Sample records for ms nm tx

  1. EIS-0412: TX Energy, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility Near...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2: TX Energy, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility Near Beaumont, TX EIS-0412: TX Energy, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility Near Beaumont, TX February 18, 2009 EIS-0412:...

  2. Mxico Social, nm. 24, julio 2012, Mxico, CEIDAS, pp. 17 19. URL: http://issuu.com/mexico_social/docs/ms_julio2012/3?mode=window

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Islas, León

    elegido el camino del extractivismo por encima o en contra del bienestar social y ambiental en generalMéxico Social, núm. 24, julio 2012, México, CEIDAS, pp. 17 ­ 19. URL: http://issuu.com/mexico_social/docs/ms_julio2012/3?mode=window visitado el día 6 FEB 2013. 1 Una Nueva Política Social para los Pueblos Indígenas

  3. Table 1 -ESTIMATED REDUCTION IN 1985 COTTON YIELDS RESULTING FROM INSECTDAMAGE TOTAL YIELD 13,622 bales INSECTS Loss in AL AZ AR CA FL GA LA MS MO NM NC OK SC TN TX VA No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, David

    Average cost for all states nTotal yield for all states o Total acres for all states *Does not include BWE cost

  4. US WSC TX Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalThe Outlook269,023Year69,023USWNC MO SiteWSC TX

  5. LADY BIRD JOHNSON MIDDLE SCHOOL IRVING, TX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;#12;#12;LADY BIRD JOHNSON MIDDLE SCHOOL IRVING, TX 2012 CAUDILL AWARD WINNER The 1st NET ZERO public school in Texas The 1st NET ZERO middle school in the United States The LARGEST NET ZERO school displays building performance and NET ZERO efficiency. #12;LADY BIRD JOHNSON MIDDLE SCHOOL IRVING, TX

  6. TX-100 manufacturing final project report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashwill, Thomas D.; Berry, Derek S. (TPI Composites, Inc., Warren, RI)

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the work completed under the TX-100 blade manufacturing portion of the Carbon-Hybrid Blade Developments: Standard and Twist-Coupled Prototype project. The TX-100 blade is a 9 meter prototype blade designed with bend-twist coupling to augment the mitigation of peak loads during normal turbine operation. This structural coupling was achieved by locating off axis carbon fiber in the outboard portion of the blade skins. The report will present the tooling selection, blade production, blade instrumentation, blade shipping and adapter plate design and fabrication. The baseline blade used for this project was the ERS-100 (Revision D) wind turbine blade. The molds used for the production of the TX-100 were originally built for the production of the CX-100 blade. The same high pressure and low pressure skin molds were used to manufacture the TX-100 skins. In order to compensate for the difference in skin thickness between the CX-100 and the TX-100, however, a new TX-100 shear web plug and mold were required. Both the blade assembly fixture and the root stud insertion fixture used for the CX-100 blades could be utilized for the TX-100 blades. A production run of seven TX-100 prototype blades was undertaken at TPI Composites during the month of October, 2004. Of those seven blades, four were instrumented with strain gauges before final assembly. After production at the TPI Composites facility in Rhode Island, the blades were shipped to various test sites: two blades to the National Wind Technology Center at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado, two blades to Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, New Mexico and three blades to the United States Department of Agriculture turbine field test facility in Bushland, Texas. An adapter plate was designed to allow the TX-100 blades to be installed on existing Micon 65/13M turbines at the USDA site. The conclusion of this program is the kick-off of the TX-100 blade testing at the three testing facilities.

  7. MS Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koppenaal, David W.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Denton, M Bonner B.; Sperline, Roger P.; Hieftje, Gary M.; Schilling, G. D.; Andrade, Francisco J.; Barnes IV., James H.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Good eyesight is often taken for granted, a situation that everyone appreciates once vision begins to fade with age. New eyeglasses or contact lenses are traditional ways to improve vision, but recent new technology, i.e. LASIK laser eye surgery, provides a new and exciting means for marked vision restoration and improvement. In mass spectrometry, detectors are the 'eyes' of the MS instrument. These 'eyes' have also been taken for granted. New detectors and new technologies are likewise needed to correct, improve, and extend ion detection and hence, our 'chemical vision'. The purpose of this report is to review and assess current MS detector technology and to provide a glimpse towards future detector technologies. It is hoped that the report will also serve to motivate interest, prompt ideas, and inspire new visions for ion detection research.

  8. CleanTX Foundation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin UrbanCity ofCityClean Economy Network JumpCleanCleanFUELCleanTX

  9. THE NOTRE DAME INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA -MASS SPECTROMETRY (ICP-MS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the PQII STE ICP-MS, Electrothermal Vaporization, and Laser Ablation units The report supercedes STE, LaserProbe (tuned to 266 nm, but with 532 nm and 1046 nm capabilities), CETAC Ultrasonic

  10. Agricultural Grassland, Soil and Water Research Laboratory, Temple, TX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agricultural Research Service Grassland, Soil and Water Research Laboratory, Temple, TX Monitoring, Modeling and Decision-Making Daren Harmel USDA-ARS, Temple, TX #12;Agricultural Research Service Grassland monitoring, modeling, and decision- making #12;Agricultural Research Service Grassland, Soil and Water

  11. Agricultural Grassland, Soil and Water Research Laboratory, Temple, TX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agricultural Research Service Grassland, Soil and Water Research Laboratory, Temple, TX Monitoring, Modeling and Decision-Making Daren Harmel USDA-ARS, Temple, TX Agricultural Research Service Grassland monitoring, modeling, and decision- making (if time and interest!!) Agricultural Research Service Grassland

  12. NCSEC'07 Plano, TX Risk-Based Quantifiable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Jeff

    NCSEC'07 Plano, TX Risk-Based Quantifiable Quality Improvement Jeff Tian (tian@engr.smu Risk · Quality for Customers/Users · Quality for Software Organizations March 30, 2007 Jeff Tian, SMU 2800 1536 1 883 737 5396 2583 45 37 9 March 30, 2007 Jeff Tian, SMU #12;NCSEC'07, Plano, TX Slide. 3

  13. Hanford Single Shell Tank Leak Causes and Locations - 241-TX Farm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girardot, C. L.; Harlow, D> G.

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This document identifies 241-TX Tank Farm (TX Farm) leak causes and locations for the 100 series leaking tanks (241-TX-107 and 241-TX-114) identified in RPP-RPT-50870, Rev. 0, Hanford 241-TX Farm Leak Inventory Assessment Report. This document satisfies the TX Farm portion of the target (T04) in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order milestone M-045-91F.

  14. austin tx usa: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    78712, USA b Bureau of Economic Geology, Jackson School of Geology, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78713, USA c Department of Mathematics Minkoff, Susan E. 50...

  15. txH2O: Volume 4, Number 2 (Complete)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Water Resources Institute

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Farmer Art Director AgriLife Communications & Marketing Danielle Supercinski Assistant Editor Texas Water Resources Institute Visit our web site at http://twri.tamu.edu for more information and to subscribe to tx H 2 O On the cover: The Rio Grande one... Texas Water Resources Institute Tammisha Farmer Art Director AgriLife Communications & Marketing Danielle Supercinski Assistant Editor Texas Water Resources Institute Visit our web site at http://twri.tamu.edu for more information and to subscribe to tx...

  16. txH2O: Volume 5, Number 2 (Complete)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Water Resources Institute

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supercinski Leslie Jordan Assistant Editors Texas Water Resources Institute Visit our Web site at http://twri.tamu.edu for more information and to subscribe to tx H2O On the cover: The Nueces River and Nueces Bay (pictured) is one of six priority... site at http://twri.tamu.edu for more information and to subscribe to tx H2O On the cover: The Nueces River and Nueces Bay (pictured) is one of six priority river basins for which a environmental flows regime will be established. Photo...

  17. txH20: Volume 7, Number 1 (Complete)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plains Underground Conservation District No. 1, is created. Dallas City Council passes a resolution limiting lawn watering. President Eisenhower declares 244 of the state?s 254 counties as drought disaster counties. Heavy, general rains begin... is funded in part by the U.S. Geological Survey and authorized by the Water Resources Research Act. To subscribe to txH2O or New Waves, TWRI?s monthly e-mail newsletter, visit twri.tamu.edu. Follow us on Twitter at Twitter.com/TxWRI. InsideNeal Wilkins...

  18. txH20: Volume 7, Number 3 (Complete)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - based soil moisture data for calibration/ validation of remote sensing platforms in Oklahoma. Editor?s note: The stories in this issue of txH2O are examples of each stage of the research process, beginning with applied research, which... scale. ?We cannot do this using only one technique, so we assimilate data from various platforms, such as ground-level measurements at the #25;nest scale and remote sensing measurements up to the watershed, Fall 2012 tx H2O 11 Left photo...

  19. RAPID/Roadmap/11-TX-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation TexasTexas) Redirecta < RAPID‎TX-aTX-c

  20. Benefits of Multiple TX Powers Robustness to Beacon Node Failure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yiling

    the partial failure of the infrastructure. Our system, called MoteTrack, is based on low-power radios coupledAccuracy Benefits of Multiple TX Powers Robustness to Beacon Node Failure Introduction to a wide range of applications. For some, the location tracking system must continue to operate despite

  1. at Texas Tech University 1717 Norfolk Ave. Lubbock, TX 79416

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yuanlin

    in the South Plains allowing us to provide the most comprehensive retirement choice in West Texas. Why waitat Texas Tech University #12;1717 Norfolk Ave. · Lubbock, TX 79416 806.281.6200 · carillonlubbock, Betty Jennings, Mary Vines and Fred Wagner THE OFFICIAL RETIREMENT COMMUNITY OF TEXAS TECH ATHLETICS

  2. HASE'07 Panel 4a Dallas, TX Achieving High Assurance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Jeff

    Jeff Tian (tian@engr.smu.edu) Southern Methodist University Dallas, Texas, USA Contents · HA Jeff Tian, SMU #12;HASE'07, Dallas, TX Slide. 2 Qualitative vs Quantification HA · Many aspects/subsystems. Performance: measurement/modeling. Analysis: statistical/other modeling Nov. 15, 2007 Jeff Tian, SMU #12;HASE

  3. Investigation of the metabolism of Substance-P at the blood-brain barrier using LC-MS/MS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappa, Arvind K.; Cooper, Joshua D.; Audus, Kenneth L.; Lunte, Susan M.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , the metabolism of SP was investigated using an in vitro model of the BBB and LC-MS/MS. Substance P metabolism was found to be non-saturable in the concentration range of 100 nM to 10 ?M, with approximately 70% of the peptide remaining intact after 5 hrs...

  4. April 11, 2001 Presentation at BRC, Temple, TX. Hydrological Applications of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    April 11, 2001 Presentation at BRC, Temple, TX. Hydrological Applications of LST Derived from AVHRR;April 11, 2001 Presentation at BRC, Temple, TX. Outline · Introduction · All about LST · Model Modeling · Drought Indices (KBDI, PDSI) · Conclusion #12;April 11, 2001 Presentation at BRC, Temple, TX

  5. (WPI-iCeMS) Pure Nano Drugs*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    (WPI-iCeMS) SN-38 50 nm * Pure Nano Drugs* SN-38 10 HepG2* JST (-STEP Permeation and Retention (EPR)* EPR 20100 nm SN-38 SN-38 * SN-38 * SN-38 20 SN-38 Pure Nano Drugs

  6. txH2O: Volume 6, Number 1 (Complete)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Water Resources Institute

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , watershed coordinator and Extension program specialist, coordinate specific projects in the Lower Rio Grande Valley and the Pecos River Basin, respectively. The institute has established many partnerships that, in addition to the colleges, units... Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Synergistic eradication Center?s First Project Tackles Invasive Plant at Treasured Lake txH2O | pg. 5 U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, NRCS, Cypress Valley Navigation District...

  7. txH20; Volume 6, Number 1 (Complete)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , watershed coordinator and Extension program specialist, coordinate specific projects in the Lower Rio Grande Valley and the Pecos River Basin, respectively. The institute has established many partnerships that, in addition to the colleges, units... Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Synergistic eradication Center?s First Project Tackles Invasive Plant at Treasured Lake txH2O | pg. 5 U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, NRCS, Cypress Valley Navigation District...

  8. txH2O: Volume 3, Number 2 (Complete) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Water Resources Institute

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    H 2 Otx Fall 2007 A Publication of the Texas Water Resources Institute Texas Water Resources Institute | Texas Agricultural Experiment Station | Texas Cooperative Extension ?? ?? ?? ?? ?? ?? ?? In This Issue: MANAGING BACTERIA POLLUTION IN TEXAS... Kari Miller Assistant Editors Texas Water Resources Institute Visit our Web site at http://twri.tamu.edu for more information and to subscribe to tx H 2 O On the cover: Low-temperature electron micrograph of a cluster of E. coli bacteria. Each...

  9. txH2O: Volume 4, Number 1 (Complete)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Water Resources Institute

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    developed about on-site conditions before a well was drilled and installed can be downloaded. ? U. S. Geological Survey?s Groundwater Data for the Nation program http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/gw A variety of groundwater data, including information... at NASA?s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, using data from three different Earth-observing satellite instruments. The presence of the Moon in this image is an artistic addition. Inside volume 4 number 1, Winter 2008 tx H 2 O...

  10. txH20: Volume 7, Number 2 (Complete)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rapid and more complete than in other places where we may have a history of not fertilizing appropriately,? Redmon said. ?#31;e moisture part of it looks pre#30;y good. How much of a crop was destroyed is site-to- site speci#28;c.? Hay production...Life Research, the Texas AgriLife Extension Service and the Texas A&M University College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. TWRI is funded in part by the U.S. Geological Survey and authorized by the Water Resources Research Act. To subscribe to txH2O or New...

  11. Staubli TX-90XL robot qualification at the LLIHE.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covert, Timothy Todd

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Light Initiated High Explosive (LIHE) Facility uses a robotic arm to spray explosive material onto test items for impulse tests. In 2007, the decision was made to replace the existing PUMA 760 robot with the Staubli TX-90XL. A qualification plan was developed and implemented to verify the safe operating conditions and failure modes of the new system. The robot satisfied the safety requirements established in the qualification plan. A performance issue described in this report remains unresolved at the time of this publication. The final readiness review concluded the qualification of this robot at the LIHE facility.

  12. txH2O: Volume 6, Number 2 (Complete) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Water Resources Institute

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    drop in the bucket? Texas scientists on the real effects of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill 7 I Developing solutions for sustainable living?the Urban Living Laboratory The world?s largest ?living laboratory? for research on green living 10 I... 26 I Controlling invasive weed Center begins studying giant salvinia-eating weevils 28 I TWRI Briefs 2 tx H2O Winter 2011 Story by Leslie Lee Texas scientists on the real e#31;ects of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill Environmental disaster...

  13. txH20: Volume 6, Number 2 (Complete) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    drop in the bucket? Texas scientists on the real effects of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill 7 I Developing solutions for sustainable living?the Urban Living Laboratory The world?s largest ?living laboratory? for research on green living 10 I... 26 I Controlling invasive weed Center begins studying giant salvinia-eating weevils 28 I TWRI Briefs 2 tx H2O Winter 2011 Story by Leslie Lee Texas scientists on the real e#31;ects of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill Environmental disaster...

  14. txH2O: Volume 9, Number 1 (Complete)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , was integral in establishing the start of the EARIP project and served as the former program coordinator for EARIP. 10 txH2O Summer 2014 Story by Danielle Kalisek El Paso Water Utilities uses an infiltration or spreading basin to recharge the Hueco... needs. In the 2012 state water plan, accessing new sources of ground- water is projected to provide more than 800,000 acre-feet of water annually by 2060. With the growing water needs in the state and the continuing drought, many are predicting...

  15. txH2O: Volume 4, Number 3 (Complete) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Water Resources Institute

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On the cover: The City of Kerrville stores excess water from the Guadalupe River in its Aquifer Storage and Recovery facility. Photo by Earl Nottingham, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. C. Allan Jones Message from the Director Working to Make Every...Life. TWRI is funded in part by the U.S. Geological Survey and authorized by the Water Resources Research Act. To subscribe to tx H2O or New Waves, TWRI?s monthly e-mail newsletter, visit http://twri.tamu.edu. 2 I Saving for dry days Aquifer storage...

  16. EIS-0412: TX Energy, LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility Near Beaumont,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised FindingDepartment of EnergyEnergyDepartment of Energy IntentTX

  17. RAPID/Roadmap/13-TX-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag Jump to:ID8/OrganizationTechProbSolutionsPublicQuanlightR3(2)3-AK-aNV-a <TX-a

  18. RAPID/Roadmap/5-TX-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, searche <caMT-aNV-bTX-a

  19. RAPID/Roadmap/1-TX-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation TexasTexas) Redirect pageNV-a <TX-a <

  20. RAPID/Roadmap/11-TX-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation TexasTexas) Redirecta < RAPID‎TX-a <

  1. RAPID/Roadmap/11-TX-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation TexasTexas) Redirecta < RAPID‎TX-a

  2. RAPID/Roadmap/12-TX-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation TexasTexas)ID-a < RAPID‎ |TX-a <

  3. RAPID/Roadmap/15-TX-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione < RAPID‎ | Roadmap JumpTX-a <

  4. RAPID/Roadmap/7-TX-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-k <TX-c <

  5. SCOPES'05 Dallas, TX, Sept., 2005 Risk-Based Quality Improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Jeff

    (tian@engr.smu.edu) Southern Methodist University Dallas, Texas, USA Contents · Quality, Reliability for ES Jeff Tian, SMU #12;SCOPES'05, Dallas, TX, Sept., 2005 Slide. 2 Quality, Reliability, and Risk 0. SE Panel: New SE Paradigms for ES Jeff Tian, SMU #12;SCOPES'05, Dallas, TX, Sept., 2005 Slide. 3 Risk

  6. CX-100 and TX-100 blade field tests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holman, Adam (USDA-Agriculture Research Service, Bushland, TX); Jones, Perry L.; Zayas, Jose R.

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of the DOE Low Wind Speed Turbine (LWST) program two of the three Micon 65/13M wind turbines at the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) center in Bushland, Texas will be used to test two sets of experimental blades, the CX-100 and TX-100. The blade aerodynamic and structural characterization, meteorological inflow and wind turbine structural response will be monitored with an array of 75 instruments: 33 to characterize the blades, 15 to characterize the inflow, and 27 to characterize the time-varying state of the turbine. For both tests, data will be sampled at a rate of 30 Hz using the ATLAS II (Accurate GPS Time-Linked Data Acquisition System) data acquisition system. The system features a time-synchronized continuous data stream and telemetered data from the turbine rotor. This paper documents the instruments and infrastructure that have been developed to monitor these blades, turbines and inflow.

  7. ICP-MS Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carman, April J.; Eiden, Gregory C.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a short document that explains the materials that will be transmitted to LLNL and DNN HQ regarding the ICP-MS Workshop held at PNNL June 17-19th. The goal of the information is to pass on to LLNL information regarding the planning and preparations for the Workshop at PNNL in preparation of the SIMS workshop at LLNL.

  8. Glass particles produced by laser ablation for ICP-MS measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, J.; Liu, C.; Wen, S.; Mao, X.; Russo, R.E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Glass particles produced by laser ablation for ICP-MS266nm) was used to generate glass particles from two sets ofWhen the current data on glass were compared with the metal

  9. Prof Dr Mr Mrs Ms Prof Dr Mr Mrs Ms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Jianliang

    Prof Dr Mr Mrs Ms Prof Dr Mr Mrs Ms Standard Room Request Payment Card No Expiry Date Contact or a 1-night applicable room charge will be levied as cancellation charge. * Daily rate will be subject

  10. Reservoir Fracture Mapping using Microearthquakes: Austin Chalk, Giddings Field, TX and 76 Field, Clinton Co., KY.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SPE 36651 Reservoir Fracture Mapping using Microearthquakes: Austin Chalk, Giddings Field, TX and enhanced recovery, production operations in fracture- dominated oil and gas reservoirs. Borehole geophones to study reservoir fracture systems. Methods currently applied to study fracture systems include tilt

  11. M.S. Physics Program M.S. in Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    M.S. Physics Program M.S. in Physics Department(s) Physics and Astronomy College Sciences 1 for later reference. 1. understanding of a variety of fields of physics at the graduate level 2. performance of a physics research project suitable for a masters thesis 3. ability to communicate scientific research

  12. METLIN: MS/MS metabolite data from the MAGGIE Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    METLIN is a metabolite database for metabolomics containing over 50,000 structures, it also represents a data management system designed to assist in a broad array of metabolite research and metabolite identification by providing public access to its repository of current and comprehensive MS/MS metabolite data. An annotated list of known metabolites and their mass, chemical formula, and structure are available on the METLIN website. Each metabolite is conveniently linked to outside resources such as the the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) for further reference and inquiry. MS/MS data is also available on many of the metabolites. The list is expanding continuously as more metabolite information is being deposited and discovered. [from http://metlin.scripps.edu/] Metlin is a component of the MAGGIE Project. MAGGIE is funded by the DOE Genomics: GTL and is an acronym for "Molecular Assemblies, Genes, and Genomics Integrated Efficiently."

  13. Stanford University Exploiting Channel Knowledge at the Tx in MISO and MIMO Wireless Exploiting Partial Channel Knowledge at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulraj, Arogyaswami

    Stanford University Exploiting Channel Knowledge at the Tx in MISO and MIMO Wireless Exploiting Partial Channel Knowledge at the Transmitter in MISO and MIMO Wireless SPAWC 2003 Rome, Italy June 18 Exploiting Channel Knowledge at the Tx in MISO and MIMO Wireless Outline Introduction · Perfect CSI

  14. Ms. Maria Galanti Site Coordinator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Office 2195 Front Street Logan, Ohio 43138 Dear Ms. Galanti: TRANSMITTAL OF Dl CONSTRUCTION COMPLETION REPORT FOR PHASES I AND II OF THE REMOVAL OF THE X-760 CHEMICAL...

  15. ACM SIGGRAPH 2002, San Antonio, TX Modeling the Accumulation of Wind-Driven Snow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, James F.

    ACM SIGGRAPH 2002, San Antonio, TX Modeling the Accumulation of Wind-Driven Snow Technical Sketch of snow drifts formed by the accumulation of wind-blown snow near buildings and other obstacles. Our method combines previous work on snow accumulation [Fearing] with techniques for incompressible fluid

  16. A Voltage Controlled Nano Addressing Circuit University of Texas, San Antonio TX 78249, USA,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Bao

    A Voltage Controlled Nano Addressing Circuit Bao Liu University of Texas, San Antonio TX 78249, USA, Abstract. A voltage controlled nano addressing circuit is proposed, which (1) improves yield and enables aggressive scaling with no require- ment of precise layout design, (2) achieves precision of addressing

  17. S/w Quality Assurance CAST-TX 1 Software Quality Assurance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Jeff

    (tian@engr.smu.edu) Southern Methodist University Dallas, Texas, USA Contents · Software Quality: Why Management Nov. 30, 2002 Prof. Jeff Tian, SMU #12;S/w Quality Assurance CAST-TX 2 Software Quality: Why/usage-based testing and relia- bility engineering measurement and risk management Nov. 30, 2002 Prof. Jeff Tian, SMU

  18. WIND ENERGY HOW MUCH AND WHAT PRICE? NSTA SAN ANTONIO, TX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collar, Juan I.

    WIND ENERGY ­ HOW MUCH AND WHAT PRICE? NSTA ­ SAN ANTONIO, TX Last Updated 04/14/13 DESCRIPTION this then extractable and transferable to the electrical grid. To understand how much power (energy per unit time household fan, the windmill's turbines will rotate. #12;Suggested questions or activities: 1. Does

  19. TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX TX OK OK OK OK OK OK OK OK OK LA LA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    areas. Movment within shaded areas may also be regulated. Updated January 9, 2002 Puerto Rico United States Department of Agriculture - Animal and Plant Health Inspection...

  20. Ms. Nancy Slach Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /Certificate, Orthodon- tics, 1948 UI Alumni Service Award Ms. Penni Ryan Alumni Relations and Con- tinuing Dental Education 2009 Regents Staff Excellence Award; President designate of the Association of Continuing Dental Education (2013). Dr. Jeffrey Murray Colleges of Medicine and Dentistry Research grant total: $1

  1. Assessment of Water Resources in A Humid Watershed and A Semi-arid Watershed; Neches River Basin, TX and Canadian River Basin, NM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heo, Joonghyeok

    2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Water is the most important resource on Earth. Climate and land cover changes are two important factors that directly influenced water resources. This research provides important information for water resources management and contributes...

  2. Lessons Learned from Continuous Commissioning of the Robert E. Johnson State Office Building, Austin, TX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bynum, J.; Claridge, D. E.

    2008-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    ESL-TR-08-08-03 Lessons Learned from Continuous Commissioning ® of the Robert E. Johnson State Office Building, Austin, TX Submitted to Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory By David Claridge, Ph.D., P.E. John Bynum Energy....5% annual lighting energy savings or 5.6% annual whole building energy savings based on a DOE-2 simulation analysis. Three main lessons were learned from the experience with the Robert E. Johnson building: • The traditional design...

  3. The environment of deposition of the Dalton Coal (Upper Pennsylvanian), Palo Pinto Co., TX.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowenstein, Glenn Robert

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alkane analysis for coal, overburden and underburden shales, and oil. 56 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Previous workers have classified coals by deter- mining whether they are al 1ochthnous (transported) or autochthonous (in situ) accumul ations (Oe...THE ENVIRONMENT OF DEPOSITION OF THE DALTON COAL (UPPER PENNSYI. VANIAN), PALO PINTO CO. , TX. A Thesis by GLENN ROBERT LOWENSTEIN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for tne...

  4. A 12b 50MS/s 2.1mW SAR ADC with redundancy and digital background calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Albert H.

    A 12-bit 50MS/s SAR ADC implemented in 65nm CMOS technology is presented. The design employs redundancy to relax the DAC settling requirement and to provide sufficient room for errors such that the static nonlinearity ...

  5. Fabrication of 10nm diameter carbon nanopores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radenovic, Aleksandra; Trepagnier, Eliane; Csencsits, Roseann; Downing, Kenneth H; Liphardt, Jan

    2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The addition of carbon to samples, during imaging, presents a barrier to accurate TEM analysis, the controlled deposition of hydrocarbons by a focused electron beam can be a useful technique for local nanometer-scale sculpting of material. Here we use hydrocarbon deposition to form nanopores from larger focused ion beam (FIB) holes in silicon nitride membranes. Using this method, we close 100-200nm diameter holes to diameters of 10nm and below, with deposition rates of 0.6nm per minute. I-V characteristics of electrolytic flow through these nanopores agree quantitatively with a one dimensional model at all examined salt concentrations.

  6. ARM - Instrument - ptr-ms

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006Datastreamstwrcam40mgovInstrumentsmwr3c Documentation MWR3CgovInstrumentspgsgovInstrumentsptr-ms

  7. LA-5097-MS INFORMAL REPORT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNewCF INDUSTRIES,L? .-I I2 m.m 2L5097-MS

  8. Geologic and geophysical investigation of a small water retention structure, Salado, Tx 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, James Lewis

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of a Small Earth Dam Caused by Piping Erosion Initiated by a Leak in Overflow Pipe, Bryan, TX. 4. Map Showing the Location of Roger's Pond . . 5 Structural Setting of the Balcones Fault Zone Along With the Divisions of the Edward's Aquifer 6 NNW... ? SSE Cross-Section of the Strata That Comprises the Water Table Portion of the Edwards Aquifer in Bell County. 12 7 Soils Map of Roger's Pond and Surrounding Area. 14 8 Observation Well Installed Below the Dam on the Downstremn Side. . . . . 9 Turf...

  9. File:03-TX-d - Lease of Public School Fund Land (1).pdf | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual1WAALandUsePlanning.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File FileInformation -TX-d -

  10. File:03-TX-e - Lease of Texas Parks & Wildlife Department Land (1).pdf |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual1WAALandUsePlanning.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File FileInformation -TX-d -Open

  11. File:03-TX-f - Lease of Land Trade Lands.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual1WAALandUsePlanning.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File FileInformation -TX-d

  12. The Efficacy of SEER as a Seasonal Performance Measure for Different Climates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, H. I.; Sachs, H. M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data Albuquerque-NM Amarillo-TX Austin-TX Boise-ID Brownsville-TX Columbia-SC Corpus_Christi-TX Elko-NV Fort_Smith-AR Grand_Junction-CO Jackson-MS Kansas_City-MO Little_Rock-AR Lubbock-TXLufkin-TX Memphis-TN Meridian-MS Miles..._City-MT Montgomery-AL Nashville-TN North_Platte-NE Norfolk-NE Pendleton-OR Pierre-SD Pocatello-ID Pueblo-CO Reno-NV Scottsbluff-NE Shreveport-LA Sioux_Falls-SD San_Antonio-TX Tonopah-NV Tucumcari-NM Victoria-TX 6 Tampa-Florida 40 60 80 100 120...

  13. Power and Performance of Native and Java Benchmarks on 130nm to 32nm Process Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Power and Performance of Native and Java Benchmarks on 130nm to 32nm Process Technologies Hadi with chip power reduc- tions. This paper examines how well process technology and mi- croarchitecture delivered on this assumption. This paper evalu- ates power and performance of native and Java workloads

  14. Tank 241-TX-118, core 236 analytical results for the final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ESCH, R.A.

    1998-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the analytical laboratory report for tank 241-TX-118 push mode core segments collected between April 1, 1998 and April 13, 1998. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank 241-TX-118 Push Mode Core sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) (Benar, 1997), the Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) (Dukelow, et al., 1995), the Data Quality Objective to Support Resolution of the Organic Complexant Safety Issue (Organic DQO) (Turner, et al, 1995) and the Historical Model Evaluation Data Requirements (Historical DQO) (Sipson, et al., 1995). The analytical results are included in the data summary table (Table 1). None of the samples submitted for Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) exceeded notification limits as stated in the TSAP (Benar, 1997). One sample exceeded the Total Alpha Activity (AT) analysis notification limit of 38.4{micro}Ci/g (based on a bulk density of 1.6), core 236 segment 1 lower half solids (S98T001524). Appropriate notifications were made. Plutonium 239/240 analysis was requested as a secondary analysis. The statistical results of the 95% confidence interval on the mean calculations are provided by the Tank Waste Remediation Systems Technical Basis Group in accordance with the Memorandum of Understanding (Schreiber, 1997) and are not considered in this report.

  15. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-TX-104

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FIELD, J.G.

    1999-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A major function of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) is to characterize waste in support of waste management and disposal activities at the Hanford Site. Analytical data from sampling and analysis and other available information about a tank are compiled and maintained in a tank characterization report (TCR). This report and its appendices serve as the TCR for single-shell tank 241-TX-104. The objectives of this report are (1) to use characterization data in response to technical issues associated with tank 241-TX-104 waste, and (2) to provide a standard characterization of this waste in terms of a best-basis inventory estimate. Section 2.0 summarizes the response to technical issues, Section 3.0 shows the best-basis inventory estimate, Section 4.0 makes recommendations about the safety status of the tank and additional sampling needs. The appendices contain supporting data and information. This report supports the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1997), Milestone M-44-15c, change request M-44-97-03 to ''issue characterization deliverables consistent with the Waste Information Requirements Document developed for FY 1999'' (Adams et al. 1998).

  16. Hydrocarbon-free resonance transition 795 nm rubidium laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Sheldon Shao Quan

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transition 795-nm rubidium laser," Opt. Lett. 32, 2423- S.transition 795- nm rubidium laser using 3 He buffer gas",transition 795-nm Rubidium laser with He buffer gas" (

  17. 2d-LC-MS/MS Method-ORNL Developed for Bacteriophage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Matthew B.

    mass spectrometry (2d-LC-MS/MS) method was optimized for bacteriophage by Kristen Corrier undergraduate should be. 4. The mass spectrometer is run in data dependent mode, specific settings should be optimized

  18. Justin Yates -Assistant Professor -Industrial and Systems Engineering -Texas A&M University 4079 ETB -College Station, TX, 77843-3131 -(O) 979-458-2337 -(E) jtyates@tamu.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boas, Harold P.

    ETB - College Station, TX, 77843-3131 - (O) 979-458-2337 - (E) jtyates@tamu.edu 1 Education: Ph - Texas A&M University 4079 ETB - College Station, TX, 77843-3131 - (O) 979-458-2337 - (E) jtyates

  19. EIS-0412: Federal Loan Guarantee to Support Construction of the TX Energy LLC, Industrial Gasification Facility near Beaumont, Texas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy is assessing the potential environmental impacts for its proposed action of issuing a Federal loan guarantee to TX Energy, LLC (TXE). TXE submitted an application to DOE under the Federal loan guarantee program pursuant to the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005) to support construction of the TXE industrial Gasification Facility near Beaumont, Texas.

  20. 28-nm laser damage testing of LIF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foltyn, S.R.; Newman, B.E.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have tested several samples of LIF, both single crystal and press forged, for damage resistance to 10-ns 248-nm pulses at 35 pps. The damage thresholds - the highest levels at which no damage could be produced - ranged from 4 to 6 J/cm/sup 2/ although some test sites survived irradiation at approx. 30 J/cm/sup 2/. We observed that bulk damage is the primary failure mechanism in single crystal and press forged samples and that both types exhibit the same resistance to laser damage.

  1. Analysis of Thiodiglycol: Validation of Semi-Volatile Analysis by HPLC-MS/MS by EPA Method MS777

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owens, J; Koester, C

    2008-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Region 5 Chicago Regional Laboratory (CRL) developed a method for the analysis of thiodiglycol, the breakdown product of the sulfur mustard HD, in water by high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS), titled Method EPA MS777 (hereafter referred to as EPA CRL SOP MS777). This draft standard operating procedure (SOP) was distributed to multiple EPA laboratories and to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, which was tasked to serve as a reference laboratory for EPA's Environmental Reference Laboratory Network (ERLN) and to develop and validate analytical procedures. The primary objective of this study was to verify the analytical procedures described in MS777 for analysis of thiodiglycol in aqueous samples. The gathered data from this study will be used to: (1) demonstrate analytical method performance; (2) generate quality control acceptance criteria; and (3) revise the SOP to provide a validated method that would be available for use during a homeland security event. The data contained in this report will be compiled, by EPA CRL, with data generated by other EPA Regional laboratories so that performance metrics of Method EPA MS777 can be determined.

  2. MS.BIOLOGY.THESIS ACADEMIC LEARNING PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Laughlin, Jay

    effectively to constructive feedback. Job Prospects for Biology Graduates MS in Biology Bioremediation Biotechnology Medical Research Industry Government Education Microbiology Health Professions Research Health Food Production Pollution Control Environmental Diagnostics Forestry Agriculture #12;APPENDIX B

  3. Energy Management Standards (EnMS)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Management Standards (EnMS) Paul Scheihing U.S. DOE January, 2009 2 Why an Energy Management Standard? Most energy efficiency in industry is achieved through changes in how energy...

