Sample records for mrcsp phase ii

  1. EA-1835: Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) Phase II Michigan Basin Project in Chester Township, Michigan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE: This EA has been cancelled. This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide approximately $65.5 million in financial assistance in a cost-sharing arrangement with the project proponent, MRCSP. MRCSP's proposed project would use CO2 captured from an existing natural gas processing plant in Chester Township, pipe it approximately 1 mile to an injection well, and inject it into a deep saline aquifer for geologic sequestration. This project would demonstrate the geologic sequestration of 1,000,000 metric tons of CO2 over a 4-year period. The project and EA are on hold.

  2. MIDWEST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP (MRCSP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Ball; Judith Bradbury; Rattan Lal; Larry Wickstrom; Neeraj Gupta; Robert Burns; Bob Dahowski

    2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the first semiannual report for Phase I of the Midwest Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP). The project consists of nine tasks to be conducted over a two year period that started in October 2003. The makeup of the MRCSP and objectives are described. Progress on each of the active Tasks is also described and where possible, for those Tasks at some point of completion, a summary of results is presented.

  3. The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James J. Dooley; Robert Dahowski; Casie Davidson

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report summarizes the Phase I research conducted by the Midwest regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP). The Phase I effort began in October 2003 and the project period ended on September 31, 2005. The MRCSP is a public/private partnership led by Battelle with the mission of identifying the technical, economic, and social issues associated with implementation of carbon sequestration technologies in its seven state geographic region (Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia) and identifying viable pathways for their deployment. It is one of seven partnerships that together span most of the U.S. and parts of Canada that comprise the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Regional Carbon Sequestration Program led by DOE's national Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The MRCSP Phase I research was carried out under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41981. The total value of Phase I was $3,513,513 of which the DOE share was $2,410,967 or 68.62%. The remainder of the cost share was provided in varying amounts by the rest of the 38 members of MRCSP's Phase I project. The next largest cost sharing participant to DOE in Phase I was the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Air Quality Development Authority (OCDO). OCDO's contribution was $100,000 and was contributed under Grant Agreement No. CDO/D-02-17. In this report, the MRCSP's research shows that the seven state MRCSP region is a major contributor to the U. S. economy and also to total emissions of CO2, the most significant of the greenhouse gases thought to contribute to global climate change. But, the research has also shown that the region has substantial resources for sequestering carbon, both in deep geological reservoirs (geological sequestration) and through improved agricultural and land management practices (terrestrial sequestration). Geological reservoirs, especially deep saline reservoirs, offer the potential to permanently store CO2 for literally 100s of years even if all the CO2 emissions from the region's large point sources were stored there, an unlikely scenario under any set of national carbon emission mitigation strategies. The terrestrial sequestration opportunities in the region have the biophysical potential to sequester up to 20% of annual emissions from the region's large point sources of CO2. This report describes the assumptions made and methods employed to arrive at the results leading to these conclusions. It also describes the results of analyses of regulatory issues in the region affecting the potential for deployment of sequestration technologies. Finally, it describes the public outreach and education efforts carried out in Phase I including the creation of a web site dedicated to the MRCSP at www.mrcsp.org.

  4. MIDWEST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP (MRCSP) MANAGING CLIMATE CHANGE AND SECURING A FUTURE FOR THE MIDWEST'S INDUSTRIAL BASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Ball; Robert Burns; Judith Bradbury; Bob Dahowski; Casie Davidson; James Dooley; Neeraj Gupta; Rattan Lal; Larry Wickstrom

    2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the third semiannual report for Phase I of the Midwest Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP). The project consists of nine tasks to be conducted over a two-year period that started in October 2003. The makeup of the MRCSP and objectives are described. Progress on each of the active Tasks is also described and where possible, for those Tasks at some point of completion, a summary of results is presented.

  5. Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuknecht, Nate [Project Manager; White, David [Principle Investigator; Hoste, Graeme [Research Engineer

    2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The SkyTrough DSP will advance the state-of-the-art in parabolic troughs for utility applications, with a larger aperture, higher operating temperature, and lower cost. The goal of this project was to develop a parabolic trough collector that enables solar electricity generation in the 2020 marketplace for a 216MWe nameplate baseload power plant. This plant requires an LCOE of 9¢/kWhe, given a capacity factor of 75%, a fossil fuel limit of 15%, a fossil fuel cost of $6.75/MMBtu, $25.00/kWht thermal storage cost, and a domestic installation corresponding to Daggett, CA. The result of our optimization was a trough design of larger aperture and operating temperature than has been fielded in large, utility scale parabolic trough applications: 7.6m width x 150m SCA length (1,118m2 aperture), with four 90mm diameter × 4.7m receivers per mirror module and an operating temperature of 500°C. The results from physical modeling in the System Advisory Model indicate that, for a capacity factor of 75%: The LCOE will be 8.87¢/kWhe. SkyFuel examined the design of almost every parabolic trough component from a perspective of load and performance at aperture areas from 500 to 2,900m2. Aperture-dependent design was combined with fixed quotations for similar parts from the commercialized SkyTrough product, and established an installed cost of $130/m2 in 2020. This project was conducted in two phases. Phase I was a preliminary design, culminating in an optimum trough size and further improvement of an advanced polymeric reflective material. This phase was completed in October of 2011. Phase II has been the detailed engineering design and component testing, which culminated in the fabrication and testing of a single mirror module. Phase II is complete, and this document presents a summary of the comprehensive work.

  6. Options Study - Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Wigeland; T. Taiwo; M. Todosow; W. Halsey; J. Gehin

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Options Study has been conducted for the purpose of evaluating the potential of alternative integrated nuclear fuel cycle options to favorably address the issues associated with a continuing or expanding use of nuclear power in the United States. The study produced information that can be used to inform decisions identifying potential directions for research and development on such fuel cycle options. An integrated nuclear fuel cycle option is defined in this study as including all aspects of the entire nuclear fuel cycle, from obtaining natural resources for fuel to the ultimate disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) or radioactive wastes. Issues such as nuclear waste management, especially the increasing inventory of used nuclear fuel, the current uncertainty about used fuel disposal, and the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation have contributed to the reluctance to expand the use of nuclear power, even though it is recognized that nuclear power is a safe and reliable method of producing electricity. In this Options Study, current, evolutionary, and revolutionary nuclear energy options were all considered, including the use of uranium and thorium, and both once-through and recycle approaches. Available information has been collected and reviewed in order to evaluate the ability of an option to clearly address the challenges associated with the current implementation and potential expansion of commercial nuclear power in the United States. This Options Study is a comprehensive consideration and review of fuel cycle and technology options, including those for disposal, and is not constrained by any limitations that may be imposed by economics, technical maturity, past policy, or speculated future conditions. This Phase II report is intended to be used in conjunction with the Phase I report, and much information in that report is not repeated here, although some information has been updated to reflect recent developments. The focus in this Options Study was to identify any nuclear fuel cycle technology or option that may result in a significant beneficial impact to the issues as compared to the current U.S. approach of once-through use of nuclear fuel in LWRs or similar reactors followed by direct disposal of UNF. This approach was taken because incremental differences may be difficult to clearly identify and justify due to the large uncertainties that can be associated with the specific causes of the issues. Phase II of this Options Study continued the review of nuclear fuel cycle options that was initiated and documented during Phase I, concentrating on reviewing and summarizing the potential of integrated nuclear fuel cycles. However, based on the reviews of previous studies and available data, it was not always possible to clearly determine sufficiently large differences between the various fuel cycle and technology options for some of the issues or evaluation measures, for example, in cases where only incremental differences with respect to the issues might be achieved regardless of the fuel cycle option or technologies being considered, or where differences were insufficient to clearly rise above the uncertainties.

  7. Combustion 2000: Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: thermal efficiency (HHV) {ge} 47%; NOx, SOx, and particulates {le} 10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard); coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input; all solid wastes benign; and cost of electricity {le} 90% of present plants. Phase 1, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase 1 also included preliminary R and D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This Phase, Phase 2, had as its initial objective the development of a complete design base for the construction and operation of a HIPPS prototype plant to be constructed in Phase 3. As part of a descoping initiative, the Phase 3 program has been eliminated and work related to the commercial plant design has been ended. The rescoped program retained a program of engineering research and development focusing on high temperature heat exchangers, e.g. HITAF development (Task 2); a rescoped Task 6 that is pertinent to Vision 21 objectives and focuses on advanced cycle analysis and optimization, integration of gas turbines into complex cycles, and repowering designs; and preparation of the Phase 2 Technical Report (Task 8). This rescoped program deleted all subsystem testing (Tasks 3, 4,and 5) and the development of a site-specific engineering design and test plan for the HIPPS prototype plant (Task 7). Work reported herein is from: Task 2.1 HITAF Combustors; Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; and Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  8. Centrifuge workers study. Phase II, completion report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wooten, H.D.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase II of the Centrifuge Workers Study was a follow-up to the Phase I efforts. The Phase I results had indicated a higher risk than expected among centrifuge workers for developing bladder cancer when compared with the risk in the general population for developing this same type of cancer. However, no specific agent could be identified as the causative agent for these bladder cancers. As the Phase II Report states, Phase I had been limited to workers who had the greatest potential for exposure to substances used in the centrifuge process. Phase II was designed to expand the survey to evaluate the health of all employees who had ever worked in Centrifuge Program Departments 1330-1339 but who had not been interviewed in Phase I. Employees in analytical laboratories and maintenance departments who provided support services for the Centrifuge Program were also included in Phase II. In December 1989, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), now known as Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), was contracted to conduct a follow-up study (Phase II). Phase H of the Centrifuge Workers Study expanded the survey to include all former centrifuge workers who were not included in Phase I. ORISE was chosen because they had performed the Phase I tasks and summarized the corresponding survey data therefrom.

  9. DSO216_Phase_II_Summary_Updates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary of DSO 216 - Phase II Update Limiting Wind Output to Scheduled Value and Curtailing Schedules to Actual Wind Generation Updated: December 13, 2013 I. PURPOSE The purpose of...

  10. Michael Rupen EVLA Phase II Definition Aug 23 25, 2001.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    Michael Rupen EVLA Phase II Definition Meeting Aug 23 ­ 25, 2001. 1 EVLA Phase II Scientific Overview Michael P. Rupen #12;Michael Rupen EVLA Phase II Definition Meeting Aug 23 ­ 25, 2001. 2 New the resolution · Always available! #12;Michael Rupen EVLA Phase II Definition Meeting Aug 23 ­ 25, 2001. 3 NMA

  11. DSO216_Phase_II_Summary_Updates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OFSupplemental TechnologySummary of DSO 216 - Phase II

  12. CLIMATE STUDY Phase II: MU Student Services Providers Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Jerry

    MU CAMPUS CLIMATE STUDY VOLUME 2 Phase II: MU Student Services Providers Survey Phase III: MU CAMPUS CLIMATE STUDY: PHASES II ­ IV Over the past three years, members of the University of Missouri-Columbia (MU) have participated in the MU Campus Climate Study for Underrepresented Groups conducted by a team

  13. DOE Awards Two Small Business Innovation Research Phase II Grants...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    sbir. The Phase II awards related to SSL are listed below: Recipient: Physical Optics Corporation (POC) Title: Highly Efficient Organic Light-Emitting Devices for General...

  14. analysis phase ii: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Robert Michael 3 Instrumentation, acquisition and analysis of the Phase II SIMPLE dark matter search signals CERN Preprints Summary: I describe the new instrumentation for the...

  15. Phase II Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigg, Reid; McPherson, Brian; Lee, Rober

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP) one of seven regional partnerships sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) carried out five field pilot tests in its Phase II Carbon Sequestration Demonstration effort, to validate the most promising sequestration technologies and infrastructure concepts, including three geologic pilot tests and two terrestrial pilot programs. This field testing demonstrated the efficacy of proposed sequestration technologies to reduce or offset greenhouse gas emissions in the region. Risk mitigation, optimization of monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) protocols, and effective outreach and communication were additional critical goals of these field validation tests. The program included geologic pilot tests located in Utah, New Mexico, Texas, and a region-wide terrestrial analysis. Each geologic sequestration test site was intended to include injection of a minimum of ~75,000 tons/year CO{sub 2}, with minimum injection duration of one year. These pilots represent medium- scale validation tests in sinks that host capacity for possible larger-scale sequestration operations in the future. These validation tests also demonstrated a broad variety of carbon sink targets and multiple value-added benefits, including testing of enhanced oil recovery and sequestration, enhanced coalbed methane production and a geologic sequestration test combined with a local terrestrial sequestration pilot. A regional terrestrial sequestration demonstration was also carried out, with a focus on improved terrestrial MVA methods and reporting approaches specific for the Southwest region.

  16. GRED III Phase II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°, -86.0529604°Wisconsin:FyreStormGLOBAL FINANCIALGP SolarparkII

  17. Phase II beam lines at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomlinson, W.

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The expansion of the National Synchrotron Light Source has been funded by the US Department of Energy. The Phase II program consists of both increased conventional facilities and six new beam lines. In this paper, an overview of the six beam lines which will be constructed during Phase II is presented. For five of the lines special radiation sources are necessary and the designs of four of the devices are complete. The relevant parameters of the insertion devices under construction and development are presented.

  18. ADMX Phase II : Relocation and Millikelvin Cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heilman, Jesse; Tracy, Kyle [University of Washington, Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2010-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Low mass axions are an attractive candidate for making up dark matter. While there are several models for how the Axion couples with other matter, were they to be the majority of the local galactic dark matter halo, they would have a number density on the order of 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}. The Axion Dark Matter eXperiment (ADMX) is a microwave cavity experiment searching for axion Dark Matter via the axion's electromagnetic coupling. While the original ADMX did not see evidence of axions, the experiment is planned to go through two phases of upgrades to expand its sensitivity and provide a definitive search for axion dark matter. The first phase established the use of a SQUID amplifier which can reduce the amplifier noise temperature to the 100 mK range. In the second phase we will first move the experiment from LLNL to CENPA at the University of Washington. Once the experiment has been moved successfully we will install a dilution refrigerator to cool the cavity to the 100 mK range thus increasing the sensititivity to the level required to scan the remainder of the allowed model space.

  19. Continuous fiber ceramic composites. Phase II - Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, James

    1997-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents Atlantic Research Corporation's (ARC) Phase 11 effort on the Department of Energy's (DOE) Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composite (CFCC) program. This project is supported by the DOE cooperative agreement DE-FCO2-92CE40998. Such DOE support does not constitute an endorsement of the views expressed in this report. ARC'S CFCC Phase II effort began during October 1993 and was suspended in March of 1997 when, for business considerations, ARC closed the Amercom operation. This report covers progress from Phase II program inception through Amercom closure. ARC'S Phase II effort built upon the results of the Phase I Applications Assessment and Process Engineering developments to produce CFCC test components for end-user evaluation. Initially, the Phase 11 effort planned to develop and produce three CFCC components: CFCC compression rings for stationary diesel engines, CFCC hot gas fans for industrial furnace applications, and CFCC hot gas filters for current and advanced coal fired power cycles. As the program progressed, the development effort for the diesel engine piston rings was suspended. This decision was based on technical issues, cost factors and reduced program funding; the status of CFCC diesel engine piston ring development will be discussed in detail in section 2.2.1.

  20. Radiological Release Accident Investigation Report (Phase II Report)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In its Phase II Report, the Accident Investigation Board concludes that the Feb. 14, 2014 radiological release at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant was caused by an exothermic reaction involving the mixture of organic materials and nitrate salts in one drum that was processed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in December 2013.

  1. CRAD, Radiological Controls- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Radiation Protection Program at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

  2. CRAD, Training- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Training Program at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

  3. CRAD, Conduct of Operations- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February, 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Conduct of Operations program at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

  4. CRAD, Fire Protection- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Fire Protection program at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

  5. CRAD, Emergency Management- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Emergency Management program at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

  6. CRAD, Quality Assurance- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Quality Assurance Program at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

  7. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Occupational Safety and Industrial Hygiene Program at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

  8. CRAD, Maintenance- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Maintenance program at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

  9. CRAD, Safety Basis- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Safety Basis at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

  10. CRAD, Criticality Safety- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Criticality Safety program at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

  11. Energy Audit Results for Forest City Phase I and Phase II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    `i Natural Energy Institute School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology University of Hawai`i April 2013Energy Audit Results for Forest City Phase I and Phase II Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-EE0003507

  12. Mechanical Engineering and Design of the LHC Phase II Collimators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertarelli, A; Gentini, L; Mariani, N; Perret, R; Timmins, M A

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase II collimators will complement the existing system to improve the expected high RF impedance and limited efficiency of Phase I jaws. An international collaborative effort has been launched to identify novel advanced materials responding to the very challenging requirements of the new collimators. Complex numerical calculations simulating extreme conditions and experimental tests are in progress. In parallel, an innovative modular design concept of the jaw assembly is being developed to allow fitting in alternative materials, minimizing the thermally induced deformations, withstanding accidents and accepting high radiation doses. Phase II jaw assembly is made up of a molybdenum back-stiffener ensuring high geometrical stability and a modular jaw split in threes sectors. Each sector is equipped with a high-efficiency independent cooling circuit. Beam position monitors (BPM) are embedded in the jaws to fasten setup time and improve beam monitoring. An adjustment system will permit to fine-tune the jaw flat...

  13. Mercury Oxidation via Catalytic Barrier Filters Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayne Seames; Michael Mann; Darrin Muggli; Jason Hrdlicka; Carol Horabik

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2004, the Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory awarded the University of North Dakota a Phase II University Coal Research grant to explore the feasibility of using barrier filters coated with a catalyst to oxidize elemental mercury in coal combustion flue gas streams. Oxidized mercury is substantially easier to remove than elemental mercury. If successful, this technique has the potential to substantially reduce mercury control costs for those installations that already utilize baghouse barrier filters for particulate removal. Completed in 2004, Phase I of this project successfully met its objectives of screening and assessing the possible feasibility of using catalyst coated barrier filters for the oxidation of vapor phase elemental mercury in coal combustion generated flue gas streams. Completed in September 2007, Phase II of this project successfully met its three objectives. First, an effective coating method for a catalytic barrier filter was found. Second, the effects of a simulated flue gas on the catalysts in a bench-scale reactor were determined. Finally, the performance of the best catalyst was assessed using real flue gas generated by a 19 kW research combustor firing each of three separate coal types.

  14. Preliminary Exploratory Study of Different Phase II Collimators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lari, L.; Assmann, R.W.; Bertarelli, A.; Bracco, C.; Brugger, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dallocchio, A.; Ferrari, A.; Mauri, M.; Roesler, S.; Sarchiapone, L.; Vlachoudis, Vasilis; /CERN; Doyle, J.E.; Keller, L.; Lundgren, S.A.; Markiewicz, Thomas W.; Smith, J.C.; /SLAC; Lari, L.; /LPHE, Lausanne

    2011-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) collimation system is installed and commissioned in different phases, following the natural evolution of the LHC performance. To improve cleaning efficiency towards the end of the low beta squeeze at 7TeV, and in stable physics conditions, it is foreseen to complement the 30 highly robust Phase I secondary collimators with low impedance Phase II collimators. At this stage, their design is not yet finalized. Possible options include metallic collimators, graphite jaws with a movable metallic foil, or collimators with metallic rotating jaws. As part of the evaluation of the different designs, the FLUKA Monte Carlo code is extensively used for calculating energy deposition and studying material damage and activation. This report outlines the simulation approach and defines the critical quantities involved.

  15. Leaching of Phase II Mercury Control Technology By-Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hesbach, P.A.; Kachur, E.K.

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. EPA has issued a final regulation for control of mercury from coal-fired power plants. An NETL research, development and demonstration program under DOE/Fossil Energy Innovations for Existing Plants is directed toward the improvement of the performance and economics of mercury control from coal-fired plants. The current Phase II of the RD&D program emphasizes the evaluation of performance and cost of control technologies through slip-stream and full scale field testing while continuing the development of novel concepts. One of the concerns of the NETL program is the fate of the captured flue gas mercury which is transferred to the condensed phase by-product stream. These adulterated by-products, both ashes and FGD material, represent the greatest challenge to the DOE goal of increased utilization of by-products. The degree of stability of capture by-products and their potential for release of mercury can have a large economic impact on material sales or the approach to disposal. One of the considerations for mercury control technology is the potential trade-off between effective but temporary mercury capture and less effective but more permanent sequestration. As part of a greater characterization effort of Phase II facility baseline and control technology sample pairs, NETL in-house laboratories have performed aqueous leaching procedures on a select subset of the available sample pairs. This report describes batch leaching results for mercury, arsenic, and selenium.

  16. Low-energy-threshold analysis of the Phase I and Phase II data sets of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monroe, Jocelyn

    Results are reported from a joint analysis of Phase I and Phase II data from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. The effective electron kinetic energy threshold used is Teff=3.5 MeV, the lowest analysis threshold yet achieved ...

  17. I 95 Landfill Phase II Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel JumpCounty, Texas: EnergyHy9Moat of Long| OpenLandfill Phase II

  18. Phase I Report, US DOE GRED II Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairbank Engineering Ltd.

    2003-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Noramex Corporation Inc, a Nevada company, owns a 100% interest in geothermal leases at the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, Humboldt County, Nevada. The company is exploring the site for a geothermal resource suitable for development for electric power generation or In the spring of 2002, Noramex drilled the first geothermal observation hole at Blue Mountain, under a cost-share program with the U.S Department of Energy (DOE), under the DOE's Geothermal Exploration and Resource Definition (GRED) program, (Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-00AL66972). DEEP BLUE No.1 was drilled to a total depth of 672.1 meters (2205 feet) and recorded a maximum temperature of 144.7 C (292.5 F). Noramex Corporation will now drill a second slim geothermal observation test hole at Blue Mountain, designated DEEP BLUE No.2. The hole will be drilled under a cost-share program with the DOE, under the DOE's Geothermal Exploration and Resource Definition II (GRED II) program, (Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-2002AL68297). This report comprises Phase I of Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC04-2002AL68297 of the GRED II program. The report provides an update on the status of resource confirmation at the Blue Mountain Geothermal Area, incorporating the results from DEEP BLUE No.1, and provides the technical background for a second test hole. The report also outlines the proposed drilling program for slim geothermal observation test hole DEEP BLUE No.2.

  19. Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Phase II Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freshley, M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hubbard, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Flach, G. [Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL), Aiken, SC (United States); Freedman, V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Agarwal, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Andre, B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Bott, Y. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chen, X. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Davis, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Faybishenko, B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gorton, I. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Murray, C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Moulton, D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Meyer, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rockhold, M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shoshani, A. [LBNL; Steefel, C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wainwright, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Waichler, S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2009, the National Academies of Science (NAS) reviewed and validated the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM) Technology Program in its publication, Advice on the Department of Energy’s Cleanup Technology Roadmap: Gaps and Bridges. The NAS report outlined prioritization needs for the Groundwater and Soil Remediation Roadmap, concluded that contaminant behavior in the subsurface is poorly understood, and recommended further research in this area as a high priority. To address this NAS concern, the EM Office of Site Restoration began supporting the development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific approach that uses an integration of toolsets for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The ASCEM modeling toolset is modular and open source. It is divided into three thrust areas: Multi-Process High Performance Computing (HPC), Platform and Integrated Toolsets, and Site Applications. The ASCEM toolsets will facilitate integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. During fiscal year 2012, the ASCEM project continued to make significant progress in capabilities development. Capability development occurred in both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and Multi-Process HPC Simulator areas. The new Platform and Integrated Toolsets capabilities provide the user an interface and the tools necessary for end-to-end model development that includes conceptual model definition, data management for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and model output processing including visualization. The new HPC Simulator capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with the Platform, and model confidence testing and verification for quality assurance. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications through a suite of demonstrations being conducted by the Site Applications Thrust. In 2010, the Phase I Demonstration focused on testing initial ASCEM capabilities. The Phase II Demonstration, completed in September 2012, focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of ASCEM capabilities on a site with relatively sparse data, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations included in this Phase II report included addressing attenuation-based remedies at the Savannah River Site F-Area, to exercise linked ASCEM components under data-dense and complex geochemical conditions, and conducting detailed simulations of a representative waste tank. This report includes descriptive examples developed by the Hanford Site Deep Vadose Zone, the SRS F-Area Attenuation-Based Remedies for the Subsurface, and the Waste Tank Performance Assessment working groups. The integrated Phase II Demonstration provides test cases to accompany distribution of the initial user release (Version 1.0) of the ASCEM software tools to a limited set of users in 2013. These test cases will be expanded with each new release, leading up to the release of a version that is qualified for regulatory applications in the 2015 time frame.

  20. PHASE II VAULT TESTING OF THE ARGONNE RFID SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willoner, T.; Turlington, R.; Koenig, R.

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (Environmental Management [EM], Office of Packaging and Transportation [EM-45]) Packaging and Certification Program (DOE PCP) has developed a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tracking and monitoring system, called ARG-US, for the management of nuclear materials packages during transportation and storage. The performance of the ARG-US RFID equipment and system has been fully tested in two demonstration projects in April 2008 and August 2009. With the strong support of DOE-SR and DOE PCP, a field testing program was completed in Savannah River Site's K-Area Material Storage (KAMS) Facility, an active Category I Plutonium Storage Facility, in 2010. As the next step (Phase II) of continued vault testing for the ARG-US system, the Savannah River Site K Area Material Storage facility has placed the ARG-US RFIDs into the 910B storage vault for operational testing. This latest version (Mark III) of the Argonne RFID system now has the capability to measure radiation dose and dose rate. This paper will report field testing progress of the ARG-US RFID equipment in KAMS, the operability and reliability trend results associated with the applications of the system, and discuss the potential benefits in enhancing safety, security and materials accountability. The purpose of this Phase II K Area test is to verify the accuracy of the radiation monitoring and proper functionality of the ARG-US RFID equipment and system under a realistic environment in the KAMS facility. Deploying the ARG-US RFID system leads to a reduced need for manned surveillance and increased inventory periods by providing real-time access to status and event history traceability, including environmental condition monitoring and radiation monitoring. The successful completion of the testing program will provide field data to support a future development and testing. This will increase Operation efficiency and cost effectiveness for vault operation. As the next step (Phase II) of continued vault testing for the ARG-US system, the Savannah River Site K Area Material Storage facility has placed the ARG-US RFIDs into the 910B storage vault. Deploying the ARG-US RFID system lends to a reduced need for manned surveillance and increased inventory periods by providing real-time access to status and event history traceability, including radiation and environmental monitoring. The successful completion of the testing program will provide field data to support future development and testing.

  1. EA-1849-S1: Phase II Facility- Ormat Tuscarora Geothermal Power Plant in Tuscarora, NV

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Supplemental Environmental Assessment (SEA) will evaluate the potential impacts of the Phase II Facility of the Ormat Tuscarora Geothermal Power Plant.

  2. Small Business Innovation Research. Abstracts of Phase II awards, 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SBIR program enables DOE to obtain effective, innovative solutions to important problems through the private sector, which has a commercial incentive to pursue the resulting technology and bring it to the marketplace. The growing number of awardees, many of them started in business in response to SBIR solicitations, is becoming a significant resource for the solution of high risk, high technology problems for the Department. As detailed below, this publication describes the technical efforts and commercialization possibilities for SBIR Phase II awards in Fiscal Year (FY) 2000. It is intended for the educated layman, and maybe of particular interest to potential investors who wish to get in on the ground floor of exciting opportunities.

  3. MICS Asia Phase II - Sensitivity to the aerosol module

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sartelet, Karine; Sportisse, Bruno

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the framework of the model inter-comparison study - Asia Phase II (MICS2), where eight models are compared over East Asia, this paper studies the influence of different parameterizations used in the aerosol module on the aerosol concentrations of sulfate and nitrate in PM10. An intracomparison of aerosol concentrations is done for March 2001 using different configurations of the aerosol module of one of the model used for the intercomparison. Single modifications of a reference setup for model configurations are performed and compared to a reference case. These modifications concern the size distribution, i.e. the number of sections, and physical processes, i.e. coagulation, condensation/evaporation, cloud chemistry, heterogeneous reactions and sea-salt emissions. Comparing monthly averaged concentrations at different stations, the importance of each parameterization is first assessed. It is found that sulfate concentrations are little sensitive to sea-salt emissions and to whether condensation is computed...

  4. Rooftop PV system. Final technical progress report, Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under this four-year PV:BONUS Program, ECD and United Solar are developing and demonstrating two new lightweight flexible building integrated Photovoltaic (BIPV) modules specifically designed as exact replacements for conventional asphalt shingles and standing seam metal roofing. These modules can be economically and aesthetically integrated into new residential and commercial buildings, and address the even larger roofing replacement market. The modules are designed to be installed by roofing contractors without special training which minimizes the installation and balance of system costs. The modules will be fabricated from high-efficiency, multiple-junction a-Si alloy solar cells developed by ECD and United Solar. Under the Phase I Program, which ended in March 1994, we developed two different concept designs for rooftop PV modules: (1) the United Solar overlapping (asphalt shingle replacement) shingle-type modules and (2) the ECD metal roof-type modules. We also developed a plan for fabricating, testing and demonstrating these modules. Candidate demonstration sites for our rooftop PV modules were identified and preliminary engineering designs for these demonstrations were developed; a marketing study plan was also developed. The major objectives of the Phase II Program, which started in June 1994 was (1) to develop, test, and qualify these new rooftop modules; (2) to develop mechanical and electrical engineering specifications for the demonstration projects; and (3) to develop a marketing/commercialization plan.

  5. ALTERNATE REDUCTANT COLD CAP EVALUATION FURNACE PHASE II TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, F.; Stone, M.; Miller, D.

    2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) conducted a Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE) to determine the optimum alternate reductant flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Specifically, two proposed flowsheets (nitric–formic–glycolic and nitric–formic–sugar) were evaluated based upon results from preliminary testing. Comparison of the two flowsheets among evaluation criteria indicated a preference towards the nitric–formic–glycolic flowsheet. Further research and development of this flowsheet eliminated the formic acid, and as a result, the nitric–glycolic flowsheet was recommended for further testing. Based on the development of a roadmap for the nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet, Waste Solidification Engineering (WS-E) issued a Technical Task Request (TTR) to address flammability issues that may impact the implementation of this flowsheet. Melter testing was requested in order to define the DWPF flammability envelope for the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Cold Cap Evaluation Furnace (CEF), a 1/12th scale DWPF melter, was selected by the SRR Alternate Reductant project team as the melter platform for this testing. The overall scope was divided into the following sub-tasks as discussed in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP): ? Phase I - A nitric–formic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled) to baseline the CEF cold cap and vapor space data to the benchmark melter flammability models; ? Phase II - A nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled and bubbled) to: o Define new cold cap reactions and global kinetic parameters in support of the melter flammability model development; o Quantify off-gas surging potential of the feed; o Characterize off-gas condensate for complete organic and inorganic carbon species. After charging the CEF with cullet from Phase I CEF testing, the melter was slurry-fed with glycolic flowsheet based SB6-Frit 418 melter feed at 36% waste loading and was operated continuously for 25 days. Process data was collected throughout testing and included melter operation parameters and off-gas chemistry. In order to generate off-gas data in support of the flammability model development for the nitric-glycolic flowsheet, vapor space steady state testing in the range of ~300-750°C was conducted under the following conditions, (i) 100% (nominal and excess antifoam levels) and 125% stoichiometry feed and (ii) with and without argon bubbling. Adjustments to feed rate, heater outputs and purge air flow were necessary in order to achieve vapor space temperatures in this range. Surge testing was also completed under nominal conditions for four days with argon bubbling and one day without argon bubbling.

