS/MS data is also available on many of the metabolites. The list is expanding continuously as more metabolite information is being deposited and discovered. [Copied from http://metlin.scripps.edu/]

Metlin is a component of the MAGGIE Project. MAGGIE is funded by the DOE Genomics: GTL and is an acronym for "Molecular Assemblies, Genes, and Genomics Integrated Efficiently."

107

LA-5097-MS INFORMAL REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

5097-MS 5097-MS INFORMAL REPORT lamos lamos scientific laboratory scientific laboratory of the University of California of the University of California LOS ALAMOS. NEW MEXICO 87544 LOS ALAMOS. NEW MEXICO 87544 Los AIamos Land Areas Environmental Radiation Survey 1972 . In the interest of prompt distribution, this LAMS re port was not edited by the Technical Information staff. Printed in the United States of America. Available from National Technical Information Service U. S. Department of Commerce 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, Virginia 22151 Price: Printed Copy $3.00; Microfiche $0.95 * ii. : . IOS alamos LA-5097.MS Informal Report UC-41 ISSUED: November 1972 sctentific laboratory of the University of California LOS ALAMO% NEW MEXICO 81544 I L Los Alamos Land Areas

108

Category:Jackson, MS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MS MS Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Jackson, MS" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Jackson MS Entergy Mississippi Inc.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 63 KB SVHospital Jackson MS Entergy Mississippi Inc.png SVHospital Jackson MS ... 74 KB SVLargeHotel Jackson MS Entergy Mississippi Inc.png SVLargeHotel Jackson M... 63 KB SVLargeOffice Jackson MS Entergy Mississippi Inc.png SVLargeOffice Jackson ... 72 KB SVMediumOffice Jackson MS Entergy Mississippi Inc.png SVMediumOffice Jackson... 72 KB SVMidriseApartment Jackson MS Entergy Mississippi Inc.png SVMidriseApartment Jac... 62 KB SVOutPatient Jackson MS Entergy Mississippi Inc.png SVOutPatient Jackson M... 74 KB

109

Ms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bogart provided legal support on issues regarding public contract acquisitions, appropriations law, environmental law, transportation, security and national defense. Since...

110

Properties of Uranium Compounds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Triuranium Octaoxide (U3O8) Uranium Dioxide (UO2) Uranium Tetrafluoride (U4) Uranyl Fluoride (UO2F2) The physical properties of the pertinent chemical forms of uranium are...

111

M&S education: practical approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As M&S work force needs increase, debate continues about what Modeling and Simulation (M&S) education should look like or where it belongs. Many schools are currently taking steps to develop undergraduate programs in M&S. This paper proposes a practical ... Keywords: apprenticeship, courses, technician education, undergraduate education

Irin Hall

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Calculations of Threshold Displacement Energies in Y2Ti2O7 and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Radiation Effects in Oxide Ceramics and Novel LWR Fuels ... Understanding Nuclear Fuel Thermal Conductivity from Phonons in UO2.

113

MODELING THE PERFORMANCE OF HIGH BURNUP THORIA AND URANIA PWR FUEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel performance models have been developed to assess the performance of ThO[subscript 2]-UO[subscript 2]

Long, Y.

114

Shale gas extraction in the UK: What the people think? Applications are invited for a three -year fully funded PhD studentship (BGS/UoN) based in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale gas extraction in the UK: What the people think? Applications are invited for a three -year/EU rate) and a maintenance grant (ÂŁ13,590 in 12/13). The emergence of shale gas on the energy landscape in the transition to a low carbon economy. In the US, for example, the speed at which shale gas has been developed

Nottingham, University of

115

HDX-MS for Biopharmaceutical Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Improve HDX-MS technology for measurements of trans-membrane protein drug ... to find the epitope of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA ...

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

116

Nuclear materials research progress reports for 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research is reported concerning radiation enhancement of stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloy, surface chemistry of epitaxial Si deposited by thermal cracking of silane, thermal gradient migration of metallic inclusions in UO/sub 2/, molecular beam studies of atomic H and reduction of oxides, mass transfer and reduction of UO/sub 2/, kinetics of laser pulse vaporization of UO/sub 2/, retention and release of water by UO/sub 2/ pellets, and solubility of H in UO/sub 2/. (FS)

Olander, D.R.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Analysis of Carbamate Pesticides: Validation of Semi-Volatile Analysis by HPLC-MS/MS by EPA Method MS666  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Region 5 Chicago Regional Laboratory (CRL) developed a method for analysis of aldicarb, bromadiolone, carbofuran, oxamyl, and methomyl in water by high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS), titled Method EPA MS666. This draft standard operating procedure (SOP) was distributed to multiple EPA laboratories and to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, which was tasked to serve as a reference laboratory for EPA's Environmental Reference Laboratory Network (ERLN) and to develop and validate analytical procedures. The primary objective of this study was to validate and verify the analytical procedures described in MS666 for analysis of carbamate pesticides in aqueous samples. The gathered data from this validation study will be used to: (1) demonstrate analytical method performance; (2) generate quality control acceptance criteria; and (3) revise the SOP to provide a validated method that would be available for use during a homeland security event. The data contained in this report will be compiled, by EPA CRL, with data generated by other EPA Regional laboratories so that performance metrics of Method EPA MS666 can be determined.

Owens, J; Koester, C

2008-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

118

Analysis of Combustion Chamber Deposits by ESI-TOF-MS and MALDI-TOF-MS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Combustion chamber deposits (CCDs) in internal combustion engines have been studied by various techniques to understand the relationship of performance degradation with deposit quantity and structure. XPS, XAS, NMR, and elemental analysis have offered insight into the bulk structure of C, H, N, O and metal components [1]. MS has offered some information about compound structure, but results are limited due to the insolubility and complexity of the materials. Recent advances in MS have opened new possibilities for analysis of CCDs. Here we report initial findings on the carbon structure of these deposits determined by ESI-TOF-MS and MADLI-TOF-MS.

Reynolds, J G; Shields, S J; Roos, J W

2001-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

119

Ms. Rebecca Peterson Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Ms. Rebecca Peterson Ms. Rebecca Peterson Energy Information Administration Submitted by email: ERS2014@eia.gov Dear Ms. Peterson: This is to comment on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) solicitation of comments on the proposed three-year reauthorization of forms EIA-63B, EIA-411, EIA-826, EIA-860, EIA-860M, EIA-861, EIA-861S, and EIA-923, and the creation of form EIA-930. These comments are in response to the notice published in Vol. 78, No. 44 of the Federal Register on March 6, 2013. Omaha Public Power District (OPPD) is a customer-owned electric utility and political subdivision of the state of Nebraska. OPPD is currently a balancing authority and owns a transmission system and

120

Manahmen fr MS Windows Betriebssysteme Gerd Hofmann  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MaĂ?nahmen fĂĽr MS Windows Betriebssysteme Gerd Hofmann IT-Sicherheitsforum - Betriebssystemsicherheit 24. Juni 2004 #12;24.06.04 gerd.hofmann@rrze.uni-erlangen.de 2Windows Sicherheit Vorstellung Gerd-85-28920 RRZE: Raum RZ 2.013 #12;24.06.04 gerd.hofmann@rrze.uni-erlangen.de 3Windows Sicherheit Inhaltsliste

Fiebig, Peter

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ms uo uo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Investigation of Uranium Polymorphs  

SciTech Connect

The UO3-water system is complex and has not been fully characterized, even though these species are common throughout the nuclear fuel cycle. As an example, most production schemes for UO3 result in a mixture of up to six or more different polymorphic phases, and small differences in these conditions will affect phase genesis that ultimately result in measureable changes to the end product. As a result, this feature of the UO3-water system may be useful as a means for determining process history. This research effort attempts to better characterize the UO3-water system with a variety of optical techniques for the purpose of developing some predictive capability for estimating process history in polymorphic phases of unknown origin. Three commercially relevant preparation methods for the production of UO3 were explored. Previously unreported low temperature routes to ?- and ?-UO3 were discovered. Raman and fluorescence spectroscopic libraries were established for pure and mixed polymorphic forms of UO3 in addition to the common hydrolysis products of UO3. An advantage of the sensitivity of optical fluorescence microscopy over XRD has been demonstrated. Preliminary aging studies of the ? and ? forms of UO3 have been conducted. In addition, development of a 3-D phase field model used to predict phase genesis of the system was initiated. Thermodynamic and structural constants that will feed the model have been gathered from the literature for most of the UO3 polymorphic phases.

Sweet, Lucas E.; Henager, Charles H.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Meier, David E.; Peper, Shane M.; Schwantes, Jon M.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

MASIC: a software program for fast quantitation and flexible visualization of chromatographic profiles from detected LC-MS(/MS) features  

SciTech Connect

Quantitative analysis of liquid chromatography (LC)- mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) data is essential to many proteomics studies. We have developed MASIC to accurately measure peptide abundances and LC elution times in low-resolution LC-MS/MS analyses. This software program uses an efficient processing algorithm to quickly generate mass specific selected ion chromatograms from a dataset and provides an interactive browser that allows users to examine individual chromatograms in a variety of fashions. The improved elution time estimates afforded by MASIC increase the utility of LC-MS/MS data in the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag approach to proteomics.

Monroe, Matthew E.; Shaw, Jason L.; Daly, Don S.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Smith, Richard D.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Analysis of Phosphonic Acids: Validation of Semi-Volatile Analysis by HPLC-MS/MS by EPA Method MS999  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Region 5 Chicago Regional Laboratory (CRL) developed a method titled Analysis of Diisopropyl Methylphosphonate, Ethyl Hydrogen Dimethylamidophosphate, Isopropyl Methylphosphonic Acid, Methylphosphonic Acid, and Pinacolyl Methylphosphonic Acid in Water by Multiple Reaction Monitoring Liquid Chromatography/Tandem Mass Spectrometry: EPA Version MS999. This draft standard operating procedure (SOP) was distributed to multiple EPA laboratories and to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, which was tasked to serve as a reference laboratory for EPA's Environmental Reference Laboratory Network (ERLN) and to develop and validate analytical procedures. The primary objective of this study was to validate and verify the analytical procedures described in EPA Method MS999 for analysis of the listed phosphonic acids and surrogates in aqueous samples. The gathered data from this validation study will be used to: (1) demonstrate analytical method performance; (2) generate quality control acceptance criteria; and (3) revise the SOP to provide a validated method that would be available for use during a homeland security event. The data contained in this report will be compiled, by EPA CRL, with data generated by other EPA Regional laboratories so that performance metrics of EPA Method MS999 can be determined.

Owens, J; Vu, A; Koester, C

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

124

Energy Management Standards (EnMS)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Standards (EnMS) Paul Scheihing U.S. DOE January, 2009 2 Why an Energy Management Standard? Most energy efficiency in industry is achieved through changes in how energy is managed in a facility, rather than through installation of new technologies; An energy management standard provides a method for integrating energy efficiency into existing industrial or commercial management systems for continuous improvement; All existing and planned energy management standards are compatible with ISO 9000/14000 1 ; Companies who have voluntarily adopted an energy management plan (a central feature of an EnMS - Standard) have achieved major energy intensity improvements 2 . 1 International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 2 Btu/lb of product ANSI Accredited U.S. TAG to ISO/PC 242

125

Core Designs and Economic Analyses of Homogeneous Thoria-Urania Fuel in Light Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The objective is to develop equilibrium fuel cycle designs for a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) loaded with homogeneously mixed uranium-thorium dioxide (ThO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2}) fuel and compare those designs with more conventional UO{sub 2} designs.The fuel cycle analyses indicate that ThO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2} fuel cycles are technically feasible in modern PWRs. Both power peaking and soluble boron concentrations tend to be lower than in conventional UO{sub 2} fuel cycles, and the burnable poison requirements are less.However, the additional costs associated with the use of homogeneous ThO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2} fuel in a PWR are significant, and extrapolation of the results gives no indication that further increases in burnup will make thoria-urania fuel economically competitive with the current UO{sub 2} fuel used in light water reactors.

Saglam, Mehmet; Sapyta, Joe J.; Spetz, Stewart W.; Hassler, Lawrence A. [Framatome ANP, Inc. (France)

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

126

Analysis of Combustion Chamber Deposits by ESI-TOF-MS and MALDI-TOF-MS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Combustion chamber deposits (CCD) in internal combustion engines have been studied by various techniques to understand the relationship of performance degradation with deposit quantity and structure. XPS, XAS, NMR, and elemental analysis have offered insight into the bulk structure of C, H, N, O and metal components. MS has offered some information about compound structure, but results are limited due to the insolubility and complexity of the materials. Recently, we have reported on the metal structure by XPS and XAS of several deposits from a GM 3800 engine generated using a standard fuel and one that contains low levels of the gasoline anti-knock additive, MMT. Here we report the initial findings on the carbon structure of these deposits determined by ESI-TOF-MS and MADLI-TOF-MS.

Reynolds, J G; Shields, S J; Roos, J W

2001-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

127

Educating the workforce: M&S professional education  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As Modeling & Simulation (M&S) becomes increasingly important, there is a significant and growing need to educate and train M&S practitioners and researchers. The Department of Defense (DoD) has a growing need for an educated M&S workforce. This need ...

Margaret L. Loper; Amy Henninger; John W. Diem; Mikel D. Petty; Andreas Tolk

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

SEPARATION OF URANIUM AND PLUTONIUM OXIDES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

ABS>A method of separating a mixture of UO/sub 2/ and PuO/sub 2/ is given which comprises immersing the mixture in a fused NaCl-KCl bath, chlorinating with chlorine or phosgene, and preferentially electrolytically or chemically reducing the UO/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ so produced to UO/sub 2/ and filtering it out. (AEC)

Benedict, G.E.; Lyon, W.L.

1961-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Ms. Leslie Jones ENERGY STAR Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 6, 2012 June 6, 2012 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW Room62023 Washington, DC 20460 Dear Ms. Jones: On October 28, 2011, the United States Depatiment of Energy (DOE) notified Friedrich Air Conditioning Company (Friedrich) that DOE had completed testing of Friedrich room air conditioner models WS12Cl0 and WS13C30 under the ENERGY STAR Testing Pilot Program and confirmed that these models do not meet the ENERGY STAR energy efficiency requirement of9.4 EER. On November 3, 201 I, DOE notified Friedrich that its room air conditioner model USI2C30 does not meet the ENERGY STAR energy efficiency requirement of9.4 EER. In each notice, DOE gave Friedrich twenty days to provide conclusive manufacturing or design evidence or quality assurance information on why DOE testing showed that these models do not

130

Ms. Leslie Jones ENERGY STAR Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 7, 2011 July 7, 2011 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue NW Room62023 Washington, DC 20460 Dear Ms. Jones: Electrolux Home Products, Inc. (Electro lux) room air conditioner model FRA256ST2 was selected for testing as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) ENERGY STAR® Verification Testing Pilot Program. DOE's initial testing, performed on a unit of this model, indicated that it may not meet ENERGY STAR requirements. After testing three additional units of this model, and finding that each fell short of the minimum standard of9.4 EER, DOE asked Electrolux to provide conclusive manufacturing or design evidence or quality assurance information on why this product should be viewed as meeting the ENERGY STAR Program's energy efficiency

131

Ms. Leslie Jones ENERGY STAR Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 21,2010 December 21,2010 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW Room 62023 Washington, DC 20460 Dear Ms. Jones: On November 24, 2010, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) notified Haier that DOE had tested the Haier room air conditioner model ESA3087 as part of the ENERGY STAR Testing Pilot Program, and that, according to Stage I testing, this model exceeded allowable ENERGY STAR energy-efficiency requirements by 18 percent. DOE gave Haier until December 3, 2010, to request additional testing or have this matter referred to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for disqualification from the ENERGY STAR program. On December 2, Haier notified DOE that it was in the process of voluntarily removing model

132

Ms. Leslie Jones ENERGY STAR Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 20, 2011 September 20, 2011 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW Room 62023 Washington, DC 20460 Dear Ms. Jones: On March 7, 2011, the United States Depmiment of Energy (DOE) notified Baier America Trading, L.L.C. (Baier) that DOE had completed testing of Baier refrigerator model PRTS21SAC* under the ENERGY STAR Verification Testing Pilot Program and confirmed that the model did not meet ENERGY STAR energy efficiency requirements. DOE gave Baier until March 28, 2011, to provide conclusive manufacturing or design evidence or quality assurance information to rebut DOE testing results, which showed that this product did not meet the ENERGY STAR Program's energy efficiency requirement. Baier responded to DOE in a letter dated March 22, 2011, contending that the results of

133

3D Microstructural Characterization of Oxide Nuclear Fuel Surrogates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... were developed to obtain Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) data for depleted UO2 pellets. ... Segregation of Ru to Edge Dislocations in Uranium Dioxide.

134

P1-04: 3D Microstructural Characterization of Uranium Oxide as a ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, P1-04: 3D Microstructural Characterization of Uranium ... to obtain Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) data for depleted UO2 pellets that  ...

135

Colleagues and Friends Remember Milton Wadsworth, 1983 TMS ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 18, 2013 ... He also held a number of administrative positions at UoU, including two separate terms as Department of Metallurgy chair, Utah Mining and ...

136

Practical estimation of veering effects on high-rise structures: a ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Teshigawara, M. (2001), Structural design principles (chapter 6 ... RH and Lappe, UO (1964), “Wind and temperature ... on a 1400 ft tower”, J. Appl. ...

2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

137

Accumulation of uranium at low concentration by the green alga ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

by Scenedesmus obliquus 34 was rapid and energy-independent and the biosorption of. UO2+ ... by the green algaScenedesmus obliquus34 is described here.

138

Pyrolitic Uranium Compound (PYRUC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pyrolitic Uranium Compound Pyrolitic Uranium Compound (PYRUC) PYRolitic Uranium Compound (PYRUC) is a shielding material consisting of depleted uranium UO2 or UC in either pellet...

139

Production and Handling Slide 14: Conversion of Yellow Cake to...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uranium dioxide UO2, called "brown oxide," is formed by reducing ammonium diuranate (NH4)2U2O7 by the addition of hydrogen. Slide 14...

140

Production and Handling Slide 15: Yellow Cake, Uranyl Nitrate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skip Presentation Navigation First Slide Previous Slide Next Slide Last Presentation Table of Contents Yellow Cake, Uranyl Nitrate, ADU, UO2 Refer to caption below for image...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ms uo uo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Production and Handling Slide 16: Conversion of Yellow Cake to...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrofluoric acid HF is added to uranium dioxide UO2 to form uranium tetrafluoride UF4, often called "green salt." Slide 16...

142

Print  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For example, uranium dioxide (UO2) is the primary nuclear fuel in light-water reactors. ... He graduated from Ohio Wesleyan University in 1978 (BA in Physics  ...

143

Environmentally Assisted Cracking of Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In-Situ Repairs of Oil Industry Pipelines, Tanks and Vessels by Welding Using Metal Arc Welding Under Oil (MAW-UO) · Interpretation of Crack Initiation and ...

144

Pair Distribution Function Analysis of Irradiated Cladding and Duct ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

First-Principles Theory of Magnetism, Crystal Field and Phonon Spectrum of UO2 ... Light Water Reactor Materials for Commercial Nuclear Power Applications.

145

About this Symposium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2011 ... Lifetime extension of reactors - Nuclear materials aging, ... First-Principles Theory of Magnetism, Crystal Field and Phonon Spectrum of UO2.

146

Metallic Fuel: Modeling and Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 9, 2012 ... Thermophyical Properties of Thoria and ThO2-UO2 Mixed Oxide Fuels ... Thorium-based nuclear fuel cycles are promising for their intrinsic ...

147

184 Synthesis, Structure and Characterization of Silver Doped ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

129 Minimization of Diametric Tolerance of U3O8-added UO2 Annular Pellet .... 220 Microwave Processing of Polymer Coatings on Instrument-Grade Wood.

148

098 Room Temperature Multiferroism in Nanocapacitors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

129 Minimization of Diametric Tolerance of U3O8-added UO2 Annular Pellet .... 220 Microwave Processing of Polymer Coatings on Instrument-Grade Wood.

149

080 Enhanced Magnetization and Magnetoelectric Coupling in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

129 Minimization of Diametric Tolerance of U3O8-added UO2 Annular Pellet .... 220 Microwave Processing of Polymer Coatings on Instrument-Grade Wood.

150

049 The Effect of Current Type on Morphology, Chemical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

129 Minimization of Diametric Tolerance of U3O8-added UO2 Annular Pellet .... 220 Microwave Processing of Polymer Coatings on Instrument-Grade Wood.

151

150 Evolution of Internal Strain with Temperature in Depleted ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

129 Minimization of Diametric Tolerance of U3O8-added UO2 Annular Pellet .... 220 Microwave Processing of Polymer Coatings on Instrument-Grade Wood.

152

About this Abstract  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

129 Minimization of Diametric Tolerance of U3O8-added UO2 Annular Pellet .... 220 Microwave Processing of Polymer Coatings on Instrument-Grade Wood.

153

095 Oxyfluoride Based Low Dielectric Constant LTCC Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

129 Minimization of Diametric Tolerance of U3O8-added UO2 Annular Pellet .... 220 Microwave Processing of Polymer Coatings on Instrument-Grade Wood.

154

040 Preparation of NaBiTiO 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

129 Minimization of Diametric Tolerance of U3O8-added UO2 Annular Pellet .... 220 Microwave Processing of Polymer Coatings on Instrument-Grade Wood.

155

070 Characteristics of Superconducting YBCO Phase Formation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

129 Minimization of Diametric Tolerance of U3O8-added UO2 Annular Pellet .... 220 Microwave Processing of Polymer Coatings on Instrument-Grade Wood.

156

192 Fabrication and Application of Ag/Al(OH)3 Nanocomposite Film ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

129 Minimization of Diametric Tolerance of U3O8-added UO2 Annular Pellet .... 220 Microwave Processing of Polymer Coatings on Instrument-Grade Wood.

157

A Potential Approach to Address Materials Aging Issues in Nuclear ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Potential applications of this technology for nuclear reactor aystems will be ... First-Principles Theory of Magnetism, Crystal Field and Phonon Spectrum of UO2 .

158

Light Water Reactor Materials for Commercial Nuclear Power ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Light Water Reactor Materials for Commercial Nuclear ... First- Principles Theory of Magnetism, Crystal Field and Phonon Spectrum of UO2.

159

LA-9252-MS UC-70a  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

/p/j ,()i --' /p/j ,()i --' z!- LA-9252-MS UC-70a Issued: May 1982 Environmental Analysis of the Bayo Canyon (TA-10) Site, Los Alamos, New Mexico Roger W. Ferenbaugh Thomas E. Buhl Alan K. Stoker Wayne FL Hansen kos A[am@ Los Alamos,New Mexico 87545 Los Alamos National Laboratory CONTENTS ABSTRACT 1 1.0 INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND 1.1 The FUSRAP Program 1.2 Preferred Alternative 2.0 THE BAY0 CANYON SITE 2.1 Summary History and Description of Site 2.1.1 Description of Site 2.1.2 History of Site 2.2 Need for Action 2.2.1 Radiological Risk 2.2.1.1 Method of Estimating Risk 2.2.1.2 Results of Dose Calculations 2.2.1.3 Health Risks from Residual Bayo Canyon Contamination 2.2.2 Criteria upon Which Cleanup Action is Based 2.3 Other Agencies Involved in Implementation of the

160

Equal Opportunity & Diversity Office WH15 MS117  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Equal Opportunity & Diversity Office WH15 MS117 Questions & to Volunteer: Samantha Poeppelman x3933 Barb Hehner x 2986 Sandra Charles x 4574 Wednesday & Thursday, November 13 & 14,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ms uo uo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

PhD Chemical Engineering MS Chemical Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 PhD Chemical Engineering MS Chemical Engineering Bylaws Gene and Linda Voiland School of ChemicalD Chemical Engineering, MS Chemical Engineering B. Discipline: Edgar, et al.1 provide a succinct description of chemical engineering: "chemical engineers seek to understand, manipulate, and control the molecular basis

Collins, Gary S.

162

Interface contributions to peak broadening in CE-ESI-MS  

SciTech Connect

The applications of capillary electrophoresis (CE) are expanding, and a number of commercial CE instruments are now available. Combining CE with mass spectroscopy (MS), first done with an electrospray ionization (ESI) interface, yields additional advantages. Other interfaces have been proposed, but CE-ESI-MS offers better sensitivity, reduced background, applicability to higher molecular weight (MW) compounds and a better interface design. Our aim has been to exploit the advantages of automated CE coupled to MS for separation of biological materials. Details of our instrument design are provided. Samples used for these studies were a mixture of myoglobin proteins (MW {approximately}17 kilodaltons) and a tryptic digest of tuna cytochrome c. The results show the ESI-MS interface does not broaden bands, and ion dissociation in the mass spectrometer permits the unambiguous identification of fragments in cases where mass alone is insufficient. 2 refs., 2 figs. (MHB)

Udseth, H.R.; Barinaga, C.J.; Smith, R.D. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Whitted, W.H. (Beckman Instruments, Inc., Palo Alto, CA (USA))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Genizah MS T-S AS 152.98  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accounts and lists, probably from a notebook. On 1r list of Genesis Parashot, on 2v several names such as Sulaym?n, Sa??d and M?s?, with numerals....

Unknown

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

164

To: Ms. Patrice Brewington From: The Environmental Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

To: Ms. Patrice Brewington From: The Environmental Project Re: Quarterly Report (July 1,2005 - September 30,2005) Federal FY 4Q DOE Expenditures: 924,746.60 Summary During FY '05...

165

Defects and Related Phenomena I - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal oxides added to UO2 to improve material performance during irradiation, ... The oxygen and uranium Frenkel pairs and the uranium-oxygen Schottky ... Using the law of mass action to the Frenkel and Schottky defects in doped UO2, ... migration in the fluorite-structured oxide CeO2 is investigated at the atomistic level.

166

Multi-scale molecular simulations of biological systems: Parallelization of RAPTOR for Blue Gene/Q  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Q Adrian W. Lange MiraCon ALCF 03/06/13 #12;Multi-state empirical valence bond Goal: - To simulate (ALCF) - Each subcommunicator creates own instance of LAMMPS - Replica Exchange between subcomms LAMMPSC) Christopher Knight (ANL) Gard Nelson (UoC) Yuxing Peng (UoC) Jeff Hammond (ALCF) Luke Westby (Notre Dame

Kemner, Ken

167

University of Pune Inde | India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Anthropologie, Science Politique, Arts, Common law, Psychologie IMPORTANT NOTE: This document contains: History, Anthropology, Political Science, Arts, Common Law, Psychology Faculté | Faculty Titre de cours | Course Title Code �quivalence UO UO Equivalency Sciences sociales Social Sciences International Political

Petriu, Emil M.

168

Coupled Biogeochemical Processes Governing the Stability of Bacteriogenic Uraninite and Release of U(VI) in Heterogeneous Media: Molecular to Meter Scales  

SciTech Connect

In-situ reductive biotransformation of subsurface U(VI) to U(IV) (as ?UO2?) has been proposed as a bioremediation method to immobilize uranium at contaminated DOE sites. The chemical stability of bacteriogenic ?UO2? is the seminal issue governing its success as an in-situ waste form in the subsurface. The structure and properties of chemically synthesized UO2+x have been investigated in great detail. It has been found to exhibit complex structural disorder, with nonstoichiometry being common, hence the designation ?UO2+x?, where 0 < x < 0.25. Little is known about the structures and properties of the important bacteriogenic analogs, which are believed to occur as nanoparticles in the environment. Chemically synthesized UO2+x exhibits an open fluorite structure and is known to accommodate significant doping of divalent cations. The extent to which bacteriogenic UO2+x incorporates common ground water cations (e.g., Ca2+) has not been investigated, and little is known about nonstoichiometry and structure defects in the bacteriogenic material. Particle size, nonstoichiometry, and doping may significantly alter the reactivity, and hence stability, of bacteriogenic UO2+x in the subsurface. The presence of associated sulfide minerals, and solid phase oxidants such as bacteriogenic Mn oxides may also affect the longevity of bacteriogenic UO2 in the subsurface.

Bargar, John R.

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

METHOD OF SEPARATING URANIUM SUSPENSIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is presented for separating colloidally dissed uranium oxides from the heavy water medium in upwhich they are contained. The method consists in treating such dispersions with hydrogen peroxide, thereby converting the uranium to non-colloidal UO/sub 4/, and separating the UO/sub 4/ sfter its rapid settling.

Wigner, E.P.; McAdams, W.A.

1958-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

170

KTH ReseaRcH assessmenT exeRcise 2012 KTH RESEARCH ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, although some UoAs now belong to a different RF, and one new RF has been created since 2008 in the RF, as well as by the Vice President for Research. The RFC has overall responsibility for planning into 13 research fields and 47 UoAs, as follows: Rf1 mathematics Research field coordinator: Professor

Lagergren, Jens

171

Chemical reduction of refractory oxides by atomic hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The chemical reduction of UO/sub 2/ and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ by atomic hydrogen was studied. Results of the UO/sub 2//H investigation indicates that reduction of UO/sub 2/ by atomic hydrogen proceeds by the production of water vapor and hypostoichiometric urania. Water vapor and aluminum metal are formed in the Al/sub 2/O/sub 3//H system. The relative ease which UO/sub 2/ is reduced by atomic hydrogen compared with Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ is due to two factors. The first is related to the thermochemistry of the reactions. The second factor which favors efficient reduction of UO/sub 2/ but not of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ is the oxygen diffusivity. (LK)

Dooley, D.; Balooch, M.; Olander, D.R.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Emerging M&S application in risk management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been compelling signs of the great potential of building further synergy with academics, researchers, and industry practitioners from the areas of Modeling and Simulation (M&S) managing risk events. This paper provides an introduction to risk ... Keywords: engineering management, risk analysis, risk assessment, risk management, systems engineering

C. Ariel Pinto; Andreas Tolk; Michael McShane

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

(WPI-iCeMS) Pure Nano Drugs*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(WPI-iCeMS) SN-38 50 nm * Pure Nano Drugs* SN-38 10 HepG2* JST (-STEP Permeation and Retention (EPR)* EPR 20100 nm SN-38 SN-38 * SN-38 * SN-38 20 SN-38 Pure Nano Drugs

Takada, Shoji

174

Office of Student Services Health Science Campus MS 1026  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Student Services Health Science Campus MS 1026 Collier Building 4405 3000 Arlington Avenue Toledo, OH 43614-2598 419-383-5810 BSN Consortium Planning Guide Bowling Green State University College of Health & Human Services Nursing Advisor - Health Center Rm. 102 Bowling Green, OH 43403 419

Moore, Paul A.

175

SPE-163690-MS Synthetic, Geomechanical Logs for Marcellus Shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SPE-163690-MS Synthetic, Geomechanical Logs for Marcellus Shale M. O. Eshkalak, SPE, S. D of hydrocarbons from the reservoirs, notably shale, is attributed to realizing the key fundamentals of reservoir and mineralogy is crucial in order to identify the "right" pay-zone intervals for shale gas production. Also

Mohaghegh, Shahab

176

Microsoft Word - MS-OM-1005 NEPA.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MS-OM-1005 MS-OM-1005 Title: FY 2012 Annual Site Subsidence Surveys Description: Subcontractor shall provide all labor, supervision, materials, equipment, transportation, and services necessary to perform a subsidence survey of the Bayou Choctaw, Big Hill, Bryan Mound and West Hackberry SPR sites. Regulatory Requirements: NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021) 10 CFR 1021.410 (Application of Categorical Exclusions) (a) The actions listed in Appendices A and B of Subpart D are classes of actions that DOE has determined do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment (categorical exclusions). (b) To find that a proposal is categorically excluded, DOE shall determine the following: (1) The proposed action fits within a class of actions that is listed in Appendix A or B of Subpart D;

177

Commander, Naval Base ATTN: Ms. Cheryl Barnett Building N-26  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

.J>?j 1.2 1990 .J>?j 1.2 1990 Commander, Naval Base ATTN: Ms. Cheryl Barnett Building N-26 Code N 9 E Norfolk, Virginia 23511-6002 Dear Ms. Barnett: I enjoyed speaking with you on the phone. The Department of Energy (DOE) has established its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) to identify sites formerly utilized by its predecessor agencies in the early days of the nation's atomic energy program and to determine the potential for these sites to contain radiological contamination, related to DOE's past activities, which may require remedial action. When necessary, radiological surveys of individual sites are performed to provide the data necessary to make this necessary determination. As we discussed, in July 1956, the Atomic Energy Commission (a DOE

178

Ms. Katharine Kaplan ENERGY STAR Product Development USEPA Headquarters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2010 7, 2010 Ms. Katharine Kaplan ENERGY STAR Product Development USEPA Headquarters 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW (6202J) Washington , DC 20460 Dear Ms. Kaplan: On May 7, 2010, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) notified ASKO Appliances, Inc. that DOE had tested ASKO dishwasher model D5122XXLB as part of the ENERGY STAR Verification Testing Pilot Program , and that, according to DOE's testing, this model exceeded allowable ENERGY STAR efficiency requirements by 12 percent. DOE gave ASKO until May 17, 2010 to request additional testing or have this matter referred to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ASKO has not requested testing of additional units by the DOE deadline. On May 12, ASKO sent an email to DOE disputing DOE's testing and providing their own test reports for the model

179

Microsoft Word - MS-OM-1185NEPAHeatExchanger.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MS-OM-1185 MS-OM-1185 Title: Hydrogen Peroxide Treatment of SPR Heat Exchangers BOA Description: Subcontractor shall provide all labor, supervision, materials, supplies, equipment, tools, and transportation required to treat the water side of the SPR heat exchangers. Work includes providing turnkey chemical injection equipment, chemical (hydrogen peroxide), chemical containment vessels, and fittings/piping/tubing required to connect the chemical injection equipment to the site heat exchangers. Subcontractor shall remove and clean all equipment and properly dispose of any waste materials after the work is completed. Regulatory Requirements: NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021) 10 CFR 1021.410 (Application of Categorical Exclusions) (a) The actions listed in Appendices A and B of Subpart D are classes of actions that DOE has determined do

180

Ms. Kimberly Krizanovic U.S. Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0, 2012 0, 2012 Ms. Kimberly Krizanovic U.S. Department of Energy Office of the Chief Financial Officer 4 th Floor, Suite 4A-236 1000 Independence Avenue Washington, DC 20585 Dear Ms. Krizanovic: The American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA) is the national, professional association of CPAs, with 369,000 CPA members worldwide in business and industry, public practice, government, education, student affiliates and international associates. It sets ethical standards for the profession and U.S. auditing standards for audits of private companies, nonprofit organizations, federal, state, and local governments. It also develops and grades the Uniform CPA Examination. On behalf of the AICPA and its Governmental Audit Quality Center, we appreciate the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ms uo uo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

CONCURRENC RTG. SYMBOL GC-34 Ms. Mary Beth Brado  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

MAY 2 9 1980 MAY 2 9 1980 CONCURRENC RTG. SYMBOL GC-34 Ms. Mary Beth Brado "*N'W Town of Lewiston * i..,! 1375 Ridge Road ^r'8 Lewiston, New York 14092 RTG.SYuBOL Dear Ms. Brado: .- ,l13. INirIA Lss iQ. W'Mott This is in response to your letter of January 29, 1980, and subsequent ..... ,. telephone discussions with irr. Brazley of my office, concerning land use 5/ /8 restrictions on the 1,511 acres declared surplus in the Towns of Lewiston RGSYMOL. and Porter, New York. In regard to your question of land use restriction and its application to the surplus land in the Lewiston area, our Office of General Counsel deter- DATE'- mined that the Department of Energy does not have the authority to restrict any land use or development of the property in question. Such authority nrTG SYMOL

182

Method for factor analysis of GC/MS data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The method of the present invention provides a fast, robust, and automated multivariate statistical analysis of gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) data sets. The method can involve systematic elimination of undesired, saturated peak masses to yield data that follow a linear, additive model. The cleaned data can then be subjected to a combination of PCA and orthogonal factor rotation followed by refinement with MCR-ALS to yield highly interpretable results.