  4. The novel hypoxic cytotoxin, TX-2098 has antitumor effect in pancreatic cancer; possible mechanism through inhibiting VEGF and hypoxia inducible factor-1{alpha} targeted gene expression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyake, Kotaro, E-mail: hif.panc@gmail.com [Department of Surgery, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan)] [Department of Surgery, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan); Nishioka, Masanori; Imura, Satoru; Batmunkh, Erdenebulgan [Department of Surgery, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan)] [Department of Surgery, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan); Uto, Yoshihiro [Department of Biological Science and Technology, Institute of Socio Technosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan)] [Department of Biological Science and Technology, Institute of Socio Technosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan); Nagasawa, Hideko [Laboratory of Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Chemistry, Gifu Pharmaceutical University, Gifu 501-1196 (Japan)] [Laboratory of Pharmaceutical and Medicinal Chemistry, Gifu Pharmaceutical University, Gifu 501-1196 (Japan); Hori, Hitoshi [Department of Biological Science and Technology, Institute of Socio Technosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan)] [Department of Biological Science and Technology, Institute of Socio Technosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan); Shimada, Mitsuo [Department of Surgery, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan)] [Department of Surgery, Institute of Health Biosciences, The University of Tokushima Graduate School, Tokushima 770-8503 (Japan)

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tumor hypoxia has been considered to be a potential therapeutic target, because hypoxia is a common feature of solid tumors and is associated with their malignant phenotype. In the present study, we investigated the antitumor effect of a novel hypoxic cytotoxin, 3-[2-hydroxyethyl(methyl)amino]-2-quinoxalinecarbonitrile 1,4-dioxide (TX-2098) in inhibiting the expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}), and consequently vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) expression in pancreatic cancer. The antitumor effects of TX-2098 under hypoxia were tested against various human pancreatic cancer cell lines using WST-8 assay. VEGF protein induced pancreatic cancer was determined on cell-free supernatant by ELISA. Moreover, nude mice bearing subcutaneously (s.c.) or orthotopically implanted human SUIT-2 were treated with TX-2098. Tumor volume, survival and expression of HIF-1 and associated molecules were evaluated in treatment versus control groups. In vitro, TX-2098 inhibited the proliferation of various pancreatic cancer cell lines. In s.c model, tumors from nude mice injected with pancreatic cancer cells and treated with TX-2098 showed significant reductions in volume (P < 0.01 versus control). Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that TX-2098 significantly inhibited mRNA expression of the HIF-1 associated molecules, VEGF, glucose transporter 1 and Aldolase A (P < 0.01 versus control). These treatments also prolong the survival in orthotopic models. These results suggest that the effect of TX-2098 in pancreatic cancer might be correlated with the expression of VEGF and HIF-1 targeted molecules. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We designed and synthesized novel hypoxic cytoxin, TX-2098. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TX-2098 inhibited the proliferation of human pancreatic cancer cells than TPZ. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TX-2098 reduced VEGF protein level than TPZ. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TX-2098 inhibited mRNA expression of VEGF, GLUT1 and Aldolase A, not HIF-1{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TX-2098 improved the survival in orthotopic SUIT-2 xenograft model.

  5. Laser Ablation-ICP-MS Analysis of Dissected Tissue: A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, William A.

    Laser Ablation-ICP-MS Analysis of Dissected Tissue: A Conservation-Minded Approach to Assessing the animal. In this paper, we report on the application of laser ablation-ICP-MS (LA- ICP-MS) for sampling

  6. Photodissociation of the Propargyl (C3D3) Radicals at 248 nm and 193 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neumark., D.M.; Crider, P.E.; Castiglioni, L.; Kautzman, K.K.

    2009-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The photodissociation of perdeuterated propargyl (D{sub 2}CCCD) and propynyl (D{sub 3}CCC) radicals was investigated using fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. Radicals were produced from their respective anions by photodetachment at 540 nm and 450 nm (below and above the electron affinity of propynyl). The radicals were then photodissociated by 248 nm or 193 nm light. The recoiling photofragments were detected in coincidence with a time- and position-sensitive detector. Three channels were observed: D{sub 2} loss, CD + C{sub 2}D{sub 2}, and CD{sub 3} + C{sub 2}. Obervation of the D loss channel was incompatible with this experiment and was not attempted. Our translational energy distributions for D{sub 2} loss peaked at nonzero translational energy, consistent with ground state dissociation over small (< 1 eV) exit barriers with respect to separated products. Translational energy distributions for the two heavy channels peaked near zero kinetic energy, indicating dissociation on the ground state in the absence of exit barriers.

  7. The Spectrum of Thorium from 250 nm to 5500 nm: Ritz Wavelengths and Optimized Energy Levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redman, Stephen L; Sansonetti, Craig J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have made precise observations of a thorium-argon hollow cathode lamp emission spectrum in the region between 350 nm and 1175 nm using a high-resolution Fourier transform spectrometer. Our measurements are combined with results from seven previously published thorium line lists (Giacchetti et al. 1974; Zalubas & Corliss 1974; Zalubas 1976; Palmer & Engleman 1983; Engleman et al. 2003; Lovis & Pepe 2007; Kerber et al. 2008) to re-optimize the energy levels of neutral, singly-, and doubly-ionized thorium (Th I, Th II, and Th III). Using the optimized level values, we calculate accurate Ritz wavelengths for 19679 thorium lines between 250 nm and 5500 nm (40000 1/cm to 1800 1/cm). We have also found 102 new thorium energy levels. A systematic analysis of previous measurements in light of our new results allows us to identify and propose corrections for systematic errors in Palmer & Engleman (1983) and typographical errors and incorrect classifications in Kerber et al. (2008). We also found a la...

  8. Sources of Technical Variability in Quantitative LC-MS Proteomics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sources of Technical Variability in Quantitative LC-MS Proteomics: Human Brain Tissue Sample Analysis. Sources of Technical Variability in Quantitative LC-MS Proteomics: Human...

  9. Electrospray Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS)-Based Shotgun Lipidomics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mezengie, Giorgis I.

    2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past decade, many new strategies for mass spectrometry (MS)-based analyses of lipids have been developed. Lipidomics is one of the most promising research fields to emerge as a result of these advances in MS. Currently, mass spectrometric analysis of lipids involves two complementary approaches: direct infusion (shotgun lipidomics) and liquid chromatography coupled to MS. In this chapter, I will demonstrate the approach of shotgun lipidomics using electrospray ionization tandem MS for the analysis of lipid molecular species directly from crude biological extracts of tissue or fluids.

  10. Analysis of Ethanolamines: Validation of Semi-Volatile Analysis by HPLC-MS/MS by EPA Method MS888

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owens, J; Vu, A; Koester, C

    2008-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Region 5 Chicago Regional Laboratory (CRL) developed a method titled 'Analysis of Diethanolamine, Triethanolamine, n-Methyldiethanolamine, and n-Ethyldiethanolamine in Water by Single Reaction Monitoring Liquid Chromatography/Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC/MS/MS): EPA Method MS888'. This draft standard operating procedure (SOP) was distributed to multiple EPA laboratories and to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, which was tasked to serve as a reference laboratory for EPA's Environmental Reference Laboratory Network (ERLN) and to develop and validate analytical procedures. The primary objective of this study was to validate and verify the analytical procedures described in 'EPA Method MS888' for analysis of the listed ethanolamines in aqueous samples. The gathered data from this validation study will be used to: (1) demonstrate analytical method performance; (2) generate quality control acceptance criteria; and (3) revise the SOP to provide a validated method that would be available for use during a homeland security event. The data contained in this report will be compiled, by EPA CRL, with data generated by other EPA Regional laboratories so that performance metrics of 'EPA Method MS888' can be determined.

  11. Analysis of Carbamate Pesticides: Validation of Semi-Volatile Analysis by HPLC-MS/MS by EPA Method MS666

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Owens, J; Koester, C

    2008-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Region 5 Chicago Regional Laboratory (CRL) developed a method for analysis of aldicarb, bromadiolone, carbofuran, oxamyl, and methomyl in water by high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS), titled Method EPA MS666. This draft standard operating procedure (SOP) was distributed to multiple EPA laboratories and to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, which was tasked to serve as a reference laboratory for EPA's Environmental Reference Laboratory Network (ERLN) and to develop and validate analytical procedures. The primary objective of this study was to validate and verify the analytical procedures described in MS666 for analysis of carbamate pesticides in aqueous samples. The gathered data from this validation study will be used to: (1) demonstrate analytical method performance; (2) generate quality control acceptance criteria; and (3) revise the SOP to provide a validated method that would be available for use during a homeland security event. The data contained in this report will be compiled, by EPA CRL, with data generated by other EPA Regional laboratories so that performance metrics of Method EPA MS666 can be determined.

  12. University of Texas Arlington Health Services Box 19329 605 S. West St. Arlington, TX 76019 T. 817.272.2771 F. 817.272.3829

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    Form 130D University of Texas Arlington Health Services Box 19329 605 S. West St. Arlington, TX, appropriate staff, and The University of Texas at Arlington and its officers, regents, and employees shall

  13. Guar Varieties and P Fertility at AGCARES, Lamesa, TX, 2001-2003 Calvin Trostle, Texas Cooperative Extension--Lubbock, c-trostle@tamu.edu, (806) 746-6101;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    . Justin Tuggle, CropDocs Consulting, Brownfield, TX, and it was seeded at a rate of ~5 lbs./A due and net return on variable costs: At $12.50-14.25/cwt. (contracted with West Texas Guar, Brownfield, TX, Brownfield) $14.25 $14.00 $12.50 Gross return $78.25 $122.50 $87.50 Variable costs of production $54.25 $56

  14. RAPID/Roadmap/8-NM-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-k <TX-caHI-aa

  15. RAPID/Roadmap/8-NM-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-k <TX-caHI-aac

  16. RAPID/Roadmap/8-NM-d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-k <TX-caHI-aacd

  17. RAPID/Roadmap/8-NM-f | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione <RAPID/Roadmap/7-FD-k <TX-caHI-aacdf

  18. LA-12968-MS The Unsaturated Hydraulic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LA-12968-MS The Unsaturated Hydraulic Characteristics of the BandelierTuff LosN A T I O N A L L A B technical correctness. #12;The Unsaturated Hydraulic Characteristics of the Bandelier Tuff David B. Rogers........................................................................................................4 Hydraulic Data Presentation

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - WAPA Transmission Developments in NM ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NM, CO, WY, KS, ND, UT, SD & ID Tasked with planning and financing of transmission lines within their respective states RETA has the additional requirement that 30% of...

  20. Generation and use of high power 213 nm and 266 nm laser radiation and tunable 210-400 nm laser radiation with BBO crystal matrix array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 213 nm laser beam is capable of single photon ablative photodecomposition for the removal of a polymer or biological material substrate. Breaking the molecular bonds and displacing the molecules away from the substrate in a very short time period results in most of the laser photon energy being carried away by the displaced molecules, thus minimizing thermal damage to the substrate. The incident laser beam may be unfocussed and is preferably produced by quintupling the 1064 nm radiation from a Nd:YAG solid state laser, i.e., at 213 nm. In one application, the 213 nm laser beam is expanded in cross section and directed through a plurality of small beta barium borate (BBO) crystals for increasing the energy per photon of the laser radiation directed onto the substrate. The BBO crystals are arranged in a crystal matrix array to provide a large laser beam transmission area capable of accommodating high energy laser radiation without damaging the BBO crystals. The BBO crystal matrix array may also be used with 266 nm laser radiation for carrying out single or multi photon ablative photodecomposition. The BBO crystal matrix array may also be used in an optical parametric oscillator mode to generate high power tunable laser radiation in the range of 210-400 nm.

  1. MS 211 -CALCULO NUMERICO -1o http://www.ime.unicamp.br/ ms211/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussner, Peter

    MS 211 - C´ALCULO NUM´ERICO - 1o SEM/2010 http://www.ime.unicamp.br/ ms211/ Turma Per Ruggiero e V´era Lucia da Rocha Lopes, C´alculo Num´erico - Aspectos Te´oricos e Computacionais, Pearson´etodos Num´ericos para as Engenharias e Ci^encias Aplicadas, Edi- tora da Unicamp, Campinas, segunda edi

  2. RF power potential of 45 nm CMOS technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Putnam, Christopher

    This paper presents the first measurements of the RF power performance of 45 nm CMOS devices with varying device widths and layouts. We find that 45 nm CMOS can deliver a peak output power density of around 140 mW/mm with ...

  3. New Materials for 157 nm Photoresists: Characterization and Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    . The current Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA) Roadmap indicates the 100 nm technology node will be reached by 2005; however, many semiconductor manufacturers foresee the need for a technology enabling 100 by 2005. Therefore, 157 nm lithography is viewed as a potential bridge across the gap between optical

  4. Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Anions at 118.2 nm: Observation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    coherent vacuum ultraviolet radiation at 118.2 nm (10.488 eV) by tripling the third harmonic output (355 nm) of a Nd:YAG laser in a XeAr cell. Our study focuses on a set of...

  5. Office of Fossil Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    TX - - - - - 2.7 3.0 - - - - - 5.7 Golden Pass, TX - - - - - - - - - - - - - Gulf LNG, MS - - - - - - - - - - - - - Lake Charles, LA - - - - - - - - - - - - - Neptune...

  6. File:USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-TX.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdf Jump to:Originalfaq.pdfFinal.pdfNM.pdf JumpSD.pdf

  7. Simultaneous MS-IR Studies of Surface Formate Reactivity Under...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MS-IR Studies of Surface Formate Reactivity Under Methanol Synthesis Conditions on CuSiO2. Simultaneous MS-IR Studies of Surface Formate Reactivity Under Methanol Synthesis...

  8. Ms. Judy Clayton, Chair Paducah Citizens Advisory Board EHI Consultant...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    0 Ms. Judy Clayton, Chair Paducah Citizens Advisory Board EHI Consultants, Inc. 1 1 1 Memorial Drive Paducah, Kentucky 4200 1 Dear Ms. Clayton: Thank you for your recent letter...

  9. MS.BIOLOGY.NON-THESIS ACADEMIC LEARNING PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Laughlin, Jay

    to constructive feedback Job Prospects for Biology Graduates MS/non-thesis in Biology Bioremediation Biotechnology Medical Research Industry Government Education Microbiology Health Professions Research Laboratories Find Food Production Pollution Control Environmental Diagnostics Forestry Agriculture #12;MS

  10. DEBRA ANNE ROACH, M.S. Assistant Dean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navara, Kristen

    #12;DEBRA ANNE ROACH, M.S. Assistant Dean Director Graduate Enrollment SEAN-MICHAEL GREEN, J.D., LL & Adult Enrollment 845-575-3512 sean-michael.green@marist.edu DEBRA ANNE ROACH, M.S. Assistant Dean

  11. Designing a Digital Version of British Library, Harley MS 4431 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laidlaw, James; Mansfield, Charlie

    2005-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Discusses design for the electronic transcription of MS BL Harley 4431 aims first of all to create a diplomatic corpus made up of the thirty works which Christine de Pizan included in the Queen’s MS. The generally accepted ...

  12. Genizah MS T-S AS 154.342

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Possibly payment order or accounting, mentioning M?s? (?), Egypt and 'only three', with Persian-Arabic numerals....

  13. 607 MS Major Code Major College Bachelor's Master's Doctor's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    Engineering CAFLS BS MS PhD 824 Biotechnology CAFLS MS 500 Business & Behavioral Science Entomology CAFLS MS PhD #12;402 General CES non 129 Environmental and Natural Res (Natural Resources CAFLS BS 126 Environmental and Natural Resources CAFLS nondegree 127 Environmental

  14. Master of Science (MS), Major: Chemical Engineering Apply Now

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihadeh, Alan

    Master of Science (MS), Major: Chemical Engineering Apply Now The Chemical Engineering Program to the following degrees: Master of Science, major Chemical Engineering The MS program will be open to students with a Bachelor of Science (BS) in Chemical Engineering, or other related disciplines. The MS program will also

  15. ARM - Campaign Instrument - ptr-ms

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492air Comments? We would love to hear from you!jpl Comments?govInstrumentsprecipisogovInstrumentsptr-ms

  16. To: Ms. Dorothy Riehle, FOIA Officer,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2, 2003 (NextTime-ResolvedTo: Ms. Dorothy Riehle, FOIA

  17. LA-8318-MS Informal Report I

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found TheHot electron dynamics in grapheneInverter8318-MS

  18. Hydrocarbon-free resonance transition 795 nm rubidium laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Sheldon Shao Quan

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and R. J. Beach, "Hydrocarbon-free resonance transition 795-a Reliable Diode-Pumped Hydrocarbon-Free 795-nm Rubidiumand R. J. Beach, "Hydrocarbon-free resonance transition 795-

  19. albuquerque nm 1st: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Proceedings of the American Solar Energy Society 98 Conference Albuquerque, NM (June 1998) Multidisciplinary Databases and...

  20. Life-Cycle Energy Demand of Computational Logic: From High-Performance 32nm CPU to Ultra-Low-Power 130nm MCU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bol, David; Boyd, Sarah; Dornfeld, David

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance 32 nm CPU to Ultra-Low-Power 130 nm MCU Davidboxes and smart phones to ultra-low-power 130 nm MCUs forthe energy demand for ultra-low-power MCUs is completely

  1. Life-Cycle Energy Demand of Computational Logic: From High-Performance 32nm CPU to Ultra-Low-Power 130nm MCU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bol, David; Boyd, Sarah; Dornfeld, David

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance 32 nm CPU to Ultra-Low-Power 130 nm MCU Davidboxes and smart phones to ultra-low-power 130 nm MCUs forthe energy demand for ultra-low-power MCUs is completely

  2. Single-frequency 1559-nm erbium-doped fiber laser pumped by a 650-nm semiconductor laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giles, C. Randy [Lucent Technologies, Bell Laboratories, Crawford Hill Laboratory, Holmdel, New Jersey 07733-0400 (United States)] Mizrahi, V. [Cienna Corporation, Hanover, Maryland 21076 (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A single-frequency laser with a 2-cm-length erbium-doped fiber and fiber-grating coupler mirrors was operated successfully with a 650-nm semiconductor pump laser. Laser pump threshold was 0.91-mW and 34-{mu}W output power at 1559 nm was obtained for 6-mW pump power. {copyright} 1997 Optical Society of America

  3. Texas AgriLife Research & Extension Center, 1102 East FM 1294, Lubbock, TX 79403 (806) 746-6101, FAX (806) 746-4057, ctrostle@ag.tamu.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    79403 (806) 746-6101, FAX (806) 746-4057, ctrostle@ag.tamu.edu Guar Update, West Texas currently consists of two primary entities: · West Texas Guar, Brownfield, TX, (806) 637-4662, http://www.westtexasguar.com (Klint Forbes, owner/manager, klint@westtexasguar.com). West Texas Guar currently serves as the only

  4. To be published in In Proceedings of ACM Eye Tracking Research & Applications Symposium, Austin, TX, 2010 Qualitative and Quantitative Scoring and Evaluation of the Eye Movement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleg, Komogortsev - Department of Computer Science, Texas State University

    To be published in In Proceedings of ACM Eye Tracking Research & Applications Symposium, Austin, TX, 2010 Qualitative and Quantitative Scoring and Evaluation of the Eye Movement Classification Algorithms presents a set of qualitative and quantitative scores designed to assess performance of any eye movement

  5. Protein degradation in a TX-TL cell-free expression system using ClpXP protease Zachary Z. Sun1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, Richard M.

    ! 1! Protein degradation in a TX-TL cell-free expression system using ClpXP protease AUTHORS that play an important role for in vivo circuit dynamics ­ namely protein degradation and protein dilution-TL with ClpXP, an AAA+ protease pair that selectively degrades tagged proteins [11], to provide finely

  6. Published in Proceedings of Digital Libraries 95, Austin, TX, June, 1995, pp. 39-48. Collection Maintenance in the Digital Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ackerman, Mark S.

    Published in Proceedings of Digital Libraries Ô95, Austin, TX, June, 1995, pp. 39-48. Collection Maintenance in the Digital Library Mark S. Ackerman Roy T. Fielding Information and Computer Science Maintenance will be critical to digital libraries, especially those that promote broad access to diverse

  7. A cesium bromide photocathode excited by 405?nm radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maldonado, J. R.; Cheng, Y. T.; Pease, Fabian W.; Hesselink, L. [Electrical Engineering Department, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Pianetta, P. [SLAC National Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In several applications, such as electron beam lithography and X-ray differential phase contrast imaging, there is a need for a free electron source with a current density at least 10?A/cm{sup 2} yet can be shaped with a resolution down to 20?nm and pulsed. Additional requirements are that the source must operate in a practical demountable vacuum (>1e-9?Torr) and be reasonably compact. In prior work, a photocathode comprising a film of CsBr on metal film on a sapphire substrate met the requirements except it was bulky because it required a beam (>10?W/cm{sup 2}) of 257?nm radiation. Here, we describe an approach using a 405?nm laser which is far less bulky. The 405?nm laser, however, is not energetic enough to create color centers in CsBr films. The key to our approach is to bombard the CsBr film with a flood beam of about 1?keV electrons prior to operation. Photoelectron efficiencies in the range of 100–1000?nA/mW were demonstrated with lifetimes exceeding 50?h between electron bombardments. We suspect that the electron bombardment creates intraband color centers whence electrons can be excited by the 405?nm photons into the conduction band and thence into the vacuum.

  8. Alignment of LC-MS Data Using Peptide Features

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Xincheng

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectrometry MALDI Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization MS Mass Spectrometry MS/MS Tandem Mass Spectrometry M/Z Mass-To-Charge Ratio PNNL Paci c Northwest National Laboratory RT Retention Time SELDI Surface Enhanced Laser Desorption Ionization... alignment. In this paper, two Shewanella datasets are obtained from Paci c Northwest Na- tional Laboratory (PNNL) and they were analyzed by SEQUEST on di erent days. SEQUEST correlates uninterpreted tandem mass spectra of peptides with amino acid...

  9. Ca II 854.2 nm BISECTORS AND CIRCUMFACULAR REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pietarila, A.; Harvey, J. W. [National Solar Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)] [National Solar Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Active regions appear bright in Ca II 854.2 nm line core intensity while the surrounding areas, referred to as circumfacular regions, are darker than the active region or the quiet Sun. We use Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun Vector Spectromagnetograph Ca II 854.2 nm data (photospheric and chromospheric full disk magnetograms as well as high spectral resolution Stokes I and V profiles) to study the connection between magnetic canopies, circumfacular regions, and Ca II 854.2 nm bisector amplitudes (spans). The line bisector amplitude is reduced in circumfacular regions, where the 3 minute period power in chromospheric H{alpha} intensity oscillations is also reduced relative to the surrounding quiet Sun. The latter is consistent with magnetic canopies in circumfacular regions suppressing upward propagating steepening acoustic waves. Our results provide further strong evidence for shock waves as the cause of the inverse C-shaped bisector and explain the observed solar cycle variation of the shape and amplitude of Sun-as-a-star Ca II 854.2 nm bisectors.

  10. 32nd Conf. Radar Meteorology Albuquerque, NM, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Ming

    32nd Conf. Radar Meteorology Albuquerque, NM, 2005 J1J.4 MULTIPLE DOPPLER WIND ANALYSIS and smoothness constraints by incorporating them into a cost function yielding the 3-D wind. In this study, this 3DVAR analysis method is adapted to perform multiple Doppler wind analysis for CASA radars, together

  11. Fabrication of 10 nm enclosed nanofluidic channels and Zhaoning Yu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrication of 10 nm enclosed nanofluidic channels Han Caoa) and Zhaoning Yu Nanostructure wafers . The nanofluidic channels were further narrowed and sealed by techniques that are based- tremely small nanofluidic structures need to be fabricated and used as matrices for the manipulation

  12. NM Junior College CATALOG YEAR 2009-Transferring from New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    2010 NM Junior College CATALOG YEAR 2009- 2010 11/9/2010 Transferring from New Mexico Junior College to the University of New Mexico #12;NMJC Course UNM Equivalent Important UNM Phone Numbers................................................................................................... http://advisement.unm.edu/ The University of New Mexico and New Mexico Junior College work closely

  13. MS. CHERYL ZAHNISER (Chair) 5915 Beach Drive SW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .com MRS. GAIL HAYES DAVIS MS `74 ArtEd; BS `69 ArtEd Executive Director (retired) Young Audiences.stangelandlandscape.com MR. DOUG STREETER Arch `80 Design Principal Perkins + Will 1221 Second Avenue, Ste. 200 Seattle, WA 98101 206.381.6007 doug.streeter@perkinswill.com www.perkinswill.com MS. JULIE STOTT B-IArch `77

  14. GRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK Vol. I. Master Programs (MS and ME)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .2 Degree Requirements 3.2.1 MS and ME Degree Requirements in Civil Engineering and Environmental.1 Welcome Welcome to the graduate program of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Environmental Engineering: Master of Engineering (M.E.) in Civil Engineering Master of Science (M.S.) in Civil

  15. Ms. Maushumi, Head Mistress Babul Sarkar, Vice President

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nahar, Sultana Nurun

    Ms. Maushumi, Head Mistress Babul Sarkar, Vice President Char Domdoama Primary School Vill: Char Razzaq-Shamsun Best Teacher Award and Abdul Awal Sarkar Best Student Awards in Char Domdoma Primary School Dear Ms. Maushumi and Mr. Sarkar, My proposal for the introduction of one teaching and three

  16. [12.7.20044:01pm] [101114] [Page No. 101] {Eserial}4393-van-Pelt/3d/vanPelt-tx08.3d Van Pelt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stryker, Michael

    . Prog Brain Res.147:103-114. Corrections indicated in red. #12;[12.7.2004­4:01pm] [101­114] [Page No[12.7.2004­4:01pm] [101­114] [Page No. 101] {Eserial}4393-van-Pelt/3d/vanPelt-tx08.3d Van Pelt U N Research, Vol. 147 ISSN 0079-6123 Copyright ß 2005 Elsevier BV. All rights reserved CHAPTER 8 Molecular

  17. Ion transport in sub-5-nm graphene nanopores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suk, Myung E.; Aluru, N. R., E-mail: aluru@illinois.edu [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene nanopore is a promising device for single molecule sensing, including DNA bases, as its single atom thickness provides high spatial resolution. To attain high sensitivity, the size of the molecule should be comparable to the pore diameter. However, when the pore diameter approaches the size of the molecule, ion properties and dynamics may deviate from the bulk values and continuum analysis may not be accurate. In this paper, we investigate the static and dynamic properties of ions with and without an external voltage drop in sub-5-nm graphene nanopores using molecular dynamics simulations. Ion concentration in graphene nanopores sharply drops from the bulk concentration when the pore radius is smaller than 0.9 nm. Ion mobility in the pore is also smaller than bulk ion mobility due to the layered liquid structure in the pore-axial direction. Our results show that a continuum analysis can be appropriate when the pore radius is larger than 0.9 nm if pore conductivity is properly defined. Since many applications of graphene nanopores, such as DNA and protein sensing, involve ion transport, the results presented here will be useful not only in understanding the behavior of ion transport but also in designing bio-molecular sensors.

  18. Sub-30 nm InAs Quantum-Well MOSFETs with Self-aligned Metal Contacts and Sub-1 nm EOT HfO2 Insulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Alamo, Jesús A.

    performance, ability to harmoniously scale down to sub-30 nm gate length dimensions and CMOS. MOSFETs with gate length dimensions in the 20-30 nm range and outstanding electrical characteristics that yields an undercut spacer is etched through highly

  19. Characterization of the Human Pancreatic Islet Proteome by Two-Dimensional LC/MS/MS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metz, Thomas O.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Fontes, Ghislaine; Qian, Weijun; Camp, David G.; Poitout, Vincent J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research to elucidate the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus has traditionally focused on the genetic and immunological factors associated with the disease, and, until recently, has not considered the target cell. While there have been reports detailing proteomic analyses of established islet cell lines or isolated rodent islets, the information gained is not always easily extrapolated to humans. Therefore, extensive characterization of the human islet proteome could result in better understanding of islet biology and lead to more effective treatment strategies. We have applied a two-dimensional LC-MS/MS-based analysis to the characterization of the human islet proteome, resulting in the detection of 29,021 unique peptides corresponding to 4,925 proteins. As expected, major islet hormones (insulin, glucagon, somatostatin), beta-cell enriched secretory products (IAPP), ion channels (K-ATP channel), and transcription factors (PDX-1, Nkx 6.1, HNF-1 beta) were detected. In addition, significant proteome coverage of metabolic enzymes and cellular pathways was obtained, including the insulin signaling cascade and the MAP kinase, NF-??, and JAK/STAT pathways. This work represents the most extensive characterization of the human islet proteome to date and provides a peptide reference library that may be utilized in future studies of islet biology and type 1 diabetes.

  20. Suppression of high-order-harmonic intensities observed in aligned CO{sub 2} molecules with 1300-nm and 800-nm pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kato, Kosaku; Minemoto, Shinichirou; Sakai, Hirofumi [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High-order-harmonic generation from aligned N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2} molecules is investigated by 1300-nm and 800-nm pulses. The harmonic intensities of 1300-nm pulses from aligned molecules show harmonic photon energy dependence similar to those of 800-nm pulses. Suppression of harmonic intensity from aligned CO{sub 2} molecules is observed for both 1300- and 800-nm pulses over the same harmonic photon energy range. As the dominant mechanism for the harmonic intensity suppression from aligned CO{sub 2} molecules, the present results support the two-center interference picture rather than the dynamical interference picture.

  1. RAPID/Roadmap/3-NM-f | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, searche <c <c <NM-f

  2. RAPID/Roadmap/3-NM-g | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, searche <c <c <NM-fg

  3. NM Underground Storage Tank Registration | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources JumpNEF Advisors LLC JumpNF- Review ofNM

  4. RAPID/Roadmap/12-NM-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformation TexasTexas)ID-a < RAPID‎ | RoadmapNM-a

  5. RAPID/Roadmap/18-NM-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione < RAPID‎ | RoadmapHI-a <caacNM-b

  6. RAPID/Roadmap/19-NM-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione < RAPID‎ | RoadmapHI-acCA-bfID-aNM-a

  7. RAPID/Roadmap/19-NM-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethodInformatione < RAPID‎ | RoadmapHI-acCA-bfID-aNM-ac

  8. GeoLectric Power Company NM LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas:Webinars/PuestaGenevaGeoLectric Power Company NM LLC

  9. MS211 -CALCULO NUMERICO -1o semestre de 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomes Ruggiero, Márcia A.

    MS211 - C´ALCULO NUM´ERICO - 1o semestre de 2008 (http://www.ime.unicamp.br/ms211) turma professor¸c~ao: o suporte computacional b´asico da disciplina ser´a o MatLab. BIBLIOGRAFIA · "C´alculo Num´erico¸c~ao, Editora Pearson, 1997. · "M´etodos Num´ericos", Maria Cristina Cunha, 2a edi¸c~ao, Editora da Unicamp

  10. MS211 -CALCULO NUMERICO -2o semestre de 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussner, Peter

    MS211 - C´ALCULO NUM´ERICO - 2o semestre de 2007 (http://www.ime.unicamp.br/ms211) Turma Professor suporte computacional da disciplina ser´a o MatLab. BIBLIOGRAFIA · "C´alculo Num´erico - Aspectos Te Pearson, 1997. · "M´etodos Num´ericos", Maria Cristina Cunha, 2a edi¸c~ao, Editora da Unicamp, 2000

  11. An LC-IMS-MS Platform Providing Increased Dynamic Range for High...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a tryptic digest of mouse blood plasma and analyzed with both a LC-Linear Ion Trap Fourier Transform (FT) MS and LC-IMS-TOF MS. The LC-FT MS detected thirteen out of the twenty...

  12. Photofragment Translational Spectroscopy of Propargyl Radicals at 248 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goncher, S.J.; Moore, D.T.; Sveum, N.E.; Neumark, D.M.

    2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The photodissociation of propargyl radical, C{sub 3}H{sub 3}, and its perdeuterated isotopolog was investigated using photofragment translational spectroscopy. Propargyl radicals were produced by 193 nm photolysis of allene entrained in a molecular beam expansion, and then photodissociated at 248 nm. photofragment time-of-flight spectra were measured at a series of laboratory angles using electron impact ionization coupled to a mass spectrometer. Data for ion masses corresponding to C{sub 3}H{sub 2}{sup +}, C{sub 3}H{sup +}, C{sub 3}{sup +}, and the analogous deuterated species show that both H and H{sub 2} loss occur. The translational energy distributions for these processes have average values = 5.7 and 15.9 kcal/mol, respectively, and are consistent with dissociation on the ground state following internal conversion, with no exit barrier for H loss but a tight transition state for H{sub 2} loss. The translational energy distribution for H atom loss is similar to that in previous work on propargyl in which the H atom, rather than the heavy fragment, was detected. The branching ratio for H loss/H{sub 2} loss was determined to be 97.6/2.4 {+-} 1.2, in good agreement with RRKM results.

  13. Training Session: Euless, TX

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This 3.5-hour training provides builders with a comprehensive review of zero energy-ready home construction including the business case, detailed specifications, and opportunities to be recognized...

  14. ~tx410.ptx

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate6,1996 http://www.eia.doe.govEffects

  15. ~tx421.ptx

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances by Climate6,1996 http://www.eia.doe.govEffects

  16. D&TX

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling Corp -KWatertowni5W 95.5x-L* d!Qwner*. ( ARGONNE

  17. Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment for the SNL/NM cafeterias.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCord, Samuel Adam

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (PPOA) was conducted for the two Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico cafeteria facilities between May and August 2005. The primary purpose of this PPOA is to assess waste and resource reduction opportunities and issue Pollution Prevention (P2) recommendations for Sandia's food service facilities. This PPOA contains recommendations for energy, water and resource reduction, as well as material substitution based upon environmentally preferable purchasing. Division 3000 has requested the PPOA report as part of the Division's compliance effort to implement the Environmental Management System (EMS) per DOE Order 450.1. This report contains a summary of the information collected and analyses performed with recommended options for implementation. The SNL/NM P2 Group will work with Division 3000 and the respective cafeteria facilities to implement these options.

  18. High power terahertz generation using 1550?nm plasmonic photomixers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, Christopher W. [Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Hashemi, Mohammad R.; Jarrahi, Mona [Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Electrical Engineering Department, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Preu, Sascha [Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Technical University Darmstadt, D-64283 Darmstadt (Germany); Lu, Hong; Gossard, Arthur C. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a 1550?nm plasmonic photomixer operating under pumping duty cycles below 10%, which offers significantly higher terahertz radiation power levels compared to previously demonstrated photomixers. The record-high terahertz radiation powers are enabled by enhancing the device quantum efficiency through use of plasmonic contact electrodes, and by mitigating thermal breakdown at high optical pump power levels through use of a low duty cycle optical pump. The repetition rate of the optical pump can be specifically selected at a given pump duty cycle to control the spectral linewidth of the generated terahertz radiation. At an average optical pump power of 150 mW with a pump modulation frequency of 1 MHz and pump duty cycle of 2%, we demonstrate up to 0.8 mW radiation power at 1 THz, within each continuous wave radiation cycle.

  19. MS17AM LEAK CHECKER The MS17AM is a manual valve version of the MS17AB. Since it is a manual unit, some care must be

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massey, Thomas N.

    MS17AM LEAK CHECKER The MS17AM is a manual valve version of the MS17AB. Since it is a manual unit, some care must be exercised in the sequencing of the valves. The most important things to remember are that during normal leak testing: 1. The THROTTLE VALVE is NEVER opened unless the ROUGH VALVE has been

  20. Fast and accurate database searches with MS-GF+Percolator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granholm, Viktor; Kim, Sangtae; Navarro, Jose' C.; Sjolund, Erik; Smith, Richard D.; Kall, Lukas

    2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    To identify peptides and proteins from the large number of fragmentation spectra in mass spectrometrybased proteomics, researches commonly employ so called database search engines. Additionally, postprocessors like Percolator have been used on the results from such search engines, to assess confidence, infer peptides and generally increase the number of identifications. A recent search engine, MS-GF+, has previously been showed to out-perform these classical search engines in terms of the number of identified spectra. However, MS-GF+ generates only limited statistical estimates of the results, hence hampering the biological interpretation. Here, we enabled Percolator-processing for MS-GF+ output, and observed an increased number of identified peptides for a wide variety of datasets. In addition, Percolator directly reports false discovery rate estimates, such as q values and posterior error probabilities, as well as p values, for peptide-spectrum matches, peptides and proteins, functions useful for the whole proteomics community.

  1. New Zone Plate for Soft X-Ray Microscopy at 15-nm Spatial Resolution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    made with the XM-1's current 25-nm MZP, the new MZP was able to obtain sharp images of lines a mere 15 nm apart-where the older zone plate had seen only a featureless field of...

  2. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments Below the TX Tank Farm: Boreholes C3830, C3831, C3832 and RCRA Borehole 299-W10-27

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horton, Duane G.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Clayton, Ray E.; Legore, Virginia L.; Orr, Robert D.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Baum, Steven R.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Vickerman, Tanya S.

    2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was revised in September 2008 to remove acid-extractable sodium data from Tables 4.8, 4.28,4.43, and 4.59. The sodium data was removed due to potential contamination introduced during the acid extraction process. The rest of the text remains unchanged from the original report issued in April 2004. The overall goal of the Tank Farm Vadose Zone Project, led by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc., is to define risks from past and future single-shell tank farm activities at Hanford. To meet this goal, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. tasked scientists from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to perform detailed analyses on vadose zone sediments from within Waste Management Area (WMA) T-TX-TY. This report is the first of two reports written to present the results of these analyses. Specifically, this report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from boreholes C3830, C3831, and C3832 in the TX Tank Farm, and from borehole 299-W-10-27 installed northeast of the TY Tank Farm.