  6. VERY LARGE ARRAY PROJECT The Proposal for Phase II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    IF THIS IS A PRELIMINARY PROPOSAL (See GPG II.C For Definitions) FOR-PROFIT ORGANIZATION WOMAN-OWNED BUSINESS THEN CHECK BELOW BEGINNING INVESTIGATOR (GPG I.A) DISCLOSURE OF LOBBYING ACTIVITIES (GPG II.C) PROPRIETARY & PRIVILEGED INFORMATION (GPG I.B, II.C.1.d) HISTORIC PLACES (GPG II.C.2.j) SMALL GRANT FOR EXPLOR. RESEARCH

  7. An Analysis of Trading Motivations in Phase II of the European Union

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Robert Michael

    An Analysis of Trading Motivations in Phase II of the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme By Executive Summary I. The European Union Emission Trading Scheme a. Evolution of the EU ETS b. Structure of Trading Behavior in Phase II of the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme "Our generation's response

  8. The role of technology in reducing health care costs. Phase II and phase III.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cilke, John F.; Parks, Raymond C.; Funkhouser, Donald Ray; Tebo, Michael A.; Murphy, Martin D.; Hightower, Marion Michael; Gallagher, Linda K.; Craft, Richard Layne, II; Garcia, Rudy John

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Phase I of this project, reported in SAND97-1922, Sandia National Laboratories applied a systems approach to identifying innovative biomedical technologies with the potential to reduce U.S. health care delivery costs while maintaining care quality. The effort provided roadmaps for the development and integration of technology to meet perceived care delivery requirements and an economic analysis model for development of care pathway costs for two conditions: coronary artery disease (CAD) and benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). Phases II and III of this project, which are presented in this report, were directed at detailing the parameters of telemedicine that influence care delivery costs and quality. These results were used to identify and field test the communication, interoperability, and security capabilities needed for cost-effective, secure, and reliable health care via telemedicine.

  9. Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vucelick, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, Mickie A.

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2003, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the Nation Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2003, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve juvenile fish passage conditions. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites.

  10. CHAOS II: Gas-Phase Abundances in NGC 5194

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Croxall, Kevin V; Berg, Danielle; Skillman, Evan D; Moustakas, John

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have observed NGC5194 (M51a) as part of the CHemical Abundances of Spirals (CHAOS) project. Using the Multi Object Double Spectrographs (MODS) on the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) we are able to measure one or more of the temperature-sensitive auroral lines ([O III] 4363, [N II] 5755, [S III] 6312) and thus measure "direct" gas-phase abundances in 29 individual HII regions. [O III] 4363 is only detected in two HII regions both of which show indications of excitation by shocks. We compare our data to previous direct abundances measured in NGC5194 and find excellent agreement for all but one region (Delta[log(O/H)] ~ 0.04). We find no evidence of trends in Ar/O, Ne/O, or S/O within NGC5194 or compared to other galaxies. We find modest negative gradients in both O/H and N/O with very little scatter (sigma = -0.62) suggests secondary nitrogen production is responsible for a significantly larger fraction of nitrogen (e.g., factor of 8-10) relative to primary production mechanisms than predicted by theoretica...

  11. Postirradiation examination of BEATRIX-II, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slagle, O.D.; Hobbs, F.D.; Baldwin, D.L.; Hollenberg, G.W. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Takahashi, T.; Noda, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Verrall, R.A. [AECL Research, Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Labs.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BEATRIX-II is an in situ tritium recovery experiment that was designed to characterize the behavior of lithium ceramics irradiated to high burnup in a fast neutron flux. Postirradiation examination was carried out on the Phase 1 vented canisters: one containing a Li{sub 2}O ring capable of temperature changes and the other a Li{sub 2}O solid specimen with a center temperature of 1,000{degrees}C. The tritium inventory of the ring specimen at 650{degrees}C was determined to be in the range from 0.2--0.6 wppm while for the solid specimen the inventory varied from 1.4 wppm at the surface to 0.06 wppm at the inner surface. Downstream transport of the Li{sub 2}O by the sweep gas was determined to be insignificant from analyses of acid rinses of selected canister surfaces. Densification and restructuring of the solid specimen during irradiation resulted in the development of a central annulus. Ceramography was used to characterize the columnar grain structure and the mechanisms involved in its evolution.

  12. Ultrafiltration of Kraft Black Liquor: Phase II, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, M.K.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major justification for examining ultrafiltration was to lower the viscosity of the Kraft Black Liquor by recovering it as an ultrafiltration permeate from which the highest MW lignin had been removed. The liquor could then be concentrated to a higher percentage solids before firing into the recovery boiler. Consequent energy savings for the 1000 ton/day pulp mill would be 2.05 x 10 Btu/y for each percentage increase in TDS (total dissolved solids) to the recovery boiler. This Phase II report gives data on viscosity with percentage solids of KBL permeates. Another favorable effect of ultrafiltration on the permeate properties is disproportionate removal of multivalent ions including the major scaling ion CaS . If this high-viscosity high-Ca retentate could be treated to lower its viscosity and to release the Ca in a non-scaling form, this would enhance the possibility that ultrafiltration might be useful in a mill situation. Included in this report are data on the results of treating the retentate fraction. Other justifications for this program included further information in KBL properties: lignin MW in the KBL at high pH; elemental and sugar analyses; and differential properties of lignins in the retentate and the permeate fractions. A preliminary economic analysis of ultrafiltration is contained in this report. These analyses indicate that with flux rates now attainable, ultrafiltration would not be economically justified at this time if the only justification is to lower KBL viscosity. For certain situations where high Ca liquors present a scaling problem, especially in an evaporator-limited mill, the economics are more favorable. There are also unsolved problems relating to the use of the high viscosity retentate.

  13. NOx control subsystem test plan: LEBS Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    It is planned that NO{sub x} control subsystem testing in support of Phase II of the Low-Emissions Boiler Systems (LEBS) Project occur in ABB Power Plant Laboratories` (PPL) pilot scale Boiler Simulation Facility (BSF). This work will be performed to provide necessary design and operational information for inclusion of an optimized NO, control subsystem in the Proof-of-Concept Test Facility (POCTF) and Commercial Generating Unit (CGU) designs. The BSF is a 50 to 90x10{sup 6} BTU/hr (15 to 26 MWt) coal, oil or natural gas fired tangential furnace designed to replicate the residence time/temperature history of a utility scale tangentially fired boiler. All major aspects of a typical utility boiler are duplicated in the BSF including the lower furnace, the ash hopper, multiple burner elevations, the arch section, superheater/reheater panels, and the convective heat transfer surfaces. The furnace walls and heat transfer surfaces are cooled by a surrounding water jacket. Steam generated is vented off at atmospheric pressure so that a constant sink temperature of 100{degrees}C (212{degrees}C) is maintained. The lower furnace water walls are selectively refractory lined to maintain an appropriate furnace gas temperature history. Refractory is required because the sink temperature (100{degrees}C) is cooler than that of a typical, utility boiler, and the surface-to-volume ratio of the BSF is greater than that of a utility boiler due to scale effects. For the subject testing, the BSF will be configured as a coal fired boiler. Design and planning activities associated with the construction of the NO{sub x} control subsystem test unit will continue through June, 1995. Additionally, the schedule for specification of certain low NO{sub x} firing system components was set to allow for precursor, internal and LEBS development activities to occur and subsequently provide necessary design parameters.

  14. LMS-based method for damage detection applied to Phase II of Structural Health Monitoring benchmark problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preston, Robin Huckaby

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    in structural stiffness for the IASC-ASCE Structural Health Monitoring Task Group Benchmark problem for both Phase I and II. The research focuses primarily on Phase II of the benchmark problem. In Phase II, modeling error and noise is introduced to the problem...

  15. Microgrid Design, Development and Demonstration - Final Report for Phase I and Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bose, Sumit; Krok, Michael

    2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This document constitutes GE’s final report for the Microgrid Design, Development and Demonstration program for DOE’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Award DE-FC02-05CH11349. It contains the final report for Phase I in Appendix I, and the results the work performed in Phase II. The program goal was to develop and demonstrate a Microgrid Energy Management (MEM) framework for a broad set of Microgrid applications that provides unified controls, protection, and energy management. This project contributed to the achievement of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Renewable and Distributed Systems Integration Program goals by developing a fully automated power delivery microgrid network that: - Reduces carbon emissions and emissions of other air pollutants through increased use of optimally dispatched renewable energy, - Increases asset use through integration of distributed systems, - Enhances reliability, security, and resiliency from microgrid applications in critical infrastructure protection, constrained areas of the electric grid, etc. - Improves system efficiency with on-site, distributed generation and improved economic efficiency through demand-side management.

  16. Citrus bioactive compounds influencing phase II detoxifying enzymes: potential for cancer chemoprevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Jose Luis

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Several cell culture and animal studies demonstrated that citrus limonoids have protective effects against certain types of cancer. These chemopreventive properties of citrus limonoids are attributed to the induction of phase II enzyme, glutathione...

  17. Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical Flushing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Final ReportPhase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive Barriers and Potential for Rejuvenation by Chemical FlushingU. S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 8 SupportJanuary 2004

  18. Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, J.A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, M.A.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the summer and fall of 2001 the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year study for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. Data were collected to determine if velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met current National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage and whether bypass outfall conditions allowed fish to safely return to the river. Based on our studies in 2001, we concluded that: in general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set forth by the NMFS; most facilities efficiently protected juvenile fish from entrainment, impingement, or migration delay; automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were well greased and operative; and removal of sediment build-up and accumulated leafy and woody debris are areas that continue to improve. Continued periodic screen evaluations will increase the effectiveness of screen operation and maintenance practices by confirming the effectiveness (or ineffectiveness) of screen operating procedures at individual sites. Where procedures are being followed and problems still occur, evaluation results can be used to suggest means to better protect fish at screening facilities. There has been a progressive improvement in the maintenance and effectiveness of fish screen facilities in the Yakima River Basin during the last several years, in part, as a result of regular screen evaluations and the rapid feedback of information necessary to improve operations and design of these important fish protection devices. Continued periodic screen evaluations will increase the effectiveness of screen operation and maintenance practices by confirming the effectiveness (or ineffectiveness) of screen operating procedures at individual sites. Where procedures are being followed and problems still occur, evaluation results can be used to suggest means to better protect fish at screening facilities. There has been a progressive improvement in the maintenance and effectiveness of fish screen facilities in the Yakima River Basin during the last several years, in part, as a result of regular screen evaluations and the rapid feedback of information necessary to improve operations and design of these important fish protection devices.

  19. ORIGINAL PAPER Rutile/TiO2II phase equilibria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Youxue

    ­10 GPa. The phase diagram proposed by Dachille et al. (1968) was criticized by Jamieson and Olinger (1969

  20. River Protection Project Integrated safety management system phase II verification report, volumes I and II - 8/19/99

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SHOOP, D.S.

    1999-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy policy (DOE P 450.4) is that safety is integrated into all aspects of the management and operations of its facilities. In simple and straightforward terms, the Department will ''Do work safely.'' The purpose of this River Protection Project (RPP) Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) Phase II Verification was to determine whether ISMS programs and processes are implemented within RFP to accomplish the goal of ''Do work safely.'' The goal of an implemented ISMS is to have a single integrated system that includes Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) requirements in the work planning and execution processes to ensure the protection of the worker, public, environment, and federal property over the RPP life cycle. The ISMS is comprised of the (1) described functions, components, processes, and interfaces (system map or blueprint) and (2) personnel who are executing those assigned roles and responsibilities to manage and control the ISMS. Therefore, this review evaluated both the ''paper'' and ''people'' aspects of the ISMS to ensure that the system is implemented within RPP. Richland Operations Office (RL) conducted an ISMS Phase I Verification of the TWRS from September 28-October 9, 1998. The resulting verification report recommended that TWRS-RL and the contractor proceed with Phase II of ISMS verification given that the concerns identified from the Phase I verification review are incorporated into the Phase II implementation plan.

  1. Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification data base. Volume 4. Hanna II, Phases II and III field test research report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartke, T.C.; Fischer, D.D.; King, S.B.; Boyd, R.M.; Humphrey, A.E.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is part of a seven-volume series on the Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification field tests. Volume 1 is a summary of the project and each of Volumes 2 through 6 describes a particular test. Volume 7 is a compilation of all the data for the tests in Volumes 2 through 6. Hanna II, Phases II and III, were conducted during the winter of 1975 and the summer of 1976. The two phases refer to linking and gasification operations conducted between two adjacent well pairs as shown in Figure 1 with Phase II denoting operations between Wells 5 and 6 and Phase III operations between Wells 7 and 8. All of the other wells shown were instrumentation wells. Wells 7 and 8 were linked in November and December 1975. This report covers: (1) specific site selection and characteristics; (2) test objectives; (3) facilities description; (4) pre-operation tests; (5) test operations summary; and (6) post-test activity. 16 refs., 21 figs., 17 tabs.

  2. Goat Mountain Phase II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAddInformationEnergyEnergyGWECCGlycosFuelII

  3. Kotzebue Wind Project Phase II & III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii9969995°,I Jump to: navigation, searchII &

  4. Milford Wind Corridor Phase II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole Inc JumpMicroPlanet Name: MidwestTreaty ActII Jump to:

  5. Technical Analysis of the Hydrogen Energy Station Concept, Phase I and Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TIAX, LLC

    2005-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase I Due to the growing interest in establishing a domestic hydrogen infrastructure, several hydrogen fueling stations already have been established around the country as demonstration units. While these stations help build familiarity with hydrogen fuel in their respective communities, hydrogen vehicles are still several years from mass production. This limited number of hydrogen vehicles translates to a limited demand for hydrogen fuel, a significant hurdle for the near-term establishment of commercially viable hydrogen fueling stations. By incorporating a fuel cell and cogeneration system with a hydrogen fueling station, the resulting energy station can compensate for low hydrogen demand by providing both hydrogen dispensing and combined heat and power (CHP) generation. The electrical power generated by the energy station can be fed back into the power grid or a nearby facility, which in turn helps offset station costs. Hydrogen production capacity not used by vehicles can be used to support building heat and power loads. In this way, an energy station can experience greater station utility while more rapidly recovering capital costs, providing an increased market potential relative to a hydrogen fueling station. At an energy station, hydrogen is generated on-site. Part of the hydrogen is used for vehicle refueling and part of the hydrogen is consumed by a fuel cell. As the fuel cell generates electricity and sends it to the power grid, excess heat is reclaimed through a cogeneration system for use in a nearby facility. Both the electrical generation and heat reclamation serve to offset the cost of purchasing the equivalent amount of energy for nearby facilities and the energy station itself. This two-phase project assessed the costs and feasibility of developing a hydrogen vehicle fueling station in conjunction with electricity and cogenerative heat generation for nearby Federal buildings. In order to determine which system configurations and operational patterns would be most viable for an energy station, TIAX developed several criteria for selecting a representative set of technology configurations. TIAX applied these criteria to all possible technology configurations to determine an optimized set for further analysis, as shown in Table ES-1. This analysis also considered potential energy station operational scenarios and their impact upon hydrogen and power production. For example, an energy station with a 50-kWe reformer could generate enough hydrogen to serve up to 12 vehicles/day (at 5 kg/fill) or generate up to 1,200 kWh/day, as shown in Figure ES-1. Buildings that would be well suited for an energy station would utilize both the thermal and electrical output of the station. Optimizing the generation and utilization of thermal energy, hydrogen, and electricity requires a detailed look at the energy transfer within the energy station and the transfer between the station and nearby facilities. TIAX selected the Baseline configuration given in Table ES-1 for an initial analysis of the energy and mass transfer expected from an operating energy station. Phase II The purpose of this technical analysis was to analyze the development of a hydrogen-dispensing infrastructure for transportation applications through the installation of a 50-75 kW stationary fuel cell-based energy station at federal building sites. The various scenarios, costs, designs and impacts of such a station were quantified for a hypothetical cost-shared program that utilizes a natural gas reformer to provide hydrogen fuel for both the stack(s) and a limited number of fuel cell powered vehicles, with the possibility of using cogeneration to support the building heat load.

  6. IAutomation for Vehicle and Habitat Operations 2007 Phase II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of which is called a procedure representation language (PRL). PRL can be automatically translated into code levels of flight personnel must be able to handle. But PRL has few constructs to enable automated planners and schedulers to take advantage of the procedures resulting from PRL. In Phase 1 we developed

  7. OCCIDENTAL VERTICAL MODIFIED IN SITU PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY OF OIL FROM OIL SHALE. PHASE II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Reid M.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The progress presented in this report covers the period June 1, 1980 through August 31, 1980 under the work scope for.Phase II of the DOE/Occidental Oil Shale, Inc. (OOSI) Cooperative Agreement. The major activities at OOSI 1s Logan Wash site during the quarter were: mining the voids at all levels for Retorts 7, 8 and 8x; completing Mini-Retort (MR) construction; continuing surface facility construction; tracer testing the MR 1 s; conducting Retorts 7 & 8 related Rock Fragmentation tests; setting up and debugging the Sandia B-61 trailer; and preparing the Phase II instrumentation plan.

  8. RadSTraM: Radiological Source Tracking and Monitoring, Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Tracy A [ORNL; Walker, Randy M [ORNL; Hill, David E [ORNL; Gross, Ian G [ORNL; Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report focuses on the technical information gained from the Radiological Source Tracking and Monitoring (RadSTraM) Phase II investigation and its implications. The intent of the RadSTraM project was to determine the feasibility of tracking radioactive materials in commerce, particularly International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Category 3 and 4 materials. Specifically, Phase II of the project addressed tracking radiological medical isotopes in commerce. These categories of materials are susceptible to loss or theft but the problem is not being addressed by other agencies.

  9. Phase-space structures II: Hierarchical Structure Finder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Maciejewski; S. Colombi; V. Springel; C. Alard; F. R. Bouchet

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new multi-dimensional Hierarchical Structure Finder (HSF) to study the phase-space structure of dark matter in N-body cosmological simulations is presented. The algorithm depends mainly on two parameters, which control the level of connectivity of the detected structures and their significance compared to Poisson noise. By working in 6D phase-space, where contrasts are much more pronounced than in 3D position space, our HSF algorithm is capable of detecting subhaloes including their tidal tails, and can recognise other phase-space structures such as pure streams and candidate caustics. If an additional unbinding criterion is added, the algorithm can be used as a self-consistent halo and subhalo finder. As a test, we apply it to a large halo of the Millennium Simulation, where 19 % of the halo mass are found to belong to bound substructures, which is more than what is detected with conventional 3D substructure finders, and an additional 23-36 % of the total mass belongs to unbound HSF structures. The distribution of identified phase-space density peaks is clearly bimodal: high peaks are dominated by the bound structures and low peaks belong mostly to tidal streams. In order to better understand what HSF provides, we examine the time evolution of structures, based on the merger tree history. Bound structures typically make only up to 6 orbits inside the main halo. Still, HSF can identify at the present time at least 80 % of the original content of structures with a redshift of infall as high as z space.

  10. Maple Ridge Wind Farm phase II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconvertersourcesource History View New5 portion)phase

  11. Nine Canyon Wind Farm Phase II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcerns Jump to:Neppelsource History(CTI PFAN) | OpenNimesFarm Phase

  12. Definition of the Semisubmersible Floating System for Phase II of OC4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Masciola, M.; Song, H.; Goupee, A.; Coulling, A.; Luan, C.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase II of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration Continuation (OC4) project involved modeling of a semisubmersible floating offshore wind system as shown below. This report documents the specifications of the floating system, which were needed by the OC4 participants for building aero-hydro-servo-elastic models.

  13. Bayesian Analysis of the Phase II IASCASCE Structural Health Monitoring Experimental Benchmark Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heaton, Thomas H.

    Bayesian Analysis of the Phase II IASC­ASCE Structural Health Monitoring Experimental Benchmark­ASCE Task Group on Structural Health Monitoring. This study involves damage detection and assessment; Identification; Bench marks; Structural analysis; Modal analysis. Introduction Structural health monitoring (SHM

  14. IDetachable, Human-Rated, Ablative Environmentally Compliant TPSLunar Surface Systems 2008 Phase II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Systems 2008 Phase II Proposal X8.01-8631 Lightweight Hybrid Ablator Incorporating Aerogel-Filled Open skeleton filled with a high temperature nanoscale aerogel insulator. Structural integrity and high insulation behavior have been demonstrated when used in combination with a non-ablating, coated carbon

  15. UNC Tomorrow Phase II Campus Response Faculty and Staff Recruitment and Retention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 UNC Tomorrow Phase II Campus Response Faculty and Staff Recruitment and Retention Submitted to/Tenure Track Faculty Hires 2009-2017 #12; 4 The projected demand for faculty and EPA and SPA staff create a range of implications for recruitment and retention in academic and non- academic units. The most

  16. Sulfurization of a carbon surface for vapor phase mercury removal II: Sulfur forms and mercury uptake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borguet, Eric

    promote the formation of organic sulfur and the presence of H2S during the cooling process increased in the presence of H2S was very effective towards Hg uptake in nitrogen. Corre- lation of mercury uptake capacitySulfurization of a carbon surface for vapor phase mercury removal ­ II: Sulfur forms and mercury

  17. Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics Spring 2012 Solar Collector Research & Development Phase II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    PENNSTATE Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics Spring 2012 Solar Collector Research, low-maintenance solar collector that can output competitive efficiencies with respect to current solar & Development Phase II Overview Solar Dynamic is a small organization with the hopes of producing an affordable

  18. hal-00142891,version1-23Apr2007 MICS Asia Phase II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the size distribution, i.e. the number of sections, and physical processes, i.e. coagulation, condensation, chemistry transport model, size distribution, coagulation, condensation, cloud chemistry, heterogeneoushal-00142891,version1-23Apr2007 MICS Asia Phase II ­ Sensitivity to the aerosol module K

  19. MHD coal combustor technology. Final report, phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design, performance, and testing of a 20-MW coal combustor for scaleup to 50 MW for use in an MHD generator are described. The design incorporates the following key features: (1) a two-stage combustor with an intermediate slag separator to remove slag at a low temperture, thus minimizing enthalpy losses required for heating and vaporizing the slag; (2) a first-stage pentad (four air streams impinging on one coal stream) injector design with demonstrated efficient mixing, promoting high carbon burnout; (3) a two-section first-stage combustion chamber; the first stage using a thin slag-protected refractory layer and the second section using a thick refractory layer, both to minimize heat losses; (4) a refractory lining in the slag separator to minimize heat losses; (5) a second-stage combustor, which provided both de-swirl of the combustion products exiting from the slag separator and simple mixing of the vitiated secondary air and seed; (6) a dense-phase coal feed system to minimize cold carrier gas entering the first-stage combustors; (7) a dry seed injection system using pulverized K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ with a 1% amorphous, fumed silicon dioxide additive to enhance flowability, resulting in rapid vaporization and ionization and ensuring maximum performance; and (8) a performance evaluation module (PEM) of rugged design based on an existing, successfully-fired unit. (WHK)

  20. Phase I and II feasibility study report for the 300-FF-5 operable unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Phase I/II feasibility study is to assemble and screen a list of alternatives for remediation of the 300-FF-5 operable site on the Hanford Reservation. This screening is based on information gathered in the Phase I Remedial Investigation (RI) and on currently available information on remediation technologies. The alternatives remaining after screening provide a range of response actions for remediation. In addition, key data needs are identified for collection during a Phase II RI (if necessary). This Phase I/II FS represents a primary document as defined by the Tri-Party Agreement, but will be followed by a Phase III FS that will further develop the alternatives and provide a detailed evaluation of them. The following remedial action objectives were identified for the 300-FF-5 operable unit: Limit current human exposure to contaminated groundwater in the unit; Limit discharge of contaminated groundwater to the Columbia River; Reduce contaminant concentrations in groundwater below acceptable levels by the year 2018.

  1. Temperature fluctuations in H II regions: t2 for the two-phase model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Zhang; B. Ercolano; X. -W. Liu

    2007-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims: We investigate temperature fluctuations in H II regions in terms of a two-phase model, which assumes that the nebular gas consists of a hot and a cold phase. Methods: We derive general formulae for T([O III), the [O III] forbidden line temperature, and T(H I), the hydrogen Balmer jump temperature, in terms of the temperatures of the hot and cold phases, T_h and T_c. Results: For large temperature differences, the values of t2 required to account for the observed difference between T([O III]) and T(H I) are much lower than those deduced using the classical formulae that assume random and small amplitude temperature fluctuations. One should therefore be cautious when using a two-phase model to account for empirically derived $t^2$ values. We present a correction of a recent work by Giammanco & Beckman, who use a two-phase model to estimate the ionization rate of H II regions by cosmicrays. We show that a very small amount of cold gas is sufficient to account for t2 values typically inferred for H II regions.

  2. Navy mobility fuels forecasting system. Phase II, report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadder, G.R.; Vineyard, T.A.; Das, S.; Lee, R.

    1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of the Navy (DON) requires an improved capability to forecast mobility fuel availability and quality. The changing patterns in fuel availability and quality are important in planning the Navy's fuel use strategy and the Mobility Fuels Technology Program. Until recently, there has been a long-term decline in the quality of crude oil entering world markets and a shift in refinery capacities domestically and worldwide. Three publicly available models developed by the Energy Information Administration of the Department of Energy were selected as the basis of the Navy Mobility Fuels Forecasting System (NMFFS). The system was used to analyze the availability and quality of jet fuel (JP-5) and diesel fuel (F-76) that could be produced in several domestic and foreign refinery regions under business-as-usual and four hypothetical world crude oil disruption scenarios in 1990. The results from the study indicate that jet fuel availability could be reduced in some refinery regions under the disruptions studied. Various strategies were investigated for increasing JP-5 production during the disruptions. In general, the availability of JP-5 was more limited than F-76 under the disruption cases studied; however, in all cases one or more strategies were identified to increase refinery output of JP-5 in all study regions. Based on the four hypothetical disruption scenarios studied, the analysis suggested tat JP-5 production could be increased by relaxing the smoke point, freezing point, flash point, and by increasing the refiners' gate price for the jet fuel in the study regions. A more complete analysis of navy mobility fuel trends, as well as several changes in the models to make them easier to use in fuel planning and forecastig studies, are planned as part of the third phase of this program.

  3. Rigid Polyurethane Foam (RPF) Technology for Countermines (Sea) Program Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WOODFIN,RONALD L.; FAUCETT,DAVID L.; HANCE,BRADLEY G.; LATHAM,AMY E.; SCHMIDT,C.O.

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Phase II report documents the results of one subtask initiated under the joint Department of Energy (DOE)/Department of Defense (DoD) Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for Countermine Warfare. The development of Rigid Polyurethane Foams for neutralization of mines and barriers in amphibious assault was the objective of the tasking. This phase of the program concentrated on formation of RPF in water, explosive mine simulations, and development of foam and fabric pontoons. Field experimentation was done primarily at the Energetic Materials Research and Testing Center (EMRTC) of the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM between February 1996 and September 1998.

  4. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF COAL-FIRED HIGH PERFORMANCE POWER SYSTEMS PHASE II AND III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents work carried out under contract DE-AC22-95PC95144 "Engineering Development of Coal-Fired High Performance Systems Phase II and III." The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: à thermal efficiency (HHV) >47%; à NOx, SOx, and particulates <10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard); à coal providing >65% of heat input; à all solid wastes benign; à cost of electricity <90% of present plants. Phase I, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase I also included preliminary R&D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This phase, Phase II, involves the development and testing of plant subsystems, refinement and updating of the HIPPS commercial plant design, and the site selection and engineering design of a HIPPS prototype plant. Work reported herein is from: à Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; à Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  5. Enertech 15-kW wind-system development. Phase II. Fabrication and test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zickefoose, C.R.

    1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Phase II report presents a description of the Enertech 15 kW prototype wind system hardware fabrication; results of component tests; and results of preliminary testing conducted at Norwich, VT and the RF Wind Energy Research Center. In addition, the assembly sequence is documented. During testing, the unit experienced several operational problems, but testing proved the design concept and demonstrated the system's ability to meet the contract design specifications for power output.

  6. National Geoscience Data Repository System, Phase II. Final report, January 30, 1995--January 28, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The American Geological Institute (AGI) has completed Phase II of a project to establish a National Geoscience Data Repository System (NGDRS). The project`s primary objectives are to preserve geoscience data in jeopardy of being destroyed and to make that data available to those who have a need to use it in future investigations. These data are available for donation to the public as a result of the downsizing that has occurred in the major petroleum and mining companies in the United States for the past decade. In recent years, these companies have consolidated domestic operations, sold many of their domestic properties and relinquished many of their leases. The scientific data associated with those properties are no longer considered to be useful assets and are consequently in danger of being lost forever. The national repository project will make many of these data available to the geoscience community for the first time. To address this opportunity, AGI sought support from the Department of Energy (DOE) in 1994 to initiate the NGDRS Phase I feasibility study to determine the types and quantity of data that companies would be willing to donate. The petroleum and mining companies surveyed indicated that they were willing to donate approximately five million well logs, one hundred million miles of seismic reflection data, millions of linear feet of core and cuttings, and a variety of other types of scientific data. Based on the positive results of the Phase I study, AGI undertook Phase II of the program in 1995. Funded jointly by DOE and industry, Phase II encompasses the establishment of standards for indexing and cataloging of geoscience data and determination of the costs of transferring data from the private sector to public-sector data repositories. Pilot projects evaluated the feasibility of the project for transfer of different data types and creation of a Web-based metadata supercatalog and browser.

  7. 37 GHz METHANOL MASERS : HORSEMEN OF THE APOCALYPSE FOR THE CLASS II METHANOL MASER PHASE?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellingsen, S. P.; Breen, S. L. [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 37, Hobart, TAS 7001 (Australia); Sobolev, A. M. [Astronomical Observatory, Ural Federal University, Lenin avenue 51, 620000 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Voronkov, M. A.; Caswell, J. L. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Australia Telescope National Facility, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Lo, N., E-mail: Simon.Ellingsen@utas.edu.au [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Camino El Observatorio 1515, Las Condes, Santiago, Casilla 36-D (Chile)

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results of a search for class II methanol masers at 37.7, 38.3, and 38.5 GHz toward a sample of 70 high-mass star formation regions. We primarily searched toward regions known to show emission either from the 107 GHz class II methanol maser transition, or from the 6.035 GHz excited OH transition. We detected maser emission from 13 sources in the 37.7 GHz transition, eight of these being new detections. We detected maser emission from three sources in the 38 GHz transitions, one of which is a new detection. We find that 37.7 GHz methanol masers are only associated with the most luminous 6.7 and 12.2 GHz methanol maser sources, which in turn are hypothesized to be the oldest class II methanol sources. We suggest that the 37.7 GHz methanol masers are associated with a brief evolutionary phase (of 1000-4000 years) prior to the cessation of class II methanol maser activity in the associated high-mass star formation region.

  8. Gasification of kraft black liquor and use of the products in combined cycle cogeneration. Final report, Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelleher, E.G.

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Phase II study of kraft black liquor gasification and use of the product gases in combined cycle cogeneration based on combustion gas turbines was motivated by the very promising results of the Phase I feasibility study. The Phase I study indicated that the alternative technology to the Tomlinson recovery furnace had the potential of improving the energy efficiency and safety of combusting black liquor, reducing the capital and operating costs, increasing the electric power output, and providing an economical system for incremental kraft capacity additions. During Phase II, additional bench-scale experiments were run, pilot-scale experiments were conducted, equipment systems were investigated, and performance and economics were reanalyzed. All of the objectives of the Phase II project were met. Recommendations are summarized.

  9. Long-Term Column Leaching of Phase II Mercury Control Technology By-Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, K.T.; Cardone, C.R.; White, Fredrick; Rohar, P.C.; Kim, A.G

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An NETL research, development and demonstration program under DOE/Fossil Energy Innovations for Existing Plants is directed toward the improvement of the performance and economics of mercury control from coal-fired plants. The current Phase II of the RD&D program emphasizes the evaluation of performance and cost of control technologies through slip-stream and full scale field testing while continuing the development of novel concepts. One of the concerns of the NETL program is the fate of the captured flue gas mercury which is transferred to the condensed phase by-product stream. The stability of mercury and any co-captured elements in the by-products could have a large economic impact if it reduced by-product sales or increasing their disposal costs. As part of a greater characterization effort of Phase II facility baseline and control technology sample pairs, NETL in-house laboratories have performed continuous leaching of a select subset of the available sample pairs using four leachants: water (pH=5.7), dilute sulfuric acid (pH=1.2), dilute acetic acid (pH=2.9), and sodium carbonate (pH=11.1). This report describes results obtained for mercury, arsenic, and selenium during the 5-month leaching experiments.