Van Benthem, Mark H; Kotula, Paul G; Keenan, Michael R

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

183

Automated Dispersive Solid Phase Extraction of Pesticide Residues in Botanicals using Triple Quadrupole LC/MS/MS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in 12.5 min; hold for 3 min MS conditions Drying gas temp: 225°C Sheath gas temp: 325°C Gas flow rate: 8 L/min Sheath gas flow: 10 L/min Nebulizer pressure: 40 psi EMV: 400 V Capillary voltage: 4000 V was then centrifuged at 5,000 x rpm for 3min ·Acetonitrile (1 ml) extract was transferred to a 2 ml auto-sampler vial

Heller, Barbara

184

Reaction of uranium oxides with chlorine and carbon or carbon monoxide to prepare uranium chlorides  

SciTech Connect

The preferred preparation concept of uranium metal for feed to an AVLIS uranium enrichment process requires preparation of uranium tetrachloride (UCI{sub 4}) by reacting uranium oxides (UO{sub 2}/UO{sub 3}) and chlorine (Cl{sub 2}) in a molten chloride salt medium. UO{sub 2} is a very stable metal oxide; thus, the chemical conversion requires both a chlorinating agent and a reducing agent that gives an oxide product which is much more stable than the corresponding chloride. Experimental studies in a quartz reactor of 4-cm ID have demonstrated the practically of some chemical flow sheets. Experimentation has illustrated a sequence of results concerning the chemical flow sheets. Tests with a graphite block at 850{degrees}C demonstrated rapid reactions of Cl{sub 2} and evolution of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) as a product. Use of carbon monoxide (CO) as the reducing agent also gave rapid reactions of Cl{sub 2} and formation of CO{sub 2} at lower temperatures, but the reduction reactions were slower than the chlorinations. Carbon powder in the molten salt melt gave higher rates of reduction and better steady state utilization of Cl{sub 2}. Addition of UO{sub 2} feed while chlorination was in progress greatly improved the operation by avoiding the plugging effects from high UO{sub 2} concentrations and the poor Cl{sub 2} utilizations from low UO{sub 2} concentrations. An UO{sub 3} feed gave undesirable effects while a feed of UO{sub 2}-C spheres was excellent. The UO{sub 2}-C spheres also gave good rates of reaction as a fixed bed without any molten chloride salt. Results with a larger reactor and a bottom condenser for volatilized uranium show collection of condensed uranium chlorides as a loose powder and chlorine utilizations of 95--98% at high feed rates. 14 refs., 7 figs., 14 tabs.

Haas, P.A.; Lee, D.D.; Mailen, J.C.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Lipid Analysis and Lipidomics: New Techniques & ApplicationChapter 4 LC/MS and Chiral Separation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lipid Analysis and Lipidomics: New Techniques & Application Chapter 4 LC/MS and Chiral Separation Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 4 LC/MS and Chiral S

186

Lipid Analysis and Lipidomics: New Techniques & ApplicationChapter 5 LC/MS and Lipid Oxidation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lipid Analysis and Lipidomics: New Techniques & Application Chapter 5 LC/MS and Lipid Oxidation Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books Downloadable pdf of Chapter 5 LC/MS and Lipid Oxidation from

187

Sensitive Femtogram Determination of Aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2 in Food Matrices using Tandem LC-MS/MS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(%) 0 95 5 5 0 100 6 0 100 MS conditions Drying gas temp: 325°C Sheath gas temp: 350°C Gas flow rate: 10 L/min Sheath gas flow: 11 L/min Nebulizer pressure: 50 psi EMV: 400 V Capillary voltage: 4000 V sample was then centrifuged at 14,000 x g for 3min prior to LC-MS/MS analysis. ·Each food matrix

Heller, Barbara

188

Genizah MS T-S AS 145.39  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*k T-S AS 145.39 *t Legal document *s 15.3 x 15.5 (7.7 one leaf); 4-15 lines (1v and 2r blank) *m Paper; 2 leaves (bifolium); slightly torn, holes, rubbed, stained *l Judaeo-Arabic; Hebrew; Arabic *c Testimony concerning an oath; mentions M?s? ibn... H?r?n al-Š?m? and Faraj Allah ibn Joseph ibn F??il. *e 4 lines on f. 2v written transversely in f. 1r....

Unknown

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

189

Intro Inlets & Sizing TOFMS Other MS LDI AMS CIMS Conc. 2012 AAAR Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intro Inlets & Sizing TOFMS Other MS LDI AMS CIMS Conc. 2012 AAAR Conference Minneapolis, MN://cires.colorado.edu/jimenez/ams.html 1 Intro Inlets & Sizing TOFMS Other MS LDI AMS CIMS Conc. Outline 1. Building Blocks ­ Inlets (see references) 2 #12;Intro Inlets & Sizing TOFMS Other MS LDI AMS CIMS Conc. Why Aerosol Mass

Colorado at Boulder, University of

190

Delta M(s) in the MSSM with large tan beta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Bs-Bsbar mixing parameter Delta Ms is studied in the MSSM with large tan beta. The recent Tevatron measurement of Delta Ms is used to constrain the MSSM parameter space. From this analysis the often neglected contribution to Delta Ms from the operator Q^SLL is found to be significant.

Parry, J K

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Teaching OR/MS to MBAs at Warwick Business School: A Turnaround Story  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OR/MS is under pressure in MBA programs in the United Kingdom as it is in the United States. To ensure its continuance, members of the operational research group at Warwick Business School redesigned the core OR/MS module. The first attempt at a redesign ... Keywords: Professional: or/ms education.

Stewart Robinson; Maureen Meadows; John Mingers; Frances A. O'Brien; Estelle A. Shale; Stephanie Stray

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Electrolytic process for preparing uranium metal  

SciTech Connect

An electrolytic process for making uranium from uranium oxide using Cl.sub.2 anode product from an electrolytic cell to react with UO.sub.2 to form uranium chlorides. The chlorides are used in low concentrations in a melt comprising fluorides and chlorides of potassium, sodium and barium in the electrolytic cell. The electrolysis produces Cl.sub.2 at the anode that reacts with UO.sub.2 in the feed reactor to form soluble UCl.sub.4, available for a continuous process in the electrolytic cell, rather than having insoluble UO.sub.2 fouling the cell.

Haas, Paul A. (Knoxville, TN)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Evaluation of weapons-grade mixed oxide fuel performance in U.S. Light Water Reactors using COMETHE 4D release 23 computer code  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The COMETHE 4D Release 23 computer code was used to evaluate the thermal, chemical and mechanical performance of weapons-grade MOX fuel irradiated under U.S. light water reactor typical conditions. Comparisons were made to and UO? fuels exhibited similar conventional UO? fuel. Weapons-grade MOX behavior. However, MOX fuel rods feature higher fuel centerline temperatures due to a lower thermal conductivity. Moreover, higher diffusion in MOX fuel results in a slightly higher fission gas release. Finally, MOX fuel shows better mechanical behavior than UO? fuel due to lower pellet-cladding mechanical interaction and rod deformation. These results indicate that the MOX fuel meets all potential licensing requirements.

Bellanger, Philippe

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

DEVELOPMENT OF CLAD CERAMIC FUEL PLATES BY SPRAY-COATING TECHNIQUES. Quarterly Tecnnical Progress Report, October-December 1960  

SciTech Connect

Activities in a ptogram concerned with development of plasma-jet spray- coating techniques suitable for production of clad ceramic fuel plates are described. Experiments on application of zirconia coatings are also described. A survey of UO/sub 2/ powder was conducted to determine its suitability for plasma spraying. Also conditions were established for spraying fused and milled UO/sub 2/. The effects of process variables on coating and deposition characteristics were found to correlate. Densities of UO/sub 2/ coatings of 75 to 80% were achieved. (J.R.D.)

Weare, N.E.

1962-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

195

Extreme Performance Scalable Operating Systems Final Progress Report (July 1, 2008 Ă?Â?Ă?¢Ă?Â?Ă?Â?Ă?Â?Ă?Â? October 31, 2011)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the final progress report for the FastOS (Phase 2) (FastOS-2) project with Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Oregon (UO). The project started at UO on July 1, 2008 and ran until April 30, 2010, at which time a six-month no-cost extension began. The FastOS-2 work at UO delivered excellent results in all research work areas: * scalable parallel monitoring * kernel-level performance measurement * parallel I/0 system measurement * large-scale and hybrid application performance measurement * onlne scalable performance data reduction and analysis * binary instrumentation

Allen D. Malony; Sameer Shende

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

196

Hidrofobiškumo ?taka dažikli? sorbcijai vilnos pluošte ir dažini? fizikin?ms savyb?ms.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Baigiamojo darbo tikslas – ištirti vilnos pluošto paviršiaus hidrofobiškumo ?tak? dažikli? sorbcijai vilnos pluošte ir dažini? fizikin?ms savyb?ms. Nauj? antrachinonini? dažikli? RB 5-37 M?lynojo ir… (more)

Gr?bli?nait?,; Egl?

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

VIA EMAIL Ms. Leslie Jones ENERGY STAR Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 13, 2011 September 13, 2011 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW Room62023 Washington, DC 20460 Dear Ms. Jones: On July 18,2011, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) notified Whirlpool Corporation (Whirlpool) that DOE had completed testing of the Whirlpool (KitchenAid brand) refrigerator model KSRG25FVMS* under the ENERGY STAR Verification Testing Pilot Program and confirmed that the model did not meet the ENERGY STAR energy efficiency requirement for maximum permitted annual energy usage. DOE gave Whirlpool until Augnst 8, 2011, to provide conclusive manufacturing or design evidence or quality assurance information rebutting DOE testing, which showed that this product did not meet the ENERGY STAR Program's energy efficiency requirement.

198

VIA EMAIL Ms. Mariah Steele ENERGY STAR Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 29, 2012 August 29, 2012 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW Room 62023 Washington, DC 20460 Dear Ms. Steele: The U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE") selected a General Electric Company ("GE") refrigerator-freezer, basic model PFSFSNFZ****, for testing as part of DOE's ENERGY STAR® Verification Testing Program. On April6, 2012, DOE notified GE that the model did not meet the ENERGY STAR energy efficiency requirement for maximum permitted annual energy usage. DOE gave GE until April27, 2012, to respond. GE replied to DOE via email on April20, 2012. GE argued that DOE did not test in accordance with the relevant DOE test procedure. In addition, GE noted that it had confirmed the validity of the energy testing that formed the basis of GE's certification and product labeling.

199

VIA EMAIL Ms. Leslie Jones ENERGY STAR Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 22, 2011 December 22, 2011 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW Room 62023 Washington, DC 20460 Dear Ms. Jones: On November 1, 2011, the United States Depmiment of Energy ("DOE") notified Grainger Global Sourcing ("Grainger") that DOE had completed testing of the Dayton-brand refrigerator- freezer model 5NTX1 under the ENERGY STAR® Verification Testing Pilot Program and explained that the model did not meet the ENERGY STAR energy efficiency requirement for maximum permitted annual energy usage. DOE gave Grainger until November 20, 2011, to provide conclusive manufacturing or design evidence or quality assurance information rebutting DOE's test results. Grainger responded to DOE via email, submitting various documents, on November 18, 2011.

200

VIA EMAIL Ms. Leslie Jones ENERGY STAR Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 28, 2011 October 28, 2011 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue NW Room 62023 Washington, DC 20460 Dear Ms. Jones: The Summit Appliance Division chest freezer model CFllES, manufactured by Midea, was selected for testing as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) ENERGY STAR® Verification Testing Pilot Program. DOE's initial testing, performed on a unit of this model, indicated that it may not meet ENERGY STAR requirements. DOE notified Summit of the initial test results, and Summit voluntarily withdrew its model from ENERGY STAR without additional testing. DOE also notified Midea, as Midea manufactures the same basic model for distribution under a variety of other brand names and model numbers, including Midea HS-390C. Midea requested that DOE

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ms uo uo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Ms. Julie Smith Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5, 2013 5, 2013 Ms. Julie Smith Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Mail Code OE-20 U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue Washington, D.C. 20585 Juliea.smith@hq.doe.gov; Christopher.lawrence@hq.doe.gov Re: DOE RFI "Improving Performance of Federal Permitting and Review of Infrastructure Projects The American people support increased production and consumption of renewable energy according to credible public opinion polls. Too often the most appropriate sites for wind, solar, hydro, and other renewable generators are in rural areas that necessitate the construction of new high voltage transmission lines to deliver the energy to customer load centers. Siting such lines is a costly multi-year

202

VIA EMAIL Ms. Mariah Steele ENERGY STAR Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 20, 2013 June 20, 2013 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW Room 62023 Washington, DC 20460 Dear Ms. Steele: The U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE") selected a Summit-brand refrigerator-freezer, model Fl 112BL, manufactured by SANYO E&E (now Panasonic Appliances Refrigeration Systems Corporation of America ("P APRSA")) and sold by Felix Storch, Inc. ("Storch"), for testing as part ofDOE's ENERGY STAR® Verification Testing Program. On March 18, 2013, DOE notified Storch that the model did not meet the ENERGY STAR specification for maximum permitted annual energy use. PAPRSA replied to DOE on April 1, 2013, making two claims. First, PAPRSA argued that DOE's test laboratory, an Intertek laboratory located in Plano, Texas ("Intertek"), did not test in

203

VIA EMAIL Ms. Mariah Steele ENERGY STAR Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Program · U.S. Envirorunental Protection Agency . 1200 Peru1sylvania Avenue, NW Room 62023 · Washington, DC 20460 Dear Ms. Steele: June 7, 2013 The .U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE") selected an Edgestal'-brand dehumidifier, model DEP400EW, for.testing as part ofDOE's ENERGY STAR®Verification Testing Program. On· . October 24, 2012, DOE notified the manufacturer of this modd, , that the model did not meet the minimum energy factor required. for a model of its capacity according to the applicab~e ENERGY STAR specific~tion. · - replied to DOE representatives and raised two- concerns with the DOE testing.' DOE has considered these. concems and found that they did not impact the. validity of DOE's test results.

204

PNM Resources 2401 Aztec NE, MS-Z100  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PNM Resources PNM Resources 2401 Aztec NE, MS-Z100 Albuquerque, NM 87107 505-241-2025 Fax 505 241-2384 PNMResources.com October 29, 2013 Mr. Christopher Lawrence Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE-20) U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 Submitted electronically via email to: Christopher.Lawrence@hq.doe.gov Dear Mr. Lawrence: Subject: Department of Energy (DOE)- Improving Performance of Federal Permitting and Review of Infrastructure Projects, Request for Information, 78 Fed. Reg. 53436 (Aug. 29, 2013) PNM Resources (PNMR) is an energy holding company with 2012 consolidated operating revenues of $1.3 billion. Through its regulated utilities, PNM and TNMP, PNMR serves electricity to more than 739,000 homes and businesses in New

205

VIA EMAIL Ms. Leslie Jones ENERGY STAR Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 22,2012 May 22,2012 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW Room62023 Washington, DC 20460 Dear Ms. Jones: The U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE") selected an Avanti Products ("Avanti") refrigerator, basic model BCA4560W-2 ("model BCA4560W-2"), for testing as patt of the DOE's ENERGY STAR® Verification Testing Program. On April 6, 2012, DOE notified Avanti that the model did not meet the ENERGY STAR energy efficiency requirement for maximum permitted annual energy usage. DOE gave Avanti until April27, 2012, to respond. Avanti responded to DOE via email, submitting various documents, on April27, 2012. Avanti explained that it had randomly selected units of model BCA4560W -2 for testing at third-party

206

STEPS: A Grid Search Methodology for Optimized Peptide Identification Filtering of MS/MS Database Search Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For bottom-up proteomics there are a wide variety of database searching algorithms in use for matching peptide sequences to tandem MS spectra. Likewise, there are numerous strategies being employed to produce a confident list of peptide identifications from the different search algorithm outputs. Here we introduce a grid search approach for determining optimal database filtering criteria in shotgun proteomics data analyses that is easily adaptable to any search. Systematic Trial and Error Parameter Selection - referred to as STEPS - utilizes user-defined parameter ranges to test a wide array of parameter combinations to arrive at an optimal "parameter set" for data filtering, thus maximizing confident identifications. The benefits of this approach in terms of numbers of true positive identifications are demonstrated using datasets derived from immunoaffinity-depleted blood serum and a bacterial cell lysate, two common proteomics sample types.

Piehowski, Paul D.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Sandoval, John D.; Burnum, Kristin E.; Kiebel, Gary R.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

DEVELOPMENT OF CLAD CERAMIC FUEL PLATES BY SPRAY-COATING TECHNIQUES. Final Report, Phase I  

SciTech Connect

Activities in a program to develop techniques of plasma spraying clad plate-type UO/sub 2/ fuel elements are reported. The investigation was also directed toward determining the limitations of the process as applied to fuel element fabrication. UO/sub 2/ powder coatings having densities of 90% theoretical were produced. At conditions required for spraying plates, densities of 86% appear to be practical. The rate and efficiency of UO/sub 2/ coating deposition were also determined for various spraying conditions. Gritblasting was found to provide the best surface for coating adherence. The O/U ratio of the UO/sub 2/ was maintained by spraying in an Ar atmosphere. Zircaloy-2 was found to be the most desirable cladding material. Cladding thicknesses of 0.035 in. are required in distortion-free 2-in.-wide plates. (J.R.D.)

Weare, N.E.

1961-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

208

On the Structural Characteristics of Steady Finite-Amplitude Mountain Waves over Bell-Shaped Topography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characteristics of the two-dimensional steady state flow of unbounded stratified Boussinesq fluid over an isolated obstacle of finite height are analyzed for the simplqst case in which the incident flow speed, UO, and Brunt-Vaisala frequency, ...

R. Laprise; W. R. Peltier

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Materials for Nuclear Power: Digital Resource Center - REPORT ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 27, 2007... Fate of the Epsilon Phase in UO2 of the Oklo Natural Fisson Reactors ... In spent nuclear fuel (SNF), the micron- to nano-sized epsilon phase ...

210

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory: SLAC Science Focus Area...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clark, S D. Conradson, and J.R. Bargar (2008) Structure of biogenic UO2 produced by Shewanella Oneidensis, strain MR-1. Environ. Sci. Technol., 42, 7898-7904. K.-U. Ulrich, D....

211

Production and Handling Slide 17: Yellow Cake, Uranyl Nitrate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

, UF4 Skip Presentation Navigation First Slide Previous Slide Next Slide Last Presentation Table of Contents Yellow Cake, Uranyl Nitrate, ADU, UO2, UF4 Refer to caption below for...

212

Cylinder Leakage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(breach) occurs and the depleted UF6 is exposed to water vapor in the air, uranyl fluoride (UO2F2) and hydrogen fluoride (HF) are formed. The uranyl fluoride is a solid that...

213

Properties of UF6  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

such as water vapor in the air, the UF6 and water react, forming corrosive hydrogen fluoride (HF) and a uranium-fluoride compound called uranyl fluoride (UO2F2). For more...

214

Uranium Health Effects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For inhalation or ingestion of soluble or moderately soluble compounds such as uranyl fluoride (UO2F2) or uranium tetrafluoride (UF4), the uranium enters the bloodstream and...

215

FAQ 28-What are the potential health effects from uranium exposure...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For inhalation or ingestion of soluble or moderately soluble compounds such as uranyl fluoride (UO2F2) or uranium tetrafluoride (UF4), the uranium enters the bloodstream and...

216

FAQ 21-What happens if a cylinder of uranium hexafluoride leaks...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(breach) occurs and the depleted UF6 is exposed to water vapor in the air, uranyl fluoride (UO2F2) and hydrogen fluoride (HF) are formed. The uranyl fluoride is a solid that...

217

Chemical Forms of Uranium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

such as water vapor in the air, the UF6 and water react, forming corrosive hydrogen fluoride (HF) and a uranium-fluoride compound called uranyl fluoride (UO2F2). For this reason,...

218

Materials Models and Simulation for Nuclear Fuels Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DIF, France), Andersson, D. (LANL, USA), Stanek, C. (LANL, USA) 9:40-10:00 Monte Carlo simulation of phonon transport in UO2 crystals with defects El-Azab, Anter (Purdue, USA),...

219

MARMOT Enhanced  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

To develop mechanistic models for fuel thermal conductivity, the Fuel team used supercells up to 55 nm long to determine the thermal conductivity of UO2 with Xe incorporated.

220

In-Situ Repairs of Oil Industry Pipelines, Tanks and Vessels by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Metal arc welding under oil (MAW-UO) is a new, revolutionary process to repair a pipeline, tank or vessel by welding in case of flaws and ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ms uo uo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A Compendium of Radiocarbon Dates for Southern Idaho Archaeological Sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Archaeology of the Shoup Rockshelters in East Central Idaho.PocateUo: Idaho State UniversUy Museum Occasional Papers No.Snake River Region of Idaho ca. 4150 B.P. - 1300 B.P.

Plew, Mark G; Pavesic, Max G

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Subsurface Uranium Fate and Transport: Integrated Experiments and Modeling of Coupled Biogeochemical Mechanisms of Nanocrystalline Uraninite Oxidation by Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides - Project Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsurface bacteria including sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) reduce soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV) with subsequent precipitation of UO2. We have shown that SRB reduce U(VI) to nanometer-sized UO2 particles (1-5 nm) which are both intra- and extracellular, with UO2 inside the cell likely physically shielded from subsequent oxidation processes. We evaluated the UO2 nanoparticles produced by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 under growth and non-growth conditions in the presence of lactate or pyruvate and sulfate, thiosulfate, or fumarate, using ultrafiltration and HR-TEM. Results showed that a significant mass fraction of bioreduced U (35-60%) existed as a mobile phase when the initial concentration of U(VI) was 160 µM. Further experiments with different initial U(VI) concentrations (25 - 900 ?M) in MTM with PIPES or bicarbonate buffers indicated that aggregation of uraninite depended on the initial concentrations of U(VI) and type of buffer. It is known that under some conditions SRB-mediated UO2 nanocrystals can be reoxidized (and thus remobilized) by Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides, common constituents of soils and sediments. To elucidate the mechanism of UO2 reoxidation by Fe(III) (hydr)oxides, we studied the impact of Fe and U chelating compounds (citrate, NTA, and EDTA) on reoxidation rates. Experiments were conducted in anaerobic batch systems in PIPES buffer. Results showed EDTA significantly accelerated UO2 reoxidation with an initial rate of 9.5?M day-1 for ferrihydrite. In all cases, bicarbonate increased the rate and extent of UO2 reoxidation with ferrihydrite. The highest rate of UO2 reoxidation occurred when the chelator promoted UO2 and Fe(III) (hydr)oxide dissolution as demonstrated with EDTA. When UO2 dissolution did not occur, UO2 reoxidation likely proceeded through an aqueous Fe(III) intermediate as observed for both NTA and citrate. To complement to these laboratory studies, we collected U-bearing samples from a surface seep at the Rifle field site and have measured elevated U concentrations in oxic iron-rich sediments. To translate experimental results into numerical analysis of U fate and transport, a reaction network was developed based on Sani et al. (2004) to simulate U(VI) bioreduction with concomitant UO2 reoxidation in the presence of hematite or ferrihydrite. The reduction phase considers SRB reduction (using lactate) with the reductive dissolution of Fe(III) solids, which is set to be microbially mediated as well as abiotically driven by sulfide. Model results show the oxidation of HS– by Fe(III) directly competes with UO2 reoxidation as Fe(III) oxidizes HS– preferentially over UO2. The majority of Fe reduction is predicted to be abiotic, with ferrihydrite becoming fully consumed by reaction with sulfide. Predicted total dissolved carbonate concentrations from the degradation of lactate are elevated (log(pCO2) ~ –1) and, in the hematite system, yield close to two orders-of-magnitude higher U(VI) concentrations than under initial carbonate concentrations of 3 mM. Modeling of U(VI) bioreduction with concomitant reoxidation of UO2 in the presence of ferrihydrite was also extended to a two-dimensional field-scale groundwater flow and biogeochemically reactive transport model for the South Oyster site in eastern Virginia. This model was developed to simulate the field-scale immobilization and subsequent reoxidation of U by a biologically mediated reaction network.

Peyton, Brent M. [Montana State University; Timothy, Ginn R. [University of California Davis; Sani, Rajesh K. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology

2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

223

TRISO Fuel Performance: Modeling, Integration into Mainstream Design Studies, and Application to a Thorium-fueled Fusion-Fission Hybrid Blanket  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shrinkage cracking, (b) fission product attack of SiC, and (in a pebble and pebbles in a bed in a hybrid LIFE fissionDiffusion coefficients of fission product species in UO 2 as

Powers, Jeffrey

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Peer Review of Strategy for Characterizing Contamination in DUF6...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

plant (GDP) sites. Therefore, the assumption in Smith 1984 that 25percent (4.6 kilograms) of the neptunium received (18.4 kilograms) in the UO 3 will enter the cascade,...

225

Complexation of Gluconate with Uranium(VI) in Acidic Solutions: Thermodynamic Study with Structural Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the thermodynamic quantities of uranium(VI)–carboxylateComplexation of Uranium(VI) by Gluconate Thermodynamic Studyacid (H A ) Hexavalent uranium as the UO 22+ ion was studied

Zhang, Zhicheng

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Rational Ligand Design for U(VI) and Pu(IV)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.6 Ligand Design for Pu(IV) …. ……..………………………. ………………………ligands used in UO 22+ and Pu(IV) structural studies …….. 23Raymond group ligands for Pu(IV) decorporation …… 208

Szigethy, Geza

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Evaluation of alternative fuel cycle strategies for nuclear power generation in the 21st century  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The deployment of fuel recycling through either CONFU (COmbined Non-Fertile and UO2 fuel) thermal watercooled reactors (LWRs) or fast ABR (Actinide Burner Reactor) reactors is compared to the Once-Through LWR reactor system ...

Boscher, Thomas

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

The Properties of Spent Nuclear Fuel under Waste Disposal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials Issues in Nuclear Waste Management in the 21st Century ... UO2 in the form of a ceramic pellet with a density close to theoretical. ... On discharge fro reactor the pellets have undergone a number of physical and ...

229

Microsoft Word - FESUO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Prevent Uraninite (UO 2 ) Oxidation Uranium (U) is one of the most prevalent radionuclide contaminants in soils and groundwater across the world as a result of nuclear fuel...

230

Nanoparticulate FeS as an Effective Redox Buffer to Prevent Uraninite...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(UO2) Oxidation Saturday, August 31, 2013 Uranium (U) is one of the most prevalent radionuclide contaminants in soils and groundwater across the world as a result of nuclear fuel...

231

The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis. XVI. Kinetic Relationships of the Intermediates in Steady State Photosynthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF CARBON I N PHOTOSYNTHESIS, X U , KINETIC REIATIORSEIPS OFof steady. state photosynthesis in cUO2 provides informationThe path of carbon i n photosynthesis begins with a small

Benson, A.A.; Kawaguchi, S.; Hayes, P.; Calvin, M.

1952-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Electrochemistry of LiCl-Li2O-H2O Molten Salt Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Uranium can be recovered from uranium oxide (UO2) spent fuel through the ... Cathodic Behavior of Silicon (?) in BaF2-CaF2 –SiO2 Melts.

233

Fabrication of Tungsten, Tungsten-Rhenium and Tungsten-CeO2 ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... kernels such as uranium dioxide (UO2) are encapsulated within a tungsten matrix. ... in the pre-exponential frequency factor for gas diffusion through such materials. ... Functional Composites: Fluorescent Carbon Nanotubes in Silica Aerogel.

234

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory: SLAC Science Focus Area...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

program. The inner portion of the particles is well ordered and similar to stoichiometric or near-stoichiometric UO2.0, and the material consequently exhibits a solubility...

235

Radiation Effects in Oxide Ceramics and Novel LWR Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear fuels, such as uranium dioxide (UO2) and Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuels, have been used in current light water reactors (LWRs) to produce about 15% of the ... of oxide ceramics for nuclear applications through experiment, theory and ...

236

chemdata.nist.gov/mass-spc/ms-search/downloads/Readme_NIST_Forensics_DART.txt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... this point, if NIST MS Search is running ... Vista, you may need to enter administrative credentials ... Terms of Use ===== o Installation and Use ...

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

237

Ms Robin Felder | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Ms. Robin Felder Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, & Biosciences (CSGB) Division CSGB Home About Staff ListingsContact Information What's New Research Areas Scientific Highlights...

238

ms&t'11 plenary session features u.s. national science foundation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

08/30 - MS&T'11 PLENARY SESSION FEATURES U.S. NATIONAL SCIENCE ... Dr. Wadsworth's presentation, “Responding to Increasing, Energy, ...

239

Nuclear materials research progress reports for 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research is presented concerning iodide stress corrosion cracking of zircaloy, self-diffusion of oxygen in hypostoichiometric urania, surface chemistry of epitaxial silicon deposition by thermal cracking of silane, kinetics of laser pulse vaporization of UO/sub 2/, gas laser model for laser induced evaporation, solubility of hydrogen in uranium dioxide, thermal gradient migration of metallic inclusions in UO/sub 2/, molecular beam studies of atomic hydrogen reduction of oxides, and thermal gradient brine-inclusion migration in salt. (FS)

Olander, D.R.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

PREPARATION OF SPHERICAL URANIUM DIOXIDE PARTICLES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to the preparation of high-density, spherical UO/sub 2/ particles 80 to 150 microns in diameter. Sinterable UO/sub 2/ powder is wetted with 3 to 5 weight per cent water and tumbled for at least 48 hours. The resulting spherical particles are then sintered. The sintered particles are useful in dispersion-type fuel elements for nuclear reactors. (AEC)

Levey, R.P. Jr.; Smith, A.E.

1963-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ms uo uo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Proceedings of the 2011 Emerging M&S Applications in Industry and Academia Symposium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EAIA symposium goes into its third year as an independent symposium! As in the recent years this symposium functions as the melting pot for new ideas and innovative applications of M&S that are not yet mature enough to fit into the traditional M&S ...

Andreas Tolk

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) system for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described is a new gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) system and method for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds. All components of such a GC/MS system external to the oven of the gas chromatograph are programmably temperature controlled to operate at a volatilization temperature specific to the compound(s) sought to be separated and measured.

Grindstaff, Quirinus G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Performance evaluation of an improved harmony search algorithm for numerical optimization: Melody Search (MS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Melody Search (MS) Algorithm as an innovative improved version of Harmony Search optimization method, with a novel Alternative Improvisation Procedure (AIP) is presented in this paper. MS algorithm mimics performance processes of the group improvisation ... Keywords: Alternative improvisation procedure, Harmony search, Melody Search algorithm, Numerical optimization, Stochastic search methods

S. M. Ashrafi; A. B. Dariane

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Emerging M&S challenges for human, social, cultural, and behavioral modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The discipline of Modeling and Simulation (M&S) is ubiquitous in many domains, such as training and education, support of decision-making, or analysis of potential developments. In particular the armed forces apply M&S extensively and enable pioneering ... Keywords: behavioral modeling, cultural modeling, human modeling, social modeling

Dr. Andreas Tolk

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Free energies and mechanisms of water exchange around Uranyl from first principles molecular dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From density functional theory (DFT) based ab initio (Car-Parrinello) metadynamics, we compute the activation energies and mechanisms of water exchange between the first and second hydration shells of aqueous Uranyl (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) using the primary hydration number of U as the reaction coordinate. The free energy and activation barrier of the water dissociation reaction [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2}){sub 5}]{sup 2+}(aq) {yields} [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2})4]{sup 2+}(aq) + H{sub 2}O are 0.7 kcal and 4.7 kcal/mol respectively. The free energy is in good agreement with previous theoretical (-2.7 to +1.2 kcal/mol) and experimental (0.5 to 2.2 kcal/mol) data. The associative reaction [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2}){sub 5}]{sup 2+}(aq) + H{sub 2}O {yields} [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2})6]{sup 2+}(aq) is short-lived with a free energy and activation barrier of +7.9 kcal/mol and +8.9 kca/mol respectively; it is therefore classified as associative-interchange. On the basis of the free energy differences and activation barriers, we predict that the dominant exchange mechanism between [UO{sub 2}(OH{sub 2}){sub 5}]{sup 2+}(aq) and bulk water is dissociative.

Atta-Fynn, Raymond; Bylaska, Eric J.; De Jong, Wibe A.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Advanced Proliferation Resistant, Lower Cost, Uranium-Thorium Dioxide Fuels for Light Water Reactors (Progress report for work through June 2002, 12th quarterly report)  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this NERI project is to evaluate the potential advantages and disadvantages of an optimized thorium-uranium dioxide (ThO2/UO2) fuel design for light water reactors (LWRs). The project is led by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), with the collaboration of three universities, the University of Florida, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and Purdue University; Argonne National Laboratory; and all of the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel vendors in the United States (Framatome, Siemens, and Westinghouse). In addition, a number of researchers at the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute and Professor Kwangheon Park at Kyunghee University are active collaborators with Korean Ministry of Science and Technology funding. The project has been organized into five tasks: · Task 1 consists of fuel cycle neutronics and economics analysis to determine the economic viability of various ThO2/UO2 fuel designs in PWRs, · Task 2 will determine whether or not ThO2/UO2 fuel can be manufactured economically, · Task 3 will evaluate the behavior of ThO2/UO2 fuel during normal, off-normal, and accident conditions and compare the results with the results of previous UO2 fuel evaluations and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing standards, · Task 4 will determine the long-term stability of ThO2/UO2 high-level waste, and · Task 5 consists of the Korean work on core design, fuel performance analysis, and xenon diffusivity measurements.

Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

U-190: Microsoft Security Bulletin MS12-037 - Critical | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: Microsoft Security Bulletin MS12-037 - Critical 0: Microsoft Security Bulletin MS12-037 - Critical U-190: Microsoft Security Bulletin MS12-037 - Critical June 13, 2012 - 3:30pm Addthis PROBLEM: Microsoft Security Bulletin MS12-037 - Critical PLATFORM: Internet Explorer 8.x ABSTRACT: This security update resolves one publicly disclosed and twelve privately reported vulnerabilities in Internet Explorer. LINKS: Microsoft Security Bulletin MS12-037 - Critical Secunia Advisory SA49412 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: The most severe vulnerabilities could allow remote code execution if a user views a specially crafted webpage using Internet Explorer. An attacker who successfully exploited any of these vulnerabilities could gain the same user rights as the current user. Users whose accounts are configured to have fewer user rights on the system could be less impacted than users who

248

U-032: Microsoft Security Bulletin Windows TCP/IP MS11-083 - Critical |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

32: Microsoft Security Bulletin Windows TCP/IP MS11-083 - 32: Microsoft Security Bulletin Windows TCP/IP MS11-083 - Critical U-032: Microsoft Security Bulletin Windows TCP/IP MS11-083 - Critical November 9, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis PROBLEM: Microsoft Security Bulletin Windows TCP/IP MS11-083 - Critical. PLATFORM: Windows XP Service Pack 3 Windows XP Professional x64 Edition Service Pack 2 Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 2 Windows Server 2003 x64 Edition Service Pack 2 Active Directory Windows Server 2003 with SP2 for Itanium-based Systems Windows Vista Service Pack 2 Windows Vista x64 Edition Service Pack 2 Windows Server 2008 for 32-bit Systems Service Pack 2 Windows Server 2008 for x64-based Systems Service Pack 2 Windows 7 for 32-bit Systems Windows 7 for 32-bit Systems Service Pack 1 Windows 7 for x64-based Systems

249

Ms Linda Cerrone | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Ms. Linda Cerrone Ms. Linda Cerrone Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About Staff Listings/Contact Information What's New User Facilities Accelerator & Detector Research & Development Principal Investigators' Meetings Scientific Highlights Construction Projects BES Home Staff Listings/Contact Information Ms. Linda Cerrone Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Cerrone Program Support Specialist Scientific User Facilities Division Office of Basic Energy Sciences SC-22.3/Germantown Building U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20585-1290 E-Mail: Linda.Cerrone@science.doe.gov Phone: (301) 903-0064 or (301) 903-0065 Fax: (301) 903-1690 Ms. Cerrone worked as administrative support specialist/office manager within the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Independent

250

Modern Methods for Lipid AnalysisChapter 5 Analysis of Fatty Acids by APCI-MS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern Methods for Lipid Analysis Chapter 5 Analysis of Fatty Acids by APCI-MS Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books AOCS Press 9906940E971125747386725393F5E58E AOCS Press Downloadable pdf ...

251

Mexico FL GA SC AL MS LA TX AR TN TN  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2005 Hurricanes on the Natural Gas Industry in the Gulf of Mexico Region Mexico FL GA SC AL MS LA TX AR TN TN Katrina - Cumulative wind > 39 mph Katrina - Cumulative wind > 73 mph...

252

Mapping the Subcellular Proteome of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 using Sarkosyl-based fractionation and LC-MS/MS protein identification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple and effective subcellular proteomic method for fractionation and analysis of gram-negative bacterial cytoplasm, periplasm, inner, and outer membranes was applied to Shewanella oneidensis to gain insight into its subcellular architecture. A combination of differential centrifugation, Sarkosyl solubilization, and osmotic lysis was used to prepare subcellular fractions. Global differences in protein fractions were observed by SDS PAGE and heme staining, and tryptic peptides were analyzed using high-resolution LC-MS/MS. Compared to crude cell lysates, the fractionation method achieved a significant enrichment (average ~2-fold) in proteins predicted to be localized to each subcellular fraction. Compared to other detergent, organic solvent, and density-based methods previously reported, Sarkosyl most effectively facilitated separation of the inner and outer membranes and was amenable to mass spectrometry, making this procedure ideal for probing the subcellular proteome of gram-negative bacteria via LC-MS/MS. With 40% of the observable proteome represented, this study has provided extensive information on both subcellular architecture and relative abundance of proteins in S. oneidensis and provides a foundation for future work on subcellular organization and protein-membrane interactions in other gram-negative bacteria.

Brown, Roslyn N.; Romine, Margaret F.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

253

Microsoft PowerPoint - SRNL-MS-2010-00070_Flach_S08.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 Modeling of Engineered Systems in the Vadose Zone Greg Flach 13 April 2010 Richland WA Performance Assessment Community of Practice Technical Exchange 2 SRNL-MS-2010-00070 Outline Engineered Systems at the Savannah River Site Key failure / degradation modes Modeling philosophy Modeling practice Opportunities for ASCEM and CBP 3 SRNL-MS-2010-00070 Engineered systems Solid waste disposal, E-area

254

Guideline for the Procurement of General Electric MS 9001 Models B/E Gas Turbine Parts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, a number of aftermarket component suppliers have begun offering replacement first, second, and third stage buckets and nozzles for the General Electric (GE) MS 9001B and its related newer version MS 9001E gas turbine, more commonly referred to as the 9B and 9E models. Several different designs, materials, and casting processes have been offered for these components for operation at different full-load firing temperatures. This procurement guideline is intended for use by power producers ...

2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

255

Guideline for the Procurement of General Electric MS6001 Model B Gas Turbine Parts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, a number of aftermarket component suppliers have begun offering replacement 1st, 2nd, and 3rd stage buckets and nozzles for the General Electric (GE) MS6001 Model B gas turbine. Several different designs, materials, and casting processes have been offered for these components for operation over at different peak firing temperatures. This procurement guideline is intended to provide owners with the requirements necessary to procure all three stages of buckets and nozzles for a GE MS6001 M...

2007-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

256

Hydrogen retention and release from uranium dioxide  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ceramic samples (UO/sub 2/) are exposed to high pressure hydrogen gas at a fixed temperature for a time sufficient to achieve equilibrium. After rapid quenching, the hydrogen-saturated sample is transferred to a vacuum-outgassing furnace. The sample is outgassed in a linear temperature ramp and the released hydrogen is detected by an in-situ mass spectrometer. This technique measures the rate of release of hydrogen with a sensitivity level of about 2 ng of hydrogen (as D/sub 2/) per hour. In this study, experiments were conducted on both polycrystalline and single-crystal UO/sub 2/. Experimental variables included temperature (1000 to 1600/sup 0/C) and infusion pressure (5 to 32 atm D/sub 2/), and for the polycrystalline specimen, stoichiometry. Dissolution of H/sub 2/ in both single-crystal and polycrystalline UO/sub 2/ was found to obey Seivert's law. The Sievert's law constant of deuterium in single-crystal UO/sub 2/ was determined to be: 3.0 x 10/sup 7/exp(-235 kJ/RT) ppM atomic/..sqrt..atm and for polycrystalline UO/sub 2/: 5.5 x 10/sup 4/exp(-100 kJ/RT) ppM atomic/..sqrt..atm. The solubility of hydrogen in hypostoichiometric urania was found to be up to three orders of magnitude greater than in stoichiometric UO/sub 2/ depending on the O/U ratios, implying the anion vacancy is the primary solution site in the UO/sub 2/ lattice. The release-rate curves for the single crystal and polycrystalline UO/sub 2/ specimens exhibited multiple peaks, with most of the deuterium released between 600 and 1200/sup 0/C for the polycrystalline samples, and between 700 and 1800/sup 0/C in the single-crystal specimens. This release of hydrogen from UO/sub 2/ could not be adequately modeled as diffusion or diffusion with trapping and resolution. It was determined that release was governed by release from traps in both the polycrystalline and single crystal UO/sub 2/ specimens. 40 refs., 72 figs., 6 tabs.

Sherman, D.F.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

ANALYSIS OF SULFONATES IN AQUEOUS SAMPLES BY ION-PAIR LC/ESI-MS/MS WITH IN-SOURCE CID FOR ADDUCT PEAK ELIMINATION  

SciTech Connect

Determination of low-molecular-weight organic sulfonates (e.g. taurine and cysteic acid) in aqueous solutions is important in many applications of biological, environmental and pharmaceutical sciences. These compounds are difficult to be determined by commonly used reversed-phase liquid chromatographic separation combined with UV-Visible detection because of their high solubility and the lack chromophoric moieties. Here the authors report a method combining ion-pair liquid chromatography and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (IPLC/ESI-MS/MS)for determining sulfonates. The ability of low-molecular-weight sulfonates to form ion-pairs with quaternary ammonium cations in aqueous solutions allowed LC separation with a C{sub 18} column. Detection of the sulfonates was accomplished with ESI-MS that lends a universal mode of mass detection for polar, water soluble compounds. An in-source collision induced dissociation (CID) was applied to eliminate the adduct peaks in mass spectra. Characteristic marker ions showed in the second stage mass spectra lent a method for identifying sulfonates.

OUYANG,S.; VAIRAVAMURTHY,M.A.

1999-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

258

Roasting and dissolution studies on nonirradiated thorium dioxide/uranium dioxide pellets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bench scale roasting and dissolution of ThO/sub 2/ and ThO/sub 2//UO/sub 2/ ractor-grade ceramic pellets were studied at the Savannah River Laboratory to define the key parameters affecting dissolution. Pellet breakup, and subsequent dissolution rates, were determined for ThO/sub 2/ and ThO/sub 2//UO/sub 2/ pellets roasted in air or in oxygen. Roasting ThO/sub 2//UO/sub 2/ pellets in air at temperatures from 400 to 900/sup 0/C caused the pellets to crack but not fragment. Roasting whole pellets or fine powdered materials decreased the rate of dissolution in a nitric acid solution containing a fluoride catalyst. Roasting 100% ThO/sub 2/ pellets did not cause cracking or affect the subsequent dissolution rate. Mixed ThO/sub 2//UO/sub 2/ ceramic pellets dissolved at a faster rate than the 100% ThO/sub 2/ pellets. The effect of MgO and CaO on dissolution rate was determined. MgO (approx. 1.0 wt %) increased the dissolution rate of ThO/sub 2/ pellets, an effect which was similar to that obtained by the addition of 20% UO/sub 2/ to the ThO/sub 2/ pellets. The combination of 1% MgO and 20% UO/sub 2/ did not result in an additional increase in dissolution rate. However, the addition of 0.25 to 0.50 wt % CaO did increase the dissolution rate of 80% ThO/sub 2//UO/sub 2/ ceramic pellets. High temperatures (and pressure) were ineffective in dissolving thoria-based fuels in HNO/sub 3/ in the absence of a fluoride catalyst. A process flowsheet outlining the required head end steps for the reprocessing of thoria-based fuels was developed.

Pickett, J.B.; Fowler, J.R.; Mosley, W.C. Jr.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Ms Van T Nguyen | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Van T Nguyen Van T Nguyen Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About Staff Listings/Contact Information What's New User Facilities Accelerator & Detector Research & Development Principal Investigators' Meetings Scientific Highlights Construction Projects BES Home Staff Listings/Contact Information Ms. Van T Nguyen Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Van T. Nguyen Program Manager Facility Coordination, Metrics, and Assessment Office of Basic Energy Sciences SC-22.3/Germantown Building U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20585-1290 E-Mail: Van.Nguyen@science.doe.gov Phone: (301) 903-3976 Fax: (301) 903-1690 Ms. Nguyen joined the Scientific User Facilities Division of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) in July 2008. Prior to joining BES, Ms. Nguyen

260

{sup 99}Tc bioassay by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A means of analyzing {sup 99}Tc in urine by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has been developed. Historically, {sup 99}Tc analysis was based on the radiometric detection of the 293 keV E{sub Max} beta decay product by liquid scintillation or gas flow proportional counting. In a urine matrix, the analysis of{sup 99}Tc is plagued with many difficulties using conventional radiometric methods. Difficulties originate during chemical separation due to the volatile nature of Tc{sub 2}O{sub 7} or during radiation detection due to color or chemical quenching. A separation scheme for {sup 99}Tc detection by ICP-MS is given and is proven to be a sensitive and robust analytical alternative. A comparison of methods using radiometric and mass quantitation of {sup 99}Tc has been conducted in water, artificial urine, and real urine matrices at activity levels between 700 and 2,200 dpm/L. Liquid scintillation results based on an external standard quench correction and a quench curve correction method are compared to results obtained by ICP-MS. Each method produced accurate results, however the precision of the ICP-MS results is superior to that of liquid scintillation results. Limits of detection (LOD) for ICP-MS and liquid scintillation detection are 14.67 and 203.4 dpm/L, respectively, in a real urine matrix. In order to determine the basis for the increased precision of the ICP-MS results, the detection sensitivity for each method is derived and measured. The detection sensitivity for the {sup 99}Tc isotope by ICP-MS is 2.175 x 10{sup {minus}7} {+-} 8.990 x 10{sup {minus}9} and by liquid scintillation is 7.434 x 10{sup {minus}14} {+-} 7.461 x 10{sup {minus}15}. A difference by seven orders of magnitude between the two detection systems allows ICP-MS samples to be analyzed for a period of 15 s compared to 3,600 s by liquid scintillation counting with a lower LOD.

Lewis, L.A.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ms uo uo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Dear Ms  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

[insert address] [insert address] Dear [insert name] : SOLICITATION NUMBER [insert solicitation number] for [insert procurement title/description] In accordance with Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) 15.306(c), the Government has established a Competitive Range of offerors for the subject contract solicitation. [insert name of offeror] is not within the established Competitive Range. We have provided the evaluation of your proposal as Attachment 1. In accordance with the FAR 15.505, you may request a debriefing concerning the exclusion of your proposal from the competitive range. We have enclosed a Debriefing Request Form for your use, should you wish to request one (see Attachment 2). Please email a completed copy of

262

Dear Ms  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

oral, as well as written. The main purpose of these discussions is to notify insert name of offeror of deficiencies and weaknesses in its proposal, as well as other aspects of...

263

MS) Systems  

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (509) 375-6958 ... » Healthcare, ... Medical » Professional Services » Security ...

264

U-127: Microsoft Security Bulletin MS12-020 - Critical | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U-127: Microsoft Security Bulletin MS12-020 - Critical U-127: Microsoft Security Bulletin MS12-020 - Critical U-127: Microsoft Security Bulletin MS12-020 - Critical March 16, 2012 - 9:30pm Addthis PROBLEM: Microsoft Security Bulletin MS12-020 - Critical PLATFORM: Windows XP Service Pack 3, Windows XP Professional x64 Edition Service Pack 2, Windows XP Professional x64 Edition Service Pack 2, Windows Server 2003 x64 Edition Service Pack 2, Windows Server 2003 with SP2 for Itanium-based Systems, Windows Vista Service Pack 2, Windows Vista x64 Edition Service Pack 2, Windows Server 2008 for 32-bit Systems Service Pack 2, Windows Server 2008 for x64-based Systems Service Pack 2, Windows Server 2008 for Itanium-based Systems Service Pack 2, Windows 7 for 32-bit Systems, Windows 7 for 32-bit Systems Service Pack 1, Windows 7 for x64-based Systems, Windows 7 for x64-based Systems Service

265

Measurement of lithium isotope ratios by quadrupole-ICP-MS: application to seawater and natural carbonates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurement of lithium isotope ratios by quadrupole-ICP-MS: application to seawater and natural method for lithium isotope ratio (7 Li/6 Li) determinations with low total lithium consumption ( lithium from all matrix elements using small volume resin (2 ml/3.4 meq AG 50W-X8) and low volume elution

Weston, Ken

266

COAL RESOURCES, POWDER RIVER BASIN By M.S. Ellis,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter PN COAL RESOURCES, POWDER RIVER BASIN By M.S. Ellis,1 G.L. Gunther,2 A.M. Ochs,2 S, Delaware 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky in the toolbar to return. 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky

267

COAL RESOURCES OF THE HANNA AND CARBON By M.S. Ellis,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter HN COAL RESOURCES OF THE HANNA AND CARBON BASINS By M.S. Ellis,1 G.L. Gunther,2 A.M. Ochs,2, Delaware 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky in the toolbar to return. 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky

268

Texas Engineering Experiment Station 1470 William D. Fitch Pkwy (MS-3579)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Engineering Experiment Station 1470 William D. Fitch Pkwy (MS-3579) College Station, TX 77845 and Information Resources for which an exception is needed Software Applications or Operating Systems (Texas Administrative Code §213.30) Web Sites (Texas Administrative Code §206.70) Telecommunications Products (Texas

269

Name Degree Year Notes Thesis title Berg, Ronald J. MS. Zoology 1969  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thermoregulation of fishes in relation to heated effluent from a steam-electric power plant (Lake Monona plant on the distribution and abundance of zooplankton near the plant's thermal outfall. Engel, Sanford & 1975 MS.Distribution of fishes near Point Beach Power Plant, Lake Michigan; Ph.D. Habitat selection

Sheridan, Jennifer

270

COAL RESOURCES, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN By M.S. Ellis,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter GN COAL RESOURCES, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN By M.S. Ellis,1 G.L. Gunther,2 A.M. Ochs,2 J of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones here or on this symbol in the toolbar to return. 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal

271

MS/NMR: A Structure-Based Approach for Discovering Protein Ligands and for Drug Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MS/NMR: A Structure-Based Approach for Discovering Protein Ligands and for Drug Design by Coupling of size exclusion gel chromatography, mass spectrometry, and NMR to identify bound complexes are then individually assayed by chemical shift perturbations in a 2D 1H-15N HSQC NMR spectrum to verify specific

Powers, Robert

272

The burnup dependence of light water reactor spent fuel oxidation  

SciTech Connect

Over the temperature range of interest for dry storage or for placement of spent fuel in a permanent repository under the conditions now being considered, UO{sub 2} is thermodynamically unstable with respect to oxidation to higher oxides. The multiple valence states of uranium allow for the accommodation of interstitial oxygen atoms in the fuel matrix. A variety of stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric phases is therefore possible as the fuel oxidizers from UO{sub 2} to higher oxides. The oxidation of UO{sub 2} has been studied extensively for over 40 years. It has been shown that spent fuel and unirradiated UO{sub 2} oxidize via different mechanisms and at different rates. The oxidation of LWR spent fuel from UO{sub 2} to UO{sub 2.4} was studied previously and is reasonably well understood. The study presented here was initiated to determine the mechanism and rate of oxidation from UO{sub 2.4} to higher oxides. During the early stages of this work, a large variability in the oxidation behavior of samples oxidized under nearly identical conditions was found. Based on previous work on the effect of dopants on UO{sub 2} oxidation and this initial variability, it was hypothesized that the substitution of fission product and actinide impurities for uranium atoms in the spent fuel matrix was the cause of the variable oxidation behavior. Since the impurity concentration is roughly proportional to the burnup of a specimen, the oxidation behavior of spent fuel was expected to be a function of both temperature and burnup. This report (1) summarizes the previous oxidation work for both unirradiated UO{sub 2} and spent fuel (Section 2.2) and presents the theoretical basis for the burnup (i.e., impurity concentration) dependence of the rate of oxidation (Sections 2.3, 2.4, and 2.5), (2) describes the experimental approach (Section 3) and results (Section 4) for the current oxidation tests on spent fuel, and (3) establishes a simple model to determine the activation energies associated with spent fuel oxidation (Section 5).

Hanson, B.D.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

THE PREPARATION OF URANIUM DIOXIDE FROM A MOLTEN SALT SOLUTION OF URANYL CHLORIDE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Uranium oxides in a molten eutectic mixture of NaClKCl were chlorinated by bubbling chlorine gas through the mixture. The reaction product, uranyl chloride. was soluble in the molten salt. Although UO/sub 2/ was the most common oxide used, the reaction was similar in the other oxides. Phosgene and aluminum chloride were also used as chlorinating agents. A dense, crystalline precipitate of pure UO/sub 2/ was prepared by the reduction of the uranyl chloride contained in the molten salt solution. The reduction was accomplished by contacting the salt solution with any of several metals, by reaction with hydrogen or dry ammonia gas, or by electrolysis. Several kilograms of UO/sub 2/ were prepared by electrolysis using graphite electrodes. The physical properties of the material made it potentially useful as a ceramic fuel material. The initial high particle density of the "as-produced" UO/sub 2/ was considered of great potential advantage for adapting this process to the refabrication of irradiated UO/sub 2/ into recycle fuel elements. (M.C.G.)

Lyon, W.L.; Voiland, E.E.

1959-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

274

Standard specification for blended uranium oxides with 235U content of less than 5 % for direct hydrogen reduction to nuclear grade uranium dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This specification covers blended uranium trioxide (UO3), U3O8, or mixtures of the two, powders that are intended for conversion into a sinterable uranium dioxide (UO2) powder by means of a direct reduction process. The UO2 powder product of the reduction process must meet the requirements of Specification C 753 and be suitable for subsequent UO2 pellet fabrication by pressing and sintering methods. This specification applies to uranium oxides with a 235U enrichment less than 5 %. 1.2 This specification includes chemical, physical, and test method requirements for uranium oxide powders as they relate to the suitability of the powder for storage, transportation, and direct reduction to UO2 powder. This specification is applicable to uranium oxide powders for such use from any source. 1.3 The scope of this specification does not comprehensively cover all provisions for preventing criticality accidents, for health and safety, or for shipping. Observance of this specification does not relieve the user of th...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Standard test method for determination of impurities in plutonium: acid dissolution, ion exchange matrix separation, and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopic (ICP/AES) analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This specification covers blended uranium trioxide (UO3), U3O8, or mixtures of the two, powders that are intended for conversion into a sinterable uranium dioxide (UO2) powder by means of a direct reduction process. The UO2 powder product of the reduction process must meet the requirements of Specification C 753 and be suitable for subsequent UO2 pellet fabrication by pressing and sintering methods. This specification applies to uranium oxides with a 235U enrichment less than 5 %. 1.2 This specification includes chemical, physical, and test method requirements for uranium oxide powders as they relate to the suitability of the powder for storage, transportation, and direct reduction to UO2 powder. This specification is applicable to uranium oxide powders for such use from any source. 1.3 The scope of this specification does not comprehensively cover all provisions for preventing criticality accidents, for health and safety, or for shipping. Observance of this specification does not relieve the user of th...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Surface Decontamination of System Components in Uranium Conversion Plant at KAERI  

SciTech Connect

A chemical decontamination process using nitric acid solution was selected as in-situ technology for recycle or release with authorization of a large amount of metallic waste including process system components such as tanks, piping, etc., which is generated by dismantling a retired uranium conversion plant at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). The applicability of nitric acid solution for surface decontamination of metallic wastes contaminated with uranium compounds was evaluated through the basic research on the dissolution of UO2 and ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC) powder. Decontamination performance was verified by using the specimens contaminated with such uranium compounds as UO2 and AUC taken from the uranium conversion plant. Dissolution rate of UO2 powder is notably enhanced by the addition of H2O2 as an oxidant even in the condition of a low concentration of nitric acid and low temperature compared with those in a nitric acid solution without H2O2. AUC powders dissolve easily in nitric acid solutions until the solution pH attains about 2.5 {approx} 3. Above that solution pH, however, the uranium concentration in the solution is lowered drastically by precipitation as a form of U3(NH3)4O9 . 5H2O. Decontamination performance tests for the specimens contaminated with UO2 and AUC were quite successful with the application of decontamination conditions obtained through the basic studies on the dissolution of UO2 and AUC powders.

Choi, W. K.; Kim, K. N.; Won, H. J.; Jung, C. H.; Oh, W. Z.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

277

Molecular uranates - laser synthesis of uranium oxide anions in the gas phase  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser ablation of solid UO{sub 3} or (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}U{sub 2}O{sub 7} yielded in the gas phase molecular uranium oxide anions with compositions ranging from [UO{sub n}]{sup -} (n = 2-4) to [U{sub 14}O{sub n}]{sup -} (n = 32-35), as detected by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The cluster series [U{sub x}O{sub 3x}]{sup -} for x {le} 6 and various [U{sub x}O{sub 3x-y}]{sup -}, in which y increased with increasing x, could be identified. A few anions with H atoms were also present, and their abundance increased when hydrated UO{sub 3} was used in place of anhydrous UO{sub 3}. Collision-induced dissociation experiments with some of the lower m/z cluster anions supported extended structures in which neutral UO{sub 3} constitutes the building block. Cationic uranium oxide clusters [U{sub x}O{sub n}]{sup +} (x = 2-9; n = 3-24) could also be produced and are briefly discussed. Common trends in the O/U ratios for both negative and positive clusters could be unveiled.

Marcalo, Joaquim; Santos, Marta; Pires de Matos, Antonio; Gibson, John K

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

278

Thermophysical properties of uranium dioxide - Version 0 for peer review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data on thermophysical properties of solid and liquid UO{sub 2} have been reviewed and critically assessed to obtain consistent thermophysical property recommendations for inclusion in the International Nuclear Safety Center Database on the World Wide Web (http://www.insc.anl.gov.). Thermodynamic properties that have been assessed are enthalpy, heat capacity, melting point, enthalpy of fusion, thermal expansion, density, surface tension, and vapor pressure. Transport properties that have been assessed are thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, viscosity, and emissivity. Summaries of the recommendations with uncertainties and detailed assessments for each property are included in this report and in the International Nuclear Safety Center Database for peer review. The assessments includes a review of the experiments and data, an examination of previous recommendations, the basis for selecting recommendations, a determination of uncertainties, and a comparison of recommendations with data and with previous recommendations. New data and research that have led to new recommendations include thermal expansion and density measurements of solid and liquid UO{sub 2}, derivation of physically-based equations for the thermal conductivity of solid UO{sub 2}, measurements of the heat capacity of liquid UO{sub 2}, and measurements and analysis of the thermal conductivity of liquid UO{sub 2}.

Fink, J.K.; Petri, M.C.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

File:USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-MS.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MS.pdf MS.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Mississippi Ethanol Plant Locations Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,650 × 1,275 pixels, file size: 278 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Mississippi Ethanol Plant Locations Sources United States Department of Agriculture Related Technologies Biomass, Biofuels, Ethanol Creation Date 2010-01-19 Extent State Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Mississippi External links http://www.nass.usda.gov/Charts_and_Maps/Ethanol_Plants/ File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 16:17, 27 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 16:17, 27 December 2010 1,650 × 1,275 (278 KB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated bot upload

280

VIA EMAIL Ms. Mariah Steele ENERGY STAR Program U.S. Environmental Protection Agency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10, 2013 10, 2013 VIA EMAIL Ms. Mariah Steele ENERGY STAR Program U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW Room 62023 Washington, DC 20460 Dear Ms. Steele: The U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE") selected a Sunpentown-brand refrigerator, model RF-330SS, manufactured by Hefei Hualing Co., Ltd. ("Hefei Hualing"), for testing as part of DOE's ENERGY STAR ® Verification Testing Program. On October 24, 2012, DOE notified Sunpentown International, Inc. ("Sunpentown") that the model did not meet the ENERGY STAR specification for maximum permitted annual energy use. Hefei Hualing replied to DOE via email, first inquiring why DOE's notification listed the model's maximum permitted energy use as 242 kilowatt-hours per year (kWh/yr) rather than

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ms uo uo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Ms Rocio Meneses | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Rocio Meneses Rocio Meneses Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About Staff Listings/Contact Information What's New User Facilities Accelerator & Detector Research & Development Principal Investigators' Meetings Scientific Highlights Construction Projects BES Home Staff Listings/Contact Information Ms. Rocio Meneses Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Program Assistant Scientific User Facilities Division Office of Basic Energy Sciences SC-22.3/Germantown Building U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20585-1290 E-Mail: Rocio.Meneses@science.doe.gov Phone: (301) 903-7792 Fax: (301) 903-1690 Ms. Meneses previously worked as an office manager for four years at a non-profit organization called Working Classroom. Working Classroom is a

282

Ms. Judy Clayton, Chair Paducah Citizens Advisory Board EHI Consultants, Inc.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

19,201 0 19,201 0 Ms. Judy Clayton, Chair Paducah Citizens Advisory Board EHI Consultants, Inc. 1 1 1 Memorial Drive Paducah, Kentucky 4200 1 Dear Ms. Clayton: Thank you for your recent letter providing a recommendation to include option periods in Department of Energy Requests for Proposals for prime contracts. The Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) provides the total of the basic and option period of a contract for services shall not exceed 5 years, unless approved in accordance with agency procedures. In determining to approve inclusion of an option beyond the 5-year base period specified in FAR, many additional factors must be taken into consideration. These factors include: an expectation that the work requirements will continue beyond the base period of the contract; a

283

VIA EMAIL Ms. Leslie Jones ENERGY STAR Program U.S. Environmental Protection Agency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6, 2011 6, 2011 VIA EMAIL Ms. Leslie Jones ENERGY STAR Program U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC 20460 Dear Ms. Jones: On March 9, 2011, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) notified Whirlpool Corporation (Whirlpool) that DOE had completed testing of the KitchenAid refrigerator model KSRS25RV* under the ENERGY STAR Testing Pilot Program and confirmed that the model did not meet the ENERGY STAR maximum energy consumption requirement of 580 kWh/yr. DOE gave Whirlpool until March 29, 2011, to provide conclusive manufacturing or design evidence or quality assurance information rebutting DOE testing, which showed that this product did not meet the ENERGY STAR Program's energy-efficiency. On March 29,2011, Whirlpool replied that its certification test results for the model met the

284

Mr. Christopher Lawrence and Ms. Julie Smith Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mr. Christopher Lawrence and Ms. Julie Smith Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Mail Code: OE-20 U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. 20585 Dear Mr. Lawrence and Ms. Smith, The Western Governors' Association (WGA) is submitting these comments in response to the Department of Energy's (DOE) Request for Information (RFI), dated August 29, 2013 1 . The RFI outlines a proposed process to establish a coordinated series of meetings and other actions for qualified transmission projects, via an Integrated, Interagency Pre-Application process (IIP). Western Governors appreciate efforts to streamline the siting and permitting process for transmission. Western Governors have a clear goal to site and permit transmission lines three years after a

285

Ms. Katharine Kaplan ENERGY STAR Program U.S. Environmental Protection Agency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 2, 2010 September 2, 2010 Ms. Katharine Kaplan ENERGY STAR Program U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW MC 6202J Washington, DC 20460 Dear Ms. Kaplan: On July 29, 2010, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) notified Whirlpool Corporation that DOE testing of one unit of the Amana dishwasher model ASD2524VE*, performed as part of the ENERGY STAR Verification Testing Pilot Program, showed that this model exceeded allowable ENERGY STAR efficiency requirements by 9.2 percent during Stage I testing. DOE gave Whirlpool until August 9, 2010, to request testing of additional units so that DOE could statistically determine whether this model meets the ENEGRY STAR requirements or to have this matter referred to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

286

Development of chiral LC-MS methods for small molecules and their applications i  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

chiral LC-MS methods for small molecules and their applications i chiral LC-MS methods for small molecules and their applications i n the analysis of enantiomeric composition and pharmacokinetic studies Meera Jay Desai A dissertation submitted to the graduate faculty in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Major: Analytical Chemistry Program of Study Committee: Daniel W. Armstrong, Major Professor Edward S. Yeung Robsrt S. Houk Victor S.-Y. Lin Gregory Phillips Iowa State University Ames, Iowa 2004 .. 11 Graduate College Iowa State University This is to certify that the doctoral dissertation of Meera Jay Desai has met the dissertation requirement of Iowa State University Major Professor ,&I w4/< For e Major Program ... 1 1 1 This dissertation i s Adicated tu Mypurt?ntsl for taking a chance on a better lge for themselves and their chilhen

287

Ms. Julie A. Smith Mr. Christopher Lawrence Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 30, 2013 October 30, 2013 Ms. Julie A. Smith Mr. Christopher Lawrence Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Mail Code: OE-20 U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 Dear Ms. Smith and Mr. Lawrence: The Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (AFWA) would like to provide comments on the Federal Register Notice Request for Information (RFI) on Improving Performance of Federal Permitting and Review of Infrastructure Projects, Federal Register Document 2013-21098. AFWA is the professional association that represents the collective voice of North America's state, provincial and territorial fish and wildlife agencies. The state fish and wildlife agencies (State agencies) have statutory authority

288

Microsoft PowerPoint - 13-01 Poirier SRNL-MS-2010-00246.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tanks 5 and 6 Oxalic Acid Dissolution and Tanks 5 and 6 Oxalic Acid Dissolution and Tank 5 and 6 Characterization M. R. Poirier, R. Jolly, and G. D. Thaxton November 18, 2010 SRNL-MS-2010-00246 Print Close 2 Outline of Talk Introduction Description of Testing Simulant Testing Actual Waste Testing Test Results Description of Oxalic Acid Cleaning in Tank Farm Results from Oxalic Acid Cleaning in Tank Farm Mechanical Cleaning Conclusions Print

289

Performance Evaluation of Real Time Formaldehyde Monitors: PTR-MS and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance Evaluation of Real Time Formaldehyde Monitors: PTR-MS and Performance Evaluation of Real Time Formaldehyde Monitors: PTR-MS and Interscan 4160-500B Portable Monitor Title Performance Evaluation of Real Time Formaldehyde Monitors: PTR-MS and Interscan 4160-500B Portable Monitor Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6357E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Sidheswaran, Meera A., Sebastian Cohn, Douglas P. Sullivan, and Lara A. Gundel Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract Executive Summary Exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in buildings is a health hazard. Of particular concern is formaldehyde, a ubiquitous carcinogen emitted from furnishings and adhesives in homes and offices. Practitioners and researchers in the area of building performance are very interested in measuring formaldehyde in homes, and they need instrumentation that responds immediately. Current formaldehyde monitoring techniques are hampered by interfering substances in the sample airstream, compromising measurement accuracy and leading to drift. Many experts are now using a tabletop real-time formaldehyde instrument, the Interscan 4160-2, that LBNL researchers have found to be very sensitive to water vapor and low levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Unless ways are found to remove these interferences, relying on the Interscan's readings in buildings will lead to the wrong conclusions about formaldehyde levels and could trigger subsequent unnecessary expense and/or inappropriate responses.

290

Performance characteristics of cryofocusing GC/MS system at BWXT Pantex Plant.  

SciTech Connect

Ensuring the reliability of all components within a weapon system becomes increasingly important as the stockpile ages. One of the most noteworthy surveillance techniques designed to circumvent (or take place alongside) traditional D&I operations is to collect a sample of gas from within the internal atmosphere of a particular region in a weapon. While a wealth of information about the weapon may be encoded within the composition of its gas sample, our access to that information is only as good as the method used to analyze the sample. It has been shown that cryofocusing-GC/MS offers advantages in terms of sensitivity, ease of sample collection, and robustness of the equipment/hardware used. Attention is therefore focused on qualifying a cryo-GC/MS system for routine stockpile surveillance operations at Pantex. A series of tests were performed on this instrument to characterize the linearity and repeatability of its response using two different standard gas mixes (ozone precursor and TO-14) at various concentrations. This paper outlines the methods used and the results of these tests in order to establish a baseline by which to compare future cryo-GC/MS analyses. A summary of the results is shown.