  3. header for SPIE use Fluoropolymers for 157nm Lithography: Optical Properties from VUV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    new radiation damage mechanisms in previously accepted optical materials. For 157 nm pellicles, newheader for SPIE use Fluoropolymers for 157nm Lithography: Optical Properties from VUV Absorbance With the introduction of 157 nm as the next optical lithography wavelength, the need for new pellicle and photoresist

  4. Damage thresholds of fluoride multilayers at 355 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chow, R.; Kozlowski, M.R.; Loomis, G.E.; Rainer, F.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluoride multilayer coatings were evaluated for use in 355 nm high reflector applications. The LaF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6], NdF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6] and GdF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6] multilayers had laser damage thresholds of 20, 17.9 and 7.4 (measured at 10-ns pulsewidths), respectively. High tensile stresses in the coatings restricted this evaluation to only 5-layer-pair partial reflectors (49--52%).The LaF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6], NdF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]Al[sub 6] and GdF[sub 3]/Na[sub 3]AlF[sub 6] multilayers had tensile stresses of [approximately] 1.1 [times] 109, 1.3 [times] 109 and 9.3 [times] 10[sup 8] dynes/cm[sup 2], respectively. Substrate material and glow-discharge processing of the substrates were found to influence the density of stress-induced coating fractures and damage thresholds in some cases. If stress fracturing and scatter can be controlled, these fluoride material combinations are suited for 3[omega] applications.

  5. This form is for use by MS students applying for a 2nd MS, Engineer or PhD degrees or for Engineer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinz, Friedrich B.

    This form is for use by MS students applying for a 2nd MS, Engineer or PhD degrees or for Engineer degree students applying for PhD. The form should be completed and returned to the CEE department office degree goal: ( ) 2nd MS ( ) Engineer ( ) PhD Field of study

  6. Entertainment Technology Center, CMU Internship Survey Results, Dec 2013, May 2014, and Dec 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matsuda, Noboru

    Developer Mount Pleasant SC Visionary Works LLC UX Designer, Game Programmer Washington DC VOCI Technology, NM, OK, TX 2 West: CA, HI, NV 16 Southeast: AL, AR, FL, GA, KY, LA, MS, NC, PR, SC, TN 1 Midwest: IA Emails 28 Faculty Contacts 22 Personal Network 17 Interviews Arranged by Career Services 9 Intern Search

  7. Entertainment Technology Center, CMU Post-Graduation Survey Results, Dec 2012, May 2013, and Aug 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matsuda, Noboru

    Alumni Contacts 13 ETC dlist email 11 Intern Search/Company Websites 9 Faculty Contacts 8 Interviews Southwest: AZ, NM, OK, TX 1 West: CA, HI, NV 40 Southeast: AL, AR, FL, GA, KY, LA, MS, NC, PR, SC, TN 3

  8. SPE-163690-MS Synthetic, Geomechanical Logs for Marcellus Shale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    SPE-163690-MS Synthetic, Geomechanical Logs for Marcellus Shale M. O. Eshkalak, SPE, S. D of production from shale gas reservoirs. In this study, synthetic geomechanical logs (Including following-driven models are developed that are capable of generating synthetic geomechanical logs from conventional logs

  9. Deborah K. Smith Department of Geology and Geophysics, MS 22

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Deborah K.

    Deborah K. Smith Department of Geology and Geophysics, MS 22 Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution: Jordan, T. H., H. W. Menard, and D.K. Smith, Density and size distribution of seamounts in the eastern. Smith, H. W. Menard, J. A. Orcutt and T. H. Jordan, Seismic reflection site survey: correlation

  10. PhD Chemical Engineering MS Chemical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    phenomena in nature and technology. The chemical engineer leverages knowledge of molecular processes across1 PhD Chemical Engineering MS Chemical Engineering Bylaws Gene and Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering College of Engineering and Architecture Approved by Voiland School faculty

  11. The Next Generation Isotope Ratio MS DELTA V Advantage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lachniet, Matthew S.

    on front panel - All pumps inside - Low noise design #12;T The Next Generation Isotope Ratio MS More than with intrinsic alignment of all ion optical components - Integrated signal amplifiers and digitizers - All ion - Comprehensive set of automated diagnostics · Compact and user-friendly design - Small footprint - Space for on

  12. MS in Water, Society, and Policy University of Arizona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    MS in Water, Society, and Policy University of Arizona Biological Sciences East, Room 325 Phone of scholarship. The Water, Society and Policy Program draws on the expertise of scientists, social scientists and the Environment School of Geography and Development Water Resources Research Center Institute

  13. Ms. Vicki Cowart Secretary of the Board of Trustees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Executive Officer of Planned Parenthood of the Rocky Mountains. Previously she served for ten years as the State Geologist and Director of the State of Colorado Geological Survey. Early in her career she worked as a geophysicist for several oil and gas companies and was a District Manager for Schlumberger Well Services. Ms

  14. GRADUATE HANDBOOK M.S. and PhD Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GRADUATE HANDBOOK M.S. and PhD Programs in Mechanical Engineering and Engineering Mechanics another MSU program 8 2.3 Admission Requirements: Ph.D. Programs.................................................. 9 2.3.1 Regular Status. 9 2.3.2 Accelerated Ph.D. Program Entry 9 2.3.3 Provisional Status. 10 2

  15. Ion Exclusion by Sub 2-nm Carbon Nanotube Pores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fornasiero, F; Park, H G; Holt, J K; Stadermann, M; Grigoropoulos, C P; Noy, A; Bakajin, O

    2008-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotubes offer an outstanding platform for studying molecular transport at nanoscale, and have become promising materials for nanofluidics and membrane technology due to their unique combination of physical, chemical, mechanical, and electronic properties. In particular, both simulations and experiments have proved that fluid flow through carbon nanotubes of nanometer size diameter is exceptionally fast compared to what continuum hydrodynamic theories would predict when applied on this length scale, and also, compared to conventional membranes with pores of similar size, such as zeolites. For a variety of applications such as separation technology, molecular sensing, drug delivery, and biomimetics, selectivity is required together with fast flow. In particular, for water desalination, coupling the enhancement of the water flux with selective ion transport could drastically reduce the cost of brackish and seawater desalting. In this work, we study the ion selectivity of membranes made of aligned double-walled carbon nanotubes with sub-2 nm diameter. Negatively charged groups are introduced at the opening of the carbon nanotubes by oxygen plasma treatment. Reverse osmosis experiments coupled with capillary electrophoresis analysis of permeate and feed show significant anion and cation rejection. Ion exclusion declines by increasing ionic strength (concentration) of the feed and by lowering solution pH; also, the highest rejection is observed for the A{sub m}{sup Z{sub A}} C{sub n}{sup Z{sub C}} salts (A=anion, C=cation, z= valence) with the greatest Z{sub A}/Z{sub C} ratio. Our results strongly support a Donnan-type rejection mechanism, dominated by electrostatic interactions between fixed membrane charges and mobile ions, while steric and hydrodynamic effects appear to be less important. Comparison with commercial nanofiltration membranes for water softening reveals that our carbon nanotube membranes provides far superior water fluxes for similar ion rejection capabilities.

  16. Low-noise low-jitter 32-pixels CMOS single-photon avalanche diodes array for single-photon counting from 300 nm to 900 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scarcella, Carmelo; Tosi, Alberto, E-mail: alberto.tosi@polimi.it; Villa, Federica; Tisa, Simone; Zappa, Franco [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy)] [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a single-photon counting multichannel detection system, based on a monolithic linear array of 32 CMOS SPADs (Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes). All channels achieve a timing resolution of 100 ps (full-width at half maximum) and a photon detection efficiency of 50% at 400 nm. Dark count rate is very low even at room temperature, being about 125 counts/s for 50 ?m active area diameter SPADs. Detection performance and microelectronic compactness of this CMOS SPAD array make it the best candidate for ultra-compact time-resolved spectrometers with single-photon sensitivity from 300 nm to 900 nm.

  17. Characterization of Vadose Zone Sediments Below the TX Tank Farm: Probe Holes C3830, C3831, C3832 and 299-W10-27

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serne, R JEFFREY.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horton, Duane G.; Lanigan, David C.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Clayton, Ray E.; LeGore, Virginia L.; Orr, Robert D.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Baum, Steven R.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Vickerman, Tanya S.

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performed detailed analyses on vadose zone sediments from within Waste Management Area T-TX-TY. This report contains all the geologic, geochemical, and selected physical characterization data collected on vadose zone sediment recovered from three probe holes (C3830, C3831, and C3832) in the TX Tank Farm, and from borehole 299-W-10-27. Sediments from borehole 299-W-10-27 are considered to be uncontaminated sediments that can be compared with contaminated sediments. This report also presents our interpretation of the sediment lithologies, the vertical extent of contamination, the migration potential of the contaminants, and the likely source of the contamination in the vadose zone and groundwater below the TX Tank Farm. Sediment from the probe holes was analyzed for: moisture, radionuclide and carbon contents;, one-to-one water extracts (soil pH, electrical conductivity, cation, trace metal, and anion data), and 8 M nitric acid extracts. Overall, our analyses showed that common ion exchange is a key mechanism that influences the distribution of contaminants within that portion of the vadose zone affected by tank liquor. We did not observe significant indications of caustic alteration of the sediment mineralogy or porosity, or significant zones of slightly elevated pH values in the probe holes. The sediments do show that sodium-, nitrate-, and sulfate-dominated fluids are present. The fluids are more dilute than tank fluids observed below tanks at the SX and BX Tank Farms. Three primary stratigraphic units were encountered in each probe hole: (1) backfill material, (2) the Hanford formation, and (3) the Cold Creek unit. Each of the probe holes contain thin fine-grained layers in the Hanford H2 stratigraphic unit that may impact the flow of leaked fluids and effect irregular and horizontal flow. The probe holes could not penetrate below the enriched calcium carbonate strata of the Cold Creek lower subunit; therefore, we did not identify the maximum vertical penetration of the tank related plumes. However, the more elevated portions of the electrical conductivity (EC) profile at probe hole C3830 currently resides at the bottom of a fine-grained thin lens in the Hanford H2 unit at 87 ft bgs. At C3831, we lack good sample coverage to ascertain whether the salt plume has significantly descended into the Cold Creek Unit. There is strong indication at probe hole C3832 that the saline plume has descended into the Cold Creek Unit. The profiles do collectively suggest that the deepest penetration of tank related fluids is found in probe hole C3832. The water potential data from 299-W10-27?s H2 unit, the unit where most of the contaminants reside in the TX probe holes, are consistent with a draining profile. Despite the evidence that elevated EC values may be present in all three probe holes to their depth of refusal, the concentrations of long-term risk drivers are not large. The inventories of potential contaminants of concern, nitrate, technetium-99, uranium, and chromium, are provided. In addition, in situ desorption Kd values for these contaminants are provided. For conservative modeling purposes, we recommend using Kd values of 0 mL/g for nitrate and technetium-99, a value of 1 mL/g for uranium, and 10 mL/g for chromium to represent the entire vadose zone profile from the bottoms of the tanks to the water table. These conservative Kd values along with the provided inventories in the vadose zone sediments obtained from the three probe holes can be used in long-term risk projections that rely on estimates of water recharge and vadose zone and aquifer transport calculations.

  18. Photometry of symbiotic stars XI. EG And, Z And, BF Cyg, CH Cyg, CI Cyg, V1329 Cyg, TX CVn, AG Dra, RW Hya, QW Sge, IV Vir and the LMXB V934 Her

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Skopal; T. Pribulla; M. Vanko; Z. Velic; E. Semkov; M. Wolf; A. Jones

    2004-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new photometric observations of EG And, Z And, BF Cyg, CH Cyg, CI Cyg, V1329 Cyg, TX CVn, AG Dra, RW Hya, AR Pav, AG Peg, AX Per, QW Sge, IV Vir and the peculiar M giant V934 Her. The current issue gathers observations of these objects to December 2003.

  19. MS211 -CALCULO NUMERICO -2o semestre de 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussner, Peter

    MS211 - C´ALCULO NUM´ERICO - 2o semestre de 2011 turma professor sala e-mail A ´Alvaro R. De Pierro. An´alise Num´erica. Pioneira Thompson Learning, 2003. 2. M.C.Cunha. M´etodos Num´ericos. 2a edi¸c~ao, Editora da Unicamp, 2000. 3. M.A.Gomes Ruggiero, V. L. da Rocha Lopes. C´alculo Num´erico - Aspectos Te

  20. MS211 -CALCULO NUMERICO -2o semestre de 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussner, Peter

    MS211 - C´ALCULO NUM´ERICO - 2o semestre de 2014 Turma Professor Sala­IMECC e-mail A M. Aparecida. Darezzo. C´alculo Num´erico - Aprendizagem com Apoio de Software. Thompson Learning, 2008. 2. R.L.Burden, J.D. Faires. An´alise Num´erica. Pioneira Thompson Learning, 2003. 3. M.C.Cunha. M´etodos Num´ericos

  1. Method for factor analysis of GC/MS data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van Benthem, Mark H; Kotula, Paul G; Keenan, Michael R

    2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The method of the present invention provides a fast, robust, and automated multivariate statistical analysis of gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) data sets. The method can involve systematic elimination of undesired, saturated peak masses to yield data that follow a linear, additive model. The cleaned data can then be subjected to a combination of PCA and orthogonal factor rotation followed by refinement with MCR-ALS to yield highly interpretable results.

  2. Two-locus linkage analysis in multiple sclerosis (MS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tienari, P.J. (National Public Health Institute, Helsinki (Finland) Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)); Terwilliger, J.D.; Ott, J. (Columbia Univ., New York (United States)); Palo, J. (Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)); Peltonen, L. (National Public Health Institute, Helsinki (Finland))

    1994-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the major challenges in genetic linkage analyses is the study of complex diseases. The authors demonstrate here the use of two-locus linkage analysis in multiple sclerosis (MS), a multifactorial disease with a complex mode of inheritance. In a set of Finnish multiplex families, they have previously found evidence for linkage between MS susceptibility and two independent loci, the myelin basic protein gene (MBP) on chromosome 18 and the HLA complex on chromosome 6. This set of families provides a unique opportunity to perform linkage analysis conditional on two loci contributing to the disease. In the two-trait-locus/two-marker-locus analysis, the presence of another disease locus is parametrized and the analysis more appropriately treats information from the unaffected family member than single-disease-locus analysis. As exemplified here in MS, the two-locus analysis can be a powerful method for investigating susceptibility loci in complex traits, best suited for analysis of specific candidate genes, or for situations in which preliminary evidence for linkage already exists or is suggested. 41 refs., 6 tabs.

  3. Separation of Yeast Cells from MS2 Viruses Using Acoustic Radiation Force

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, B; Fisher, K; Ness, K; Rose, K A; Mariella, Jr., R P

    2008-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a rapid and robust separation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and MS2 bacteriophage using acoustic focusing in a microfluidic device. A piezoelectric transducer (PZT) generates acoustic standing waves in the microchannel. These standing waves induce acoustic radiation force fields that direct microparticles towards the nodes (i.e., pressure minima) or the anti-nodes (i.e., pressure maxima) of the standing waves depending on the relative compressidensity between the particle and the suspending liquid.[1] For particles larger than 2 {micro}m, the transverse velocities generated by these force fields enable continuous, high throughput separation. Extensive work in the last decade [2-4] has demonstrated acoustic focusing for manipulating microparticles or biological samples in microfluidic devices. This prior work has primarily focused on experimental realization of acoustic focusing without modeling or with limited one-dimensional modeling estimates. We recently developed a finite element modeling tool to predict the two-dimensional acoustic radiation force field perpendicular to the flow direction in microfluidic devices.[1] Here we compare results from this model with experimental parametric studies including variations of the PZT driving frequencies and voltages as well as various particle sizes and compressidensities. These experimental parametric studies also provide insight into the development of an adjustable 'virtual' pore-size filter as well as optimal operating conditions for various microparticle sizes. Figure 1 shows a typical experimental acoustic focusing result for microparticles (diameter = 2.0 {micro}m) in a 500 {micro}m wide by 200 {micro}m deep microchannel. In this case, the PZT driving frequency and voltage are, respectively, 1.459 MHz and 6.6 V. The microparticles tightly focus (full width half maximum (FWHM) {approx}30 {micro}m) less than 30 s after the initiation of the acoustic field. We simulated the same geometry and operating conditions for comparison. The surface plot in Figure 2 illustrates the two-dimensional pressure field orthogonal to the flow direction (x-direction) from the simulation. The superimposed vector plot shows the acoustic radiation force in this plane. The dark regions and the light regions respectively represent the nodes and anti-nodes of the acoustic pressure field. The corresponding force field predicts acoustic focusing at the center of the microchannel, which is confirmed by the experimental results shown in Figure 1. We demonstrated the separation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (typical cell size of 4-6 {micro}m depending on the cell growth stage, measured using a Coulter counter) and MS2 bacteriophage (typical diameter {approx}30 nm [5]) using acoustic focusing (Figure 3). A mixture of S. cerevisiae and MS2 labeled with Ribogreen was prepared and injected into one inlet of the microchip (i.e., half of the microchannel was filled with the sample). We varied driving voltages from 1.96 to 4.76 V, while fixing the driving frequency at 1.459 MHz and flow rate at 20 {micro}l/min. The acoustic radiation force did not affect the MS2 viruses, and their concentration profile remained unchanged. Increased driving voltages enhanced the acoustic focusing of the yeast cells thereby achieving good separation. We are able to achieve yields of > 80% and sample purities of > 90% in this continuous-flow sample preparation device.

  4. Demonstration of 12 nm resolution Fresnel zone plate lens based soft x-ray microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao, W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of 12 nm Resolution Fresnel Zone Plate Lens based Soft X-raynanofabrication process for Fresnel zone plate lenses. Theoptical performance of Fresnel zone plate lens based imaging

  5. Improved Quality Control Processing of Peptide-centric LC-MS...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quality Control Processing of Peptide-centric LC-MS Proteomics Data. Improved Quality Control Processing of Peptide-centric LC-MS Proteomics Data. Abstract: In the analysis of...

  6. A Top-Down LC-FTICR MS-Based Strategy for Characterizing Oxidized...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Top-Down LC-FTICR MS-Based Strategy for Characterizing Oxidized Calmodulin in Activated Macrophages . A Top-Down LC-FTICR MS-Based Strategy for Characterizing Oxidized Calmodulin...

  7. FT-ICR MS optimization for the analysis of intact proteins. ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FT-ICR MS optimization for the analysis of intact proteins. FT-ICR MS optimization for the analysis of intact proteins. Abstract: Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR)...

  8. Effects of the anesthesia agents benozocaine and tricaine methanesulfonate (MS-222) on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kane, Andrew S.

    1 Effects of the anesthesia agents benozocaine and tricaine methanesulfonate (MS-222) on immune anesthesia ­ 10 min MS-222 ­ 14 min benzocaine #12;3 Materials and Methods Control Rinse MS-222 Benzocaine Control Anesthesia Recovery ASW ASW Aquaria 7 days Materials and Methods: Experiment 1 · Blood collection

  9. Aerospace Engineering Aircraft and Spacecraft Design BS, MS Space Transportation and Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    Engineering BS, MS Chemical Engineering Biotechnology BS, MS Environmental Health and Safety Semiconductors and Polymers Processing Civil Engineering Construction BS, MS Environmental Geotechnical Structural and Environmental Engineering 408-924-3900 www.cee.sjsu.edu Computer Engineering 408-924-4150 www

  10. Mini-Project Assignment: MS2a Bioinformatics and Computational Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldschmidt, Christina

    1 Mini-Project Assignment: MS2a Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Deadline TWO COPIES of your completed mini-project for MS2a Bioinformatics and Computational Biology should be handed-project assignment are on pages 2-4 below. #12;2 Mini-Project Assignment: MS2a Bioinformatics and Computational

  11. Construction of a 1014.8nm fiber amplifier for quadrupling into the UV 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giuoco, Frank Joseph

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber amplifier is constructed at 1014.8nm and then frequency doubled to produce 507.4nm. This could then be frequency doubled again to produce 253.7 radiation. The fiber amplifier consists of Ytterbium doped double-clad fiber cooled to low...

  12. Construction of a 1014.8nm fiber amplifier for quadrupling into the UV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giuoco, Frank Joseph

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber amplifier is constructed at 1014.8nm and then frequency doubled to produce 507.4nm. This could then be frequency doubled again to produce 253.7 radiation. The fiber amplifier consists of Ytterbium doped double-clad fiber cooled to low...

  13. Proceedings of Nuclear and Emerging Technologies for Space 2013 Albuquerque, NM, February 25-28, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meunier, Michel

    Proceedings of Nuclear and Emerging Technologies for Space 2013 Albuquerque, NM, February 25 #12;Proceedings of Nuclear and Emerging Technologies for Space 2013 Albuquerque, NM, February 25-28, 2013 Paper 6722 DRAGON5: Designing Computational Schemes Dedicated to Fission Nuclear Reactors

  14. Enhanced production of coherent pulsed radiation at 125 nm: the route towards a tabletop VUV laser.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    surface with a 50-mm quartz lens. The VUV signal is measured by a calibrated CsI solar efficiency. Since deposition of opaque Hg on windows is an issue, very complex cell geometries have been to produce coherent 125-nm light with a single dye laser at 625.7 nm using a room-temperature Hg cell [3]. We

  15. A 60GHz, 13dBm Fully Integrated 65nm RF-CMOS Power Amplifier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    simulation. A. Transistor Layout Caracterisation The size of the transistor depends on the maximum powerA 60GHz, 13dBm Fully Integrated 65nm RF-CMOS Power Amplifier Sofiane Aloui, Eric Kerhervé IMS-CNRS University of Toulouse Toulouse, France plana@laas.fr Abstract--A 65nm CMOS, 60GHz fully integrated power

  16. Coherence and Linewidth Studies of a 4-nm High Power FEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fawley, W.M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bandwidth for a single-pass FEL amplifier initiated by SASE.Studies of a 4-nm High Power FEL W.M. Fawley, A.M. Sessler,Studies of a 4-nm High Power FEL W. M. Fawley and A. M.

  17. Passively modelocked 832 nm vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Ursula

    , focused into an optical spot with dimensions of 100 Ã? 200 mm. The SESAM consisted of an AlAs/Al0.2Ga0.8As DBR, a spacer layer of GaAs0.75P0.25, a 4.8 nm GaAs quantum well and a 2 nm-thick capping layer of Ga

  18. Magnetization switching in 70-nm-wide pseudo-spin-valve nanoelements Xiaobin Zhua)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grütter, Peter

    Fe, respectively, in this case separated by a spacer layer. The individual elements have dimensions of 70 nm 550 nm with submicron or deep- submicron dimensions.4,5 These PSV or MTJ elements con- sist of asymmetric sandwiches is magnetically hard. For elements with micron-scale dimensions, interactions between the layers can lead

  19. ARM - Campaign Instrument - pyran-eko-ms-801

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492air Comments? We would love to hear from you!jplcarter-scott Comments? We would love to heareko-ms-801

  20. Pole- versus MS-mass definitions in the electroweak theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Faisst; J. H. Kuhn; O. Veretin

    2004-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Two different two-loop relations between the pole- and the MS-mass of the top quark have been derived in the literature which were based on different treatments of the tadpole diagrams. In addition, the limit M_W^2/m_t^2 \\to 0 was employed in one of the calculations. It is shown that, after appropriate transformations, the results of the two calculations are in perfect agreement. Furthermore we demonstrate that the inclusion of the non-vanishing mass of the W-boson leads to small modifications only.

  1. Bioenergia Brasil S A MS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in Carbonof AlternativeBioenergia Brasil S A MS Jump to:

  2. Superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors at a wavelength of 940 nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, W J; You, L X; He, Y H; Zhang, L; Liu, X Y; Yang, X Y; Wu, J J; Guo, Q; Chen, S J; Wang, Z; Xie, X M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop single-photon detectors comprising single-mode fiber-coupled superconducting nanowires, with high system detection efficiencies at a wavelength of 940 nm. The detector comprises a 6.5-nm-thick, 110-nm-wide NbN nanowire meander fabricated onto a Si substrate with a distributed Bragg reflector for enhancing the optical absorptance. We demonstrate that, via the design of a low filling factor (1/3) and active area ({\\Phi} = 10 {\\mu}m), the system reaches a detection efficiency of ~60% with a dark count rate of 10 Hz, a recovery time <12 ns, and a timing jitter of ~50 ps.

  3. Rare-earth plasma extreme ultraviolet sources at 6.5-6.7 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otsuka, Takamitsu; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; Yugami, Noboru; Yatagai, Toyohiko [Department of Advanced Interdisciplinary Sciences, Center for Optical Research and Education (CORE), Utsunomiya University, Yoto 7-1-2, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Kilbane, Deirdre; White, John; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Jiang, Weihua [Department of Electrical Engineering, Nagaoka University of Technology, Kami-tomiokamachi 1603-1, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188 (Japan); Endo, Akira [Forschungszentrum Dresden, Bautzner Landstrs. 400, D-01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2010-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We have demonstrated a laser-produced plasma extreme ultraviolet source operating in the 6.5-6.7 nm region based on rare-earth targets of Gd and Tb coupled with a Mo/B{sub 4}C multilayer mirror. Multiply charged ions produce strong resonance emission lines, which combine to yield an intense unresolved transition array. The spectra of these resonant lines around 6.7 nm (in-band: 6.7 nm {+-}1%) suggest that the in-band emission increases with increased plasma volume by suppressing the plasma hydrodynamic expansion loss at an electron temperature of about 50 eV, resulting in maximized emission.

  4. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolff, T.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Community Involvement and Issues Management Dept.; Hansen, R.P. [Hansen Environmental Consultants, Englewood, CO (United States)

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report on National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) compliance at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) chronicles past and current compliance activities and includes a recommended strategy that can be implemented for continued improvement. This report provides a list of important references. Attachment 1 contains the table of contents for SAND95-1648, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Guide Sandia National Laboratories (Hansen, 1995). Attachment 2 contains a list of published environmental assessments (EAs) and environmental impact statements (EISs) prepared by SNL/NM. Attachment 3 contains abstracts of NEPA compliance papers authored by SNL/NM and its contractors.

  5. Optical system for Argus 355-nm 90-mm aperture target-illumination experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, B.C.; Boyd, R.; Hermes, G.; Hildum, J.S.; Linford, G.; Martin, W.E.

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The requirements of laser alignment, crystal tuning, target alignment, and laser beam diagnosis are provided by this optical system. Initial setup and preshot alignment techniques are discussed. Layout and operation are contrasted with the 532 nm target experiments.

  6. LOS ALAMOS, N.M., June 18, 2014-Los Alamos National Laboratory...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 18, 2014 Los Alamos to partner with Toshiba to remotely and safely peer inside nuclear reactors LOS ALAMOS, N.M., June 18, 2014-Los Alamos National Laboratory today...

  7. Switching of 800 nm femtosecond laser pulses using a compact PMN-PT modulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adany, Peter; Price, E. Shane; Johnson, Carey K.; Zhang, Run; Hui, Rongqing

    2009-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A voltage-controlled birefringent cell based on ceramic PMN-PT material is used to enable fast intensity modulation of femtosecond laser pulses in the 800 nm wavelength window. The birefringent cell based on a PMN-PT ...

  8. Sub-10-nm electron-beam lithography for templated placement of colloidal quantum dots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manfrinato, Vitor Riseti

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the investigation of resolution limits of electron-beam lithography (EBL) at the sub-10-nm scale. EBL patterning was investigated at low electron energy (2 keV) in a converted scanning electron microscope ...

  9. Sub-20nm substrate patterning using a self-assembled nanocrystal template

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabone, Ryan C

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hexagonally close-packed monolayer of lead selenide quantum dots is presented as a template for patterning with a tunable resolution from 2 to 20nm. Spin-casting and micro-contact printing are resolved as methods of ...

  10. Comprehensive inverse modeling for the study of carrier transport models in sub-50nm MOSFETs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Djomehri, Ihsan Jahed, 1976-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct quantitative 2-D characterization of sub-50 nm MOSFETs continues to be elusive. This research develops a comprehensive indirect inverse modeling technique for extracting 2-D device topology using combined log(I)-V ...

  11. Carbon nanotube assisted formation of sub-50 nm polymeric nano-structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Chia-Hua

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel processing method was developed for sub-50 nm structures by integrating quantum dots (QDs) on patterned polymer substrates. Poly(styrene-alt-maleic anhydride) (PSMa) was prepared by the initiated chemical vapor ...

  12. Timing performance of 30-nm-wide superconducting nanowire avalanche photodetectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najafi, Faraz

    We investigated the timing jitter of superconducting nanowire avalanche photodetectors (SNAPs, also referred to as cascade-switching superconducting single-photon detectors) based on 30-nm-wide nanowires. At bias currents ...

  13. Variables and units in Ocean 420 u zonal velocity (east-west) m/s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, LuAnne

    speed m/s Cg group velocity m/s k wave number 1/m frequency 1/s wavelength m T period s kinematic mixed-layer and water below C E Energy density in surface gravity wave J/m 2 #12;Some constants k Von surface height m g gravitational constant m/s 2 a amplitude of wave in sea surface height m f Coriolis

  14. STEPS: A Grid Search Methodology for Optimized Peptide Identification Filtering of MS/MS Database Search Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piehowski, Paul D.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Sandoval, John D.; Burnum, Kristin E.; Kiebel, Gary R.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For bottom-up proteomics there are a wide variety of database searching algorithms in use for matching peptide sequences to tandem MS spectra. Likewise, there are numerous strategies being employed to produce a confident list of peptide identifications from the different search algorithm outputs. Here we introduce a grid search approach for determining optimal database filtering criteria in shotgun proteomics data analyses that is easily adaptable to any search. Systematic Trial and Error Parameter Selection - referred to as STEPS - utilizes user-defined parameter ranges to test a wide array of parameter combinations to arrive at an optimal "parameter set" for data filtering, thus maximizing confident identifications. The benefits of this approach in terms of numbers of true positive identifications are demonstrated using datasets derived from immunoaffinity-depleted blood serum and a bacterial cell lysate, two common proteomics sample types.

  15. Calibration of an astrophysical spectrograph below 1 m/s using a laser frequency comb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, David F.

    We deployed two wavelength calibrators based on laser frequency combs (“astro-combs”) at an astronomical telescope. One astro-comb operated over a 100 nm band in the deep red (~ 800 nm) and a second operated over a 20 nm ...

  16. Discovery of novel glucose-regulated proteins in isolated human pancreatic islets using LC-MS/MS-based proteomics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutledge, Alexandra C.; Fontes, Ghislaine; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Anderson, David J.; Waters, Katrina M.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Smith, Richard D.; Poitout, Vincent; Metz, Thomas O.

    2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing dramatically throughout the world, and the disease has become a major public health issue. The most common form of the disease, type 2 diabetes, is due in part to insufficient insulin production from the pancreatic beta-cell. Since glucose is the most potent and physiologically important regulators of beta-cell function under physiological conditions, understanding the insulin secretory defect underlying type 2 diabetes requires a better understanding of glucose regulation of beta-cell function. To this aim, a bottom-up LC-MS/MS-based proteomics approach was used to profile pooled islets from multiple donors under basal (5 mM) or high (15 mM) glucose conditions. Our analysis discovered 256 differentially abundant proteins ({approx}p < 0.05) after 24 h of high glucose exposure from more than 4500 identified in total. Several novel glucose-regulated proteins were elevated under high glucose conditions, including regulators of mRNA splicing (Pleiotropic regulator 1), processing (Retinoblastoma binding protein 6), and function (Nuclear RNA export factor 1), in addition to Neuron navigator 1 and Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1. Proteins whose abundances markedly decreased during incubation at 15 mM glucose included Bax inhibitor 1 and Synaptotagmin-17. Many proteins found to be differentially abundant after high glucose stimulation were uncharacterized or hypothetical. These findings expand our knowledge of glucose regulation of the human islet proteome and suggest many hitherto unknown responses to glucose that require additional studies to explore novel functional roles.

  17. Application of Printed Circuit Board Technology to FT-ICR MS...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology to FT-ICR MS Analyzer Cell Construction and Prototyping. Abstract: Although Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICRMS) remains themass...

  18. Apply for the OIA Undergraduate Scholarship 1. Your name Mr. Miss, Ms., Mrs.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    Apply for the OIA Undergraduate Scholarship 1. Your name Mr. Miss, Ms., Mrs. Family Name (as of birth (country): ____________________________________________ Page 1 of 3 You are eligible

  19. 4.1.2 NANO FOUNTAIN PROBE WITH 40 NM WRITING RESOLUTION K.-H. Kim, N. Moldovan, H. D. Espinosa; "A Novel Nano Fountain Probe with sub-100 nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shull, Kenneth R.

    4.1.2 NANO FOUNTAIN PROBE WITH 40 NM WRITING RESOLUTION K.-H. Kim, N. Moldovan, H. D. Espinosa; "A Novel Nano Fountain Probe with sub-100 nm Molecular Writing Resolution", Small, 2005, ASAP. Patent the first "nano-fountain pen" capable of depositing organic ink molecules in patterns as small as 40 nm

  20. EA-2005: Chromium Plume Control Interim Measure And Plume-Center Characterization, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EA-2005: Chromium Plume Control Interim Measure And Plume-Center Characterization, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM

  1. Optical breakdown threshold investigation of 1064 nm laser induced air plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Thompson, Shane [Plasma Engineering Research Lab (PERL), College of Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University-Corpus Christi, Texas 78412 (United States)

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the theoretical and experimental measurements and analysis of the optical breakdown threshold for dry air by 1064 nm infrared laser radiation and the significance of the multiphoton and collisional cascade ionization process on the breakdown threshold measurements over pressures range from 10 to 2000 Torr. Theoretical estimates of the breakdown threshold laser intensities and electric fields are obtained using two distinct theories namely multiphoton and collisional cascade ionization theories. The theoretical estimates are validated by experimental measurements and analysis of laser induced breakdown processes in dry air at a wavelength of 1064 nm by focusing 450 mJ max, 6 ns, 75 MW max high-power 1064 nm IR laser radiation onto a 20 {mu}m radius spot size that produces laser intensities up to 3 - 6 TW/cm{sup 2}, sufficient for air ionization over the pressures of interest ranging from 10 to 2000 Torr. Analysis of the measured breakdown threshold laser intensities and electric fields are carried out in relation with classical and quantum theoretical ionization processes, operating pressures. Comparative analysis of the laser air breakdown results at 1064 nm with corresponding results of a shorter laser wavelength (193 nm) [M. Thiyagarajan and J. E. Scharer, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 36, 2512 (2008)] and a longer microwave wavelength (10{sup 8} nm) [A. D. MacDonald, Microwave Breakdown in Gases (Wiley, New York, 1966)]. A universal scaling analysis of the breakdown threshold measurements provided a direct comparison of breakdown threshold values over a wide range of frequencies ranging from microwave to ultraviolet frequencies. Comparison of 1064 nm laser induced effective field intensities for air breakdown measurements with data calculated based on the collisional cascade and multiphoton breakdown theories is used successfully to determine the scaled collisional microwave portion. The measured breakdown threshold of 1064 nm laser intensities are then scaled to classical microwave breakdown theory after correcting for the multiphoton ionization process for different pressures and good agreement, regarding both pressure dependence and breakdown threshold electric fields, is obtained. The effect of the presence of submicron particles on the 1064 nm breakdown threshold was also investigated. The measurements show that higher breakdown field is required, especially at lower pressures, and in close agreement with classical microwave breakdown theory and measurements in air.

  2. A Radiation-Hard Dual Channel 4-bit Pipeline for a 12-bit 40 MS/s ADC Prototype with extended Dynamic Range for the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter Readout Electronics Upgrade at the CERN LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayanth Kuppambatti; Jaroslav Ban; Timothy Andeen; Peter Kinget; Gustaaf Brooijmans

    2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of a radiation-hard dual channel 12-bit 40 MS/s pipeline ADC with extended dynamic range is presented, for use in the readout electronics upgrade for the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The design consists of two pipeline A/D channels with four Multiplying Digital-to-Analog Converters with nominal 12-bit resolution each. The design, fabricated in the IBM 130 nm CMOS process, shows a performance of 68 dB SNDR at 18 MHz for a single channel at 40 MS/s while consuming 55 mW/channel from a 2.5 V supply, and exhibits no performance degradation after irradiation. Various gain selection algorithms to achieve the extended dynamic range are implemented and tested.