  10. Final Phase II Report : QuickSite{reg_sign} investigation, Centralia, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. (Environmental Research)

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), formerly operated a grain storage facility approximately 1,100 ft north of Centralia from 1949 until 1971. Subsequently, a concrete mixing plant operated on the site (FSA 1997). None of the CCC/USDA structures remain, though belowgrade foundations related to structures associated with the concrete mixing operations are evident. Two additional grain storage facilities currently exist in and near Centralia: the Nemaha County Co-op, approximately 4,000 ft south of the former CCC/USDA facility, and a private grain storage facility near the Don Morris residence, 3,500 ft north of the former CCC/USDA facility (Figure 1.1). The property on which the former facility was located is currently owned by Jeanne Burdett Lacky of Seneca, Kansas. In August-September 1998 the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) conducted preliminary investigations at the former CCC/USDA facility, on the basis of the detection of carbon tetrachloride in the domestic well at the Don Morris residence (north of the former CCC/USDA facility). Prior to 1986, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were commonly used by the CCC/USDA and the grain storage industry to preserve grain. The details of previous investigations in the area and a summary of the findings were reported previously (Argonne 2002a). Because the KDHE detected carbon tetrachloride in groundwater and soil at the former CCC/USDA facility at Centralia that might be related to historical use of carbon tetrachloride-based grain fumigants at the facility, the CCC/USDA is conducting an environmental site investigation to determine the source(s) and extent of the carbon tetrachloride contamination at the former facility near Centralia and to assess whether the contamination requires remedial action. The town of Centralia and all residents near the former CCC/USDA facility currently obtain their water from Rural Water District No.3. Therefore, local residents are not drinking or using the contaminated groundwater detected at the former facility. The Environmental Research Division of Argonne National Laboratory is performing the investigation at Centralia on behalf of the CCC/USDA. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The CCC/USDA has entered into an interagency agreement with DOE, under which Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at its former grain storage facilities. At these former facilities, Argonne is applying its QuickSite{reg_sign} environmental site characterization methodology. QuickSite is Argonne's proprietary implementation system for the expedited site characterization process. This methodology has been applied successfully at a number of former CCC/USDA facilities in Nebraska and Kansas and has been adopted by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM 1998) as standard practice for environmental site characterization. Argonne's investigations are conducted with a phased approach. Phase I focuses primarily on the investigation and evaluation of geology, hydrogeology, and hydrogeochemistry to identify potential contaminant pathways at a site. Phase II focuses on delineating the contamination present in both soil and aquifers along the potential migration pathways. Phase I of Argonne's investigation was conducted in March-April 2002. The results and findings of the Phase I investigation at Centralia were reported previously (Argonne 2003). This report documents the findings of the Phase II activities at Centralia. Section 1 provides a brief history of the area, a review of the Phase I results and conclusions, technical objectives for the Phase II investigation, and a brief description of the sections contained in this report. Section 2 describes the investigative methods used during the Phase II investigation. Section 3 presents all of the data obtained during the investigation. Se

  11. Benchmark calculations on the phase II problem of uncertainty analyses for criticality safety assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, G. S.; Lee, J.; Kim, G. Y.; Woo, S. W. [Korea Inst. of Nuclear Safety, 62 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-338 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The phase II benchmark problem of expert group UACSA includes a configuration of a PWR fuel storage rack and focuses on the uncertainty of criticality from manufacturing tolerance of design parameters such as fuel enrichment, density, diameter, thickness of neutron absorber and structural material, and so on. It provides probability density functions for each design parameter. In this paper, upper limits of k{sub eff} of 95%/95% tolerance with two methods are calculated by sampling design parameters using given probability distributions and compared with the result from traditional approach. (authors)

  12. The Upgrade of the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Readout Electronics for Phase II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Tile Collaboration; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Large Hadron Collider at CERN is scheduled to undergo a major upgrade, called the Phase II Upgrade, in 2022. The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter community will do major modifications to the sub-detector to account for the increased luminosity. More specifically, a large proportion of the current front and back-end electronics will be upgraded in order to digitize all signals generated in the Calorimeters. A Demonstrator program has been established, which combines the current and future architectures, as a proof of principle. The insertion of the first demonstrator is planned for the end of 2015.

  13. FY 2014 Phase II Release 2+ EERE Awards | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721Energy 3_adv_battery.pdf More Documents & FYFY 2014 Phase II Release

  14. Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification data base. Volume 3. The Hanna II, Phase I field test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartke, T.C.; Fischer, D.D.; King, S.B.; Boyd, R.M.; Humphrey, A.E.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is part of a seven-volume series on the Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification field tests. Volume 1 is a summary of the project, and each of Volumes 2 through 6 describes a particular test. Volume 7 is a compilation of all the data for the tests in Volumes 2 through 6. Hanna II, Phase I was conducted during the spring and summer of 1975, at a site about 700 feet up dip (to the southwest) of the Hanna I test. The test was conducted in two stages - Phase IA and IB. Phase IA consisted of linking and gasification operations between Wells 1 and 3 and Phase IB of linking from the 1-3 gasification zone to Well 2, followed by a short period of gasification from Well 2 to Well 3 over a broad range of air injection rates, in order to determine system turndown capabilities and response times. This report covers: (1) site selection and characteristics; (2) test objectives; (3) facilities description; (4) pre-operational testing; (5) test operations summary; and (6) post-test activity. 7 refs., 11 figs., 8 tabs.

  15. Electrodril system field test program. Phase II: Task C-1-deep drilling system demonstration. Final report for Phase II: Task C-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, P D

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electrodril Deep Drilling System field test demonstrations were aborted in July 1979, due to connector problems. Subsequent post test analyses concluded that the field replacable connectors were the probable cause of the problems encountered. The designs for both the male and female connectors, together with their manufacturing processes, were subsequently modified, as was the acceptance test procedures. A total of nine male and nine female connectors were manufactured and delivered during the 2nd Quarter 1980. Exhaustive testing was then conducted on each connector as a precursor to formal qualification testing conducted during the month of October 1980, at the Brown Oil Tool test facility located in Houston, Texas. With this report, requirements under Phase II, Task C-1 are satisfied. The report documents the results of the connector qualification test program which was successfully completed October 28, 1980. In general, it was concluded that connector qualification had been achieved and plans are now in progress to resume the field test demonstration program so that Electrodril System performance predictions and economic viability can be evaluated.

  16. DOE Phase II SBIR: Spectrally-Assisted Vehicle Tracking - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villeneuve, Pierre V. [Space Computer Corporation

    2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this Phase II SBIR has been to develop a prototype software package to demonstrate spectrally-aided vehicle tracking. The primary application is to show improved target vehicle tracking performance in complex environments where traditional spatial tracker systems may show reduced performance. Examples include scenarios where the target vehicle is obscured by a large structure for an extended period of time, or where the target is engaging in extreme maneuvers amongst other civilian vehicles. The target information derived from spatial processing is unable to differentiate between the green versus the red vehicle. Spectral signature exploitation enables comparison of new candidate targets with existing track signatures. The ambiguity in this confusing scenario is resolved by folding spectral analysis results into each target nomination and association processes. The work performed over the two-year effort was divided into three general areas: algorithm refinement, software prototype development, and prototype performance demonstration. The tasks performed under this Phase II resulted in the completion of a software tool suitable for evaluation and testing of advanced tracking concepts.

  17. ICFT: An initial closed-loop flow test of the Fenton Hill Phase II HDR reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dash, Z.V. (ed.); Aguilar, R.G.; Dennis, B.R.; Dreesen, D.S.; Fehler, M.C.; Hendron, R.H.; House, L.S.; Ito, H.; Kelkar, S.M.; Malzahn, M.V.

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 30-day closed-loop circulation test of the Phase II Hot Dry Rock reservoir at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, was conducted to determine the thermal, hydraulic, chemical, and seismic characteristics of the reservoir in preparation for a long-term energy-extraction test. The Phase II heat-extraction loop was successfully tested with the injection of 37,000 m/sup 3/ of cold water and production of 23,300 m/sup 3/ of hot water. Up to 10 MW/sub t/ was extracted when the production flow rate reached 0.0139 m/sup 3//s at 192/degree/C. By the end of the test, the water-loss rate had decreased to 26% and a significant portion of the injected water was recovered; 66% during the test and an additional 20% during subsequent venting. Analysis of thermal, hydraulic, geochemical, tracer, and seismic data suggests the fractured volume of the reservoir was growing throughout the test. 19 refs., 64 figs., 19 tabs.

  18. ADVANCED SIMULATION CAPABILITY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT – CURRENT STATUS AND PHASE II DEMONSTRATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seitz, Roger; Freshley, Mark D.; Dixon, Paul; Hubbard, Susan S.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Flach, Gregory P.; Faybishenko, Boris; Gorton, Ian; Finsterle, Stefan A.; Moulton, John D.; Steefel, Carl I.; Marble, Justin

    2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Soil and Groundwater, is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of computer software capabilities with an emphasis on integration of capabilities in FY12. Capability development is occurring for both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and High-Performance Computing (HPC) Multiprocess Simulator. The Platform capabilities provide the user interface and tools for end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model, management of data for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and processing of model output, including visualization. The HPC capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications in a set of demonstrations as part of Site Applications Thrust Area activities. The Phase I demonstration focusing on individual capabilities of the initial toolsets was completed in 2010. The Phase II demonstration completed in 2012 focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site deep vadose zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of capabilities, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations, addressing attenuation-based remedies at the Savannah River Site F Area and performance assessment for a representative waste tank, illustrate integration of linked ASCEM capabilities and initial integration efforts with tools from the Cementitious Barriers Partnership.

  19. ADVANCED SIMULATION CAPABILITY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT- CURRENT STATUS AND PHASE II DEMONSTRATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seitz, R.

    2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Soil and Groundwater, is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of computer software capabilities with an emphasis on integration of capabilities in FY12. Capability development is occurring for both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and High-Performance Computing (HPC) Multiprocess Simulator. The Platform capabilities provide the user interface and tools for end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model, management of data for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and processing of model output, including visualization. The HPC capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications in a set of demonstrations as part of Site Applications Thrust Area activities. The Phase I demonstration focusing on individual capabilities of the initial toolsets was completed in 2010. The Phase II demonstration completed in 2012 focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site deep vadose zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of capabilities, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations, addressing attenuation-based remedies at the Savannah River Site F Area and performance assessment for a representative waste tank, illustrate integration of linked ASCEM capabilities and initial integration efforts with tools from the Cementitious Barriers Partnership.

  20. Granular bed filter development program, Phase II. Quarterly report, January-March 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moresco, L. L.; Ferguson, J.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase I included the development of a mathematical model, a cold flow parametric test series in a 0.746 Nm/sup 3//s GBF, and investigations of potential dust plugging problems at the inlet screen. Collection efficiencies of 99% and filter outlet loadings less than 0.0074 g/m/sup 3/ were demonstrated. The objectives of Phase II are to investigate the effects of elevated temperature and coal combustion particulate on GBF filtration performance; to update the analytical model developed in Phase I to reflect high temperature effects; to optimize filter internal configuration; to perform parametric and long duration tests to characterize the effects of filter design improvements on filtration efficiencies. Hot flow testing to date has confirmed that the GBF configured with inlet and outlet screens has exhibited a tendency for extensive and irreversible ash plugging. The potential advantages of a screenless configuration, having higher filtration efficiency, has been confirmed. This report describes the continuation of work pertinent to the development and design improvement of the GBF system, specifically addressing: (1) the development of governing equations derived for the 3-dimensional GBF mathematical model; (2) the initial results of subcontracted experiments to establish correlations of particulate capture mechanisms for use in the numerical 3-dimensional model; and (3) the design and physical modifications incorporated into the Model 4 GBF hot test setup for the final series of hot gas tests.

  1. Phase II Water Rental Pilot Project: Snake River Resident Fish and Wildlife Resources and Management Recommendations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stovall, Stacey H.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project was implemented in 1991 as part of the Non-Treaty Storage Fish and Wildlife Agreement between Bonneville Power Administration and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority. The goal of the project is to quantify resident fish and wildlife impacts resulting from salmon flow augmentation releases made from the upper Snake River Basin. Phase I summarized existing resource information and provided management recommendations to protect and enhance resident fish and wildlife habitat resulting from storage releases for the I improvement of an adromous fish migration. Phase II includes the following: (1) a summary of recent biological, legal, and political developments within the basin as they relate to water management issues, (2) a biological appraisal of the Snake River between American Falls Reservoir and the city of Blackfoot to examine the effects of flow fluctuation on fish and wildlife habitat, and (3) a preliminary accounting of 1993--1994 flow augmentation releases out of the upper Snake, Boise, and Payette river systems. Phase III will include the development of a model in which annual flow requests and resident fish and wildlife suitability information are interfaced with habitat time series analysis to provide an estimate of resident fish and wildlife resources.

  2. Evaluation of hydrothermal resources of North Dakota. Phase II. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, K.L.; Howell, F.L.; Winczewski, L.M.; Wartman, B.L.; Umphrey, H.R.; Anderson, S.B.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Phase II activities dealt with three main topical areas: geothermal gradient and heat-flow studies, stratigraphic studies, and water quality studies. Efforts were concentrated on Mesozoic and Cenozoic rocks. The geothermal gradient and heat-flow studies involved running temperature logs in groundwater observation holes in areas of interest, and locating, obtaining access to, and casing holes of convenience to be used as heat-flow determination sites. The stratigraphic and water quality studies involved two main efforts: updating and expanding WELLFILE and assembling a computer library system (WELLCAT) for all water wells drilled in the state. WATERCAT combines data from the United States Geological Survey Water Resources Division's WATSTOR and GWST computer libraries; and includes physical, stratigraphic, and water quality data. Goals, methods, and results are presented.

  3. SRNL PHASE II SHELF LIFE STUDIES - SERIES 1 ROOM TEMPERATURE AND HIGH RELATIVE HUMIDITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mickalonis, J.; Duffey, J.

    2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Phase II, Series 1 shelf-life corrosion testing for the Department of Energy Standard 3013 container is presented and discussed in terms of the localized corrosion behavior of Type 304 stainless steel in contact with moist plutonium oxide and chloride salt mixtures and the potential impact to the 3013 inner container. This testing was designed to address the influence of temperature, salt composition, initial salt moisture, residual stress and type of oxide/salt contact on the relative humidity inside a 3013 container and the initiation and propagation of localized corrosion, especially stress corrosion cracking. The integrated plan is being conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory and SRNL. SRNL is responsible for conducting a corrosion study in small scale vessels containing plutonium oxide and chloride salts under conditions of humidity, temperature and oxide/salt compositions both within the limits of 3013 storage conditions as well as beyond the 3013 storage requirements to identify margins for minimizing the initiation of stress corrosion cracking. These worst case conditions provide data that bound the material packaged in 3013 containers. Phase I of this testing was completed in 2010. The Phase II, Series 1 testing was performed to verify previous results from Phase I testing and extend our understanding about the initiation of stress corrosion cracking and pitting that occur in 304L under conditions of room temperature, high humidity, and a specific plutonium oxide/salt chemistry. These results will aid in bounding the safe storage conditions of plutonium oxides in 3013 containers. A substantial change in the testing was the addition of the capability to monitor relative humidity during test exposure. The results show that under conditions of high initial moisture ({approx}0.5 wt%) and room temperature stress corrosion cracking occurred in 304L teardrop coupons in contact with the oxide/salt mixture at times as short as 85 days. In all cases, the cracking appeared to be associated with pitting or localized general corrosion. Crack initiation at other sites, such as surface imperfections or inclusions, cannot be excluded. Cracks appear in most cases to initiate through an intergranular mode and transition to a transgranular mode.

  4. Environmentally benign manufacturing of compact disc stampers [Final Phase II report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1999-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical data storage is currently a $10B/yr. business. With the introduction of the high capacity Digital Versatile Disc (D/D) as well as the continued growth of CD-Audio and CD-ROM worldwide sales of optical data products as a whole are growing at rate of more than 10% per year. In North America, more than 2.5 billion optical discs will be sold in 1998. By 1999, the numbers of optical discs produced for the North American market will grow to almost three billion. The optical disc manufacturing industry is dominated by Asian and European companies (e.g. Sony of Japan and Philips of Netherlands). Prism Corporation has created a process that could significantly improve US competitiveness in the business of optical disc production. The objectives of the Phase II STTR project were to build and test an ion machining system (IMS) for stamper fabrication, prove overall manufacturing system feasibility by fabrication stampers and replicas, and evaluate alternative materials and alternative process parameters to optimize the process. During tie period of the Phase II project Prism Corporation was able to meet these objectives. In the course of doing so, adjustments had been made to better the project and in turn the final product. An ion machining system was designed and built that produced stampers ready for the molding process. Also, many control steps in the manufacturing process were studied to improve the current process and make it even more compatible with the industry standards, fitting seamlessly into current manufacturing lines.

  5. Seismic Safety Margins Research Program: Phase II program plan (FY 83-FY 84)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bohn, M.P.; Bernreuter, D.L.; Cover, L.E.; Johnson, J.J.; Shieh, L.C.; Shukla, S.N.; Wells, J.E.

    1982-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) is an NRC-funded, multiyear program conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Its goal is to develop a complete, fully coupled analysis procedure (including methods and computer codes) for estimating the risk of an earthquake-caused radioactive release from a commercial nuclear power plant. The analysis procedure is based upon a state-of-the-art evaluation of the current seismic analysis and design process and explicitly includes the uncertainties inherent in such a process. The results will be used to improve seismic licensing requirements for nuclear power plants. As currently planned, the SSMRP will be completed in September, 1984. This document presents the program plan for work to be done during the remainder of the program. In Phase I of the SSMRP, the necessary tools (both computer codes and data bases) for performing a detailed seismic risk analysis were identified and developed. Demonstration calculations were performed on the Zion Nuclear Power Plant. In the remainder of the program (Phase II) work will be concentrated on developing a simplified SSMRP methodology for routine probabilistic risk assessments, quantitative validation of the tools developed and application of the simplified methodology to a Boiling Water Reactor. (The Zion plant is a pressurized water reactor.) In addition, considerable effort will be devoted to making the codes and data bases easily accessible to the public.

  6. ART CCIM Phase II-A Off-Gas System Evaluation Test Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nick Soelberg; Jay Roach

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This test plan defines testing to be performed using the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) engineering-scale cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) test system for Phase II-A of the Advanced Remediation Technologies (ART) CCIM Project. The multi-phase ART-CCIM Project is developing a conceptual design for replacing the joule-heated melter (JHM) used to treat high level waste (HLW) in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) with a cold crucible induction melter. The INL CCIM test system includes all feed, melter off-gas control, and process control subsystems needed for fully integrated operation and testing. Testing will include operation of the melter system while feeding a non-radioactive slurry mixture prepared to simulate the same type of waste feed presently being processed in the DWPF. Process monitoring and sample collection and analysis will be used to characterize the off-gas composition and properties, and to show the fate of feed constituents, to provide data that shows how the CCIM retrofit conceptual design can operate with the existing DWPF off-gas control system.

  7. GERDA phase II detectors: Behind the production and characterisation at low background conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maneschg, Werner [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA Collaboration; and others

    2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The low background GERmanium Detector Array (GERDA) at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) is designed to search for the rare neutrinoless double beta decay (0???) in {sup 76}Ge. Bare germanium diodes are operated in liquid argon which is used as coolant, as passive and soon active as well shield against external radiation. Currently, Phase I of the experiment is running using ?15 kg of co-axial High Purity Germanium diodes. In order to increase the sensitivity of the experiment 30 Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) diodes will be added within 2013. This presentation reviews the production chain of the new BEGe detectors from isotopic enrichment to diode production and testing. As demonstrated all steps were carefully planned in order to minimize the exposure of the enriched germanium to cosmic radiation. Following this premise, acceptance and characterisation measurement of the newly produced diodes have been performed within the HEROICA project in the Belgian underground laboratory HADES close to the diode manufacturer. The test program and the results from a subset of the recently terminated GERDA Phase II BEGe survey will be presented.

  8. Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management - Current Status and Phase II Demonstration Results - 13161

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seitz, Roger R.; Flach, Greg [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Bldg 773-43A, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Bldg 773-43A, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Freshley, Mark D.; Freedman, Vicky; Gorton, Ian [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, MSIN K9-33, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, MSIN K9-33, P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Dixon, Paul; Moulton, J. David [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS B284, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS B284, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Hubbard, Susan S.; Faybishenko, Boris; Steefel, Carl I.; Finsterle, Stefan [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 50B-4230, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 50B-4230, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Marble, Justin [Department of Energy, 19901 Germantown Road, Germantown, MD 20874-1290 (United States)] [Department of Energy, 19901 Germantown Road, Germantown, MD 20874-1290 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Soil and Groundwater, is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of computer software capabilities with an emphasis on integration of capabilities in FY12. Capability development is occurring for both the Platform and Integrated Tool-sets and High-Performance Computing (HPC) Multi-process Simulator. The Platform capabilities provide the user interface and tools for end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model, management of data for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and processing of model output, including visualization. The HPC capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, tool-sets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications in a set of demonstrations as part of Site Applications Thrust Area activities. The Phase I demonstration focusing on individual capabilities of the initial tool-sets was completed in 2010. The Phase II demonstration completed in 2012 focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site deep vadose zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of capabilities, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations, addressing attenuation-based remedies at the Savannah River Site F Area and performance assessment for a representative waste tank, illustrate integration of linked ASCEM capabilities and initial integration efforts with tools from the Cementitious Barriers Partnership. (authors)

  9. Final Report: Phase II Nevada Water Resources Data, Modeling, and Visualization (DMV) Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackman, Thomas [Desert Research Institute] [Desert Research Institute; Minor, Timothy [Desert Research Institute] [Desert Research Institute; Pohll, Gregory [Desert Research Institute] [Desert Research Institute

    2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Water is unquestionably a critical resource throughout the United States. In the semi-arid west -- an area stressed by increase in human population and sprawl of the built environment -- water is the most important limiting resource. Crucially, science must understand factors that affect availability and distribution of water. To sustain growing consumptive demand, science needs to translate understanding into reliable and robust predictions of availability under weather conditions that could be average but might be extreme. These predictions are needed to support current and long-term planning. Similar to the role of weather forecast and climate prediction, water prediction over short and long temporal scales can contribute to resource strategy, governmental policy and municipal infrastructure decisions, which are arguably tied to the natural variability and unnatural change to climate. Change in seasonal and annual temperature, precipitation, snowmelt, and runoff affect the distribution of water over large temporal and spatial scales, which impact the risk of flooding and the groundwater recharge. Anthropogenic influences and impacts increase the complexity and urgency of the challenge. The goal of this project has been to develop a decision support framework of data acquisition, digital modeling, and 3D visualization. This integrated framework consists of tools for compiling, discovering and projecting our understanding of processes that control the availability and distribution of water. The framework is intended to support the analysis of the complex interactions between processes that affect water supply, from controlled availability to either scarcity or deluge. The developed framework enables DRI to promote excellence in water resource management, particularly within the Lake Tahoe basin. In principle, this framework could be replicated for other watersheds throughout the United States. Phase II of this project builds upon the research conducted during Phase I, in which the hydrologic framework was investigated and the development initiated. Phase II concentrates on practical implementation of the earlier work but emphasizes applications to the hydrology of the Lake Tahoe basin. Phase 1 efforts have been refined and extended by creating a toolset for geographic information systems (GIS) that is usable for disparate types of geospatial and geo-referenced data. The toolset is intended to serve multiple users for a variety of applications. The web portal for internet access to hydrologic and remotely sensed product data, prototyped in Phase I, has been significantly enhanced. The portal provides high performance access to LANDSAT-derived data using techniques developed during the course of the project. The portal is interactive, and supports the geo-referenced display of hydrologic information derived from remotely sensed data, such as various vegetative indices used to calculate water consumption. The platform can serve both internal and external constituencies using inter-operating infrastructure that spans both sides of the DRI firewall. The platform is intended grow its supported data assets and to serve as a template for replication to other geographic areas. An unanticipated development during the project was the use of ArcGIS software on a new computer system, called the IBM PureSytems, and the parallel use of the systems for faster, more efficient image processing. Additional data, independent of the portal, was collected within the Sagehen basin and provides detailed information regarding the processes that control hydrologic responses within mountain watersheds. The newly collected data include elevation, evapotranspiration, energy balance and remotely sensed snow-pack data. A Lake Tahoe basin hydrologic model has been developed, in part to help predict the hydrologic impacts of climate change. The model couples both the surface and subsurface hydrology, with the two components having been independently calibrated. Results from the coupled simulations involving both surface water and groundwater processes

  10. Advanced Start of Combustion Sensor Phases I and II-A: Feasibility Demonstration, Design and Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chad Smutzer

    2010-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Homogeneous Compressed Charge Ignition (HCCI) has elevated the need for Start of Combustion (SOC) sensors. HCCI engines have been the exciting focus of engine research recently, primarily because HCCI offers higher thermal efficiency than the conventional Spark Ignition (SI) engines and significantly lower NOx and soot emissions than conventional Compression Ignition (CI) engines, and could be fuel neutral. HCCI has the potential to unify all the internal combustion engine technology to achieve the high-efficiency, low-emission goal. However, these advantages do not come easy. It is well known that the problems encountered with HCCI combustion center on the difficulty of controlling the Start of Combustion. TIAX has an SOC sensor under development which has shown promise. In previous work, including a DOE-sponsored SBIR project, TIAX has developed an accelerometer-based method which was able to determine SOC within a few degrees crank angle for a range of operating conditions. A signal processing protocol allows reconstruction of the combustion pressure event signal imbedded in the background engine vibration recorded by the accelerometer. From this reconstructed pressure trace, an algorithm locates the SOC. This SOC sensor approach is nonintrusive, rugged, and is particularly robust when the pressure event is strong relative to background engine vibration (at medium to high engine load). Phase I of this project refined the previously developed technology with an engine-generic and robust algorithm. The objective of the Phase I research was to answer two fundamental questions: Can the accelerometer-based SOC sensor provide adequate SOC event capture to control an HCCI engine in a feedback loop? And, will the sensor system meet cost, durability, and software efficiency (speed) targets? Based upon the results, the answer to both questions was 'YES'. The objective of Phase II-A was to complete the parameter optimization of the SOC sensor prototype in order to reach a juncture where plans can be and are discussed with an industry partner for how best to perform a more detailed implementation of the TIAX SOC technology on an HCCI engine system. This occurred, as evidenced the number of potential commercialization partners shown in Table 4. Potential Commercialization Partners Contacted (up to date as of January 31, 2010). During the two phases, a robust, engine-generic algorithm was developed that met the desired targets and was shown to work extremely well for HCCI engine operation.

  11. DOE SBIR Phase II Final Report: Distributed Relevance Ranking in Heterogeneous Document Collections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abe Lederman

    2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the comprehensive summary of the work performed on the SBIR Phase II project (“Distributed Relevance Ranking in Heterogeneous Document Collections”) at Deep Web Technologies (http://www.deepwebtech.com). We have successfully completed all of the tasks defined in our SBIR Proposal work plan (See Table 1 - Phase II Tasks Status). The project was completed on schedule and we have successfully deployed an initial production release of the software architecture at DOE-OSTI for the Science.gov Alliance's search portal (http://www.science.gov). We have implemented a set of grid services that supports the extraction, filtering, aggregation, and presentation of search results from numerous heterogeneous document collections. Illustration 3 depicts the services required to perform QuickRank™ filtering of content as defined in our architecture documentation. Functionality that has been implemented is indicated by the services highlighted in green. We have successfully tested our implementation in a multi-node grid deployment both within the Deep Web Technologies offices, and in a heterogeneous geographically distributed grid environment. We have performed a series of load tests in which we successfully simulated 100 concurrent users submitting search requests to the system. This testing was performed on deployments of one, two, and three node grids with services distributed in a number of different configurations. The preliminary results from these tests indicate that our architecture will scale well across multi-node grid deployments, but more work will be needed, beyond the scope of this project, to perform testing and experimentation to determine scalability and resiliency requirements. We are pleased to report that a production quality version (1.4) of the science.gov Alliance's search portal based on our grid architecture was released in June of 2006. This demonstration portal is currently available at http://science.gov/search30 . The portal allows the user to select from a number of collections grouped by category and enter a query expression (See Illustration 1 - Science.gov 3.0 Search Page). After the user clicks “search” a results page is displayed that provides a list of results from the selected collections ordered by relevance based on the query expression the user provided. Our grid based solution to deep web search and document ranking has already gained attention within DOE, other Government Agencies and a fortune 50 company. We are committed to the continued development of grid based solutions to large scale data access, filtering, and presentation problems within the domain of Information Retrieval and the more general categories of content management, data mining and data analysis.

  12. EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF CHEMICAL SEQUESTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN DEEP AQUIFER MEDIA - PHASE II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neeraj Gupta; Bruce Sass; Jennifer Ickes

    2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1998 Battelle was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under a Novel Concepts project grant to continue Phase II research on the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in deep saline formations. The focus of this investigation is to conduct detailed laboratory experiments to examine factors that may affect chemical sequestration of CO{sub 2} in deep saline formations. Reactions between sandstone and other geologic media from potential host reservoirs, brine solutions, and CO{sub 2} are being investigated under high-pressure conditions. Some experiments also include sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) gases to evaluate the potential for co-injection of CO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} related gases in the deep formations. In addition, an assessment of engineering and economic aspects is being conducted. This current Technical Progress Report describes the status of the project as of September 2000. The major activities undertaken during the quarter included several experiments conducted to investigate the effects of pressure, temperature, time, and brine composition on rock samples from potential host reservoirs. Samples (both powder and slab) were taken from the Mt. Simon Sandstone, a potential CO{sub 2} host formation in the Ohio, the Eau Claire Shale, and Rome Dolomite samples that form the caprock for Mt. Simon Sandstone. Also, a sample with high calcium plagioclase content from Frio Formation in Texas was used. In addition, mineral samples for relatively pure Anorthite and glauconite were experimented on with and without the presence of additional clay minerals such as kaolinite and montmorillonite. The experiments were run for one to two months at pressures similar to deep reservoirs and temperatures set at 50 C or 150 C. Several enhancements were made to the experimental equipment to allow for mixing of reactants and to improve sample collection methods. The resulting fluids (gases and liquids) as well as the rock samples were characterized to evaluate the geochemical changes over the experimental period. Preliminary results from the analysis are presented in the report. More detailed interpretation of the results will be presented in the technical report at the end of Phase II.

  13. Predicting Pattern Tooling and Casting Dimensions for Investment Casting, Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nick Cannell (EMTEC); Adrian S. Sabau (ORNL)

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The investment casting process allows the production of complex-shape parts and close dimensional tolerances. One of the most important phases in the investment casting process is the design of the pattern die. Pattern dies are used to create wax patterns by injecting wax into dies. The first part of the project involved preparation of reports on the state of the art at that time for all the areas under consideration (die-wax, wax-shell, and shell-alloy). The primary R&D focus during Phase I was on the wax material since the least was known about it. The main R&D accomplishments during this phase were determination of procedures for obtaining the thermal conductivity and viscoelastic properties of an unfilled wax and validating those procedures. Phase II focused on die-wax and shell-alloy systems. A wax material model was developed based on results obtained during the previous R&D phase, and a die-wax model was successfully incorporated into and used in commercial computer programs. Current computer simulation programs have complementary features. A viscoelastic module was available in ABAQUS but unavailable in ProCAST, while the mold-filling module was available in ProCAST but unavailable in ABAQUS. Thus, the numerical simulation results were only in good qualitative agreement with experimental results, the predicted shrinkage factors being approximately 2.5 times larger than those measured. Significant progress was made, and results showed that the testing and modeling of wax material had great potential for industrial applications. Additional R&D focus was placed on one shell-alloy system. The fused-silica shell mold and A356 aluminum alloy were considered. The experimental part of the program was conducted at ORNL and commercial foundries, where wax patterns were injected, molds were invested, and alloys were poured. It was very important to obtain accurate temperature data from actual castings, and significant effort was made to obtain temperature profiles in the shell mold. A model for thermal radiation within the shell mold was developed, and the thermal model was successfully validated using ProCAST. Since the fused silica shells had the lowest thermal expansion properties in the industry, the dewaxing phase, including the coupling between wax-shell systems, was neglected. The prefiring of the empty shell mold was considered in the model, and the shell mold was limited to a pure elastic material. The alloy dimensions were obtained from numerical simulations only with coupled shell-alloy systems. The alloy dimensions were in excellent quantitative agreement with experimental data, validating the deformation module. For actual parts, however, the creep properties of the shell molds must also be obtained, modeled, and validated.

  14. Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vucelick, J.; McMichael, G.; Chamness, M. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2003, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service [NMFS]) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2003, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the NOAA Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve juvenile fish passage conditions. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites.

  15. THE WIDE-AREA ENERGY STORAGE AND MANAGEMENT SYSTEM PHASE II Final Report - Flywheel Field Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Ning; Makarov, Yuri V.; Weimar, Mark R.; Rudolph, Frank; Murthy, Shashikala; Arseneaux, Jim; Loutan, Clyde; Chowdhury, S.