Brown, Jason R.; Banet, Judith F.; Ithaca, Jerry (BWXT Pantex Plant, Amarillo, TX); Thornberg, Steven Michael; Woods, Lorelei (BWXT Pantex Plant, Amarillo, TX)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Sources of Technical Variability in Quantitative LC-MS Proteomics: Human Brain Tissue Sample Analysis.  

SciTech Connect

To design a robust quantitative proteomics study, an understanding of both the inherent heterogeneity of the biological samples being studied as well as the technical variability of the proteomics methods and platform is needed. Additionally, accurately identifying the technical steps associated with the largest variability would provide valuable information for the improvement and design of future processing pipelines. We present an experimental strategy that allows for a detailed examination of the variability of the quantitative LC-MS proteomics measurements. By replicating analyses at different stages of processing, various technical components can be estimated and their individual contribution to technical variability can be dissected. This design can be easily adapted to other quantitative proteomics pipelines. Herein, we applied this methodology to our label-free workflow for the processing of human brain tissue. For this application, the pipeline was divided into four critical components: Tissue dissection and homogenization (extraction), protein denaturation followed by trypsin digestion and SPE clean-up (digestion), short-term run-to-run instrumental response fluctuation (instrumental variance), and long-term drift of the quantitative response of the LC-MS/MS platform over the 2 week period of continuous analysis (instrumental stability). From this analysis, we found the following contributions to variability: extraction (72%) >> instrumental variance (16%) > instrumental stability (8.4%) > digestion (3.1%). Furthermore, the stability of the platform and its’ suitability for discovery proteomics studies is demonstrated.

Piehowski, Paul D.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Orton, Daniel J.; Xie, Fang; Moore, Ronald J.; Ramirez Restrepo, Manuel; Engel, Anzhelika; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Albin, Roger L.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Myers, Amanda J.

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

292

Characterization Of Nuclear Materials Using Time-Of-Flight ICP-MS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The investigation of illicit trafficking of nuclear materials, nuclear safeguards analysis, and non-proliferation control requires sensitive and isotope-selective detection methods to gain crucial nuclear forensic information like isotope 'fingerprints' and multi-element signatures. The advantage of time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry - quasi-simultaneous multi-mass analysis - combined with an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) ion source provides an analytical instrument with multi-element and multi-isotope capability and good detection limits. A TOF-ICP-MS system thus appears to be an advantageous choice for the investigation and characterization of nuclear materials. We present here results using a GBC OptiMass 8000 time-of-flight ICP-MS for the isotope screening of solid samples by laser ablation and the multi-element determination of impurities in uranium ore concentrates using matrix matched standards. A laser ablation system (New Wave Research, UP 213) coupled to the TOF-ICP-MS instrument has been used to optimize the system for analysis of non-radioactive metal samples of natural isotopic composition for a variety of elements including Cu, Sr, Zr, Mo, Cd, In, Ba, Ta, W, Re, Pt, and Pb in pure metals, alloys, and glasses to explore precision, accuracy, and detection limits. Similar methods were then applied to measure uranium. When the laser system is optimized, no mass bias correction is required. Precision and accuracy for the determination of the isotopic composition is typically 1 - 3% for elemental concentrations of as little as 50 ppm in the matrix, with no requirement for sample preparation. The laser ablation precision and accuracy are within ~10x of the instrumental limits for liquid analysis (0.1%). We have investigated the capabilities of the TOF-ICP-MS for the analysis of impurities in uranium matrices. Matrix matching has been used to develop calibration curves for a range of impurities (alkaline, earth-alkaline, transition metals, and rare earth elements). These calibration curves have been used to measure impurities in a number of uranium samples. The results from the TOF-ICP-MS will be compared with other mass spectrometric methods.

Buerger, Stefan [ORNL; Riciputi, Lee R [ORNL; Bostick, Debra A [ORNL; Duckworth, Douglas {Doug} C [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

J.G. Tobin and S.-W. Yu Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, USA  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Differentiation of 5f and 6d Components Differentiation of 5f and 6d Components in the Unoccupied Electronic Structure of UO 2 J.G. Tobin and S.-W. Yu Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, USA Summary: One of the crucial questions of all actinide electronic structure determinations is the issue of 5f versus 6d character and the distribution of these components across the density of states. Here, two break-though experiments will be discussed, which have allowed the direct determination of the U5f and U6d contributions to the unoccupied density of states (UDOS) in Uranium Dioxide (UO 2 ). [1] First, a combined soft X-ray Absorption and Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy (XAS and BIS, respectively) study of UO 2 will be discussed. [2] Second, a novel Resonant Inverse Photoelectron and X-ray Emission Spectroscopy (RIPES and

294

Kinetics of laser pulse vaporization of uranium dioxide by mass spectrometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safety analyses of nuclear reactors require knowledge of the evaporation behavior of UO/sub 2/ at temperatures well above the melting point of 3140 K. In this study, rapid transient heating of a small spot on a UO/sub 2/ specimen was accomplished by a laser pulse, which generates a surface temperature excursion. This in turn vaporizes the target surface and the gas expands into vacuum. The surface temperature transient was monitored by a fast-response automatic optical pyrometer. The maximum surface temperatures investigated range from approx. 3700 K to approx. 4300 K. A computer program was developed to simulate the laser heating process and calculate the surface temperature evolution. The effect of the uncertainties of the high temperature material properties on the calculation was included in a sensitivity study for UO/sub 2/ vaporization. The measured surface temperatures were in satisfactory agreements.

Tsai, C.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

DEVELOPMENT OF PLUTONIUM-BEARING FUEL MATERIALS. Monthly Progress Letter for Month of January 1962  

SciTech Connect

Development work leading to comparison of co-precipitated and mechanically blended UO/sub 2/-- PuO/sub 2? powders is reported in which special emphasis was placed on blending trials, pellet sintering studies, and subsequent evaluation of pellets made with blended material. Homogeneity studies indicate that currently used procedures are unsatisfactory because particle buildup occurs during blending. Powder preparation via the oxalate route was continued along with PuO/sub 2/ moisture pickup studies. Homogeneous precipitation studies on UO/ sub 2/ were continued to determine feasibility of direct preparation of dense UO/ sub 2/-- PuO/sub 2/ feed materials. Plasma-torch-produced PuO/sub 2/ spheres are being evaluated. (J.R.D.)

Puechl, K.H.

1962-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

SUMMARY TECHNICAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD JULY 1, 1956 TO SEPTEMBER 1, 1956  

SciTech Connect

The activities of the Technical Division, including the HNO/sub 3/ recovery process, a study of UO/sub 3/ factors as related to the production of metal-grade UF/sub 4/, a thermobalance investigation of starch as a reducing agent for UO/sub 3/, reduction of UF/sub 4/ to uranium by a thermite type reaction, melting and casting of Nb-U alloy, uranium recovery from scrap materials, preparation of uranium shot, cal cium reduction of ThO/sub 2/ production of thorium ingots, "wet chemical" and spectrochemical development, ammonia precipitation and filtration studies from uranyl nitrate solutions and preparation of active UO/sub 2/ from UF/sub 6/ are reviewed. (W.L.H.)

Simmons, J.W. ed.

1956-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

Chandra Observation of MS 1455.0+2232: cold fronts in a massive cooling flow cluster?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the Chandra observation of the cluster of galaxies MS 1455.0+2232. From previous ASCA and ROSAT observations, this cluster was identified as a ``relaxed'' cluster that hosts one of the most massive cooling flows detected. With higher angular resolution, the Chandra X-ray image shows the presence of two surface brightness edges on opposite sides of the X-ray peak: the first at 190 kpc to the north and the second at 450 kpc to the south. Even though the low exposure of this observation limits our ability to constrain the temperature jump across both edges, we show that the northern edge is likely to be a ``cold front'' similar to others observed recently by Chandra in the clusters A2142, A3667, RX J1720.1+2638, and A2256. The observed cold front is most likely produced by the motion, from south to north, of a group-size dark matter halo. The most natural explanation for the presence of this observed moving subclump is that MS 1455.0+2232 is a merger cluster in the very last stage before it becomes fully relaxed. This scenario, however, appears to be unlikely as the cluster shows no further sign of ongoing merger. Moreover, it is not clear if a massive cooling flow could have survived this kind of merger. We propose an alternative scenario in which, as for RX J1720.1+2638, MS 1455.0+2232 is the result of the hierarchical collapse of two co-located density perturbations, the first a group-scale perturbation collapse followed by a second cluster-scale perturbation collapse that surrounded, but did not destroy, the first. We suggest that a cooling flow may have begun inside the already collapsed group-scale perturbation and may have been later amplified by the gas compression induced by the infall of the overlying main cluster mass.

P. Mazzotta; M. Markevitch; W. R. Forman; C. Jones; A. Vikhlinin; L. VanSpeybroeck

2001-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

298

Toward Joint Hypothesis-Tests Seismic Event Screening Analysis: Ms|mb and Event Depth  

SciTech Connect

Well established theory can be used to combine single-phenomenology hypothesis tests into a multi-phenomenology event screening hypothesis test (Fisher's and Tippett's tests). Commonly used standard error in Ms:mb event screening hypothesis test is not fully consistent with physical basis. Improved standard error - Better agreement with physical basis, and correctly partitions error to include Model Error as a component of variance, correctly reduces station noise variance through network averaging. For 2009 DPRK test - Commonly used standard error 'rejects' H0 even with better scaling slope ({beta} = 1, Selby et al.), improved standard error 'fails to rejects' H0.

Anderson, Dale [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Selby, Neil [AWE Blacknest

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

299

Extreme Chromatography: Faster, Hotter, SmallerChapter 1 The Theory and Practice of UHPLC and UHPLC-MS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extreme Chromatography: Faster, Hotter, Smaller Chapter 1 The Theory and Practice of UHPLC and UHPLC-MS Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 1 The Theory a

300

Market Research Survey of Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) Portable MS Systems for IAEA Safeguards Applications  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results for the market research survey of mass spectrometers that are deemed pertinent to International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) needs and strategic objectives. The focus of the report is on MS instruments that represent currently available (or soon to be) commercial off-the shelf (COTS) technology and weigh less than 400 pounds. A compilation of all available MS instruments (36 COTS and 2 R&D) is presented, along with pertinent information regarding each instrument.

Hart, Garret L.; Hager, George J.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Duckworth, Douglas C.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ms uo uo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Web Site: http://www.coop-program.engr.uga.edu/ms.html UGA Cooperative Engineering Program Development Key Points and Notes.docx  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Web Site: http://www.coop-program.engr.uga.edu/ms.html UGA Cooperative Engineering Program;Web Site: http://www.coop-program.engr.uga.edu/ms.html UGA Cooperative Engineering Program Development can be earned for their degree. #12;Web Site: http://www.coop-program.engr.uga.edu/ms.html UGA

Arnold, Jonathan

302

Greening academia: Developing sustainable waste management at Higher Education Institutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) are often the size of small municipalities. Worldwide, the higher education (HE) sector has expanded phenomenally; for example, since the 1960s, the United Kingdom (UK) HE system has expanded sixfold to >2.4 million students. As a consequence, the overall production of waste at HEIs throughout the world is very large and presents significant challenges as the associated legislative, economic and environmental pressures can be difficult to control and manage. This paper critically reviews why sustainable waste management has become a key issue for the worldwide HE sector to address and describes some of the benefits, barriers, practical and logistical problems. As a practical illustration of some of the issues and problems, the four-phase waste management strategy developed over 15 years by one of the largest universities in Southern England - the University of Southampton (UoS) - is outlined as a case study. The UoS is committed to protecting the environment by developing practices that are safe, sustainable and environmentally friendly and has developed a practical, staged approach to manage waste in an increasingly sustainable fashion. At each stage, the approach taken to the development of infrastructure (I), service provision (S) and behavior change (B) is explained, taking into account the Political, Economic, Social, Technological, Legal and Environmental (PESTLE) factors. Signposts to lessons learned, good practice and useful resources that other institutions - both nationally and internationally - can access are provided. As a result of the strategy developed at the UoS, from 2004 to 2008 waste costs fell by around Pounds 125k and a recycling rate of 72% was achieved. The holistic approach taken - recognizing the PESTLE factors and the importance of a concerted ISB approach - provides a realistic, successful and practical example for other institutions wishing to effectively and sustainably manage their waste.

Zhang, N. [School of Civil Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, University Rd., Highfield, Southampton, Hampshire SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Williams, I.D., E-mail: idw@soton.ac.uk [School of Civil Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, University Rd., Highfield, Southampton, Hampshire SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Kemp, S. [School of Civil Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, University Rd., Highfield, Southampton, Hampshire SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Smith, N.F. [Estates and Facilities Management, University of Southampton, University Rd., Highfield, Southampton, Hampshire SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

The Luminosity Function of MS2255.7+2039 at z=0.288  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The luminosity function of MS2255.7+2039 at z=0.288 is determined down to atotal magnitude of R ~ 24, corresponding to M_R ~ -17 (H_0 = 50 km/s/Mpc). Thedata are corrected for incompleteness and crowding using detailed simulations.We find that the luminosity function is steeper than a standard Schechterfunction at faint magnitudes, and shows an excess of galaxies below M_R ~ -19.After corrections for light loss and crowding, the data can be described by asum of two Schechter functions, one with M_R = -22.8 and alpha = -1.0, and onesteeper with M_R = -18.9 and alpha = -1.5, representing the dwarf population. Astraight-line fit to the faint part yields a slope similar to the Schechteralpha = -1.5 of the dwarf population. The luminosity function of MS2255.7+2039is compared to other clusters at lower redshifts, and does not show anysignificant difference. The redshift range for clusters in which increasednumber of dwarf galaxies have been found is therefore extended to higherredshifts.

Naslund, M; Huldtgren, M

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Pure electron plasmas confined for 90 ms in a stellarator without electron sources or internal objects  

SciTech Connect

We report on the creation and up to 90 ms sustainment of pure electron plasmas confined in a stellarator without internal objects. Injection of positrons into such plasmas is expected to lead to the creation of the first electron-positron plasma experiments. These newly created plasmas will also allow a study of pure electron plasmas without the perturbing presence of internal objects. The plasmas were created by thermionic emission of electrons from a heated, biased filament that was retracted in 20 ms. The confinement of these transient plasmas is different from that of steady state plasmas with internal objects and emissive filaments, and is generally shorter, limited by ion buildup. The decay time is increased by lowering the neutral pressure, lowering the electron plasma temperature, or operating with neutrals with high ionization energies (helium). These findings are all consistent with ion accumulation being the cause for the shorter than expected confinement times. The magnetic field strength also moderately increases the decay times. The deleterious effect of ions is not expected to imply a similar deleterious effect when introducing positrons, but it implies that ion accumulation must be avoided also in an electron-positron experiment.

Brenner, P. W.; Sunn Pedersen, T.

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

Reduction of Solvent Effect in Reverse Phase Gradient Elution LC-ICP-MS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Quantification in liquid chromatography (LC) is becoming very important as more researchers are using LC, not as an analytical tool itself, but as a sample introduction system for other analytical instruments. The ability of LC instrumentation to quickly separate a wide variety of compounds makes it ideal for analysis of complex mixtures. For elemental speciation, LC is joined with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to separate and detect metal-containing, organic compounds in complex mixtures, such as biological samples. Often, the solvent gradients required to perform complex separations will cause matrix effects within the plasma. This limits the sensitivity of the ICP-MS and the quantification methods available for use in such analyses. Traditionally, isotope dilution has been the method of choice for LC-ICP-MS quantification. The use of naturally abundant isotopes of a single element in quantification corrects for most of the effects that LC solvent gradients produce within the plasma. However, not all elements of interest in speciation studies have multiple naturally occurring isotopes; and polyatomic interferences for a given isotope can develop within the plasma, depending on the solvent matrix. This is the case for reverse phase LC separations, where increasing amounts of organic solvent are required. For such separations, an alternative to isotope dilution for quantification would be is needed. To this end, a new method was developed using the Apex-Q desolvation system (ESI, Omaha, NE) to couple LC instrumentation with an ICP-MS device. The desolvation power of the system allowed greater concentrations of methanol to be introduced to the plasma prior to destabilization than with direct methanol injection into the plasma. Studies were performed, using simulated and actual linear methanol gradients, to find analyte-internal standard (AIS) pairs whose ratio remains consistent (deviations {+-} 10%) over methanol concentration ranges of 5%-35% (simulated) and 8%-32% (actual). Quadrupole (low resolution) and sector field (high resolution) ICP-MS instrumentation were utilized in these studies. Once an AIS pair is determined, quantification studies can be performed. First, an analysis is performed by adding both elements of the AIS pair post-column while performing the gradient elution without sample injection. A comparison of the ratio of the measured intensities to the atomic ratio of the two standards is used to determine a correction factor that can be used to account for the matrix effects caused by the mobile phase. Then, organic and/or biological molecules containing one of the two elements in the AIS pair are injected into the LC column. A gradient method is used to vary the methanol-water mixture in the mobile phase and to separate out the compounds in a given sample. A standard solution of the second ion in the AIS pair is added continuously post-column. By comparing the ratio of the measured intensities to the atomic ratio of the eluting compound and internal standard, the concentration of the injected compound can be determined.

Patrick Allen Sullivan

2005-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

306

Putting the Pieces Together: High-performance LC-MS/MS Provides Network-, Pathway-, and Protein-level Perspectives in Populus  

SciTech Connect

High-performance mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics enabled the construction of a detailed proteome atlas for Populus, a woody perennial plant model organism. Optimization of experimental procedures and implementation of current state-of-the-art instrumentation afforded the most detailed look into the predicted proteome space of Populus, offering varying proteome perspectives: 1) network-wide, 2) pathway-specific, and 3) protein-level viewpoints. Together, enhanced protein retrieval through a detergent-based lysis approach and maximized peptide sampling via the dual-pressure linear ion trap mass spectrometer (LTQ Velos), have resulted in the identification of 63,056 tryptic peptides. The technological advancements, specifically spectral- acquisition and sequencing speed, afforded the deepest look into the Populus proteome, with peptide abundances spanning 6 orders of magnitude and mapping to~25% of the predicted proteome space. In total, tryptic peptides mapped to 13,574 protein assignments across four organ-types: mature (fully expanded, leaf plastichronic index (LPI) 10-12) leaf, young (juvenile, LPI 4-6) leaf, root, and stem. To resolve protein ambiguity, identified proteins were grouped by sequence similarity ( 90%), thereby reducing the protein assignments into 7,538 protein groups. In addition, this large-scale data set features the first systems-wide survey of protein expression across different Populus organs. As a demonstration of the precision and comprehensiveness of the semi-quantitative analysis, we were able to contrast two stages of leaf development, mature versus young leaf. Statistical comparison through ANOVA analysis revealed 1,432 protein groups that exhibited statistically significant (p 0.01) differences in protein abundance. Experimental validation of the metabolic circuitry expected in mature leaf (characterized by photosynthesis and carbon fixation) compared to young leaf (characterized by rapid growth and moderate photosynthetic activities) strongly testifies to the credibility of the approach. Instead of quantitatively comparing a few proteins, a systems view of all the changes associated with a given cellular perturbation could be made.

Abraham, Paul E [ORNL; Giannone, Richard J [ORNL; Adams, Rachel M [ORNL; Kalluri, Udaya C [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

NEAMS Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April - June 2013 Published September 2013 April - June 2013 Published September 2013 Nuclear Energy ANL/NEAMS-13/3 Quarterly Highlights } } The BISON team is refining and validating the new friction model for fuel-cladding interactions (pages 2 and 3). } } Gas bubble equilibrium configurations in UO 2 were simulated, an important step toward modeling fission gas movement in oxide fuels (page 2). } } Benchmark calculations for the thermal conductivity of UO 2 have been prepared as part of the effort to predict fuel

308

PRESSURIZED WATER REACTOR PROGRAM TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT FOR THE PERIOD MAY 5, 1955 TO JUNE 16, 1955  

SciTech Connect

The current PWR plant and core parameters are listed. Resign requirements are briefly summarized for a radiation monitoring system, a fuel handling water system, a coolant purification system, an electrical power distribution system, and component shielding. Results of studies on thermal bowing and stressing of UO/sub 2/ are reported. A graph is presented of reactor power vs. reactor flow for various hot channel conditions. Development of U-- Mo and U-Nb alloys has been stopped because of the recent selection of UO/sub 2/ fuel material for the PWR core and blanket. The fabrication characteristics of UO/sub 2/ powders are being studied. Seamless Zircaloy-2 tubing has been tested to determine elastic limits, bursting pressures, and corrosion resistance. Fabrication techniques and tests for corrosion and defects in Zircaloy-clad U-Mo and UO/sub 2/ fuel rods are described. The preparation of UO/sub 2/ by various methods is being studied to determine which method produces a material most suitable for PWR fuel elements. The stability of UO/sub 2/ compacts in high temperature water and steam is being determined. Surface area and density measurements have been performed on samples of UO/sub 2/ powder prepared by various methods. Revelopment work on U-- Mo and U--Nb alloys has included studies of the effect on corrosion behavior of additions to the test water, additions to the alloys, homogenization of the alloys, annealing times, cladding, and fabrication techniques. Data are presented on relaxation in spring materials after exposure to a corrosive environment. Results are reported from loop and autoclave tests on fission product and crud deposition. Results of irradiation and corrosion testing of clad and unclad U--Mo and U-Nh alloys are described. The UO/sub 2/ irradiation program has included studies of dimensional changes, release of fission gases, and activity in the water surrounding the samples. A review of the methods of calculating reactor physics parameters has been completed, and the established procedures have been applied to determination of PWR reference design parameters. Critical experiments and primary loop shielding analyses are described. (D.E.B.)

1958-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

309

PRESSURIZED WATER REACTOR PROGRAM TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT FOR THE PERIOD SEPTEMBER 9 TO OCTOBER 20, 1955  

SciTech Connect

Progress in the design, development, and construction of PWR power plant systems and components and PWR core and auxiliaries is summarized. The blanket assembly design is described and illustrated. Results of MTR evaluation of fuel element failure instrumentation are reported. Development of fabrication and testing tochaiques for clad fuel elements, fuel rods, plates, and assemblies is described. Investigations of fuel and cladding alloys include crystal structure and thermal stability determinations on U--Mo alloys, studies on the nature of the hydride phase formed during corrosion of gamma -phase alloys in high- temperature water, and specific heat, resistivity, and phase diagram studies of U- -Mo and U--Nb alloys. The equilibrium and kinetics in the system UO/sub 2/--O/ sub 2/ are being studied to gain information on the structure and stability of UO/ sub 2/ under various conditions. Results of irradiation tests on UO/sub 2/ samples and of thermal cycling tests of Zircaloy-2 clad UO/sub 2/ rods are reported. Corrosion test resuIts are summarized for unclad and Zircaloy-2 clad U- - Mo and U--Nb samples. The radiation induced volume change of prototype fuel reds has been investigated. Studies of the fabrication cladding, tensile properties, and corrosion of U-- Si systems are described. Corrosion tests are continuing on Zircaloy-2 clad U-- Zr fuel elements and on various experimental Al alloys for cladding applications. Work was continued on the preparation, corrosion and sinterability of pure UO/sub 2/ and UO/sub 2/ containing additives. Operation and chemical analysis of in-pile loop experiments are described. Results are reported from studies of the erosion of UO/sub 2/ in high-velocity coolant, decontamination of water by ion exchange resins, sorption of radioisotopes on stainless steel, and decontamination of corrosion loops. Work in reactor physics has included PWR control calculations using a 2-dimensional UNIVAC code, calculation of fission product activity in the primary coolant, and criticaiity studies on the Flexibie Critical Experiment and on a lattice of UO/ sub 2/ fuel reds in the TRX. Current PWR plant parameters are recapitulated. (D.E.B.)

1958-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

310

Neutronic safety parameters and transient analyses for potential LEU conversion of the Budapest Research Reactor.  

SciTech Connect

An initial safety study for potential LEU conversion of the Budapest Research Reactor was completed. The study compares safety parameters and example transients for reactor cores with HEU and LEU fuels. Reactivity coefficients, kinetic parameters and control rod worths were calculated for cores with HEU(36%) UAl alloy fuel and UO{sub 2}-Al dispersion fuel, and with LEU (19.75%)UO{sub 2}-Al dispersion fuel that has a uranium density of about 2.5 g/cm{sup 3}. A preliminary fuel conversion plan was developed for transition cores that would convert the BRR from HEU to LEU fuel after the process is begun.

Pond, R. B.; Hanan, N. A.; Matos, J. E.; Maraczy, C.

1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

311

HRP-CP: AN EVALUATION OF THE DESIGN FEATURES OF BLANKET PROCESSING LOOP P- 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design features and the performance of UO/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ blanket processing Loop P-1 are evaluated from an engineering viewpoint. This unique experiment development loop was operated with pump heating to study the behavior of plutonium in 1.4 M UO/sub 2/SO/sub 4/at 250 deg C and was designed for mixed O/ sub 2/-H/sub 2/ gas pressurization The canned loop and the feed and sampling systems in glove boxes completely contained the plutonium throughout the experimental program. (auth)

Snider, J.W.; Clinton, S.D.

1958-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

312

Variation of stability constants of thorium and uranium oxalate complexes with ionic strength  

SciTech Connect

Extraction of Th(IV) and UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} by a solution of TTA and HDEHP, respectively, in toluene was used to obtain stability constants of their oxalate complexes in 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 M ionic strength (NaClO{sub 2}) solutions. The complexes formed were the MOx, MHOx, MOx{sub 2} and M(HOx){sub 2} (M = Th, UO{sub 2}) species. The values were analyzed by the Specific Interaction Theory and agreed to I {le} 3 M but required an additional term for fitting at I > 3 M.

Erten, H.N; Mohammed, A.K.; Choppin, G.R. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

313

Preparation of thorium-uranium gel spheres  

SciTech Connect

Ceramic oxide spheres with diameters of 15 to 1500 ..mu..m are being evaluated for fabrication of power reactor fuel rods. (Th,U)O/sub 2/ spheres can be prepared by internal or external chemical gelation of nitrate solutions or oxide sols. Two established external gelation techniques were tested but proved to be unsatisfactory for the intended application. Established internal gelation techniques for UO/sub 2/ spheres were applied with minor modifications to make 75% ThO/sub 2/-25% UO/sub 2/ spheres that sinter to diameters of 200 to 1400 ..mu..m (99% T.D.).

Spence, R.D.; Haas, P.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Effects of Time, Heat, and Oxygen on K Basin Sludge Agglomeration, Strength, and Solids Volume  

SciTech Connect

Sludge disposition will be managed in two phases under the K Basin Sludge Treatment Project. The first phase is to retrieve the sludge that currently resides in engineered containers in the K West (KW) Basin pool at ~10 to 18°C. The second phase is to retrieve the sludge from interim storage in the sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs) and treat and package it in preparation for eventual shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The work described in this report was conducted to gain insight into how sludge may change during long-term containerized storage in the STSCs. To accelerate potential physical and chemical changes, the tests were performed at temperatures and oxygen partial pressures significantly greater than those expected in the T Plant canyon cells where the STSCs will be stored. Tests were conducted to determine the effects of 50°C oxygenated water exposure on settled quiescent uraninite (UO2) slurry and a full simulant of KW containerized sludge to determine the effects of oxygen and heat on the composition and mechanical properties of sludge. Shear-strength measurements by vane rheometry also were conducted for UO2 slurry, mixtures of UO2 and metaschoepite (UO3•2H2O), and for simulated KW containerized sludge. The results from these tests and related previous tests are compared to determine whether the settled solids in the K Basin sludge materials change in volume because of oxidation of UO2 by dissolved atmospheric oxygen to form metaschoepite. The test results also are compared to determine if heating or other factors alter sludge volumes and to determine the effects of sludge composition and settling times on sludge shear strength. It has been estimated that the sludge volume will increase with time because of a uranium metal ? uraninite ? metaschoepite oxidation sequence. This increase could increase the number of containers required for storage and increase overall costs of sludge management activities. However, the volume might decrease because of decreases in the water-volume fraction caused by sludge solid reactions, compaction, or intergrowth and recrystallization of metaschoepite. In that case, fewer STSCs may be needed, but the shear strength would increase, and this could challenge recovery by water jet erosion and require more aggressive retrieval methods. Overall, the tests described herein indicate that the settled solids volume remains the same or decreases with time. The only case for which the sludge solids volumes increase with time is for the expansion factor attendant upon the anoxic corrosion of uranium metal to produce UO2 and subsequent reaction with oxygen to form equimolar UO2.25 and UO3•2H2O.

Delegard, Calvin H.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Daniel, Richard C.; Burns, Carolyn A.

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

315

Microsoft PowerPoint - 12-06 Poirier SRNL-MS-2010-00236.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MST Mixing and Kinetics Studies in Support of MST Mixing and Kinetics Studies in Support of SCIX Deployment at SRS Michael Poirier, Zafar Qureshi, Michael Williams, Tim Steeper, and Michael Restivo E&CPT Research Programs, SRNL November 18, 2010 SRNL-MS-2010-00236 Print Close 2 Introduction * SRR developing SCIX process to remove cesium, strontium, and select actinides from SRS Liquid Waste * Process uses existing waste tank (i.e., Tank 41H) Adds MST to waste tank to chemically sorb strontium and select actinides Removes MST and entrained sludge with in-riser rotary microfilter Removes cesium from RMF filtrate with CST ion-exchange column * RMF returns concentrated solids (i.e., MST and entrained sludge) to waste tank * Loaded CST ground to reduce its size and transferred into a waste tank (e.g., Tank 40H, 41H or 51H)

316

VIA EMAIL Ms. Leslie Jones ENERGY STAR Program U.S. Environmental Protection Agency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Room62023 Room62023 Washington, DC 20460 Dear Ms. Jones: December 22, 2011 The ASKO Appliances, Inc. ("ASKO") dishwasher model D5253XXL was selected for testing as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's ("DOE") ENERGY STAR®Verification Testing Pilot Program. DOE's initial testing, performed on a single unit of this model, indicated that it may not meet the ENERGY STAR requirement. In accordance with DOE's procedures for conducting verification testing in support of ENERGY STAR (see http://www l.eere.energy. go v/buildings/appliance standards/pdfs/ estar verification process.pdf), DOE determined that it would need to test three additional units to determine whether the model met the ENERGY STAR specification. DOE was unable to procure and test these three

317

VIA EMAIL Ms. Leslie Jones ENERGY STAR Program U,S. Enviromnental Protection Agency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U,S. Enviromnental Protection Agency U,S. Enviromnental Protection Agency 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW Room 62023 Washington, DC 20460 Dear Ms. Jones: April18, 2012 Kenmore-brand freezer model253.16582104, manufactured by Electrolux Major Appliances North America ("Electrolux"), was selected for testing as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's ("DOE") ENERGY STAR® Verification Testing Pilot Program. DOE's initial testing, performed by a third-party lab on a single unit of this model, indicated that the model might not meet the ENERGY STAR energy efficiency requirement for maximum permitted annual energy usage. In accordance with DOE's Pilot Program procedures for conducting verification testing in support of ENERGY STAR (see http://wwwl.eere.energy.gov/buildings/appliance standards/pdfs/fag final december-201 O.pdj),

318

Ms. Leslie Jones ENERGY STAR Program U.S. Environmental Protection Agency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Avenue, NW Avenue, NW Room 62023 Washington, DC 20460 Dear Ms. Jones: March 16,2011 On September 20, 2010, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) notified Whirlpool Corporation (Whirlpool) that DOE testing of one unit ofMaytag clothes washer model MVWC6ESWW1 as part of the ENERGY STAR Testing Pilot Program indicated that this model exceeded allowable ENERGY STAR energy-efficiency requirements. After consulting with Whirlpool, DOE proceeded with testing of additional units. Stage II testing also indicated that model MVWC6ESWW1 does not meet the ENERGY STAR requirements. The Department notified Whirlpool of these results on January 19, 2011. In response, Whirlpool explained that the discrepancy between DOE's test results and Whirlpool's own testing stemmed from the measurement of the clothes container capacity. Whirlpool further

319

Ms. Leslie Jones ENERGY STAR Program U.S. Environmental Protection Agency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A venue, NW A venue, NW Room 62023 Washington, DC 20460 Dear Ms. Jones: March 4, 2011 On January 31,2011, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) notified Haier that DOE testing ofHaier room air conditioner model ESA408J under the ENERGY STAR Testing Pilot Program confirmed that this model exceeded allowable ENERGY STAR energy-efficiency specification. On February 18,2011, Haier notified DOE that it is willing to accept the results of the ENERGY STAR testing for the purposes of determining whether this model meets the applicable ENERGY STAR efficiency level, although Haier' s test results are not consistent with DOE's testing. Haier stressed that this model has not been manufactured since May 2010. Haier also stated that it had previously informed ENERGY STAR that the model has been discontinued

320

VIA EMAIL Ms. Mariah Steele ENERGY STAR Program U.S. Environmental Protection Agency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania Avenue, NW Pennsylvania Avenue, NW Room 62023 · Washington, DC 20460 Dear Ms. Steele: May 10, 2013 · The U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE") selected a Haier-brand dehumidifier, model DE45EK, for testing as part ofDOE's ENERGY ST AR® Verification Testing Program. On October 24, · 2012, DOE notified the manufacturer of this model, Haier America Trading, L.L.C. ("Haier"), thaJ the model did not meet the minimum energy factor required for a model of its capacity according to the applicable ENERGY STAR specifi.cation. · Haier replied to, and later spoke with, DOE representatives about DOE's results. Haier also provided test data from previous testing of this model; the test data provided documented a higher energy factor than that observed .in the DOE testing. Baier could not, however, point out

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321

ATOMIC ENERGY CO&lbiISSION ms AlAMos. NEW MMICO  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ATOMIC ENERGY CO&lbiISSION ATOMIC ENERGY CO&lbiISSION ms AlAMos. NEW MMICO 87544 JUL 5 1973 H. C. Donnelly, Manager Albuquerque Operations UNNEEDED REAL PROPERTY - LOS AL-4MOS AREA OFFICE In our annual review of real property holdings at the Los Alamos Area Office we have identified four individual tracts within the community which are unneeded. An envi~konmental radioactivity survey has been conducted on each of the areas and no radiation or radiocontamination observations were encountered which are of radiological or environmental concern. Exhibit "A" contains detailed results of the survey of each of the four tracts. We recommend that approval be obtained to dispose of the property as excess through the-General Services Administration channel. The follow'

322

VIA EMAIL Ms. Mariah Steele ENERQY STAR Program· U.S. Environmental Protection Agency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENERQY STAR Program· ENERQY STAR Program· U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW Room62023 · Washington, DC 20460 Dear Ms. Steele: May 10, 2013 · The _D.S. Department of Energy ("DOE") selected a Kenmore-brand dehumidifier, mpde] 90701:, for testing as part ofDOE's ENERGY STAR® Verification Testing Program. On March 18, · 2013, DOE notified the manufacturer of this model, , that the model did not meet the minimum energy factor required for a model of its capacity according to the applicable. ENERGY STAR specification. . .. 11111 replied to,' and later spoke with, DOE representatives abqut DOE's results. - also . provided test d~t_a from previous testing of this model; the test da~a prov_ided.documented a higher energy factor than that observed in the DOE testing. -

323

Chattanooga Eagle Ford Western Gulf TX-LA-MS Salt Basin Uinta Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Western Western Gulf TX-LA-MS Salt Basin Uinta Basin Devonian (Ohio) Marcellus Utica Bakken*** Avalon- Bone Spring San Joaquin Basin Monterey Santa Maria, Ventura, Los Angeles Basins Monterey- Temblor Pearsall Tuscaloosa Big Horn Basin Denver Basin Powder River Basin Park Basin Niobrara* Mowry Niobrara* Heath** Manning Canyon Appalachian Basin Antrim Barnett Bend New Albany Woodford Barnett- Woodford Lewis Hilliard- Baxter- Mancos Excello- Mulky Fayetteville Floyd- Neal Gammon Cody Haynesville- Bossier Hermosa Mancos Pierre Conasauga Michigan Basin Ft. Worth Basin Palo Duro Basin Permian Basin Illinois Basin Anadarko Basin Greater Green River Basin Cherokee Platform San Juan Basin Williston Basin Black Warrior Basin A r d m o r e B a s i n Paradox Basin Raton Basin Montana Thrust Belt Marfa Basin Valley & Ridge Province Arkoma Basin Forest

324

VIA EMAIL Ms. Leslie Jones ENERGY STAR Program U.S. Environmental Protection Agency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Room 62023 Room 62023 Washington, DC 20460 Dear Ms. Jones: April3, 2012 The U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE") selected an Electrolux Major Appliances North America ("Electrolux") dishwasher, basic model EIDW6305*** ("model EIDW6305***"), for testing as patt of the DOE's ENERGY STAR® Verification Testing Program. DOE's initial testing, performed on a single unit of this model, indicated that it might not meet the ENERGY STAR requirement for maximum annual energy consumption. In accordance with DOE's procedures for conducting verification testing in support of ENERGY STAR, DOE would normally test tlu·ee additional units to determine whether the basic model meets the ENERGY STAR specification. DOE has been unable to procure and test three additional units of model EIDW6305***.