  3. JMB--MS 467 Cust. Ref. No. CAM 517/94 [SGML] J. Mol. Biol. (1995) 248, 402413

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dynamics (X-PLOR). The final model has an R-value of 18.1% for the 5.0 to 1.8 Å data shell and 19 bonds; 129 water molecules are included in the final model. We show structural comparisons confirming of many fungal hyphae. We previouslyTexas, Austin, TX 78712 U.S.A. reported the three

  4. The SEMATECH Berkeley microfield exposure tool: learning a the 22-nm node and beyond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naulleau, Patrick; Anderson, Christopher; Baclea-an, Lorie-Mae; Denham, Paul; George, Simi; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Goldstein, Michael; Hoef, Brian; Hudyma, Russ; Jones, Gideon; Koh, Chawon; La Fontaine, Bruno; McClinton, Brittany; Miyakawa, Ryan; Montgomery, Warren; Roller, John; Wallow, Tom; Wurm, Stefan

    2009-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Microfield exposure tools (METs) continue to playa dominant role in the development of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) resists. One of these tools is the SEMATECH Berkeley 0.3-NA MET operating as a SEMATECH resist and mask test center. Here we present an update summarizing the latest resist test and characterization results. The relatively small numerical aperture and limited illumination settings expected from 1st generation EUV production tools make resist resolution a critical issue even at the 32-nm node. In this presentation, sub 22 nm half pitch imaging results of EUV resists are reported. We also present contact hole printing at the 30-nm level. Although resist development has progressed relatively well in the areas of resolution and sensitivity, line-edge-roughness (LER) remains a significant concern. Here we present a summary of recent LER performance results and consider the effect of system-level contributors to the LER observed from the SEMA TECH Berkeley microfield tool.

  5. A compact ultranarrow high-power laser system for experiments with 578nm Ytterbium clock transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappellini, Giacomo; Mancini, Marco; Pagano, Guido; Pizzocaro, Marco; Fallani, Leonardo; Catani, Jacopo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present the realization of a compact, high-power laser system able to excite the Ytterbium clock transition at 578 nm. Starting from an external-cavity laser based on a quantum dot chip at 1156 nm with an intra-cavity electro-optic modulator, we were able to obtain up to 60 mW of visible light at 578 nm via frequency doubling. The laser is locked with a 500 kHz bandwidth to a ultra-low-expansion glass cavity stabilized at its zero coefficient of thermal expansion temperature through an original thermal insulation and correction system. This laser allowed the observation of the clock transition in fermionic $^{173}$Yb with a < 50 Hz linewidth over 5 minutes, limited only by a residual frequency drift of some 0.1 Hz/s.

  6. 1 AVS 2001 National Symposium, MS-TuA9 Research supported by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    1 AVS 2001 National Symposium, MS-TuA9 Research supported by In-Situ FTIR Spectroscopy of Maryland, College Park, MD C.A. Gogol, J.F. Kushneir Inficon, Inc. East Syracuse, NY #12;2 AVS 2001 Spectroscopy Acoustic Sensing Ultra-Violet Spectroscopy #12;3 AVS 2001 National Symposium, MS-TuA9 Non

  7. REVISED 01/6/10 -MS SSRL/LCLS User Account Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    REVISED 01/6/10 - MS SSRL/LCLS User Account Form To open or renew an account, complete and submit Park, CA 94025 FAX: 650-926-8665 TEL: 650-926-3011 SSRL/LCLS SPOKESPERSON): __________________________ _________________________ __________________________ _________________________ __________________________ _________________________ __________________________ _________________________ __________________________ _________________________ SSRL/LCLS USER ACCOUNT INFORMATION #12;REVISED 01/6/10 - MS Why Have a User Account? Each user group

  8. Parallel Processing of Large Datasets from NanoLC-FTICR-MS Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Nieuwpoort, Rob V.

    for these biomarkers Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) is a powerful tool becauseParallel Processing of Large Datasets from NanoLC-FTICR-MS Measurements Y. E. M. van der Burgt, I parallel processing of large mass spectral datasets in a distributed computing environment is demonstrated

  9. Boston University User Fee Structure for ICP-ES, ICP-MS and Laser Labs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutyra, Lucy R.

    Cost per sample by laser ablation includes three spots on a sample plus an additional three spotsBoston University User Fee Structure for ICP-ES, ICP-MS and Laser Labs The Department of Earth come to BU and digest their samples in our labs with sufficient training. Laser-ICP-MS cost per sample

  10. Stanford MBA/MS Electrical Engineering Joint Degree Program Page 1 of 20 August 18, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    Stanford MBA/MS Electrical Engineering Joint Degree Program Page 1 of 20 August 18, 2014 Becky at the end of this transcript. Stanford MBA/MS Electrical Engineering Joint Degree Webinar August 18, 2014 on the Masters in Electrical Engineering and MBA Joint Degree Program. We are going to be together here for 45

  11. ENG BE/ME/MS 504: Polymers and Soft Materials GRS PY 744: Polymer Physics.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vajda, Sandor

    ENG BE/ME/MS 504: Polymers and Soft Materials GRS PY 744: Polymer Physics. Prof. Rama Bansil Class: Blackboard.bu.edu ME/MS/BE 504 PY 744 A1 POLYMERS AND SOFT MATERIALS (FALL 2012) (12FALLENGME504_A1) E with thermodynamics and statistical mechanics will be assumed. Practical applications of polymers will be discussed

  12. Name Degree Year Notes Thesis title Berg, Ronald J. MS. Zoology 1969

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    thermoregulation of fishes in relation to heated effluent from a steam-electric power plant (Lake Monona & 1975 MS.Distribution of fishes near Point Beach Power Plant, Lake Michigan; Ph.D. Habitat selection bluegill and three other panfish in Lake Wingra. Brauer, Garrett MS Zoology 1972 The effect of a power

  13. Gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) system for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grindstaff, Quirinus G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Described is a new gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) system and method for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds. All components of such a GC/MS system external to the oven of the gas chromatograph are programmably temperature controlled to operate at a volatilization temperature specific to the compound(s) sought to be separated and measured.

  14. Developing a Human Error Modeling Architecture (HEMA)1 Michael E. Fotta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrne, Mike

    ., MS-25 Houston TX 77005 byrne@rice.edu Michael S. Luther Booz Allen Hamilton 8283 Greensboro Dr Mc

  15. US WSC TX Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    an average of 77 million Btu per year, about 14% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption per Texas home is 26% higher than the national average, but...

  16. College TX 71843-25000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. A., Polymer 19(1978) 1008. L—8 JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE * LET'I'RFS No l. 1976. [14] HUANG, Y. Y., FRIEDMAN, E. A., ANDREWS, R. D. and HART_ i,.

  17. ~txF74.ptx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian Nuclearand Characterization ofC u r r e n t IENERGY'S CONTRACTS WITH +

  18. ~tx22C0.ptx

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORT Americium/Curium Vitrification Project At-234-4433 Neal R.

  19. Proceedings of the American Solar Energy Society 98 Conference Albuquerque, NM (June 1998)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    Proceedings of the American Solar Energy Society 98 Conference Albuquerque, NM (June 1998) 131 and Environmental Policy University of Delaware Newark, DE 19716 Steven Letendre Green Mountain College One College Circle Poultney, VT 05764 and Center for Energy and Environmental Policy University of Delaware Donald W

  20. A high-power 626 nm diode laser system for Beryllium ion trapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Ball; M. W. Lee; S. D. Gensemer; M. J. Biercuk

    2013-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a high-power, frequency-tunable, external cavity diode laser (ECDL) system near 626 nm useful for laser cooling of trapped $^9$Be$^+$ ions. A commercial single-mode laser diode with rated power output of 170 mW at 635 nm is cooled to $\\approx - 31$ C, and a single longitudinal mode is selected via the Littrow configuration. In our setup, involving multiple stages of thermoelectric cooling, we are able to obtain $\\approx$130 mW near 626 nm, sufficient for efficient frequency doubling to the required Doppler cooling wavelengths near 313 nm in ionized Beryllium. In order to improve nonlinear frequency conversion efficiency, we achieve larger useful power via injection locking of a slave laser. In this way the entirety of the slave output power is available for frequency doubling, while analysis may be performed on the master output. We believe that this simple laser system addresses a key need in the ion trapping community and dramatically reduces the cost and complexity associated with Beryllium ion trapping experiments.

  1. Development of a 1319-nm Laser Radar Using Fiber Optics and RF Pulse Compression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    Development of a 1319-nm Laser Radar Using Fiber Optics and RF Pulse Compression Christopher T of this concept. Our laboratory breadboard uses standard, single-mode optical fiber, off-the-shelf fiber-optic IMPLEMENTATION 3.1 Transmitter--Single-mode laser 3.2 Transmitter--Single-mode fiber 3.3 Transmitter--Optical

  2. Highly efficient semiconductor optical amplifier for the 820-860-nm spectral range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobintsov, A A; Shramenko, M V [Superlum Diodes Ltd., Moscow (Russian Federation); Uspenskii, Mikhail B; Shishkin, Viktor A [M.F. Stel'makh Polyus Research and Development Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Yakubovich, S D [Moscow State Institute of Radio-Engineering, Electronics and Automation (Technical University), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A single-pass optical amplifier with a gain up to 32 dB at a wavelength of 840 nm is developed. Its high reliability is demonstrated at a single-mode fibre-coupled cw output power up to 50 mW. Examples of efficient application of this amplifier in MOPA systems are presented. (lasers)

  3. Laser amplification at 18. 2 nm in recombining plasma from a laser-irradiated carbon fiber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chenais-Popovics, C.; Corbett, R.; Hooker, C.J.; Key, M.H.; Kiehn, G.P.; Lewis, C.L.S.; Pert, G.J.; Regan, C.; Rose, S.J.; Sadaat, S.

    1987-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Extreme ultraviolet laser amplification has been observed for the C VI Balmer-..cap alpha.. transition at 18.2 nm, with use of a novel optical system to irradiate up to 1 cm length of carbon fiber target. The measurements were time resolved and indicated peak single-transit amplification of about 30 times.

  4. A 90nm CMOS Direct Conversion Transmitter for WCDMA Xuemin Yang1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A 90nm CMOS Direct Conversion Transmitter for WCDMA Xuemin Yang1 , Anosh Davierwalla2 , David Mann3 IBM, Burlington, VT Abstract -- A linear high output power CMOS direct conversion transmitter for wideÃ?5 QFN. Index Terms -- direct conversion, CMOS, WCDMA, transmitter, third order distortion cancellation

  5. Efficient methylammonium lead iodide perovskite solar cells with active layers from 300 to 900 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Momblona, C.; Malinkiewicz, O.; Soriano, A.; Gil-Escrig, L.; Bandiello, E.; Scheepers, M.; Bolink, H. J., E-mail: henk.bolink@uv.es [Instituto de Ciencia Molecular, Universidad de Valencia, C/Catedrático J. Beltrán 2, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Roldán-Carmona, C. [Instituto de Ciencia Molecular, Universidad de Valencia, C/Catedrático J. Beltrán 2, 46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Department of Physical Chemistry and Applied Thermodynamics, University of Córdoba, Campus Rabanales, Ed. C3, 14014, Córdoba (Spain); Edri, E. [Department of Materials and Interfaces, Weizmann Institute of Science, Herzl St. 34, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficient methylammonium lead iodide perovskite-based solar cells have been prepared in which the perovskite layer is sandwiched in between two organic charge transporting layers that block holes and electrons, respectively. This configuration leads to stable and reproducible devices that do not suffer from strong hysteresis effects and when optimized lead to efficiencies close to 15%. The perovskite layer is formed by using a dual-source thermal evaporation method, whereas the organic layers are processed from solution. The dual-source thermal evaporation method leads to smooth films and allows for high precision thickness variations. Devices were prepared with perovskite layer thicknesses ranging from 160 to 900 nm. The short-circuit current observed for these devices increased with increasing perovskite layer thickness. The main parameter that decreases with increasing perovskite layer thickness is the fill factor and as a result optimum device performance is obtained for perovskite layer thickness around 300 nm. However, here we demonstrate that with a slightly oxidized electron blocking layer the fill factor for the solar cells with a perovskite layer thickness of 900 nm increases to the same values as for the devices with thin perovskite layers. As a result the power conversion efficiencies for the cells with 300 and 900 nm are very similar, 12.7% and 12%, respectively.

  6. Performance of a High-Concentration Erbium-Doped Fiber Amplifier with 100 nm Amplification Bandwidth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hajireza, P.; Shahabuddin, N. S.; Abbasi-Zargaleh, S.; Emami, S. D.; Abdul-Rashid, H. A.; Yusoff, Z. [Center for Advanced Devices and Systems, Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, 63100 Cyberjaya (Malaysia)

    2010-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing demand for higher bandwidth has driven the need for higher Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) channels. One of the requirements to achieve this is a broadband amplifier. This paper reports the performance of a broadband, compact, high-concentration and silica-based erbium-doped fiber amplifier. The amplifier optimized to a 2.15 m long erbium-doped fiber with erbium ion concentration of 2000 ppm. The gain spectrum of the amplifier has a measured amplification bandwidth of 100 nm using a 980 nm laser diode with power of 150 mW. This silica-based EDFA shows lower noise figure, higher gain and wider bandwidth in shorter wavelengths compared to Bismuth-based EDFA with higher erbium ion concentration of 3250 ppm at equivalent EDF length. The silica-based EDF shows peak gain at 22 dB and amplification bandwidth between 1520 nm and 1620 nm. The lowest noise figure is 5 dB. The gain is further improved with the implementation of enhanced EDFA configurations.

  7. An EUV Fresnel zoneplate mask-imaging microscope for lithography generations reaching 8 nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An EUV Fresnel zoneplate mask-imaging microscope for lithography generations reaching 8 nm Kenneth lithography design rules. The proposed microscope features an array of user-selectable Fresnel zoneplate-EUV, Fresnel zoneplate microscope, the AIT has been in the vanguard of high-resolution EUV mask imaging

  8. FIRST LASING AT 32 NM OF THE VUV-FEL AT DESY S. Schreiber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FIRST LASING AT 32 NM OF THE VUV-FEL AT DESY S. Schreiber , DESY, Hamburg, Germany for the VUV-FEL team Abstract The VUV-FEL is a free electron laser user facility being commissioned at DESY. It is based on the TTF-FEL, which was in operation until end of 2002 providing a photon beam for two pilot

  9. 1-10 nM E2 E2 30 E2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawato, Suguru

    076 1. E2 E2 E2 E2 2. E2 E2 2 E2 1 1-10 nM E2 5), 7) E2 30 E2 7) E2 512076-0792011 Modulation of Learning and Memory slowly but also rapidly. Slow actions of estradiol (E2) occur via nuclear receptors (ER), while rapid E2

  10. Diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser emitting at 899 nm Marc Castaing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    technologies have been developed to reach the blue range: GaN la- ser diodes, frequency-doubled laser diodes to the doping percentage, P cm-2 the absorption cross section at the pump wavelength 808 nm , A s-1 the inverse

  11. Sub-10 nm Self-Enclosed Self-Limited Nanofluidic Channel Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sub-10 nm Self-Enclosed Self-Limited Nanofluidic Channel Arrays Qiangfei Xia, Keith J. Morton report a new method to fabricate self-enclosed optically transparent nanofluidic channel arrays with sub. Here we propose and demonstrate a new method to fabricate enclosed optically transparent nanofluidic

  12. InGaAs/InP DHBTs WITH A 75nm COLLECTOR, 20nm BASE DEMONSTRATING 544 GHz f , BVCEO = 3.2V, and BVCBO = 3.4V

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodwell, Mark J. W.

    InGaAs/InP DHBTs WITH A 75nm COLLECTOR, 20nm BASE DEMONSTRATING 544 GHz f , BVCEO = 3.2V, and BVCBOGaAs base and a 75 nm InP collector containing an InGaAs/InAlAs superlattice grade. These devices exhibit collector thickness for any HBT. The devices have been scaled vertically for reduced base and collector

  13. Part I:Part I: Degradation in 3.2 nm Gate Oxides:Degradation in 3.2 nm Gate Oxides: Effects on Inverter Performance and MOSFETEffects on Inverter Performance and MOSFET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    1 Part I:Part I: Degradation in 3.2 nm Gate Oxides:Degradation in 3.2 nm Gate Oxides: Effects--Thin GateThin Gate Oxide DegradationOxide Degradation #12;2 AcknowledgmentsAcknowledgments University), ECE Miles Wiscombe (UG), ECE #12;3 Part I:Part I: Degradation in 3.2 nm Gate Oxides:Degradation in 3

  14. Optical properties and energy transfer processes of Ho{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+}- codoped fluorotellurite glass under 1550?nm excitation for 2.0??m applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Feifei; Liu, Xueqiang [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Hu, Lili; Chen, Danping, E-mail: dpchen2008@aliyun.com [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates 2.0??m emission properties and energy transfer processes in the Er{sup 3+}/Ho{sup 3+} codoped fluorotellurite glass. The measured absorption spectra demonstrate that the codoped sample can be pumped by 1550?nm excitation efficiently. Judd-Ofelt and radiative parameters are calculated and discussed. Intensive 2.0??m emission originating from Ho{sup 3+}: {sup 5}I{sub 7}?{sup 5}I{sub 8} transition is observed and a long lifetime (11?ms) of the {sup 5}I{sub 7} level is measured when Ho{sup 3+} ions are sensitized by Er{sup 3+} ions. Meanwhile, the upconversion spectra of the Er{sup 3+} singly and codoped samples are obtained and the energy transfer processes of the two ions is discussed based on the change of the upconversion emissions. The microscopic interaction parameters of the phonon-assisted (Er{sup 3+}: {sup 4}I{sub 13/2}?Ho{sup 3+}:{sup 5}I{sub 7}) process are calculated and the microparameter reaches as high as 10.1?×?10{sup ?41} cm{sup 6}/s. Hence, these results indicate that this Ho{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} codoped fluorotellurite glass will be a suitable material for developing solid state laser around 2.0??m.

  15. Updated 7-12 Ms. Markowich is currently the Director of the Battlespace Simulation Department (AIR-5.4) at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and complete adequate testing to demonstrate suitable and effective operations in the joint battlespace. Ms and simulation in a Battlespace environment. Ms. Markowich is the Department of Navy Modeling and Simulation and unmanned partnerships across the Navy and Joint Services. Ms. Markowich previously served as the Deputy

  16. Implementation of a doubling cavity to produce a 423 nm light source for the excitation of Ca isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higashimaru, H.; Kitajima, T.; Hasegawa, S. [Department of Quantum Engineering and Systems Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2009-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    For selective excitation of isotopes of Ca, a 423 nm narrow linewidth, continuous wave (CW) light source which corresponds to the S-P transition (4s{sup 21}S{sub 0}-4s4p {sup 1}P{sub 1}) is required. A solid state CW light source which generates 423 nm is difficult to commercially use. Therefore, we have developed a Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) system to obtain 423 nm lights from 846 nm lights by using a nonlinear optical crystal.

  17. Training is sponsoring two MS PowerPoint Courses. The course...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Training is sponsoring two MS PowerPoint Courses. The course options feature level 1 and level 2. This email is to gauge interest. The associated cost per class is 200.00. If...

  18. Daniel A. Goldstein 501 Campbell Hall #3411 1 Cyclotron Road MS 50B-4206

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Backer, Don

    Daniel A. Goldstein 501 Campbell Hall #3411 1 Cyclotron Road MS 50B-4206 Department of Astronomy., Brown, P.J., Finley, D. A., Fischer, J., Goldstein, D., et al. DES13S2cmm: The First Superluminous

  19. Engineering (MS, PhD) www.grad.clemson.edu/brochure/IndustEng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    maintenance. · The Advanced Quality Engineering Laboratory focuses on research to discover scientific design, reliability engineering, tolerance design, human-machine collaborative design optimizationIndustrial Engineering (MS, PhD) www.grad.clemson.edu/brochure/IndustEng #12;Introduction

  20. SOLID STATE ELECTRONICS ECE 103 M.S. COMPREHENSIVE EXAM SPRING 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Deli

    SOLID STATE ELECTRONICS ­ ECE 103 M.S. COMPREHENSIVE EXAM SPRING 2013 1. Semiconductor fundamentals-type Si sample with one end heavily doped so that the carrier concentration is 10 times greater than

  1. TEXTS OF EMPOWERMENT: A FUNCTIONAL RHETORICAL ANALYSIS OF MS. MAGAZINE IN THE FIRST FIVE YEARS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Partlow Lefevre, Sarah Taylor

    2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Ms. was the first mass mediated feminist magazine in the United States and has often been identified as an icon of the feminist movement. This study examines three rhetorical sites in the magazine during the first five ...

  2. Repres rapides pour dbuter avec MsOffice 2007 Le logo identificateur de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    Repères rapides pour débuter avec MsOffice 2007 Le logo identificateur de l'application cache des menus... Il faut cliquer sur le logo pour avoir accès aux icônes ouvrir, enregistrer, etc. #12;Les

  3. Stable formation of ultrahigh power-density 248 nm channels in Xe cluster targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borisov, Alex B.; Racz, Ervin; Khan, Shahab F.; Poopalasingam, Sankar; McCorkindale, John C.; Boguta, John; Longworth, James W.; Rhodes, Charles K. [Laboratory for X-ray Microimaging and Bioinformatics, Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607-7059 (United States); KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, EURATOM Association, P.O. Box 49, 1525 Budapest (Hungary)

    2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The optimization of relativistic and ponderomotive self-channeling of ultra-powerful 248 nm laser pulses launched in underdense plasmas with an appropriate longitudinal gradient in the electron density profile located at the initial stage of the self-channeling leads to (1) stable channel formation and (2) highly efficient power compression producing power densities in the 10{sup 19}-10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 3} range. The comparison of theoretical studies with experimental results involving the correlation of (a) Thomson images of the electron density with (b) x-ray images of the channel morphology demonstrates that more than 90% of the incident 248 nm power can be trapped in stable channels and that this stable propagation can be extended to power levels significantly exceeding the critical power of the self-channeling process.

  4. Laser-plasma source parameters for Kr, Gd, and Tb ions at 6.6 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masnavi, Majid; Szilagyi, John; Parchamy, Homaira; Richardson, Martin C. [The Townes Laser Institute, College of Optics and Photonics, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States)] [The Townes Laser Institute, College of Optics and Photonics, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Blvd., Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States)

    2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    There is increasing interest in extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) laser-based lamps for sub-10-nm lithography operating in the region of 6.6 nm. A collisional-radiative model is developed as a post-processor of a hydrodynamic code to investigate emission from resonance lines in Kr, Gd, and Tb ions under conditions typical for mass-limited EUV sources. The analysis reveals that maximum conversion efficiencies of Kr occur at 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10}W/cm{sup 2}, while for Gd and Tb it was Asymptotically-Equal-To 0.9%/2{pi}sr for laser intensities of (2-5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12}W/cm{sup 2}.

  5. Promethium-doped phosphate glass laser at 933 and 1098 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krupke, W.F.; Shinn, M.D.; Kirchoff, T.A.; Finch, C.B.; Boatner, L.A.

    1987-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A promethium (Pm/sup 3 +/) laser has been demonstrated for the first time. Trivalent promethium 147 doped into a lead-indium-phosphate glass etalon was used to produce room-temperature four-level laser emission at wavelengths of 933 and 1098 nm. Spectroscopic and kinetic measurements have shown that Pm/sup 3 +/ is similar to Nd/sup 3 +/ as a laser active ion.

  6. Investigation of a Polarization Controller in Titanium Diffused Lithium Niobate Waveguide near 1530 nm Wavelength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sung, Won Ju

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    INVESTIGATION OF A POLARIZATION CONTROLLER IN TITANIUM DIFFUSED LITHIUM NIOBATE WAVEGUIDE NEAR 1530 NM WAVELENGTH A Dissertation by WON JU SUNG Submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies of Texas A&M University... systems are being commercialized [1-3], and efforts for 400G modulators are being pursued [1, 4]. Various materials have been explored for high speed devices need [5, 6], and lithium niobate remains the most attractive choice currently [7]. Fiber...

  7. Formation of Micro and Nano Structures Using VUV 157 nm Laser Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walton, C. D.; Cockcroft, S. [Physics, Department of Physical Sciences, University of Hull, HU6 7RX (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on laser ablation experiments on micro and nano size composite structures. The surface of CR-39 and polycarbonate has been intentionally seeded with silicon carbide and silver nanowires and subsequently laser irradiated at a wavelength of 157 nm. We show scanning electron micrograph images of prismatic and conical structures produced by laser ablation and discuss a shape transformation from a prismatic to a conical structure.

  8. Table 1 Comparison of potential sub-10 nm III-V device architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Alamo, Jesús A.

    Extremely-Thin-Body (ETB) InAs quantum-well (QW) MOSFETs with improved electrostatics down to Lg = 50 nm (SAs channel. The ETB channel does not significantly degrade transport properties as evidenced by gm >1.5 mS/m and vinj = 2.4 107 cm/s. ETB-QW InAs MOSFET with scaled body for Improved Electrostatics T.-W. Kim, D

  9. InGaAsP/InGaP buried heterostructure lasers at 810 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wakao, K.; Isozumi, S.; Nishi, H.; Ohsaka, S.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    InGaAsP/InGaP buried heterostructure lasers emitting at 810 nm have been grown on GaAs substrates using two-step liquid-phase epitaxy. A threshold current of 79 mA and an external differential quantum efficiency of 26% are obtained. Fundamental transverse mode operation up to 3 mW is achieved in the laser with the active region of 3.5 ..mu..m wide.

  10. Toward Rapid Unattended X-ray Tomography of Large Planar Samples at 50-nm Resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudati, J.; Tkachuk, A.; Gelb, J.; Hsu, G.; Feng, Y.; Pastrick, R.; Lyon, A.; Trapp, D.; Beetz, T.; Chen, S.; Hornberger, B.; Seshadri, S.; Kamath, S.; Zeng, X.; Feser, M.; Yun, W. [Xradia, Inc., Concord, California (United States); Pianetta, P.; Andrews, J.; Brennan, S. [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, California (United States); Chu, Y. S. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois (United States)] (and others)

    2009-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray tomography at sub-50 nm resolution of small areas ({approx}15 {mu}mx15 {mu}m) are routinely performed with both laboratory and synchrotron sources. Optics and detectors for laboratory systems have been optimized to approach the theoretical efficiency limit. Limited by the availability of relatively low-brightness laboratory X-ray sources, exposure times for 3-D data sets at 50 nm resolution are still many hours up to a full day. However, for bright synchrotron sources, the use of these optimized imaging systems results in extremely short exposure times, approaching live-camera speeds at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory near Chicago in the US These speeds make it possible to acquire a full tomographic dataset at 50 nm resolution in less than a minute of true X-ray exposure time. However, limits in the control and positioning system lead to large overhead that results in typical exposure times of {approx}15 min currently.We present our work on the reduction and elimination of system overhead and toward complete automation of the data acquisition process. The enhancements underway are primarily to boost the scanning rate, sample positioning speed, and illumination homogeneity to performance levels necessary for unattended tomography of large areas (many mm{sup 2} in size). We present first results on this ongoing project.

  11. Materials Science and Engineering BS/MS Program The Department of Materials Science and Engineering offers a combined BS/MS degree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Materials Science and Engineering BS/MS Program The Department of Materials Science and Engineering currently enrolled in Major Status in the Materials Science and Engineering program can be admitted of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Utah. A minimum 3.5 GPA is required for admission

  12. SNRE MS and MLA Career Information From 2008-2009 the School of Natural Resources and Environment graduated 84 MS and MLA students.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Paul N.

    Corps (Protected Areas Management Advisor) USDA Forest Service Sierra National Forest (Natural Resource (Research Assistant) Matthaei Botanical Gardens and Nichols Arboretum (Natural Areas Manager) Michigan StateSNRE MS and MLA Career Information From 2008-2009 the School of Natural Resources and Environment

  13. Automated Liquid Microjunction Surface Sampling-HPLC-MS/MS Analysis of Drugs and Metabolites in Whole-Body Thin Tissue Sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kertesz, Vilmos [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fully automated liquid extraction-based surface sampling system utilizing a commercially available autosampler coupled to high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) detection is reported. Discrete spots selected for droplet-based sampling and automated sample queue generation for both the autosampler and MS were enabled by using in-house developed software. In addition, co-registration of spatially resolved sampling position and HPLC-MS information to generate heatmaps of compounds monitored for subsequent data analysis was also available in the software. The system was evaluated with whole-body thin tissue sections from propranolol dosed rat. The hands-free operation of the system was demonstrated by creating heatmaps of the parent drug and its hydroxypropranolol glucuronide metabolites with 1 mm resolution in the areas of interest. The sample throughput was approximately 5 min/sample defined by the time needed for chromatographic separation. The spatial distributions of both the drug and its metabolites were consistent with previous studies employing other liquid extraction-based surface sampling methodologies.

  14. Understanding the mechanism of nanotube synthesis for controlled production of specific (n,m) structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Resasco, Daniel E.

    2010-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report shows the extensive research on the mechanism responsible for the formation of single walled carbon nanotubes in order to get control over their structural parameters (diameter and chirality). Catalyst formulations, pre-treatment conditions, and reaction conditions are described in detail as well as mechanisms to produce nanotubes structures of specific arrays (vertical forest, nanotube pillars). Applications of SWNT in different fields are also described in this report. In relation to this project five students have graduated (3 PhD and 2 MS) and 35 papers have been published.

  15. 785 nm Raman Spectroscopy of CVD Diamond Films Paul William May, James A Smith, and Keith N Rosser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    . Here, we report that when using 785 nm excitation, the Raman spectra from thin polycrystalline diamond785 nm Raman Spectroscopy of CVD Diamond Films Paul William May, James A Smith, and Keith N Rosser Raman spectroscopy is a powerful technique often used to study CVD diamond films, however, very little

  16. 785 nm Raman spectroscopy of CVD diamond films P.W. May , J.A. Smith, K.N. Rosser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    using 785 nm excitation with 1 µm spot size, the Raman spectra from thin polycrystalline diamond films785 nm Raman spectroscopy of CVD diamond films P.W. May , J.A. Smith, K.N. Rosser School is a powerful technique often used to study CVD diamond films, however, very little work has been reported

  17. Highly efficient Nd:YVO4 laser by direct in-band diode pumping at 914 nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Highly efficient Nd:YVO4 laser by direct in-band diode pumping at 914 nm Damien Sangla,1,2 Marc (Doc. ID 109884); published July 9, 2009 A Nd:YVO4 crystal was pumped directly into the emitting level nm for an absorbed pump power of 14.6 W, corresponding to an optical efficiency of 78.7%. We

  18. Damage threshold of inorganic solids under free-electron-laser irradiation at 32.5 nm wavelength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von der Linde, D.

    to the optical components required to utilize XFEL beams, including radiation damage. Theoretical workDamage threshold of inorganic solids under free-electron-laser irradiation at 32.5 nm wavelength SC were exposed to single 25 fs long pulses of 32.5 nm free-electron-laser radiation at fluences of up

  19. 1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer as the ultimate copper diffusion barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Ba-Son [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lin, Jen-Fin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Perng, Dung-Ching, E-mail: dcperng@ee.ncku.edu.tw [Institute of Microelectronics and Electrical Engineering Department, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Center for Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the thinnest ever reported Cu diffusion barrier, a 1-nm-thick graphene tri-layer. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra show that the graphene is thermally stable at up to 750?°C against Cu diffusion. Transmission electron microscopy images show that there was no inter-diffusion in the Cu/graphene/Si structure. Raman analyses indicate that the graphene may have degraded into a nanocrystalline structure at 750?°C. At 800?°C, the perfect carbon structure was damaged, and thus the barrier failed. The results of this study suggest that graphene could be the ultimate Cu interconnect diffusion barrier.

  20. Corrosion-resistant multilayer coatings for the 28-75 nm wavelength region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soufli, R; Fernandez-Perea, M; Al, E T

    2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrosion has prevented use of SiC/Mg multilayers in applications requiring good lifetime stability. We have developed Al-based barrier layers that dramatically reduce corrosion, while preserving high reflectance and low stress. The aforementioned advances may enable the implementation of corrosion-resistant, high-performance SiC/Mg coatings in the 28-75 nm region in applications such as tabletop EUV/soft x-ray laser sources and solar physics telescopes. Further study and optimization of corrosion barrier structures and coating designs is underway.

  1. Quantitative analysis of reptation of partially extended DNA in sub-30 nm nanoslits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeh, Jia-Wei; Taloni, Alessandro; Chen, Yeng-Long; Chou, Chia-Fu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We observed reptation of single DNA molecules in fused silica nanoslits of sub-30 nm height. The reptation behavior and the effect of confinement are quantitatively characterized using orientation correlation and transverse fluctuation analysis. We show tube-like polymer motion arises for a tense polymer under strong quasi-2D confinement and interaction with surface- passivating polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) molecules in nanoslits, while etching- induced device surface roughness, chip bonding materials and DNA-intercalated dye-surface interaction, play minor roles. These findings have strong implications for the effect of surface modification in nanofluidic systems with potential applications for single molecule DNA analysis.

  2. Light trapping in a 30-nm organic photovoltaic cell for efficient carrier collection and light absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Cheng-Chia; Banerjee, Ashish; Osgood, Richard M; Englund, Dirk

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe surface patterning strategies that permit high photon-collection efficiency together with high carrier-collection efficiency in an ultra-thin planar heterojunction organic photovoltaic cell. Optimized designs reach up to 50% photon collection efficiency in a P3HT layer of only 30 nm, representing a 3- to 5-fold improvement over an unpatterned cell of the same thickness. We compare the enhancement of light confinement in the active layer with an ITO top layer for TE and TM polarized light, and demonstrate that the light absorption can increase by a factor of 2 due to a gap-plasmon mode in the active layer.

  3. Bulk and surface laser damage of silica by picosecond and nanosecond pulses at 1064 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Arlee V.; Do, Binh T

    2008-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We measured bulk and surface dielectric breakdown thresholds of pure silica for 14 ps and 8 ns pulses of 1064 nm light. The thresholds are sharp and reproducible. For the 8 ns pulses the bulk threshold irradiance is 4.75 {+-} 0.25 kW/{mu}m{sup 2}. The threshold is approximately three times higher for 14 ps pulses. For 8 ns pulses the input surface damage threshold can be made equal to the bulk threshold by applying an alumina or silica surface polish.

  4. NM Stat. 62-9 - The Utility Franchise | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources JumpNEF Advisors LLC JumpNF- Review ofNM Stat.

  5. File:USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-NM.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdf Jump to:Originalfaq.pdfFinal.pdfNM.pdf Jump to: navigation,

  6. Two-photon laser excitation of trapped 232Th+ ions via the 402 nm resonance line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrera-Sancho, O A; Zimmermann, K; Tamm, Chr; Peik, E; Taichenachev, A V; Yudin, V I; Glowacki, P

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments on one- and two-photon laser excitation of 232Th+ ions in a radiofrequency ion trap are reported. As the first excitation step, the strongest resonance line at 402 nm from the 6d^2 7s J=3/2 ground state to the 6d7s7p J=5/2 state at 24874 cm^{-1} is driven by radiation from an extended cavity diode laser. Spontaneous decay of the intermediate state populates a number of low-lying metastable states, thus limiting the excited state population and fluorescence signal obtainable with continuous laser excitation. We study the collisional quenching efficiency of helium, argon, and nitrogen buffer gases, and the effect of repumping laser excitation from the three lowest-lying metastable levels. The experimental results are compared with a four-level rate equation model, that allows us to deduce quenching rates for these buffer gases. Using laser radiation at 399 nm for the second step, we demonstrate two-photon excitation to the state at 49960 cm^{-1}, among the highest-lying classified levels of Th+. Thi...