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This research was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operated for the U.S. department of Energy (DOE) by Battelle Memorial Institute for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), California Institute for Energy and Environment (CIEE) and California Energy Commission (CEC). A wide-area energy management system (WAEMS) is a centralized control system that operates energy storage devices (ESDs) located in different places to provide energy and ancillary services that can be shared among balancing authorities (BAs). The goal of this research is to conduct flywheel field tests, investigate the technical characteristics and economics of combined hydro-flywheel regulation services that can be shared between Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and California Independent System Operator (CAISO) controlled areas. This report is the second interim technical report for Phase II of the WAEMS project. This report presents: 1) the methodology of sharing regulation service between balancing authorities, 2) the algorithm to allocate the regulation signal between the flywheel and hydro power plant to minimize the wear-and-tear of the hydro power plants, 3) field results of the hydro-flywheel regulation service (conducted by the Beacon Power), and 4) the performance metrics and economic analysis of the combined hydro-flywheel regulation service.

  16. Postburn evaluation for Hanna II, Phases 2 and 3, underground coal gasification experiments, Hanna, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youngberg, A.D.; Sinks, D.J.; Craig, G.N. II; Ethridge, F.G.; Burns, L.K.

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 1980 and 1981 the Laramie Energy Technology Center (LETC) conducted a post-burn study at the Hanna II, Phases 2 and 3 underground coal gasification (UCG) site, Hanna, Wyoming. This report contains a summary of the field and laboratory results from the study. Lithologic and geophysical well log data from twenty-two (22) drill holes, combined with high resolution seismic data delineate a reactor cavity 42.7m (140 ft.) long, 35.1 m (115 ft.) and 21.3 m (70 ft.) high that is partially filled with rubble, char and pyrometamorphic rock. Sedimentographic studies were completed on the overburden. Reflectance data on coal samples within the reactor cavity and cavity wall reveal that the coal was altered by temperatures ranging from 245/sup 0/C to 670/sup 0/C (472/sup 0/-1238/sup 0/F). Overburden rocks found within the cavity contain various pyrometamorphic minerals, indicating that temperatures of at least 1200/sup 0/C (2192/sup 0/F) were reached during the tests. The calcite cemented fine-grained sandstone and siltstone directly above the Hanna No. 1 coal bed formed a strong roof above the cavity, unlike other UCG sites such as Hoe Creek which is not calcite cemented. 30 references, 27 figures, 8 tables.

  17. Condensation of N bosons. II. Nonequilibrium analysis of an ideal Bose gas and the laser phase-transition analogy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kocharovsky, VV; Scully, Marlan O.; Zhu, S. Y.; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bosons. II. Nonequilibriu and the laser phase-transitio V. V. Kocharovsky,1,3 Marlan O. Scully,1 1Department of Physics and Institute for Quantum Studies 2Max-Planck Institut fur Quantenoptik 3Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academ 4... by the restriction to N particles. Stated differently, the present approach lends itself to different approximations, yielding, among other things, a simple ~approximate! analytic expression for the ground state density matrix for N trapped bosons.?? ~4a! Herzog...

  18. Condensation of N bosons. II. Nonequilibrium analysis of an ideal Bose gas and the laser phase-transition analogy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kocharovsky, VV; Scully, Marlan O.; Zhu, S. Y.; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bosons. II. Nonequilibriu and the laser phase-transitio V. V. Kocharovsky,1,3 Marlan O. Scully,1 1Department of Physics and Institute for Quantum Studies 2Max-Planck Institut fur Quantenoptik 3Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academ 4... by the restriction to N particles. Stated differently, the present approach lends itself to different approximations, yielding, among other things, a simple ~approximate! analytic expression for the ground state density matrix for N trapped bosons.?? ~4a! Herzog...

  19. Separation of Corn Fiber and Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals Phase II: Pilot-scale Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbas, Charles; Beery, Kyle; Orth, Rick; Zacher, Alan

    2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Department of Energy (DOE)-supported corn fiber conversion project, “Separation of Corn Fiber and Conversion to Fuels and Chemicals Phase II: Pilot-scale Operation” is to develop and demonstrate an integrated, economical process for the separation of corn fiber into its principal components to produce higher value-added fuel (ethanol and biodiesel), nutraceuticals (phytosterols), chemicals (polyols), and animal feed (corn fiber molasses). This project has successfully demonstrated the corn fiber conversion process on the pilot scale, and ensured that the process will integrate well into existing ADM corn wet-mills. This process involves hydrolyzing the corn fiber to solubilize 50% of the corn fiber as oligosaccharides and soluble protein. The solubilized fiber is removed and the remaining fiber residue is solvent extracted to remove the corn fiber oil, which contains valuable phytosterols. The extracted oil is refined to separate the phytosterols and the remaining oil is converted to biodiesel. The de-oiled fiber is enzymatically hydrolyzed and remixed with the soluble oligosaccharides in a fermentation vessel where it is fermented by a recombinant yeast, which is capable of fermenting the glucose and xylose to produce ethanol. The fermentation broth is distilled to remove the ethanol. The stillage is centrifuged to separate the yeast cell mass from the soluble components. The yeast cell mass is sold as a high-protein yeast cream and the remaining sugars in the stillage can be purified to produce a feedstock for catalytic conversion of the sugars to polyols (mainly ethylene glycol and propylene glycol) if desirable. The remaining materials from the purification step and any materials remaining after catalytic conversion are concentrated and sold as a corn fiber molasses. Additional high-value products are being investigated for the use of the corn fiber as a dietary fiber sources.

  20. Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, Continuation: Phase II Results of a Floating Semisubmersible Wind System: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Musial, W.; Vorpahl, F.; Popko, W.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation tools that account for the coupled dynamics of the wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity, and controls of the turbine, along with the incident waves, sea current, hydrodynamics, and foundation dynamics of the support structure. The Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration (OC3), which operated under the International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind Task 23, was established to verify the accuracy of these simulation tools [1]. This work was then extended under the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, Continuation (OC4) project under IEA Wind Task 30 [2]. Both of these projects sought to verify the accuracy of offshore wind turbine dynamics simulation tools (or codes) through code-to-code comparison of simulated responses of various offshore structures. This paper describes the latest findings from Phase II of the OC4 project, which involved the analysis of a 5-MW turbine supported by a floating semisubmersible. Twenty-two different organizations from 11 different countries submitted results using 24 different simulation tools. The variety of organizations contributing to the project brought together expertise from both the offshore structure and wind energy communities. Twenty-one different load cases were examined, encompassing varying levels of model complexity and a variety of metocean conditions. Differences in the results demonstrate the importance and accuracy of the various modeling approaches used. Significant findings include the importance of mooring dynamics to the mooring loads, the role nonlinear hydrodynamic terms play in calculating drift forces for the platform motions, and the difference between global (at the platform level) and local (at the member level) modeling of viscous drag. The results from this project will help guide development and improvement efforts for these tools to ensure that they are providing the accurate information needed to support the design and analysis needs of the offshore wind community.

  1. II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ I 1' . _ .t.fiom/ I'l7aaII

  2. II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ I 1' . _ .t.fiom/ I'l7aaII

  3. II*

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 3400, U.S.MajorMarketsNov-14 Dec-14Has Hydrocarbon, a 1 II

  4. Syracuse Univesity Test Report On Uptake Factor Resulting From A Dropped Storage Container - Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Zhi; Zhang, Jianshun S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under certain circumstances, powder from an accidently dropped container can become airborne and inhaled by people nearby such as those who are moving the containers. The inhaled fine particles can deposit on respiratory tracts and lungs, causing asthma, lung cancer, and other acute respiratory illnesses and chronic symptoms. The objective of this study was to develop a standard procedure to measure the airborne concentrations of different size particles within the vicinity of a dropped container where a significant portion of the contained powder is ejected. Tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) was selected in this study to represent relatively heavy powders (7.16 g/cm3 specific gravity for WO{sub 3}). A typical can with the outer dimensions of 4.25” diameter and 4.875” tall was used as the container. The powder was dropped in two different configurations: 1) contained within a can covered by a lid that has a 0.25” diameter hole, and 2) contained within a can without a lid. The packing volume of the powder was 51.4 in3 (842.7 cm{sup 3}) and the target mass was 1936 g. The tests were carried out in a full-scale stainless steel environmental chamber with an interior volume of 852 ft3 (24.1 m3). The chamber system includes an internal recirculation loop with a rectangular air diffuser and 10 variable frequency drive fans to provide a typical room air recirculation flow pattern. Two air filters were installed in the chamber air supply duct and return duct to achieve the required low background particle concentration. The initial chamber air conditions were set at 70°F (± 5°F) and 50% (± 10%) RH. A supporting frame and releasing device were designed and built to trigger consistently the dropping of the can. The particle sampling inlet was placed 5 ft above the floor and 6 inches laterally away from the can’s falling path. Concentrations of particles between 0.5 ?m and 20 ?m were recorded in units of mass and number of particles per unit volume. The data acquisition rate was once every 2 seconds during the first 2 hours. A test procedure was developed and verified. A total of thirty two drop tests were performed, eight in Phase I and twenty four in Phase II, covering variations in dropping height (8 ft or 4 ft from the floor), room air movement (0.25-0.30 m/s or 0.10-0.15 m/s near the ceiling), landing scenario (on a flat plate or a block), and lid condition (¼” lid hole or no lid). There were ten tests with flat plate and ¼” lid hole, ten tests with flat plate no lid and twelve tests with block no lid.

  5. Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) Waste Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. L. Schwendiman

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Waste Management Plan describes waste management and waste minimization activities for Group 3, Other Surface Soils Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center located within the Idaho National Laboratory. The waste management activities described in this plan support the selected response action presented in the Final Record of Decision for Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13. This plan identifies the waste streams that will be generated during implementation of the remedial action and presents plans for waste minimization, waste management strategies, and waste disposition.

  6. TAILORING INORGANIC SORBENTS FOR SRS STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE SEPARATIONS: OPTIMIZED MONOSODIUM TITANATE PHASE II FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobbs, D; Thomas Peters, T; Michael Poirier, M; Mark Barnes, M; Major Thompson, M; Samuel Fink, S

    2007-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a final report of Phase II testing activities for the development of a modified monosodium titanate (MST) that exhibits improved strontium and actinide removal characteristics compared to the baseline MST material. The activities included determining the key synthesis conditions for preparation of the modified MST, preparation of the modified MST at a larger scale by a commercial vendor, demonstration of the strontium and actinide removal characteristics with actual tank waste supernate and measurement of filtration characteristics. Key findings and conclusions include the following. Testing evaluated three synthetic methods and eleven process parameters for the optimum synthesis conditions for the preparation on an improved form of MST. We selected the post synthesis method (Method 3) for continued development based on overall sorbate removal performance. We successfully prepared three batches of the modified MST using Method 3 procedure at a 25-gram scale. The laboratory prepared modified MST exhibited increased sorption kinetics with simulated and actual waste solutions and similar filtration characteristics to the baseline MST. Characterization of the modified MST indicated that the post synthesis treatment did not significantly alter the particle size distribution, but did significantly increase the surface area and porosity compared to the original MST. Testing indicated that the modified MST exhibits reduced affinity for uranium compared to the baseline MST, reducing risk of fissile loading. Shelf-life testing indicated no change in strontium and actinide performance removal after storing the modified MST for 12-months at ambient laboratory temperature. The material releases oxygen during the synthesis and continues to offgas after the synthesis at a rapidly diminishing rate until below a measurable rate after 4 months. Optima Chemical Group LLC prepared a 15-kilogram batch of the modified MST using the post synthesis procedure (Method 3). Performance testing with simulated and actual waste solutions indicated that the material performs as well as or better than batches of modified MST prepared at the laboratory-scale. Particle size data of the vendor-prepared modified MST indicates a broader distribution centered at a larger particle size and microscopy shows more irregular particle morphology compared to the baseline MST and laboratory prepared modified MST. Stirred-cell (i.e., dead-end) filter testing revealed similar filtration rates relative to the baseline MST for both the laboratory and vendor-prepared modified MST materials. Crossflow filtration testing indicated that with MST-only slurries, the baseline MST produced between 30-100% higher flux than the vendor-prepared modified MST at lower solids loadings and comparable flux at higher solids loadings. With sludge-MST slurries, the modified MST produced 1.5-2.2 times higher flux than the baseline MST at all solids loadings. Based on these findings we conclude that the modified MST represents a much improved sorbent for the separation of strontium and actinides from alkaline waste solutions and recommend continued development of the material as a replacement for the baseline MST for waste treatment facilities at the Savannah River Site.

  7. Systems Description; Sperry Low Temperature Geothermal Conversion System - Phase I and Phase II; Final Report, Volume III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, Hugh B.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Volume should be considered the introductory volume to the series of six volumes even though numbered out of sequence. Volumes I and II were completed first and released in 1981 while a staff member was available to do the work. Volumes III through VI are being written and released some two years later as DOE funding became available for the purpose. They are as complete as possible considering that almost all the people involved in the program are now unavailable. This Volume III is an overview of the entire program, and many of the items presented herein briefly will be found in expanded form in one of the other five volumes. It will be noticed that assumptions and parameters such as well flow, well temperature, wet bulb temperatures, etc., involved in the several different performance calculations in the volume vary somewhat. These calculations were made at different times for different purposes and no attempt has been made to bring them into exact agreement.

  8. Open cycle heat pump development: Phase II, District heating case study analysis: Progress report, October 1988--December 31, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiBella, F.; Becker, F.E.; Glick, J.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A district heating system is proposed that uses low-level waste-energy sources, and a quasi open-cycle steam heat pump as a means of upgrading the energy in the form of hot water to use as a transport medium in the system. The use of a water-based, open-cycle heat pump appears to be extremely well suited in terms of its potential thermodynamic performance, cost, and environmental safety compared to more typical organic gased closed cycle systems. The Phase II case study provides a detailed analysis of a district heating system that utilizes the open cycle steam heat pump concept developed in Phase I. This quarterly report describes the energy audit performed on the heat source and heat sink.

  9. The Neutron Energy Spectrum Study from the Phase II Solid Methane Moderator at the LENS Neutron Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yunchang Shin; W. Mike Snow; Christopher M. Lavelle; David V. Baxter; Xin Tong; Haiyang Yan; Mark Leuschner

    2007-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron energy spectrum measurements from a solid methane moderator were performed at the Low Energy Neutron Source (LENS) at Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) to verify our neutron scattering model of solid methane. The time-of-flight method was used to measure the energy spectrum of the moderator in the energy range of 0.1$meV\\sim$ 1$eV$. Neutrons were counted with a high efficiency $^{3}{He}$ detector. The solid methane moderator was operated in phase II temperature and the energy spectra were measured at the temperatures of 20K and 4K. We have also tested our newly-developed scattering kernels for phase II solid methane by calculating the neutron spectral intensity expected from the methane moderator at the LENS neutron source using MCNP (Monte Carlo N-particle Transport Code). Within the expected accuracy of our approximate approach, our model predicts both the neutron spectral intensity and the optimal thickness of the moderator at both temperatures. The predictions are compared to the measured energy spectra. The simulations agree with the measurement data at both temperatures.

  10. Bosque River Environmental Infrastructure Improvement Plan: Phase II BMP Modeling Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tuppad, Pushpa; Srinivasan, Raghavan

    cropland and grazing land, land-applied dairy waste, and effluent discharge from eight wastewater treatment plants. The first phase of the project developed an effective methodology for determining priority areas in the watershed where best management...

  11. Final phase I report and phase II work plan : QuickSite{reg_sign} investigation, Centralia, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Research)

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), formerly operated a grain storage facility approximately 1,100 ft north of Centralia (Figure 1.2). The CCC/USDA operated this facility from 1949 until 1971. None of the CCC/USDA structures remain. Two additional grain storage facilities currently exist in and near Centralia: the Nemaha County Co-op, approximately 4,000 ft south of the former CCC/USDA facility, and a private grain storage facility near the Don Morris residence, 3,500 ft north of the former CCC/USDA facility. Prior to 1986, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were commonly used by the CCC/USDA and the grain storage industry to preserve grain. In April 1998, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) sampled the domestic well at the Don Morris residence near Centralia (Figure 1.2) as part of the CCC/USDA Private Well Sampling Program, which was initiated to determine whether carbon tetrachloride was present in domestic wells located near former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities in Kansas. Carbon tetrachloride was detected in the Morris well at 19.3 mg/L and confirmed at 25.4 mg/L, both concentrations above the maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5 mg/L for carbon tetrachloride in drinking water. On the basis of the detection of carbon tetrachloride in the Morris well, the KDHE in August-September 1998 conducted preliminary investigations at the former CCC/USDA facility. For the details of previous investigations in the area and a summary of their findings, see the QuickSite{reg_sign} Phase I Work Plan for Centralia (Argonne 2002a). Because the KDHE found carbon tetrachloride at the former CCC/USDA facility at Centralia that might, in part, be linked to historical use of carbon tetrachloride-based grain fumigants at the facility, the CCC/USDA is conducting an environmental site investigation at Centralia. However, the KDHE established in 1998 that the probable groundwater flow direction at the former CCC/USDA facility is not toward the Morris well, and thus the former facility is not responsible for the carbon tetrachloride measured in that well. The town of Centralia and all residents near the former CCC/USDA facility currently obtain their water from Rural Water District No.3 (RWD 3). Therefore, these local residents are not drinking and using contaminated groundwater. The investigation at Centralia is being performed by the Environmental Research Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The CCC/USDA has entered into an interagency agreement with DOE, under which Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at its former grain storage facilities. At these facilities, Argonne is applying its QuickSite environmental site characterization methodology. QuickSite is Argonne's proprietary implementation system for the expedited site characterization (ESC) process. Argonne's Environmental Research Division developed the ESC process to optimize preremedial site characterization work at hazardous waste sites by obtaining and then applying a thorough understanding of a site's geology, hydrogeology, and hydrogeochemistry (e.g., Burton 1994). This approach is fundamental to successful site characterization because the geology and hydrogeology of a site largely govern the mobility and fate of contaminants there. Argonne's ESC process has been used successfully at a number of former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas and Nebraska and has been adopted by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM 1998) as standard practice for environmental site characterization. This report documents the findings of the Phase I activities at Centralia. Section 1 provides a brief history of the area and the QuickSite process, a summary of the geologic/hydrogeologic model, objectives of the Phase I investigation, and a brief description of the sections cont

  12. R and D for improved efficiency small steam turbines, Phase II. Report No. 1380-3. First quarterly technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jansen, Dr., W.; Maillar, K. M.; Bender, D. A.; Brassert, W. L.; Capone, P. A.; Carter, A. F.; Heitmann, A. M.; Holland, J. E.; Lord, R. E.; Thirumalaisamy, S. N.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress made in the second phase of a two-phase research, design and prototype development program is presented. Phase II consists of the detailed design of the prototype radial inflow steam turbine configuration selected during the first phase and subsequent fabrication and testing. At this time, the detailed aerodynamic design of the stage flowpath has been completed except for the crossover piping from the first stage exhaust to the second stage inlet. In addition, mechanical design effort has resulted in a definition of a rotor system. The aerodynamic design included the optimization of the overall flowpath geometry of the stages specified in the initial phase of the program. The detailed aerodynamic designs of the rotor blades, nozzle vanes, scroll and diffuser were based on the optimized geometry. The final blading selected for the stage is a radial design with 26 blades, 13 of which are splitters. Sixteen nozzle vanes have been specified. The mechanical design of the rotor system to date has included the specification of the rotor wheels and shafts with their polygon connection, and the design of the thrust and journal bearings and the gearing. In addition, various shaft sealing arrangements have been evaluated, subject to the constraints indicated by initial rotordynamic analyses. Indications are that a reasonably effective labyrinth seal is not precluded by shaft length limitations. As this type of seal has been long accepted by steam turbine users, its use in the prototype is most likely. Proven components have been specified wherever possible, i.e., redesign/development could not be justified. The rotor system has been designed for at least 100,000 hours life with the most severe operating conditions and loads. The system cannot be considered complete, however, until dynamic response of the rotors for all possible operating conditions is shown to be within acceptable limits.

  13. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert Calderon

    2003-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 30 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy.

  14. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert Calderon

    2002-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 30 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy.

  15. SBIR/STTR Phase II Release 1 Award Winners Announced, Includes Two Hydrogen

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 <Department of ii iii2014 UpdateRobertRound-UpDataS

  16. Engineering development of coal-fired high performance power systems, Phase II and III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: thermal efficiency (HHV) {ge} 47%; NOx, SOx, and particulates {le} 10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard) coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input; all solid wastes benign; cost of electricity {le} 90% of present plants. Phase 1, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase 1 also included preliminary R and D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This phase, Phase 2, involves the development and testing of plant subsystems, refinement and updating of the HIPPS commercial plant design, and the site selection and engineering design of a HIPPS prototype plant. Work reported herein is from: Task 2.1 HITAC Combustors; Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  17. High level waste storage tanks 242-A evaporator S/RID phase II assessment report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biebesheimer, E.

    1996-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This document, the Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) Phase 2 Assessment Report for the subject facility, represents the results of a Performance Assessment to determine whether procedures containing S/RID requirements are fully implemented by field personnel in the field. It contains a summary report and three attachments; an assessment schedule, performance objectives, and assessments for selected functional areas.

  18. Engineering development of coal-fired high performance power systems, Phase II and III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: thermal efficiency (HHV) {ge} 47%, NOx, SOx, and particulates {le} 10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard), coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input, all solid wastes benign cost of electricity {le} 90% of present plants. Phase 1, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase 1 also included preliminary R and D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This phase, Phase 2, involves the development and testing of plant subsystems, refinement and updating of the HIPPS commercial plant design, and the site selection and engineering design of a HIPPS prototype plant. Work reported herein is from: Task 2.1 HITAF Combustor; Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

  19. Phase II Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeff Wurtz

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Phase II CAIP describes new work needed to potentially reduce uncertainty and achieve increased confidence in modeling results. This work includes data collection and data analysis to refine model assumptions, improve conceptual models of flow and transport in a complex hydrogeologic setting, and reduce parametric and structural uncertainty. The work was prioritized based on the potential to reduce model uncertainty and achieve an acceptable level of confidence in the model predictions for flow and transport, leading to model acceptance by NDEP and completion of the Phase II CAI stage of the UGTA strategy.

  20. Phase II final report and second update of the energy economic data base (EEDB) program. Volume 1 of 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Economic Data Base (EEDB) Program deals with the development of cost data for nuclear and comparison electric power generating stations. The objective of the USDOE EEDB Program is to provide periodic updates of technical and cost (capital, fuel and operating and maintenance) information of significance to the US Department of Energy. This information is intended to be used by USDOE in evaluating and monitoring US Civilian nuclear power programs, and to provide them with a consistent means of evaluating the nuclear option against alternatives. This report presents the Second Update of the EEDB for a cost and regulation date of January 1, 1979, prepared during Phase II of the EEDB Program. The Second Update is the first of a series of periodic updates marking the beginning of the next step in meeting the objective of the EEDB Program.

  1. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert Calderon

    2003-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 42 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets and coke.

  2. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert Calderon; Reina Calderon

    2004-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 42 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets and coke.

  3. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert Calderon

    2004-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 42 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets and coke.

  4. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert Calderon

    2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was successfully completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. In 2000, U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron or steel consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy by using iron ore concentrate and coal as raw materials, both materials being appreciably lower in cost than using iron pellets, briquettes, sinter and coke.

  5. Advanced conceptual design report. Phase II. Liquid effluent treatment and disposal Project W-252

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Advanced Conceptual Design Report (ACDR) provides a documented review and analysis of the Conceptual Design Report (CDR), WHC-SD-W252-CDR-001, June 30, 1993. The ACDR provides further design evaluation of the major design approaches and uncertainties identified in the original CDR. The ACDR will provide a firmer basis for the both the design approach and the associated planning for the performance of the Definitive Design phase of the project.

  6. Measurement of the CP-violating phase ?sJ/?? in Bs0?J/?? decays with the CDF II detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Dell’Orso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a measurement of the CP-violating parameter ?sJ/?? using approximately 6500 B0s?J/?? decays reconstructed with the CDF II detector in a sample of pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV corresponding to 5.2 fb?¹ integrated luminosity produced by the Tevatron collider at Fermilab. We find the CP-violating phase to be within the range ?sJ/??? [0.02,0.52]?[1.08,1.55] at 68% confidence level where the coverage property of the quoted interval is guaranteed using a frequentist statistical analysis. This result is in agreement with the standard model expectation at the level of about one Gaussian standard deviation. We consider the inclusion of a potential S-wave contribution to the B0s?J/?K?K? final state which is found to be negligible over the mass interval 1.009sJ/??, we find the B0s decay width difference to be ??s=0.075±0.035(stat)±0.006(syst) ps?¹. We also present the most precise measurements of the B0s mean lifetime ?(B0s)=1.529±0.025(stat)±0.012(syst) ps, the polarization fractions |A0(0)|²=0.524±0.013(stat)±0.015(syst) and |A II (0)|²=0.231±0.014(stat)±0.015(syst), as well as the strong phase ??=2.95±0.64(stat)±0.07(syst) rad. In addition, we report an alternative Bayesian analysis that gives results consistent with the frequentist approach.

  7. High-reliability gas-turbine combined-cycle development program: Phase II, Volume 3. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hecht, K.G.; Sanderson, R.A.; Smith, M.J.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This three-volume report presents the results of Phase II of the multiphase EPRI-sponsored High-Reliability Gas Turbine Combined-Cycle Development Program whose goal is to achieve a highly reliable gas turbine combined-cycle power plant, available by the mid-1980s, which would be an economically attractive baseload generation alternative for the electric utility industry. The Phase II program objective was to prepare the preliminary design of this power plant. The power plant was addressed in three areas: (1) the gas turbine, (2) the gas turbine ancillaries, and (3) the balance of plant including the steam turbine generator. To achieve the program goals, a gas turbine was incorporated which combined proven reliability characteristics with improved performance features. This gas turbine, designated the V84.3, is the result of a cooperative effort between Kraftwerk Union AG and United Technologies Corporation. Gas turbines of similar design operating in Europe under baseload conditions have demonstrated mean time between failures in excess of 40,000. The reliability characteristics of the gas turbine ancillaries and balance-of-plant equipment were improved through system simplification and component redundancy and by selection of component with inherent high reliability. A digital control system was included with logic, communications, sensor redundancy, and manual backup. An independent condition monitoring and diagnostic system was also included. Program results provide the preliminary design of a gas turbine combined-cycle baseload power plant. This power plant has a predicted mean time between failure of nearly twice the 3000-h EPRI goal. The cost of added reliability features is offset by improved performance, which results in a comparable specific cost and an 8% lower cost of electricty compared to present market offerings.

  8. Measurement of the CP-violating phase ?sJ/?? in Bs0?J/?? decays with the CDF II detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; et al

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a measurement of the CP-violating parameter ?sJ/?? using approximately 6500 B0s?J/?? decays reconstructed with the CDF II detector in a sample of pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV corresponding to 5.2 fb?¹ integrated luminosity produced by the Tevatron collider at Fermilab. We find the CP-violating phase to be within the range ?sJ/??? [0.02,0.52]?[1.08,1.55] at 68% confidence level where the coverage property of the quoted interval is guaranteed using a frequentist statistical analysis. This result is in agreement with the standard model expectation at the level of about one Gaussian standard deviation. We consider the inclusion of a potential S-wavemore »contribution to the B0s?J/?K?K? final state which is found to be negligible over the mass interval 1.009sJ/??, we find the B0s decay width difference to be ??s=0.075±0.035(stat)±0.006(syst) ps?¹. We also present the most precise measurements of the B0s mean lifetime ?(B0s)=1.529±0.025(stat)±0.012(syst) ps, the polarization fractions |A0(0)|²=0.524±0.013(stat)±0.015(syst) and |A II (0)|²=0.231±0.014(stat)±0.015(syst), as well as the strong phase ??=2.95±0.64(stat)±0.07(syst) rad. In addition, we report an alternative Bayesian analysis that gives results consistent with the frequentist approach.« less

  9. Fiscal Year 2013 Phase II (Release 2) Awardee List | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721Energy 3_adv_battery.pdfFerrinMarketAugustShipmentFiscal Year 2013 Phase

  10. ENTROPY PRODUCTION IN COLLISIONLESS SYSTEMS. II. ARBITRARY PHASE-SPACE OCCUPATION NUMBERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, Eric I. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, La Crosse, WI 54601 (United States); Williams, Liliya L. R., E-mail: barnes.eric@uwlax.edu, E-mail: llrw@astro.umn.edu [Minnesota Institue for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of two thermodynamic techniques for determining equilibria of self-gravitating systems. One is the Lynden-Bell (LB) entropy maximization analysis that introduced violent relaxation. Since we do not use the Stirling approximation, which is invalid at small occupation numbers, our systems have finite mass, unlike LB's isothermal spheres. (Instead of Stirling, we utilize a very accurate smooth approximation for ln x{exclamation_point}.) The second analysis extends entropy production extremization to self-gravitating systems, also without the use of the Stirling approximation. In addition to the LB statistical family characterized by the exclusion principle in phase space, and designed to treat collisionless systems, we also apply the two approaches to the Maxwell-Boltzmann (MB) families, which have no exclusion principle and hence represent collisional systems. We implicitly assume that all of the phase space is equally accessible. We derive entropy production expressions for both families and give the extremum conditions for entropy production. Surprisingly, our analysis indicates that extremizing entropy production rate results in systems that have maximum entropy, in both LB and MB statistics. In other words, both thermodynamic approaches lead to the same equilibrium structures.

  11. NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Division Andrea McNemar MRCSP Phase III Subtask 1.6.2 Bush5 Well Characterization Battelle will conduct wireline logging, rock coring, and pressure monitoring at the 2,940 ft...

  12. NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FC26-05NT42589 Battelle Perry Township, OH NA FESCCStorage Division Andrea McNemar MRCSP Phase III Subtask 1.6.2 Pattison Trust 1-D Well Characterization Battelle will conduct...

  13. Granular Bed Filter Development Program, Phase II. Monthly technical progress report for April 1-30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moresco, L.L.; Cooper, J.; Ferguson, J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy is sponsoring a multiphase program to investigate the filtration potential of the moving bed granular filter (GBF) for application in pressurized high temperature energy conversion systems. Phase I included the development of a mathematical model, a cold flow parametric test series in a 0.746 Nm/sup 3//s GBF, and investigations of potential dust plugging problems at the inlet screen. During the experimental program, collection efficiencies of 99% and filter outlet loadings less that 0.0074 g/m/sup 3/ were demonstrated. The objectives of Phase II are to investigate the effects of elevated temperature and coal combustion particulate on GBF filtration performance, to update the analytical model developed in Phase I to reflect high-temperature effects, to optimize filter internal configuration, to demonstrate long duration GBF performance relative to corrosion, deposition, erosion, filtration efficiency, reliability, controllability, and to design and construct a 0.879 Nm/sup 3//s, 660 kPa filter for delivery to DOE. Hot flow testing to date has confirmed that the GBF configured with inlet and outlet screens has exhibited a tendency for extensive and irreversible ash plugging. As an alternative, the potential advantages produced by a screenless configuration, having higher filtration efficiency, has been achieved during both cold flow and hot flow tests as previously reported. Feed and solid compositions from test P704, the 400-hour GBF test, are presented. A status report on the design of the high pressure GBF along with operation details for purging the GBF of corrosive gases upon shutdown and granular reserve sensing during its operation are detailed.

  14. GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUID BED BOILERS (Phase II--Evaluation of the Oxyfuel CFB Concept)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John L. Marion; Nsakala ya Nsakala

    2003-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall project goal is to determine if carbon dioxide can be captured and sequestered at a cost of about $10/ton of carbon avoided, using a newly constructed Circulating Fluidized Bed combustor while burning coal with a mixture of oxygen and recycled flue gas, instead of air. This project is structured in two Phases. Phase I was performed between September 28, 2001 and May 15, 2002. Results from Phase I were documented in a Topical Report issued on May 15, 2003 (Nsakala, et al., 2003), with the recommendation to evaluate, during Phase II, the Oxyfuel-fired CFB concept. DOE NETL accepted this recommendation, and, hence approved the project continuation into Phase II. Phase 2. The second phase of the project--which includes pilot-scale tests of an oxygen-fired circulating fluidized bed test facility with performance and economic analyses--is currently underway at ALSTOM's Power Plant Laboratories, located in Windsor, CT (US). The objective of the pilot-scale testing is to generate detailed technical data needed to establish advanced CFB design requirements and performance when firing coals and delayed petroleum coke in oxygen/carbon dioxide mixtures. Results will be used in the design of oxygen-fired CFB boilers--both retrofit and new Greenfield--as well as to provide a generic performance database for other researchers. At the conclusion of Phase 2, revised costs and performance will be estimated for both retrofit and new Greenfield design concepts with CO2 capture, purification, compression, and liquefaction.