325

VIA EMAIL Ms. Mariah Steele ENERGY STAR Program U.S. Environmental Protection Agency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Peru1sylvania Avenue, NW Peru1sylvania Avenue, NW Room62023 Washington, DC 20460 Dear Ms. Steele: June 12, 2013 The U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE") selected a Fisher & Paykel Appliances ("F&P") residential clothes washer, model WA42T26GW1, for testing as part ofDOE's ENERGY STAR® Verification Testing Program. On March 18, 2013, DOE notified F&P that DOE testing showed the model did not meet the ENERGY STAR requirement for water factor ("WF") 1 or modified energy factor ("MEF"). 2 F&P replied to DOE on April 16, 2013, making two claims. First, F&P argued that DOE had impropel'ly tested the warm wash cycles on the relevant units because the tested model has a "uniformly distributed warm wash temperature selection/' as defined in section 1.17 of

326

Energy harvesting by magnetostrictive material (MsM) for powering wireless sensors in SHM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new class of vibrational energy harvester based on Magnetostrictive material (MsM) Metglas 2605SC is designed, developed, and tested in building practical energy harvesting wireless sensor networks. Compared to piezoelectric material, Metglas 2605SC offers advantages including ultra-high energy conversion efficiency, high power density, longer life cycles without depolarization issue, and flexibility to operate in strong ambient vibrations. To enhance the energy conversion efficiency and shrink the size of the harvester, Metglas is annealed in the direction normal to the axial strain direction without the need of electromagnet for applying bias (static) magnetic field. To seamlessly integrate with a newly developed wireless sensor at NC State 1, a prototype design for the MsM harvester is proposed. An analytical model is developed for the harvesting using an equivalent electromechanical circuit. The model resulting in achievable output performances of the harvester powering a resistive load and charging a capacitive energy storage device, respectively, is quantitatively derived. An energy harvesting module, which powers a wireless sensor, stores excess energy in an ultracapacitor is designed on a printed circuit board (PCB) with dimension 25mm×35mm. The main functionalities of the circuit include a voltage quadrupler, a 3F ultracapacitor, and a smart regulator. The output DC voltage from the PCB can be adjusted within 2.0~5.5V. In experiments, the maximum output power and power density on the resistor can reach 200 µW and 900 µW/cm 3, respectively. For a working prototype, the average power and power

Lei Wang; F. G. Yuan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

LC-IMS-MS Feature Finder: Detecting Multidimensional Liquid Chromatography, Ion Mobility, and Mass Spectrometry Features in Complex Datasets  

SciTech Connect

We introduce a command line software application LC-IMS-MS Feature Finder that searches for molecular ion signatures in multidimensional liquid chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry-mass spectrometry (LC-IMS-MS) data by clustering deisotoped peaks with similar monoisotopic mass, charge state, LC elution time, and ion mobility drift time values. The software application includes an algorithm for detecting and quantifying co-eluting chemical species, including species that exist in multiple conformations that may have been separated in the IMS dimension.

Crowell, Kevin L.; Slysz, Gordon W.; Baker, Erin Shammel; Lamarche, Brian L.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Payne, Samuel H.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

328

STEMS-MS v3.0, Short-Term Electricity Market Simulator - MultiSettle, Version 3.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Short-Term Electricity Market Simulator – MultiSettle (STEMS-MS), Version 3.0 software allows the user to simulate flexibly examples of electricity markets. STEMS-MS is based on EPRI's pioneering development and application of agent-based simulation for the study of decision-making associated with electricity markets. A recent Nobel Prize in Economics was awarded to earlier pioneers of this type of investigation using human subjects, which is called experimental economics. While the use of computer-...

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

329

Multiwavelength optical observations of the chromospherically active binary system MS Ser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present here a continuation of our ongoing project of multiwavelength optical observations aimed at studying the chromosphere of active binary systems using the information provided for several optical spectroscopic features that are formed at different heights in the chromosphere (Montes et al. 1997, 1998; Sanz-Forcada et al. 1998). In this contribution we focus our study on the preliminar analysis of the active binary system MS Ser. We have taken H$\\alpha$ and H$\\beta$ spectra in 1995 with the Coude Spectrograph at 2.2m telescope in Calar Alto, and high resolution SOFIN echelle spectra (covering H_alpha, H_beta, Na I D_{1} and D_{2}, He I D_{3}, Mg I b triplet, Ca II H & K, and Ca II infrared triplet lines) in 1998 with the 2.56m Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) in La Palma. A strong emission in the Ca II H & K and Ca II IRT lines, coming from the primary component (recently classified as K2IV) is observed. One of the Ca II H & K spectra (at orbital phase near quadrature) reveals that the secondary (G8V) also exhibit a small emission. A near complete and variable filling-in of the H_alpha and H_beta is obtained after the application of the spectral subtraction technique. We detect also some seasonal variations between these two observing runs and in comparation with our previous Ca II H & K observations taken in 1993 (Montes et al. 1995).

J. Sanz-Forcada; D. Montes; M. J. Fernandez-Figueroa; E. De Castro; M. Cornide

1998-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

330

A single-slope 80MS/s ADC using two-step time-to-digital conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An 80 MS/s analog-to-digital converter (ADC) based on single-slope conversion is presented which utilizes a recently developed gated ring oscillator (GRO) time-to-digital converter (TDC) to achieve an ENOB of 6.45 bits. ...

Park, Min

331

Modern Methods for Lipid AnalysisChapter 9 Analysis of Molecular Species of Plant Glycolipids by HPLC/APCI-MS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern Methods for Lipid Analysis Chapter 9 Analysis of Molecular Species of Plant Glycolipids by HPLC/APCI-MS Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books D9362F8F06B7CB16FD59D7C2F2FBABF2 AOCS Press Downloa

332

DEVELOPMENT OF CLAD CERAMIC FUEL PLATES BY SPRAY-COATING TECHNIQUES. Quarterly Technical Progress Report, April-June 1961  

SciTech Connect

Studies were made on the effects of spray-coating variables on coating characteristics in the development of plasma-jet spraying techniques for making clad UO/sub 2/ fuel plates. UO/sub 2/ coatings of up to 90% theoretical density and - O/U ratios of nearly 2.00 were deposited at efficiencies of 40%. Adherent UO/sub 2/ coatings up to 0.100 inch thick can be deposited on 0.030-inch thick stainless steel and Zircaloy-2 substrates. Studies of coated composite bends and coating adherence at room temperature indicate that, for best results, the coating temperature should be maintained below 870 deg C and the substrate below 450 deg C during deposition. A plasma spray torch was tested for spraying UO/sub 2/ at 40 kw and found to be equivalent to operation at 25 kw. A preliminary cost analysis indicated considerably lower fabrication costs using plasma jet sprayingn ~ 0/kg U as compared to ~ 0/kg U for oxide pellet-in-tube elements. (D.L.C.)

Weare, N.E.; Buchanan, E.; Marchandise, H.

1962-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

333

Kheshbn No. 147 - Spring 2006 - Journal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DK" - .pNT ^KD pra tsu TO iy Diy^a - ." pnt^yDi IOO^KII ,i^ONT ^yoa'^ayao'ra ]x iy 0"Diy oxra iy DIO VNÖ s D'o .p' ? npun piraya piKn pK .f?" rnKO Diy TO -]KA f? yn TO uoKnya /

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

United States Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

uq/Uu.3/uo U-L:i ' rAA OuL a uo oUu. 0tri.l± i m,.i,*, u". run.' r.yrcir V e.u uq/Uu.3/uo U-L:i ' rAA OuL a uo oUu. 0tri.l± i m,.i,*, u". run.' r.yrcir V e.u O000DOE F 1325.8 (08-93) Department of Energy United States Government Department of Energy Memorandum OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL DATE: March 31,2006 REPLY TO ATTN OF: IG-34 (A05TG028) Audit Report No.: OAS-L-06-10 SUBJECT: Report on Audit of "The Department's Information Technology Capital Planning and Investment Control Process" TO: Chief Information Officer, IM-1 INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE Federal guidance requires that Agencies develop and implement capital planning and investment control (CPIC) processes to help ensure that their major information technology investments achieve intended outcomes, represent the best allocation of resources, and reach strategic goals and objectives. The Department of Energy

335

Application of the active well coincidence counter to the measurement of uranium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Active Well Coincidence Counter has been developed to assay uranium fuel material in field inspection applications. The unit is used to measure bulk UO/sub 2/ samples, high enrichment uranium metals, LWR fuel pellets, and /sup 233/U-Th fuel materials which have very high gamma-ray backgrounds.

Menlove, H.O.; Foley, J.E.; Bosler, G.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Bi-annual report 2007-2008 Chemical Science and Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nuclear fuel. A. Beyond the saturation: Co adsorbed on iron oxide nanoparticles During the last decade in simulated irradiated UO2 nuclear fuel. One of the main goals of research in nuclear energy is to improve the economic and safety performance of nuclear fuels. One solution is to extend its life time in reactor

Lagergren, Jens

337

RENSSELAER CATALOG RENSSELAER POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Triangular Atomic Patterns as Key to the Chemistry of Nuclear Fuels (Poster 12) 16 Resolving Shock #12;16 Triangular Atomic Patterns as Key to the Chemistry of Nuclear Fuels (Poster 12) David Andersson dioxide, UO2, is typically the major constituent of current nuclear fuel. Understanding of its properties

Varela, Carlos

338

Structural similarities between biogenic uraninites produced by phylogenetically and metabolically diverse bacteria.  

SciTech Connect

While the product of microbial uranium reduction is often reported to be“UO2”, a comprehensive characterization including stoichiometry and unit cell determination is available for only one Shewanella species. Here, we compare the products of batch uranyl reduction by a collection of dissimilatory metal- and sulfate-reducing bacteria of the genera Shewanella, Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter, and Desulfovibrio under similar laboratory conditions. Our results demonstrate that U(VI) bioreduction by this assortment of commonly studied, environmentally relevant bacteria leads to the precipitation of uraninite with a composition between UO2.00 and UO2.075, regardless of phylogenetic or metabolic diversity. Coupled analyses, including electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and powder diffraction, confirm that structurally and chemically analogous uraninite solids are produced. These biogenic uraninites have particle diameters of about 2-3 nm and lattice constants consistent with UO2.0 and exhibit a high degree of intermediate-range order. Results indicate that phylogenetic and metabolic variability within delta- and gamma-proteobacteria has little effect on nascent biouraninite structure or crystal size under the investigated conditions.

Sharp, Jonathan; Schofield, Eleanor J.; Veeramani, Harish; Suvorova, Elena; Kennedy, David W.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Mehta, Apurva; Bargar, John R.; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Functional blockade of impulse trains caused by acute nerve compression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4UOJOB! P jo ia(wnu P. o4 anp aq ur,a jr,t4ua4od uopar,uo jaojq ains -said P. o4 anp st ssot aqa 8 4ug4 aztsag4od6q

Jewett, Don L

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

AEC PHOTOVOLTAIC TEST FACILITY FIRST YEAR TEST DATA James Krumsick  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Oregon Solar Radiation Lab 1274 University of Oregon Eugene, OR 97403-1274 e-mail: fev, the University of Oregon Solar Radiation Monitoring Lab (UO SRML) under a contract with the Energy Trust environmental conditions. The test facility consists of a 25 KW rooftop array separated into eight systems. Each

Oregon, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ms uo uo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Optimal scaling of the ADMM algorithm for distributed quadratic ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Strategic Research (SSF), the Swedish Research Council (VR), a UoM Early Career .... ? > 0, there exists an R that does not change the constraint set in (2) and ..... a future work, we plan to extend the results to a broader class of distributed ...

342

URANIUM SEPARATION PROCESS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation of uranium from an aqueous solution containing a water soluble uranyl salt is described. The process involves adding an alkali thiocyanate to the aqueous solution, contacting the resulting solution with methyl isobutyl ketons and separating the resulting aqueous and organic phase. The uranium is extracted in the organic phase as UO/sub 2/(SCN)/sub/.

McVey, W.H.; Reas, W.H.

1959-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

343

Preparation and Characterization of Uranium Oxides in Support of the K Basin Sludge Treatment Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uraninite (UO2) and metaschoepite (UO3·2H2O) are the uranium phases most frequently observed in K Basin sludge. Uraninite arises from the oxidation of uranium metal by anoxic water and metaschoepite arises from oxidation of uraninite by atmospheric or radiolytic oxygen. Studies of the oxidation of uraninite by oxygen to form metaschoepite were performed at 21°C and 50°C. A uranium oxide oxidation state characterization method based on spectrophotometry of the solution formed by dissolving aqueous slurries in phosphoric acid was developed to follow the extent of reaction. This method may be applied to determine uranium oxide oxidation state distribution in K Basin sludge. The uraninite produced by anoxic corrosion of uranium metal has exceedingly fine particle size (6 nm diameter), forms agglomerates, and has the formula UO2.004±0.007; i.e., is practically stoichiometric UO2. The metaschoepite particles are flatter and wider when prepared at 21°C than the particles prepared at 50°C. These particles are much smaller than the metaschoepite observed in prolonged exposure of actual K Basin sludge to warm moist oxidizing conditions. The uraninite produced by anoxic uranium metal corrosion and the metaschoepite produced by reaction of uraninite aqueous slurries with oxygen may be used in engineering and process development testing. A rapid alternative method to determine uranium metal concentrations in sludge also was identified.

Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

344

N  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ple c opy a lgorithms i n N AMD & f orce fi eld d evelopment Yun (Lyna) L uo PI: B enoit R oux Project G oal NAMD --- T he E ngine f or L arge---Scale C lassical M olecular...

345

Water-Moderated and -Reflected Slabs of Uranium Oxyfluoride  

SciTech Connect

A series of ten experiments were conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Critical Experiment Facility in December 1955, and January 1956, in an attempt to determine critical conditions for a slab of aqueous uranium oxyfluoride (UO2F2). These experiments were recorded in an Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Logbook and results were published in a journal of the American Nuclear Society, Nuclear Science and Engineering, by J. K. Fox, L. W. Gilley, and J. H. Marable (Reference 1). The purpose of these experiments was to obtain the minimum critical thickness of an effectively infinite slab of UO2F2 solution by extrapolation of experimental data. To do this the slab thickness was varied and critical solution and water-reflector heights were measured using two different fuel solutions. Of the ten conducted experiments eight of the experiments reached critical conditions but the results of only six of the experiments were published in Reference 1. All ten experiments were evaluated from which five critical configurations were judged as acceptable criticality safety benchmarks. The total uncertainty in the acceptable benchmarks is between 0.25 and 0.33 % ?k/keff. UO2F2 fuel is also evaluated in HEU-SOL-THERM-043, HEU-SOL-THERM-011, and HEU-SOL-THERM-012, but these those evaluation reports are for large reflected and unreflected spheres. Aluminum cylinders of UO2F2 are evaluated in HEU-SOL-THERM-050.

Margaret A. Marshall; John D. Bess; J. Blair Briggs; Clinton Gross

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

The MacEngineer 1 MacEngineer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWR) otherwise known as CANDU2 , a similar Russian design called Reaktor reactors are commonly called CANDU reactors. #12;28 A BWR is a simpler design than a PWR, but it exposes, Japan, Sweden 94 86.4 enriched UO2 water water Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor 'CANDU' (PHWR) Canada 43

Haykin, Simon

347

Table of Contents Page 1 NERC 2007 Long-Term Reliability Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWR) otherwise known as CANDU2 , a similar Russian design called Reaktor reactors are commonly called CANDU reactors. #12;28 A BWR is a simpler design than a PWR, but it exposes, Japan, Sweden 94 86.4 enriched UO2 water water Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor 'CANDU' (PHWR) Canada 43

348

PL2ESIDCNI The District Engineer, U. S. Engineer Office,  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

lb., f.o.b. East Liverpool, Ohio. 500 lb. at 2.15 Fer lb., f.o.b. Los iingel.es, California. SCgIttd UR:lAT?7 (Approxi.utely 84" U,Os) : 1485 lb. at 1.55 per lb., f.o.b....

349

HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

process efficiency (UoK, GA) · Estimate the size and cost of the process equipment (All) #12;s NERI H2 6 cycle analysis (SNL) · Develop detailed chemical flowsheet for selected process and determine projected UT-3 process is conceptually simple. . . l Invented at Univ. of Tokyo, being pursued in Japan, SI

350

VII. SOLAR RADIATION DATA COMPARISONS In this section some of the solar radiation data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

18 VII. SOLAR RADIATION DATA COMPARISONS In this section some of the solar radiation data gathered by the UO Solar Monitoring Network is presented in tabular and pictorial form and related to similar information from other Western U.S. sites. A comparison of the amount of incident solar radiation is made us

Oregon, University of

351

Bioremediation of Uranium Plumes with Nano-scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bioremediation of Uranium Plumes with Nano-scale Zero-valent Iron Angela Athey Advisers: Dr. Reyes Undergraduate Student Fellowship Program April 15, 2011 #12;Main Sources of Uranium Natural · Leaching from(IV) (UO2[s], uraninite) Anthropogenic · Release of mill tailings during uranium mining - Mobilization

Cushing, Jim. M.

352

214 Synthesis of ZnO Nanostructures and Their Influence on ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our results suggest that synthesis method can be used to produce desired .... 107 Alignment of BN Nanosheets Using DC and Nano Pulse-Width Electric Field ... 129 Minimization of Diametric Tolerance of U3O8-added UO2 Annular Pellet .... 220 Microwave Processing of Polymer Coatings on Instrument-Grade Wood.

353

An Investigation into the Oxidation State of Molybdenum in Simplified High Level Nuclear Waste Glass Compositions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a full simulated HLW stream based upon 4:1 ratio of high burn up UO2/mixed oxide (HBU/MOX) fuel. EXPERIMENTAL A series of simplified simulated HLW glasses (based on the 4:1 HBU/MOX composition) were melted

Sheffield, University of

354

Some Electrical Properties of Ion-Implanted Urania--Part II: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's effort to evaluate the use of UO2 as a material for photovoltaic (e.g., solar cell) applications, single-crystal UO2 samples were characterized as to their electrical and electro-optical properties. Samples of UO2 were ion implanted with boron and sulfur dopants, as well as with boron and sulfur co-dopants, at the Ion Beam Materials Laboratory facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Activation energies for electrical conduction were measured to be from 0.13 to 0.26 eV, when temperatures varied from 180 to 450 K. Dark current was measured followed by light current under 1-sun illumination. In general, the dark and light currents were about an order of magnitude greater than those reported earlier for polycrystalline UO2. Optical and infrared absorption and transmission data were also obtained and are reported. Transmission data on the single-crystal samples revealed a complex structure that made it difficult to resolve a single optical bandgap.

von Roedern, B.; Meek, T. T.; Haire, M. J.

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Pyrolytic carbon-coated nuclear fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved nuclear fuel kernel having at least one pyrolytic carbon coating and a silicon carbon layer is provided in which extensive interaction of fission product lanthanides with the silicon carbon layer is avoided by providing sufficient UO.sub.2 to maintain the lanthanides as oxides during in-reactor use of said fuel.

Lindemer, Terrence B. (Oak Ridge, TN); Long, Jr., Ernest L. (Oak Ridge, TN); Beatty, Ronald L. (Wurlingen, CH)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

PROCESS ENGINEERING REPORT ON REVISED PROCESS DESIGN TRANSMITTAL, GREEN SALT PLANT, JOB NO. 3004 OF THE FEED MATERIALS PRODUCTION CENTER, FERNALD, OHIO. Specifications Contract No. 3000, Part XXV, Section 4  

SciTech Connect

Process design information concerning equipment and operation of a plant to produce UF/sub 4/ from UO/sub 3/ is presented. Included are process flow diagrams, drawings of ventilation and dust control systems, and vent gas systenas. Equipment lists and estimated utilities are also included as well as a description of the process. (J.R.D.)

Holby, G.V.; James, F.

1952-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Microsoft PowerPoint - 2012IPRC_BDD_Park  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cathode: 4Li + + 4e - 4Li UO 2 + 4Li U + 2Li 2 O 650 o C, 1 wt% Li 2 O-LiCl molten salt 4 O 2 at anode Stable in LiCl CO 2 at anode Stable in LiCl Replacement of...

358

The Development of Models to Optimize Selection of Nuclear Fuels through Atomic-Level Simulation  

SciTech Connect

Demonstrated that FRAPCON can be modified to accept data generated from first principles studies, and that the result obtained from the modified FRAPCON make sense in terms of the inputs. Determined the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity of single crystal UO2 from atomistic simulation.

Prof. Simon Phillpot; Prof. Susan B. Sinnott; Prof. Hans Seifert; Prog. James Tulenko

2009-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

359

Nuclear Energy: Where do we go from here? Keith Bradley  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alamos National Laboratories, studying the physics of nuclear weapons, technology development for nuclear Energy Summit 9 "In comparison with the standard UO2+Zircaloy system, develop a fuel/clad system Modular Reactor Ltd. (PBMR)] #12;Where can experimentation help? § Development of new

Levi, Anthony F. J.

360

METHOD OF MAKING SPHERICAL ACTINIDE CARBIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent describes a method of making uniform, spherical, nonpyrophoric UC. UO/sub 2/ and carbon are mixed in stoichiometric proportions and passed through a plasma flame of inert gas at 10,000 to 13,000 deg C. (AEC)

White, G.D.; O' Rourke, D.C.

1962-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ms uo uo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Hydrate Test Well, Milne Pt. Alaska Thomas D. Lorenson* U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd., MS/ 999  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment of Hydrocarbon Gas Sources from the Mt. Elbert No. 1 Gas Assessment of Hydrocarbon Gas Sources from the Mt. Elbert No. 1 Gas Hydrate Test Well, Milne Pt. Alaska Thomas D. Lorenson* U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd., MS/ 999 Menlo Park, CA, 94025, USA tlorenson@usgs.gov Timothy S. Collett U.S. Geological Survey, Denver Federal Center Box 25046, MS-939 Denver CO, 80225, USA Robert B. Hunter ASRC Energy Services, 3900 C St., Suite 702 Anchorage, Alaska, 99503 USA ABSTRACT Hydrocarbon gases were collected from well cuttings and core at the MtElbert-01 gas hydrate stratigraphic test well, drilled within the Milne Point field on the Alaska North Slope. Regionally, the Eileen gas hydrate deposits overlie the more deeply buried Prudhoe Bay, Milne Point, and Kuparuk River oil fields and are

362

Project Final Report: Ubiquitous Computing and Monitoring System (UCoMS) for Discovery and Management of Energy Resources  

SciTech Connect

The UCoMS research cluster has spearheaded three research areas since August 2004, including wireless and sensor networks, Grid computing, and petroleum applications. The primary goals of UCoMS research are three-fold: (1) creating new knowledge to push forward the technology forefronts on pertinent research on the computing and monitoring aspects of energy resource management, (2) developing and disseminating software codes and toolkits for the research community and the public, and (3) establishing system prototypes and testbeds for evaluating innovative techniques and methods. Substantial progress and diverse accomplishment have been made by research investigators in their respective areas of expertise cooperatively on such topics as sensors and sensor networks, wireless communication and systems, computational Grids, particularly relevant to petroleum applications.

Tzeng, Nian-Feng; White, Christopher D.; Moreman, Douglas

2012-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

363

Plant Physiol. (1997) 113: 841-852 The cdc2Ms Kinase 1s Differently Regulated in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

School, Sandoz Center for Immunology, New England Deaconess Hospital, 185 Pilgrim Road, Boston, MA 02215 with the dimensions of 1.5 mm x 16 cm x 10 cm. with the help of a prestained molecular-mass marker (Rainbow, Amersham of molecular mass markersas well as of the cdc2Ms forms with a calculated mass of 31 and 32 kD are indicated

Hirt, Heribert

364

Guideline for the Procurement of Buckets and Nozzles for General Electric MS7001 Model E/EA Gas Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, a number of aftermarket component suppliers have begun offering replacement 1st, 2nd, and 3rd stage buckets and nozzles for the General Electric (GE) MS7001 Model E and EA gas turbine. Several different designs, materials, and casting processes have been offered for these components for operation over at different peak firing temperatures. This procurement guideline is intended to provide owners with the requirements necessary to procure all three stages of buckets and the first stage no...

2007-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

365

HOMOGENEOUS REACTOR PROJECT QUARTERLY PROGRESS REPORT FOR PERIOD ENDING APRIL 30, 1954  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Homogeneous Reactor Experiment. Final data were obtained on the effectiveness of Cu/sup ++/ as an internal recombiner catalyst for radiolytic gas. Homogeneous Reactor Test. Criticality calculations have been completed for three blanket configurations using D/sub 2/O. ThO/sub 2/ slurry, and unenriched UO/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ solutions. Investigations on the temperature coefficient of reactivity and kinetic studies with respect to core pressure rise were also undertaken. Startup and shutdown procedures will involve the addition and removal of fuel concentrate. Revised flow sheet and design data sheets are presented, including the reactor vessel assembly, fuel pressurizer, recombiner- condenser, outer dump tank condenser, and fuel solution evaporator. The physical properties of HRT fuel and blanket solution at 2000 psia are given. Present evidence indicates that the Xe poison level can be maintained below 1% by continuous stripping with only 2% of the decomposition gases which would be produced if no Cu/sup ++/ catalyst were present for recombination. Revised inlet and outlet valve designs for the HRT pulsafeeder system have resulted in improved performance. General Homogeneous Reactor Studies. Principal activities in engineering development consist of the design of several representative heat exchanger layouts and recombiner loops. An extensive body of data on the corrosion of stainless steel by UO/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ solutions has been accumulated. The corrosive effects of boiling HNO/sub 3/ on stainless steel, and the UO/sub 2/ SO/sub 4/ corrosion of Zircaloy were also investigated. Stress relief annealing at 1000 deg F improved the dynamic corrosion resistance of austenitic stainless steel welds corroded by UO/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. The dynamic corrosion of Zircaloy-2 and Ti by UO/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ showed no marked effect on the impact behavior of these materials. The yield of N/sub 2/ from irradiated Th(NO/sub 3/)/sub 4/ is considerably less than previous values reported for UO/sub 2/(NO/sub 3/)/sub 2/ solutions. A revised phase diagram of the UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/-H/sub 2/O system is presented. The preparation and corrosive properties of ThO/sub 2/ slurries were investigated, together with the abrasion characteristics on stainless steel and Ti. Considerations associated with chemical processing of fuel and blanket solutions, such as the solubility of rare-earth sulfates, are discussed. (T.R.H.)

McDuffie, H.F. comp.

1954-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

366

Determination of Plutonium Isotope Ratios at Very Low Levels by ICP-MS using On-Line Electrochemically Modulated Separations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrochemically modulated separations (EMS) are shown to be a rapid and selective means of extracting and concentrating Pu from complex solutions prior to isotopic analysis by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP?MS). This separation is performed in a flow injection mode, on?line with the ICP?MS. A three?electrode, flow?by electrochemical cell is used to accumulate Pu at an anodized glassy carbon electrode by redox conversion of Pu(III) to Pu (IV&VI). The entire process takes place in 2% v/v (0.46M) HNO3. No redox chemicals or acid concentration changes are required. Plutonium accumulation and release is redox dependent and controlled by the applied cell potential. Thus large transient volumetric concentration enhancements can be achieved. Based on more negative U(IV) potentials relative to Pu(IV), separation of Pu from uranium is efficient, thereby eliminating uranium hydride interferences. EMS?ICP?MS isotope ratio measurement performance will be presented for femtogram to attogram level plutonium concentrations.

Liezers, Martin; Lehn, Scott A.; Olsen, Khris B.; Farmer, Orville T.; Duckworth, Douglas C.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Validation of Electrochemically Modulated Separations Performed On-Line with MC-ICP-MS for Uranium and Plutonium Isotopic Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The most time consuming process in uranium or plutonium isotopic analyses is performing the requisite chromatographic separation of the actinides. Filament preparation for thermal ionization (TIMS) adds further delays, but is generally accepted due to the unmatched performance in trace isotopic analyses. Advances in Multi-Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) are beginning to rival the performance of TIMS. Methods, such as Electrochemically Modulated Separations (EMS) can efficiently pre-concentrate U or Pu quite selectively from small solution volumes in a matrix of 0.5 M nitric acid. When performed in-line with ICP-MS, the rapid analyte release from the electrode is fast, and large transient analyte signal enhancements of >100 fold can be achieved as compared to more conventional continuous nebulization of the original starting solution. This makes the approach ideal for very low level isotope ratio measurements. In this paper, some aspects of EMS performance are described. These include low level Pu isotope ratio behavior versus concentration by MC-ICP-MS and uranium rejection characteristics that are also important for reliable low level Pu isotope ratio determinations.

Liezers, Martin; Olsen, Khris B.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Duckworth, Douglas C.

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

368

NOI1VU1SININQV NOLLVINUOdNI A9H3N3 AO^HNH  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-661 J9QUJ9AON -661 J9QUJ9AON NOI1VU1SININQV NOLLVINUOdNI A9H3N3 AO^HNH 1661 '98902 00 'uoi6mi|SEM 'MS 'anuaAV aouapuadspui QOOl 'IG2-I3 'UOJIBJISIUILUPV UOIJBIUJOJUI 'yoo/jno Xfi/eu3 uuaj_-no^s o; sa6ueiJO ssejppe puas :yaiSVlNlSOd 'saojjjo BUIUBUI iBuomppe pus '8666-99002 OO 'uoiBingsEM JB p|Bd sBeisod ssep-puooag -(soiiou aouBApe >noni!/« a6uBi|o oj joafqns soud) jseA jed 00>L$ J J snas pus 'gggos 00 'uoj6u!MSBM 'MS 'enuoAV eouepuedepui oOOI-'uoiJBJisiuiijupv UOUBUUOJUI ABjaug agj Aq A|jaiJBnb pagsnqnd S] (t?090-Ct'/0 NSSl)^ooWO A6JSU3 UUB±-)JOLJS aqj. 1-661 '9 JOqiiieAON :6u!iuud JQJ p8SB9|9u -j-|AJ '8UIII UJ8JSB8 "LU'd S - 'WE 9 18U-989 (202) ^ '8lUI}UJaiSE8 "Urd g- 'WE 8 3MJ J 0) 2LS-202-LXVd 0088-989(202) 8E2E-E8/ (202) 98902 DO 'uo}6u|L|SBM

369

General-Purpose Heat Source Development: Safety Verification Test Program. Flyer plate test series  

SciTech Connect

The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) is a modular component of a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) that will provide electric power for space missions. The initial RTG applications will be for the NASA Galileo and the ESA Ulysses missions. Each of the 18 GPHS modules in an RTG contains four /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/-fueled clads and generates 250 W/sub (t)/. A series of Safety Verification Tests (SVTs) has been conducted to assess the ability of the GPHS fueled clads to contain the plutonia in accident environments. Because a launch pad or postlaunch explosion of the Space Transportation System Vehicle (space shuttle) is one conceivable accident, the SVT plan included a series of tests to simulate the fragment environment that the RTG and GPHS modules would experience in such an event. These tests deal specifically with the flat-on collision of flyer-plate-type fragments with bare, simulant-fueled (depleted UO/sub 2/) clads. Results of these tests suggest that the fueled clad is only minimally breached by collision with 3.53-mm-thick flyer-plate-type fragments of space shuttle alloy at velocities up to 1170 m/s. However, collision of a 38.1-mm-thick plate with a bare GPHS clad, at a velocity of 270 m/s, results in a total release of fuel.

Cull, T.A.; Pavone, D.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Via E-mail to ERS2014@eia.gov Ms. Rebecca Peterson U. S. Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

of the Northwest Balancing Authorities of the Northwest Balancing Authorities Page 1 of 6 May 6, 2013 Via E-mail to ERS2014@eia.gov Ms. Rebecca Peterson U. S. Energy Information Administration U. S. Department of Energy Re: Comments on Proposed Form EIA-930 "Balancing Authority Operations Report" Avista Corporation ("Avista"), Portland General Electric Company ("PGE"), NorthWestern Energy, Puget Sound Energy ("PSE"), Seattle City Light, Chelan PUD, and Tacoma Power (collectively, "Northwest Balancing Authorities" or "Northwest BAs") appreciate the opportunity to make comments on the

371

Determination of impurities in uranium matrices by time-of-flight ICP-MS using matrix-matched method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analysis of impurities in uranium matrices is performed in a variety of fields, e.g. for quality control in the production stream converting uranium ores to fuels, as element signatures in nuclear forensics and safeguards, and for non-proliferation control. We have investigated the capabilities of time-of-flight ICP-MS for the analysis of impurities in uranium matrices using a matrix-matched method. The method was applied to the New Brunswick Laboratory CRM 124(1-7) series. For the seven certified reference materials, an overall precision and accuracy of approximately 5% and 14%, respectively, were obtained for 18 analyzed elements.