  7. Study on the oxidation and reduction of tungsten surface for sub-50 nm patterning process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jong Kyu; Nam, Seok Woo; Cho, Sung Il; Jhon, Myung S.; Min, Kyung Suk; Kim, Chan Kyu; Jung, Ho Bum; Yeom, Geun Young [Memory Division Semiconductor Business, Samsung Electronics, San No. 16 Banwol-Ri, Taean-Eup, Hwasung-City, Gyeonggi-Do 449-711, South Korea and Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Memory Division Semiconductor Business, Samsung Electronics, San No. 16 Banwol-Ri, Taean-Eup, Hwasung-City, Gyeonggi-Do 449-711 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemical Engineering and Data Storage Systems Center, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The oxidation characteristics of tungsten line pattern during the carbon-based mask-layer removal process using oxygen plasmas have been investigated for sub-50 nm patterning processes, in addition to the reduction characteristics of the WO{sub x} layer formed on the tungsten line surface using hydrogen plasmas. The surface oxidation of tungsten lines during the mask layer removal process could be minimized by using low-temperature (300 K) plasma processing for the removal of the carbon-based material. Using this technique, the thickness of WO{sub x} on the tungsten line could be decreased to 25% compared to results from high-temperature processing. The WO{sub x} layer could also be completely removed at a low temperature of 300 K using a hydrogen plasma by supplying bias power to the tungsten substrate to provide a activation energy for the reduction. When this oxidation and reduction technique was applied to actual 40-nm-CD device processing, the complete removal of WO{sub x} formed on the sidewall of tungsten line could be observed.

  8. Nonlinear bleaching, absorption, and scattering of 532-nm-irradiated plasmonic nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liberman, V.; Sworin, M.; Kingsborough, R. P.; Geurtsen, G. P.; Rothschild, M. [Lincoln Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 244 Wood Street, Lexington, Massachusetts 02420 (United States)

    2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Single-pulse irradiation of Au and Ag suspensions of nanospheres and nanodisks with 532-nm 4-ns pulses has identified complex optical nonlinearities while minimizing material damage. For all materials tested, we observe competition between saturable absorption (SA) and reverse SA (RSA), with RSA behavior dominating for intensities above {approx}50 MW/cm{sup 2}. Due to reduced laser damage in single-pulse experiments, the observed intrinsic nonlinear absorption coefficients are the highest reported to date for Au nanoparticles. We find size dependence to the nonlinear absorption enhancement for Au nanoparticles, peaking in magnitude for 80-nm nanospheres and falling off at larger sizes. The nonlinear absorption coefficients for Au and Ag spheres are comparable in magnitude. On the other hand, the nonlinear absorption for Ag disks, when corrected for volume fraction, is several times higher. These trends in nonlinear absorption are correlated to local electric field enhancement through quasi-static mean-field theory. Through variable size aperture measurements, we also separate nonlinear scattering from nonlinear absorption. For all materials tested, we find that nonlinear scattering is highly directional and that its magnitude is comparable to that of nonlinear absorption. These results indicate methods to improve the efficacy of plasmonic nanoparticles as optical limiters in pulsed laser systems.

  9. Glass particles produced by laser ablation for ICP-MS measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, J.; Liu, C.; Wen, S.; Mao, X.; Russo, R.E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NIST) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) monitor samples from Glenstandards), and figure 2 (XRF standards). The error barsand 160 and 180 nm for XRF monitor samples. These data show

  10. {sup 99}Tc bioassay by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, L.A.

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A means of analyzing {sup 99}Tc in urine by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has been developed. Historically, {sup 99}Tc analysis was based on the radiometric detection of the 293 keV E{sub Max} beta decay product by liquid scintillation or gas flow proportional counting. In a urine matrix, the analysis of{sup 99}Tc is plagued with many difficulties using conventional radiometric methods. Difficulties originate during chemical separation due to the volatile nature of Tc{sub 2}O{sub 7} or during radiation detection due to color or chemical quenching. A separation scheme for {sup 99}Tc detection by ICP-MS is given and is proven to be a sensitive and robust analytical alternative. A comparison of methods using radiometric and mass quantitation of {sup 99}Tc has been conducted in water, artificial urine, and real urine matrices at activity levels between 700 and 2,200 dpm/L. Liquid scintillation results based on an external standard quench correction and a quench curve correction method are compared to results obtained by ICP-MS. Each method produced accurate results, however the precision of the ICP-MS results is superior to that of liquid scintillation results. Limits of detection (LOD) for ICP-MS and liquid scintillation detection are 14.67 and 203.4 dpm/L, respectively, in a real urine matrix. In order to determine the basis for the increased precision of the ICP-MS results, the detection sensitivity for each method is derived and measured. The detection sensitivity for the {sup 99}Tc isotope by ICP-MS is 2.175 x 10{sup {minus}7} {+-} 8.990 x 10{sup {minus}9} and by liquid scintillation is 7.434 x 10{sup {minus}14} {+-} 7.461 x 10{sup {minus}15}. A difference by seven orders of magnitude between the two detection systems allows ICP-MS samples to be analyzed for a period of 15 s compared to 3,600 s by liquid scintillation counting with a lower LOD.

  11. Ms Robin Felder | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhaven National LaboratoryJeffreyMs. Linda Cerrone Scientific UserMs.

  12. Ms Rocio Meneses | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhaven National LaboratoryJeffreyMs. Linda Cerrone Scientific UserMs.Rocio

  13. EA-1906: Operations, Consolidation, and Upgrades at the Office of Secure Transportation Western Command Site, Albuquerque, NM

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates environmental impacts associated with the siting and construction of several proposed buildings, including a new vehicle maintenance facility and mobile equipment maintenance building (and their support structures) at the Western Command Site, Albuquerque, NM.

  14. High-order harmonic generation in atomic hydrogen at 248 nm: Dipole-moment versus acceleration spectrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Tsin-Fu; Chu, Shih-I

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of the high-order harmonic-generation (HG) spectra of atomic hydrogen at 248 nm based on the Fourier transform of the expectation values of the induced dipole moment and acceleration. The calculations ...

  15. Proceedings of the American Solar Energy Society Solar 98 Conference Albuquerque, NM (June 1998): 231-237.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    Proceedings of the American Solar Energy Society Solar 98 Conference Albuquerque, NM (June 1998 technologies, like photovoltaics (PV), can offer additional benefits to electric utility companies utility company to defer investments in upgrading transmission and distribution facilities, among other

  16. 34 OPTICS LETTERS / Vol. 22, No. 1 / January 1, 1997 Intense plasma discharge source at 13.5 nm for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocca, Jorge J.

    and Education in Optics and Lasers, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816-2700 J. J. Rocca The f lux emitted at 13.5 nm by a lithium plasma within the bandwidth of multilayer op- tics

  17. Nanosecond-laser-induced damage in potassium titanyl phosphate: pure 532 nm pumping and frequency conversion situations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Frank R.; Hildenbrand, Anne; Natoli, Jean-Yves; Commandre, Mireille

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanosecond-laser-induced damage measurements in the bulk of KTiOPO{sub 4} (KTP) crystals are reported using incident 532 nm light or using incident 1064 nm light, which pumps more or less efficient second harmonic generation. No damage threshold fatigue effect is observed with pure 532 nm irradiation. The damage threshold of Z-polarized light is higher than the one for X- or Y-polarized light. During frequency doubling, the damage threshold was found to be lower than for pure 1064 or 532 nm irradiation. More data to quantify the cooperative damage mechanism were generated by performing fluence ramp experiments with varying conditions and monitoring the conversion efficiency. All damage thresholds plotted against the conversion efficiency align close to a characteristic curve.

  18. Ytterbium-doped fibre laser tunable in the range 1017 - 1040 nm with second-harmonic generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dontsova, E I; Kablukov, S I; Babin, Sergei A

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A cladding-pumped ytterbium-doped fibre laser has been tuned to shorter emission wavelengths (from 1040 to 1017 nm). The laser output power obtained has been compared to calculation results. We have studied frequency doubling of the laser in a KTiOPO{sub 4} (KTP) crystal with type II phase matching in the XY plane and demonstrated wavelength tuning in the range 510 - 520 nm. (lasers)

  19. Frequency doubling and sum-frequency mixing operation at 469.2, 471, and 473 nm in Nd:YAG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    at around 445, 469, or 479 nm are required to pump these Pr3-doped laser hosts [8­13]. Gal- lium nitride (GaN decades for different applications [1­4] such as la- ser remote sensing (differential absorption LIDAR to an absorption band of Pr3 [14]. For that purpose the laser has to work on the 938.5 nm transition line of Nd

  20. Efficient 13.5 nm extreme ultraviolet emission from Sn plasma irradiated by a long CO2 laser pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    Efficient 13.5 nm extreme ultraviolet emission from Sn plasma irradiated by a long CO2 laser pulse-band 2% bandwidth conversion efficiency CE from a CO2 laser to 13.5 nm extreme ultraviolet EUV light was investigated for Sn plasma. It was found that high in-band CE, 2.6%, is consistently obtained using a CO2 laser

  1. Structural distortions in 5-10 nm silver nanoparticles under high pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koski, Kristie J.; Kamp, Noelle M.; Kunz, Martin; Knight, Jason K.; Alivisatos, A.P.; Smith, R.K.

    2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present experimental evidence that silver nanoparticles in the size range of 5-10 nm undergo a reversible structural transformation under hydrostatic pressures up to 10 GPa. We have used x-ray diffraction with a synchrotron light source to investigate pressure-dependent and size-dependent trends in the crystal structure of silver nanoparticles in a hydrostatic medium compressed in a diamond-anvil cell. Results suggest a reversible linear pressure-dependent rhombohedral distortion which has not been previously observed in bulk silver. We propose a mechanism for this transition that considers the bond-length distribution in idealized multiply twinned icosahedral particles. To further support this hypothesis, we also show that similar measurements of single-crystal platinum nanoparticles reveal no such distortions.

  2. Dense wavelength multiplexing of 1550 nm QKD with strong classical channels in reconfigurable networking environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, Danna [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Peterson, Charles G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dallmann, Nicholas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hughes, Richard J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mccabe, Kevin P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nordholt, Jane E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tyagi, Hush T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Peters, Nicholas A [TELCORDIA TECHNOLOGIES; Toliver, Paul [TELCORDIA TECHNOLOGIES; Chapman, Thomas E [TELCORDIA TECHNOLOGIES; Runser, Robert J [TELCORDIA TECHNOLOGIES; Mcnown, Scott R [TELCORDIA TECHNOLOGIES

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To move beyond dedicated links and networks, quantum communications signals must be integrated into networks carrying classical optical channels at power levels many orders of magnitude higher than the quantum signals themselves. We demonstrate transmission of a 1550-nm quantum channel with up to two simultaneous 200-GHz spaced classical telecom channels, using ROADM (reconfigurable optical <1dd drop multiplexer) technology for multiplexing and routing quantum and classical signals. The quantum channel is used to perform quantum key distribution (QKD) in the presence of noise generated as a by-product of the co-propagation of classical channels. We demonstrate that the dominant noise mechanism can arise from either four-wave mixing or spontaneous Raman scattering, depending on the optical path characteristics as well <1S the classical channel parameters. We quantity these impairments and discuss mitigation strategies.

  3. Optical-fiber source of polarization-entangled photon pairs in the 1550nm telecom band

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiaoying Li; Paul L. Voss; Jay E. Sharping; Prem Kumar

    2004-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a fiber based source of polarization-entangled photon pairs that is well suited for quantum communication applications in the 1550nm band of standard fiber-optic telecommunications. Polarization entanglement is created by pumping a nonlinear-fiber Sagnac interferometer with two time-delayed orthogonally-polarized pump pulses and subsequently removing the time distinguishability by passing the parametrically scattered signal-idler photon pairs through a piece of birefringent fiber. Coincidence detection of the signal-idler photons yields biphoton interference with visibility greater than 90%, while no interference is observed in direct detection of either the signal or the idler photons. All four Bell states can be prepared with our setup and we demonstrate violations of CHSH form of Bell's inequalities by up to 10 standard deviations of measurement uncertainty.

  4. Pedestrian and traffic safety in parking lots at SNL/NM : audit background report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, Paul Ernest

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report supplements audit 2008-E-0009, conducted by the ES&H, Quality, Safeguards & Security Audits Department, 12870, during fall and winter of FY 2008. The study evaluates slips, trips and falls, the leading cause of reportable injuries at Sandia. In 2007, almost half of over 100 of such incidents occurred in parking lots. During the course of the audit, over 5000 observations were collected in 10 parking lots across SNL/NM. Based on benchmarks and trends of pedestrian behavior, the report proposes pedestrian-friendly features and attributes to improve pedestrian safety in parking lots. Less safe pedestrian behavior is associated with older parking lots lacking pedestrian-friendly features and attributes, like those for buildings 823, 887 and 811. Conversely, safer pedestrian behavior is associated with newer parking lots that have designated walkways, intra-lot walkways and sidewalks. Observations also revealed that motorists are in widespread noncompliance with parking lot speed limits and stop signs and markers.

  5. Final report on LDRD project : single-photon-sensitive imaging detector arrays at 1600 nm.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Childs, Kenton David; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Geib, Kent Martin; Hawkins, Samuel D.; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Klem, John Frederick; Sheng, Josephine Juin-Jye; Patel, Rupal K.; Bolles, Desta; Bauer, Tom M.; Koudelka, Robert

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The key need that this project has addressed is a short-wave infrared light detector for ranging (LIDAR) imaging at temperatures greater than 100K, as desired by nonproliferation and work for other customers. Several novel device structures to improve avalanche photodiodes (APDs) were fabricated to achieve the desired APD performance. A primary challenge to achieving high sensitivity APDs at 1550 nm is that the small band-gap materials (e.g., InGaAs or Ge) necessary to detect low-energy photons exhibit higher dark counts and higher multiplication noise compared to materials like silicon. To overcome these historical problems APDs were designed and fabricated using separate absorption and multiplication (SAM) regions. The absorption regions used (InGaAs or Ge) to leverage these materials 1550 nm sensitivity. Geiger mode detection was chosen to circumvent gain noise issues in the III-V and Ge multiplication regions, while a novel Ge/Si device was built to examine the utility of transferring photoelectrons in a silicon multiplication region. Silicon is known to have very good analog and GM multiplication properties. The proposed devices represented a high-risk for high-reward approach. Therefore one primary goal of this work was to experimentally resolve uncertainty about the novel APD structures. This work specifically examined three different designs. An InGaAs/InAlAs Geiger mode (GM) structure was proposed for the superior multiplication properties of the InAlAs. The hypothesis to be tested in this structure was whether InAlAs really presented an advantage in GM. A Ge/Si SAM was proposed representing the best possible multiplication material (i.e., silicon), however, significant uncertainty existed about both the Ge material quality and the ability to transfer photoelectrons across the Ge/Si interface. Finally a third pure germanium GM structure was proposed because bulk germanium has been reported to have better dark count properties. However, significant uncertainty existed about the quantum efficiency at 1550 nm the necessary operating temperature. This project has resulted in several conclusions after fabrication and measurement of the proposed structures. We have successfully demonstrated the Ge/Si proof-of-concept in producing high analog gain in a silicon region while absorbing in a Ge region. This has included significant Ge processing infrastructure development at Sandia. However, sensitivity is limited at low temperatures due to high dark currents that we ascribe to tunneling. This leaves remaining uncertainty about whether this structure can achieve the desired performance with further development. GM detection in InGaAs/InAlAs, Ge/Si, Si and pure Ge devices fabricated at Sandia was shown to overcome gain noise challenges, which represents critical learning that will enable Sandia to respond to future single photon detection needs. However, challenges to the operation of these devices in GM remain. The InAlAs multiplication region was not found to be significantly superior to current InP regions for GM, however, improved multiplication region design of InGaAs/InP APDs has been highlighted. For Ge GM detectors it still remains unclear whether an optimal trade-off of parameters can achieve the necessary sensitivity at 1550 nm. To further examine these remaining questions, as well as other application spaces for these technologies, funding for an Intelligence Community post-doc was awarded this year.

  6. Oxygen in Galactic Disk Stars: non-LTE abundances from the 777 nm O I triplet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Ramirez; C. Allende Prieto; D. L. Lambert

    2005-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxygen abundances for a large sample of dwarf and giant stars kinematically selected to be part of the Galactic thin and thick disks have been determined from a non-LTE analysis of the O I triplet lines at 777 nm. The abundance analysis was performed using the infrared flux method temperature scale, trigonometric surface gravities, and accurate atomic data. Within this framework, the ionization balance of iron lines could not be satisfied and so we adopted the iron abundances from Fe II lines only given that they are relatively less sensitive to changes in the atmospheric parameters. We show the resulting [O/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] relationship and briefly discuss its implications.

  7. Nanofiltration of Electrolyte Solutions by Sub-2nm Carbon Nanotube Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fornasiero, F; Park, H G; Holt, J K; Stadermann, M; Kim, S; In, J B; Grigoropoulos, C P; Noy, A; Bakajin, O

    2008-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Both MD simulations and experimental studies have shown that liquid and gas flow through carbon nanotubes with nanometer size diameter is exceptionally fast. For applications in separation technology, selectivity is required together with fast flow. In this work, we use pressure-driven filtration experiments to study ion exclusion in silicon nitride/sub-2-nm CNT composite membranes as a function of solution ionic strength, pH, and ion valence. We show that carbon nanotube membranes exhibit significant ion exclusion at low salt concentration. Our results support a rejection mechanism dominated by electrostatic interactions between fixed membrane charges and mobile ions, while steric and hydrodynamic effects appear to be less important. Comparison with commercial nanofiltration membranes for water softening reveals that our carbon nanotube membranes provides far superior water fluxes for similar ion rejection capabilities.

  8. The photodissociation of oxetane at 193 nm as the reverse of the Paterno-Buchi reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Shih-Huang [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center (NSRRC), 101 Hsin-Ann Road, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China)

    2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the photodissociation of oxetane (1,3-trimethylene oxide) at 193.3 nm in a molecular-beam apparatus using photofragment-translational spectroscopy and selective photoionization. We measured time-of-flight (TOF) spectra and angular anisotropy parameters {beta}(t) as a function of flight time of products at m/z=26-30 u utilizing photoionization energies from 9.8 to 14.8 eV. The TOF distributions of the products alter greatly with the employed photon energy, whereas their {beta}(t) distributions are insensitive to the photon energy. Dissociation to H{sub 2}CO+C{sub 2}H{sub 4} is the major channel in the title reaction. Three distinct dissociation paths with branching ratios 0.923:0.058:0.019 are responsible for the three features observed in the distribution of kinetic energy released in the channel H{sub 2}CO+C{sub 2}H{sub 4}. The observation of H{sub 2} and H atoms, {approx}1% in branching, indicates that products H{sub 2}CO and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} spontaneously decompose to only a small extent. Most HCO, C{sub 2}H{sub 3}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} ions originate from dissociative photoionization of products H{sub 2}CO and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}. Except atomic H and H{sub 2}, the photoproducts have large angular anisotropies, {beta}{>=}-0.8, which reflects rapid dissociation of oxetane following optical excitation at 193.3 nm. The mechanisms of dissociation of oxetane are addressed. Our results confirm the quantum-chemical calculations of Palmer et al. and provide profound insight into the Paterno-Buchi reaction.

  9. Physiological Stress Responses to Prolonged Exposure to MS-222 and Surgical Implantation in Juvenile Chinook Salmon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Katie A.; Woodley, Christa M.; Seaburg, Adam; Skalski, John R.; Eppard, Matthew B.

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    While many studies have investigated the effects of transmitters on fish condition, behavior, and survival, to our knowledge, no studies have taken into account anesthetic exposure time in addition to tag and surgery effects. We investigated stress responses to prolonged MS-222 exposure after stage 4 induction in surgically implanted juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). Survival, tag loss, plasma cortisol concentration, and blood [Na+], [K+], [Ca2+], and pH were measured immediately following anesthetic exposure and surgical implantation and 1, 7, and 14 days post-treatment. Despite the prolonged anesthetic exposure, 3-15 minutes post Stage 4 induction, there were no mortalities or tag loss in any treatment. MS-222 was effective at delaying immediate cortisol release during surgical implantation; however, osmotic disturbances resulted, which were more pronounced in longer anesthetic time exposures. From day 1 to day 14, [Na+], [Ca2+], and pH significantly decreased, while cortisol significantly increased. The cortisol increase was exacerbated by surgical implantation. There was a significant interaction between MS-222 time exposure and observation day for [Na+], [Ca2+], [K+], and pH; variations were seen in the longer time exposures, although not consistently. In conclusion, stress response patterns suggest stress associated with surgical implantation is amplified with increased exposure to MS-222.

  10. Roger E Husser, Jr., M.S., P.E. Planning, Design & Construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harms, Kyle E.

    Roger E Husser, Jr., M.S., P.E. Director Planning, Design & Construction Herschel Hoffpauir Associate Director Campus Design & Construction Cliff Gillio Manager Mechanical Engineering Neal Pendleton Project Manager Architect Danielle Welborn Civil Engineer Planning, Design & Construction 1/13/2014 Hari

  11. M.S. Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, 2005 Submitted to the Graduate Faculty of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    M.S. Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, 2005 Submitted to the Graduate Faculty of the Department of Physics and Astronomy in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy University of Pittsburgh 2009 Andrew J. Mason B.S. Physics, State University of New York

  12. 182 28th ANNUAL eMS Sorption and Desorption of Quaternary Amine Cations on Clays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    182 28th ANNUAL eMS Sorption and Desorption of Quaternary Amine Cations on Clays Z. Z. Zhang and D of organic cations on clays was first studied by Hendricks1. It has been shown that organic cations to measure the cation exchange capacity of the clay2 as well as to determine the specific surface area3

  13. advanced gc-ms technology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gc-ms technology First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Kasvinsuojeluaineiden jmien...

  14. Microsymposium 34, MS047, 2001 SOME PROBLEMS OF THE EVOLUTION OF ASTEROIDS RUBBLE PILE. G. A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Microsymposium 34, MS047, 2001 SOME PROBLEMS OF THE EVOLUTION OF ASTEROIDS ­ RUBBLE PILE. G the evolution of an asteroid ­ rubble pile ­ as an isolated object. Evidently, we can distinguish two processes the pile of individ- ual fragments with maximum energy and an- gular momentum, the distribution of which

  15. COAL RESOURCES OF THE HANNA AND CARBON By M.S. Ellis,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter HN COAL RESOURCES OF THE HANNA AND CARBON BASINS By M.S. Ellis,1 G.L. Gunther,2 A.M. Ochs,2, Delaware 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky in the toolbar to return. 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky

  16. COAL RESOURCES, POWDER RIVER BASIN By M.S. Ellis,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter PN COAL RESOURCES, POWDER RIVER BASIN By M.S. Ellis,1 G.L. Gunther,2 A.M. Ochs,2 S, Delaware 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky in the toolbar to return. 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky

  17. Computer Engineering Integrated BS/MS Handbook Dated: February 06, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Computer Engineering Integrated BS/MS Handbook Dated: February 06, 2014 INTEGRATED BACHELOR AND MASTER OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER ENGINEERING Computer Engineering Program College of Engineering & Computer@fullerton.edu Telephone: 657-278-5987 Fax: 657-278-5804 http://www.fullerton.edu/ecs/cpe #12;Computer Engineering

  18. 5 year BS/MS Accelerated Physics Program Requirements and other important information.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    5 year BS/MS Accelerated Physics Program Requirements and other important information. Overall GPA 3.300 or better You must maintain a Physics GPA 3.500 or better in core physics classes Must apply the Graduate School accelerated program application online application and include Statement of purpose Two

  19. MS Degree Program in Computer Engineering College of Engineering and Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    of computer-based systems, along with an in-depth knowledge in engineering analysis, design, implementationMS Degree Program in Computer Engineering College of Engineering and Computer Science California State University, Fullerton The Computer Engineering Program in the College of Engineering and Computer

  20. Christine L. Harvey, M.S. Page 1 CHRISTINE L. HARVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    ) Department of Advanced Geospatial Modeling and Simulation: · Perform geospatial engineering supporting the Phantom Works CEMSA project (Complex Events Modeling Simulation and Analysis) · Developed prototype P components · Voting member of the OGC (Open Geospatial Consortium) #12;Christine L. Harvey, M.S. Page 2

  1. Sediment profiles of less commonly determined elements measured by Laser Ablation ICP-MS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mcdonough, William F.

    Sediment profiles of less commonly determined elements measured by Laser Ablation ICP on a short list of high-abundance trace elements. Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry of this investigation is to harness the analytical power of Laser Ablation ICP-MS to explore the behavior of a large

  2. MICROANALYSIS OF SIDEROPHILE ELEMENTS IN FREMDLINGE USING LASER ABLATION ICP-MS. A. J. Campbell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, Lawrence

    MICROANALYSIS OF SIDEROPHILE ELEMENTS IN FREMDLINGE USING LASER ABLATION ICP-MS. A. J. Campbell 1@midway.uchicago.edu). Introduction: Laser ablation ICP mass spectrome- try has been used to measure distributions of the highly vein in Allende (CV3-oxidized). Experimental: The laser ablation system utilized a CETAC LSX-200 laser

  3. Lee, C-T A Laser Ablation Data Reduction 2006 LASER ABLATION ICP-MS: DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Cin-Ty Aeolus

    Lee, C-T A Laser Ablation Data Reduction 2006 1 LASER ABLATION ICP-MS: DATA REDUCTION Cin-Ty A. Lee 24 September 2006 Analysis and calculation of concentrations Laser ablation analyses are done in time by turning on the laser and ablating the sample, generating a time-dependent signal (Fig. 1). Measurements

  4. Environmental Hydrology and Hydraulic Engineering Degree Requirements for 1year MS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minsker, Barbara S.

    Environmental Hydrology and Hydraulic Engineering Degree Requirements for 1year MS To obtain (choose 4 hours) Core Courses [Requireda ] CEE 450: Surface Hydrology CEE 451: Env. Fluid Mech. CEE 457: Groundwater Hydrology CEE 434: Environmental Systems I CEE 595W: Seminar CEE 595W: Seminar Choose at least

  5. M.S. in Library and Information Science (M.S.(LIS)) 1. Scope and Objectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    M.S. in Library and Information Science (M.S.(LIS)) 1. Scope and Objectives This is an advanced programme in Library and Information Science with special emphasis on applications of Information technology of information systems. Contributing to the discipline of Library and Information science in terms of research

  6. Degrees Offered: MS Rice University introduced the professional master's degree in environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    in the Environment(F) CEVE536Environmental Biotechnology and Bioremediation(S) CEVE 550 Environmental Organic1 Degrees Offered: MS Rice University introduced the professional master's degree in environmental.Asaninterdisciplinaryprogram, it aims to give students the ability to predict environmental problems, not just solve them. It emphasizes

  7. COMPDYN 2011 -May 2011 Corfu Greece MS -Fuzzy methods in computational dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    COMPDYN 2011 - May 2011 Corfu Greece MS - Fuzzy methods in computational dynamics G. C. Marano, M), imprecise simulation methods and tools, subjectivity and heuristic assessments of the engineer, etc-symposium aims to present the latest advances on the application of fuzzy methods in computational mechanics

  8. Childhood Obesity and Insulin-Resistant Cynthia S. Yensel, MS, RN, CPNP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihara, Daisuke

    Childhood Obesity and Insulin-Resistant Syndrome Cynthia S. Yensel, MS, RN, CPNP Daniel Preud'Homme, MD, CNS Donna Miles Curry, PhD, RN Childhood obesity has become a national concern, health threat, and is increasing at an alarming rate. Obesity is associated with many comorbidities that last into adulthood

  9. MS ID: JLR/2013/039446 Obesity alters the gustatory perception of lipids in the mouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 MS ID: JLR/2013/039446 Obesity alters the gustatory perception of lipids in the mouse: plausible INSERM/Université de Bourgogne/AgroSup Dijon, F-21000 Dijon, France. Short title: Obesity decreases-induced obesity; GLP-1, glucagon-like peptide-1; HF, high fat diet; HFHS, high fat/high sucrose diet; LA, linoleic

  10. EB2012-MS-43 ADVANCES IN THE MODELLING OF CARBON/CARBON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , the Carbon-Carbon composites (C/C) are materials frequently used in industrial applications such as planeEB2012-MS-43 ADVANCES IN THE MODELLING OF CARBON/CARBON COMPOSITE UNDER TRIBOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS 1, homogenization, carbon ABSTRACT Thermo mechanical properties of Carbon-Carbon composite (C/C) allow them

  11. CALIBRATING MS-SSIM FOR COMPRESSION DISTORTIONS USING MLDS C. Charrier1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maloney, Laurence T.

    its performance. Index Terms-- Difference scaling, Genetic algorithm, MS-SSIM. 1. INTRODUCTION Lossy image compression techniques such as JPEG2000 al- low high compression rates, but only at the cost as the compression rate is increased to optimize the construction of psychovisual scale. Such a scale will serve

  12. Improving Alpha Spectrometry Energy Resolution by Ion Implantation with ICP-MS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dion, Michael P.; Liezers, Martin; Farmer, Orville T.; Miller, Brian W.; Morley, Shannon M.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Eiden, Gregory C.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report results of a novel technique using an Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS) as a method of source preparation for alpha spectrometry. This method produced thin, contaminant free 241Am samples which yielded extraordinary energy resolution which appear to be at the lower limit of the detection technology used in this research.

  13. ECE 230A/B AP/EDM (Grad) MS Comprehensive Exam FA10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Deli

    ECE 230A/B ­ AP/EDM (Grad) MS Comprehensive Exam FA10 Problem 1 For the 1-D Ga (everything else unchanged). (d) Replace the Si base with a uniform SiGe base of bandgap 0.1 eV smaller than that of Si (everything else unchanged). #12;

  14. Parentage: MS702-80 x NY88 Developers: Michigan State University and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    Boulder (MSF373-8) Parentage: MS702-80 x NY88 Developers: Michigan State University Douches at Michigan State University (517-355- 0271 x 194, douchesd@msu.edu). Morphological and the Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station Plant Variety Protection: In application Strengths: Boulder

  15. ENG BE/ME/MS 504: Polymers and Soft Materials GRS PY 744: Polymer Physics.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vajda, Sandor

    ENG BE/ME/MS 504: Polymers and Soft Materials GRS PY 744: Polymer Physics. Prof. Rama Bansil Class will be assumed. The course will not emphasize synthetic polymer chemistry. Practical applications of polymers of classes TEXT BOOKS Main Text Book: Required: Polymer Chemistry, 2nd Edition, Hiemenz and Lodge, CRC Press

  16. Predicting the Permeability of Pervious Concretes from Planar Images M.S. Sumanasooriya1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentz, Dale P.

    -dimensional material structures. Introduction Pervious concrete (also called Enhanced Porosity Concrete, or porous1 Predicting the Permeability of Pervious Concretes from Planar Images M.S. Sumanasooriya1 , D-dimensional material structures of pervious concretes using two-dimensional digital images obtained from actual

  17. MS/NMR: A Structure-Based Approach for Discovering Protein Ligands and for Drug Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powers, Robert

    MS/NMR: A Structure-Based Approach for Discovering Protein Ligands and for Drug Design by Coupling to bind a target protein while obtaining structure-related information as part of a struc- ture-based drug for drug discovery is the utilization of a biological assay to screen a large library of compounds (>100

  18. The Department of Mechanical Engineering and the MS & E Program present: Sandeep Kumar, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JC ME MSE The Department of Mechanical Engineering and the MS & E Program present: Sandeep Kumar, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Mechanical Engineering Department University of California Riverside-electronics, data storage, sensors and actuators, energy conversion and micro-electro-mechanical systems, where

  19. Calibration and Optimization of PTR-MS for Measurement of Methyl Hydroperoxide (CH3OOH)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    is to optimize and calibrate a Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS) for the analysis of MHP with the sensitivity to measure this species in air. A promising technique is proton transfer reaction mass by a NSF Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) grant ATM- 0754990. I would like to thank all

  20. Delineating Diseases by IMS-MS Profiling of Serum N-linked Glycans Dragan Isailovic,,,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clemmer, David E.

    the number density of the gas is much less than that for condensed phases, this separation can be carried out spectrometry (MS) measurements, with principal component analysis (PCA) for characterizing serum N. Proteome Res. 2008, 7, 1109-1117] of isomers associated with a single glycan (S1H5N4) in which PCA analysis

  1. Profiling of Human Serum Glycans Associated with Liver Cancer and Cirrhosis by IMS-MS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clemmer, David E.

    in their mobilities through the gas.5 IMS-MS is similar in many ways to electrophoretic migration in the condensed mobility spectrometry/mass spectrometry analysis of N-linked glycans from human serum. Distributions about glycan conformational and isomeric composition. Statistical analysis of data from 22 apparently

  2. Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, China, 19992006 M.S. Materials Science and Engineering, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Jiaotong University, Chengdu, China, 1999­2006 M.S. Materials Science and Engineering, 2006 B.S. Materials (865)241-0731 wangk@ornl.gov Publications #12;U.S. Patent Zhou, W. L.; Chen, J. J.; Wang, K. "Aligned

  3. Aggregate production: Fines generation during rock crushing M.S. Guimaraes a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palomino, Angelica M.

    Aggregate production: Fines generation during rock crushing M.S. Guimaraes a , J.R. Valdes b , A.M.: +1 814 865 9427; fax: +1 814 863 7304. E-mail address: amp26@psu.edu (A.M. Palomino). 0301

  4. MS2a: Bioinformatics and Computational Biology -16MT Recommended Prerequisites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldschmidt, Christina

    MS2a: Bioinformatics and Computational Biology - 16MT Recommended Prerequisites None. In particular of statistical analysis and modelling to be properly interpreted. The fields of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology have this as their subject matter and there is no sharp boundary between them. Bioinformatics has

  5. Portable 543 nm length standard and magnetic-induced zero-crossing shift on length standard transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shy,Jow-Tsong

    a convenient and objective length standard for use in both academic and industrial applications. Ever since the ve- locity of light in a vacuum was defined as 299 792 458 m/s in 1983,1 atom or molecule of the primary length-standard lasers,16 and some inter- comparisons were held thereafter.11,14 Therefore

  6. Size-selected 2, 5, and 10 nm gold nanoparticles for laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stumpo, Katherine Anne

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The analytical utility of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) is examined here. An evaluation of the parameters that affect desorption/ionization show that careful treatments of AuNPs is needed...

  7. Size-selected 2, 5, and 10 nm gold nanoparticles for laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stumpo, Katherine Anne

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The analytical utility of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) is examined here. An evaluation of the parameters that affect desorption/ionization show that careful treatments of AuNPs is needed...

  8. Using Entrez Utilities Web Service with C# and MS Visual Studio Entrez Utilities Web Service has been tested with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Judith G.