  15. Advanced hydrogen/methanol utilization technology demonstration. Phase II: Hydrogen cold start of a methanol vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the Phase 11 Final Report on NREL Subcontract No. XR-2-11175-1 {open_quotes}Advanced Hydrogen/Methane Utilization Demonstration{close_quotes} between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Alternative Fuels Utilization Program, Golden, Colorado and Hydrogen Consultants, Inc. (HCI), Littleton, Colorado. Mr. Chris Colucci was NREL`s Technical Monitor. Colorado State University`s (CSU) Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory was HCI`s subcontractor. Some of the vehicle test work was carried out at the National Center for Vehicle Emissions Control and Safety (NCVECS) at CSU. The collaboration of the Colorado School of Mines is also gratefully acknowledged. Hydrogen is unique among alternative fuels in its ability to burn over a wide range of mixtures in air with no carbon-related combustion products. Hydrogen also has the ability to burn on a catalyst, starting from room temperature. Hydrogen can be made from a variety of renewable energy resources and is expected to become a widely used energy carrier in the sustainable energy system of the future. One way to make a start toward widespread use of hydrogen in the energy system is to use it sparingly with other alternative fuels. The Phase I work showed that strong affects could be achieved with dilute concentrations of hydrogen in methane (11). Reductions in emissions greater than the proportion of hydrogen in the fuel provide a form of leverage to stimulate the early introduction of hydrogen. Per energy unit or per dollar of hydrogen, a greater benefit is derived than simply displacing fossil-fueled vehicles with pure hydrogen vehicles.

  16. Phase II - final report study of alternatives for future operations of the naval petroleum and oil shale reserves NPR-3, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has asked Gustavson Associates, Inc. to serve as an Independent Petroleum Appraiser under contract DE-AC01-96FE64202. This authorizes a study and recommendations regarding future development of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) in Natrona County, Wyoming. The report that follows is the Phase II Final Report for that study.

  17. First limits on WIMP nuclear recoil signals in ZEPLIN-II: a two phase xenon detector for dark matter detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. J. Alner; H. M. Araujo; A. Bewick; C. Bungau; B. Camanzi; M. J. Carson; R. J. Cashmore; H. Chagani; V. Chepel; D. Cline; D. Davidge; J. C. Davies; E. Daw; J. Dawson; T. Durkin; B. Edwards; T. Gamble; J. Gao; C. Ghag; A. S. Howard; W. G. Jones; M. Joshi; E. V. Korolkova; V. A. Kudryavtsev; T. Lawson; V. N. Lebedenko; J. D. Lewin; P. Lightfoot; A. Lindote; I. Liubarsky; M. I. Lopes; R. Luscher; P. Majewski; K Mavrokoridis; J. E. McMillan; B. Morgan; D. Muna; A. St. J. Murphy; F. Neves; G. G. Nicklin; W. Ooi; S. M. Paling; J. Pinto da Cunha; S. J. S. Plank; R. M. Preece; J. J. Quenby; M. Robinson; F. Sergiampietri; C. Silva; V. N. Solovov; N. J. T. Smith; P. F. Smith; N. J. C. Spooner; T. J. Sumner; C. Thorne; D. R. Tovey; E. Tziaferi; R. J. Walker; H. Wang; J. White; F. L. H. Wolfs

    2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Results are presented from the first underground data run of ZEPLIN-II, a 31 kg two phase xenon detector developed to observe nuclear recoils from hypothetical weakly interacting massive dark matter particles. Discrimination between nuclear recoils and background electron recoils is afforded by recording both the scintillation and ionisation signals generated within the liquid xenon, with the ratio of these signals being different for the two classes of event. This ratio is calibrated for different incident species using an AmBe neutron source and Co-60 gamma-ray sources. From our first 31 live days of running ZEPLIN-II, the total exposure following the application of fiducial and stability cuts was 225 kgxdays. A background population of radon progeny events was observed in this run, arising from radon emission in the gas purification getters, due to radon daughter ion decays on the surfaces of the walls of the chamber. An acceptance window, defined by the neutron calibration data, of 50% nuclear recoil acceptance between 5 keVee and 20 keVee, had an observed count of 29 events, with a summed expectation of 28.6+/-4.3 gamma-ray and radon progeny induced background events. These figures provide a 90% c.l. upper limit to the number of nuclear recoils of 10.4 events in this acceptance window, which converts to a WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross-section with a minimum of 6.6x10^-7 pb following the inclusion of an energy dependent, calibrated, efficiency. A second run is currently underway in which the radon progeny will be eliminated, thereby removing the background population, with a projected sensitivity of 2x10^-7 pb for similar exposures as the first run.

  18. High speed low damage grinding of advanced ceramics - Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kovach, J.A.; Malkin, S.

    2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the manufacture of structural ceramic components, grinding costs can comprise up to 80% of the entire manufacturing cost. As a result, one of the most challenging tasks faced by manufacturing process engineers is the development of a ceramic finishing process to maximize part throughput while minimizing costs and associated scrap levels. The efforts summarized in this report represent the second phase of a program whose overall objective was to develop a single-step, roughing-finishing process suitable for producing high-quality silicon nitride parts at high material removal rates and at substantially lower cost than traditional, multi-stage grinding processes. More specifically, this report provides a technical overview of High-Speed, Low-Damage (HSLD) ceramic grinding which employs elevated wheel speeds to achieve the small grain depths of cut necessary for low-damage grinding while operating at relatively high material removal rates. The study employed the combined use of laboratory grinding tests, mathematical grinding models, and characterization of the resultant surface condition. A single-step, roughing-finishing process operating at high removal rates was developed and demonstrated.

  19. Phase II test plan for the evaluation of the performance of container filling systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The PHMC will provide tank wastes for final treatment by BNFL from Hanford's waste tanks. Concerns about the ability for ''grab'' sampling to provide large volumes of representative waste samples has led to the development of a nested, fixed-depth sampling system. Preferred concepts for filling sample containers that meet RCRA organic sample criteria were identified by a PHMC Decision Board. These systems will replace the needle based sampling ''T'' that is currently on the sampling system. This test plan document identifies cold tests with simulants that will demonstrate the preferred bottle filling concepts abilities to provide representative waste samples and will meet RCRA criteria. Additional tests are identified that evaluate the potential for cross-contamination between samples and the ability for the system to decontaminate surfaces which have contacted tank wastes. These tests will be performed with kaolid/water and sand/water slurry simulants in the test rig that was used by AEAT to complete Phase 1 tests in FY 1999.

  20. Direct heat resource assessment: Phase II, year 1. Final report, February 1, 1979-January 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, D.M.; Cox, M.E.; Kauahikaua, J.P.; Mattice, M.D.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 1979 reconnaissance field surveys were conducted on the islands of Hawaii, Maui, and Oahu with the objective of confirming groundwater chemical data and geophysical data compiled during the preliminary regional assessment of Phase I of the Direct Heat Resource Assessment Program. The exploration techniques applied include (1) groundwater chemistry, (2) mercury-radon surveys, (3) isotopic composition of groundwaters, (4) time domain electromagnetics, and (5) Schlumberger resistivity surveys. The results of these surveys can be classified as follows: (1) Hawaii: Kailua-Kona, strong geochemical anomalies; Kawaihae, strong geophysical anomalies, moderate to strong geochemical anomalies; Hualalai northwest rift, weak geochemical and moderate geophysical anomalies; South Point, moderate to weak geophysical anomalies; Hualalai southeast rift, weak geophysical anomalies; Keaau, weak geophysical and geochemical anomalies; (2) Maui: Haiku-Paia, strong geochemical anomalies; Olowalu-Ukamehame canyons, moderate to strong geochemical and geophysical anomalies; Lahaina, weak geochemical and geophysical anomalies; (3) Oahu: Lualualei, moderate to strong geochemical and geophysical anomalies; Waimanalo-Maunawili, insufficient data.

  1. ART CCIM PHASE II-A OFF-GAS SYSTEM EVALUATION TEST REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nick Soelberg

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AREVA Federal Services (AFS) is performing a multi-year, multi-phase Advanced Remediation Technologies (ART) project, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), to evaluate the feasibility and benefits of replacing the existing joule-heated melter (JHM) used to treat high level waste (HLW) in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site with a cold crucible induction melter (CCIM). The AFS ART CCIM project includes several collaborators from AREVA subsidiaries, French companies, and DOE national laboratories. The Savannah River National Laboratory and the Commissariat a l’Energie Atomique (CEA) have performed laboratory-scale studies and testing to determine a suitable, high-waste-loading glass matrix. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and CEA are performing CCIM demonstrations at two different pilot scales to assess CCIM design and operation for treating SRS sludge wastes that are currently being treated in the DWPF. SGN is performing engineering studies to validate the feasibility of retrofitting CCIM technology into the DWPF Melter Cell. The long-term project plan includes more lab-testing, pilot- and large-scale demonstrations, and engineering activities to be performed during subsequent project phases. A simulant of the DWPF SB4 feed was successfully fed and melted in a small pilot-scale CCIM system during two test series. The OGSE tests provide initial results that (a) provide melter operating conditions while feeding a DWPF SB4 simulant feed, (b) determine the fate of feed organic and metal feed constituents and metals partitioning, and (c) characterize the melter off-gas source term to a downstream off-gas system. The INL CCIM test system was operated continuously for about 30 hours during the parametric test series, and for about 58 hours during the OGSE test. As the DWPF simulant feed was continuously fed to the melter, the glass level gradually increased until a portion of the molten glass was drained from the melter. The glass drain was operated periodically on-demand. A cold cap of unmelted feed was controlled by adjusting the feedrate and melter power levels to obtain the target molten glass temperatures with varying cold cap levels. Three test conditions were performed per the test plan, during which the melter was operated with a target melt temperature of either 1,250oC or 1,300oC, and with either a partial or complete cold cap of unmelted feed on top of the molten glass. Samples of all input and output streams including the starting glass, the simulant feed, the off-gas particulate matter, product glass, and deposits removed from the crucible and off-gas pipe after the test were collected for analysis.

  2. Hanford tank initiative vehicle/based waste retrieval demonstration report phase II, track 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berglin, E.J.

    1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the versatile TracPUMpTm, Environmental Specialties Group, LLC (ES) performed a successful Phase 11 demonstration of a Vehicle- Based Waste Retrieval System (VWRS) for removal of waste material and residual liquid found in the Hanford Underground Storage Tanks (ousts). The purpose of this demonstration was to address issues pertaining to the use of a VWRS in OUSTS. The demonstration also revealed the waste removal capabilities of the TracPumpTm and the most effective techniques and equipment to safely and effectively remove waste simulants. ES successfully addressed the following primary issues: I . Dislodge and convey the waste forms present in the Hanford OUSTS; 2. Access the UST through tank openings as small as twenty-four inches in diameter; 3. Traverse a variety of terrains including slopes, sludges, rocks and hard, slippery surfaces without becoming mired; 4. Dislodge and convey waste within the confinement of the Decontamination Containment Capture Vessel (DCCV) and with minimal personnel exposure; 5. Decontaminate equipment to acceptable limits during retrieval from the UST; 6. Perform any required maintenance within the confinement of the DCCV; and 7. Maintain contaminate levels ``as low as reasonably achievable`` (ALARA) within the DCCV due to its crevice and comer-free design. The following materials were used to simulate the physical characteristics of wastes found in Hanford`s OUSTS: (1) Hardpan: a clay-type material that has high shear strength; (2) Saltcake: a fertilizer-based material that has high compressive strength; and (3) Wet Sludge.- a sticky, peanut- butter- like material with low shear strength. Four test beds were constructed of plywood and filled with a different simulant to a depth of eight to ten inches. Three of the test beds were of homogenous simulant material, while the fourth bed consisted of a mixture of all three simulant types.

  3. Applicability of beneficiated sub-bituminous coal in a phase II (AAA), deregulated electrical power market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loreman, M.R.; McCord, T.G.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilities have adapted to an operating environment increasingly constrained by emissions requirements, e.g., Phase 1 of the US 1992 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA), and by competitive economic conditions triggered in the present early stages of utility deregulation. Low capacity utilization, while not desirable, has been a factor in the ability of utilities to adapt. The method of choice for many Midwestern utilities has been to switch to sub-bituminous coals from the Powder River Basin (PRB) with their low sulfur and low delivered cost. However, the derates that have been experienced by switching to PRB coal in order to adapt to present regulations will become a negative factor as capacity utilization increases. Beneficiation of sub-bituminous coals would provide one option for utilities to eliminate derates and thereby increases capacity utilization, while maintaining low SO{sub 2} emissions. An optimum product can be delivered where just enough upgraded material could be blended with run-of-mine PRB coal at the beneficiation plant/mine facility to allow desired power plant performance at the lowest cost. Two plants, large enough to provide trainload quantities of unblended upgraded product, are in operation. A third plant is under construction. Progress continues in demonstrating the ability to transport and use these materials in utility boilers. This paper reviews the results of full-scale burns of the products from one of these plants, including shipments of both blended and unblended material. Technically, burns have been completed in boiler types including both pulverized-fired and cyclone-fired units. Stable flames are produced with NO{sub x} emissions lower than or comparable to the baseline blend. Opacity results are consistent with those of the source coal used for upgrading. Also considered are the economics of increased capacity utilization using these beneficiated PRB fuels in blends with PRB coal.

  4. Predicting Pattern Tooling and Casting Dimensions for Investment Casting - Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The investment casting process allows the production of complex-shape parts and close dimensional tolerances. One of the most important phases in the investment casting process is the design of the pattern die. Pattern dies are used to create wax patterns by injecting wax into dies. The wax patterns are used to create a ceramic shell by the application of a series of ceramic coatings, and the alloy is cast into the dewaxed shell mold (Fig. 1.1). However, the complexity of shape and the close dimensional tolerances required in the final casting make it difficult to determine tooling dimensions. The final linear dimension of the casting depends on the cumulative effects of the linear expansions or contractions in each step of the investment casting process (Fig. 1.2). In most cases, the mold geometry or cores restrict the shrinkage of the pattern or the cast part, and the final casting dimensions may be affected by time-dependent processes such as viscoelastic deformation of the wax, and viscoplastic creep and plastic deformations of the shell and alloy. The pattern die is often reworked several times to produce castings whose dimensions are within acceptable tolerances. To date, investment casting technology has been based on hands-on training and experience. Technical literature is limited to experimental, phenomenological studies aimed at obtaining empirical correlations for quick and easy application in industry. The goal of this project was to predict casting dimensions for investment castings in order to meet blueprint nominal during the first casting run. Several interactions have to be considered in a coupled manner to determine the shrinkage factors: these are the die-wax, wax-shell, and shell-alloy interactions (as illustrated in Fig. 1.3). In this work, the deformations of the die-wax and shell-alloy systems were considered in a coupled manner, while the coupled deformation of the wax-shell system was not considered. Future work is needed in order to deliver to industry a computer program in which all three systems are coupled for determining the dimensions of the wax pattern, the shell mold, and casting in a sequential but coupled manner.

  5. A Phase I/II Trial of Gefitinib Given Concurrently With Radiotherapy in Patients With Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joensuu, Greetta [Cancer Gene Therapy Group, Molecular Cancer Biology Program and Transplantation Laboratory and Haartman Institute and Finnish Institute for Molecular Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); International Comprehensive Cancer Center Docrates, Helsinki (Finland); Joensuu, Timo [International Comprehensive Cancer Center Docrates, Helsinki (Finland); Nokisalmi, Petri [Cancer Gene Therapy Group, Molecular Cancer Biology Program and Transplantation Laboratory and Haartman Institute and Finnish Institute for Molecular Medicine, University of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); HUSLAB, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki (Finland)

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To estimate the safety and tolerability of daily administration of 250 mg of gefitinib given concurrently with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for patients with nonmetastatic prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 42 patients with T2-T3N0M0 tumors were treated in a nonrandomized single-center study. A prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of <20 and a good performance status (WHO, 0-1) were required. Adjuvant or neoadjuvant hormone treatments were not allowed. A daily regimen of 250 mg of gefitinib was started 1 week before radiation therapy began and lasted for the duration of radiation therapy. A dose of 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/day) was administered to the tumor, prostate, and seminal vesicles, followed by a 22-Gy booster (2 Gy/day) for a total dose of 72.4 Gy. Correlative studies included analysis of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), EGFRvIII, and phosphorylated EGFR in tumors and tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1{alpha} (IL-1{alpha}), and IL-6 in serum. Results: Maximum tolerated dose was not reached in phase I (12 patients), and 30 additional patients were treated in phase II. Thirty (71.4%) patients completed trial medication. Dose-limiting toxicities were recorded for 16 (38.1%) patients, the most common of which was a grade 3 to 4 increase in transaminase (6 patients). After a median follow-up of 38 months, there were no deaths due to prostate cancer. The estimated PSA relapse-free survival rate at 4 years (Kaplan-Meier) was 97%, the salvage therapy-free survival rate was 91%, and the overall survival rate was 87%. These figures compared favorably with those of matched patients treated with radiation only at higher doses. Conclusions: The combination of gefitinib and radiation is reasonably well tolerated and has promising activity against nonmetastatic prostate cancer.

  6. Next Generation Metallic Iron Nodule Technology in Electric Arc Steelmaking - Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald R. Fosnacht; Iwao Iwasaki; Richard F. Kiesel; David J. Englund; David W. Hendrickson; Rodney L. Bleifuss

    2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The current trend in the steel industry is a gradual decline in conventional steelmaking from taconite pellets in blast furnaces, and an increasing number of alternative processes using metallic scrap iron, pig iron and metallized iron ore products. Currently, iron ores from Minnesota and Michigan are pelletized and shipped to the lower Great Lakes ports as blast furnace feed. The existing transportation system and infrastructure is geared to handling these bulk materials. In order to expand the opportunities for the existing iron ore mines beyond their blast furnace customer base, a new material is needed to satisfy the needs of the emerging steel industry while utilizing the existing infrastructure and materials handling. A recent commercial installation employing Kobe Steel’s ITmk3 process, was installed in Northeastern Minnesota. The basic process uses a moving hearth furnace to directly reduce iron oxides to metallic iron from a mixture of iron ore, coals and additives. The resulting products can be shipped using the existing infrastructure for use in various steelmaking processes. The technology reportedly saves energy by 30% over the current integrated steelmaking process and reduces emissions by more than 40%. A similar large-scale pilot plant campaign is also currently in progress using JFE Steel’s Hi-QIP process in Japan. The objective of this proposal is to build upon and improve the technology demonstrated by Kobe Steel and JFE, by further reducing cost, improving quality and creating added incentive for commercial development. This project expands previous research conducted at the University of Minnesota Duluth’s Natural Resources Research Institute and that reported by Kobe and JFE Steel. Three major issues have been identified and are addressed in this project for producing high-quality nodular reduced iron (NRI) at low cost: (1) reduce the processing temperature, (2) control the furnace gas atmosphere over the NRI, and (3) effectively use sub-bituminous coal as a reductant. From over 4000 laboratory tube and box furnace tests, it was established that the correct combination of additives, fluxes, and reductant while controlling the concentration of CO and CO2 in the furnace atmosphere (a) lowers the operating temperature, (b) decreases the use of reductant coal (c) generates less micro nodules of iron, and (d) promotes desulphurization. The laboratory scale work was subsequently verified on 12.2 m (40 ft) long pilot scale furnace. High quality NRI could be produced on a routine basis using the pilot furnace facility with energy provided from oxy-gas or oxy-coal burner technologies. Specific strategies were developed to allow the use of sub-bituminous coals both as a hearth material and as part of the reaction mixture. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling was used to study the overall carbothermic reduction and smelting process. The movement of the furnace gas on a pilot hearth furnace and larger simulated furnaces and various means of controlling the gas atmosphere were evaluated. Various atmosphere control methods were identified and tested during the course of the investigation. Based on the results, the appropriate modifications to the furnace were made and tested at the pilot scale. A series of reduction and smelting tests were conducted to verify the utility of the processing conditions. During this phase, the overall energy use characteristics, raw materials, alternative fuels, and the overall economics predicted for full scale implementation were analyzed. The results indicate that it should be possible to lower reaction temperatures while simultaneously producing low sulfur, high carbon NRI if the right mix chemistry and atmosphere are employed. Recommendations for moving the technology to the next stage of commercialization are presented.

  7. Total On-line Access Data System (TOADS): Phase II Final Report for the Period August 2002 - August 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuracko, K L; Parang, M; Landguth, D C; Coleman, R

    2004-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    TOADS (Total On-line Access Data System) is a new generation of real-time monitoring and information management system developed to support unattended environmental monitoring and long-term stewardship of U.S. Department of Energy facilities and sites. TOADS enables project managers, regulators, and stakeholders to view environmental monitoring information in realtime over the Internet. Deployment of TOADS at government facilities and sites will reduce the cost of monitoring while increasing confidence and trust in cleanup and long term stewardship activities. TOADS: ? Reliably interfaces with and acquires data from a wide variety of external databases, remote systems, and sensors such as contaminant monitors, area monitors, atmospheric condition monitors, visual surveillance systems, intrusion devices, motion detectors, fire/heat detection devices, and gas/vapor detectors; ? Provides notification and triggers alarms as appropriate; ? Performs QA/QC on data inputs and logs the status of instruments/devices; ? Provides a fully functional data management system capable of storing, analyzing, and reporting on data; ? Provides an easy-to-use Internet-based user interface that provides visualization of the site, data, and events; and ? Enables the community to monitor local environmental conditions in real time. During this Phase II STTR project, TOADS has been developed and successfully deployed for unattended facility, environmental, and radiological monitoring at a Department of Energy facility.

  8. Phase II Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregg Ruskuaff

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document, the Phase II Frenchman Flat transport report, presents the results of radionuclide transport simulations that incorporate groundwater radionuclide transport model statistical and structural uncertainty, and lead to forecasts of the contaminant boundary (CB) for a set of representative models from an ensemble of possible models. This work, as described in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) strategy (FFACO, 1996; amended 2010), forms an essential part of the technical basis for subsequent negotiation of the compliance boundary of the Frenchman Flat corrective action unit (CAU) by Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Underground nuclear testing via deep vertical shafts was conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) from 1951 until 1992. The Frenchman Flat area, the subject of this report, was used for seven years, with 10 underground nuclear tests being conducted. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NNSA/NSO initiated the UGTA Project to assess and evaluate the effects of underground nuclear tests on groundwater at the NTS and vicinity through the FFACO (1996, amended 2010). The processes that will be used to complete UGTA corrective actions are described in the “Corrective Action Strategy” in the FFACO Appendix VI, Revision No. 2 (February 20, 2008).

  9. Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 2004-2005 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vucelick, Jessica; McMichael, Geoffrey; Chamness, Mickie [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2004, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 25 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2004, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by NOAA Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well-greased and operative. (4) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites. (5) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve passage conditions for juvenile fish. For example, Taylor has had problems meeting bypass flow and submergence operating criteria since the main river channel shifted away from the site 2 years ago, and Fruitvale consistently has had problems meeting bypass flow criteria when the water is low. (6) Continued problems at Gleed point to design flaws. This site should be considered for redesign or replacement.

  10. Multicenter phase II study of matured dendritic cells pulsed with melanoma cell line lysates in patients with advanced melanoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TAAs (Melan-A/MART1, NY-ESO-1, tyrosinase or gp100), with noi) gp100 family, ii) tyrosinase and TRP-2 family, iii) MAGE

  11. A phase I/II trial of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung metastases: Initial report of dose escalation and early toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schefter, Tracey E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)]. E-mail: Tracey.Schefter@uchsc.edu; Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Raben, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Kane, Madeleine [Division of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Chen Changhu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Stuhr, Kelly [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Kelly, Karen [Division of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Mitchell, John D. [Section of Thoracic Surgery, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Bunn, Paul A. [Division of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Gaspar, Laurie E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung metastases. Methods and Materials: A Phase I clinical trial was conducted. Eligible patients had one to three pulmonary metastases from a solid tumor, cumulative tumor diameter <7 cm, and adequate pulmonary function (forced expiratory volume in 1 s {>=}1.0 L). The planning target volume (PTV) was typically constructed from the gross tumor volume (GTV) by adding a 5-mm radial and 10-mm craniocaudal margin. The first cohort received 48 Gy to the PTV in three fractions (F). SBRT dose was escalated in subsequent cohorts up to a preselected maximum of 60 Gy/3 F. The percent of normal lung receiving more than 15 Gy (V{sub 15}) was restricted to less than 35%. Respiratory control and a dynamic conformal arc SBRT technique were used. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) included acute Grade 3 lung or esophageal toxicity or any acute Grade 4 toxicity within 3 months. After the Phase I dose escalation, the trial continued as a Phase II study, and patients in this cohort are included to increase the number of patients evaluable for early toxicity assessment. Results: Twenty-five eligible patients have been enrolled to date. In the Phase I component of the trial, there were 12 patients (7 male, 5 female): median age, 55 years (range, 31-83 years); the most common primary site was colorectal (4 patients). Seven patients had two lung lesions, and 1 patient had three lesions. The median aggregate volume of all GTVs was 18.7 mL (range, 2-40 mL). No patient experienced a DLT, and dose was escalated to 60 Gy/3 F without reaching the MTD; including the additional Phase II cohort patients, 16 patients have been treated to a dose of 60 Gy/3F without experiencing a DLT in the first 3 months. The equivalent uniform dose to the GTV in the highest dose group ranged from 66 to 77 Gy in 3 F. Conclusions: In patients with limited pulmonary metastases, radiobiologically potent doses of SBRT are well tolerated with minimal early toxicity. A Phase II SBRT study of 60 Gy/3 F for lung metastases is ongoing to evaluate local tumor control rates with this regimen and continue surveillance for any late effects.

  12. Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. E. Shanklin

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Remedial Design/Remedial Action Work Plan provides the framework for defining the remedial design requirements, preparing the design documentation, and defining the remedial actions for Waste Area Group 3, Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils, Remediation Sets 4-6 (Phase II) located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Laboratory. This plan details the design developed to support the remediation and disposal activities selected in the Final Operable Unit 3-13, Record of Decision.

  13. Open cycle heat pump development for local resource use Phase II district heating case study analysis: Progress report, 1 January 1989--30 March 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiBella, F.; Becker, F.E.; Glick, J.

    1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A district heating system is proposed that uses low-level waste- energy sources, and a quasi open-cycle steam heat pump as a means of upgrading the energy in the form of hot water to use as a transport medium in the system. the use of a water-based, open-cycle heat pump appears to be extremely well suited in terms of its potential thermodynamic performance, cost, and environmental safety compared to more typical organic gased closed cycle systems. The Phase II case study provides a detailed analysis of a district heating system that utilizes the open cycle steam heat pump concept developed in Phase I. This quarterly report describes the energy audit performed on the heat source and heat sink.

  14. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part II: Multi-layered cloud

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, H; McCoy, R B; Klein, S A; Xie, S; Luo, Y; Avramov, A; Chen, M; Cole, J; Falk, M; Foster, M; Genio, A D; Harrington, J; Hoose, C; Khairoutdinov, M; Larson, V; Liu, X; McFarquhar, G; Poellot, M; Shipway, B; Shupe, M; Sud, Y; Turner, D; Veron, D; Walker, G; Wang, Z; Wolf, A; Xu, K; Yang, F; Zhang, G

    2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a deep, multi-layered, mixed-phase cloud system observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. This cloud system was associated with strong surface turbulent sensible and latent heat fluxes as cold air flowed over the open Arctic Ocean, combined with a low pressure system that supplied moisture at mid-level. The simulations, performed by 13 single-column and 4 cloud-resolving models, generally overestimate the liquid water path and strongly underestimate the ice water path, although there is a large spread among the models. This finding is in contrast with results for the single-layer, low-level mixed-phase stratocumulus case in Part I of this study, as well as previous studies of shallow mixed-phase Arctic clouds, that showed an underprediction of liquid water path. The overestimate of liquid water path and underestimate of ice water path occur primarily when deeper mixed-phase clouds extending into the mid-troposphere were observed. These results suggest important differences in the ability of models to simulate Arctic mixed-phase clouds that are deep and multi-layered versus shallow and single-layered. In general, models with a more sophisticated, two-moment treatment of the cloud microphysics produce a somewhat smaller liquid water path that is closer to observations. The cloud-resolving models tend to produce a larger cloud fraction than the single-column models. The liquid water path and especially the cloud fraction have a large impact on the cloud radiative forcing at the surface, which is dominated by the longwave flux for this case.

  15. High temperature turbine technology program. Phase II. Technology test and support studies. Annual technical progress report, January 1, 1979-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Work performed on the High Temperature Turbine Technology Program, Phase II - Technology Test and Support Studies during the period from January 1, 1979 through December 31, 1979 is summarized. Objectives of the program elements as well as technical progress and problems encountered during this Phase II annual reporting period are presented. Progress on design, fabrication and checkout of test facilities and test rigs is described. LP turbine cascade tests were concluded. 350 hours of testing were conducted on the LP rig engine first with clean distillate fuel and then with fly ash particulates injected into the hot gas stream. Design and fabrication of the turbine spool technology rig components are described. TSTR 60/sup 0/ sector combustor rig fabrication and testing are reviewed. Progress in the design and fabrication of TSTR cascade rig components for operation on both distillate fuel and low Btu gas is described. The new coal-derived gaseous fuel synthesizing facility is reviewed. Results and future plans for the supporting metallurgical programs are discussed.

  16. Five-year Local Control in a Phase II Study of Hypofractionated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With an Incorporated Boost for Early Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freedman, Gary M., E-mail: Gary.Freedman@uphs.upenn.edu [Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Anderson, Penny R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Bleicher, Richard J. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Litwin, Samuel; Li Tianyu [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Swaby, Ramona F. [Department of Medical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Medical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ma, Chang-Ming Charlie; Li Jinsheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Sigurdson, Elin R. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Watkins-Bruner, Deborah [School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)] [School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Morrow, Monica [Department of Surgical Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] [Department of Surgical Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goldstein, Lori J. [Department of Medical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Medical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Conventional radiation fractionation of 1.8-2 Gy per day for early stage breast cancer requires daily treatment for 6-7 weeks. We report the 5-year results of a phase II study of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), hypofractionation, and incorporated boost that shortened treatment time to 4 weeks. Methods and Materials: The study design was phase II with a planned accrual of 75 patients. Eligibility included patients aged {>=}18 years, Tis-T2, stage 0-II, and breast conservation. Photon IMRT and an incorporated boost was used, and the whole breast received 2.25 Gy per fraction for a total of 45 Gy, and the tumor bed received 2.8 Gy per fraction for a total of 56 Gy in 20 treatments over 4 weeks. Patients were followed every 6 months for 5 years. Results: Seventy-five patients were treated from December 2003 to November 2005. The median follow-up was 69 months. Median age was 52 years (range, 31-81). Median tumor size was 1.4 cm (range, 0.1-3.5). Eighty percent of tumors were node negative; 93% of patients had negative margins, and 7% of patients had close (>0 and <2 mm) margins; 76% of cancers were invasive ductal type: 15% were ductal carcinoma in situ, 5% were lobular, and 4% were other histology types. Twenty-nine percent of patients 29% had grade 3 carcinoma, and 20% of patients had extensive in situ carcinoma; 11% of patients received chemotherapy, 36% received endocrine therapy, 33% received both, and 20% received neither. There were 3 instances of local recurrence for a 5-year actuarial rate of 2.7%. Conclusions: This 4-week course of hypofractionated radiation with incorporated boost was associated with excellent local control, comparable to historical results of 6-7 weeks of conventional whole-breast fractionation with sequential boost.