Buerger, Stefan [ORNL; Riciputi, Lee R [ORNL; Bostick, Debra A [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Elemental and Isotopic Analysis of Uranium Oxide an NIST Glass Standards by FEMTOSECOND-LA-ICP-MIC-MS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this work was to test and demonstrate the analytical figures of merit of a femtosecond-laser ablation (fs-LA) system coupled with an inductively coupled plasma-multi-ion collector-mass spectrometer (ICP-MIC-MS). The mobile fs-LA sampling system was designed and assembled at Ames Laboratory and shipped to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), where it was integrated with an ICP-MIC-MS. The test period of the integrated systems was February 2-6, 2009. Spatially-resolved analysis of particulate samples is accomplished by 100-shot laser ablation using a fs-pulsewidth laser and monitoring selected isotopes in the resulting ICP-MS transient signal. The capability of performing high sensitivity, spatially resolved, isotopic analyses with high accuracy and precision and with virtually no sample preparation makes fs-LA-ICP-MIC-MS valuable for the measurement of actinide isotopes at low concentrations in very small samples for nonproliferation purposes. Femtosecond-LA has been shown to generate particles from the sample that are more representative of the bulk composition, thereby minimizing weaknesses encountered in previous work using nanosecond-LA (ns-LA). The improvement of fs- over ns-LA sampling arises from the different mechanisms for transfer of energy into the sample in these two laser pulse-length regimes. The shorter duration fs-LA pulses induce less heating and cause less damage to the sample than the longer ns pulses. This results in better stoichiometric sampling (i.e., a closer correlation between the composition of the ablated particles and that of the original solid sample), which improves accuracy for both intra- and inter-elemental analysis. The primary samples analyzed in this work are (a) solid uranium oxide powdered samples having different {sup 235}U to {sup 238}U concentration ratios, and (b) glass reference materials (NIST 610, 612, 614, and 616). Solid uranium oxide samples containing {sup 235}U in depleted, natural, and enriched abundances were analyzed as particle aggregates immobilized in a collodion substrate. The uranium oxide samples were nuclear reference materials (CRMs U0002, U005-A, 129-A, U015, U030-A, and U050) obtained from New Brunswick Laboratory-USDOE.

Ebert, Chris; Zamzow, Daniel S.; McBay, Eddie H.; Bostick, Debra A.; Bajic, Stanley J.; Baldwin, David P.; Houk, R.S.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

11/11/2002 1AVS 49th Int'l Symp. MS-MoA7 (Oct. 29, 2002) -Cho Dynamic Simulation and Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

'l Symp. MS-MoA7 (Oct. 29, 2002) - Cho Scope & Strategy Multilevel modeling & simulation incorporating dynamics &Multilevel modeling & simulation incorporating dynamics & stochasticsstochastics ESH fluctuations Incorporate capability in models for dynamics & stochastics Process & tool Fundamental science Si

Rubloff, Gary W.

374

In Proceedings Human Systems Integration Symposium 2003, Vienna, VA, June 23-25, 2003. Joseph L. Gabbard, M.S., Deborah Hix, Ph.D., J. Edward Swan II, Ph.D.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Complex Interactive Systems Development ABSTRACT Usability engineering is a cost-effective, user- centered systems (Section "Usability Engineering Case Studies: Developing Complex Interactive Systems"). For each, M.S., Simon J. Julier, Ph.D. Dennis Brown, M.S., Yohan Baillot, M.S. Usability Engineering

Gabbard, Joseph L.

375

www.elsevier.com/locate/fuel Trace elements in coal derived liquids: analysis by ICP-MS and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concentrations of trace elements in coal derived liquids have been investigated by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and by Mössbauer spectroscopy. Liquefaction extracts prepared from the Argonne Premium Coals and a coal tar pitch have been examined. Microwave digestion in concentrated nitric acid has been shown as a suitable method for determining trace element concentrations in coal derived liquids by ICP-MS—for sample sizes as small as 3–20 mg. High concentrations of Fe were found for all extract samples (?265–1474 ppm). Ti, Cr, Mn, Co, Ga, Sb, Cs and Ba were measurable. Concentration distributions of trace elements found in the extracts bore little relation to the corresponding distributions in the original coals. The proportions of individual trace elements present in the original coals and found in the extracts, varied widely. Mössbauer spectroscopy of the extracts indicated that the high Fe-concentrations corresponded to the presence of organometallic-Fe compounds—and not to pyritic iron. There is evidence suggesting the presence of material derived from iron-storage proteins such as ferritin, but final proof is lacking. Our data suggest that other metallic ions detected in these coal derived liquids may be present in association with the organic material. Concentrations of paramagnetic metal species were found to be of the same order of magnitude as ESR spin-densities already found in coal liquids. Both types of paramagnetic species are suspected of causing loss of signal in

Mössbauer Spectroscopy; R. Richaud A; H. Lachas A; M. -j. Lazaro A; L. J. Clarke B; K. E. Jarvis B; A. A. Herod A; T. C. Gibb C; R. Kandiyoti A

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

GC/MS characterization of condensable tars in the output stream of a stirred fixed-bed gasifier  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The output stream of the stirred fixed-bed gasifier at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center was sampled for total entrained material. A major portion of the entrained material, in addition to particles, is condensable tar that is subsequently removed from the process gas by wet scrubbing. Characterization of the entrained materials, specifically the tar, is important to establish contaminant levels and to evaluate performance of downstream cleanup units. Samples of tars were collected from the process unit in a combined ice, dry ice, and liquid nitrogen sampler and stored in a refrigerator. The tar samples were then separated into asphaltene, neutral oil, tar acid, and base fractions by solvent extraction using toluene, pentane, sulfuric acid, and potassium hydroxide extraction. Characterization of the fractions obtained from these tars include IR, UV, GC, and GC/MS analysis. The mass spectrometer analysis of the various isolates shows that many individual peaks in the gas chromatograph are in fact mixtures that can be readily identified by the mass spectrometer. It was found that many of the species identified in these fractions were members of aromatic homologous series consisting of parent, mono, di, and tri substituted compounds. Compound identification was made by comparison of the data system library and standard reference spectra. This paper will discuss the instrumental approach and limitation of the GC/MS and the results of the characterization studies of entrained hydrocarbons collected from the gasifier stream.

Lamey, S.C.; McCaskill, K.B.; Smith, R.R.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

A WSRC-MS-g8-00318 Heat Transfer Model of Above and Underground Insulated Piping  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

WSRC-MS-g8-00318 Heat Transfer Model of Above and Underground Insulated Piping Systems by K. C. Kwon Westinghouse Savannah River Company Savannah River Site Aiken, South Carolina 29808 A document prepared for ASME CONFERENCE - HEAT EXCHANGER COMMITTEE MEETING 8 , INTERNATIONAL JOINT POWER GENERATION CONFERENCE 1998 at Baltimore, MA, USA from 8/23/98 - 8/26/98. DOE Contract No. DE-AC09-96SR18500 This paper was prepared in connection with work done under the above contract number with the U. S. Department of Energy. By acceptance of this paper, the publisher and/or recipient acknowledges the U. S. Government's right to retain a nonexclusive, royalty-free license in and to any copyright covering this paper, along with the right to reproduce and to authorize others to reproduce all or part of the copyrighted paper.

378

High speed, low power 100 MS/s front end track-and-hold amplifier for ten-bit pipelined ADC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The work focuses on the design of a high speed, low power track-and-hold amplifier (THA) for ten-bit 100 MS/s pipelined analogue-to-digital converter (ADC). A wide bandwidth and high gain two-stage ... Keywords: #, 47, CMFB, HPSA, MDAC, MHz, MS&, amplifier design, common-mode feedback, digital to analogue converters, high-performance systems architecture, hold amplifiers, mega samples per second, megahertz, multiplying DAC, nanometres, nm, operational transconductance amplifiers, peak, peak-to-, s, switched capacitors, track-and-

D. Meganathan; Raja Paul Perinbam; R. Deepalakshmi

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

M186  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

U U . S . Department of E n m National NucIear Security A d ~ t i o n P.O. Box M50 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 PAGE ! of 3 PAGES Ahf~NDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODWJCATZON OF CONTaACT --- I - I 8. NAMEAND ADDRESS OF CONTMCn,R (Uo., me#, &my, Zm We) I 9 k AMENDMENT OF SOLKITATION NO. 1. CONTRACT I D CODE A C 2. kMENDMENTMODFICATION NO. MI86 B a h d & W ~ X T a d Y - 1 2 , LLC P.0, Box 2009 MS 8014 Oak Ridge, 'JX 37?33143014 3. EFlBIWE DATE Sct Block l k . Offasmust~~h&edgtroaeiptdthis t prior to Ihc l m m and dak qxa5d in &e wlicitatim as by m e o f t h following mthk (n)ByeompktiagItu~rj8 and 1 5 , d z - wpics ofhe m m h m r ; (b) By achowldging rexipt ofthis amendment on each cqy of tbe offer ~ u b m i w or (c) By separate letter w telegnm which includg a rcfcmm to the solicitdon and mcndumt numbas. FAILURE OF YOUR ACKNOWLEIXMENT TO 8E

380

Effects of buoyancy on lean premixed v-flames, Part II. VelocityStatistics in Normal and Microgravity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The field effects of buoyancy on laminar and turbulent premixed v-flames have been studied by the use of laser Doppler velocimetry to measure the velocity statistics in +1g, -1g and {micro}g flames. The experimental conditions covered mean velocity, Uo, of 0.4 to 2 m/s, methane/air equivalence ratio, f, of 0.62 to 0.75. The Reynolds numbers, from 625 to 3130 and the Richardson number from 0.05 to 1.34. The results show that a change from favorable (+1g) to unfavorable (-1g) mean pressure gradient in the plume create stagnating flows in the far field whose influences on the mean and fluctuating velocities persist in the near field even at the highest Re we have investigated. The use of Richardson number flames are direct consequences of buoyancy. Furthermore, the rms fluctuations in the plumes of {micro}g flames are lower and more isotropic than in the laboratory flames to show that the unstable plumes in laboratory flames also induce velocity fluctuations. The phenomena influenced by buoyancy i.e. degree of flame wrinkling, flow acceleration, flow distribution, and turbulence production, can be subtle due to their close coupling with other flame flow interaction processes. But they cannot be ignored in fundamental studies or else the conclusions and insights would be ambiguous and not very meaningful.

Cheng, R.K.; Bedat, B.; Yegian, D.T.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ms uo uo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Inhibited Release of Mobile Contaminants from Hanford Tank Residual Waste  

SciTech Connect

Investigations of contaminant release from Hanford Site tank residual waste have indicated that in some cases certain contaminants of interest (Tc and Cr) exhibit inhibited release. The percentage of Tc that dissolved from residual waste from tanks 241-C-103, 241-C-106, 241-C-202, and 241-C-203 ranged from approximately 6% to 10%. The percent leachable Cr from residual waste from tanks C-103, C 202, and C-203 ranged from approximately 1.1% to 44%. Solid phase characterization results indicate that the recalcitrant forms of these contaminants are associated with iron oxides. X-ray absorption near edge structure analysis of Tc and Cr in residual waste indicates that these contaminants occur in Fe oxide particles as their lower, less soluble oxidation states [Tc(IV) and Cr(III)]. The form of these contaminants is likely as oxides or hydroxides incorporated within the structure of the Fe oxide. Leaching behavior of U from tank residual waste was studied using deionized water, and CaCO3 and Ca(OH)2 saturated solutions as leachants. The release behavior of U from tank residual waste is complex. Initial U concentrations in water and CaCO3 leachants are high due to residual amounts of the highly soluble U mineral cejkaite. As leaching and dilution occur NaUO2PO4 {center_dot} xH2O, Na2U2O7(am) and schoepite (or a similar phase) become the solubility controlling phases for U. In the case of the Ca(OH)2 leachant, U release from tank residual waste is dramatically reduced. Thermodynamic modeling indicates that the solubility of CaUO4(c) controls release of U from residual waste in the Ca(OH)2 leachants. It is assumed the solubility controlling phase is actually a hydrated version of CaUO4 with a variable water content ranging from CaUO4 to CaUO4 {center_dot} (H2O). The critically reviewed value for CaUO4(c) (log KSP0 = 15.94) produced good agreement with our experimental data for the Ca(OH)2 leachates.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Heald, Steve M.; Arey, Bruce W.; Lindberg, Michael J.

2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

382

LA-983%MS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

with nuclear mater- ials at Los Alamos, New Mexico, for the World War II MED atomic bomb project starting in 1943 and,subsequently, by work conducted for the AEC. Untreated...

383

NIST MS AID Presentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... walls of that pipe Page 22. Guided Waves in Pipes Multi-modal Dispersive Multi-path ... Page 27. LIDAR Support for Bridge Inspection ...

2012-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

384

Monoclonal Antibody MS Libraries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... step. The data for this project is both being generated 'in-house' at NIST and collected from many outside sources. NIST ...

2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

385

MS&T'14  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy Storage IV: Materials, Systems and Applications Symposium · Failure Analysis and ... Green Technologies for Materials Manufacturing and Processing VI.

386

Hagen Maraun MS Candidate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to urbanization and land use conversion of rural and natural areas is a major concern in Florida with the use of fossil fuels. Out of them, biomass from sugar cane, citrus molasses, animal waste, and forests, has major potential to produce liquid fuels, biogass, and electricity. Bioethanol Ethanol can

Gray, Matthew

387

NIST MS Data Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Spectra that produce top matches with NIST 98 Acetic acid, 1-methylethyl ester Acetic acid, butyl ester Butanoic acid, 3-oxo-, methyl ester 1-Butanol ...

2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

388

MS Report Template  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the WDRS head is responsible for developing and maintaining the Human Resource Asset Management Assurance System. 1.5.8. Office of Quality and Best Practices Head Reporting to the...

389

Dear Ms. Haney:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this letter is to request an extension of the implementation date for the Order relating to the direct transfer of material license numbers SNM-7003 and SNM-2011 from USEC Inc. (USEC) to a subsidiary limited liability company, American Centrifuge Operating, LLC (ACO). Background

unknown authors

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Validation predictions of a 13 m/s cross-wind fire for Fuego and the University of Waterloo dataset.  

SciTech Connect

Detailed herein are the results of a validation comparison. The experiment involved a 2 meter diameter liquid pool of Jet-A fuel in a 13 m/s crosswind. The scenario included a large cylindrical blocking object just down-stream of the fire. It also included seven smaller calorimeters and extensive instrumentation. The experiments were simulated with Fuego. The model included several conduction regions to model the response of the calorimeters, the floor, and the large cylindrical blocking object. A blind comparison was used to compare the simulation predictions with the experimental data. The more upstream data compared very well with the simulation predictions. The more downstream data did not compare very well with the simulation predictions. Further investigation suggests that features omitted from the original model contributed to the discrepancies. Observations are made with respect to the scenario that are aimed at helping an analyst approach a comparable problem in a way that may help improve the potential for quantitative accuracy.

Brown, Alexander L.; Evans, Gregory Herbert (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Gill, Walter; Jarboe, Daniel T. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Structural Transitions of Electrosprayed Ubiquitin Ions Stored in an Ion Trap over 10 ms Sunnie Myung, Ethan R. Badman, Young Jin Lee, and David E. Clemmer*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

phase by a new ion trap/ion mobility-mass spectrometry technique. The approach allows transitions ms time scales of previous mobility measurements [J. Am. Soc. Mass Spectrom. 1997, 8, 954] and minute these conformers as they evolve from states that are formed initially by ESI into new gas-phase structures over

Clemmer, David E.

392

Analysis of Non-Enzymatically Glycated Peptides: Neutral-Loss Triggered MS3 Versus Multi-Stage Activation Tandem Mass Spectrometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Non-enzymatic glycation of tissue proteins has important implications in the development of complications of diabetes mellitus. While electron transfer dissociation (ETD) has been shown to outperform collision-induced dissociation (CID) in sequencing glycated peptides by tandem mass spectrometry, ETD instrumentation is not yet available in all laboratories. In this study, we evaluated different advanced CID techniques (i.e., neutral-loss triggered MS3 and multi-stage activation) during LC-MSn analyses of Amadori-modified peptides enriched from human serum glycated in vitro. During neutral-loss triggered MS3 experiments, MS3 scans triggered by neutral-losses of 3 H2O or 3 H2O + HCHO produced similar results in terms of glycated peptide identifications. However, neutral losses of 3 H2O resulted in significantly more glycated peptide identifications during multi-stage activation experiments. Overall, the multi-stage activation approach produced more glycated peptide identifications, while the neutral-loss triggered MS3 approach resulted in much higher specificity. Both techniques offer a viable alternative to ETD for identifying glycated peptides when that method is unavailable.

Zhang, Qibin; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Orton, Daniel J.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Yang, Feng; Smith, Richard D.; Metz, Thomas O.

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGYDISTINGUISHED ALUMNI AWARDS Dr. Mihran S. Agbabian MS 1948 CE Fred Champion Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering, University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGYDISTINGUISHED ALUMNI AWARDS Dr. Mihran S. Agbabian MS 1948 CE Fred Champion Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering, University of Southern California 2000 Dr. Bruce N. Ames PhD 1953 BI Professor/Biochemistry, University of California, Berkeley 1977 Dr. John P

Greer, Julia R.

394

Quantitative 3-D Elemental Mapping by LA-ICP-MS of a Basaltic Clast from the Hanford 300 Area, Washington, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantitative 3-D Elemental Mapping by LA-ICP-MS of a Basaltic Clast from the Hanford 300 Area collected from the Hanford 300 Area in south-central Washington State, United States. A calibration method and riparian quality in many locations, most notably at the Hanford, Savannah River, Oak Ridge, and Nevada Test

Hu, Qinhong "Max"

395

An Insulating Breakthrough | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed An Insulating Breakthrough JANUARY 8, 2007 Bookmark and Share Tungsten Diselenide A new insulating material with the lowest thermal conductivity ever measured for a fully dense solid has been created at the University of Oregon (UO) and tested at the XOR/UNI 33-BM beamline at the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne. The research was carried out by collaborators from the UO, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and Argonne. While far from having immediate application, the principles involved, once understood, could lead to improved insulation for a wide variety of uses,

396

CX-008356: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Categorical Exclusion Determination 6: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-008356: Categorical Exclusion Determination Heating Actinide Materials in a 2.9 volume % Hydrogen Atmosphere Using a Laboratory Furnace in the C-155 Glovebox CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/18/2012 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office The preparation of uranium (IV) oxide (UO2) and mixed actinide oxides containing UO2 can be accomplished by heating actinide compounds in the presence of hydrogen. Hydrogen is required as a reducing agent to prevent the oxidation of U(IV) to a higher oxidation state. The capability to heat actinide materials in a reducing environment using 2.9 volume % hydrogen in Ar was installed in glovebox 46 in lab C-155. Multiple research and demonstration programs will utilize the furnace capability to prepare

397

Adequacy of the 123-group cross-section library for criticality analyses of water-moderated uranium systems  

SciTech Connect

In a recent criticality analysis for an array of water-moderated packages containing highly enriched uranium, the 123-group cross-section library in the SCALE system was observed to have a nonconservative discrepancy of approximately 3 to 3.5% when compared with more recently developed libraries. A simple representative system of UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O was used to identify that the problem results from a lack of resonance data for {sup 235}U. Only a single set of self-shielded cross sections, most likely corresponding to a water-moderated infinite dilute system, was provided with the original data. The UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O study indicates that this limitation may cause nonconservative discrepancies as high as 5.5% for some water-moderated, highly enriched uranium systems. Characteristics of the systems where the discrepancy is evident are identified and discussed.

Parks, C.V.; Wright, R.Q.; Jordan, W.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heating Actinide Materials in a 2.9 vol % Hydrogen Atmosphere Using a Laboratory Furnace in the C-155 Glovebox Heating Actinide Materials in a 2.9 vol % Hydrogen Atmosphere Using a Laboratory Furnace in the C-155 Glovebox Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina The preparation of uranium (IV) oxide (UO2) and mixed actinide oxides containing UO2 can be accomplished by heating actinide compounds in the presence of H2. Hydrogen is required as a reducing agent to prevent the oxidation of U(IV) to a higher oxidation state. The capability to heat actinide materials in a reducing environment using 2.9 vol % H2 in Ar was installed in glovebox 46 in lab C-155. Multiple R&D programs will utilize the furnace capability to prepare actinide oxides. B3.6 - Small-scale research and development, laboratory operations, and pilot projects Andrew R. Grainger

399

MARMOT Enhanced | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MARMOT Enhanced MARMOT Enhanced MARMOT Enhanced January 29, 2013 - 10:23am Addthis Lower-length-scale Model Development To develop mechanistic models for fuel thermal conductivity, the Fuel team used supercells up to 55 nm long to determine the thermal conductivity of UO2 with Xe incorporated. Atomistic simulations were used to determine thermal resistance values for four different types of grain boundaries, and these values have been used in meso-scale simulations of heat transport through representative fuel microstructures. [LANL] Density functional theory techniques, previously applied to diffusion of Xe in UO2, have now been extended to Kr. Thus, both major gaseous fission products are now included in the simulations, which have identified the transport mechanism as being vacancy mediated. Activation energies have

400

u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAG EMENT CENTER NEPA DETERl.VIINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.O!) U.O!) u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAG EMENT CENTER NEPA DETERl.VIINATION RECIPIENT:Commonwealth of the Northem Mari ana Islands Energy Division PROJECT TITLE : State Energy Program Formula Grant Page 1 of2 STATE: M P Funding Opportunity Announcement Number DE-FOA-OOOO507 Procurement Instrument Number DE-EE0004510 NEPA Control Number em Number GF0-0004510-OO1 GO Based on my review or the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451. IA), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description : A91nfonnation gatheri ng, analysis, and disseminatlon A11 Technical advice and assistance t o organizations Informatton gathering (induding, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, site ViSits, and audits), data

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ms uo uo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

THE SODIUM GRAPHITE REACTOR POWER PLANT FOR CPPD  

SciTech Connect

The plant arrangement, component design, and the functions of various systems are described and illustrated. Relative estimated costs of the systems and major components are indicated. The reactor core is designed around requiremouts for 254 thermal megawatts, 950 deg F maximum sodium temperature, stainless steel clad graphite moderator blocks, and low enrichment (0.015 to 0.04 U/sup 235/) uranium fuel elements. The fuel cycle is described for the possible fuel elements. The fuel cost factors are discussed. Burn-up limitations encountered for metallic fuel in the SGR temperature range indicate UO/sub 2/ the more desirable choice. The estimated cost of electrical energy associated with the UO/sub 2/ fuel is given. (auth)

Olson, R.L.; Gerber, R.C.; Gordon, R.B.; Ross-Clunis, H.A.; Stolz, J.F.

1958-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

402

Method for fluorination of uranium oxide  

SciTech Connect

Highly pure uranium hexafluoride is made from uranium oxide and fluorine. The uranium oxide, which includes UO.sub.3, UO.sub.2, U.sub.3 O.sub.8 and mixtures thereof, is introduced together with a small amount of a fluorine-reactive substance, selected from alkali chlorides, silicon dioxide, silicic acid, ferric oxide, and bromine, into a constant volume reaction zone. Sufficient fluorine is charged into the zone at a temperature below approximately 0.degree. C. to provide an initial pressure of at least approximately 600 lbs/sq. in. at the ambient atmospheric temperature. The temperature is then allowed to rise in the reaction zone until reaction occurs.

Petit, George S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

HOMOGENEOUS REACTOR PROJECT QUARTERLY PROGRESS REPORT FOR PERIOD ENDING JULY 31, 1956  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Homogeneous Reactor Test. Experiments and tests conducted preparatory to operation with unenriched UO//sub 2/SO/sub 4/ are reviewed. Remote maintenance practlces and operation at reduced pressures and temperatures were analyzed. A simplified freeze jackct design for remote operation wlil be used in the HRT system. A differential-temperature flowmeter was designed for use on feed and purge pumps. The preliminary design of the replacement pressure vessel is shown. Fuel and blanket feed and purge pump test using UO/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ solutions were continued. Performance and corrosion results are given. HRT controls and instrumentation status is reviewed. Flowsheets for the fuel and blanket chemical processing systems are shown. The construction and engineering test status of the fuel processing plant are presented. Reactor Design and Analysis. Prellminary design parameters indicate the feasibility of a 500 Mw homogeneous research reactor using UO/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. The fuel costs for homogeneous reactors whose fuel is processed on a batch rather than a continuous basis were analyzed. Tables of data were prepared indicating the effecta of fuel isotopic concentration, the use of Li//sub 2/SO/sub 4/ additives, fission product removal, reactor operating periods, and Fu recovery on per krv power cost. The effects of Xe/sup 135/ on reactor conditions following shutdown were determined for the case of a U/sup 235/O/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, D/sub 2/O, spheri cal reactor operating at 280 deg C, assuming no fission product removal. Engineering Development. Developmental studies of ThO/sub 2/ blanket slurries were continued. Experience with ThO/sub 2/ deposits in circulation loops is tabulated; and shear diagrams, friction factors, and heat transfer characteristics are plotted. Slurry blanket system operational tests indicate satisfactory operation up to 300 deg C. Corrosion and Matertals. Studies of the corrosive effects of UO/sub 2/SO/ sub 4/ on Zircaloy, stainless steel, and Al//sub 2/O/sub were continued. The appearance of liquid phases as a function of temperature in UO//sub 2/SO/sub 4/-- Li/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, UO/sub 2/SO /sub 4/-BeSO/sub 4/, and BeSO/sub 4/-- UO/sub 3/ systems is plotted. Additional observations of pump corrosion and performance in reactor blanket loops contalning a range of ThO/sub 2/ concentrations are reported. Further attempts were made to establish the effects of slurry particle size on corrosive attack rates. Results of metallographic examinations of in- pile corrosion specimens of Zr and Ti alloys and stainless steel are tabulated and discussed. The effects of high temperatures and welding on crystalline phase changes in Zr alloys were investigated. The crystailine phase changes in H pickup in Ti, Zr, Al-Ti-V alloy, and Zircaloy upon exposure in the recombiner loop were determined. The effects of aging and temperature on Zircaloy impact strength are plotted. Chemical Engineering Revelopment. Chemical and engineering studies associated wlth HRT fuel processing are reported. In the study of Pu-producer blanket chemistry, adsorption of Pu on metals, Pu behavior in UO/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ solutions at 250 deg C, and dissolutlon of corrosion product oxides were considered. Slurries of ThO/sub 2/-U0//sub 3/-MoO/sub 3/-H/ sub 2/O were prepared and irradiated. Radiation effects and gas recombination rates for this type slurry are repcrted. Methods of particle size control in Th and U oxide preparation, and the effects of additives on oxide sedimentation rates in slurries were investigated. Supporting Chemical Research. Studies of slurry particle preparation and suspension are reported. The methods used in separating Pa/sup 231/ from Mallinckrodt waste are reviewed. (D.E.B.)

None

1956-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

ACTIVE PROCESS DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES FOR PROCESSING OF FEED MATERIALS  

SciTech Connect

The carbonate and organic leaching processes for the recovery of U from its ores are outlined. The Excer prccess (ion-exchange conversion and electrolytic reduction) and the Fluorox process (starch-- HF reaction) for the production of UF/sub 4/ from ore concentrate and depleted reactor fuels are described. The fluidized-bed process for UF/sub 4/ production from UO/sub 2/(NO/ sub 3/)/sub 2/ is also described. Methods for improving the reactivity of UO/sub 3/ and mechanical and thermal processes for increasing the density of UF/sub 4/ were investigated. Applications of fluoride volatility prccesses to feed materials are discussed. (C.W.H.)

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Aeorsol Characterization from a Simulated HCDA  

SciTech Connect

Environmental conditions simulating the HCDA on a reduced scale provided the following information: Aerosols resulting from the condensation of gaseous constituents without sodium generally comprise small, spherical particles (diameter 0.01 to 0.25 um) and branched chain-like structures. Aerosols resulting from the condensation of gaseous constituents with sodium generally comprise spherical, small (diameter 0.01 to 0.50 um) particles, with some branched chain-like structures and some agglomerating particles. Electron diffraction analyses identified actinide dioxides, the constituents of stainless steel, an oxide of sodium (Na2O), sodium uranates (Na3UO4 and Na4UO5), and a sodium plutonate compound (Na4PuO5). Initial solubility studies indicated that 12.1% of the plutonium-239 dissolved in distilled water when a mixed-oxide (Pu, U) stainless steel pellet was vaporized with sodium. Reaction products are controlled kinetically during cooling rather than by equilibrium thermodynamics.

Zanotelli, W. A.; Miller, G. D.; Johnson, E. W.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Fuel System Compatibility Issues for Prometheus-1  

SciTech Connect

Compatibility issues for the Prometheus-1 fuel system have been reviewed based upon the selection of UO{sub 2} as the reference fuel material. In particular, the potential for limiting effects due to fuel- or fission product-component (cladding, liner, spring, etc) chemical interactions and clad-liner interactions have been evaluated. For UO{sub 2}-based fuels, fuel-component interactions are not expected to significantly limit performance. However, based upon the selection of component materials, there is a potential for degradation due to fission products. In particular, a chemical liner may be necessary for niobium, tantalum, zirconium, or silicon carbide-based systems. Multiple choices exist for the configuration of a chemical liner within the cladding; there is no clear solution that eliminates all concerns over the mechanical performance of a clad/liner system. A series of tests to evaluate the performance of candidate materials in contact with real and simulated fission products is outlined.

DC Noe; KB Gibbard; MH Krohn

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

407

[HOW TO RUN THE CSD FROM A WINDOWS2000] January 28, 2009 How to run the CSD from a MS Windows 2000 (will not work with VISTA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[HOW TO RUN THE CSD FROM A WINDOWS2000] January 28, 2009 How to run the CSD from a MS Windows 2000 for a terminal window to appear. The wait may be 30 to 70 seconds on some machines. 6. Use the terminal window, and shut down the X server. 12. Remove CD from drive. #12;[HOW TO RUN THE CSD FROM A WINDOWS2000] January

Meagher, Mary

408

A Comparative Analysis of Computational Approaches to Relative Protein Quantification Using Peptide Peak Intensities in Label-free LC-MS Proteomics Experiments  

SciTech Connect

Liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is widely used to identify and quantify peptides in complex biological samples. In particular, label-free shotgun proteomics is highly effective for the identification of peptides and subsequently obtaining a global protein profile of a sample. As a result, this approach is widely used for discovery studies. Typically, the objective of these discovery studies is to identify proteins that are affected by some condition of interest (e.g. disease, exposure). However, for complex biological samples, label-free LC-MS proteomics experiments measure peptides and do not directly yield protein quantities. Thus, protein quantification must be inferred from one or more measured peptides. In recent years, many computational approaches to relative protein quantification of label-free LC-MS data have been published. In this review, we examine the most commonly employed quantification approaches to relative protein abundance from peak intensity values, evaluate their individual merits, and discuss challenges in the use of the various computational approaches.

Matzke, Melissa M.; Brown, Joseph N.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Metz, Thomas O.; Pounds, Joel G.; Rodland, Karin D.; Shukla, Anil K.; Smith, Richard D.; Waters, Katrina M.; McDermott, Jason E.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

SPECIFICATIONS AND FABRICATION PROCEDURES FOR TYPE 3 FUEL ELEMENTS  

SciTech Connect

Process and product requirements to be met in the fabrication of Type 3 fuel elements are presented. The fuel elements specified consist of thin plates of a dispersion of highly enriched UO/sub 2/ and ZrB/sub 2/ in a stainless steel matrix which is clad with stainless steel on all surfaces. Quality assurance provisions are discussed. Process and material specifications and packaging and packing for shipment are described. Sample calculations and drawings are included. (M.C.G.)

Edgar, E.C.; Clayton, H.R.

1962-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

410

Diffusion of uranium in H-451 graphite at 900 to 1400/sup 0/C  

SciTech Connect

In this study, the diffusion of uranium (as a stand-in for plutonium) was investigated under conditions approximating those of the primary coolant loop in a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR). Profiles were obtained for uranium penetration in H-451 graphite (from the Great Lakes Carbon Company) at temperatures ranging from 900 to 1400/sup 0/C. Diffusion coefficients are established for UO/sub 2/ and UC/sub 2/.

Tallent, O.K.; Wichner, R.P.; Towns, R.L.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Magnetic resonance as a structural probe of a uranium (VI) sol-gel process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NMR investigations on the ORNL process for sol-gel synthesis of microspherical nuclear fuel (UO{sub 2}), has been useful in sorting out the chemical mechanism in the sol-gel steps. {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N, and {sup 1}H NMR studies on the HMTA gelation agent (Hexamethylene tetramine, C{sub 6}H{sub l2}N{sub 4}) has revealed near quantitative stability of this adamantane-like compound in the sol-Gel process, contrary to its historical role as an ammonia source for gelation from the worldwide technical literature. {sub 17}0 NMR of uranyl (UO{sub 2}{sup ++}) hydrolysis fragments produced in colloidal sols has revealed the selective formation of a uranyl trimer, ((UO{sub 2}){sub 3}({mu}{sub 3}-O)({mu}{sub 2}-OH){sub 3}){sup +}, induced by basic hydrolysis with the HMTA gelation agent. Spectroscopic results show that trimer condensation occurs during sol-gel processing leading to layered polyanionic hydrous uranium oxides in which HMTAH{sup +} is occluded as an intercalation'' cation. Subsequent sol-gel processing of microspheres by ammonia washing results in in-situ ion exchange and formation of a layered hydrous ammonium uranate with a proposed structural formula of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}((UO{sub 2}){sub 8}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 10}) {center dot} 8H{sub 2}0. This compound is the precursor to sintered U0{sub 2} ceramic fuel.