    Using Entrez Utilities Web Service with C# and MS Visual Studio 2008 Entrez Utilities Web Service Version 9.0.30729.1 SP Creating a Web Service Client Project The following walkthrough describes how to create a new C# project to access the NCBI Entrez Utilities Web Service using MS Visual Studio 2008

  9. Simulating the FTICR-MS Signal of a Decaying Beryllium-7 Ion Plasma in a 2D Electrostatic PIC Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    Simulating the FTICR-MS Signal of a Decaying Beryllium-7 Ion Plasma in a 2D Electrostatic PIC Code the FTICR-MS Signal of a Decaying Beryllium-7 Ion Plasma in a 2D Electrostatic PIC Code Michael Takeshi Nakata Department of Physics and Astronomy Doctor of Philosophy Beryllium-7 (Be-7) only decays

  10. Master's Degree in Agriculture Plant Health Management Option Option Title: Master of Science (MS) in Agriculture: Plant Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Master's Degree in Agriculture ­ Plant Health Management Option Option Title: Master of Science (MS) in Agriculture: Plant Health Management Department(s) or Program(s): Supported of Agricultural, Human, and Natural Resource Sciences (CAHNRS) Contact Name: Dr. Kim Kidwell, Director MS

  11. Evaluation of pneumatic nebulization and ns-laser ablation ICP-MS for bulk elemental analysis and 2-dimensional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claeys, Philippe

    Evaluation of pneumatic nebulization and ns-laser ablation ICP-MS for bulk elemental analysis and 2 nebulization and ns-laser ablation ICP-MS for bulk elemental analysis and 2-dimensional element mapping of iron 20XX DOI: 10.1039/b000000x The capabilities and limitations of nanosecond laser ablation ICP ­ mass

  12. Elemental fractionation during LA-ICP-MS analysis of silicate glasses: implications for matrix-independent standardization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    Elemental fractionation during LA-ICP-MS analysis of silicate glasses: implications for matrix-element solution and from the laser ablation of a range of silicate reference materials (SRM 61X series, MPI-independent standardization of LA- ICP-MS analysis of non-transparent silicates and ceramics, then, is an accurate and viable

  13. UGA IACUC Guidelines for the Use of Tricaine Methanesulfonate (MS-222) in Fishes and Other Aquatic Animals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Daniel

    UGA IACUC Guidelines for the Use of Tricaine Methanesulfonate (MS-222) in Fishes and Other Aquatic Animals MS-222 is used for anesthesia and euthanasia of fishes and other aquatic species. See widely between species and is affected by water temperature, hardness, and size of the individual fish

  14. Dynamics and manipulation of the dominant 13.5 nm in-band extreme ultraviolet emitting region of laser-produced Sn plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuspeh, Samuel Edward

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    manufacturing (HVM) of semiconductor microchips with nodes 32 nm and below is extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography using laser

  15. Page 312 Courses: Environmental Studies and Planning (ENSP) Sonoma State University 2012-2013 Catalog ENSP 306 ENviroNmENtal EthicS (3)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    -2013 Catalog ENSP 306 ENviroNmENtal EthicS (3) An examination of philosophical issues; concepts of extending and Critical Thinking). ENSP 307 ENviroNmENtal hiStory (4) History of the American environment and the ways). ENSP 308 ENviroNmENtal litEraturE (3) A survey of great American environmental books, including H. D

  16. Efficient charge carrier injection into sub-250?nm AlGaN multiple quantum well light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehnke, Frank, E-mail: mehnke@physik.tu-berlin.de; Kuhn, Christian; Guttmann, Martin; Reich, Christoph; Kolbe, Tim; Rass, Jens; Wernicke, Tim [Technische Universität Berlin, Institut für Festkörperphysik, Hardenbergstr. 36, EW 6-1, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Kueller, Viola; Knauer, Arne; Lapeyrade, Mickael; Einfeldt, Sven; Weyers, Markus [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut für Höchstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 4, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Kneissl, Michael [Technische Universität Berlin, Institut für Festkörperphysik, Hardenbergstr. 36, EW 6-1, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut für Höchstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 4, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and Mg-doping profile of AlN/Al{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}N electron blocking heterostructures (EBH) for AlGaN multiple quantum well (MQW) light emitting diodes (LEDs) emitting below 250?nm was investigated. By inserting an AlN electron blocking layer (EBL) into the EBH, we were able to increase the quantum well emission power and significantly reduce long wavelength parasitic luminescence. Furthermore, electron leakage was suppressed by optimizing the thickness of the AlN EBL while still maintaining sufficient hole injection. Ultraviolet (UV)-C LEDs with very low parasitic luminescence (7% of total emission power) and external quantum efficiencies of 0.19% at 246?nm have been realized. This concept was applied to AlGaN MQW LEDs emitting between 235?nm and 263?nm with external quantum efficiencies ranging from 0.002% to 0.93%. After processing, we were able to demonstrate an UV-C LED emitting at 234?nm with 14.5??W integrated optical output power and an external quantum efficiency of 0.012% at 18.2?A/cm{sup 2}.

  17. A Multi-chain Measurements Averaging TDC Implemented in a 40 nm FPGA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi Shen; Shubin Liu; Binxiang Qi; Qi An; Shengkai Liao; Chengzhi Peng; Weiyue Liu

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A high precision and high resolution time-to-digital converter (TDC) implemented in a 40 nm fabrication process Virtex-6 FPGA is presented in this paper. The multi-chain measurements averaging architecture is used to overcome the resolution limitation determined by intrinsic cell delay of the plain single tapped-delay chain. The resolution and precision are both improved with this architecture. In such a TDC, the input signal is connected to multiple tapped-delay chains simultaneously (the chain number is M), and there is a fixed delay cell between every two adjacent chains. Each tapped-delay chain is just a plain TDC and should generate a TDC time for a hit input signal, so totally M TDC time values should be got for a hit signal. After averaging, the final TDC time is obtained. A TDC with 3 ps resolution (i.e. bin size) and 6.5 ps precision (i.e. RMS) has been implemented using 8 parallel tapped-delay chains. Meanwhile the plain TDC with single tapped-delay chain yields 24 ps resolution and 18 ps precision.

  18. Detonation wave profiles measured in plastic bonded explosives using 1550 nm photon doppler velocimetry (PDV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavsen, Richard L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bartram, Brian D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sanchez, Nathaniel (nate) J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present detonation wave profiles measured in two TATB based explosives and two HMX based explosives. Profiles were measured at the interface of the explosive and a Lithium-Fluoride (LiF) window using 1550 nm Photon Doppler Velocimetry (PDV). Planar detonations were produced by impacting the explosive with a projectile launched in a gas-gun. The impact state was varied to produce varied distance to detonation, and therefore varied support of the Taylor wave following the Chapman-Jouget (CJ) or sonic state. Profiles from experiments with different support should be the same between the Von-Neumann (VN) spike and CJ state and different thereafter. Comparison of profiles with differing support, therefore, allows us to estimate reaction zone lengths. For the TATB based explosive, a reaction zone length of {approx} 3.9 mm, 500 ns was measured in EDC-35, and a reaction zone length of {approx} 6.3 mm, 800 ns was measured in PBX 9502 pre-cooled to -55 C. The respective VN spike state was 2.25 {+-} 0.05 km/s in EDC-35 and 2.4 {+-} 0.1 km/s in the cooled PBX 9502. We do not believe we have resolved either the VN spike state (> 2.6 km/s) nor the reaction zone length (<< 50 ns) in the HMX based explosives.

  19. Stress-induced piezoelectric field in GaN-based 450-nm light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tawfik, Wael Z. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Chonnam National University, Yongbong 300 Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef 62511 (Egypt); Hyeon, Gil Yong; Lee, June Key, E-mail: junekey@chonnam.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Chonnam National University, Yongbong 300 Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the influence of the built-in piezoelectric field induced by compressive stress on the characteristics of GaN-based 450-nm light-emitting diodes (LEDs) prepared on sapphire substrates of different thicknesses. As the sapphire substrate thickness was reduced, the compressive stress in the GaN layer was released, resulting in wafer bowing. The wafer bowing-induced mechanical stress altered the piezoelectric field, which in turn reduced the quantum confined Stark effect in the InGaN/GaN active region of the LED. The flat-band voltage was estimated by measuring the applied bias voltage that induced a 180° phase shift in the electro-reflectance (ER) spectrum. The piezoelectric field estimated by the ER spectra changed by ?110?kV/cm. The electroluminescence spectral peak wavelength was blue-shifted, and the internal quantum efficiency was improved by about 22% at a high injection current of 100?mA. The LED on the 60-?m-thick sapphire substrate exhibited the highest light output power of ?59?mW at an injection current of 100?mA, with the operating voltage unchanged.

  20. RPT_PERIOD","R_S_NAME","LINE_NUM","PROD_CODE","PROD_NAME","PORT...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    SSOR-TX","TX","TEXAS",3 "applicationvnd.ms-excel","ASTRA OIL CO LLC ",2,138,"All Other Motor Gas Blending Components",1001,"NEW YORK, NY","NEW YORK",1,940,"VENEZUELA",51,0,0,"KIND...

  1. Office of Fossil Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    GA 2.9 3.0 5.9 Everett, MA 7.7 7.6 15.4 Freeport, TX - - - Golden Pass, TX - - - Gulf LNG, MS - - - Lake Charles, LA - - - Neptune Deepwater Port - - - Northeast Gateway Energy...

  2. Resolving three-dimensional shape of sub-50?nm wide lines with nanometer-scale sensitivity using conventional optical microscopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Attota, Ravikiran, E-mail: Ravikiran.attota@nist.gov; Dixson, Ronald G. [Semiconductor and Dimensional Metrology Division, NIST, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally demonstrate that the three-dimensional (3-D) shape variations of nanometer-scale objects can be resolved and measured with sub-nanometer scale sensitivity using conventional optical microscopes by analyzing 4-D optical data using the through-focus scanning optical microscopy (TSOM) method. These initial results show that TSOM-determined cross-sectional (3-D) shape differences of 30?nm–40?nm wide lines agree well with critical-dimension atomic force microscope measurements. The TSOM method showed a linewidth uncertainty of 1.22?nm (k?=?2). Complex optical simulations are not needed for analysis using the TSOM method, making the process simple, economical, fast, and ideally suited for high volume nanomanufacturing process monitoring.

  3. Electron Transport Behavior on Gate Length Scaling in Sub-50 nm GaAs Metal Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Jaeheon [Department of Electronic Engineering, Kangnam University, 111 Gugal-dong, Giheung-gu, Yongin-city, Gyeonggi-do, Korea 446-702 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Short channel GaAs Metal Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MESFETs) have been fabricated with gate length to 20 nm, in order to examine the characteristics of sub-50 nm MESFET scaling. Here the rise in the measured transconductance is mainly attributed to electron velocity overshoot. For gate lengths below 40 nm, however, the transconductance drops suddenly. The behavior of velocity overshoot and its degradation is investigated and simulated by using a transport model based on the retarded Langevin equation (RLE). This indicates the existence of a minimum acceleration length needed for the carriers to reach the overshoot velocity. The argument shows that the source resistance must be included as an internal element, or appropriate boundary condition, of relative importance in any model where the gate length is comparable to the inelastic mean free path of the carriers.

  4. Broadband superluminescent diodes with bell-shaped spectra emitting in the range from 800 to 900 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreeva, E V; Il'ichenko, S N; Kostin, Yu O; Lapin, P I [Superlum Diodes Ltd., Moscow (Russian Federation); Ladugin, M A; Marmalyuk, A A [Open Joint-Stock Company 'M.F. Stel'makh Polyus Research and Development Institute', Moscow (Russian Federation); Yakubovich, S D [Moscow State Institute of Radio-Engineering, Electronics and Automation (Technical University), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum-well superluminescent diodes (SLD) with extremely thin active (AlGa)As and (InGa)As layers and centre wavelengths about 810, 840, 860 and 880 nm are experimentally studied. Their emission spectrum possesses the shape close to Gaussian, its FWHM being 30 – 60 nm depending on the length of the active channel and the level of pumping. Under cw injection, the output power of light-emitting modules based on such SLDs can amount to 1.0 – 25 mW at the output of a single-mode fibre. It is demonstrated that the operation lifetime of these devices exceeds 30000 hours. Based on the light-emitting modules the prototypes of combined BroadLighter series light sources are implemented having a bell-shaped spectrum with the width up to 100 nm. (optical radiation sources)

  5. Testing improved staggered fermions with $m_s$ and $B_K$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, W; Fleming, G T; Gupta, R; Kilcup, G; Sharpe, S R; Lee, Weonjong; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Fleming, George T.; Gupta, Rajan; Kilcup, Gregory; Sharpe, Stephen R.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the improvement of staggered fermions using hypercubically smeared (HYP) links. We calculate the strange quark mass and the kaon B-parameter, $B_K$, in quenched QCD on a $16^3 \\times 64$ lattice at $\\beta=6.0$ ($1/a=1.95 GeV$). We find $m_s(\\bar{\\rm MS},2 {\\rm GeV})=101.2\\pm1.3\\pm4 $MeV and $B_K(\\bar{\\rm MS},2 {\\rm GeV}) = 0.580 \\pm 0.018\\pm 0.041$, where the first error is from statistics and fitting, and the second from using one-loop matching factors. Comparing to quenched results obtained using unimproved staggered fermions and other discretizations, we argue that the size of discretization errors are substantially reduced by improvement.

  6. Solid-phase chelation for the determination of trace elements by ICP-MS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, D.B.; Kingston, H.M.; Nogay, D. [Duquesne Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A low pressure method for the concentration of analytes and elimination of matrix elements prior to determination by ICP-MS is described. The method reduces the interferences caused by high concentrations of matrix elements in samples and biases caused by differences between samples and standards by delivering the analytes to the ICP-MS in a consistent nitric acid matrix. The method uses a commercially available low pressure sample manipulation system (PrepLab, Fisons) to perform Solid Phase Chelation (SPC) on an iminodiacetate column. The effectiveness of the method is demonstrated for the determination of Cd, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, U, and Zn in the certified reference materials CASS-2, near shore seawater, NASS-4, open ocean seawater, and 1643b, trace elements in water. The detection limits for 10 mL samples ranged from 0.4 ng L{sup -1} for Co to 5.6 ng L{sup -1} for Ni and Zn.

  7. Improved DESI-MS Performance using Edge Sampling and aRotational Sample Stage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kertesz, Vilmos [ORNL; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The position of the surface to be analyzed relative to the sampling orifice or capillary into the mass spectrometer has been known to dramatically affect the observed signal levels in desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESIMS). In analyses of sample spots on planar surfaces, DESI-MS signal intensities as much as five times greater were routinely observed when the bottom of the sampling capillary was appropriately positioned beneath the surface plane ( edge sampling") compared to when the capillary just touched the surface. To take advantage of the optimum "edge sampling" geometry and to maximize the number of samples that could be analyzed in this configuration, a rotational sample stage was integrated into a typical DESI-MS setup. The rapid quantitative determination of caffeine in two diet sport drinks (Diet Turbo Tea, Speed Stack Grape) spiked with an isotopically labeled internal standard demonstrated the utility of this approach.

  8. Large-sensitive-area superconducting nanowire single-photon detector at 850 nm with high detection efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Hao; You, Lixing; Yang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Weijun; Liu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Sijing; Wang, Zhen; Xie, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Satellite-ground quantum communication requires single-photon detectors of 850-nm wavelength with both high detection efficiency and large sensitive area. We developed superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) on one-dimensional photonic crystals, which acted as optical cavities to enhance the optical absorption, with a sensitive-area diameter of 50 um. The fabricated multimode fiber coupled NbN SNSPDs exhibited a maximum system detection efficiency (DE) of up to 82% and a DE of 78% at a dark count rate of 100 Hz at 850-nm wavelength as well as a system jitter of 105 ps.

  9. Nucleation of single GaN nanorods with diameters smaller than 35 nm by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yen-Ting [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, S-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Araki, Tsutomu [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Ritsumeikan University, 525-8577 Shiga (Japan)] [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Ritsumeikan University, 525-8577 Shiga (Japan); Palisaitis, Justinas; Persson, Per O. Å.; Olof Holtz, Per; Birch, Jens [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, S-58183 Linköping (Sweden)] [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, S-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Chen, Li-Chyong [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Kuei-Hsien [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China) [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China); Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China); Nanishi, Yasushi [Global Innovation Research Organization, Ritsumeikan University, 525-8577 Shiga (Japan)] [Global Innovation Research Organization, Ritsumeikan University, 525-8577 Shiga (Japan)

    2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Nucleation mechanism of catalyst-free GaN nanorod grown on Si(111) is investigated by the fabrication of uniform and narrow (<35 nm) nanorods without a pre-defined mask by molecular beam epitaxy. Direct evidences show that the nucleation of GaN nanorods stems from the sidewall of the underlying islands down to the Si(111) substrate, different from commonly reported ones on top of the island directly. Accordingly, the growth and density control of the nanorods is exploited by a “narrow-pass” approach that only narrow nanorod can be grown. The optimal size of surrounding non-nucleation area around single nanorod is estimated as 88 nm.

  10. Evaluation of ultra-low background materials for uranium and thorium using ICP-MS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoppe, E. W.; Overman, N. R.; LaFerriere, B. D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

    2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An increasing number of physics experiments require low background materials for their construction. The presence of Uranium and Thorium and their progeny in these materials present a variety of unwanted background sources for these experiments. The sensitivity of the experiments continues to drive the necessary levels of detection ever lower as well. This requirement for greater sensitivity has rendered direct radioassay impractical in many cases requiring large quantities of material, frequently many kilograms, and prolonged counting times, often months. Other assay techniques have been employed such as Neutron Activation Analysis but this requires access to expensive facilities and instrumentation and can be further complicated and delayed by the formation of unwanted radionuclides. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a useful tool and recent advancements have increased the sensitivity particularly in the elemental high mass range of U and Th. Unlike direct radioassay, ICP-MS is a destructive technique since it requires the sample to be in liquid form which is aspirated into a high temperature plasma. But it benefits in that it usually requires a very small sample, typically about a gram. This paper discusses how a variety of low background materials such as copper, polymers, and fused silica are made amenable to ICP-MS assay and how the arduous task of maintaining low backgrounds of U and Th is achieved.

  11. Evaluation of Ultra-Low Background Materials for Uranium and Thorium Using ICP-MS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoppe, Eric W.; Overman, Nicole R.; LaFerriere, Brian D.

    2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An increasing number of physics experiments require low background materials for their construction. The presence of Uranium and Thorium and their progeny in these materials present a variety of unwanted background sources for these experiments. The sensitivity of the experiments continues to drive the necessary levels of detection ever lower as well. This requirement for greater sensitivity has rendered direct radioassay impractical in many cases requiring large quantities of material, frequently many kilograms, and prolonged counting times, often months. Other assay techniques have been employed such as Neutron Activation Analysis but this requires access to expensive facilities and instrumentation and can be further complicated and delayed by the formation of unwanted radionuclides. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a useful tool and recent advancements have increased the sensitivity particularly in the elemental high mass range of U and Th. Unlike direct radioassay, ICP-MS is a destructive technique since it requires the sample to be in liquid form which is aspirated into a high temperature plasma. But it benefits in that it usually requires a very small sample, typically about a gram. Here we will discuss how a variety of low background materials such as copper, polymers, and fused silica are made amenable to ICP-MS assay and how the arduous task of maintaining low backgrounds of U and Th is achieved.

  12. Sources of Technical Variability in Quantitative LC-MS Proteomics: Human Brain Tissue Sample Analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piehowski, Paul D.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Orton, Daniel J.; Xie, Fang; Moore, Ronald J.; Ramirez Restrepo, Manuel; Engel, Anzhelika; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Albin, Roger L.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Myers, Amanda J.

    2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    To design a robust quantitative proteomics study, an understanding of both the inherent heterogeneity of the biological samples being studied as well as the technical variability of the proteomics methods and platform is needed. Additionally, accurately identifying the technical steps associated with the largest variability would provide valuable information for the improvement and design of future processing pipelines. We present an experimental strategy that allows for a detailed examination of the variability of the quantitative LC-MS proteomics measurements. By replicating analyses at different stages of processing, various technical components can be estimated and their individual contribution to technical variability can be dissected. This design can be easily adapted to other quantitative proteomics pipelines. Herein, we applied this methodology to our label-free workflow for the processing of human brain tissue. For this application, the pipeline was divided into four critical components: Tissue dissection and homogenization (extraction), protein denaturation followed by trypsin digestion and SPE clean-up (digestion), short-term run-to-run instrumental response fluctuation (instrumental variance), and long-term drift of the quantitative response of the LC-MS/MS platform over the 2 week period of continuous analysis (instrumental stability). From this analysis, we found the following contributions to variability: extraction (72%) >> instrumental variance (16%) > instrumental stability (8.4%) > digestion (3.1%). Furthermore, the stability of the platform and its’ suitability for discovery proteomics studies is demonstrated.

  13. Performance characteristics of cryofocusing GC/MS system at BWXT Pantex Plant.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Jason R.; Banet, Judith F.; Ithaca, Jerry (BWXT Pantex Plant, Amarillo, TX); Thornberg, Steven Michael; Woods, Lorelei (BWXT Pantex Plant, Amarillo, TX)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ensuring the reliability of all components within a weapon system becomes increasingly important as the stockpile ages. One of the most noteworthy surveillance techniques designed to circumvent (or take place alongside) traditional D&I operations is to collect a sample of gas from within the internal atmosphere of a particular region in a weapon. While a wealth of information about the weapon may be encoded within the composition of its gas sample, our access to that information is only as good as the method used to analyze the sample. It has been shown that cryofocusing-GC/MS offers advantages in terms of sensitivity, ease of sample collection, and robustness of the equipment/hardware used. Attention is therefore focused on qualifying a cryo-GC/MS system for routine stockpile surveillance operations at Pantex. A series of tests were performed on this instrument to characterize the linearity and repeatability of its response using two different standard gas mixes (ozone precursor and TO-14) at various concentrations. This paper outlines the methods used and the results of these tests in order to establish a baseline by which to compare future cryo-GC/MS analyses. A summary of the results is shown.

  14. NM WAIDS: A PRODUCED WATER QUALITY AND INFRASTRUCTURE GIS DATABASE FOR NEW MEXICO OIL PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martha Cather; Robert Lee; Ibrahim Gundiler; Andrew Sung; Naomi Davidson; Ajeet Kumar Reddy; Mingzhen Wei

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The New Mexico Water and Infrastructure Data System (NM WAIDS) seeks to alleviate a number of produced water-related issues in southeast New Mexico. The project calls for the design and implementation of a Geographical Information System (GIS) and integral tools that will provide operators and regulators with necessary data and useful information to help them make management and regulatory decisions. The major components of this system are: (1) databases on produced water quality, cultural and groundwater data, oil pipeline and infrastructure data, and corrosion information, (2) a web site capable of displaying produced water and infrastructure data in a GIS or accessing some of the data by text-based queries, (3) a fuzzy logic-based, site risk assessment tool that can be used to assess the seriousness of a spill of produced water, and (4) a corrosion management toolkit that will provide operators with data and information on produced waters that will aid them in deciding how to address corrosion issues. The various parts of NM WAIDS will be integrated into a website with a user-friendly interface that will provide access to previously difficult-to-obtain data and information. Primary attention during the first six months of this project has been focused on creating the water quality databases for produced water and surface water, along with collection of corrosion information and building parts of the corrosion toolkit. Work on the project to date includes: (1) Creation of a water quality database for produced water analyses. The database was compiled from a variety of sources and currently has over 4000 entries for southeast New Mexico. (2) Creation of a web-based data entry system for the water quality database. This system allows a user to view, enter, or edit data from a web page rather than having to directly access the database. (3) Creation of a semi-automated data capturing system for use with standard water quality analysis forms. This system improves the accuracy and speed of water quality data entry. (4) Acquisition of ground water data from the New Mexico State Engineer's office, including chloride content and TDS (Total Dissolved Solids) for over 30,000 data points in southeast New Mexico. (5) Creation of a web-based scale prediction tool, again with a web-based interface, that uses two common scaling indices (Stiff-Davis and Oddo-Thomson) to predict the likelihood of scaling. This prediction tool can either run from user input data, or the user can select samples from the water analysis database. (6) Creation of depth-to-groundwater maps for the study area. (7) Analysis of water quality data by formation. (8) Continuation of efforts to collect produced water quality information from operators in the southeast New Mexico area. (9) Qualitative assessment of produced water from various formations regarding corrosivity. (10) Efforts at corrosion education in the region through operator visits. Future work on this project will include: (11) Development of an integrated web and GIS interface for all the information collected in this effort. (12) Continued development of a fuzzy logic spill risk assessment tool that was initially developed prior to this project. Improvements will include addition of parameters found to be significant in determining the impact of a brine spill at a specific site. (13) Cleanup and integration of water quality databases. (14) Compilation of both hard copy and online corrosion toolkit material.

  15. NM WAIDS: A PRODUCED WATER QUALITY AND INFRASTRUCTURE GIS DATABASE FOR NEW MEXICO OIL PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martha Cather; Robert Lee; Ibrahim Gundiler; Andrew Sung

    2003-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The New Mexico Water and Infrastructure Data System (NM WAIDS) seeks to alleviate a number of produced water-related issues in southeast New Mexico. The project calls for the design and implementation of a Geographical Information System (GIS) and integral tools that will provide operators and regulators with necessary data and useful information to help them make management and regulatory decisions. The major components of this system are: (1) Databases on produced water quality, cultural and groundwater data, oil pipeline and infrastructure data, and corrosion information. (2) A web site capable of displaying produced water and infrastructure data in a GIS or accessing some of the data by text-based queries. (3) A fuzzy logic-based, site risk assessment tool that can be used to assess the seriousness of a spill of produced water. (4) A corrosion management toolkit that will provide operators with data and information on produced waters that will aid them in deciding how to address corrosion issues. The various parts of NM WAIDS will be integrated into a website with a user-friendly interface that will provide access to previously difficult-to-obtain data and information. Primary attention during the first six months of this project was focused on creating the water quality databases for produced water and surface water, along with collecting of corrosion information and building parts of the corrosion toolkit. Work on the project to date includes: (1) Creation of a water quality database for produced water analyses. The database was compiled from a variety of sources and currently has over 7000 entries for New Mexico. (2) Creation of a web-based data entry system for the water quality database. This system allows a user to view, enter, or edit data from a web page rather than having to directly access the database. (3) Creation of a semi-automated data capturing system for use with standard water quality analysis forms. This system improves the accuracy and speed of water quality data entry. (4) Acquisition of ground water data from the New Mexico State Engineer's office, including chloride content and TDS (Total Dissolved Solids) for over 30,000 data points in southeast New Mexico. (5) Creation of a web-based scale prediction tool, again with a web-based interface, that uses two common scaling indices to predict the likelihood of scaling. This prediction tool can either run from user input data, or the user can select samples from the water analysis database. (6) Creation of depth-to-groundwater maps for the study area. (7) Analysis of water quality data by formation. (8) Continuation of efforts to collect produced water quality information from operators in the southeast New Mexico area. (9) Qualitative assessment of produced water from various formations regarding corrosivity. (10) Efforts at corrosion education in the region through operator visits. Future work on this project will include: (1) Development of an integrated web and GIS interface for all the information collected in this effort. (2) Continued development of a fuzzy logic spill risk assessment tool that was initially developed prior to this project. Improvements will include addition of parameters found to be significant in determining the impact of a brine spill at a specific site. (3) Compilation of both hard copy and online corrosion toolkit material.

  16. Use of a dynamic simulation model to understand nitrogen cycling in the middle Rio Grande, NM.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meixner, Tom (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Oelsner, Gretchen (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Brooks, Paul (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Roach, Jesse D.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water quality often limits the potential uses of scarce water resources in semiarid and arid regions. To best manage water quality one must understand the sources and sinks of both solutes and water to the river system. Nutrient concentration patterns can identify source and sink locations, but cannot always determine biotic processes that affect nutrient concentrations. Modeling tools can provide insight into these large-scale processes. To address questions about large-scale nitrogen removal in the Middle Rio Grande, NM, we created a system dynamics nitrate model using an existing integrated surface water--groundwater model of the region to evaluate our conceptual models of uptake and denitrification as potential nitrate removal mechanisms. We modeled denitrification in groundwater as a first-order process dependent only on concentration and used a 5% denitrification rate. Uptake was assumed to be proportional to transpiration and was modeled as a percentage of the evapotranspiration calculated within the model multiplied by the nitrate concentration in the water being transpired. We modeled riparian uptake as 90% and agricultural uptake as 50% of the respective evapotranspiration rates. Using these removal rates, our model results suggest that riparian uptake, agricultural uptake and denitrification in groundwater are all needed to produce the observed nitrate concentrations in the groundwater, conveyance channels, and river as well as the seasonal concentration patterns. The model results indicate that a total of 497 metric tons of nitrate-N are removed from the Middle Rio Grande annually. Where river nitrate concentrations are low and there are no large nitrate sources, nitrate behaves nearly conservatively and riparian and agricultural uptake are the most important removal mechanisms. Downstream of a large wastewater nitrate source, denitrification and agricultural uptake were responsible for approximately 90% of the nitrogen removal.

  17. Development of tandem time-of-flight instrumentation for the examination of prompt photodissociation of peptides using 193-nm radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morgan, Joseph William

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    YIHPF)........................................................................................ 115 65 Prompt photofragment ion spectrum of phosphorylated peptide KRpTLRR............................................................................................... 116 66 Prompt photofragment ion spectrum of phosphorylated peptide F(Nle)(Nle... acid sequence is then determined by manual inspection of the data [30], or via database searching [109- 111]. Although CID has several limitations, it is the most commonly employed method for tandem MS analysis [38,39]. For example, activation...

  18. Development of tandem time-of-flight instrumentation for the examination of prompt photodissociation of peptides using 193-nm radiation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morgan, Joseph William

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    YIHPF)........................................................................................ 115 65 Prompt photofragment ion spectrum of phosphorylated peptide KRpTLRR............................................................................................... 116 66 Prompt photofragment ion spectrum of phosphorylated peptide F(Nle)(Nle... acid sequence is then determined by manual inspection of the data [30], or via database searching [109- 111]. Although CID has several limitations, it is the most commonly employed method for tandem MS analysis [38,39]. For example, activation...

  19. Calibration of Silver Plasmon Rulers in the 1-25 nm Separation Range: Experimental Indications of Distinct Plasmon Coupling Regimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calibration of Silver Plasmon Rulers in the 1-25 nm Separation Range: Experimental Indications of Distinct Plasmon Coupling Regimes Linglu Yang, Hongyun Wang, Bo Yan, and Bjo¨rn M. Reinhard* Department nanoparticles, so-called silver plasmon rulers, are synthesized with use of a rational DNA programmed self

  20. June 15, 2004 / Vol. 29, No. 12 / OPTICS LETTERS 1357 Highly coherent light at 13 nm generated by use of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartels, Randy

    , and in developing new types of nano- probe. However, many EUV sources, such as synchrotrons and undulators1 and high Bartels et al. demonstrated that EUV light produced by HHG in gas-filled hollow waveguides exhibits full spatial coherence at wavelengths around 30 nm.3 The extended propagation length in the hollow

  1. Power Supply Optimization in Sub-130 nm Leakage Dominant Technologies Man L Mui Kaustav Banerjee Amit Mehrotra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power Supply Optimization in Sub-130 nm Leakage Dominant Technologies Man L Mui Kaustav Banerjee a methodology for systematically optimizing the power supply voltage for maximizing the performance of VLSI cir- cuits in technologies where leakage power is not an insignificant fraction of the total power

  2. Photodissociation of Ozone from 321 to 329 nm: The Relative Yields P2) with O2(X 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houston, Paul L.

    Photodissociation of Ozone from 321 to 329 nm: The Relative Yields of O(3 P2) with O2(X 3 g - ), O2 Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Product imaging of O(3 P2) following dissociation of ozone has been used to determine the relative yields of the product channels O(3 P2) + O2(X 3 g - ) of ozone. All three channels

  3. A Fiber-Optic-Based 1550-nm Laser Radar Altimeter with RF Pulse Compression Christopher Allen, Sivaprasad Gogineni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    A Fiber-Optic-Based 1550-nm Laser Radar Altimeter with RF Pulse Compression Christopher Allen-the-shelf fiber-optic components and traditional RF and digital signal processing techniques to achieve fine erbium-doped fiber amplifiers (EDFAs) could be used to provide optical gain. The transmitted signal

  4. Development of a 1319 nm Laser Radar using Fiber-Optics and RF Pulse Compression: Receiver Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    Development of a 1319 nm Laser Radar using Fiber-Optics and RF Pulse Compression: Receiver and commercially available fiber-optic technologies. We use radio frequency (RF) pulse compression and digital commensurate with the desired range accuracy. With today's off-the-shelf fiber-optic components, multi

  5. Low-threshold, mirrorless emission at 981 nm in an Yb,Gd,Lu:KYW inverted rib waveguide laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low-threshold, mirrorless emission at 981 nm in an Yb,Gd,Lu:KYW inverted rib waveguide laser Amol for generating short pulses [2]. Liquid phase epitaxy has been used to fabricate planar [3, 4] and channel [5, 6W and a channel waveguide laser with an output power of 11 mW [9]. In this paper we demonstrate mirrorless lasing

  6. 2512 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 36, NO. 5, OCTOBER 2008 Experimental Investigation of 193-nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scharer, John E.

    2512 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 36, NO. 5, OCTOBER 2008 Experimental Investigation of 193-nm Laser Breakdown in Air Magesh Thiyagarajan, Member, IEEE, and John E. Scharer, Senior Member, IEEE Abstract--We present the measurements and analysis of laser- induced breakdown processes in dry

  7. Sub-10-nm half-pitch electron-beam lithography by using poly,,methyl methacrylate... as a negative resist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berggren, Karl K.

    is of great importance for high-density magnetic storage, integrated circuits, and nanoelectronic and nanophotonic devices. Until now, hydrogen silsesquioxane HSQ and calixarene were the only two reported negative, the authors report that 10-nm half-pitch dense nanostructures can also be readily fabricated using the well

  8. A 65nm CMOS Ultra Low Power and Low Noise 131M Front-End Transimpedance Amplifier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayers, Joseph

    A 65nm CMOS Ultra Low Power and Low Noise 131M Front-End Transimpedance Amplifier Jiaping Hu and simulation of a high-transimpedance gain, ultra low-power dissipation and low-noise CMOS front- end control [3]. However, it introduces design challenges in the form of trade-offs between noise, power

  9. Using Mobilize Power Management IP for Dynamic & Static Power Reduction in SoC at 130 nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Using Mobilize Power Management IP for Dynamic & Static Power Reduction in SoC at 130 nm Dan Tensilica's 32-bit Xtensa microprocessor core, using Virtual Silicon's Power Management IP. Independent of incorporating more and more devices on a single chip, but also managing the increase in the power that goes

  10. Abstract--High speed, oxide-confined, polyimide-planarized 850 nm vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) exhibit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lear, Kevin L.

    10760 1 Abstract--High speed, oxide-confined, polyimide-planarized 850 nm vertical cavity surface using a reproducible, simple process incorporating polyimide with good adhesion that does not require based on a simplified, robust process incorporating photosensitive polyimide with good metal adhesion

  11. Dynamics of cavitation bubble induced by 193 nm ArF excimer laser in concentrated sodium chloride solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palanker, Daniel

    of pulsed lasers for ablation, drilling, and cutting of soft tissues in liquid environments are accompaniedDynamics of cavitation bubble induced by 193 nm ArF excimer laser in concentrated sodium chloride solutions Igor Turovets and Daniel Palanker Laser Center, Hadassah University Hospital, P.O. Box 12000

  12. High resolution photoelectron images and D{sup +} photofragment images following 532-nm photolysis of D{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, D.W.; Neyer, D.W. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Heck, A.J. [Univ. of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The non-resonant ionization and dissociation of D{sub 2} by intense 532-nm laser light is studied by a variation of the ``Ion Imaging`` technique called ``Velocity Mapping``. Images of the both the photoelectrons and D{sup +} photofragments are obtained and analyzed at two different laser intensities. Results are compared to previous studies and several differences are discussed.

  13. The effects of 100 nm-diameter Au nanoparticles on dye-sensitized solar Changwoo Nahm,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Byungwoo

    The effects of 100 nm-diameter Au nanoparticles on dye-sensitized solar cells Changwoo Nahm,1 nanoparticles for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). At the optimum Au/TiO2 mass ratio of 0.05, the power nanoparticles were also introduced to the electrodes of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), and the solar-cell

  14. Summary Leaf reflectance at visible and near-infrared wavelengths (4001000 nm) is related primarily to pigmenta-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, Andrew D.

    Summary Leaf reflectance at visible and near-infrared wavelengths (400­1000 nm) is related physiology and relationships between plants and their growth environment. We studied reflectance of two co collected from 24 sites and white spruce from 30 sites. Overall, reflectance spectra of the two species were

  15. South Of Espanola; North Of Pojoaque At Intersection of NM399 and US 84/285 Turn onto 399(WSW),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurien, Susan

    will be on your left, Go to third house on right (#18 on fence), 1.5 story adobe with passive solar Windows facing at Affordable Price Or Possible Lease or Lease to Purchase 18 Terrace Farm Rd LaMesilla, NM 2 story passive the Puye Ruins on Santa Clara Pueblo. House is oriented with huge solar windows facing due south toward

  16. Development of scanning x-ray fluorescence microscope with spatial resolution of 30 nm using Kirkpatrick-Baez mirror optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsuyama, S.; Mimura, H.; Yumoto, H.; Sano, Y.; Yamamura, K.; Yabashi, M.; Nishino, Y.; Tamasaku, K.; Ishikawa, T.; Yamauchi, K. [Department of Precision Science and Technology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Research Center for Ultra-Precision Science and Technology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); SPring-8/Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayoucho, Sayogun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); SPring-8/RIKEN, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayoucho, Sayogun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Department of Precision Science and Technology, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a high-spatial-resolution scanning x-ray fluorescence microscope (SXFM) using Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors. As a result of two-dimensional focusing tests at BL29XUL of SPring-8, the full width at half maximum of the focused beam was achieved to be 50x30 nm{sup 2} (VxH) under the best focusing conditions. The measured beam profiles were in good agreement with simulated results. Moreover, beam size was controllable within the wide range of 30-1400 nm by changing the virtual source size, although photon flux and size were in a trade-off relationship. To demonstrate SXFM performance, a fine test chart fabricated using focused ion beam system was observed to determine the best spatial resolution. The element distribution inside a logo mark of SPring-8 in the test chart, which has a minimum linewidth of approximately 50-60 nm, was visualized with a spatial resolution better than 30 nm using the smallest focused x-ray beam.