  17. PHASE II CHARACTERIZATION SURVEY OF THE USNS BRIDGE (T AOE 10), MILITARY SEALIFT FLEET SUPPORT COMMAND, NAVAL STATION, NORFOLK, VIRGINIA DCN 5180-SR-01-0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NICK A. ALTIC

    2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In March 2011, the USNS Bridge was deployed off northeastern Honshu, Japan with the carrier USS Ronald Reagan to assist with relief efforts after the 2011 T?hoku earthquake and tsunami. During that time, the Bridge was exposed to air-borne radioactive materials leaking from the damaged Fukushima I Nuclear Power Plant. The proximity of the Bridge to the air-borne impacted area resulted in the contamination of the ship’s air-handling systems and the associated components, as well as potential contamination of other ship surfaces due to either direct intake/deposition or inadvertent spread from crew/operational activities. Preliminary surveys in the weeks after the event confirmed low-level contamination within the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) ductwork and systems, and engine and other auxiliary air intake systems. Some partial decontamination was performed at that time. In response to the airborne contamination event, Military Sealift Fleet Support Command (MSFSC) contracted Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under provisions of the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, to assess the radiological condition of the Bridge. Phase I identified contamination within the CPS filters, ventilation systems, miscellaneous equipment, and other suspect locations that could not accessed at that time (ORAU 2011b). Because the Bridge was underway during the characterization, all the potentially impacted systems/spaces could not be investigated. As a result, MSFSC contracted with ORAU to perform Phase II of the characterization, specifically to survey systems/spaces previously inaccessible. During Phase II of the characterization, the ship was in port to perform routine maintenance operations, allowing access to the previously inaccessible systems/spaces.

  18. Phase II Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 2 with ROTC 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marutzky, Sam

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Phase II CAIP describes new work needed to potentially reduce uncertainty and achieve increased confidence in modeling results. This work includes data collection and data analysis to refine model assumptions, improve conceptual models of flow and transport in a complex hydrogeologic setting, and reduce parametric and structural uncertainty. The work was prioritized based on the potential to reduce model uncertainty and achieve an acceptable level of confidence in the model predictions for flow and transport, leading to model acceptance by NDEP and completion of the Phase II CAI stage of the UGTA strategy.

  19. A Phase II Trial of Neoadjuvant Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy With S-1 Plus Irinotecan and Radiation in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: Clinical Feasibility and Response Rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sato, Takeo; Ozawa, Heita; Hatate, Kazuhiko; Onosato, Wataru; Naito, Masanori; Nakamura, Takatoshi; Ihara, Atsushi [Department of Surgery, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan); Koizumi, Wasaburo [Department of Internal Medicine, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan); Hayakawa, Kazushige [Department of Radiology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan); Okayasu, Isao [Department of Pathology, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan); Yamashita, Keishi [Department of Surgery, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan); Watanabe, Masahiko, E-mail: rint@kitasato-u.ac.j [Department of Surgery, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: We aimed to validate our hypothesis that a preoperative chemoradiotherapy regimen with S-1 plus irinotecan is feasible, safe, and active for the management of locally advanced rectal cancer in a single-arm Phase II setting. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had previously untreated, locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma. Radiotherapy was administered in fractions of 1.8Gy/d for 25 days. S-1 was administered orally in a fixed daily dose of 80mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1 to 5, 8 to 12, 22 to 26, and 29 to 33. Irinotecan (80mg/m{sup 2}) was infused on Days 1, 8, 22, and 29. Four or more weeks after the completion of the treatment, total mesorectal excision with lateral lymph node dissection was performed. The primary endpoint was the rate of completing treatment in terms of feasibility. The secondary endpoints were the response rate and safety. Results: We enrolled 43 men and 24 women in the study. The number of patients who completed treatment was 58 (86.6%). Overall, 46 patients (68.7%) responded to treatment and 24 (34.7%) had a complete histopathologic response. Three patients had Grade 3 leukopenia, and another three patients had Grade 3 neutropenia. Diarrhea was the most common type of nonhematologic toxicity: 3 patients had Grade 3 diarrhea. Conclusions: A preoperative regimen of S-1, irinotecan, and radiotherapy to the rectum was feasible, and it appeared safe and effective in this nonrandomized Phase II setting. It exhibited a low incidence of adverse events, a high rate of completion of treatment, and an extremely high rate of pathologic complete response.

  20. Summary of Research through Phase II/Year 2 of Initially Approved 3 Phase/3 Year Project - Establishing the Relationship between Fracture-Related Dolomite and Primary Rock Fabric on the Distribution of Reservoirs in the Michigan Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Grammer

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This final scientific/technical report covers the first 2 years (Phases I and II of an originally planned 3 Year/3 Phase program). The project was focused on evaluating the relationship between fracture-related dolomite and dolomite constrained by primary rock fabric in the 3 most prolific reservoir intervals in the Michigan Basin. The characterization of select dolomite reservoirs was the major focus of our efforts in Phases I and II of the project. Structural mapping and log analysis in the Dundee (Devonian) and Trenton/Black River (Ordovician) suggest a close spatial relationship among gross dolomite distribution and regional-scale, wrench fault-related NW-SE and NE-SW structural trends. A high temperature origin for much of the dolomite in these 2 studied intervals (based upon fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures and stable isotopic analyses,) coupled with persistent association of this dolomite in reservoirs coincident with wrench fault-related features, is strong evidence for these reservoirs being influenced by hydrothermal dolomitization. In the Niagaran (Silurian), there is a general trend of increasing dolomitization shelfward, with limestone predominant in more basinward positions. A major finding is that facies types, when analyzed at a detailed level, are directly related to reservoir porosity and permeability in these dolomites which increases the predictability of reservoir quality in these units. This pattern is consistent with our original hypothesis of primary facies control on dolomitization and resulting reservoir quality at some level. The identification of distinct and predictable vertical stacking patterns within a hierarchical sequence and cycle framework provides a high degree of confidence at this point that the results should be exportable throughout the basin. Much of the data synthesis and modeling for the project was scheduled to be part of Year 3/Phase III, but the discontinuation of funding after Year 2 precluded those efforts. Therefore, the results presented in this document are not final, and in many cases represent a report of 'progress to date' as numerous tasks were scheduled to extend into Year 3.

  1. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Pure r-Phase Manganese(II) Sulfide without the Use of Organic Reagents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel, F.M.; Schoonen, M.A.A.; Zhang, X.V.; Martin, S.T.; Parise, J.B. (SBU); (Harvard)

    2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies exploring the role of metal sulfides as (photo)catalysts in prebiotic synthesis reactions provide the impetus for finding carbon-free synthesis methods for metal sulfides. The decomposition of organosulfur and organometallic precursor compounds is often the protocol for synthesizing bulk metal chalcogenides, such as manganese sulfide (MnS). Here we report a hydrothermal synthesis method for the formation of MnS in which a MnCl{sub 2} solution is injected into a preheated sulfide solution. By varying the temperature of injection and subsequent aging time, we can control the specific crystal phase of the product. Three MnS polymorphs are known, and two of these, {alpha}-MnS and {gamma}-MnS, form as pure phases in aqueous systems. The initial precipitate formed upon mixing of aqueous solutions of Mn{sup 2+} and S{sup 2-} at ambient temperature is nanocrystalline and is composed of a mixture of {gamma}-MnS (wurtzite structure) and {beta}-MnS (zinc blende structure). {beta}-MnS has not previously been identified as forming under aqueous conditions. The initial binary-phase precipitate can be transformed to pure, highly crystalline {gamma}-MnS by aging at temperatures as low as 150 C within 3 days. Aging to yield pure {alpha}-MnS requires temperatures in excess of 200 C for 3 days. Characterization of the products was performed using powder X-ray diffraction, total scattering and pair distribution function analysis, dynamic light scattering, and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Chemical analyses were performed using colorimetric techniques.

  2. Development of improved processing and evaluation methods for high reliability structural ceramics for advanced heat engine applications Phase II. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pujari, V.J.; Tracey, D.M.; Foley, M.R. [and others

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research program had as goals the development and demonstration of significant improvements in processing methods, process controls, and nondestructive evaluation (NDE) which can be commercially implemented to produce high reliability silicon nitride components for advanced heat engine applications at temperatures to 1370{degrees}C. In Phase I of the program a process was developed that resulted in a silicon nitride - 4 w% yttria HIP`ed material (NCX 5102) that displayed unprecedented strength and reliability. An average tensile strength of 1 GPa and a strength distribution following a 3-parameter Weibull distribution were demonstrated by testing several hundred buttonhead tensile specimens. The Phase II program focused on the development of methodology for colloidal consolidation producing green microstructure which minimizes downstream process problems such as drying, shrinkage, cracking, and part distortion during densification. Furthermore, the program focused on the extension of the process to gas pressure sinterable (GPS) compositions. Excellent results were obtained for the HIP composition processed for minimal density gradients, both with respect to room-temperature strength and high-temperature creep resistance. Complex component fabricability of this material was demonstrated by producing engine-vane prototypes. Strength data for the GPS material (NCX-5400) suggest that it ranks very high relative to other silicon nitride materials in terms of tensile/flexure strength ratio, a measure of volume quality. This high quality was derived from the closed-loop colloidal process employed in the program.

  3. Modeling of fluidized-bed combustion of coal: Phase II, final reports. Volume V. Appendix: stability and instability in fluidized-bed combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louis, J.F.; Tung, S.E.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the fifth of the seven volumes series of our Phase II Final Report. The material developed in this volume has not been incorporated into the system model. It will be used as a precursor of a transient model to be developed in the next phase of our model work. There have been various fluidized combustor models of differing complexity and scope published in the literature. Most of these models have identified and predicted - often in satisfactory agreement with results from pilot units - the key steady state combustor characteristics such as the mass of carbon in the bed (carbon loading), the combustion efficiency, the sulfur retention by the solid sorbent and the pollutant (mainly NO/sub x/) emissions. These models, however, cannot be in most instances successfully used to study the extinction and ignition characteristics of the combustor because they are isothermal in structure in the sense that the bed temperature is not an output variable but rather an input one and must be a priori specified. In order to remedy these inadequacies of the previous models, we here present a comprehensive account of the formulation and some typical results of a new nonisothermal model which has been developed in order to study, among other things, the ignition and extinction characteristics of the AFBC units. This model is able to predict the temperature patterns in the bed, the carbon loading, the combustion efficiency and the O/sub 2/ and CO concentration profiles in the combustor for the different design or operational characteristics.

  4. Potential use of California lignite and other alternate fuel for enhanced oil recovery. Phase I and II. Final report. [As alternative fuels for steam generation in thermal EOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shelton, R.; Shimizu, A.; Briggs, A.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nation's continued reliance on liquid fossil fuels and decreasing reserves of light oils gives increased impetus to improving the recovery of heavy oil. Thermal enhanced oil recovery EOR techniques, such as steam injection, have generally been the most effective for increasing heavy oil production. However, conventional steam generation consumes a large fraction of the produced oil. The substitution of alternate (solid) fuels would release much of this consumed oil to market. This two-part report focuses on two solid fuels available in California, the site of most thermal EOR - petroleum coke and lignite. Phase I, entitled Economic Analysis, shows detailed cost comparisons between the two candidate fuels and also with Western coal. The analysis includes fuels characterizations, process designs for several combustion systems, and a thorough evaluation of the technical and economic uncertainties. In Phase II, many technical parameters of petroleum coke combustion were measured in a pilot-plant fluidized bed. The results of the study showed that petroleum coke combustion for EOR is feasible and cost effective in a fluidized bed combustor.

  5. Improved Titanium Billet Inspection Sensitivity through Optimized Phased Array Design, Part II: Experimental Validation and Comparative Study with Multizone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassan, W.; Vensel, F.; Knowles, B. [Honeywell Aerospace, 111 S. 34th Street, M/S 503-118 Phoenix, AZ 85034, Phoenix, AZ 85034 (United States); Lupien, V. [Acoustic Ideas Inc., 27 Eaton Street, Wakefield, MA 01880 (United States)

    2006-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The inspection of critical rotating components of aircraft engines has made important advances over the last decade. The development of Phased Array (PA) inspection capability for billet and forging materials used in the manufacturing of critical engine rotating components has been a priority for Honeywell Aerospace. The demonstration of improved PA inspection system sensitivity over what is currently used at the inspection houses is a critical step in the development of this technology and its introduction to the supply base as a production inspection. As described in Part I (in these proceedings), a new phased array transducer was designed and manufactured for optimal inspection of eight inch diameter Ti-6Al-4V billets. After confirming that the transducer was manufactured in accordance with the design specifications a validation study was conducted to assess the sensitivity improvement of the PAI over the current capability of Multi-zone (MZ) inspection. The results of this study confirm the significant ({approx_equal} 6 dB in FBH number sign sensitivity) improvement of the PAI sensitivity over that of MZI.

  6. LWA demonstration applications using Illinois coal gasification slag: Phase II. Technical report, 1 March--31 May 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choudhry, V. [Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (United States); Steck, P. [Harvey Cement Products, Inc. (United States)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major objective of this project is to demonstrate the suitability of using ultra-lightweight aggregates (ULWA) produced by thermal expansion of solid residues (slag) generated during the gasification of Illinois coals as substitutes for conventional aggregates, which are typically produced by pyroprocessing of perlite ores. To meet this objective, expanded slag aggregates produced from an Illinois coal slag feed in Phase I will be subjected to characterization and applications-oriented testing. Target applications include the following: aggregates in precast products (blocks and rooftiles); construction aggregates (loose fill insulation and insulating concrete); and other applications as identified from evaluation of expanded slag properties. The production of value-added products from slag is aimed at eliminating a solid waste and possibly enhancing the overall economics of the gasification process, especially when the avoided costs of disposal are taken into consideration.

  7. Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, Continuation within IEA Wind Task 30: Phase II Results Regarding a Floating Semisubmersible Wind System: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Vorpahl, F.; Popko, W.; Qvist, J.; Froyd, L.; Chen, X.; Azcona, J.; Uzungoglu, E.; Guedes Soares, C.; Luan, C.; Yutong, H.; Pengcheng, F.; Yde, A.; Larsen, T.; Nichols, J.; Buils, R.; Lei, L.; Anders Nygard, T.; et al.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation tools (or codes) that account for the coupled dynamics of the wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity, and controls of the turbine, along with the incident waves, sea current, hydrodynamics, and foundation dynamics of the support structure. This paper describes the latest findings of the code-to-code verification activities of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, Continuation (OC4) project, which operates under the International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind Task 30. In the latest phase of the project, participants used an assortment of simulation codes to model the coupled dynamic response of a 5-MW wind turbine installed on a floating semisubmersible in 200 m of water. Code predictions were compared from load-case simulations selected to test different model features. The comparisons have resulted in a greater understanding of offshore floating wind turbine dynamics and modeling techniques, and better knowledge of the validity of various approximations. The lessons learned from this exercise have improved the participants? codes, thus improving the standard of offshore wind turbine modeling.

  8. NIHAO project II: Halo shape, phase-space density and velocity distribution of dark matter in galaxy formation simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butsky, Iryna; Dutton, Aaron A; Wang, Liang; Stinson, Greg S; Penzo, Camilla; Kang, Xi; Keller, Ben W; Wadsley, James

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show the effect of galaxy formation on the dark matter (DM) distribution across a wide range of halo masses. We focus on how baryon physics changes the dark matter halo shape, the so called "pseudo phase-space density distribution" and the velocity distribution within the virial radius, Rvir and in the solar neighborhood. This study is based on the NIHAO galaxy formation simulations, a large suite of cosmological zoom-in simulations. The galaxies reproduce key properties of observed galaxies, and hence offer unique insight into how baryons change the dark matter morphology and kinematics. When compared to dark matter only simulations, the NIHAO haloes have similar shapes at Rvir, but are substantially rounder inside ~0.1 Rvir. In DM-only simulations the inner halo has a minor-to-major axis ratio of c/a~0.5. In hydro simulations c/a increases with halo mass and integrated star formation efficiency, reaching ~0.8 at the Milky Way mass, reconciling a long-standing conflict between observations and DM only sim...

  9. INITIAL COMMISSIONING OF NDCX-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lidia, S.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INITIAL COMMISSIONING OF NDCX-II* S. Lidia # , D. Arbelaez,the results of early commissioning studies that characterizeschematic and commissioning phases. The commissioning phases

  10. Final work plan : phase II investigation of potential contamination at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Savannah, Missouri.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    From approximately 1949 until 1970, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility on federally owned property approximately 0.25 mi northwest of Savannah, Missouri (Figure 1.1). During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were commonly used by the CCC/USDA and the private grain storage industry to preserve grain in their facilities. In November 1998, carbon tetrachloride was detected in a private well (Morgan) roughly 50 ft south of the former CCC/USDA facility, as a result of statewide screening of private wells near former CCC/USDA facilities, conducted in Missouri by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1999). The 1998 and subsequent investigations by the EPA and the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MoDNR) confirmed the presence of carbon tetrachloride in the Morgan well, as well as in a second well (on property currently occupied by the Missouri Department of Transportation [MoDOT]) described as being approximately 400 ft east of the former CCC/USDA facility. The identified concentrations in these two wells were above the EPA maximum contaminant level (MCL) and the Missouri risk-based corrective action default target level (MRBCA DTL) values of 5.0 {micro}g/L for carbon tetrachloride in water used for domestic purposes (EPA 1999; MoDNR 2000a,b, 2006). Because the observed contamination in the Morgan and MoDOT wells might be linked to the past use of carbon tetrachloride-based fumigants at its former grain storage facility, the CCC/USDA is conducting an investigation to (1) characterize the source(s), extent, and factors controlling the subsurface distribution and movement of carbon tetrachloride at Savannah and (2) evaluate the potential risks to human health, public welfare, and the environment posed by the contamination. This work is being performed in accord with the Intergovernmental Agreement established between the Farm Service Agency of the USDA and the MoDNR, to address carbon tetrachloride contamination potentially associated with a number of former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities in Missouri. The site characterization at Savannah is being conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The investigation at Savannah is being conducted in phases. This approach is being used by the CCC/USDA and Argonne, with the approval of the MoDNR, so that information obtained and interpretations developed during each incremental stage of the investigation can be used most effectively to guide subsequent phases of the program. Phase I of the Savannah program was conducted in October-November 2007 and January 2008 (Argonne 2007a, 2008). This site-specific Work Plan provides a brief summary of the Phase I findings and the results of groundwater level monitoring that has been ongoing since completion of the Phase I study and also outlines technical objectives, investigation tasks, and investigation methods for Phase II of the site characterization at Savannah.

  11. SCENARIOS FOR MEETING CALIFORNIA'S 2050 CLIMATE GOALS California's Carbon Challenge Phase II Volume I: Non-Electricity Sectors and Overall Scenario Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Max

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    II Volume I: Non-Electricity Sectors and Overall ScenarioElectricity Sector Conditions Assumed for Electricity Sector and Building

  12. Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113, Detail Design Report (Title II). Volume 2: Solid waste retrieval facilities -- Phase 1, detail design drawings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solid Waste Retrieval Facility--Phase 1 (Project W113) will provide the infrastructure and the facility required to retrieve from Trench 04, Burial ground 4C, contact handled (CH) drums and boxes at a rate that supports all retrieved TRU waste batching, treatment, storage, and disposal plans. This includes (1) operations related equipment and facilities, viz., a weather enclosure for the trench, retrieval equipment, weighing, venting, obtaining gas samples, overpacking, NDE, NDA, shipment of waste and (2) operations support related facilities, viz., a general office building, a retrieval staff change facility, and infrastructure upgrades such as supply and routing of water, sewer, electrical power, fire protection, roads, and telecommunication. Title I design for the operations related equipment and facilities was performed by Raytheon/BNFL, and that for the operations support related facilities including infrastructure upgrade was performed by KEH. These two scopes were combined into an integrated W113 Title II scope that was performed by Raytheon/BNFL. Volume 2 provides the complete set of the Detail Design drawings along with a listing of the drawings. Once approved by WHC, these drawings will be issued and baselined for the Title 3 construction effort.

  13. Hypofractionated High-Dose Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: Long-Term Results of a Multi-Institutional Phase II Trial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fonteyne, Valerie, E-mail: valerie.fonteyne@uzgent.be [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Soete, Guy [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussels, Jette (Belgium)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussels, Jette (Belgium); Arcangeli, Stefano [Department of Radiotherapy, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); De Neve, Wilfried [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Rappe, Bernard [Department of Urology, Algemeen Stedelijk Ziekenhuis, Aalst (Belgium)] [Department of Urology, Algemeen Stedelijk Ziekenhuis, Aalst (Belgium); Storme, Guy [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussels, Jette (Belgium)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussels, Jette (Belgium); Strigari, Lidia [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy)] [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Arcangeli, Giorgio [Department of Radiotherapy, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); De Meerleer, Gert [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)] [Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To report late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity, biochemical and clinical outcomes, and overall survival after hypofractionated radiation therapy for prostate cancer (PC). Methods and Materials: Three institutions included 113 patients with T1 to T3N0M0 PC in a phase II study. Patients were treated with 56 Gy in 16 fractions over 4 weeks. Late toxicity was scored using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer criteria extended with additional symptoms. Biochemical outcome was reported according to the Phoenix definition for biochemical failure. Results: The incidence of late GI and GU toxicity was low. The 3-year actuarial risk of developing late GU and GI toxicity of grade {>=}2 was 13% and 8% respectively. Five-year biochemical non-evidence of disease (bNED) was 94%. Risk group, T stage, and deviation from planned hormone treatment were significant predictive factors for bNED. Deviation from hormone treatment remained significant in multivariate analysis. Five-year clinical non evidence of disease and overall survival was 95% and 91% respectively. No patient died from PC. Conclusions: Hypofractionated high-dose radiation therapy is a valuable treatment option for patients with PC, with excellent biochemical and clinical outcome and low toxicity.

  14. Measurement of the CP-Violating Phase beta_s in B0s -> J/Psi Phi Decays with the CDF II Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; et al.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a measurement of the \\CP-violating parameter \\betas using approximately 6500 $\\BsJpsiPhi$ decays reconstructed with the CDF\\,II detector in a sample of $p\\bar p$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV corresponding to 5.2 fb$^{-1}$ integrated luminosity produced by the Tevatron Collider at Fermilab. We find the \\CP-violating phase to be within the range $\\betas \\in [0.02, 0.52] \\cup [1.08, 1.55]$ at 68% confidence level where the coverage property of the quoted interval is guaranteed using a frequentist statistical analysis. This result is in agreement with the standard model expectation at the level of about one Gaussian standard deviation. We consider the inclusion of a potential $S$-wave contribution to the $\\Bs\\to J/\\psi K^+K^-$ final state which is found to be negligible over the mass interval $1.009 < m(K^+K^-)<1.028 \\gevcc$. Assuming the standard model prediction for the \\CP-violating phase \\betas, we find the \\Bs decay width difference to be $\\deltaG = 0.075 \\pm 0.035\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.006\\,\\textrm{(syst)} \\ps$. We also present the most precise measurements of the \\Bs mean lifetime $\\tau(\\Bs) = 1.529 \\pm 0.025\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.012\\,\\textrm{(syst)}$ ps, the polarization fractions $|A_0(0)|^2 = 0.524 \\pm 0.013\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.015\\,\\textrm{(syst)}$ and $|A_{\\parallel}(0)|^2 = 0.231 \\pm 0.014\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.015\\,\\textrm{(syst)}$, as well as the strong phase $\\delta_{\\perp}= 2.95 \\pm 0.64\\,\\textrm{(stat)} \\pm 0.07\\,\\textrm{(syst)} \\textrm{rad}$. In addition, we report an alternative Bayesian analysis that gives results consistent with the frequentist approach.

  15. SPIDERS Phase II Technical Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Awareness for Operators * Increased Automation of Distribution * Integration of Renewable Resources for Backup Power * Multiple Modes of Operation Both Islanded and...

  16. CRAD, Engineering - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Engineering - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II CRAD, Engineering - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II February 2006 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2...

  17. A Phase II Study of Bevacizumab in Combination With Definitive Radiotherapy and Cisplatin Chemotherapy in Untreated Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Carcinoma: Preliminary Results of RTOG 0417

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schefter, Tracey E., E-mail: tracey.schefter@ucdenver.edu [University of Colorado-Denver, Aurora, CO (United States); Winter, Kathryn [RTOG Statistical Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Kwon, Janice S. [University of British Columbia and BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Stuhr, Kelly [Anschutz Cancer Pavilion, Aurora, CO (United States); Balaraj, Khalid [King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Yaremko, Brian P. [University of Western Ontario, London Regional Cancer Program, London, ON (Canada); Small, William [The Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Gaffney, David K. [University of Utah Health Science Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Concurrent cisplatin-based chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is the standard treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer. RTOG 0417 was a Phase II study exploring the safety and efficacy of the addition of bevacizumab to standard CRT. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients with bulky tumors (Stage IB-IIIB) were treated with once-weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m{sup 2}) chemotherapy and standard pelvic radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Bevacizumab was administered at 10 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks for three cycles. Treatment-related serious adverse event (SAE) and other adverse event (AE) rates within the first 90 days from treatment start were determined. Treatment-related SAEs were defined as any Grade {>=}4 vaginal bleeding or thrombotic event or Grade {>=}3 arterial event, gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, or bowel/bladder perforation, or any Grade 5 treatment-related death. Treatment-related AEs included all SAEs and Grade 3 or 4 GI toxicity persisting for >2 weeks despite medical intervention, Grade 4 neutropenia or leukopenia persisting for >7 days, febrile neutropenia, Grade 3 or 4 other hematologic toxicity, and Grade 3 or 4 GI, renal, cardiac, pulmonary, hepatic, or neurologic AEs. All AEs were scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria (CTCAE) v 3.0 (MedDRA version 6.0). Results: A total of 60 patients from 28 institutions were enrolled between 2006 and 2009, and of these, 49 patients were evaluable. The median follow-up was 12.4 months (range, 4.6-31.4 months).The median age was 45 years (range, 22-80 years). Most patients had FIGO Stage IIB (63%) and were of Zubrod performance status of 0 (67%). 80% of cases were squamous. There were no treatment-related SAEs. There were 15 (31%) protocol-specified treatment-related AEs within 90 days of treatment start; the most common were hematologic (12/15; 80%). 18 (37%) occurred during treatment or follow-up at any time. 37 of the 49 patients (76%) had cisplatin and bevacizumab administered per protocol, and 46 of the 49 (94%) had both external beam and brachytherapy administered per protocol or with acceptable variation. Conclusion: Bevacizumab in addition to standard pelvic chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer is feasible and safe with respect to the protocol-specified treatment-related SAEs and AEs.

  18. Growth of alternating (1OO)/(lll )-oriented II-VI regions for quasi-phase-matched nonlinear optical devices on GaAs substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fejer, Martin M.

    ferroelectrics such as lithium nio- bate and potassium titanyl phosphate. Efficient operation is possible) nonlinear interactions. II-VI semiconductors, with transparency from the far in- frared to the visible phasematched interactions.' A powerful alternative technique, QPM, re- quires periodic patterning of the sign

  19. 24 DAVID SENOUF [15] T.D. Lee and C.N. Yang, Statistical theory of equations of state and phase transitions. II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soatto, Stefano

    transitions. II Lattice gas and ising model, Phys. Rev. 87 (1952), pp. 410­447. [16] D. Senouf, Asymptotic, Handbook of Mathematical Functions, Dover, 1965. [2] L.V. Ahlfors, Complex Analysis, Mc.Graw Hill, 3rd 1990, pp. 252­257. [4] D. Bessis and J.D. Fournier, Pole condensation and the Riemann surface

  20. Identification of photons in double beta-decay experiments using segmented germanium detectors - studies with a GERDA Phase II prototype detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Abt; A. Caldwell; K. Kröninger; J. Liu; X. Liu; B. Majorovits

    2007-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The sensitivity of experiments searching for neutrinoless double beta-decay of germanium was so far limited by the background induced by external gamma-radiation. Segmented germanium detectors can be used to identify photons and thus reduce this background component. The GERmanium Detector Array, GERDA, will use highly segmented germanium detectors in its second phase. The identification of photonic events is investigated using a prototype detector. The results are compared with Monte Carlo data.

  1. Charmless $B_s\\to PP, PV, VV$ Decays Based on the six-quark Effective Hamiltonian with Strong Phase Effects II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang Su; Yue-Liang Wu; Ci Zhuang; Yi-Bo Yang

    2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a systematic study of charmless $B_s \\to PP, PV, VV$ decays ($P$ and $V$ denote pseudoscalar and vector mesons, respectively) based on an approximate six-quark operator effective Hamiltonian from QCD. The calculation of the relevant hard-scattering kernels is carried out, the resulting transition form factors are consistent with the results of QCD sum rule calculations. By taking into account important classes of power corrections involving "chirally-enhanced" terms and the vertex corrections as well as weak annihilation contributions with non-trivial strong phase, we present predictions for the branching ratios and CP asymmetries of $B_s$ decays into PP, PV and VV final states, and also for the corresponding polarization observables in VV final states. It is found that the weak annihilation contributions with non-trivial strong phase have remarkable effects on the observables in the color-suppressed and penguin-dominated decay modes. In addition, we discuss the SU(3) flavor symmetry and show that the symmetry relations are generally respected.

  2. GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS: PHASE II--PILOT SCALE TESTING AND UPDATED PERFORMANCE AND ECONOMICS FOR OXYGEN FIRED CFB WITH CO2 CAPTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; David G. Turek

    2004-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Because fossil fuel fired power plants are among the largest and most concentrated producers of CO{sub 2} emissions, recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of such plants has been identified as one of the primary means for reducing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions. In this Phase II study, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) has investigated one promising near-term coal fired power plant configuration designed to capture CO{sub 2} from effluent gas streams for sequestration. Burning fossil fuels in mixtures of oxygen and recirculated flue gas (made principally of CO{sub 2}) essentially eliminates the presence of atmospheric nitrogen in the flue gas. The resulting flue gas is comprised primarily of CO{sub 2}, along with some moisture, nitrogen, oxygen, and trace gases like SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Oxygen firing in utility scale Pulverized Coal (PC) fired boilers has been shown to be a more economical method for CO{sub 2} capture than amine scrubbing (Bozzuto, et al., 2001). Additionally, oxygen firing in Circulating Fluid Bed Boilers (CFB's) can be more economical than in PC or Stoker firing, because recirculated gas flow can be reduced significantly. Oxygen-fired PC and Stoker units require large quantities of recirculated flue gas to maintain acceptable furnace temperatures. Oxygen-fired CFB units, on the other hand, can accomplish this by additional cooling of recirculated solids. The reduced recirculated gas flow with CFB plants results in significant Boiler Island cost savings resulting from reduced component The overall objective of the Phase II workscope, which is the subject of this report, is to generate a refined technical and economic evaluation of the Oxygen fired CFB case (Case-2 from Phase I) utilizing the information learned from pilot-scale testing of this concept. The objective of the pilot-scale testing was to generate detailed technical data needed to establish advanced CFB design requirements and performance when firing coals and delayed petroleum coke in O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixtures. Firing rates in the pilot test facility ranged from 2.2 to 7.9 MM-Btu/hr. Pilot-scale testing was performed at ALSTOM's Multi-use Test Facility (MTF), located in Windsor, Connecticut.

  3. Turbine fuels from tar-sands bitumen and heavy oil. Part 2. Phase II. Laboratory sample production. Interim report, 1 October 1983-31 October 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talbot, A.F.; Elanchenny, V.; Schwedock, J.P.; Swesey, J.R.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The conversion of domestic tar-sands bitumens or heavy crude oils into aviation turbine fuels was studied in small scale equipment to demonstrate the process scheme consisting of hydrovisbreaking the bitumen or crude residuum follwed by catalytic hydrotreating or hydrocracking of the resultant naphtha or distillate fractions. Four different feedstocks were employed; two were bitumens (from Kentucky or Utah) and two were heavy crudes from California. Significant operating parameters were examined for each process step. Prototype naphtha and kerosene-type fuel samples compared well with JP-4 and JP-8 specifications, although fuels prepared from Utah bitumen (Sunnyside deposit) were deficient in freeze point. Initiation of Phase III, pilot-plant-scale evaluation of the process is recommended.