King, C.M.; Thompson, M.C.; Buchanan, B.R. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); King, R.B. (Georgia Univ., Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry); Garber, A.R. (South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Magnetic resonance as a structural probe of a uranium (VI) sol-gel process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NMR investigations on the ORNL process for sol-gel synthesis of microspherical nuclear fuel (UO{sub 2}), has been useful in sorting out the chemical mechanism in the sol-gel steps. {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N, and {sup 1}H NMR studies on the HMTA gelation agent (Hexamethylene tetramine, C{sub 6}H{sub l2}N{sub 4}) has revealed near quantitative stability of this adamantane-like compound in the sol-Gel process, contrary to its historical role as an ammonia source for gelation from the worldwide technical literature. {sub 17}0 NMR of uranyl (UO{sub 2}{sup ++}) hydrolysis fragments produced in colloidal sols has revealed the selective formation of a uranyl trimer, [(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}({mu}{sub 3}-O)({mu}{sub 2}-OH){sub 3}]{sup +}, induced by basic hydrolysis with the HMTA gelation agent. Spectroscopic results show that trimer condensation occurs during sol-gel processing leading to layered polyanionic hydrous uranium oxides in which HMTAH{sup +} is occluded as an ``intercalation`` cation. Subsequent sol-gel processing of microspheres by ammonia washing results in in-situ ion exchange and formation of a layered hydrous ammonium uranate with a proposed structural formula of (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 8}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 10}] {center_dot} 8H{sub 2}0. This compound is the precursor to sintered U0{sub 2} ceramic fuel.

King, C.M.; Thompson, M.C.; Buchanan, B.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); King, R.B. [Georgia Univ., Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Garber, A.R. [South Carolina Univ., Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

413

Nuclear carrier business volume projections, 1980-2000  

SciTech Connect

The expected number of shipments of commodities in the nuclear fuel cycle are projected for the years 1980 thru 2000. Projections are made for: yellowcake (U/sub 3/O/sub 8/); natural, enriched and reprocessed uranium hexafluoride (UF/sub 6/); uranium dioxide powder (UO/sub 2/); plutonium dioxide powder (PuO/sub 2/); fresh UO/sub 2/ and mixed oxide (MOX) fuel; spent UO/sub 2/ fuel; low-level waste (LLW); transuranic (TRU) waste; high-activity TRU waste; high-level waste (HLW), and cladding hulls. Projections are also made for non-fuel cycle commodities such as defense TRU wastes and institutional wastes, since they also are shipped by the commercial transportation industry. Projections of waste shipments from LWRs are based on the continuation of current volume reduction and solidification techniques now used by the utility industry. Projections are also made based on a 5% per year reduction in LWR waste volume shipped which is assumed to occur as a result of increased implementation of currently available volume reduction systems. This assumption results in a net 64% decrease in the total waste shipped by the year 2000. LWR waste shipment projections, and essentially all other projections for fuel cycle commodities covered in this report, are normalized to BWR and PWR generating capacity projections set forth by the Department of Energy (DOE) in their low-growth projection of April, 1979. Therefore these commodity shipment projections may be altered to comply with future changes in generating capacity projections. Projected shipments of waste from the reprocessing of spent UO/sub 2/ fuel are based on waste generation rates proposed by Nuclear Fuels Services, Allied-General Nuclear Services, Exxon Nuclear, and the DOE. Reprocessing is assumed to begin again in 1990, with mixed oxide fresh fuel available for shipment by 1991.

Lebo, R.G.; McKeown, M.S.; Rhyne, W.R.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Determination of ultratrace levels of uranium by selective laser excitation of precipitates  

SciTech Connect

Selective excitation of probe ion luminescence (SEPIL) is applied to the analysis of uranium by coprecipitation into calcium fluoride. Subsequent ignition of the precipitate in air yields intense fluorescence transitions from UO/sub 6//sup 6 -/ species which can be selectively excited with a narrow band dye laser system. A detection limit of 0.4 pg/mL is obtained. The interference effects of several ions are also presented.

Johnston, M.V.; Wright, J.C.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Nuclear criticality safety evaluation of SRS 9971 shipping package  

SciTech Connect

This evaluation is requested to revise the criticality evaluation used to generate Chapter 6 (Criticality Evaluation) of the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) for shipment Of UO{sub 3} product from the Uranium Solidification Facility (USF) in the SRS 9971 shipping package. The pertinent document requesting this evaluation is included as Attachment I. The results of the evaluation are given in Attachment II which is written as Chapter 6 of a NRC format SARP.

Vescovi, P.J.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Use of Savannah River Site facilities for blend down of highly enriched uranium  

SciTech Connect

Westinghouse Savannah River Company was asked to assess the use of existing Savannah River Site (SRS) facilities for the conversion of highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). The purpose was to eliminate the weapons potential for such material. Blending HEU with existing supplies of depleted uranium (DU) would produce material with less than 5% U-235 content for use in commercial nuclear reactors. The request indicated that as much as 500 to 1,000 MT of HEU would be available for conversion over a 20-year period. Existing facilities at the SRS are capable of producing LEU in the form of uranium trioxide (UO{sub 3}) powder, uranyl nitrate [UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}] solution, or metal. Additional processing, and additional facilities, would be required to convert the LEU to uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) or uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 3}), the normal inputs for commercial fuel fabrication. This study`s scope does not include the cost for new conversion facilities. However, the low estimated cost per kilogram of blending HEU to LEU in SRS facilities indicates that even with fees for any additional conversion to UO{sub 2} or UF{sub 6}, blend-down would still provide a product significantly below the spot market price for LEU from traditional enrichment services. The body of the report develops a number of possible facility/process combinations for SRS. The primary conclusion of this study is that SRS has facilities available that are capable of satisfying the goals of a national program to blend HEU to below 5% U-235. This preliminary assessment concludes that several facility/process options appear cost-effective. Finally, SRS is a secure DOE site with all requisite security and safeguard programs, personnel skills, nuclear criticality safety controls, accountability programs, and supporting infrastructure to handle large quantities of special nuclear materials (SNM).

Bickford, W.E.; McKibben, J.M.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Draft report on melt point as a function of composition for urania-based systems  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the testing of a urania (UO{sub 2.00}) sample as a baseline and the attempt to determine the melt point associated with 4 compositions of urania-ceria and urania-neodymia pseudo binaries provided by ORNL, with compositions of 95/5, and 80/20 and of (U/Ce)O{sub 2.00} and (U/Nd)O{sub 2.00} in the newly developed ceramic melt point determination system. A redesign of the system using parts fabricated from tungsten was undertaken in order to help prevent contamination and tungsten carbide formation in the crucibles. The previously developed system employed mostly graphite parts that were shown to react with the sample containment black-body crucible leading to unstable temperature readings and crucible failure, thus the redesign. Measured melt point values of UO{sub 2.00} and U{sub 0.95}Ce{sub 0.05}O{sub 2.00}, U{sub 0.80}Ce{sub 0.20}O{sub 2.00}, U{sub 0.95}Nd{sub 0.05}O{sub 2.00} and U{sub 0.80}Nd{sub 0.20}O{sub 2.00} were measured using a 2-color pyrometer. The value measured for UO{sub 2.00} was consistent with the published accepted value 2845 C {+-} 25 C, although a wide range of values has been published by researchers and will be discussed later in the text. For comparison, values obtained from a published binary phase diagram of UO{sub 2}-Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} were used for comparison with our measure values. No literature melt point values for comparison with the measurements performed in this study were found for (U/Ce)O{sub 2.00} in our stoichiometry range.

Valdez, James A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Byler, Darrin D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

418

High Burn-Up Properties of the Fuel Variants Irradiated in IFA-649  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The "standard product" uranium dioxide (UO2) fuel pellet has remained unchanged for many years and provides excellent performance in all but the most extreme reactor operation. The requirement to prolong fuel residence in commercial reactors, thus increasing discharge levels of burn-up, has led to a need for detailed measurements of high burn-up properties under a variety of normal and off-normal conditions. The changes in fuel material properties, such as density and swelling, ...

2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

419

NFIR-IV Disc Irradiation Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel restructuring observed in uranium dioxide (UO2) based fuel at high burnup coincides with observations of enhanced fission gas release and reduced thermal conductivity of the fuel material. The transformation of fuel microstructure to so-called high burnup structure (HBS) is thus perceived as a potential limitation to fuel performance. To pursue future research and development (RD) in these and other fuel-pellet-related areas, the Nuclear Fuel Industry Research (NFIR) program commissioned an in-pile ...

2006-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

420

Specific Heat Measurements and Post-Test Characterization of Irradiated and Unirradiated Urania and Gadolinia Doped Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In pursuit of higher burnups at nuclear plants, fuel designers have introduced the use of 'advanced' fuel types, including doped fuels. Completing a systematic program to acquire data on the basic properties of these fuels, this project measured the specific heat and density of high burn-up UO2 and (U, Gd)O2 using irradiated materials of the same origin as those on which thermal diffusivity measurements had previously been made and thermal recovery phenomena investigated.

2000-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ms uo uo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Accommodation of Uranium into the Garnet Structure Sergey V.Yudintsev1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accommodation of Uranium into the Garnet Structure Sergey V.Yudintsev1 , Marya I. Lapina1 for uranium, the CaO ­ Fe2O3 ­ Al2O3 ­ SiO2 ­ ZrO2 ­ Gd2O3 ­ UO2 system was studied. Experiments were- corporation of U was found to be greatly dependent on the phase composition. Uranium content decreased from 18

Utsunomiya, Satoshi

422

Sur la radioactivit des solutions de sels d'uranium Par L. MICHIELS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

432 Sur la radioactivité des solutions de sels d'uranium Par L. MICHIELS [Laboratoire de'une substanceradioactive ne produisant pas d'émanation, telle que l'uranium. D'une première série d'expériences effectuées au moyen de solutions de sulfate uranico-potassique K(UO)SO4+H2O dont la teneur, exprimée en uranium

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

423

High-harmonic XUV source for time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a laser-based apparatus for visible pump/XUV probe time- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (TRARPES) utilizing high-harmonic generation from a noble gas. Femtosecond temporal resolution for each selected harmonic is achieved by using a time-delay-compensated monochromator (TCM). The source has been used to obtain photoemission spectra from insulators (UO{sub 2}) and ultrafast pump/probe processes in semiconductors (GaAs).

Dakovski, Georgi L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Yinwan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Durakiewicz, Tomasz [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez, George [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF REPLACEMENT CORES FOR SM AND PM TYPE REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

An economic analysis is presented for the fabrication of replacement cores for SM and PM type reactors, including analysis of various core types and core fabrication technologies. The analysis indicates that major savings are possible by utilizing Type 3 cores (40-mil plates, 25 wt% UO/sub 2/, welded assembly) in all SM and PM type reactors, and that significant savings are possible by multiple core procurement and reprocessing, and relaxation of cobalt and tantalum requirements in Type 347 stainless steel. (auth)

Wilder, A.S.

1961-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Polyethylene Encapsulated Depleted Uranium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Poly DU Poly DU Polyethylene Encapsulated Depleted Uranium Technology Description: Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has completed preliminary work to investigate the feasibility of encapsulating DU in low density polyethylene to form a stable, dense product. DU loadings as high as 90 wt% were achieved. A maximum product density of 4.2 g/cm3 was achieved using UO3, but increased product density using UO2 is estimated at 6.1 g/cm3. Additional product density improvements up to about 7.2 g/cm3 were projected using DU aggregate in a hybrid technique known as micro/macroencapsulation.[1] A U.S. patent for this process has been received.[2] Figure 1 Figure 1: DU Encapsulated in polyethylene samples produced at BNL containing 80 wt % depleted UO3 A recent DU market study by Kapline Enterprises, Inc. for DOE thoroughly identified and rated potential applications and markets for DU metal and oxide materials.[3] Because of its workability and high DU loading capability, the polyethylene encapsulated DU could readily be fabricated as counterweights/ballast (for use in airplanes, helicopters, ships and missiles), flywheels, armor, and projectiles. Also, polyethylene encapsulated DU is an effective shielding material for both gamma and neutron radiation, with potential application for shielding high activity waste (e.g., ion exchange resins, glass gems), spent fuel dry storage casks, and high energy experimental facilities (e.g., accelerator targets) to reduce radiation exposures to workers and the public.

426

Multiscale Simulation of Thermo-mechancial Processes in Irradiated Fission-reactor Materials.  

SciTech Connect

The work funded from this project has been published in six papers, with two more in draft form, with submission planned for the near future. The papers are: (1) Kinetically-Evolving Irradiation-Induced Point-Defect Clusters in UO{sub 2} by Molecular-Dynamics Simulation; (2) Kinetically driven point-defect clustering in irradiated MgO by molecular-dynamics simulation; (3) Grain-Boundary Source/Sink Behavior for Point Defect: An Atomistic Simulation Study; (4) Energetics of intrinsic point defects in uranium dioxide from electronic structure calculations; (5) Thermodynamics of fission products in UO{sub 2{+-}x}; and (6) Atomistic study of grain boundary sink strength under prolonged electron irradiation. The other two pieces of work that are currently being written-up for publication are: (1) Effect of Pores and He Bubbles on the Thermal Transport Properties of UO2 by Molecular Dynamics Simulation; and (2) Segregation of Ruthenium to Edge Dislocations in Uranium Dioxide.

Simon R. Phillpot

2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

427

DOE/EIA-0321/HRIf Residential Energy Consumption Survey. Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

/HRIf /HRIf Residential Energy Consumption Survey. Consumption and Expenditures, April 1981 Through March 1982 an Part I: National Data Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. (202) 20fr02 'O'Q 'uoifkjjUSBM ujiuud juaoiujeAog 'S'n siuawnooQ jo luapuaiuuadns - 0088-292 (202) 98S02 '0'Q 8f 0-d I 6ujp|ing uoiieflSjUjiup v UOIIBUJJOJU | ABjau 3 02-13 'jaiuao UOIJBUJJOJUI XBjaug IBUO!;BN noA pasopua s; uujoi japjo uy 'MO|aq jeadde sjaqoinu auoydajaj PUB sassajppv 'OI3N 9>4i oi papajip aq pinoqs X6jaue uo suotjsenQ '(OIBN) J9»ueo aqjeiMJO^ui ASjaug (BUOIJEN s,vi3 QMi JO OdO 941 UUGJJ peuiBiqo eq ABOI suoijBonqnd (vi3) UO!JBJ;S!UILUPV UOIIBUUJO|U| XBjeug jaiflo PUB SJMJ p ssBiiojnd PUB UOIIBLUJO^JI 6uuepjQ (Od9) 90IWO Bujjuud luetuujaAOQ -g'n 'sjuaiunooa p juapuaiuuedng aqt LUOJI aiqB||BAB si uoHBOjiqnd sjt|i

428

FAQ 3-What are the common forms of uranium?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are the common forms of uranium? are the common forms of uranium? What are the common forms of uranium? Uranium can take many chemical forms. In nature, uranium is generally found as an oxide, such as in the olive-green-colored mineral pitchblende. Uranium oxide is also the chemical form most often used for nuclear fuel. Uranium-fluorine compounds are also common in uranium processing, with uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and uranium tetrafluoride (UF4) being the two most common. In its pure form, uranium is a silver-colored metal. The most common forms of uranium oxide are U3O8 and UO2. Both oxide forms have low solubility in water and are relatively stable over a wide range of environmental conditions. Triuranium octaoxide (U3O8) is the most stable form of uranium and is the form most commonly found in nature. Uranium dioxide (UO2) is the form in which uranium is most commonly used as a nuclear reactor fuel. At ambient temperatures, UO2 will gradually convert to U3O8. Because of their stability, uranium oxides are generally considered the preferred chemical form for storage or disposal.

429

General-Purpose Heat Source: Research and development program: Cold-Process Verification Test Series  

SciTech Connect

The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of {sup 238}Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements. Because any space mission could experience a launch abort or return from orbit, the heat source must be designed and constructed to survive credible accident environments. Previous testing conducted in support of the Galileo and Ulysses missions documented the response of GPHSs and individual GPHS capsules fueled with {sup 238}UO{sub 2} ({sup 235}U-depleted) to a variety of explosive overpressure and impact events. In the early 1990s, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) resumed fabrication of {sup 238}UO{sub 2} GPHS pellets. The Cold-Process Verification (CPV) Test Series was designed to compare the response of GPHS heat sources loaded with recently fabricated hot- and cold-pressed {sup 238}UO{sub 2} pellets to the response of urania pellets used in the Galileo and Ulysses performance tests. This report documents eleven bare-capsule impacts and one impact of a fully loaded GPHS module. All of the failures observed in the bare-clad impact tests were similar to failures observed in previous safety tests. No failures occurred in the module impact test.

Reimus, M.A.H.; George, T.G.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Results of recent reactor-material tests on dispersal of oxide fuel from a disrupted core  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of experimental investigations and related analyses are reported addressing the dispersal of molten oxide fuel from a disrupted core via various available pathways for the CRBR system. These investigations included the GAPFLOW tests in which pressure-driven and gravity drainage tests were performed using dispersal pathways mocking up the intersubassembly gaps, the CAMEL C6 and C7 tests in which molten fuel entered sodium-filled control assembly ducts under prototypic thermal-hydraulic conditions, and the Lower Internals Drainage (LID) tests in which molten fuel drained downward through simulated below-core structure (orifice plate stacks) as the bottom of control assembly ducts. The results of SHOTGUN tests addressing basic freezing of molten UO/sub 2/ and UO/sub 2//metal mixtures flowing through circular tubes are also reported. Test results have invariably shown the existance of stable UO/sub 2/ crusts on the inside surfaces of the flow paths. Appreciable removal of fuel was indicated prior to freezing-induced immobilization. Application of heat transfer models based upon the presence of stable, insulating fuel crusts tends to overpredict the removal process.

Spencer, B.W.; Wilson, R.J.; Vetter, D.L.; Erickson, E.G.; Dewey, G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Electrochemistry of LiCl-Li2O-H2O Molten Salt Systems  

SciTech Connect

Uranium can be recovered from uranium oxide (UO2) spent fuel through the combination of the oxide reduction and electrorefining processes. During oxide reduction, the spent fuel is introduced to molten LiCl-Li2O salt at 650 degrees C and the UO2 is reduced to uranium metal via two routes: (1) electrochemically, and (2) chemically by lithium metal (Li0) that is produced electrochemically. However, the hygroscopic nature of both LiCl and Li2O leads to the formation of LiOH, contributing hydroxyl anions (OH-), the reduction of which interferes with the Li0 generation required for the chemical reduction of UO2. In order for the oxide reduction process to be an effective method for the treatment of uranium oxide fuel, the role of moisture in the LiCl-Li2O system must be understood. The behavior of moisture in the LiCl-Li2O molten salt system was studied using cyclic voltammetry, chronopotentiometry and chronoamperometry, while reduction to hydrogen was confirmed with gas chromatography.

Natalie J. Gese; Batric Pesic

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Photoelectron Spectroscopy of U Oxide at LLNL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In our laboratory at LLNL, an effort is underway to investigate the underlying complexity of 5f electronic structure with spin-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy using chiral photonic excitation, i.e. Fano Spectroscopy. Our previous Fano measurements with Ce indicate the efficacy of this approach and theoretical calculations and spectral simulations suggest that Fano Spectroscopy may resolve the controversy concerning Pu electronic structure and electron correlation. To this end, we have constructed and commissioned a new Fano Spectrometer, testing it with the relativistic 5d system Pt. Here, our preliminary photoelectron spectra of the UO{sub 2} system are presented. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy has been used to characterize a sample of UO{sub 2} grown on an underlying substrate of Uranium. Both AlK{alpha} (1487 eV) and MgK{alpha} (1254 eV) emission were utilized as the excitation. Using XPS and comparing to reference spectra, it has been shown that our sample is clearly UO{sub 2}.

Tobin, J G; Yu, S; Chung, B W; Waddill, G D

2010-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

433

Multiple Irradiation Capsule Experiment (MICE)-3B Irradiation Test of Space Fuel Specimens in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) - Close Out Documentation for Naval Reactors (NR) Information  

SciTech Connect

Few data exist for UO{sub 2} or UN within the notional design space for the Prometheus-1 reactor (low fission rate, high temperature, long duration). As such, basic testing is required to validate predictions (and in some cases determine) performance aspects of these fuels. Therefore, the MICE-3B test of UO{sub 2} pellets was designed to provide data on gas release, unrestrained swelling, and restrained swelling at the upper range of fission rates expected for a space reactor. These data would be compared with model predictions and used to determine adequacy of a space reactor design basis relative to fission gas release and swelling of UO{sub 2} fuel and to assess potential pellet-clad interactions. A primary goal of an irradiation test for UN fuel was to assess performance issues currently associated with this fuel type such as gas release, swelling and transient performance. Information learned from this effort may have enabled use of UN fuel for future applications.

M. Chen; CM Regan; D. Noe

2006-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

434

The Reactions of Water Vapour on the Surfaces of Stoichiometric and Reduced Uranium Dioxide: A High Resolution XPS Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The reaction of water with stoichiometric and O-defective UO{sub 2} thin film surfaces is studied by high-resolution photoelectron spectroscopy using synchrotron X-rays radiation. The decomposition of D{sub 2}O molecules and the oxidative healing of defects on the reduced surfaces was observed and quantified. D{sub 2}O adsorption on the stoichiometric UO{sub 2} surface at 300 K showed small amounts of OD species (ca. 532 eV) probably formed on trace amounts of surface defects, while at 95 K D2O ice (533.5 eV) was the main surface species. On the contrary, a large signal of OD species was seen on the 300 K-Ar{sup +}-sputtered (reduced) surface, UO{sub 2-x}. This was concomitant with a rapid healing of surface defects as monitored by their U4f signal. Quantitative analysis of the OD signal with increasing temperature showed their disappearance by 550 K. The disappearance of these species while hydrogen molecules are still desorbing from the surface as monitored by TPD [S.D. Senanayake, H. Idriss, Surf. Sci. 563 (1-3) (2004) 135; S.D. Senanayake, R. Rousseau, D. Colegrave, H. Idriss, J. Nucl. Mater. 342 (2005) 179] is shedding light on the re-combinative desorption mechanism from dissociatively adsorbed water molecules on the surfaces of this defective metal oxide.

Senanayake,S.; Waterhouse, G.; Chan, A.; Madey, T.; Mullins, D.; Idriss, H.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Characterization of an enriched uranyl fluoride deposit in a valve and pipe intersection using time-of-flight transmission measurements with {sup 252}Cf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method was developed and successfully applied to characterize large uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) deposits at the former Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant. These deposits were formed by a wet air in-leakage into the UF{sub 6} process gas lines over a period of years. The resulting UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} is hygroscopic, readily absorbing moisture from the air to form hydrates as UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}-nH{sub 2}O. The ratio of hydrogen to uranium can vary from 0--16, and has significant nuclear criticality safety impacts for large deposits. In order to properly formulate the required course of action, a non-intrusive characterization of the distribution of the fissile material within the pipe, its total mass, and amount of hydration was necessary. The Nuclear Weapons Identification System (NWIS) previously developed at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant for identification of uranium weapons components in storage containers was used to successfully characterize these deposits.

Wyatt, M.S. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Uckan, T.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Valentine, T.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hannon, T.F. [East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Physics of enriched uranyl fluoride deposit characterizations using active neutron and gamma interrogation techniques with {sup 252}Cf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method was developed and successfully applied to characterize large uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 21}) deposits at the former Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant. These deposits were formed by a wet air in-leakage into the UF{sub 6} process gas lines over a period of years. The resulting UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} is hygroscopic, readily absorbing moisture from the air to form hydrates as UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}-nH{sub 2}O. The ratio of hydrogen to uranium, denoted H/U, can vary from 0--16, and has significant nuclear criticality safety impacts for large deposits. In order to properly formulate the required course of action, a non-intrusive characterization of the distribution of the fissile material within the pipe, its total mass, and amount of hydration was needed. The Nuclear Weapons Identification System (NWIS) previously developed at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant for identification of uranium weapons components in storage containers was used to successfully characterize the distribution, hydration, and total mass of these deposits.

Wyatt, M.S. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Uckan, T.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Valentine, T.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hannon, T.F. [East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Final assessment of MOX fuel performance experiment with Japanese PWR specification fuel in the HBWR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to obtain high burn-up MOX fuel irradiation performance data, SBR and MIMAS MOX fuel rods with Pu-fissile enrichment of about 6 wt% had been irradiated in the HBWR from 1995 to 2006. The peak burn-up of MOX pellet achieved 72 GWd/tM. In this test, fuel centerline temperature, rod internal pressure, stack length and cladding length were measured for MOX fuel and UO{sub 2} fuel as reference. MOX fuel temperature is confirmed to have no significant difference in comparison with UO{sub 2}, taking into account of adequate thermal conductivity degradation due to PuO{sub 2} addition and burn-up development. And the measured fuel temperature agrees well with FINE code calculation up to high burn-up region. Fission gas release of MOX is possibly greater than UO{sub 2} based on temperature and pressure assessment. No significant difference is confirmed between SBR and MIMAS MOX on FGR behavior. MOX fuel swelling rate agrees well with solid swelling rate in the literature. Cladding elongation data shows onset of PCMI in high power region. (authors)

Fujii, Hajime; Teshima, Hideyuki; Kanasugi, Katsumasa [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., 1-1, Wadasaki-cho 1-chome, Hyogo-ku, Kobe 652-8585 (Japan); Kosaka, Yuji [Nuclear Development Corporation, 622-12 Funaishikawa, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1111 (Japan); Arakawa, Yasushi [The Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., 8 Yokota, 13 Goichi, Mihama-cho, Mikata-gun, Fukui, 919-1141 (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Helium Behavior in Oxide Nuclear Fuels: First Principles Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

UO2 and (U, Pu)O2 solid solutions (the so-called MOX) nowadays are used as commercial nuclear fuels in many countries. One of the safety issues during the storage of these fuels is related to their self-irradiation that produces and accumulates point defects and helium therein. We present density functional theory (DFT) calculations for UO2, PuO2 and MOX containing He atoms in octahedral interstitial positions. In particular, we calculated basic MOX properties and He incorporation energies as functions of Pu concentration within the spin-polarized, generalized gradient approximation (GGA) DFT calculations. We also included the on-site electron correlation corrections using the Hubbard model (in the framework of the so-called DFT + U approach). We found that PuO2 remains semiconducting with He in the octahedral position while UO2 requires a specific lattice distortion. Both materials reveal a positive energy for He incorporation, which, therefore, is an exothermic process. The He incorporation energy increases with the Pu concentration in the MOX fuel.

Gryaznov, D.; Rashkeev, Sergey N.; Kotomin, E. A.; Heifets, Eugene; Zhukovskii, Yuri F.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

PRODUCTION OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the production of uranium hexafluoride from the oxides of uranium is reported. In accordance with the method, the higher oxides of uranium may be reduced to uranium dioxide (UO/sub 2/), the latter converted into uranium tetrafluoride by reaction with hydrogen fluoride, and the UF/sub 4/ converted to UF/sub 6/ by reaction with a fluorinating agent, such as CoF/sub 3/. The UO/sub 3/ or U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ is placed in a reac tion chamber in a copper boat or tray enclosed in a copper oven, and heated to 500 to 650 deg C while hydrogen gas is passed through the oven. After nitrogen gas is used to sweep out the hydrogen and the water vapor formed, and while continuing to inaintain the temperature between 400 deg C and 600 deg C, anhydrous hydrogen fluoride is passed through. After completion of the conversion of UO/sub 2/ to UF/sub 4/ the temperature of the reaction chamber is lowered to about 400 deg C or less, the UF/sub 4/ is mixed with the requisite quantity of CoF/sub 3/, and after evacuating the chamber, the mixture is heated to 300 to 400 deg C, and the resulting UF/sub 6/ is led off and delivered to a condenser.

Fowler, R.D.

1957-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

440

Urania vapor composition at very high temperatures  

SciTech Connect

Due to the chemically unstable nature of uranium dioxide its vapor composition at very high temperatures is, presently, not sufficiently studied though more experimental knowledge is needed for risk assessment of nuclear reactors. We used laser vaporization coupled to mass spectrometry of the produced vapor to study urania vapor composition at temperatures in the vicinity of its melting point and higher. The very good agreement between measured melting and freezing temperatures and between partial pressures measured on the temperature increase and decrease indicated that the change in stoichiometry during laser heating was very limited. The evolutions with temperature (in the range 2800-3400 K) of the partial pressures of the main vapor species (UO{sub 2}, UO{sub 3}, and UO{sub 2}{sup +}) were compared with theoretically predicted evolutions for equilibrium noncongruent gas-liquid and gas-solid phase coexistences and showed very good agreement. The measured main relative partial pressure ratios around 3300 K all agree with calculated values for total equilibrium between condensed and vapor phases. It is the first time the three main partial pressure ratios above stoichiometric liquid urania have been measured at the same temperature under conditions close to equilibrium noncongruent gas-liquid phase coexistence.

Pflieger, Rachel [Institute for Transuranium Elements, Joint Research Centre, European Commission, P.O. Box 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Marcoule Institute for Separation Chemistry (ICSM), UMR 5257, CEA-CNRS-UMII-ENSCM, Bagnols sur Ceze Cedex (France); Colle, Jean-Yves [Institute for Transuranium Elements, Joint Research Centre, European Commission, P.O. Box 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Iosilevskiy, Igor [Joint Institute for High Temperature, Russian Academy of Science, 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, State University, 141700 Moscow (Russian Federation); Extreme Matter Institute (EMMI), 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Sheindlin, Michael [Institute for Transuranium Elements, Joint Research Centre, European Commission, P.O. Box 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Joint Institute for High Temperature, Russian Academy of Science, 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ms uo uo" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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441

Irradiation of SiC Clad Fuel Rods in the HFIR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 2009 and- 2010, new test capability for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was developed that allows testing of advanced nuclear fuels and cladding under prototypic light-water-reactor (LWR) operating conditions (i.e., cladding and fuel temperatures, fuel average linear heat generation rates, and cladding fluence). For the initial experiments for this test program, ORNL teamed with commercial fuel/cladding vendors who have developed an advanced composite-wound SiC cladding material for possible use in LWRs. The first experiment, containing SiC-clad UN fuel, was inserted in HFIR in June 2010, and the second experiment, containing SiC-clad UO2 fuel, was inserted in October 2010. Two capsules (one containing UN fuel and the other UO2) were withdrawn from their respective assemblies in November 2011 at an estimated fuel burnup of approximately 10 GWd/MTHM; and two capsules (one containing UN fuel and the other UO2) were withdrawn from their respective assemblies in February 2013 at an estimated fuel burnup of approximately 20 GWd/MTHM. These capsules are currently awaiting PIE. This paper will describe the experiment, as-run operating conditions for these capsules, and current PIE plans and status.

Ott, Larry J [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL; Ellis, Ronald James [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel Lee [ORNL; Morris, Robert Noel [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

In situ treatment of VOCs by recirculation technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project described herein was conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to identify processes and technologies developed in Germany that appeared to have near-term potential for enhancing the cleanup of volatile organic compound (VOC) contaminated soil and groundwater at DOE sites. Members of the ORNL research team identified and evaluated selected German technologies developed at or in association with the University of Karlsruhe (UoK) for in situ treatment of VOC contaminated soils and groundwater. Project activities included contacts with researchers within three departments of the UoK (i.e., Applied Geology, Hydromechanics, and Soil and Foundation Engineering) during fall 1991 and subsequent visits to UoK and private industry collaborators during February 1992. Subsequent analyses consisted of engineering computations, groundwater flow modeling, and treatment process modeling. As a result of these project efforts, two processes were identified as having near-term potential for DOE: (1) the vacuum vaporizer well/groundwater recirculation well and (2) the porous pipe/horizontal well. This document was prepared to summarize the methods and results of the assessment activities completed during the initial year of the project. The project is still ongoing, so not all facets of the effort are completely described in this document. Recommendations for laboratory and field experiments are provided.

Siegrist, R.L.; Webb, O.F.; Ally, M.R.; Sanford, W.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (US); Kearl, P.M.; Zutman, J.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (US)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Experimental Results for SimFuels  

SciTech Connect

Assessing the performance of Spent (or Used) Nuclear Fuel (UNF) in geological repository requires quantification of time-dependent phenomena that may influence its behavior on a time-scale up to millions of years. A high-level waste repository environment will be a dynamic redox system because of the time-dependent generation of radiolytic oxidants and reductants and the corrosion of Fe-bearing canister materials. One major difference between used fuel and natural analogues, including unirradiated UO2, is the intense radiolytic field. The radiation emitted by used fuel can produce radiolysis products in the presence of water vapor or a thin-film of water that may increase the waste form degradation rate and change radionuclide behavior. To study UNF, we have been working on producing synthetic UO2 ceramics, or SimFuels that can be used in testing and which will contain specific radionuclides or non-radioactive analogs so that we can test the impact of radiolysis on fuel corrosion without using actual spent fuel. Although, testing actual UNF would be ideal for understanding the long term behavior of UNF, it requires the use of hot cells and is extremely expensive. In this report, we discuss, factors influencing the preparation of SimFuels and the requirements for dopants to mimic the behavior of UNF. We have developed a reliable procedure for producing large grain UO2 at moderate temperatures. This process will be applied to a series of different formulations.

Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Andrew M.; Skomurski, Frances N.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Wittman, Richard S.; Mcnamara, Bruce K.

2012-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

444

Conceptual Design of a CERMET NTR Fission Core Using Multiphysics Modeling Techniques  

SciTech Connect

An initial pre-conceptual CERMET Nuclear Thermal Propulsion reactor system is investigated within this paper. Reactor configurations are investigated where the fuel consists of 60 vol.% UO2 and 40 vol.% W where the UO2 consists of Gd2O3 concentrations of 5 and 10 mol.%.Gd2O3. The fuel configuration consisting of 5 mol.% UO2 was found to have a total mass of 2761 kg and a thrust to weight ratio of 4.10 and required a coolant channel surface area to fueled volume ratio of approximately 15.0 in order to keep the centerline temperature below 3000 K. The configuration consisting of 10 mol.% Gd2O3 required a surface area to volume ratio of approximately 12.2 to cool the reactor to a peak temperature of 3000 K and had a total mass of 3200 kg and a thrust to weight ratio of 3.54. It is not known yet what concentration of Gd2O3 is required to maintain fuel stability at 3000 K; however, both reactors offer the potential for operations at 25,000 lb, and at a specific impulse which may range from 900 to 950 seconds.

Jonathan A. Webb; Brian J. Gross; William T. Taitano

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Peace and Conflict Studies (PACS) Essay Contest --$500 Scholarship to the Winner! Inspired by her own survival of the dropping of an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, BGSU alumnus Ms.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

own survival of the dropping of an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, BGSU alumnus Ms. Hiroko Nakamoto has threat of nuclear weapons in our world in a lecture entitled: "Nuclear Alarmism from Hiroshima to Al

Moore, Paul A.