  17. The West Virginia University College of Engineering and Mineral Resources has seven academic departments with undergraduate and graduate (M.S. and Ph.D.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    ............................. MSE · Industrial Engineering ............. BS / MS / PhD · Industrial Hygiene.................... MS.S. programs in Industrial Hygiene and Safety Management are ABET accredited. Biometrics is a unique departments with undergraduate and graduate (M.S. and Ph.D.) degree programs and the Mining and Industrial

  18. SUMMARY OF PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO REGULATION FSU-2.024, TUITION AND FEES; MS-NURSE ANESTHESIA PROGRAM; MD TUITION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    SUMMARY OF PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO REGULATION FSU-2.024, TUITION AND FEES; MS-NURSE ANESTHESIA for a new Master of Science in Nurse Anesthesia program at the Panama City Florida Campus. The new program

  19. Combined thermogravimetric and mass spectroscopic analysis (TG/MS). Quarterly report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopp, O.C.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress is reported on the analysis of coals using thermogravimetric (TG) and mass spectrographic (MS) analysis and adding information to the database. Samples were analyzed using oxidative pyrolysis. Various types (coal rank) of coal were utilized.

  20. M.S. Economic Geology, Oregon State University College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, Corvallis, OR Expected Spring, 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    EDUCATION M.S. Economic Geology, Oregon State University College of Earth, Ocean. Dilles Relevant Courses Interpretation of Geologic Maps Igneous Petrology Tectonic Geomorphology B.S. Geology, University of Idaho College of Science, Moscow, ID; GPA: 3

  1. Proteome Profiling for Assessing Diversity: Analysis of Individual Heads of Drosophila melanogaster Using LC-Ion Mobility-MS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clemmer, David E.

    Proteome Profiling for Assessing Diversity: Analysis of Individual Heads of Drosophila melanogaster dimensions of condensed-phase separations with mass spec- trometry (MS).4 In this approach, mass-to-charge (m-speed, gas-phase sep

  2. A Novel Self-Calibration Scheme for 12-bit 50MS/s In-Seok Jung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayers, Joseph

    A Novel Self-Calibration Scheme for 12-bit 50MS/s SAR ADC In-Seok Jung Department of Electrical@ece.neu.edu Abstract-- This paper presents a low-power 12-bit 50MS/s suc- cessive approximation register (SAR) analog-to-digital converter (ADC) using single input condition for Built-In Self Test (BIST) that uses a novel self-calibration

  3. Market Research Survey of Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) Portable MS Systems for IAEA Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Garret L.; Hager, George J.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Duckworth, Douglas C.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results for the market research survey of mass spectrometers that are deemed pertinent to International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) needs and strategic objectives. The focus of the report is on MS instruments that represent currently available (or soon to be) commercial off-the shelf (COTS) technology and weigh less than 400 pounds. A compilation of all available MS instruments (36 COTS and 2 R&D) is presented, along with pertinent information regarding each instrument.

  4. 22c-MS&PMS-III AGB Thermal Pulsing and Dredge-ups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sitko, Michael L.

    22c-MS&PMS-III DREDGE-UP AGB Thermal Pulsing and Dredge-ups Pre-AGB Dredge-ups 1st ­ on the RGB;Pre-Dredge-up C:N:O ~ 1 2 : 1 6 :1 After 1st C:N:O~ 1 3 : 1 3 :1 After 2nd C:N:O~0 to the surface. This is the 3rd Dredge-up phase that can bring C-rich material to the surface, changing the star

  5. 25c-MS&PMS-III AGB Thermal Pulsing and Dredge-ups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sitko, Michael L.

    25c-MS&PMS-III DREDGE-UP AGB Thermal Pulsing and Dredge-ups Pre-AGB Dredge-ups 1st ­ on the RGB;Pre-Dredge-up C:N:O ~ 1 2 : 1 6 :1 After 1 st C:N:O~ 1 3 : 1 3 :1 After 2 nd C:N:O~0. This is the 3rd Dredge-up phase that can bring C-rich material to the surface, changing the star from an M

  6. Toward Joint Hypothesis-Tests Seismic Event Screening Analysis: Ms|mb and Event Depth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Dale [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Selby, Neil [AWE Blacknest

    2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Well established theory can be used to combine single-phenomenology hypothesis tests into a multi-phenomenology event screening hypothesis test (Fisher's and Tippett's tests). Commonly used standard error in Ms:mb event screening hypothesis test is not fully consistent with physical basis. Improved standard error - Better agreement with physical basis, and correctly partitions error to include Model Error as a component of variance, correctly reduces station noise variance through network averaging. For 2009 DPRK test - Commonly used standard error 'rejects' H0 even with better scaling slope ({beta} = 1, Selby et al.), improved standard error 'fails to rejects' H0.

  7. Ms Linda Cerrone | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhaven National LaboratoryJeffreyMs. Linda Cerrone Scientific User

  8. Ms Van T Nguyen | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhaven National LaboratoryJeffreyMs. Linda Cerrone Scientific

  9. Ms. Chris Andres, Chief Bureau of Federal Facilities Division of Environmental Protection

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourth Five-Year38Report3DepartmentE-23TimMs.

  10. Formation of in-volume nanogratings with sub-100 nm periods in glass by femtosecond laser irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liao, Yang; Cui, Yun; Qiao, Lingling; Bellouard, Yves; Sugioka, Koji; Cheng, Ya

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present direct experimental observation of the morphological evolution during the formation of nanogratings with sub-100-nm periods with the increasing number of pulses. Theoretical simulation shows that the constructive interference of the scattering light from original nanoplanes will create an intensity maximum located between the two adjacent nanoplanes, resulting in shortening of the nanograting period by half. The proposed mechanism enables explaining the formation of nanogratings with periods beyond that predicted by the nanoplasmonic model.

  11. Cytometer LASER (nm) Detector range Fluorochrome Names check LSRII-A UV 355 A 505-550 Indo-1 (Blue)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Cytometer LASER (nm) Detector range Fluorochrome Names check LSRII-A UV 355 A 505-550 Indo-1 (Blue) B 420-460 Live Dead UV Blue Alexa 350 DAPI Indo-1(Violet) Hoechst 33342 C - empty Violet 405 A 505-550 Pac. Orange V500 VioGreen BVio 510 Viability Dye eF506 Alexa 430 Sapphire B 420-460 Pac. Blue eF450 V

  12. First Observation of Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission in a Free-Electron Laser at 109 nm Wavelength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andruszków, J; Ayvazyan, V T; Baboi, N I; Bakker, R; Balakin, V; Barni, D; Bazhan, A; Bernard, M; Bosotti, A; Bourdon, J C; Brefeld, W; Brinkmann, R; Bühler, S; Carneiro, J P; Castellano, M G; Castro, P; Catani, L; Chel, S; Cho, Y; Choroba, S; Colby, E R; Decking, W; Den Hartog, P; Desmons, M; Dohlus, M; Edwards, D; Edwards, H T; Faatz, B; Feldhaus, J; Ferrario, M; Fitch, M J; Flöttmann, K; Fouaidy, M; Gamp, A; Garvey, Terence; Geitz, M A; Gluskin, E S; Gretchko, V; Hahn, U; Hartung, W H; Hubert, D; Hüning, M; Ischebek, R; Jablonka, M; Joly, J M; Juillard, M; Junquera, T; Jurkiewicz, P; Kabel, A C; Kahl, J; Kaiser, H; Kamps, T; Katelev, V V; Kirchgessner, J L; Körfer, M; Kravchuk, L V; Kreps, G; Krzywinski, J; Lokajczyk, T; Lange, R; Leblond, B; Leenen, M; Lesrel, J; Liepe, M; Liero, A; Limberg, T; Lorenz, R; Lu, H H; Lu, F H; Magne, C; Maslov, M A; Materlik, G; Matheisen, A; Menzel, J; Michelato, P; Möller, W D; Mosnier, A; Müller, U C; Napoly, O; Novokhatskii, A V; Omeich, M; Padamsee, H; Pagani, C; Peters, F; Petersen, B; Pierini, P; Pflüger, J; Piot, P; Phung Ngoc, B; Plucinski, L; Proch, D; Rehlich, K; Reiche, S; Reschke, D; Reyzl, I; Rosenzweig, J; Rossbach, J; Roth, S; Saldin, E L; Sandner, W; Sanok, Z; Schlarb, H; Schmidt, G; Schmüser, P; Schneider, J R; Schneidmiller, E A; Schreiber, H J; Schreiber, S; Schütt, P; Sekutowicz, J; Serafini, L; Sertore, D; Setzer, S; Simrock, S; Sonntag, B F; Sparr, B; Stephan, F; Sytchev, V V; Tazzari, S; Tazzioli, F; Tigner, Maury; Timm, M; Tonutti, M; Trakhtenberg, E; Treusch, R; Trines, D; Verzilov, V A; Vielitz, T; Vogel, V; Von Walter, G; Wanzenberg, R; Weiland, T; Weise, H; Weisend, J G; Wendt, M; Werner, M; White, M M; Will, I; Wolff, S; Yurkov, M V; Zapfe, K; Zhogolev, P; Zhou, F

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first observation of Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) in a free-electron laser (FEL) in the Vacuum Ultraviolet regime at 109 nm wavelength (11 eV). The observed free-electron laser gain (approx. 3000) and the radiation characteristics, such as dependency on bunch charge, angular distribution, spectral width and intensity fluctuations all corroborate the existing models for SASE FELs.

  13. Detailed lensing properties of the MS2137-2353 core and reconstruction of sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammer, F; Shaya, E J; Gioia, I M; Luppino, G A; Lefèvre, O

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A deep HST image of the MS 2137-2353 core has revealed detailed morphological structures in two arc systems, which are modelled and well reproduced after a complete analysis of the lensing properties of the dark matter component. Latter could have a simple elliptical mass distribution with ellipticity and angular orientation similar to those of the visible and X-ray light, which suggests that the MS 2137-2353 is a relaxed cluster at z=0.313. The predicted density profile ($\\rho$ $\\sim$ $r^{-1.56\\pm0.1}$ with $r_{c}$ $\\le$ 22.5$h_{50}^{-1}$ kpc) within 150$h_{50}^{-1}$ kpc implies increasing M/L ratio with the radius, and could be in agreement with predictions from standard CDM simulations. At least two faint sources (unlensed magnitude, R=23.9 and 26, respectively) are aligned with the cluster core and are responsible of the arc systems. They have been reconstructed with details as small as 0".02 (or 160$h_{50}^{-1}$ pc in the source assumed at z= 1), one could be a nearly edge-on barred spiral galaxy, and th...

  14. Characterization of CMPO and its radiolysis products by Direct Infusion ESI-MS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. S. Groenewold; G. Elias; B. J. Mincher; S. P. Mezyk

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct infusion electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) approaches were developed for rapid identification of octyl,phenyl,(N,N-(diisobutyl)carbamoylmethyl) phosphine oxide (CMPO) and impurity compounds formed during alpha and gamma irradiation experiments. CMPO is an aggressive Lewis base, and produces extremely abundant metal complex ions in the ESI-MS analysis that make identification of low abundance compounds that are less nucleophilic challenging. Radiolysis products were identified using several approaches including restricting ion trapping so as to exclude the abundant natiated CMPO ions, extraction of acidic products using aqueous NaOH, and extraction of basic products using HNO3. These approaches generated protonated, natiated and deprotonated species derived from CMPO degradation products formed via radiolytic cleavages of several different bonds. Cleavages of the amide and methylene-phosphoryl bonds appear to be favored by both forms of irradiation, while alpha irradiation also appears to induce cleavage of the methylene-carbonyl bond. The degradation products observed are formed from recombination of the initially formed radicals with hydrogen, methyl, isopropyl and hydroxyl radicals that are derived either from CMPO, or the dodecane solvent.

  15. Full Stokes observations in the He I 1083 nm spectral region covering an M3.2 flare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuckein, C; Sainz, R Manso; Ramos, A Asensio

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an exceptional data set acquired with the Vacuum Tower Telescope (Tenerife, Spain) covering the pre-flare, flare, and post-flare stages of an M3.2 flare. The full Stokes spectropolarimetric observations were recorded with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter in the He I 1083.0 nm spectral region. The object under study was active region NOAA 11748 on 2013 May 17. During the flare the chomospheric He I 1083.0 nm intensity goes strongly into emission. However, the nearby photospheric Si I 1082.7 nm spectral line profile only gets shallower and stays in absorption. Linear polarization (Stokes Q and U) is detected in all lines of the He I triplet during the flare. Moreover, the circular polarization (Stokes V) is dominant during the flare, being the blue component of the He I triplet much stronger than the red component, and both are stronger than the Si I Stokes V profile. The Si I inversions reveal enormous changes of the photospheric magnetic field during the flare. Before the flare magnetic field conc...

  16. Note: Deep ultraviolet Raman spectrograph with the laser excitation line down to 177.3 nm and its application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Shaoqing [State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Fan, Fengtao; Guo, Meiling; Zhang, Ying; Feng, Zhaochi, E-mail: zcfeng@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: canli@dicp.ac.cn; Li, Can, E-mail: zcfeng@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: canli@dicp.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep UV Raman spectrograph with the laser excitation line down to 177.3 nm was developed in this laboratory. An ellipsoidal mirror and a dispersed-subtractive triple monochromator were used to collect and disperse Raman light, respectively. The triple monochromator was arranged in a triangular configuration with only six mirrors used. 177.3 nm laser excited Raman spectrum with cut-off wavenumber down to 200 cm{sup ?1} and spectral resolution of 8.0 cm{sup ?1} can be obtained under the condition of high purity N{sub 2} purging. With the C–C ? bond in Teflon selectively excited by the 177.3 nm laser, resonance Raman spectrum of Teflon with good quality was recorded on the home-built instrument and the ?-?{sup *} transition of C–C bond was studied. The result demonstrates that deep UV Raman spectrograph is powerful for studying the systems with electronic transition located in the deep UV region.

  17. High-average-power, 100-Hz-repetition-rate, tabletop soft-x-ray lasers at sub-15-nm wavelengths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reagan, Brendon [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Berrill, Mark A [ORNL] [ORNL; Wernsing, Keith [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Baumgarten, Cory [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Woolston, Mark [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Rocca, Jorge [Colorado State University, Fort Collins] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficient excitation of dense plasma columns at 100-Hz repetition rate using a tailored pump pulse profile produced a tabletop soft-x-ray laser average power of 0.1 mW at = 13.9 nm and 20 W at = 11.9 nm from transitions of Ni-like Ag and Ni-like Sn, respectively. Lasing on several other transitions with wavelengths between 10.9 and 14.7 nm was also obtained using 0.9-J pump pulses of 5-ps duration from a compact diode-pumped chirped pulse amplification Yb:YAG laser. Hydrodynamic and atomic plasma simulations show that the pump pulse profile, consisting of a nanosecond ramp followed by two peaks of picosecond duration, creates a plasma with an increased density of Ni-like ions at the time of peak temperature that results in a larger gain coefficient over a temporally and spatially enlarged space leading to a threefold increase in the soft-x-ray laser output pulse energy. The high average power of these compact soft-x-ray lasers will enable applications requiring high photon flux. These results open the path to milliwatt-average-power tabletop soft-x-ray lasers.

  18. formation of the main deposit. At lower current densities, it is possible to deposit only this extremely thin tin film: it is 5 nm thick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stocker, Thomas

    . Whereas the 200-nm copper and 300-nm tin films in Fig. 4 have a thickness close to that predicted. We propose the following mechan- istic explanation of this effect. First, in thin cells problems of Li rechargeable batteries. Indeed, cycling efficiency of Li batteries is drastically reduced

  19. Micro-Grids for Colonias (TX)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean Schneider; Michael Martin; Renee Berry; Charles Moyer

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of the final implementation and testing of a hybrid micro-grid system designed for off-grid applications in underserved Colonias along the Texas/Mexico border. The project is a federally funded follow-on to a project funded by the Texas State Energy Conservation Office in 2007 that developed and demonstrated initial prototype hybrid generation systems consisting of a proprietary energy storage technology, high efficiency charging and inverting systems, photovoltaic cells, a wind turbine, and bio-diesel generators. This combination of technologies provided continuous power to dwellings that are not grid connected, with a significant savings in fuel by allowing power generation at highly efficient operating conditions. The objective of this project was to complete development of the prototype systems and to finalize and engineering design; to install and operate the systems in the intended environment, and to evaluate the technical and economic effectiveness of the systems. The objectives of this project were met. This report documents the final design that was achieved and includes the engineering design documents for the system. The system operated as designed, with the system availability limited by maintenance requirements of the diesel gensets. Overall, the system achieved a 96% availability over the operation of the three deployed systems. Capital costs of the systems were dependent upon both the size of the generation system and the scope of the distribution grid, but, in this instance, the systems averaged $0.72/kWh delivered. This cost would decrease significantly as utilization of the system increased. The system with the highest utilization achieved a capitol cost amortized value of $0.34/kWh produced. The average amortized fuel and maintenance cost was $0.48/kWh which was dependent upon the amount of maintenance required by the diesel generator. Economically, the system is difficult to justify as an alternative to grid power. However, the operational costs are reasonable if grid power is unavailable, e.g. in a remote area or in a disaster recovery situation. In fact, avoided fuel costs for the smaller of the systems in use during this project would have a payback of the capital costs of that system in 2.3 years, far short of the effective system life.

  20. Roma, TX Natural Gas Exports to Mexico

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubic Feet)Thousand Cubic Feet)Year20,042

  1. TX, RRC District 1 Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV - DailyPercent96 263,04734 26

  2. TX, RRC District 10 Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV - DailyPercent9698

  3. TX, RRC District 5 Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV -Changes,2 1 80 3 120,4600 1 0 1

  4. TX, RRC District 6 Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV -Changes,2 1 80 312,61910 12 11

  5. TX, RRC District 8 Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV -Changes,2 15097,586 7,440537

  6. TX, RRC District 9 Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 181 177 1959,5488 25 21 20

  7. TX, State Offshore Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousandCubic Feet) DecadeV49 155 181 177 1959,5488 250 0 0

  8. Clint, TX Natural Gas Exports to Mexico

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321Spain (Million Cubic 1. Introduction4..

  9. Hidalgo, TX Natural Gas Exports to Mexico

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOWYear-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 30 0

  10. Alamo, TX Natural Gas Exports to Mexico

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building Floorspace (Square Feet)SalesYear Jan Feb Mar Aprper Annual Download

  11. Alamo, TX Natural Gas Exports to Mexico

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building Floorspace (Square Feet)SalesYear Jan Feb Mar Aprper Annual

  12. ~txF7D.ptx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian Nuclearand Characterization ofC u r r e n t IENERGY'S CONTRACTS WITH

  13. Penitas, TX Natural Gas Exports to Mexico

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (NumberThousand Cubic Feet) 0PADPrevious Annual Download

  14. Penitas, TX Natural Gas Exports to Mexico

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (NumberThousand Cubic Feet) 0PADPrevious Annual Download8

  15. Microsoft Word - abstract-lacognata-tx_2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1 SECTION A. Revised: April 3,  T T r rXMLTHE

  16. Mass Spectrometry Data from the Biological MS Data and Software Distribution Center

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Anderson, Gordon

    The mass spectrometry capabilities at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are primarily applied to biological research, with an emphasis on proteomics and metabolomics. Many of these cutting-edge mass spectrometry capabilities and bioinformatics methods are housed in the Department of Energy's Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility operated by PNNL. These capabilities have been developed and acquired through cooperation between the EMSL national scientific user program and PNNL programmatic research. At the website of the Biological MS Data and Software Distribution Center, the following resources are made available: PNNL-developed software tools and source code, PNNL-generated raw data and processed results, links to publications that used the data and results available on this site, and tutorials and user manuals. [taken from http://omics.pnl.gov/

  17. Studies on the content of heavy metals in Aries River using ICP-MS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voica, Cezara, E-mail: Cezara.Voica@itim-cj.ro; Kovacs, Melinda, E-mail: Cezara.Voica@itim-cj.ro; Feher, Ioana, E-mail: Cezara.Voica@itim-cj.ro [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath Str., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath Str., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Among the industrial branches, the mining industry has always been an important source of environmental pollution, both aesthetically and chemically. Through this paper results of ICP-MS characterization of Aries River Basin are reported. Mining activities from this area has resulted in contamination of environment and its surrounding biota. This is clearly evidenced in analyzed water samples, especially from Baia de Aries site where increased amount of trace elements as Cr, Zn, As, Se, Cd, Pb and U were founded. Also in this site greater amount of rare earth elements was evidenced also. Through monitoring of Aries River from other non-mining area it was observed that the quantitative content of heavy metals was below the maximum permissible levels which made us to conclude that the water table wasn't seriously affected (which possibly might be attributed to the cessation of mining activities in this area from a few years ago)

  18. Top-Down Mass Spectrometry Imaging of Intact Proteins by LAESI FT-ICR MS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kiss, András; Reschke, Brent R; Powell, Matthew J; Heeren, Ron M A

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser Ablation Electrospray Ionization is a recent development in mass spectrometry imaging. It has been shown that lipids and small metabolites can be imaged in various samples such as plant material, tissue sections or bacterial colonies without anysample pre-treatment. Further, laser ablation electrospray ionization has been shown to produce multiply charged protein ions from liquids or solid surfaces. This presents a means to address one of the biggest challenges in mass spectrometry imaging; the identification of proteins directly from biological tissue surfaces. Such identification is hindered by the lack of multiply charged proteins in common MALDI ion sources and the difficulty of performing tandem MS on such large, singly charged ions. We present here top-down identification of intact proteins from tissue with a LAESI ion source combined with a hybrid ion-trap FT-ICR mass spectrometer. The performance of the system was first tested with a standard protein with ECD and IRMPD fragmentation to prove the...

  19. A New Weak Lensing Analysis of MS1224.7+2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philippe Fischer

    1999-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Galaxy cluster mass distributions are useful probes of Omega_0 and the nature of the dark matter. Large clusters will distort the observed shapes of background galaxies through gravitational lensing allowing the measurement of the cluster mass distributions. For most cases, the agreement between weak lensing and radial velocity mass measurements of clusters is reasonably good. There is, however, one significant exception, the z=0.32 cluster MS1224.7+2007, which has a lensing mass substantially larger than the virial mass and also a very high mass-to-light ratio. Since this controversial object might be an unusually dark mass a follow-up study is definitely warranted. In this paper we study the mass and light distributions of MS1224+2007 out to a projected radius of 800/h kpc by measuring the gravitationally-induced distortions of background galaxies. We detect a shear signal in the background galaxies in the radial range 27.5 arcsec < r < 275 arcsec at the 5.5 sigma level. The resultant mass map exhibits a peak centered on the dominant cluster galaxy and strong evidence for substructure which is even more strongly seen in the galaxy distribution. Assuming all the detected shear is due to mass at z=0.32 we find cluster mass-to-light ratio of M/L_R = 640 +/- 150. The mass profile is quite flat compared to other clusters, disagreeing with a pseudo-singular isothermal sphere at the 95% confidence level. Our mass and M/L estimates are consistent with the previous weak lensing result. The discrepancy between the lensing and virial mass remains although it might be partially explained by subclustering and infall perpendicular to the line-of-site. This cluster remains a candidate dark object deficient in baryons and as such severely tests cosmological models.

  20. Effect of 710 nm visible light irradiation on neurite outgrowth in primary rat cortical neurons following ischemic insult

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Dong-Hee [Center for Neuroscience Research, SMART Institute of Advanced Biomedical Science, Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of) [Center for Neuroscience Research, SMART Institute of Advanced Biomedical Science, Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Medical Science, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung-Hee; Kim, Ji-Hye; Kim, Moon Young [Center for Neuroscience Research, SMART Institute of Advanced Biomedical Science, Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Center for Neuroscience Research, SMART Institute of Advanced Biomedical Science, Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Jeong Hoon [Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of) [Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Rehabilitation Medicine, Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine, National University Hospital, National University Health System (Singapore); Lee, Jongmin, E-mail: leej@kuh.ac.kr [Center for Neuroscience Research, SMART Institute of Advanced Biomedical Science, Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of) [Center for Neuroscience Research, SMART Institute of Advanced Biomedical Science, Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 710 nm wavelength light (LED) has a protective effect in the stroke animal model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We determined the effects of LED irradiation in vitro stroke model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LED treatment promotes the neurite outgrowth through MAPK activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The level of synaptic markers significantly increased with LED treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LED treatment protects cell death in the in vitro stroke model. -- Abstract: Objective: We previously reported that 710 nm Light-emitting Diode (LED) has a protective effect through cellular immunity activation in the stroke animal model. However, whether LED directly protects neurons suffering from neurodegeneration was entirely unknown. Therefore, we sought to determine the effects of 710 nm visible light irradiation on neuronal protection and neuronal outgrowth in an in vitro stroke model. Materials and methods: Primary cultured rat cortical neurons were exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and reoxygenation and normal conditions. An LED array with a peak wavelength of 710 nm was placed beneath the covered culture dishes with the room light turned off and were irradiated accordingly. LED treatments (4 min at 4 J/cm{sup 2} and 50 mW/cm{sup 2}) were given once to four times within 8 h at 2 h intervals for 7 days. Mean neurite density, mean neurite diameter, and total fiber length were also measured after microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP2) immunostaining using the Axio Vision program. Synaptic marker expression and MAPK activation were confirmed by Western blotting. Results: Images captured after MAP2 immunocytochemistry showed significant (p < 0.05) enhancement of post-ischemic neurite outgrowth with LED treatment once and twice a day. MAPK activation was enhanced by LED treatment in both OGD-exposed and normal cells. The levels of synaptic markers such as PSD 95, GAP 43, and synaptophysin significantly increased with LED treatment in both OGD-exposed and normal cells (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Our data suggest that LED treatment may promote synaptogenesis through MAPK activation and subsequently protect cell death in the in vitro stroke model.

  1. Correlated Two-Electron Momentum Spectra for Strong-Field Nonsequential Double Ionization of He at 800 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudenko, A.; Ergler, Th.; Zrost, K.; Feuerstein, B.; Schroeter, C. D.; Moshammer, R.; Ullrich, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Jesus, V. L. B. de [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Quimica de Nilopolis/RJ, Rua Lucio Tavares 1045, Centro-Nilopolis-26530-060, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a kinematically complete experiment on nonsequential double ionization of He by 25 fs 800 nm laser pulses at 1.5 PW/cm{sup 2}. The suppression of the recollision-induced excitation at this high intensity allows us to address in a clean way direct (e,2e) ionization by the recolliding electron. In contrast with earlier experimental results, but in agreement with various theoretical predictions, the two-electron momentum distributions along the laser polarization axis exhibit a pronounced V-shaped structure, which can be explained by the role of Coulomb repulsion and typical (e,2e) kinematics.

  2. Lithography-free sub-100nm nanocone array antireflection layer for low-cost silicon solar cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Zhida

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High density and uniformity sub-100nm surface oxidized silicon nanocone forest structure is created and integrated onto the existing texturization microstructures on photovoltaic device surface by a one-step high throughput plasma enhanced texturization method. We suppressed the broadband optical reflection on chemically textured grade-B silicon solar cells for up to 70.25% through this nanomanufacturing method. The performance of the solar cell is improved with the short circuit current increased by 7.1%, fill factor increased by 7.0%, conversion efficiency increased by 14.66%. Our method demonstrates the potential to improve the photovoltaic device performance with low cost high and throughput nanomanufacturing technology.

  3. Silica–silica Polyimide Buffered Optical Fibre Irradiation and Strength Experiment at Cryogenic Temperatures for 355 nm Pulsed Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takala, E; Bordini, B; Bottura, L; Bremer, J; Rossi, L

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A controlled UV-light delivery system is envisioned to be built in order to study the stability properties of superconducting strands. The application requires a wave guide from room temperature to cryogenic temperatures. Hydrogen loaded and unloaded polyimide buffered silica–silica 100 microm core fibres were tested at cryogenic temperatures. A thermal stress test was done at 1.9 K and at 4.2 K which shows that the minimal mechanical bending radius for the fibre can be 10 mm for testing (transmission was not measured). The cryogenic transmission loss was measured for one fibre to assess the magnitude of the transmission decrease due to microbending that takes place during cooldown. UV-irradiation degradation measurements were done for bent fibres at 4.2 K with a deuterium lamp and 355 nm pulsed lasers. The irradiation tests show that the fibres have transmission degradation only for wavelengths smaller than 330 nm due to the two photon absorption. The test demonstrates that the fibres are suitable for the ...

  4. Seedless Polyol Synthesis and CO Oxidation Activity of Monodisperse (111) and (100)-Oriented Rhodium Nanocrystals in Sub-10 nm Sizes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yawen; Grass, Michael E.; Huang, Wenyu; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Monodisperse sub-10 nm (6.5 nm) sized Rh nanocrystals with (111) and (100) surface structures were synthesized by a seedless polyol reduction in ethylene glycol, with poly(vinylpyrrolidone) as a capping ligand. When using [Rh(Ac){sub 2}]{sub 2} as the metal precursor, (111)-oriented Rh nanopolyhedra containing 76% (111)-twined hexagons (in 2D projection) were obtained; whereas, when employing RhCl{sub 3} as the metal precursor in the presence of alkylammonium bromide, such as tetramethylammonium bromide and trimethyl(tetradecyl)ammonium bromide, (100)-oriented Rh nanocubes were obtained with 85% selectivity. The {l_brace}100{r_brace} faces of the Rh nanocrystals are stabilized by chemically adsorbed Br{sup -} ions from alkylammonium bromides, which led to (100)-oriented nanocubes. Monolayer films of the (111)-oriented Rh nanopolyhedra and (100)-oriented Rh nanocubes were deposited on silicon wafers in a Langmuir-Blodgett trough to make model 2D nanoarray catalysts. These nanocatalysts were active for CO oxidation by O{sub 2}, and the turnover frequency was independent of nanoparticle shape, consistent with that previously observed for Rh(111) and Rh(100) single crystals.

  5. A comparison of the y-Radiolysis of TODGA and T(EH)DGA using UHPLC-ESI-MS analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zarzana, Christopher A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Groenewold, Gary S. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mincher, Bruce J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mezyk, Stephen P. [California State Uni; Wilden, Andreas [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung-Nukleare Entsorgung und Reaktorsicherheit (IEK-6), Jülich (Germany); Schmidt, Holger [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung-Nukleare Entsorgung und Reaktorsicherheit (IEK-6), Jülich (Germany); Modolo, Giuseppe [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung-Nukleare Entsorgung und Reaktorsicherheit (IEK-6), Jülich (Germany); Wishart, James F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Cook, Andrew R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Solutions of the diglycolamide extractants TODGA and T(EH)DGA in n-dodecane were subjected to ?- irradiation in the presence and absence of an acidic aqueous phase. These solutions were then analyzed using UHPLC-ESI-MS to determine the rates of radiolytic decay of the two extractants neat and in contact with respect to the acidity of the contacted aqueous phase, as well as to identify radiolysis products. The presence or absence of an acidic aqueous phase was shown to have no influence on the measured decay rates, nor did the side-chain have an influence. A number of radiolysis products were identified, consistent with those previously identified for these two compounds using GC-MS. The identity of these radiolysis products suggests that the bonds most vulnerable to radiolytic attack are those in the dyglycolamide center of these molecules, and not on the side-chains.  The agreement of these results with previous work using GC-MS indicates supports the further use of UHPLC-ESI-MS as a tool for studying diglycolamide extractant systems.

  6. Zi-Wei Lin Oct 5, 2004 UAH / NASA Space Radiation Shielding Program, MS Determine Important Nuclear Fragmentation Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zi-wei

    Zi-Wei Lin Oct 5, 2004 UAH / NASA Space Radiation Shielding Program, MS Determine Important Nuclear Fragmentation Processes for Space Radiation Protection in Human Space Explorations Why do we need to study? Conclusions Zi-Wei Lin University of Alabama in Huntsville/ NASA Space Radiation Shielding Program, MSFC #12

  7. Bogazici University, Istanbul, Turkey Chemical Engineering B.S., 2006 Bogazici University, Istanbul, Turkey Chemical Engineering M.S., 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Education Bogazici University, Istanbul, Turkey Chemical Engineering B.S., 2006 Bogazici University, Istanbul, Turkey Chemical Engineering M.S., 2008 The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio Chemical study awarded from The Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey Ibrahim Ilgaz Soykal

  8. A Review of "Nicholas Oldisworth’s Manuscript (Bodleian MS. Don.c.24)" edited by John Gouws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Quehen, A. H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of George Herbert. John Gouws, ed. Nicholas Oldisworth?s Manuscript (Bodleian MS. Don.c.24). Tempe, AZ: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2009. xlv + 256 pp. $54.00. Review by a.h. de quehen, university of toronto. Nicholas Oldisworth...

  9. MS#040418-01 1 Abstract--The fine scale swimming behavior of fish can now be

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linder, Stephen

    MS#040418-01 1 Abstract--The fine scale swimming behavior of fish can now be studied because evaluation of the performance of these tracking algorithms for the analysis of fine scale behavior of fish was performed using a data set of 100 fish track tracks recorded simultaneously with a multibeam sonar

  10. 48 28th ANNUAL eMS CHROMIUM(llI) INDUCED SOLID PHASE TRANSFORMATION OF o-Mn02

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    48 28th ANNUAL eMS CHROMIUM(llI) INDUCED SOLID PHASE TRANSFORMATION OF o-Mn02 Fendorf S pathways which will allow for transformations between oxidation states (redox reactions). Manganese oxides implications for environmental quality. The highly redox reactive a-Mn02 is transformed into a redox stable

  11. Ultrafast laser ablation ICP-MS: role of spot size, laser fluence, and repetition rate in signal intensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    Ultrafast laser ablation ICP-MS: role of spot size, laser fluence, and repetition rate in signal,a Richard E. Russob and Ahmed Hassaneina Ultrafast laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass system. Though ultrafast laser ablation sample introduction provides better accuracy and precision

  12. Sorption of MS2 Bacteriophage to Layered Double Hydroxides: Effects of Reaction Time, pH, and Competing Anions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    that some materials such as coal-based media, clay minerals, metal oxides­hydroxides, and activated very high retention capacities for from an aqueous solution by bituminous coal (Oza and MS2. Sorption) from 5.2 102 plaque-forming units (pfu)/mL solution by Mg­Al reported that some coal-based media

  13. A self-consistent nonlinear force-free solution for a solar active region magnetic M.S. Wheatland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Régnier, Stéphane

    fields 1. Introduction Solar coronal magnetic fields provide the source of energy for solar flaresA self-consistent nonlinear force-free solution for a solar active region magnetic field M.S. Wheatland Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia m

  14. SURFACE OXIDATION OF DIESEL PARTICULATE MATTER IN PRESENCE OF O3 +NOX: NEW TD/GC/MS ANALYSIS METHOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmén, Britt A.

    SURFACE OXIDATION OF DIESEL PARTICULATE MATTER IN PRESENCE OF O3 +NOX: NEW TD/GC/MS ANALYSIS METHOD+08 2.6e+08 2.8e+08 3e+08 Time--> Abundance TIC: 0914S4.D INTRODUCTION Diesel exhaust is one into the atmosphere diesel particles can be transformed through physical and chemical processes resulting

  15. A comparison of the y-Radiolysis of TODGA and T(EH)DGA using UHPLC-ESI-MS analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zarzana, Christopher A.; Groenewold, Gary S.; Mincher, Bruce J.; Mezyk, Stephen P.; Wilden, Andreas; Schmidt, Holger; Modolo, Giuseppe; Wishart, James F.; Cook, Andrew R.