  4. A Phase II Study of Radiotherapy and Concurrent Paclitaxel Chemotherapy in Breast-Conserving Treatment for Node-Positive Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, William C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Kim, Janice [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Kim, Edward [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus, OH (United States); Silverman, Paula [Department of Medicine, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Overmoyer, Beth [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Cooper, Brenda W. [Department of Medicine, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Anthony, Sue [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Shenk, Robert; Leeming, Rosemary [Department of Surgery, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States); Hanks, Shelli H. [Arizona Institute of Urology, Tucson, AZ (United States); Lyons, Janice A., E-mail: janice.lyons@uhhospitals.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Administering adjuvant chemotherapy before breast radiotherapy decreases the risk of systemic recurrence, but delays in radiotherapy could yield higher local failure. We assessed the feasibility and efficacy of placing radiotherapy earlier in the breast-conserving treatment course for lymph node-positive breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Between June 2000 and December 2004, 44 women with node-positive Stage II and III breast cancer were entered into this trial. Breast-conserving surgery and 4 cycles of doxorubicin (60 mg/m{sup 2})/cyclophosphamide (600 mg/m{sup 2}) were followed by 4 cycles of paclitaxel (175 mg/m{sup 2}) delivered every 3 weeks. Radiotherapy was concurrent with the first 2 cycles of paclitaxel. The breast received 39.6 Gy in 22 fractions with a tumor bed boost of 14 Gy in 7 fractions. Regional lymphatics were included when indicated. Functional lung volume was assessed by use of the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide as a proxy. Breast cosmesis was evaluated with the Harvard criteria. Results: The 5-year actuarial rate of disease-free survival is 88%, and overall survival is 93%. There have been no local failures. Median follow-up is 75 months. No cases of radiation pneumonitis developed. There was no significant change in the diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide either immediately after radiotherapy (p = 0.51) or with extended follow-up (p = 0.63). Volume of irradiated breast tissue correlated with acute cosmesis, and acute Grade 3 skin toxicity developed in 2 patients. Late cosmesis was not adversely affected. Conclusions: Concurrent paclitaxel chemotherapy and radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery shortened total treatment time, provided excellent local control, and was well tolerated.

  5. Penile bulb dose and impotence after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer on RTOG 9406: Findings from a prospective, multi-institutional, phase I/II dose-escalation study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, Mack [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)]. E-mail: roach@radonc17.ucsf.edu; Winter, Kathryn [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Michalski, Jeffrey M. [Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Cox, James D. [3D Quality Assurance Center at Washington University St. Louis, MO (United States); Purdy, James A. [University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Bosch, Walter [University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Lin Xiao [University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Shipley, William S. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston MA (United States)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To assess the relationship between the dose to the bulb of the penis and the risk of impotence in men treated on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 9406. Methods and materials: Men enrolled on a Phase I/II dose-escalation study, RTOG 9406, who were reported to be potent at entry and evaluable (n = 158) were selected for inclusion. Follow-up evaluations were scheduled every 3, 4, and 6 months for the first, second, and the third through fifth years, then annually. At each follow-up visit an assessment of potency status was made. Penile structures were defined by a single observer blinded to the potency status, using Web-based, on-line software. The dosimetry for penile structures was calculated at the Quality Assurance Center at Washington University and provided to RTOG Statistical Headquarters to determine whether there was a relationship between dose and impotence. Results: Patients whose median penile dose was {>=}52.5 Gy had a greater risk of impotence compared with those receiving <52.5 Gy (p = 0.039). In a multivariate analysis neither age, the dose to the prostate, nor the use of hormonal therapy correlated with the risk of impotence. Conclusions: Dose to the bulb of the penis seems to be associated with the risk of radiation-induced impotence.

  6. Photosystem II

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    James Barber

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

  7. Thermodynamics of Blue Phases In Electric Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Henrich; D. Marenduzzo; K. Stratford; M. E. Cates

    2010-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present extensive numerical studies to determine the phase diagrams of cubic and hexagonal blue phases in an electric field. We confirm the earlier prediction that hexagonal phases, both 2 and 3 dimensional, are stabilized by a field, but we significantly refine the phase boundaries, which were previously estimated by means of a semi-analytical approximation. In particular, our simulations show that the blue phase I -- blue phase II transition at fixed chirality is largely unaffected by electric field, as observed experimentally.

  8. Confined Cubic Blue Phases under Shear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Henrich; K. Stratford; D. Marenduzzo; P. V. Coveney; M. E. Cates

    2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the behaviour of confined cubic blue phases under shear flow via lattice Boltzmann simulations. We focus on the two experimentally observed phases, blue phase I and blue phase II. The disinclination network of blue phase II continuously breaks and reforms under shear, leading to an oscillatory stress response in time. The oscillations are only regular for very thin samples. For thicker samples, the shear leads to a "stick-slip" motion of part of the network along the vorticity direction. Blue phase I responds very differently: its defect network undergoes seemingly chaotic rearrangements under shear, irrespective of system size.

  9. Thin Wall Cast Iron: Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doru M. Stefanescu

    2005-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of thin-wall technology allows the designers of energy consuming equipment to select the most appropriate material based on cost/material properties considerations, and not solely on density. The technology developed in this research project will permit the designers working for the automotive industry to make a better informed choice between competing materials and thin wall cast iron, thus decreasing the overall cost of the automobile.

  10. Tercero Phase II Segundo Services Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    : energy efficiencies, use of renewable resources, reduction of energy use, use of recycled and recyclable sustainability into departmental business practices and long term planning. · Model sustainable practices and strives to be a model program for the integration of sustainable practices. We are committed to developing

  11. STAGING OF FUEL CELLS - PHASE II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Per Onnerud; Suresh Sriramulu

    2002-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    TIAX has executed a laboratory-based development program aiming at the improvement of stationary fuel cell systems. The two-year long development program resulted in an improved understanding of staged fuel cells and inorganic proton conductors through evaluation of results from a number of laboratory tasks: (1) Development of a fuel cell modeling tool--Multi-scale model was developed, capable of analyzing the effects of materials and operating conditions; and this model allowed studying various ''what-if'' conditions for hypothetically staged fuel cells; (2) Study of new high temperature proton conductor--TIAX discovery of a new class of sulfonated inorganics capable of conducting protons when exposed to water; and study involved synthesis and conductivity measurements of novel compounds up to 140 C; (3) Electrochemical fuel cell measurements--the feasibility of staged fuel cells was tested in TIAX's fuel cell laboratories experimental design was based on results from modeling.

  12. IMiniature Integrated Payload Suites 2010 Phase II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abstract The PowerCube is a 1U CubeSat module that provides integrated propulsion, power, and precision with magnetic torque coils, enables sun-tracking of the solar panel, vectoring of the thruster, and precision/s of delta-V per 90 minute orbit for a 3U CubeSat. Compared to other CubeSat propulsion technologies

  13. IPrognosis of Aircraft Anomalies 2010 Phase II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Algorithms Using High Performance Computing Hardware Optimal Synthesis, Inc. Technical Abstract NASA roles in NASA's ATM research, by parallel implementation on emerging high performance computing (HPC

  14. Multiyear Program Plan Template - Phase II Guidance

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement of the NationalPennsylvaniaTemperatureMultipurposeMultiyear

  15. KODE Novus Phase II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii |Island, Florida: EnergyKDOTII Jump to:

  16. Welcome to the Phase II Hopper System!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1DOETHEWeekly Reports 2014CCSTA BLE OFWelcome

  17. Rheology of Cubic Blue Phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver Henrich; Kevin Stratford; Peter V. Coveney; Michael E. Cates; Davide Marenduzzo

    2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the behaviour of cubic blue phases under shear flow via lattice Boltzmann simulations. We focus on the two experimentally observed phases, Blue Phase I (BPI) and Blue Phase II (BPII). The disclination network of Blue Phase II continuously breaks and reforms under steady shear, leading to an oscillatory stress response in time. For larger shear rates, the structure breaks up into a Grandjean texture with a cholesteric helix lying along the flow gradient direction. Blue Phase I leads to a very different response. Here, oscillations are only possible for intermediate shear rates -- very slow flow causes a transition of the initially ordered structure into an amorphous network with an apparent yield stress. Larger shear rates lead to another amorphous state with different structure of the defect network. For even larger flow rates the same break-up into a Grandjean texture as for Blue Phase II is observed. At the highest imposed flow rates both cubic blue phases adopt a flow-aligned nematic state. Our results provide the first theoretical investigation of sheared blue phases in large systems, and are relevant to understanding the bulk rheology of these materials.

  18. Electronic Structure of Nickel(II) and Zinc(II) Borohydrides from Spectroscopic Measurements and Computational Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    Electronic Structure of Nickel(II) and Zinc(II) Borohydrides from Spectroscopic Measurements materials for solid phase hydrogen storage. In some cases, nickel and other transition metals can play a role in the catalytic decomposition of these solid phase hydrides.6 Nickel exhibits rich and varied

  19. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plan (Phase II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Joe Benson; David Hilton; David Cate; Lewis Brown

    2006-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research efforts for Phase II of the project were drilling an infill well strategically located in Section 13, T. 10 N., R. 2 W., of the Womack Hill Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, and obtaining fresh core from the upper Smackover reservoir to test the feasibility of implementing an immobilized enzyme technology project in this field. The Turner Land and Timber Company 13-10 No. 1 well was successfully drilled and tested at a daily rate of 132 barrels of oil in Section 13. The well has produced 27,720 barrels of oil, and is currently producing at a rate of 60 barrels of oil per day. The 13-10 well confirmed the presence of 175,000 barrels of attic (undrained) oil in Section 13. As predicted from reservoir characterization, modeling and simulation, the top of the Smackover reservoir in the 13-10 well is structurally high to the tops of the Smackover in offsetting wells, and the 13-10 well has significantly more net pay than the offsetting wells. The drilling and testing of the 13-10 well showed that the eastern part of the field continues to have a strong water drive and that there is no need to implement a pressure maintenance program in this part of the Womack Hill Field at this time. The success achieved in drilling and testing the 13-10 infill well demonstrates the benefits of building a geologic model to target areas in mature fields that have the potential to contain undrained oil, thus increasing the productivity and profitability of these fields. Microbial cultures that grew at 90 C and converted ethanol to acid were recovered from fresh cuttings from the Smackover carbonate reservoir in an analogous field to the Womack Hill Field in southwest Alabama; however, no viable microorganisms were found in the Smackover cores recovered from the drilling of the 13-10 well in Womack Hill Field. Further evaluation is, therefore, required prior to implementing an immobilized enzyme technology project in the Womack Hill Field.

  20. APOLLO II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, R.; Mondot, J.; Stankovski, Z.; Cossic, A.; Zmijarevic, I.

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    APOLLO II is a new, multigroup transport code under development at the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique. The code has a modular structure and uses sophisticated software for data structuralization, dynamic memory management, data storage, and user macrolanguage. This paper gives an overview of the main methods used in the code for (a) multidimensional collision probability calculations, (b) leakage calculations, and (c) homogenization procedures. Numerical examples are given to demonstrate the potential of the modular structure of the code and the novel multilevel flat-flux representation used in the calculation of the collision probabilities.

  1. II f

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNewCF INDUSTRIES,L? .-I I ,Is II:c* -W.f - f

  2. Ii1

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNewCF INDUSTRIES,L? .-I I ,Is II:c*1r' (-r

  3. State of Washington Department of Ecology criteria pollutants and toxic air polluntants phase II notice of construction for the Hanford Site spent nuclear fuel project--cold vacuum dryingfacility, Project W-441

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jansky, M.T., Westinghouse Hanford

    1997-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This Phase 11 notice of construction (NOC) provides the additional information committed to in the Phase I NOC submittal (DOE/RL-96- 55) regarding the air toxic and criteria pollutants that could potentially be emitted during operation of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). This Phase 11 NOC is being submitted to ensure the CVDF is in full compliance with Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-460-040(8), `Commencement of Construction`. The Phase I NOC (approved September 30, 1996) was defined as constructing the substructure, including but not limited to, pouring the concrete for the floor, and construction of the exterior. This Phase 11 NOC is being submitted for approval before installation and operation of the process equipment that will generate any potential air emissions at the CVDF, and installation and operation of the emissions control equipment.

  4. Artificial Photosynthesis II -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    II - Artificial Photosynthesis II - Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP) Simulations NathanLewis.png Schematic of a photoelectrochemical cell being designed to harness...

  5. SEARCHING FOR NEW HYPERCOMPACT H II REGIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez-Monge, Alvaro [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, INAF, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Pandian, Jagadheep D. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Dr., Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Kurtz, Stan, E-mail: asanchez@arcetri.astro.it [Centro de RadioastronomIa y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Hypercompact (HC) H II regions are, by nature, very young H II regions, associated with the earliest stages of massive star formation. They may represent the transition phase as an early B-type star grows into an O-type star. Unfortunately, so few HC H II regions are presently known that their general attributes and defining characteristics are based on small number statistics. A larger sample is needed for detailed studies and good statistics. Class II methanol masers are one of the best indicators of the early stages of massive star formation. Using the Arecibo Methanol Maser Galactic Plane Survey-the most sensitive blind survey for 6.7 GHz methanol masers to date-we selected 24 HC H II region candidates. We made Expanded Very Large Array continuum observations at 3.6 and 1.3 cm to search for HC H II regions associated with these masers. We identified six potential HC H II regions in our sample based on the presence of optically thick free-free emission. Overall, we find that 30% of the methanol masers have an associated centimeter radio continuum source (separation less than 0.1 pc), which is in general agreement with previous studies.

  6. Alpha phase precipitation from phase-separated beta phase in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alpha phase precipitation from phase-separated beta phase in a model Ti-Mo-Al alloy studied by direct coupling of transmission Alpha phase precipitation from phase-separated beta...

  7. Nucleation and propagation of phase mixtures in a bistable chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vainchtein, Anna; Van Vleck, Erik

    2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Nucleation and propagation of phase mixtures in a bistable chain Anna Vainchtein* Department of Mathematics, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260, USA Erik S. Van Vleck† Department of Mathematics, University of Kansas, Lawrence...-to-nearest-neighbor interactions. w h wc a phase I phase II FIG. 2. The biquadratic NN interaction potential Eq. #1;3#2; . ANNA VAINCHTEIN AND ERIK S. VAN VLECK PHYSICAL REVIEW B 79, 144123 #1;2009#2; 144123-2 wn = un ? un?1 #7; , is below #1;phase I#2; or above #1;phase II#2...

  8. Phase I (CATTS Theory), Phase II (Milne Point), Phase III (Hydrate Ridge)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study introduces a new type of â??cumulative seismic attributeâ? (CATT) which quantifies gas hydrates resources in Hydrate Ridge offshore Oregon. CATT is base on case-specific transforms that portray hydrated reservoir properties. In this study we used a theoretical rock physics model to correct measured velocity log data.

  9. Application of phase-retrieval x-ray diffractometry to carbon doped SiGe(C)/Si(C) superlattice structures. II. High resolution reconstruction using neural network root finder technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dilanian, Ruben A.; Nikulin, Andrei Y.; Darahanau, Aliaksandr V.; Hester, James; Zaumseil, Peter [School of Physics, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Private Mail Bag 1, Menai, New South Wales 2234 (Australia); IHP, Im Technologiepark 25, D-15236 Frankfurt (Germany)

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A neural network root finder approach for finding complex roots of high-degree complex polynomials was applied as part of the phase-retrieval x-ray diffractometry technique to reconstruct strain profiles in SiGe(C)/Si(C) superlattice structures. The high spatial resolution, 5 A, as a result of significantly higher degree of the complex polynomial, 1400 roots, allowed us to obtain more accurate results for the strain profile distribution in SiGe(C)/Si(C) superlattice structures. Previously, such high quality analysis was fundamentally impossible due to the limitations imposed by conventional numerical methods of finding complex polynomial roots.

  10. PEP-II injection timing and controls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharadwaj, V.; Browne, M.; Crane, M.; Gromme, T.; Himel, T.; Ross, M.; Stanek, M. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Ronan, M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hardware has been built and software written and incorporated in the existing SLC accelerator control system to control injection of beam pulses from the accelerator into the PEP-II storage rings currently under construction. Hardware includes a CAMAC module to delay the machine timing fiducial in order that a beam pulse extracted from a damping ring will be injected into a selected group of four 476 MHz buckets in a PEP-II ring. Further timing control is accomplished by shifting the phase of the bunches stored in the damping rings before extraction while leaving the phase of the PEP-II stored beam unchanged. The software which drives timing devices on a pulse-to-pulse basis relies on a dedicated communication link on which one scheduling microprocessor broadcasts a 128-bit message to all distributed control microprocessors at 360 Hz. PEP-II injection will be driven by the scheduling microprocessor according to lists specifying bucket numbers in arbitrary order, and according to scheduling constraints maximizing the useful beam delivered to the SLC collider currently in operation. These lists will be generated by a microprocessor monitoring the current stored per bucket in each of the PEP-II rings.

  11. Development of advanced blanket performance under irradiation and system integration through JUPITER-II project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abe, Katsunori; Kohyama, Akira; Tanaka, Satoru; Namba, C.; Terai, T.; Kunugi, T.; Muroga, Takeo; Hasegawa, Akira; Sagara, A.; Berk, S.; Zinkle, Steven J.; Sze, Dai Kai; Petti, D. A.; Abdou, Mohamed A.; Morley, Neil B.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Snead, Lance L.; Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes an outline of the activities of the JUPITER-II collaboration (japan-USA program of Irradiation/Integration test for Fusion Research-II), Which has bee carried out through six years (2001-2006) under Phase 4 of the collabroation implemented by Amendment 4 of Annex 1 to the DOE (United States Department of Energy)-MEXT (Ministry of Education ,Culture,Sports,Science and Technology) Cooperation. This program followed the RTNS-II Program (Phase1:1982-4986), the FFTF/MOTA Program (Phase2:1987-1994) and the JUPITER Program (Phase 3: 1995-2000) [1].

  12. Late Toxicity and Patient Self-Assessment of Breast Appearance/Satisfaction on RTOG 0319: A Phase 2 Trial of 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy-Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Following Lumpectomy for Stages I and II Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chafe, Susan, E-mail: susan.chafe@albertahealthservices.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute-University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Moughan, Jennifer [Department of Radiation Oncology, RTOG Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); McCormick, Beryl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wong, John [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Pass, Helen [Womens' Breast Center, Stamford Hospital, Stamford, Connecticut (United States); Rabinovitch, Rachel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Arthur, Douglas W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Petersen, Ivy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); White, Julia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Vicini, Frank A. [Michigan Healthcare Professionals/21st Century Oncology, Farmington Hills, Michigan (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Late toxicities and cosmetic analyses of patients treated with accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) on RTOG 0319 are presented. Methods and Materials: Patients with stages I to II breast cancer ?3 cm, negative margins, and ?3 positive nodes were eligible. Patients received three-dimensional conformal external beam radiation therapy (3D-CRT; 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions twice daily over 5 days). Toxicity and cosmesis were assessed by the patient (P), the radiation oncologist (RO), and the surgical oncologist (SO) at 3, 6, and 12 months from the completion of treatment and then annually. National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, was used to grade toxicity. Results: Fifty-two patients were evaluable. Median follow-up was 5.3 years (range, 1.7-6.4 years). Eighty-two percent of patients rated their cosmesis as good/excellent at 1 year, with rates of 64% at 3 years. At 3 years, 31 patients were satisfied with the treatment, 5 were not satisfied but would choose 3D-CRT again, and none would choose standard radiation therapy. The worst adverse event (AE) per patient reported as definitely, probably, or possibly related to radiation therapy was 36.5% grade 1, 50% grade 2, and 5.8% grade 3 events. Grade 3 AEs were all skin or musculoskeletal-related. Treatment-related factors were evaluated to potentially establish an association with observed toxicity. Surgical bed volume, target volume, the number of beams used, and the use of bolus were not associated with late cosmesis. Conclusions: Most patients enrolled in RTOG 0319 were satisfied with their treatment, and all would choose to have the 3D-CRT APBI again.

  13. POSSIBLE PHASE LOOP FOR THE GLOBAL DECOUPLING.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LUO, Y.; CAMERON, P.; DELLA PENNA, A.; JONES, R.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The two eigentunes Q{sub I} and Q{sub II}, two eigenmode amplitude ratios R{sub I} and R{sub II}, and two eignmode phase differences {Delta}{phi}{sub I} and {Delta}{phi}{sub II}, are defined as the coupling observables for the linear weak difference betatron coupling. Simulations were carried out to investigate their behaviors in global decoupling scans. It was found that the amplitude ratios R{sub I,II} are more sensitive than the tune split when the decoupling scan is approaching the global uncoupled point, and that the phase differences {Delta}{phi}{sub I,II} tell the right global decoupling direction, the right strength combination of the skew quadrupoles or families. The analytical solution to these six coupling observables is calculated through both the strict matrix approach and the perturbation Hamiltonian approach. The constant phase differences in the right decoupling direction hint a possible global decoupling phase loop. Dedicated beam experiments were carried out at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The preliminary results from the beam experiments are presented. These six parameters can be used for the global decoupling in feed-back mode, especially on the non-stop energy ramp.

  14. ACRA-II

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003089IBMPC00 ACRA-II: Kernel Integration Code System for Estimation of Radiation Doses Caused by a Hypothetical Reactor Accident   

  15. CSC6870 Computer Graphics II CSC6870 Computer Graphics II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Jing

    CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Surfaces CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Surfaces · Plane · Quadratic. CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Plane and Intersection CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Plane Equations · General plane equation ax+by+cz+d=0 · Normal of the plane n=[a, b, c] CSC6870 Computer Graphics II

  16. The Role of tantalum in TiC-WC-TaC-Co sintered carbides. II. influence of tantalum content on the structure and properties of TiC-WC-TaC-Co three-phase sintered carbides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheburaeva, R.F.; Chaporova, I.N.

    1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is devoted to a study of the influence of tantalum on the structure and properties of three-phase alloys. The investigations were made with a constant weight ratio of Ti:WC = 35:65% and an unchanged carbon content. The alloys were prepared by mixing of the (T, W, Ta)C carbides with cobalt and tungsten carbide. The pressed specimens were given a preliminary sinter in hydrogen at 923-973 K and a final one in a vacuum furnace at 1773 K. The microstructure, density, and bend and compressive strengths at room and increased temperatures, coeffiecients of cutting life and strength (in comparison with a standard taken as unity), and adhesion interaction were determined. The coefficient of cutting life was determined by transverse machining of steel. The coefficient of strength was determined by the method of breaking feed in milling of 50 steel with a single-tooth cutter. The adhesion interaction of TiC-WC-TaC-Co alloys with the material being machined (50 steel) was determined in vacuum (which eliminated the additional influence of oxidation of the alloy) at 873 K with a load of 1000N. Tantalum carbide additions have a favorable influence on the physicomechanical and service properties of TiC-WC-Co alloys. Their bend strength at room and increased temperatures increases and there is an increase in the total deformation and the work for deformation at increased temperatures, a reduction in oxidation and adhesion interaction with the material being machined, and a significant increase in wear resistance in cutting. Graphs and tables are included.

  17. Phase I Independent Investigation of Paducah Gaseous Diffusion...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    covers the period from 1990 to the present. Phase II, which will begin in October 1999, will evaluate ES&H performance and concerns about Plant operations prior to 1990....

  18. Flexoelectric switching in cholesteric blue phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Tiribocchi; M. E. Cates; G. Gonnella; D. Marenduzzo; E. Orlandini

    2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We present computer simulations of the response of a flexoelectric blue phase network, either in bulk or under confinement, to an applied field. We find a transition in the bulk between the blue phase I disclination network and a parallel array of disclinations along the direction of the applied field. Upon switching off the field, the system is unable to reconstruct the original blue phase but gets stuck in a metastable phase. Blue phase II is comparatively much less affected by the field. In confined samples, the anchoring at the walls and the geometry of the device lead to the stabilisation of further structures, including field-aligned disclination loops, splayed nematic patterns, and yet more metastable states. Our results are relevant to the understanding of the switching dynamics for a class of new, "superstable", blue phases which are composed of bimesogenic liquid crystals, as these materials combine anomalously large flexoelectric coefficients, and low or near-zero dielectric anisotropy.

  19. Jan Hendrik Bruinier II Anna von Pippich Fabrizio Andreatta -Milan, Italy II Massimo Bertolini -Essen, Germany II Siegfried Bcherer -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller-Dintelmann, Robert

    Massimo Bertolini - Essen, Germany II Siegfried Böcherer - Mannheim, Germany II Thanasis Bouganis - Durham II Jay Jorgenson - New York, USA II Winfried Kohnen - Heidelberg, Germany II Jürg Kramer - Berlin, Germany II Siddarth Sankaran - Bonn, Germany II Maryna Viazovska - Bonn, Germany II Tonghai Yang - Madison

  20. PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) PARS II More Documents & Publications PARS II TRAINING PARS II TRAINING PARS II 104 Contractor Monthly...

  1. Gravitationally Induced Neutrino-Oscillation Phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. V. Ahluwalia; C. Burgard

    2004-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In this essay, we introduce a new effect of gravitationally induced quantum mechanical phases in neutrino oscillations. These phases arise from an hitherto unexplored interplay of gravitation and the principle of the linear superposition of quantum mechanics. In the neighborhood of a 1.4 solar-mass neutron star, gravitationally induced quantum mechanical phases are roughly 20% of their kinematical counterparts. When this information is coupled with the mass square differences implied by the existing neutrino-oscillation data we find that the new effect may have profound consequences for type-II supernova evolution.

  2. Incommensurate composite crystal structure of scandium-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujihisa, Hiroshi; Gotoh, Yoshito; Yamawaki, Hiroshi; Sakashita, Mami; Takeya, Satoshi; Honda, Kazumasa [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST Tsukuba Central 5, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan); Akahama, Yuichi; Kawamura, Haruki [Graduate School of Material Science, University of Hyogo, 3-2-1 Koto, Kamigohri, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan)

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The long-unknown crystal structure of the high pressure phase scandium-II was solved by powder x-ray diffraction and was found to have tetragonal host channels along the c axis and guest chains that are incommensurate with the host, as well as the high pressure phases of Ba, Sr, Bi, and Sb. The pressure dependences of the lattice constants, the incommensurability, the atomic distances, and the atomic volume were investigated.

  3. Computer Graphics II CSC6870 Computer Graphics II CSC6870 Computer Graphics II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Jing

    1 Computer Graphics II CSC6870 Computer Graphics II CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Course Information://www.cs.wayne.edu/~jinghua/6870/csc6870.htm) CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Textbooks · REQUIRED TEXTBOOK: Interactive Computer Graphics: A Top-Down Approach with Shader-Based OpenGL (6th Edition) Edward Angel, Dave Shreiner ISBN-10

  4. 48C Phase II Advanced Energy Manufacturing Tax Credit Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    technological innovation, speed to project completion, and potential for reducing air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. DOE also considered additional factors such as...

  5. NREL Combined Experimental Final Report--Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butterfield, C. P.; Musial, W. P.; Scott, G. N.; Simms, D. A.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Predicting peak power and loads on a fixed-pitch wind turbine. How does the performance of the airfoil in the wind tunnel differ from the performance of an operating horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT)?

  6. 2009 Phase II Proposal A3.01-8549

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the use of smart-material actuated bistable tabs for rotor blade tracking, with a newer integral actuation. It is also crucial that the overall system performance be robust to wind and operational uncertainties of a helicopter's rotor blades, rotor hub components, or both. The proposed work addresses this deficiency through

  7. Phase II Smart Grid Data Access Funding Opportunity Winner Announced...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    adopt its innovative program designed to get customers more involved in their own energy consumption. Additionally, SDG&E has committed to providing 2.33 million in funding...

  8. Seismic fragility of nuclear power plant components (Phase II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandyopadhyay, K.K.; Hofmayer, C.H.; Kassir, M.K.; Pepper, S.E. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA))

    1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Component Fragility Program which was initiated in FY 1985, three additional equipment classes have been evaluated. This report contains the fragility results and discussions on these equipment classes which are switchgear, I and C panels and relays. Both low and medium voltage switchgear assemblies have been considered and a separate fragility estimate for each type is provided. Test data on cabinets from the nuclear instrumentation/neutron monitoring system, plant/process protection system, solid state protective system and engineered safeguards test system comprise the BNL data base for I and C panels (NSSS). Fragility levels have been determined for various failure modes of switchgear and I C panels, and the deterministic results are presented in terms of test response spectra. In addition, the test data have been evaluated for estimating the respective probabilistic fragility levels which are expressed in terms of a median value, an uncertainty coefficient, a randomness coefficient and an HCLPF value. Due to a wide variation of relay design and the fragility level, a generic fragility level cannot be established for relays. 7 refs., 13 figs., 12 tabs.

  9. Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Rutledge

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southwest Regional Partnership (SWP) on Carbon Sequestration designed and deployed a medium-scale field pilot test of geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in the Aneth oil field. Greater Aneth oil field, Utah's largest oil producer, was discovered in 1956 and has produced over 455 million barrels of oil (72 million m3). Located in the Paradox Basin of southeastern Utah, Greater Aneth is a stratigraphic trap producing from the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation. Because it represents an archetype oil field of the western U.S., Greater Aneth was selected as one of three geologic pilots to demonstrate combined enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and CO2 sequestration under the auspices of the SWP on Carbon Sequestration, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy. The pilot demonstration focuced on the western portion of the Aneth Unit as this area of the field was converted from waterflood production to CO2 EOR starting in late 2007. The Aneth Unit is in the northwestern part of the field and has produced 149 million barrels (24 million m3) of the estimated 450 million barrels (71.5 million m3) of the original oil in place - a 33% recovery rate. The large amount of remaining oil makes the Aneth Unit ideal to demonstrate both CO2 storage capacity and EOR by CO2 flooding. This report summarizes the geologic characterization research, the various field monitoring tests, and the development of a geologic model and numerical simulations conducted for the Aneth demonstration project. The Utah Geological Survey (UGS), with contributions from other Partners, evaluated how the surface and subsurface geology of the Aneth Unit demonstration site will affect sequestration operations and engineering strategies. The UGS-research for the project are summarized in Chapters 1 through 7, and includes (1) mapping the surface geology including stratigraphy, faulting, fractures, and deformation bands, (2) describing the local Jurassic and Cretaceous stratigraphy, (3) mapping the Desert Creek zone reservoir, Gothic seal, and overlying aquifers, (4) characterizing the depositional environments and diagenetic events that produced significant reservoir heterogeneity, (5) describing the geochemical, petrographic, and geomechanical properties of the seal to determine the CO2 or hydrocarbon column it could support, and (6) evaluating the production history to compare primary production from vertical and horizontal wells, and the effects of waterflood and wateralternating- gas flood programs. The field monitoring demonstrations were conducted by various Partners including New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, University of Utah, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan, Los Alamos National Laboratory and Cambridge Geosciences. The monitoring tests are summarized in Chapters 8 through 12, and includes (1) interwell tracer studies during water- and CO2-flood operations to characterize tracer behavoirs in anticipation of CO2-sequestration applications, (2) CO2 soil flux monitoring to measure background levels and variance and assess the sensitivity levels for CO2 surface monitoring, (3) testing the continuous monitoring of self potential as a means to detect pressure anomalies and electrochemical reaction due to CO2 injection, (4) conducting time-lapse vertical seismic profiling to image change near a CO2 injection well, and (5) monitoring microseismicity using a downhole string of seismic receivers to detect fracture slip and deformation associated with stress changes. Finally, the geologic modeling and numerical simulation study was conducted by researcher at the University of Utah. Chapter 13 summarizes their efforts which focused on developing a site-specific geologic model for Aneth to better understand and design CO2 storage specifically tailored to oil reservoirs.

  10. Regional discrimination studies: Phase II. Scientific report No. 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonner, J.; Hayward, C.; Herrin, E.; Sorrell, G.G.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report consists of four parts and an appendix. Part (1) `Seismic Acoustic Studies at TXAR`, is by Eugene Herrin and C.G. Sorrells. Part (2) `Inversion of Surface Waves for Shallow Velocity Structure in the Fort Worth Basin,` is by Jessie Bonner. Part (3) `A Preliminary Investigation of the Use of Acoustic and Seismic Acoustic Observations to Identify Vented Explosive Seismic Sources`, is by C.G. Sorrells and Eugene Herrin. Part (4) consists of the Acknowledgments called for by the contract. Appendix 1 Preliminary Report` Characteristics of the Broadband Acoustic Sensors Installed in the SMU Lajitas CSE Array, is by Chris Hayward.