446

Retention indices, relative response factors, and mass spectra of trifluoroethyl and heptafluorobutyl esters of carboxylic acids determined by capillary GC/MS  

SciTech Connect

The GC/MS characteristics of carboxylic acid esters prepared from fluorine-containing alcohols were compared to those of methyl esters. The GC retention of 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl (TFE) esters was less than, and 2,2,3,3,4,4,4-heptafluoro-1-butyl (HFB) esters approximately equivalent to that of methyl esters. The peak shape of both TFE and HFB esters was slightly superior to that of methyl esters. Mass spectra of TFE and HFB aliphatic esters show significantly more intense molecular and key fragment ions than those of methyl esters. Also, owing to their significantly higher molecular weights, TFE or HFB ester molecular ions and most fragment ions of interest occur at significantly higher m/z values than most potential interfering ions. The GC retention indices, relative GC/MS total ion current response factors, and 70 eV electron impact mass spectra of about 70 TFE and 70 HFB carboxylic acid esters are reported. Results from analysis of a TFE/HFB esterified petroleum carboxylic acid concentrate are discussed in detail. 26 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

Yu, S.K.-T.; Vrana, R.P.; Green, J.B.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Technical Project Plan for The Enhanced Thermal Conductivity of Oxide Fuels Through the Addition of High Thermal Conductivity Fibers and Microstructural Engineering  

SciTech Connect

The commercial nuclear power industry is investing heavily in advanced fuels that can produce higher power levels with a higher safety margin and be produced at low cost. Although chemically stable and inexpensive to manufacture, the in-core performance of UO{sub 2} fuel is limited by its low thermal conductivity. There will be enormous financial benefits to any utility that can exploit a new type of fuel that is chemically stable, has a high thermal conductivity, and is inexpensive to manufacture. At reactor operating temperatures, UO{sub 2} has a very low thermal conductivity (<5 W/m {center_dot}K), which decreases with temperature and fuel burnup. This low thermal conductivity limits the rate at which energy can be removed from the fuel, thus limiting the total integrated reactor power. If the fuel thermal conductivity could be increased, nuclear reactors would be able to operate at higher powers and larger safety margins thus decreasing the overall cost of electricity by increasing the power output from existing reactors and decreasing the number of new electrical generating plants needed to meet base load demand. The objective of the work defined herein is to produce an advanced nuclear fuel based on the current UO{sub 2} fuel with superior thermal conductivity and structural integrity that is suitable for current and future nuclear reactors, using the existing fuel fabrication infrastructure with minimal modifications. There are two separate components to the research: (1) Enhanced Thermal Conductivity (ETC) - adding high conductivity fibers to the UO{sub 2} prior to sintering, which act as conduits for moving the heat energy generated within the pellet to the outer surface, (2) Microstructural Engineering (ME) - adding second phase particulates to UO{sub 2} bodies to retard grain growth and to increase thermal conductivity, as well as improve fracture and creep resistance. Different groups will perform the laboratory work for each of these research components with some overlap in personnel. The overlapping areas primarily involve computer simulations and final testing of the fuel in a reactor. The estimated cost and duration of this project is $5,000,000 over three years.

Hollenbach, Daniel F [ORNL; Ott, Larry J [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL; Armstrong, Beth L [ORNL; Wereszczak, Andrew A [ORNL; Lin, Hua-Tay [ORNL; Ellis, Ronald James [ORNL; Becher, Paul F [ORNL; Jubin, Robert Thomas [ORNL; Voit, Stewart L [ORNL

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

In-Situ Measurements of Low Enrichment Uranium Holdup Process Gas Piping at K-25 - Paper for Waste Management Symposia 2010 East Tennessee Technology Park Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final version of a paper submitted to the Waste Management Symposia, Phoenix, 2010, abstract BJC/OR-3280. The primary document from which this paper was condensed is In-Situ Measurement of Low Enrichment Uranium Holdup in Process Gas Piping at K-25 Using NaI/HMS4 Gamma Detection Systems, BJC/OR-3355. This work explores the sufficiency and limitations of the Holdup Measurement System 4 (HJVIS4) software algorithms applied to measurements of low enriched uranium holdup in gaseous diffusion process gas piping. HMS4 has been used extensively during the decommissioning and demolition project of the K-25 building for U-235 holdup quantification. The HMS4 software is an integral part of one of the primary nondestructive assay (NDA) systems which was successfully tested and qualified for holdup deposit quantification in the process gas piping of the K-25 building. The initial qualification focused on the measurement of highly enriched UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} deposits. The purpose of this work was to determine if that qualification could be extended to include the quantification of holdup in UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} deposits of lower enrichment. Sample field data are presented to provide evidence in support of the theoretical foundation. The HMS4 algorithms were investigated in detail and found to sufficiently compensate for UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} source self-attenuation effects, over the range of expected enrichment (4-40%), in the North and East Wings of the K-25 building. The limitations of the HMS4 algorithms were explored for a described set of conditions with respect to area source measurements of low enriched UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} deposits when used in conjunction with a 1 inch by 1/2 inch sodium iodide (NaI) scintillation detector. The theoretical limitations of HMS4, based on the expected conditions in the process gas system of the K-25 building, are related back to the required data quality objectives (DQO) for the NBA measurement system established for the K-25 demolition project. The combined review of the HMS software algorithms and supporting field measurements lead to the conclusion that the majority of process gas pipe measurements are adequately corrected for source self-attenuation using HMS4. While there will be instances where the UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} holdup mass presents an infinitely thick deposit to the NaI-HMS4 system these situations are expected to be infrequent. This work confirms that the HMS4 system can quantify UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} holdup, in its current configuration (deposition, enrichment, and geometry), below the DQO levels for the K-25 building decommissioning and demolition project. For an area measurement of process gas pipe in the K-25 building, if an infinitely thick UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} deposit is identified in the range of enrichment of {approx}4-40%, the holdup quantity exceeds the corresponding DQO established for the K-25 building demolition project.

Rasmussen B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

DEVELOPMENT OF PLUTONIUM-BEARING FUEL MATERIALS. Progress Report for Period January 1 through March 31, 1962  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During this reporting period, particular effort was of aced on powder blending and pellet sintering studies prior to irradiation sample fabrication, and, subsequently, the production and characterization of the pellets slated for irradiation. Also, PuO/sub 2/ and UO/sub 2/-PuO/sub 2/ characterization studies were continued, and new techniques are being developed. Specifically, dynamic moisture pickup determinations on PuO/sub 2/ were made in moist air, N, and CO/ sub 2/ atmospheres using a recording thermogravimetric balance; the Sharples Micromerograph was committed to Pu, and powder particle size distributions were measured and compared with previous determinations made with air-permeability equipment; and the suitability and reliability of analytical chemistry assaying procedures such as x-ray-fluorescence and gamma spectrometry are being evaluated. Prototype work on UO/sub 2/ for the direct precipitation of PuO/sub 2/ and PuO/ sub 2/-UO/sub 2/ feed materials for swaging, vibratory compaction, and dispersion fabrication was also continued. In addition, investigation of PuO/sub 2/ spherical particle formation by mechanical buildup and by plasma torch fusion was extended. Associated reactor physics studies were concentrated on the further comparison of Pu and U/sup 235/ in near-thermal converter reactors. In preparation for the fabrication of irradiation test specimens to be prepared by the mechanical blending of individuaI PuO/sub 2/ and UO/sub 2/ powders, bIending studies were initiated to develop methods required for the attainment of desired homogeneity. Sintering studies were carried out on PuOs/sub 2/ to study the effects of compaction pressure, firing temperature, firing time, and firing atmosphere. It was determined that 1400 to 1500 deg C is the best firing temperature to obtain maximum pellet density, and that sintering in air yields higher densities than sintering in a N/sub 2/--H/sub 2/ atmosphere. Further, it was noted that the degree of Pu/sub 2/O/sub 3/ formation while sintering in an N/ sub 2/--H/sub 2/ atm osphere is inversely proportional to compaction pressure, indicating that the degree of formation is determined by the exposed surface area. Two additional Iots of UO/sub 2/-5 wt% PuO/sub 2/ powder were precipitated during this period. Powder characterization data for these and two previously produced lots were obtained. Also, powder characteristics were remeasured following hammermilling in order to allow assessment of the effects of this treatment. In preparation for work with PuO/sub 2/ and UO/sub 2/--PuO/sub 2/, prototype studies are being carried out with UO/sub 2/ to assess the possibility of producing directly high density granular feed for swaging, vibratory compaction, and dispersion fuel fabrication. Effort was continued on the fabrication of spherical PuO/sub 2/ particles by mechanical buildup and by plasma torch fusion. Reactor physics studies were continued to allow assessment of Pu relative to U/ sup 235/ in near-thermal reactor sys tems. Under cost assumptions used previously, it was shown that optimum fuel cycle costs from Pu-natural U fueled systems are well below those attainable with slightly enriched U iueled systems even if it is assumed that radiation damage is not limiting and that an ideal burnable poison (or solution poison) exists to limit the reactivity. (auth)

None

1962-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

450

Characterization of U/Pu Particles Originating From the Nuclear Weapon Accidents at Palomares, Spain, 1966 And Thule, Greenland, 1968  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following the USAF B-52 bomber accidents at Palomares, Spain in 1966 and at Thule, Greenland in 1968, radioactive particles containing uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu) were dispersed into the environment. To improve long-term environmental impact assessments for the contaminated ecosystems, particles from the two sites have been isolated and characterized with respect to properties influencing particle weathering rates. Low [239]Pu/[235]U (0.62-0.78) and [240]Pu/[239]Pu (0.055-0.061) atom ratios in individual particles from both sites obtained by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) show that the particles contain highly enriched U and weapon-grade Pu. Furthermore, results from electron microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) and synchrotron radiation (SR) based micrometer-scale X-ray fluorescence ({micro}-XRF) 2D mapping demonstrated that U and Pu coexist throughout the 1-50 {micro}m sized particles, while surface heterogeneities were observed in EDX line scans. SR-based micrometer-scale X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure Spectroscopy ({micro}-XANES) showed that the particles consisted of an oxide mixture of U (predominately UO[2] with the presence ofU[3][8]) and Pu ((III)/(IV), (V)/(V) or (III), (IV) and (V)). Neither metallic U or Pu nor uranyl or Pu(VI) could be observed. Characteristics such as elemental distributions, morphology and oxidation states are remarkably similar for the Palomares and Thule particles, reflecting that they originate from similar source and release scenarios. Thus, these particle characteristics are more dependent on the original material from which the particles are derived (source) and the formation of particles (release scenario) than the environmental conditions to which the particles have been exposed since the late 1960s.

Lind, O.C.; Salbu, B.; Janssens, K.; Proost, K.; Garcia-Leon, M.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.

2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

451

Effects of buoyancy on lean premixed v-flames, Part II. VelocityStatistics in Normal and Microgravity  

SciTech Connect

The field effects of buoyancy on laminar and turbulent premixed v-flames have been studied by the use of laser Doppler velocimetry to measure the velocity statistics in +1g, -1g and {micro}g flames. The experimental conditions covered mean velocity, Uo, of 0.4 to 2 m/s, methane/air equivalence ratio, f, of 0.62 to 0.75. The Reynolds numbers, from 625 to 3130 and the Richardson number from 0.05 to 1.34. The results show that a change from favorable (+1g) to unfavorable (-1g) mean pressure gradient in the plume create stagnating flows in the far field whose influences on the mean and fluctuating velocities persist in the near field even at the highest Re we have investigated. The use of Richardson number < 0.1 as a criterion for momentum dominance is not sufficient to prescribe an upper limit for these buoyancy effects. In {micro}g, the flows within the plumes are non-accelerating and parallel. Therefore, velocity gradients and hence mean strain rates in the plumes of laboratory flames are direct consequences of buoyancy. Furthermore, the rms fluctuations in the plumes of {micro}g flames are lower and more isotropic than in the laboratory flames to show that the unstable plumes in laboratory flames also induce velocity fluctuations. The phenomena influenced by buoyancy i.e. degree of flame wrinkling, flow acceleration, flow distribution, and turbulence production, can be subtle due to their close coupling with other flame flow interaction processes. But they cannot be ignored in fundamental studies or else the conclusions and insights would be ambiguous and not very meaningful.

Cheng, R.K.; Bedat, B.; Yegian, D.T.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

MS/MS Libraries of Identified Peptides and Recurring Spectra ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Three Classes of Libraries. I. Conventional Target Identification. Peptides (Proteins). II. Identifiable. By unconventional searching. III. Not Identifiable. ...

2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

453

NIST MS/MS Database and Search Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Precursor Types: [M+H] +; [M+2H] 2+; [MH] -; [M+Na] +; [M+NH4] +; [Cat] +; [An] -; [p-H2O]; [p-NH3]; etc. Database Contents: 6,999, Compounds. ...

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

454

MS_Oil_Studyguide.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LOOKING DOWN AN OIL WELL LOOKING DOWN AN OIL WELL Ever wonder what oil looks like underground, down deep, hundreds or thousands of feet below the surface, buried under millions of tons of rock and dirt? If you could look down an oil well and see oil where nature created it, you might be surprised. You wouldn't see a big underground lake, as a lot of people think. Oil doesn't exist in deep, black pools. In fact, an underground oil formation-called an "oil reservoir" -looks very much like any other rock formation. It looks a lot like...well, rock. Oil exists underground as tiny droplets trapped inside the open spaces, called "pores," inside rocks. Th e "pores" and the oil droplets can be seen only through a microscope. Th e droplets cling to the rock, like drops of water cling

455

MS_Coal_Studyguide.indd  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COAL-OUR MOST ABUNDANT FUEL COAL-OUR MOST ABUNDANT FUEL America has more coal than any other fossil fuel resource. Th e United States also has more coal reserves than any other single country in the world. In fact, 1/4 of all the known coal in the world is in the United States. Th e United States has more energy in coal that can be mined than the rest of the world has in oil that can be pumped from the ground. Currently, coal is mined in 25 of the 50 states. Coal is used primarily in the United States to generate electricity. In fact, it is burned in power plants to produce nearly half of the electricity we use. A stove uses about half a ton of coal a year. A water heater uses about two tons of coal a year. And a refrigerator, that's another half-ton a year. Even though you

456

MS_07_Number_14.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3: 4: Mergedsounding Primer What is Mergedsounding? Mergedsounding provides a continuous thermodynamic profile of the lower atmosphere. It uses data from ARM sources (sondes,...

457

ARM - Datastreams - irt200ms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Australia ARM Mobile Facility GRW M1 Browse Data Graciosa Island, Azores, Portugal OLI M1 Browse Data Oliktok Point, Alaska PVC M1 Browse Data Highland Center, Cape Cod MA; AMF 1...

458

Dear Ms. LaWare:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We are pleased to inform you that Vermont's September 11,2006, employer sponsored insurance (ESI)/Catamount Health Program amendment application, has been approved. Under this approval, Vermont has the authority to provide premium assistance for adults with income up to 200 percent of the Federal poverty level (FPL). The Global Commitment continues as project number 11-W-0019411 for a period of 5 years, beginning October I, 2005, through September 30, 20 I O. This approval is under the authority of section 1115(a) of the Social Security Act. Using a multi-disciplinary approach including the basic principles of public health, the fundamentals of effective administration of a Medicaid managed care delivery system, and flexibility under this demonstration, Vermont will continue to demonstrate its ability to promote universal access to health care, cost containment, and improved quality of care. Vermont will be required to conduct an evaluation of the impact of the demonstration program during the S-year period. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is granting Vermont the authority to cover all adults with income up to 200 percent of the FPL, either through access to the current

Ms. Cynthia; D. Laware

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

3D Lya radiation transfer. II. Fitting the Lyman break galaxy MS 1512-cB58 and implications for Lya emission in high-z starbursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using our 3D Lya radiation transfer code, we compute the radiation transfer of Lya and UV continuum photons including dust. Observational constraints on the neutral gas (column density, kinematics, etc.) are taken from other analysis of this object. RESULTS: The observed Lya profile of MS 1512--cB58 is reproduced for the first time taking radiation transfer and all observational constraints into account. The observed absorption profile is found to result naturally from the observed amount of dust and the relatively high HI column density. Radiation transfer effects and suppresion by dust transform a strong intrinsic Lya emission with EW(Lya)>~ 60 Ang into the observed faint superposed Lya emission peak. We propose that the vast majority of LBGs have intrinsically EW(Lya)~60-80 Ang or larger, and that the main physical parameter responsible for the observed variety of Lya strengths and profiles in LBGs is N_H and the accompanying variation of the dust content. Observed EW(Lya) distributions, Lya luminosity functions, and related quantities must therefore be corrected for radiation transfer and dust effects. The implications from our scenario on the duty-cycle of Lya emitters are also discussed.

Daniel Schaerer; Anne Verhamme

2008-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

460

LONG-TERM OPTICAL OBSERVATIONS OF TWO LMXBs: UW CrB (=MS 1603+260) AND V1408 Aql (=4U 1957+115)  

SciTech Connect

We present new optical photometry of two low-mass X-ray binary stars, UW CrB (MS 1603+260) and V1408 Aql (4U 1957+115). UW CrB is an eclipsing binary and we refine its eclipse ephemeris and measure an upper limit to the rate of change of its orbital period, | P-dot | < 4.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} (unitless). The light curve of UW CrB shows optical counterparts of type I X-ray bursts. We tabulate the times, orbital phases, and fluences of 33 bursts and show that the optical flux in the bursts comes primarily from the accretion disk, not from the secondary star. The new observations are consistent with a model in which the accretion disk in UW CrB is asymmetric and precesses in the prograde direction with a period of {approx}5.5 days. The light curve of V1408 Aql has a low-amplitude modulation at its 9.33 hr orbital period. The modulation remained a nearly pure sine curve in the new data as it was in 1984 and 2008, but its mean amplitude was lower, 18% against 23% in the earlier data. A model in which the orbital modulation is caused by the varying aspect of the heated face of the secondary star continues to give an excellent fit to the light curve. We derive a much improved orbital ephemeris for the system.

Mason, Paul A. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Robinson, Edward L.; Bayless, Amanda J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Hakala, Pasi J. [Finnish Centre for Astronomy with ESO, Vaeisaelaentie 20, FIN-21500 Piikkioe, University of Turku (Finland)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Deconstruction of Activity-Dependent Covalent Modification of Heme in Human Neutrophil Myeloperoxidase by Multistage Mass Spectrometry (MS[superscript 4])  

SciTech Connect

Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is known to be inactivated and covalently modified by treatment with hydrogen peroxide and agents similar to 3-(2-ethoxypropyl)-2-thioxo-2,3-dihydro-1H-purin-6(9H)-one (1), a 254.08 Da derivative of 2-thioxanthine. Peptide mapping by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry detected modification by 1 in a labile peptide-heme-peptide fragment of the enzyme, accompanied by a mass increase of 252.08 Da. The loss of two hydrogen atoms was consistent with mechanism-based oxidative coupling. Multistage mass spectrometry (MS{sup 4}) of the modified fragment in an ion trap/Orbitrap spectrometer demonstrated that 1 was coupled directly to heme. Use of a 10 amu window delivered the full isotopic envelope of each precursor ion to collision-induced dissociation, preserving definitive isotopic profiles for iron-containing fragments through successive steps of multistage mass spectrometry. Iron isotope signatures and accurate mass measurements supported the structural assignments. Crystallographic analysis confirmed linkage between the methyl substituent of the heme pyrrole D ring and the sulfur atom of 1. The final orientation of 1 perpendicular to the plane of the heme ring suggested a mechanism consisting of two consecutive one-electron oxidations of 1 by MPO. Multistage mass spectrometry using stage-specific collision energies permits stepwise deconstruction of modifications of heme enzymes containing covalent links between the heme group and the polypeptide chain.

Geoghegan, Kieran F.; Varghese, Alison H.; Feng, Xidong; Bessire, Andrew J.; Conboy, James J.; Ruggeri, Roger B.; Ahn, Kay; Spath, Samantha N.; Filippov, Sergey V.; Conrad, Steven J.; Carpino, Philip A.; Guimarăes, Cristiano R.W.; Vajdos, Felix F. (Pfizer)

2013-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

462

Identification of volatile butyl rubber thermal-oxidative degradation products by cryofocusing gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (cryo-GC/MS).  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical structure and physical properties of materials, such as polymers, can be altered as aging progresses, which may result in a material that is ineffective for its envisioned intent. Butyl rubber formulations, starting material, and additives were aged under thermal-oxidative conditions for up to 413 total days at up to 124 %C2%B0C. Samples included: two formulations developed at Kansas City Plant (KCP) (%236 and %2310), one commercially available formulation (%2321), Laxness bromobutyl 2030 starting material, and two additives (polyethylene AC-617 and Vanax MBM). The low-molecular weight volatile thermal-oxidative degradation products that collected in the headspace over the samples were preconcentrated, separated, and detected using cryofocusing gas chromatography mass spectrometry (cryo-GC/MS). The majority of identified degradation species were alkanes, alkenes, alcohols, ketones, and aldehydes. Observations for Butyl %2310 aged in an oxygen-18 enriched atmosphere (18O2) were used to verify when the source of oxygen in the applicable degradation products was from the gaseous environment rather than the polymeric mixture. For comparison purposes, Butyl %2310 was also aged under non-oxidative thermal conditions using an argon atmosphere.

Smith, Jonell Nicole; White, Michael Irvin; Bernstein, Robert; Hochrein, James Michael

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Quick-scanning x-ray absorption spectroscopy system with a servo-motor-driven channel-cut monochromator with a temporal resolution of 10 ms  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a quick-scanning x-ray absorption fine structure (QXAFS) system and installed it at the recently constructed synchrotron radiation beamline BL33XU at the SPring-8. Rapid acquisition of high-quality QXAFS data was realized by combining a servo-motor-driven Si channel-cut monochromator with a tapered undulator. Two tandemly aligned monochromators with channel-cut Si(111) and Si(220) crystals covered energy ranges of 4.0-28.2 keV and 6.6-46.0 keV, respectively. The system allows the users to adjust instantly the energy ranges of scans, the starting angles of oscillations, and the frequencies. The channel-cut crystals are cooled with liquid nitrogen to enable them to withstand the high heat load from the undulator radiation. Deformation of the reflecting planes is reduced by clamping each crystal with two cooling blocks. Performance tests at the Cu K-edge demonstrated sufficiently high data quality for x-ray absorption near-edge structure and extended x-ray absorption fine-structure analyses with temporal resolutions of up to 10 and 25 ms, respectively.

Nonaka, T.; Dohmae, K.; Araki, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Hirose, Y. [Toyota Central R and D Labs., Inc., Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Uruga, T.; Yamazaki, H.; Tanida, H.; Goto, S. [JASRI/Spring-8, 1-1-1, Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Mochizuki, T. [JASRI/Spring-8, 1-1-1, Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Toyama Corp., Zama, Kanagawa 228-0003 (Japan)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

464

A Radiation-Hard Dual Channel 4-bit Pipeline for a 12-bit 40 MS/s ADC Prototype with extended Dynamic Range for the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter Readout Electronics Upgrade at the CERN LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design of a radiation-hard dual channel 12-bit 40 MS/s pipeline ADC with extended dynamic range is presented, for use in the readout electronics upgrade for the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The design consists of two pipeline A/D channels with four Multiplying Digital-to-Analog Converters with nominal 12-bit resolution each. The design, fabricated in the IBM 130 nm CMOS process, shows a performance of 68 dB SNDR at 18 MHz for a single channel at 40 MS/s while consuming 55 mW/channel from a 2.5 V supply, and exhibits no performance degradation after irradiation. Various gain selection algorithms to achieve the extended dynamic range are implemented and tested.

Kuppambatti, Jayanth; Andeen, Timothy; Kinget, Peter; Brooijmans, Gustaaf

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

A Radiation-Hard Dual Channel 4-bit Pipeline for a 12-bit 40 MS/s ADC Prototype with extended Dynamic Range for the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter Readout Electronics Upgrade at the CERN LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design of a radiation-hard dual channel 12-bit 40 MS/s pipeline ADC with extended dynamic range is presented, for use in the readout electronics upgrade for the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The design consists of two pipeline A/D channels with four Multiplying Digital-to-Analog Converters with nominal 12-bit resolution each. The design, fabricated in the IBM 130 nm CMOS process, shows a performance of 68 dB SNDR at 18 MHz for a single channel at 40 MS/s while consuming 55 mW/channel from a 2.5 V supply, and exhibits no performance degradation after irradiation. Various gain selection algorithms to achieve the extended dynamic range are implemented and tested.

Jayanth Kuppambatti; Jaroslav Ban; Timothy Andeen; Peter Kinget; Gustaaf Brooijmans

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

466

Bulk and surface controlled diffusion of fission gas atoms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fission gas retention and release impact nuclear fuel performance by, e.g., causing fuel swelling leading to mechanical interaction with the clad, increasing the plenum pressure and reducing the gap thermal conductivity. All of these processes are important to understand in order to optimize operating conditions of nuclear reactors and to simulate accident scenarios. Most fission gases have low solubility in the fuel matrix, which is especially pronounced for large fission gas atoms such as Xe and Kr, and as a result there is a significant driving force for segregation of gas atoms to extended defects such as grain boundaries or dislocations and subsequently for nucleation of gas bubbles at these sinks. Several empirical or semi-empirical models have been developed for fission gas release in nuclear fuels, e.g. [1-6]. One of the most commonly used models in fuel performance codes was published by Massih and Forsberg [3,4,6]. This model is similar to the early Booth model [1] in that it applies an equivalent sphere to separate bulk UO{sub 2} from grain boundaries represented by the sphere circumference. Compared to the Booth model, it also captures trapping at grain boundaries, fission gas resolution and it describes release from the boundary by applying timedependent boundary conditions to the circumference. In this work we focus on the step where fission gas atoms diffuse from the grain interior to the grain boundaries. The original Massih-Forsberg model describes this process by applying an effective diffusivity divided into three temperature regimes. In this report we present results from density functional theory calculations (DFT) that are relevant for the high (D{sub 3}) and intermediate (D{sub 2}) temperature diffusivities of fission gases. The results are validated by making a quantitative comparison to Turnbull's [8-10] and Matzke's data [12]. For the intrinsic or high temperature regime we report activation energies for both Xe and Kr diffusion in UO{sub 2{+-}x}, which compare favorably to available experiments. This is an extension of previous work [13]. In particular, it applies improved chemistry models for the UO{sub 2{+-}x} nonstoichiometry and its impact on the fission gas activation energies. The derivation of these models follows the approach that used in our recent study of uranium vacancy diffusion in UO{sub 2} [14]. Also, based on the calculated DFT data we analyze vacancy enhanced diffusion mechanisms in the intermediate temperature regime. In addition to vacancy enhanced diffusion we investigate species transport on the (111) UO{sub 2} surface. This is motivated by the formation of small voids partially filled with fission gas atoms (bubbles) in UO{sub 2} under irradiation, for which surface diffusion could be the rate-limiting transport step. Diffusion of such bubbles constitutes an alternative mechanism for mass transport in these materials.

Andersson, Anders D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

467

Validation of the WATEQ4 geochemical model for uranium  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Geochemical Modeling and Nuclide/Rock/Groundwater Interactions Studies Program, a study was conducted to partially validate the WATEQ4 aqueous speciation-solubility geochemical model for uranium. The solubility controls determined with the WATEQ4 geochemical model were in excellent agreement with those laboratory studies in which the solids schoepite (UO/sub 2/(OH)/sub 2/ . H/sub 2/O), UO/sub 2/(OH)/sub 2/, and rutherfordine ((UO/sub 2/CO/sub 3/) were identified as actual solubility controls for uranium. The results of modeling solution analyses from laboratory studies of uranyl phosphate solids, however, identified possible errors in the characterization of solids in the original solubility experiments. As part of this study, significant deficiencies in the WATEQ4 thermodynamic data base for uranium solutes and solids were corrected. Revisions included recalculation of selected uranium reactions. Additionally, thermodynamic data for the hydroxyl complexes of U(VI), including anionic (VI) species, were evaluated (to the extent permitted by the available data). Vanadium reactions were also added to the thermodynamic data base because uranium-vanadium solids can exist in natural ground-water systems. This study is only a partial validation of the WATEQ4 geochemical model because the available laboratory solubility studies do not cover the range of solid phases, alkaline pH values, and concentrations of inorganic complexing ligands needed to evaluate the potential solubility of uranium in ground waters associated with various proposed nuclear waste repositories. Further validation of this or other geochemical models for uranium will require careful determinations of uraninite solubility over the pH range of 7 to 10 under highly reducing conditions and of uranyl hydroxide and phosphate solubilities over the pH range of 7 to 10 under oxygenated conditions.

Krupka, K.M.; Jenne, E.A.; Deutsch, W.J.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

The Affect of the Hydrogen to Heavy Metal Ratio (H/HM) on Reactivity and Discharge Isotopics of Homogeneous Thoria-Urania Fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Calculations were performed using MOCUP, which includes the use of MCNP for neutron transport and ORIGEN for depletion. The MOCUP calculations were done using a unit cell (pin cell) model, where the ThO2 varied from 65-75wt% and the UO2 varied from 25-35wt%. The fission products and actinides being tracked in the calculations account for >97% of the parasitic captures in the fuel. The fuel pin was surrounded by four reflecting planes, where typical parameters were used for a 17x17 PWR assembly. The hydrogen to heavy metal ratio (H/HM) was varied by increasing or decreasing the water density in the cell. The results show that the drier lattices have insufficient reactivity due to the limited enrichment of the uranium. However, a slightly wetter lattice will increase the reactivity-limited burnup by 26% for the 25% UO2 – 75% ThO2, and 19% for the 35% UO2 – 65% ThO2 as compared to the standard coolant density. This is appears to be consistent with similar studies done with all-uranium lattices, where advantages are gained by hardening or further softening the neutron spectrum. Although some advantage is gained by softening the spectrum, the same can be said of all-uranium fueled cores. The spectral changes and, to a lesser extent, competing resonances between the 238U and bred-in 233U appear to hamper advantages in the conversion of thorium in homogeneous fuel that might otherwise be gained by shifting the neutron spectrum. Physically separating the uranium and thorium (e.g., in micro-heterogeneous and seed-and-blanket arrangements) have been shown alleviate this problem. A change in moderation may further enhance the reactivity-limited burnup of these lattices, and will be the focus of future work.

Weaver, Kevan Dean; Herring, James Stephen

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

A Multi-Modular Neutronically Coupled Power Generation System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The High Temperature Integrated Multi-Modular Thermal Reactor is a small modular reactor that uses an enhanced conductivity BeO-UO2 fuel with supercritical CO2 coolant to drive turbo-machinery in a direct Brayton cycle. The core consists of several self-contained pressurized modules, each containing fuel elements in pressurized channels surrounded by a graphite moderator, and Brayton cycle turbo-machinery. Each module is subcritical by itself, and when several modules are brought into proximity of one another, a single critical core is formed. The multi-modular approach and use of BeO-UO2 fuel with graphite moderator and supercritical CO2 coolant leads to an inherently safe system capable of high efficiency operation. The pressure channel design and multi-modular approach eliminates engineering challenges associated with large pressure vessels. The subcriticality of the modules ensures inherent safety during construction, transportation, and after decommissioning. Serpent, a continuous-energy Monte-Carlo reactor physics burnup calculation code, was used to develop a critical configuration of the subcritical modules using UO2 fuel enriched with 5 wt% 235U with a 5 wt% BeO additive. The core lifetime was found to be 14.6 years operating at 10 MWth, though the U enrichment and power can be altered to achieve desired core lifetimes. Negative fuel and moderator temperature coefficients of reactivity were found that could maintain safety during operation. The multi-modular design was found to be beneficial compared to a core with all fuel elements in one module. Batch battery type refueling was found to be beneficial and the feasibility of controlling the reactor was demonstrated through the use of control shells that surround each module. The HT-IMMTR design is an inherently safe, highly efficient, economically competitive, and most important, feasible reactor design that takes advantage of proven technologies to facilitate the demonstration of a successful commercial deployment.

Patel, Vishal

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Towards the reanalysis of void coefficients measurements at proteus for high conversion light water reactor lattices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High Conversion Light Water Reactors (HCLWR) allows a better usage of fuel resources thanks to a higher breeding ratio than standard LWR. Their uses together with the current fleet of LWR constitute a fuel cycle thoroughly studied in Japan and the US today. However, one of the issues related to HCLWR is their void reactivity coefficient (VRC), which can be positive. Accurate predictions of void reactivity coefficient in HCLWR conditions and their comparisons with representative experiments are therefore required. In this paper an inter comparison of modern codes and cross-section libraries is performed for a former Benchmark on Void Reactivity Effect in PWRs conducted by the OECD/NEA. It shows an overview of the k-inf values and their associated VRC obtained for infinite lattice calculations with UO{sub 2} and highly enriched MOX fuel cells. The codes MCNPX2.5, TRIPOLI4.4 and CASMO-5 in conjunction with the libraries ENDF/B-VI.8, -VII.0, JEF-2.2 and JEFF-3.1 are used. A non-negligible spread of results for voided conditions is found for the high content MOX fuel. The spread of eigenvalues for the moderated and voided UO{sub 2} fuel are about 200 pcm and 700 pcm, respectively. The standard deviation for the VRCs for the UO{sub 2} fuel is about 0.7% while the one for the MOX fuel is about 13%. This work shows that an appropriate treatment of the unresolved resonance energy range is an important issue for the accurate determination of the void reactivity effect for HCLWR. A comparison to experimental results is needed to resolve the presented discrepancies. (authors)

Hursin, M.; Koeberl, O.; Perret, G. [Paul Scherrer Institut PSI, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Energy Frontier Research Center, Center for Materials Science of Nuclear Fuels  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, has funded the INL as one of the Energy Frontier Research Centers in the area of material science of nuclear fuels. This document is the required annual report to the Office of Science that outlines the accomplishments for the period of May 2010 through April 2011. The aim of the Center for Material Science of Nuclear Fuels (CMSNF) is to establish the foundation for predictive understanding of the effects of irradiation-induced defects on thermal transport in oxide nuclear fuels. The science driver of the center’s investigation is to understand how complex defect and microstructures affect phonon mediated thermal transport in UO2, and achieve this understanding for the particular case of irradiation-induced defects and microstructures. The center’s research thus includes modeling and measurement of thermal transport in oxide fuels with different levels of impurities, lattice disorder and irradiation-induced microstructure, as well as theoretical and experimental investigation of the evolution of disorder, stoichiometry and microstructure in nuclear fuel under irradiation. With the premise that thermal transport in irradiated UO2 is a phonon-mediated energy transport process in a crystalline material with defects and microstructure, a step-by-step approach will be utilized to understand the effects of types of defects and microstructures on the collective phonon dynamics in irradiated UO2. Our efforts under the thermal transport thrust involved both measurement of diffusive phonon transport (an approach that integrates over the entire phonon spectrum) and spectroscopic measurements of phonon attenuation/lifetime and phonon dispersion. Our distinct experimental efforts dovetail with our modeling effort involving atomistic simulation of phonon transport and prediction of lattice thermal conductivity using the Boltzmann transport framework.

Todd R. Allen, Director

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z