    2015-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Solutions of the diglycolamide extractants TODGA and T(EH)DGA in n-dodecane were subjected to ?- irradiation in the presence and absence of an acidic aqueous phase. These solutions were then analyzed using UHPLC-ESI-MS to determine the rates of radiolytic decay of the two extractants neat and in contact with respect to the acidity of the contacted aqueous phase, as well as to identify radiolysis products. The presence or absence of an acidic aqueous phase was shown to have no influence on the measured decay rates, nor did the side-chain have an influence. A number of radiolysis products were identified, consistent with thosemore »previously identified for these two compounds using GC-MS. The identity of these radiolysis products suggests that the bonds most vulnerable to radiolytic attack are those in the dyglycolamide center of these molecules, and not on the side-chains.  The agreement of these results with previous work using GC-MS indicates supports the further use of UHPLC-ESI-MS as a tool for studying diglycolamide extractant systems.« less

  16. Non-Darcy natural convection in high porosity metal foams M.S. Phanikumar a,*, R.L. Mahajan b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­Forchheimer-extended Darcy flow model and a semi-heuristic two-equation energy model obtained by relaxing the local thermalNon-Darcy natural convection in high porosity metal foams M.S. Phanikumar a,*, R.L. Mahajan b but only a heated plate. Thermal dispersion effects and the effects of Darcy number on heat transfer

  17. Taxonomic Classification of Planning Decisions in Health Care: a Review of the State of the Art in OR/MS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boucherie, Richard J.

    Taxonomic Classification of Planning Decisions in Health Care: a Review of the State of the Art Classification of Planning Decisions in Health Care: a Review of the State of the Art in OR/MS 2 1. Introduction a comprehensive bibliography on operating room management articles. `ORCHID' [181] is a reference library, which

  18. DETECTION OF ALUMINUM WASTE REACTIONS AND WASTE FIRES Jeffrey W. Martin, M.S., P.G., R.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    combustion of the surrounding solid waste. The landfill liner and explosive gas extraction and leachate, landfill, leachate, leachate recirculation, salt cake, slope stability, smoldering, solid waste, Subtitle DDETECTION OF ALUMINUM WASTE REACTIONS AND WASTE FIRES Jeffrey W. Martin, M.S., P.G., R

  19. SUMUKH V., engineering educator; b. Maharashlra. India; S. BabWekar. MS in Mech. Engring. The V. Toledo, Ohio. 2002.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baica, Malvina

    and Zhenyu Bai; m, Yan Wang, Feb. 25,1958; I child, Xoe, MS. Beijing Inst. Tech,. 1987; BS. Tsinghua Br. V .· Beijing. 1983; PhD. Aa. Atlantic V .· Boca Raton, 2000. Sr. software engr. Lam Rsch. Corp.. Fremont. Calif

  20. Application for theAnn and Bill Fisher Graduate Scholarship 1. Your name Mr. Miss, Ms., Mrs.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    Application for theAnn and Bill Fisher Graduate Scholarship 1. Your name Mr. Miss, Ms., Mrs): _____________________________________________ _____________________________________________ 6. Date of birth: (month, day, year): Page 1 of 3 Eligibility: You are eligible for this scholarship; and You are proficient in at least two languages; and You are able to demonstrate 1) outstanding academic

  1. Application for theAnn and Bill Fisher Graduate Scholarship 1. Your name Mr. Miss, Ms., Mrs.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    Application for theAnn and Bill Fisher Graduate Scholarship 1. Your name Mr. Miss, Ms., Mrs): _____________________________________________ _____________________________________________ 5. Date of birth: (month, day, year): Page 1 of 3 Eligibility: You are eligible for this scholarship, and You are proficient in at least two languages, and You are able to demonstrate 1)outstanding academic

  2. Re-thinking highest and best use : implementing smart development in support of smart growth : a case study in Santa Fe, NM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balkcom, Jennifer K

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper answers the questions "where to develop?", "for whom to develop?", and "what to develop?" from a double bottom line perspective of profit making and social benefit, using a 3-acre property in Santa Fe, NM as an ...

  3. Method to grow carbon thin films consisting entirely of diamond grains 3-5 nm in size and high-energy grain boundaries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlisle, John A.; Auciello, Orlando; Birrell, James

    2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) having an average grain size between 3 and 5 nanometers (nm) with not more than about 8% by volume diamond having an average grain size larger than 10 nm. A method of manufacturing UNCD film is also disclosed in which a vapor of acetylene and hydrogen in an inert gas other than He wherein the volume ratio of acetylene to hydrogen is greater than 0.35 and less than 0.85, with the balance being an inert gas, is subjected to a suitable amount of energy to fragment at least some of the acetylene to form a UNCD film having an average grain size of 3 to 5 nm with not more than about 8% by volume diamond having an average grain size larger than 10 nm.

  4. Generation of 30-50 nm Structures Using Easily Fabricated, Composite Teri W. Odom, Venkat R. Thalladi, J. Christopher Love, and George M. Whitesides*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prentiss, Mara

    of tens of nanometers are useful in ultradense data storage, subwavelength optics, and devices This communication describes a method to generate simple nanostructures with critical dimensions down to 30 nm, over

  5. Resonant cavity-enhanced photosensitivity in As[subscript 2]S[subscript 3] chalcogenide glass at 1550 nm telecommunication wavelength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Juejun

    We report the first (to our knowledge) experimental observation of resonant cavity-enhanced photosensitivity in As[subscript 2]S[subscript 3] chalcogenide glass film at 1550?nm telecommunication wavelength. The measured ...

  6. Discovery of Optical Bursts from MS1603.6+2600 = UW CrB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. I. Hynes; E. L. Robinson; E. Jeffery

    2004-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the discovery of several optical burst-like events from the low-mass X-ray binary MS1603.6+2600 (UW CrB). The events last for a few tens of seconds, exhibit a very fast rise and slow decay, and involve optical brightening of a factor of 2-3. The flares appear distinct from the lower level flickering and instead strongly resemble reprocessed type-I X-ray bursts as seen in a number of other neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries. In conjunction with the previously reported candidate X-ray burst, these confirm that the compact object in UW CrB is a neutron star. We examine the optical burst brightness and recurrence times and discuss how the nature of the system can be constrained. We conclude that the source is most likely an accretion disk corona source at an intermediate distance, rather than a nearby quiescent system or very distant dipper.

  7. 60nm collector InGaAs/InP Type-I DHBTs demonstrating 660 GHz f , BVCEO = 2.5V, and BVCBO = 2.7V

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodwell, Mark J. W.

    60nm collector InGaAs/InP Type-I DHBTs demonstrating 660 GHz f , BVCEO = 2.5V, and BVCBO = 2.7VGaAs base and a 60 nm InP collector containing an InGaAs/InAlAs superlattice grade. Devices employing a 400. The devices have been scaled vertically for reduced base and collector electron transit times, and the base-collector

  8. The 846 nm A' 32; +X 3Z; band system of jet-cooled V, Eileen M. Spain, Jane M. Behm,a) and Michael D. Morse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morse, Michael D.

    The 846 nm A' 32; +X 3Z; band system of jet-cooled V, Eileen M. Spain, Jane M. Behm,a) and Michael October 1991; accepted 4 November 1991) The 846 nm band system of jet-cooled 5'V2 has been recorded using resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy, and is assigned as the A '38; +X `2; band system. Both the w

  9. Room-temperature cw operation of InGaAsP/InGaP lasers at 727 nm grown on GaAs substrates by liquid phase epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wakao, K.; Nishi, H.; Kusunoki, T.; Isozumi, S.; Ohsaka, S.

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    InGaAsP/InGaP lasers emitting at 724--727 nm have been fabricated on GaAs substrates using liquid phase epitaxy. The threshold current is reduced to 8 kA/cm/sup 2/ by thinning the active layer. Room-temperature cw operation is achieved for the first time in the lasing wavelength range below 760 nm in this quaternary system.

  10. Frequency stabilization of a 1083 nm fiber laser to {sup 4}He transition lines with optical heterodyne saturation spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, W.; Peng, X., E-mail: xiangpeng@pku.edu.cn; Li, W.; Guo, H., E-mail: hongguo@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Optical Communication Systems and Networks, School of Electronics Engineering and Computer Science, Center for Quantum Information Technology, and Center for Computational Science and Engineering (CCSE), Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two kinds of optical heterodyne saturation spectroscopies, namely, frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS) and modulation transfer spectroscopy (MTS), are demonstrated for locking a fiber laser to the transition lines of metastable {sup 4}He atoms around 1083 nm. The servo-loop error signals of FMS and MTS for stabilizing laser frequency are optimized by studying the dependence of the peak-to-peak amplitude and slope on the optical power of pump and probe beams. A comparison of the stabilization performances of FMS/MTS and polarization spectroscopy (PS) is presented, which shows that MTS exhibits relatively superior performance with the least laser frequency fluctuation due to its flat-background dispersive signal, originated from the four-wave mixing process. The Allan deviation of the stabilized laser frequency is 5.4 × 10{sup ?12}@100 s with MTS for data acquired in 1000 s, which is sufficiently applicable for fields like laser cooling, optical pumping, and optical magnetometry.

  11. Pressure shift and broadening of the 254-nm intercombination line of mercury by N{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, James P.; Warrington, R. Bruce [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Montana, Missoula, Montana 59812, USA (United States); Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA (United States)

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used laser absorption spectroscopy to study the collisional broadening and shift of the 254-nm 6 {sup 1}S{sub 0}{yields}6 {sup 3}P{sub 1} intercombination line of Hg in the presence of N{sub 2} for pressures below 400 Torr. This study comprises the first measurements of the proportionality constants for pressure broadening and shift of Hg due to N{sub 2} in this pressure range, and the first high-precision measurements of these pressure effects on Hg for any foreign gas. We obtain -2.54(2) MHz/Torr for the shift and 9.01(4) MHz/Torr for the broadening (full width at half maximum) at 21 degree sign C (95% confidence interval). These results are important for ongoing experiments using optical pumping of mercury in tests of fundamental symmetries, as well as for characterization of interatomic forces and tests of the theory of collisional line broadening.

  12. Viability of Cladosporium herbarum spores under 157 nm laser and vacuum ultraviolet irradiation, low temperature (10 K) and vacuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarantopoulou, E., E-mail: esarant@eie.gr; Stefi, A.; Kollia, Z.; Palles, D.; Cefalas, A. C. [National Hellenic Research Foundation, Theoretical and Physical Chemistry Institute, 48 Vassileos Constantinou Avenue, Athens 11635 (Greece); Petrou, P. S.; Bourkoula, A.; Koukouvinos, G.; Kakabakos, S. [N.C.S.R. “Demokritos”, Institute for Nuclear and Radiological Sciences, Energy, Technology and Safety, Patriarchou Gregoriou Str. Aghia Paraskevi, Athens 15310 (Greece); Velentzas, A. D. [University of Athens, Faculty of Biology, Department of Cell Biology and Biophysics, Athens 15784 (Greece)

    2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultraviolet photons can damage microorganisms, which rarely survive prolonged irradiation. In addition to the need for intact DNA, cell viability is directly linked to the functionality of the cell wall and membrane. In this work, Cladosporium herbarum spore monolayers exhibit high viability (7%) when exposed to 157 nm laser irradiation (412 kJm?²) or vacuum-ultraviolet irradiation (110–180 nm) under standard pressure and temperature in a nitrogen atmosphere. Spore viability can be determined by atomic-force microscopy, nano-indentation, mass, ?-Raman and attenuated reflectance Fourier-transform far-infrared spectroscopies and DNA electrophoresis. Vacuum ultraviolet photons cause molecular damage to the cell wall, but radiation resistance in spores arises from the activation of a photon-triggered signaling reaction, expressed via the exudation of intracellular substances, which, in combination with the low penetration depth of vacuum-ultraviolet photons, shields DNA from radiation. Resistance to phototoxicity under standard conditions was assessed, as was resistance to additional environmental stresses, including exposure in a vacuum, under different rates of change of pressure during pumping time and low (10 K) temperatures. Vacuum conditions were far more destructive to spores than vacuum-ultraviolet irradiation, and UV-B photons were two orders of magnitude more damaging than vacuum-ultraviolet photons. The viability of irradiated spores was also enhanced at 10 K. This work, in addition to contributing to the photonic control of the viability of microorganisms exposed under extreme conditions, including decontamination of biological warfare agents, outlines the basis for identifying bio-signaling in vivo using physical methodologies.

  13. Web Site: http://www.coop-program.engr.uga.edu/ms.html UGA Cooperative Engineering Program Development Key Points and Notes.docx

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Web Site: http://www.coop-program.engr.uga.edu/ms.html UGA Cooperative Engineering Program;Web Site: http://www.coop-program.engr.uga.edu/ms.html UGA Cooperative Engineering Program Development Development Key Points and Notes.docx Latest Update: October 3, 2012 Mission Statement: The UGA Engineering

  14. Handbook of M.S. Programs -Industrial & Systems Engineering Department, Wayne State University Revised: May 8, 2013 Pg. 1 of 10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    Handbook of M.S. Programs - Industrial & Systems Engineering Department, Wayne State University Revised: May 8, 2013 Pg. 1 of 10 M.S. Programs Handbook Industrial & Systems Engineering Department Wayne Engineering at Wayne State University: Master of Science in Industrial Engineering Master of Science

  15. Sandia Corporation (Albuquerque, NM)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diver, Richard B. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A Theoretical Overlay Photographic (TOP) alignment method uses the overlay of a theoretical projected image of a perfectly aligned concentrator on a photographic image of the concentrator to align the mirror facets of a parabolic trough solar concentrator. The alignment method is practical and straightforward, and inherently aligns the mirror facets to the receiver. When integrated with clinometer measurements for which gravity and mechanical drag effects have been accounted for and which are made in a manner and location consistent with the alignment method, all of the mirrors on a common drive can be aligned and optimized for any concentrator orientation.

  16. Abrviations NM Nantes Mtropole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Premier week-end de formation WE2 Deuxième week-end d'investigation WE3 Troisième week-end de délibération

  17. Sandia Corporation (Albuquerque, NM)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ewsuk, Kevin G. (Albuquerque, NM); Arguello, Jr., Jose G. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of designing a primary geometry, such as for a forming die, to be used in a powder pressing application by using a combination of axisymmetric geometric shapes, transition radii, and transition spaces to simulate the geometry where the shapes can be selected from a predetermined list or menu of axisymmetric shapes and then developing a finite element mesh to represent the geometry. This mesh, along with material properties of the component to be designed and powder, is input to a standard deformation finite element code to evaluate the deformation characteristics of the component being designed. The user can develop the geometry interactively with a computer interface in minutes and execute a complete analysis of the deformation characteristics of the simulated component geometry.

  18. Surface Cleaning Techniques: Ultra-Trace ICP-MS Sample Preparation and Assay of HDPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overman, Nicole R.; Hoppe, Eric W.; Addleman, Raymond S.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The world’s most sensitive radiation detection and assay systems depend upon ultra-low background (ULB) materials to reduce unwanted radiological backgrounds. Herein, we evaluate methods to clean HDPE, a material of interest to ULB systems and the means to provide rapid assay of surface and bulk contamination. ULB level material and ultra-trace level detection of actinide elements is difficult to attain, due to the introduction of contamination from sample preparation equipment such as pipette tips, sample vials, forceps, etc. and airborne particulate. To date, literature available on the cleaning of such polymeric materials and equipment for ULB applications and ultra-trace analyses is limited. For these reasons, a study has been performed to identify an effective way to remove surface contamination from polymers in an effort to provide improved instrumental detection limits. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS) was utilized to assess the effectiveness of a variety of leachate solutions for removal of inorganic uranium and thorium surface contamination from polymers, specifically high density polyethylene (HDPE). HDPE leaching procedures were tested to optimize contaminant removal of thorium and uranium. Calibration curves for thorium and uranium ranged from 15 ppq (fg/mL) to 1 ppt (pg/mL). Detection limits were calculated at 6 ppq for uranium and 7 ppq for thorium. Results showed the most effective leaching reagent to be clean 6 M nitric acid for 72 hour exposures. Contamination levels for uranium and thorium found in the leachate solutions were significant for ultralow level radiation detection applications.

  19. Project Final Report: Ubiquitous Computing and Monitoring System (UCoMS) for Discovery and Management of Energy Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tzeng, Nian-Feng; White, Christopher D.; Moreman, Douglas

    2012-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The UCoMS research cluster has spearheaded three research areas since August 2004, including wireless and sensor networks, Grid computing, and petroleum applications. The primary goals of UCoMS research are three-fold: (1) creating new knowledge to push forward the technology forefronts on pertinent research on the computing and monitoring aspects of energy resource management, (2) developing and disseminating software codes and toolkits for the research community and the public, and (3) establishing system prototypes and testbeds for evaluating innovative techniques and methods. Substantial progress and diverse accomplishment have been made by research investigators in their respective areas of expertise cooperatively on such topics as sensors and sensor networks, wireless communication and systems, computational Grids, particularly relevant to petroleum applications.

  20. 10.30.2001 1Soon Cho -AVS01 MS-TuA8 Thickness Metrology and Real-Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    Electronics Box Lamp Heater #12;10.30.2001 5Soon Cho - AVS01 MS-TuA8 Metrology Development in 0.5 Torr SiH4/WF) + SiH4 (g) èèèè W (s) + 2 SiHF3 (g) + 3 H2 (g) SiH4SignalH2Signal Step # 1 & 2 3 4 5 6 P (Mtorr) 100

  1. Electrosteric enhanced stability of functional sub-10 nm cerium and iron oxide particles in cell culture medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Chanteau; J. Fresnais; J. -F. Berret

    2009-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Applications of nanoparticles in biology require that the nanoparticles remain stable in solutions containing high concentrations of proteins and salts, as well as in cell culture media. In this work, we developed simple protocols for the coating of sub-10 nm nanoparticles and evaluated the colloidal stability of dispersions in various environments. Ligands (citric acid), oligomers (phosphonate-terminated poly(ethylene oxide)) and polymers (poly(acrylic acid)) were used as nanometer-thick adlayers for cerium (CeO2) and iron (gamma-Fe2O3) oxide nanoparticles. The organic functionalities were adsorbed on the particle surfaces via physical (electrostatic) forces. Stability assays at high ionic strength and in cell culture media were performed by static and dynamic light scattering. Among the three coating examined, we found that only poly(acrylic acid) fully preserved the dispersion stability on the long term (> weeks). The improved stability was explained by the multi-point attachments of the chains onto the particle surface, and by the adlayer-mediated electrosteric interactions. These results suggest that anionically charged polymers represent an effective alternative to conventional coating agents.

  2. Experimental investigation of factors limiting slow axis beam quality in 9xx nm high power broad area diode lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winterfeldt, M., E-mail: martin.winterfeldt@fbh-berlin.de; Crump, P.; Wenzel, H.; Erbert, G.; Tränkle, G. [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut, Leibniz-Institut für Höchstfrequenztechnik, Gustav-Kirchhoff-Str. 4, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    GaAs-based broad-area diode lasers are needed with improved lateral beam parameter product (BPP{sub lat}) at high power. An experimental study of the factors limiting BPP{sub lat} is therefore presented, using extreme double-asymmetric (EDAS) vertical structures emitting at 910?nm. Continuous wave, pulsed and polarization-resolved measurements are presented and compared to thermal simulation. The importance of thermal and packaging-induced effects is determined by comparing junction -up and -down devices. Process factors are clarified by comparing diodes with and without index-guiding trenches. We show that in all cases studied, BPP{sub lat} is limited by a non-thermal BPP ground-level and a thermal BPP, which depends linearly on self-heating. Measurements as a function of pulse width confirm that self-heating rather than bias-level dominates. Diodes without trenches show low BPP ground-level, and a thermal BPP which depends strongly on mounting, due to changes in the temperature profile. The additional lateral guiding in diodes with trenches strongly increases the BPP ground-level, but optically isolates the stripe from the device edges, suppressing the influence of the thermal profile, leading to a BPP-slope that is low and independent of mounting. Trenches are also shown to initiate strain fields that cause parasitic TM-polarized emission with large BPP{sub lat}, whose influence on total BPP{sub lat} remains small, provided the overall polarization purity is >95%.

  3. Damage threshold of inorganic solids under free-electron-laser irradiation at 32.5 nm wavelength

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hau-Riege, S; London, R A; Bionta, R M; McKernan, M A; Baker, S L; Krzywinski, J; Sobierajski, R; Nietubyc, R; Pelka, J B; Jurek, M; Klinger, D; Juha, L; Chalupsky, J; Cihelka, J; Hajkova, V; Koptyaev, S; Velyhan, A; Krasa, J; Kuba, J; Tiedtke, K; Toleikis, S; Tschentscher, T; Wabnitz, H; Bergh, M; Caleman, C; Sokolowski-Tinten, K; Stojanovic, N; Zastrau, U; Tronnier, A; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J

    2007-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We exposed samples of B4C, amorphous C, chemical-vapor-deposition (CVD)-diamond C, Si, and SiC to single 25 fs-long pulses of 32.5 nm free-electron-laser radiation at fluences of up to 2.2 J/cm{sup 2}. The samples were chosen as candidate materials for x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) optics. We found that the threshold for surface-damage is on the order of the fluence required for thermal melting. For larger fluences, the crater depths correspond to temperatures on the order of the critical temperature, suggesting that the craters are formed by two-phase vaporization [1]. XFELs have the promise of producing extremely high-intensity ultrashort pulses of coherent, monochromatic radiation in the 1 to 10 keV regime. The expected high output fluence and short pulse duration pose significant challenges to the optical components, including radiation damage. It has not been possible to obtain direct experimental verification of the expected damage thresholds since appropriate x-ray sources are not yet available. FLASH has allowed us to study the interaction of high-fluence short-duration photon pulses with materials at the shortest wavelength possible to date. With these experiments, we have come closer to the extreme conditions expected in XFEL-matter interaction scenarios than previously possible.

  4. Characterization, 1064 nm photon signals and background events of a tungsten TES detector for the ALPS experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dreyling-Eschweiler, Jan; Döbrich, Babette; Horns, Dieter; Januschek, Friederike; Lindner, Axel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high efficiency, low-background, and single-photon detection with transition-edge sensors (TES) is making this type of detector attractive in widely different types of application. In this paper, we present first characterizations of a TES to be used in the Any Light Particle Search (ALPS) experiment searching for new fundamental ultra-light particles. Firstly, we describe the setup and the main components of the ALPS TES detector (TES, millikelvin-cryostat and SQUID read-out) and their performances. Secondly, we explain a dedicated analysis method for single-photon spectroscopy and rejection of non-photon background. Finally, we report on results from extensive background measurements. Considering an event-selection, optimized for a wavelength of $1064~{\\rm nm}$, we achieved a background suppression of $\\sim 10^{-3}$ with a $\\sim 50~\\%$ efficiency for photons passing the selection. The resulting overall efficiency was $23~\\%$ with a dark count rate of $8.6 \\cdot 10^{-3}~{\\rm s}^{-1}$. We observed that pi...

  5. Characterization, 1064 nm photon signals and background events of a tungsten TES detector for the ALPS experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan Dreyling-Eschweiler; Noemie Bastidon; Babette Döbrich; Dieter Horns; Friederike Januschek; Axel Lindner

    2015-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The high efficiency, low-background, and single-photon detection with transition-edge sensors (TES) is making this type of detector attractive in widely different types of application. In this paper, we present first characterizations of a TES to be used in the Any Light Particle Search (ALPS) experiment searching for new fundamental ultra-light particles. Firstly, we describe the setup and the main components of the ALPS TES detector (TES, millikelvin-cryostat and SQUID read-out) and their performances. Secondly, we explain a dedicated analysis method for single-photon spectroscopy and rejection of non-photon background. Finally, we report on results from extensive background measurements. Considering an event-selection, optimized for a wavelength of $1064~{\\rm nm}$, we achieved a background suppression of $\\sim 10^{-3}$ with a $\\sim 50~\\%$ efficiency for photons passing the selection. The resulting overall efficiency was $23~\\%$ with a dark count rate of $8.6 \\cdot 10^{-3}~{\\rm s}^{-1}$. We observed that pile-up events of thermal photons are the main background component.

  6. O({sup 3}P{sub J}) formation and desorption by 157-nm photoirradiation of amorphous solid water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeSimone, Alice J. [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332–0400 (United States)] [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332–0400 (United States); Orlando, Thomas M., E-mail: thomas.orlando@chemistry.gatech.edu [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332–0400 (United States); School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332–0400 (United States)

    2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Photodissociation of amorphous solid water (ASW) deposited on a thinly oxidized copper substrate at 82 K was studied by measuring O({sup 3}P{sub J=2,1,0}) photoproducts detected with resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization. For each spin-orbit state, the oxygen atom time-of-flight spectrum was measured as a function of H{sub 2}O exposure, which is related to ice thickness, and 157-nm irradiation time. Four Maxwell-Boltzmann distributions with translational temperatures of 10?000 K, 1800 K, 400 K, and 82 K were found to fit the data. The most likely formation mechanisms are molecular elimination following ionization of water and ion-electron recombination, secondary recombination of hydroxyl radicals, and photodissociation of adsorbed hydroxyl radicals. Evidence for O-atom diffusion through bulk ASW was found for H{sub 2}O exposures of at least 5 Langmuir (1 L = 10{sup ?6} Torr?s). The cross sections for O({sup 3}P{sub 2}) depletion were 1.3 × 10{sup ?19} and 6.5 × 10{sup ?20} cm{sup 2} for 1 and 5 L, respectively.

  7. THE EVOLUTION OF SOLAR FLUX FROM 0.1 nm TO 160 {mu}m: QUANTITATIVE ESTIMATES FOR PLANETARY STUDIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claire, Mark W. [School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK NR4 7TJ (United Kingdom); Sheets, John; Meadows, Victoria S. [Virtual Planetary Laboratory and Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Cohen, Martin [Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Ribas, Ignasi [Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Facultat de Ciencies, Torre C5 parell, 2a pl, Campus UAB, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Catling, David C., E-mail: M.Claire@uea.ac.uk [Virtual Planetary Laboratory and Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Washington, Box 351310, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding changes in the solar flux over geologic time is vital for understanding the evolution of planetary atmospheres because it affects atmospheric escape and chemistry, as well as climate. We describe a numerical parameterization for wavelength-dependent changes to the non-attenuated solar flux appropriate for most times and places in the solar system. We combine data from the Sun and solar analogs to estimate enhanced UV and X-ray fluxes for the young Sun and use standard solar models to estimate changing visible and infrared fluxes. The parameterization, a series of multipliers relative to the modern top of the atmosphere flux at Earth, is valid from 0.1 nm through the infrared, and from 0.6 Gyr through 6.7 Gyr, and is extended from the solar zero-age main sequence to 8.0 Gyr subject to additional uncertainties. The parameterization is applied to a representative modern day flux, providing quantitative estimates of the wavelength dependence of solar flux for paleodates relevant to the evolution of atmospheres in the solar system (or around other G-type stars). We validate the code by Monte Carlo analysis of uncertainties in stellar age and flux, and with comparisons to the solar proxies {kappa}{sup 1} Cet and EK Dra. The model is applied to the computation of photolysis rates on the Archean Earth.

  8. Lifetime studies of 130nm nMOS transistors intended for long-duration, cryogenic high-energy physics experiments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoff, J.R.; /Fermilab; Arora, R.; Cressler, J.D.; /Georgia Tech; Deptuch, G.W.; /Fermilab; Gui, P.; /Southern Methodist U.; Lourenco, N.E.; /Georgia Tech; Wu, G.; /Southern Methodist U.; Yarema, R.J.; /Fermilab

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Future neutrino physics experiments intend to use unprecedented volumes of liquid argon to fill a time projection chamber in an underground facility. To increase performance, integrated readout electronics should work inside the cryostat. Due to the scale and cost associated with evacuating and filling the cryostat, the electronics will be unserviceable for the duration of the experiment. Therefore, the lifetimes of these circuits must be well in excess of 20 years. The principle mechanism for lifetime degradation of MOSFET devices and circuits operating at cryogenic temperatures is via hot carrier degradation. Choosing a process technology that is, as much as possible, immune to such degradation and developing design techniques to avoid exposure to such damage are the goals. This requires careful investigation and a basic understanding of the mechanisms that underlie hot carrier degradation and the secondary effects they cause in circuits. In this work, commercially available 130nm nMOS transistors operating at cryogenic temperatures are investigated. The results show that the difference in lifetime for room temperature operation and cryogenic operation for this process are not great and the lifetimes at both 300K and at 77K can be projected to more than 20 years at the nominal voltage (1.5V) for this technology.

  9. 500 Fifth Street, NW Phone: 202 334 2934 Washington, DC 20001 Fax: 202 334 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .TRB.org November 11, 2010 Nauman M. Sheikh Texas Transportation Institute Texas A&M University System MS-3135 College Station, TX 77843-3135 Roger P. Bligh Texas Transportation Institute Texas A&M University System MS-3135 College Station, TX 77843-3135 Richard B. Albin Federal Highway Administration 12300 West

  10. Influence of germanium and the melting method on the mechanical properties of NM23KhYu alloy at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebedev, D.V.; Rozonova, V.M.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the investigation was to increase the plasticity and ductility of NM233KhYu alloy without a detrimental effect on its service properties, selection of methods evaluation of placticity and ductility at increased temperatures, and establishment on the basis of the results obtained of the optimum temperature range for hot working by pressure. To evaluate the mechanical properties at increased temperature tension, impact strength and torsion tests were made. Alloying with germanium of NM23KhYu alloy leads to a two-to-three-time increase in its impact strength. Electron beam remelting of NM23KhYu alloy with germanium increases the impact strength, and the characteristics of plasticity by 1.5-2 times in comparison with the similar properties of this alloy produced by vacuum induction melting.

  11. Nonlinear absorption and optical strength of BaF{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} at the wavelength of 248 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morozov, Nikolai V; Sergeev, P B [P.N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Reiterov, V M [All-Russian Scientific Centre 'S.I. Vavilov State Optical Institute', St Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1999-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental investigation was made of the dependence of the transmission of BaF{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples on the intensity of KrF-laser radiation ({lambda} = 248 nm) pulses of 85 ns duration. The two-photon absorption coefficients were found at {lambda} = 248 nm and their values for these two crystals were 0.5 {+-} 0.2 and 2 {+-} 1 cm Gw{sup -1}. The surface and bulk laser breakdown thresholds were determined for these samples. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  12. Vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting 625-nm laser upon optical pumping of an InGaP/AlGaInP nanostructure with a Bragg mirror

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozlovskii, Vladimir I; Lavrushin, B M; Skasyrsky, Yan K [P N Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Tiberi, M D [Principia Light Works Inc., Woodland Hills, CA (United States)

    2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulsed lasing is obtained in a multilayer quantum-well InGaP/AlGaInP structure in a cavity with an external mirror and a Bragg AlAs/AlGaAs mirror pumped by the 532-nm second harmonic from a diode-pumped Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Lasing is obtained at the TEM{sub 00} fundamental transverse mode of the cavity at a wavelength of 625 nm. The pulse beam power was 3.1 W and the radiation divergence achieved a diffraction limit of 10-12 mrad for 5-ns pulses with a repetition rate of 6 kHz. (lasers)

  13. Structure of a novel dodecaheme cytochrome c from Geobacter sulfurreducens reveals an extended 12 nm protein with interacting hemes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pokkuluri, P. R.; Londer, Y. Y.; Duke, N. E. C.; Pessanha, M.; Yang, X.; Orshonsky, V.; Orshonsky, L.; Erickson, J.; Zagyansky, Y.; Salgueiro, C. A.; Schiffer, M. (Biosciences Division); (Requimte-CQFB); (Univ. nova de Lisboa)

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiheme cytochromes c are important in electron transfer pathways in reduction of both soluble and insoluble Fe(III) by Geobacter sulfurreducens. We determined the crystal structure at 3.2 {angstrom} resolution of the first dodecaheme cytochrome c (GSU1996) along with its N-terminal and C-terminal hexaheme fragments at 2.6 and 2.15 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. The macroscopic reduction potentials of the full-length protein and its fragments were measured. The sequence of GSU1996 can be divided into four c{sub 7}-type domains (A, B, C and D) with homology to triheme cytochromes c{sub 7}. In cytochromes c{sub 7} all three hemes are bis-His coordinated, whereas in c{sub 7}-type domains the last heme is His-Met coordinated. The full-length GSU1996 has a 12 nm long crescent shaped structure with the 12 hemes arranged along a polypeptide to form a 'nanowire' of hemes; it has a modular structure. Surprisingly, while the C-terminal half of the protein consists of two separate c{sub 7}-type domains (C and D) connected by a small linker, the N-terminal half of the protein has two c{sub 7}-type domains (A and B) that form one structural unit. This is also observed in the AB fragment. There is an unexpected interaction between the hemes at the interface of domains A and B, which form a heme-pair with nearly parallel stacking of their porphyrin rings. The hemes adjacent to each other throughout the protein are within van der Waals distance which enables efficient electron exchange between them. For the first time, the structural details of c{sub 7}-type domains from one multiheme protein were compared.

  14. Aufgabe 3-7: Luft tritt mit 1 = 2,21 kg/m und v1 = 40 m/s kontinuierlich in eine Dse ein und verlsst diese mit 2 = 0,762 kg/m und v2 = 180 m/s. Die Einlassflche der Dse betrgt 90

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Norbert

    Aufgabe 3-7: Luft tritt mit 1 = 2,21 kg/m³ und v1 = 40 m/s kontinuierlich in eine Düse ein und, 800 kPa) tritt mit 10 m/s in eine Düse ein (siehe Abbildung 1). In der Düse verliert der Dampf Wärme

  15. M.S. ABDULLAH, I. BENEST, A. EVANS, and C. KIMBLE, Knowledge Modelling Techniques For Developing Knowledge Management Systems, 3rd European Conference on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimble, Chris

    modelling, knowledge management, knowledge management system, knowledge, knowledge engineering. 1M.S. ABDULLAH, I. BENEST, A. EVANS, and C. KIMBLE, Knowledge Modelling Techniques For Developing Knowledge Management Systems, 3rd European Conference on Knowledge Management, Dublin, Ireland, September

  16. Quantitative 3-D Elemental Mapping by LA-ICP-MS of a Basaltic Clast from the Hanford 300 Area, Washington, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Qinhong "Max"

    : Laser ablation with inductively coupled plasma- mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was used to measure (XAS2,8 ), and by cryogenic laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (CLIFS7 ). Both XAS and CLIFS

  17. TECHBOOKS Journal: AGAG MS Code: 529 PIPS No: 5271116 DISK 1-4-2004 18:38 Pages: 43 Annals of Global Analysis and Geometry xxx: 143, 2004.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belaud, Yves

    UNCO RRECTED PRO O F TECHBOOKS Journal: AGAG MS Code: 529 PIPS No: 5271116 DISK 1-4-2004 18 et Phys. Parc de Grandmont, 37200 Tours, France. e-mail: belaud@univ-tours.fr 5 6 (Received: 25

  18. {sup 99}Tc bioassay: A direct comparison of liquid scintillation radiation detection and ICP-MS mass detection of the {sup 99}Tc isotope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, L.A. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Analytical Services Organization; Schweitzer, G.K. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A means of analyzing {sup 99}Tc in urine by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has been developed. Historically, {sup 99}Tc analysis was based on the radiometric detection of the 293 keV E{sub Max.} beta decay product by liquid scintillation or gas flow proportional counting. A separation scheme for {sup 99}Tc detection by ICP-MS is given and is proven to be a sensitive and robust analytical alternative. A comparison of methods using radiometric and mass quantitation of {sup 99}Tc has been conducted in water, artificial urine, and real urine matrices at activity levels between 700 and 2,200 dpm/L. Liquid scintillation results based on an external standard manual quench correction and an automatic quench curve correction method are compared with results obtained by ICP-MS. Each method produced accurate results; however, the precision of the ICP-MS results is superior to that of liquid scintillation results.

  19. Measurement of elemental speciation by liquid chromatography -- inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LC-ICP-MS) with the direct injection nebulizer (DIN)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shum, S.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is divided into 4 parts: elemental speciation, speciation of mercury and lead compounds by microbore column LC-ICP-MS with direct injection nebulization, spatially resolved measurements of size and velocity distributions of aerosol droplets from a direct injection nebulizer, and elemental speciation by anion exchange and size exclusion chromatography with detection by ICP-MS with direct injection nebulization. Tabs, figs, refs.

  20. Radionuclide content of simulated and fully radioactive SRLLL waste gl;asses: comparison of results from ICP-MS, gamma spectrometry and alpha spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, S.F.; Bates, J.K.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the transuranic content of two transuranic=doped, simulated waste glasses, using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), {gamma}-spectrometry, and {alpha}-spectrometry. Average concentrations measured by each technique were within {+-} 10% of the as-doped concentrations. We also report the transuranic content of three fully radioactive SRL waste glasses that were determined using {gamma}- and {alpha}-spectrometry measurements to deconvolute isobaric interferences present in the ICP-MS analyses.