  11. PHASE I AND II PARKING STRUCTURE CONDITION SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Hawaii at Manoa Facilities Planning and Management Office Project No. UHM 001A-006-11 FINAL to provide the University a means of planning for and budgeting to perform the recommended repairs PROJECT NO. UHM 001A-006-11 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 0.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

  12. OVAI Contract Report #2012-43 PHASE II ARCHAEOLOGICAL EVALUATION...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of these artifacts are either container glass (48.5%) or ceramics (46.7%). Most of the balance consists of items associated with canning jars, such as milk glass lid liners and...

  13. Granular-bed-filter development program, Phase II. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guillory, J.; Cooper, J.; Ferguson, J.; Goldbach, G.; Placer, F.

    1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high-temperature moving bed granular filter (GBF) program at Combustion Power Company (CPC) commenced in 1977. Its purpose was to investigate, for the Department of Energy, the filtration performance of the GBF for application to coal-fired PFBC turbine systems. The GBF test system was successfully operated on 1500/sup 0/F to 1600/sup 0/F gases produced from an atmospheric pressure coal-fired fluidized bed combustor. Overall collection efficiencies above 99% and submicron collection efficiencies above 96% were consistently demonstrated in over 1500 hours of high-temperature testing. Alkali content of the hot gases was also measured to evaluate aluminosilicate additives for controlling alkali emissions. Operational and performance stability under upset conditions (ten times normal inlet loading and 125% of design gas flowrate) was also demonstrated experimentally. A computer-based GBF performance model was developed. It predicts overall particle capture within +- 5%. Gas flow streamlines and isobars are computer generated from theoretical principles and particle capture is based on the most recent empirical models. The effects of elevated pressure on efficiency and filter pressure drop are included in the model. A modular approach was adopted for GBF scale-up to commercial size systems using elements of the same size tested in this program. Elements can be readily packaged into 30,000 acfm modules at a projected equipment cost of approximately $27 per acfm.

  14. 2009 Phase II Proposal A2.06-8042

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Materials Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. Materials and Structures for Future Aircraft #12; does not exist for reentry into other planetary atmospheres. This is a severe limitation for future

  15. Phase II -- Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications (PVUSA). Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications (PVUSA) is a national public-private partnership that is assessing and demonstrating the viability of utility-scale (US) photovoltaic (PV) electric generation systems and recent developments in PV module technology. This report updates the project`s progress, reviews the status and performance of the various PV installations during 1994, summarizes key accomplishments and conclusions for the year, and outlines future work. The PVUSA project has five objectives. These are designed to narrow the gap between a large utility industry that is unfamiliar with PV and a small PV industry that is aware of a potentially large utility market but unfamiliar with how to meet its requirements. The objectives are: Evaluate the performance, reliability, and cost of promising PV modules and balance-of-system (BOS) components side by side at a single location; Assess PV system operation and maintenance in a utility setting; Compare US utilities hands-on experience in designing, procuring, and operating PV systems; and, Document and disseminate knowledge gained from the project.

  16. Physical properties of Kraft Black Liquor. Interim report, Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fricke, A.L.

    1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Objectives are to determine the rheological, thermal, and surface properties of Kraft Black Liquors, and to relate these properties to the chemical composition and to pulping conditions. A four-variable, multi-level pulping experiment is being conducted. Pulping results are reported. Complete analyses of the liquors have been done. Thermal analyses have been done. DSC was employed to determine heat capacities of black liquors and lignins. Rheological (viscosity) studies are being conducted. Density and thermal expansion have been studied for seven liquors. Energy savings through more efficient recovery systems are appreciable.

  17. OVAI Contract Report #2012-43 PHASE II ARCHAEOLOGICAL EVALUATION...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    located near the northeastern edge of PORTS, just upstream from the Sludge Lagoon (X-611B) (Figures 1.1 and 8.1). This farmstead sits on a narrow toe- slope overlooking a small...

  18. Low Cost Heliostat Development Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kusek, Stephen M.

    2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The heliostat field in a central receiver plant makes up roughly one half of the total plant cost. As such, cost reductions for the installed heliostat price greatly impact the overall plant cost and hence the plant’s Levelized Cost of Energy. The general trend in heliostat size over the past decades has been to make them larger. One part of our thesis has been that larger and larger heliostats may drive the LCOE up instead of down due to the very nature of the precise aiming and wind-load requirements for typical heliostats. In other words, it requires more and more structure to precisely aim the sunlight at the receiver as one increases heliostat mirror area and that it becomes counter-productive, cost-wise, at some point.

  19. Neutron Compound Refractive Prisms - DOE SBIR Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Jay Theodore Cremer, Jr

    2011-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the research led to a pulsed electromagnetic periodic magnetic field array (PMF), which coupled with a pair of collimation slits, and a mechanical chopper slit, were able to deflect spin-up neutrons to a band of line-fused neutrons a focal plane heights that correspond to the time-varying magnetic field amplitude. The electromagnetic field PMF produced 5.4 pulses per minute in which each pulse was 50 msec in duration with a full width half maximum (FWHM) of 7.5 msec. The calculated 7.7 mm vertical height of the band of focused spin-up neutrons corresponded closely to the measured 7.5 mm height of the center line of the imaged band of neutrons. The band of deflected spin-up neutrons was 5 mm in vertical width and the bottom of the band was 5 mm above the surface of the PMF pole. The limited exposure time of 3 hours and the smaller 0.78 T magnetic field allowed focused and near focused neutrons of 1.8 ���� to 2.6 ���� neutrons, which were in the tails of the McClellan Nuclear Radiation Center Bay 4 Maxwell Boltzmann distribution of neutrons with peak flux at 1.1-1.2 ����. The electromagnetic PMF was expected to produces a 2.0 T peak magnetic field amplitude, which would be operational at a higher duty factor, rather than the as built 7.5 msec FWHM with pulse repetition frequency of 5.4 pulses per minute. The fabricated pulsed electromagnetic PMF with chopper is expected to perform well on a cold, very cold or ultra cold beam line as a spectrometer or monochromator source of spin-up polarized neutron. In fact there may be a possible use of the PMF to do ultra-cold neutron trapping, see paper by A. I. Frank1, V. G. Nosov, Quantum Effects in a One-Dimensional Magnetic Gravitational Trap for Ultracold Neutrons, JETP Letters, Vol. 79, No. 7, 2004, pp. 313�¢����315. The next step is to find a cold or very cold neutron facility, where further testing or use of the pulsed magnetic field PMF can be pursued.

  20. SLUDGE BATCH 4 SIMULANT FLOWSHEET STUDIES: PHASE II RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, M; David Best, D

    2006-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will transition from Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) processing to Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) processing in early fiscal year 2007. Tests were conducted using non-radioactive simulants of the expected SB4 composition to determine the impact of varying the acid stoichiometry during the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) process. The work was conducted to meet the Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW/DWPF/TTR-2004-0031 and followed the guidelines of a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TT&QAP). The flowsheet studies are performed to evaluate the potential chemical processing issues, hydrogen generation rates, and process slurry rheological properties as a function of acid stoichiometry. Initial SB4 flowsheet studies were conducted to guide decisions during the sludge batch preparation process. These studies were conducted with the estimated SB4 composition at the time of the study. The composition has changed slightly since these studies were completed due to changes in the sludges blended to prepare SB4 and the estimated SB3 heel mass. The following TTR requirements were addressed in this testing: (1) Hydrogen and nitrous oxide generation rates as a function of acid stoichiometry; (2) Acid quantities and processing times required for mercury removal; (3) Acid quantities and processing times required for nitrite destruction; and (4) Impact of SB4 composition (in particular, oxalate, manganese, nickel, mercury, and aluminum) on DWPF processing (i.e. acid addition strategy, foaming, hydrogen generation, REDOX control, rheology, etc.).

  1. applications phase ii: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of fiducial and stability cuts was 225 kgxdays. A background population of radon progeny events was observed in this run, arising from radon emission in the gas...

  2. avt phase ii: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are performed and compared to a reference case. These modifications concern the size distribution, i.e. the number of sections, and physical processes, i.e. coagulation,...

  3. asia phase ii: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are performed and compared to a reference case. These modifications concern the size distribution, i.e. the number of sections, and physical processes, i.e. coagulation,...

  4. Final Report: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Technology Phase II: Animas

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 NoEuropeStrat.pdfInactive Jump to: navigation,Valley, New Mexico

  5. Phase II Independent Investigation of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from the fluorination ash and cylinder heels for classified uses. In response to a demand for technetium for use at Oak Ridge, a program to recover technetium from the cylinder...

  6. Final Report Phase II: Performance Evaluation of Permeable Reactive

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers New Training on Energy6 Federalof EnergyThorium,8,2011Barriers and

  7. Phase II Smart Grid Data Access Funding Opportunity Winner Announced |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005UNS Electric, Inc. toEnergy July 1,DOEFull|AuditPeter W.Department of

  8. Victory Gardens Phase IV Wind Farm II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global EnergyUtility Rate HomeVela Jump to:IsourceSchoolI Jump

  9. DOE Issues WIPP Radiological Release Phase II Investigation Report |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube| Department of Energy81st Lessons LearnedArgonne NationalReserve |Department

  10. Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompanyPCNInformation USPerseus| Open EnergyU.S. DOEII -

  11. Multiyear Program Plan Template - Phase II Guidance | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyGlossary ofHomeJC3Minh Le About UsMultinationalMultiyear

  12. Solano Wind Project- phase II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |RippeyInformationSoda Springs,SolaicxSolanoWind

  13. DOE Issues WIPP Radiological Release Phase II Investigation Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OF CALCIUMCOST MANAGEMENT REPORT Page8Department4, 201416,

  14. Moulton Chandler Hills Wind Farm Phase II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole IncMinutemanVistaZephyr) JumpMorroMoulton Chandler Hills

  15. Biglow Canyon Phase II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher Homes JumpMaintenance |BigBig Windy (GreatBiglow

  16. Sweetwater Phase II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <Maintained By FaultSunpodsSweetwater 4a Jump to: navigation,

  17. Top Crop Wind Farm (Phase II) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThePty LtdOpenHabitatand CalculatorFarm

  18. Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaign, Phase II

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Radiation Protection Regulations: The FederalRadiative Effects

  19. Caprock Wind Ranch phase II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:Power LPInformation 8thCalwind IICaney RiverSiemens) Wind

  20. Condon Wind Project phase II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png ElColumbia,2005) |Use

  1. TECHNICAL EVALUATION REPORT TUBA CITY FINAL PHASE I GROUND-WATER COMPLIANCE ACTION PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    remediation at the site, and is expected to last approximately 3 years. Phase I includes installation of additional recovery wells and Phase II will include expansion of remediation capacity and monitoring to ensure the aquifer restoration standards are met. Phases I and II of ground-water remediation are expected to last approximately 12 years. DESCRIPTION OF THE REQUEST: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has requested concurrence from the U.S. Nuclear

  2. Towards a Cosmological Hubble Diagram for Type II-PSupernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nugent, Peter; Sullivan, Mark; Ellis, Richard; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Leonard, Douglas C.; Howell, D. Andrew; Astier, Pierre; Carlberg, RaymondG.; Conley, Alex; Fabbro, Sebastien; Fouchez, Dominique; Neill, James D.; Pain, Reynald; Perrett, Kathy; Pritchet, Chris J; Regnault, Nicolas

    2006-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first high-redshift Hubble diagram for Type II-P supernovae (SNe II-P) based upon five events at redshift upto z {approx}0.3. This diagram was constructed using photometry from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Supernova Legacy Survey and absorption line spectroscopy from the Keck observatory. The method used to measure distances to these supernovae is based on recent work by Hamuy&Pinto (2002) and exploits a correlation between the absolute brightness of SNeII-P and the expansion velocities derived from the minimum of the Fe II 516.9 nm P-Cygni feature observed during the plateau phases. We present three refinements to this method which significantly improve the practicality of measuring the distances of SNe II-P at cosmologically interesting redshifts. These are an extinction correction measurement based on the V-I colors at day 50, across-correlation measurement for the expansion velocity and the ability to extrapolate such velocities accurately over almost the entire plateau phase. We apply this revised method to our dataset of high-redshift SNe II-P and find that the resulting Hubble diagram has a scatter of only 0.26 magnitudes, thus demonstrating the feasibility of measuring the expansion history, with present facilities, using a method independent of that based upon supernovae of Type Ia.

  3. Smog Check II Evaluation Part II: Overview of Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    Smog Check II Evaluation Part II: Overview of Vehicle Emissions . . . . . . . . . . . . Prepared in Later Sections ____________________ 1 3. Older Vehicles Have Higher Emissions on Average _____________ 3 4. The Vehicle Fleet Is Dominated by Newer Vehicles______________ 8 5. More Recent Vehicle Models

  4. Atmospheric Dynamics II Instructor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AT602 Atmospheric Dynamics II 2 credits Instructor: David W. J. Thompson davet: An Introduction to Dynamic Meteorology, 5th Edition, Academic Press (recommended) · Marshall, J., and Plumb, R. A., 2008: Atmosphere, Ocean, and Climate Dynamics: An Introductory Text, Academic Press. · Vallis, G. K

  5. LCLS-II Undulator Tolerance Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuhn, H.-D.; /SLAC; Marks, S.; /LBL, Berkeley; Wu, J.; /SLAC

    2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is building a new FEL user facility, LCLS-II, as a major upgrade to the Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The upgrade will include two new Free Electron Lasers (FELs), to generate soft (SXR) and hard x-ray (HXR) SASE FEL radiation, based on planar, variable gap hybrid undulators with two different undulator periods (SXU: 55 mm, HXU: 32 mm). An algebraic FEL tolerance analysis for the undulator lines, including tuning, alignment, and phase correction tolerances has been performed. The methods and results are presented in this paper.

  6. Kaman 40-kW wind system. Phase II. Fabrication and tests. Volume II. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howes, H; Perley, R

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A program is underway to design, fabricate and test a horizontal axis Wind Turbine Generator (WTG) capable of producing 40 kW electrical output power in a 20 mph wind. Results are presented of the program effort covering fabrication and testing of the Wing Turbine Generator designed earlier. A minimum of difficulties were experienced during fabrication and, after successful completion of Contractor tests through 20 mph winds, the WTG was shipped to Rocky Flats, assembled and operated there. The 40 kW WTG is presently undergoing extended tests at Rockwell's Rocky Flats test facility.

  7. GEOC Martial Taillefert Monday, April 08, 2013 74 Effect of ferrihydriteorganic matter coprecipitation on the Fe(II)catalyzed transformation of ferrihydrite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    coprecipitation on the Fe(II)catalyzed transformation of ferrihydrite Chunmei Chen, cmchen@udel.edu, Donald L in the natural environment. Aqueous Fe(II) has been shown to catalyze the transformation of ferrihydrite to more(II)induced transformation of ferrihydrite to secondary phases. Accordingly, we synthesized a series of 2line ferrihydrite

  8. Nuclear Concrete Materials Database Phase I Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Naus, Dan J [ORNL

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The FY 2011 accomplishments in Phase I development of the Nuclear Concrete Materials Database to support the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program are summarized. The database has been developed using the ORNL materials database infrastructure established for the Gen IV Materials Handbook to achieve cost reduction and development efficiency. In this Phase I development, the database has been successfully designed and constructed to manage documents in the Portable Document Format generated from the Structural Materials Handbook that contains nuclear concrete materials data and related information. The completion of the Phase I database has established a solid foundation for Phase II development, in which a digital database will be designed and constructed to manage nuclear concrete materials data in various digitized formats to facilitate electronic and mathematical processing for analysis, modeling, and design applications.

  9. Ribosomal Database Project II

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) provides ribosome related data and services to the scientific community, including online data analysis and aligned and annotated Bacterial small-subunit 16S rRNA sequences. As of March 2008, RDP Release 10 is available and currently (August 2009) contains 1,074,075 aligned 16S rRNA sequences. Data that can be downloaded include zipped GenBank and FASTA alignment files, a histogram (in Excel) of the number of RDP sequences spanning each base position, data in the Functional Gene Pipeline Repository, and various user submitted data. The RDP-II website also provides numerous analysis tools.[From the RDP-II home page at http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/index.jsp

  10. Magnetic properties of two-phase superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Di Grezia; S. Esposito; G. Salesi

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We have recently proposed a theoretical model for superconductors endowed with two distinct superconducting phases, described by two scalar order parameters which condensate at different critical temperatures. On analyzing the magnetic behavior of such systems, we have found some observable differences with respect to the case of ordinary Ginzburg-Landau superconductors. In particular, at low temperature the London penetration length is strongly reduced and the Ginzburg-Landau parameter k becomes a function of temperature. By contrast, in the temperature region between the two phase transitions k is constant and the system is a type-I or a type-II superconductor depending on the ratio between the critical temperatures.

  11. SRC-II process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmid, B.K.; Jackson, D.M.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extensive laboratory and pilot plant experimental work on the Solvent Refined Coal Process has led to the development of an improved version of the process known as SRC-II. This work has shown considerable promise and plans are being made to demonstrate the SRC-II process using commercial size equipment in a 6000 T/D plant to be located near Morgantown, West Virginia. On the basis of recent economic studies, the products (both liquid and gas) from a future large-scale commercial plant are expected to have an overall selling price of $4.00 to 5.00 per million Btu (first quarter 1980 basis). The major product of the primary process is distillate fuel oil of less than 0.3% sulfur for use largely as a non-polluting fuel for generating electrical power and steam, especially in the east where utilities and industry are presently using petroleum products. For the longer term, the major growth opportunity for SRC-II fuel oil in the generation of electric power will probably be through advanced combustion turbine units with heat recovery boilers (combined cycle units). The light liquid fractions (naphtha and middle distillate) produced by the SRC-II process can be upgraded to a high octane unleaded gasoline to supplement petroleum-derived supplies. Significant quantities of pipeline gas are also produced at a cost which should be competitive with SNG from direct coal gasification. Light hydrocarbons (ethane, propane) from the process may be effectively converted to ethylene in conventional cracking plants to offset ethylene demand from petroleum-derived naphtha and gas oil, both of which could otherwise be used for other refinery products. In addition, certain fraction of the fuel oil might also be used in medium speed diesel engines and automotive gas turbines.

  12. Part II - Managerial Competencies: Organizational Representation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    II - Managerial Competencies: Organizational Representation and Liaison Part II - Managerial Competencies: Organizational Representation and Liaison Form for the SES program...

  13. Some proposals about the vector and parallel implementations of STEM-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Touriño, Juan

    @usc.es Abstract STEM-II is an Eulerian air quality model which includes different pollutant emissions, transport-phase and aqueous- phase, and pollutants removal by dry and wet deposition, complete the main air pollution they are going to be applied in air pollution management. Specially, AQMs that consider all the physical

  14. Fusion Power Demonstrations I and II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doggett, J.N. (ed.)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report we present a summary of the first phase of the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. During this first phase, we investigated two configurations, performed detailed studies of major components, and identified and examined critical issues. In addition to these design specific studies, we also assembled a mirror-systems computer code to help optimize future device designs. The two configurations that we have studied are based on the MARS magnet configuration and are labeled FPD-I and FPD-II. The FPD-I configuration employs the same magnet set used in the FY83 FPD study, whereas the FPD-II magnets are a new, much smaller set chosen to help reduce the capital cost of the system. As part of the FPD study, we also identified and explored issues critical to the construction of an Engineering Test Reactor (ETR). These issues involve subsystems or components, which because of their cost or state of technology can have a significant impact on our ability to meet FPD's mission requirements on the assumed schedule. General Dynamics and Grumman Aerospace studied two of these systems, the high-field choke coil and the halo pump/direct converter, in great detail and their findings are presented in this report.

  15. Microprocessor-based monitoring and control project: Phase 2 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the activities of Phase II of the microprocessor-based monitoring and control project. The object of this multiphase project in the Electrical Systems Group of TVA's Division of Energy Demonstration and Technology (ED and T) is the development of microprocessor-based systems for special-purpose applications in monitoring, control, and protection of the power system. Phase II dealt with the hardware enhancements and software development to simulate the switching of the 46-kV capacitor banks at the Concord substation for voltage and VAR control.

  16. Evaluation of the computerized procedures Manual II (COPMA II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Converse, S.A. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a computerized procedure system, the Computerized Procedure Manual II (COPMA-II), on the performance and mental workload of licensed reactor operators. To evaluate COPMA-II, eight teams of two operators were trained to operate a scaled pressurized water reactor facility (SPWRF) with traditional paper procedures and with COPMA-II. Following training, each team operated the SPWRF under normal operating conditions with both paper procedures and COPMA-II. The teams then performed one of two accident scenarios with paper procedures, but performed the remaining accident scenario with COPMA-II. Performance measures and subjective estimates of mental workload were recorded for each performance trial. The most important finding of the study was that the operators committed only half as many errors during the accident scenarios with COPMA-II as they committed with paper procedures. However, time to initiate a procedure was fastest for paper procedures for accident scenario trials. For performance under normal operating conditions, there was no difference in time to initiate or to complete a procedure, or in the number of errors committed with paper procedures and with COPMA-II. There were no consistent differences in the mental workload ratings operators recorded for trials with paper procedures and COPMA-II.

  17. ARM - RHUBC II Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP :ProductsVaisala CL51Instruments Related Links RHUBC-II Home RHUBC Home

  18. Artificial Photosynthesis II -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumni AlumniFederal FacilityAprilAreAroundArthur P.I ArtificialII

  19. II.1 Itic

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNewCF INDUSTRIES,L? .-I I ,Is II:c* -W.f -

  20. ICFT- An Initial Closed-Loop Flow Test of the Fenton Hill Phase...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ICFT- An Initial Closed-Loop Flow Test of the Fenton Hill Phase II HDR Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: ICFT- An Initial...

  1. CrowdPhase: crowdsourcing the phase problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorda, Julien; Sawaya, Michael R. [Institute for Genomics and Proteomics, 611 Charles Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Yeates, Todd O., E-mail: yeates@mbi.ucla.edu [Institute for Genomics and Proteomics, 611 Charles Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Molecular Biology Institute, 611 Charles Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); University of California, 611 Charles Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The idea of attacking the phase problem by crowdsourcing is introduced. Using an interactive, multi-player, web-based system, participants work simultaneously to select phase sets that correspond to better electron-density maps in order to solve low-resolution phasing problems. The human mind innately excels at some complex tasks that are difficult to solve using computers alone. For complex problems amenable to parallelization, strategies can be developed to exploit human intelligence in a collective form: such approaches are sometimes referred to as ‘crowdsourcing’. Here, a first attempt at a crowdsourced approach for low-resolution ab initio phasing in macromolecular crystallography is proposed. A collaborative online game named CrowdPhase was designed, which relies on a human-powered genetic algorithm, where players control the selection mechanism during the evolutionary process. The algorithm starts from a population of ‘individuals’, each with a random genetic makeup, in this case a map prepared from a random set of phases, and tries to cause the population to evolve towards individuals with better phases based on Darwinian survival of the fittest. Players apply their pattern-recognition capabilities to evaluate the electron-density maps generated from these sets of phases and to select the fittest individuals. A user-friendly interface, a training stage and a competitive scoring system foster a network of well trained players who can guide the genetic algorithm towards better solutions from generation to generation via gameplay. CrowdPhase was applied to two synthetic low-resolution phasing puzzles and it was shown that players could successfully obtain phase sets in the 30° phase error range and corresponding molecular envelopes showing agreement with the low-resolution models. The successful preliminary studies suggest that with further development the crowdsourcing approach could fill a gap in current crystallographic methods by making it possible to extract meaningful information in cases where limited resolution might otherwise prevent initial phasing.

  2. Hypergeometric systems II: GKZ systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uli Walther

    2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Solutions of A-hypergemetric systems. Hypergeometric systems II: GKZ systems ... Power series ansatz: z = ?. ? k=0 aktk shows ak ? vj >0 vj ?1. ? l=0.

  3. Supernovae. Part II: The aftermath

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trimble, V

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    R. Viswanathan, 1980, As- Supernovae. Part II ExperimentalSmith, 1982, Astrophys. Supernovae. Chevalier, R. A. , andC. B. , 1974, Ed. , Supernovae and Supernova Rem- nants,

  4. Map-likelihood phasing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Bioscience Division, Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A map-likelihood function is described that can yield phase probabilities with very low model bias. The recently developed technique of maximum-likelihood density modification [Terwilliger (2000 ?), Acta Cryst. D56, 965–972] allows a calculation of phase probabilities based on the likelihood of the electron-density map to be carried out separately from the calculation of any prior phase probabilities. Here, it is shown that phase-probability distributions calculated from the map-likelihood function alone can be highly accurate and that they show minimal bias towards the phases used to initiate the calculation. Map-likelihood phase probabilities depend upon expected characteristics of the electron-density map, such as a defined solvent region and expected electron-density distributions within the solvent region and the region occupied by a macromolecule. In the simplest case, map-likelihood phase-probability distributions are largely based on the flatness of the solvent region. Though map-likelihood phases can be calculated without prior phase information, they are greatly enhanced by high-quality starting phases. This leads to the technique of prime-and-switch phasing for removing model bias. In prime-and-switch phasing, biased phases such as those from a model are used to prime or initiate map-likelihood phasing, then final phases are obtained from map-likelihood phasing alone. Map-likelihood phasing can be applied in cases with solvent content as low as 30%. Potential applications of map-likelihood phasing include unbiased phase calculation from molecular-replacement models, iterative model building, unbiased electron-density maps for cases where 2F{sub o} ? F{sub c} or ?{sub A}-weighted maps would currently be used, structure validation and ab initio phase determination from solvent masks, non-crystallographic symmetry or other knowledge about expected electron density.

  5. Abstract Presented at Synchrotron Environmental Science II (SES-II)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Abstract Presented at Synchrotron Environmental Science II (SES-II) Argonne National Laboratory - 6 an important environmental problem. As a result, the disposal of the dredged material removed from the Harbor in developing methods for the environmentally responsible handling of the approximately 3,000,000 m3 of dredged

  6. Continuous flow system for controlling phases separation near ? transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chorowski, M.; Poli?ski, J. [Wroc?aw University of Technology, Wybrze?e Wyspia?skiego 27,50-560 Wroc?aw (Poland); Kempi?ski, W.; Trybu?a, Z.; ?o?, Sz. [Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Smoluchowskiego 17,60-179 Pozna? (Poland); Cho?ast, K.; Kociemba, A. [Polish Oil and Gas Company, Odolanow, ul. Krotoszynska 148, 63-430 Odolanow (Poland)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    As demands on 3He are increasing and conventional 3He production through tritium decay is decreasing, alternative 3He production methods are becoming economically viable. One such possibility is to use entropy filters for extraction of the 3He isotope from natural gas. According to the phase diagram of the 3He, its solidification is impossible by only lowering of the temperature. Hence during the cooling process at stable pressure we can reach ?-point and pass to the special phase - He II. The total density of HeII is a sum of the two phases: normal the superfluid ones. It is possible to separate these two phases with an entropy filter - the barrier for the classically-behaving normal phase. This barrier can also be used to separate the two main isotopes of He: 4He and 3He, because at temperatures close to the 4He-?-point the 3He isotope is part of the normal phase. The paper presents continuous flow schemes of different separation methods of 3He from helium commodity coming from natural gas cryogenic processing. An overall thermodynamic efficiency of the 3He/4He separation process is presented. A simplified model of continuous flow HeI -HeII recuperative heat exchanger is given. Ceramic and carbon porous plugs have been tested in entropy filter applications.

  7. CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Geometric Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Jing

    CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Geometric Modeling CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Overview 3D Shape, subdivision surfaces, implicit surfaces, particles. · Solids CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Basic Shapes CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Fundamental Shapes CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Fundamental Shapes CSC6870 Computer

  8. National Synchrotron Light Source II

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Steve Dierker

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory is a proposed new state-of-the-art medium energy storage ring designed to deliver world-leading brightness and flux with top-off operation

  9. Remedial action plan and site design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Tuba City, Arizona: Phase 2, Construction, Subcontract documents: Appendix E, final report. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This appendix discusses Phase II construction and subcontract documents uranium mill site near Tuba City, Arizona. It contains the bid schedule, special conditions, specifications, and subcontract drawings.

  10. Collective Phase Sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoji Kawamura; Hiroya Nakao; Kensuke Arai; Hiroshi Kori; Yoshiki Kuramoto

    2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The collective phase response to a macroscopic external perturbation of a population of interacting nonlinear elements exhibiting collective oscillations is formulated for the case of globally-coupled oscillators. The macroscopic phase sensitivity is derived from the microscopic phase sensitivity of the constituent oscillators by a two-step phase reduction. We apply this result to quantify the stability of the macroscopic common-noise induced synchronization of two uncoupled populations of oscillators undergoing coherent collective oscillations.

  11. Webinar: Systems Performance Advancement II Funding Opportunity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Webinar: Systems Performance Advancement II Funding Opportunity Announcement Webinar: Systems Performance Advancement II Funding Opportunity Announcement January 22, 2015 2:00PM to...

  12. FULLY INTEGRATED CURRENT-MODE SUBAPERTURE CENTROID CIRCUITS AND PHASE RECONTRUCTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furth, Paul

    , New Mexico July 2001 #12;ii "Fully Integrated Current-Mode Subaperture Centroid Circuits and Phase: Electrical Engineering (Analog VLSI Circuit Design) #12;vi ABSTRACT FULLY INTEGRATED CURRENT-MODE SUBAPERTUREFULLY INTEGRATED CURRENT-MODE SUBAPERTURE CENTROID CIRCUITS AND PHASE RECONTRUCTOR BY ALUSHULLA

  13. Lyapunov exponents and phase diagrams reveal multi-factorial control over TRAIL-induced apoptosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyapunov exponents and phase diagrams reveal multi-factorial control over TRAIL-induced apoptosis). Here, we investigate factors controlling type I versus II phenotypes by performing Lyapunov exponent-or-none control over activation of effector caspases. Thus, phase diagrams derived from Lyapunov exponent analysis

  14. Switching dynamics in cholesteric blue phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Tiribocchi; G. Gonnella; D. Marenduzzo; E. Orlandini

    2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Blue phases are networks of disclination lines, which occur in cholesteric liquid crystals near the transition to the isotropic phase. They have recently been used for the new generation of fast switching liquid crystal displays. Here we study numerically the steady states and switching hydrodynamics of blue phase I (BPI) and blue phase II (BPII) cells subjected to an electric field. When the field is on, there are three regimes: for very weak fields (and strong anchoring at the boundaries) the blue phases are almost unaffected, for intermediate fields the disclinations twist (for BPI) and unzip (for BPII), whereas for very large voltages the network dissolves in the bulk of the cell. Interestingly, we find that a BPII cell can recover its original structure when the field is switched off, whereas a BPI cell is found to be trapped more easily into metastable configurations. The kinetic pathways followed during switching on and off entails dramatic reorganisation of the disclination networks. We also discuss the effect of changing the director field anchoring at the boundary planes and of varying the direction of the applied field.

  15. Environmental Chemistry II (Atmospheric Chemistry)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dibble, Theodore

    SYLLABUS FOR Environmental Chemistry II (Atmospheric Chemistry) FCH 511 Fall 2013 Theodore S/explaining the trends in J as a function of altitude and solar zenith angle. The second involves analyzing real

  16. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ii 1.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanaka, Jiro

    ;. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ii 1 1 1.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 2 4 2.1.3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 3 7 3.1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 3

  17. Experience with capture cavity II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koeth, T.; /Fermilab /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Branlard, J.; Edwards, H.; Fliller, R.; Harms, E.; Hocker, A.; McGee, M.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Prieto, P.; Reid, J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Valuable experience in operating and maintaining superconducting RF cavities in a horizontal test module has been gained with Capture Cavity II. We report on all facets of our experience to date.

  18. Stabilising the Blue Phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. P. Alexander; J. M. Yeomans

    2006-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an investigation of the phase diagram of cholesteric liquid crystals within the framework of Landau - de Gennes theory. The free energy is modified to incorporate all three Frank elastic constants and to allow for a temperature dependent pitch in the cholesteric phase. It is found that the region of stability of the cubic blue phases depends significantly on the value of the elastic constants, being reduced when the bend elastic constant is larger than splay and when twist is smaller than the other two. Most dramatically we find a large increase in the region of stability of blue phase I, and a qualitative change in the phase diagram, in a system where the cholesteric phase displays helix inversion.

  19. ORFEUS II and IUE Spectroscopy of EX Hydrae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher W. Mauche

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using ORFEUS-SPAS II FUV spectra, IUE UV spectra, and archival EUVE deep survey photometry, we present a detailed picture of the behavior of the magnetic cataclysmic variable EX Hydrae. Like HUT spectra of this source, the FUV and UV spectra reveal broad emission lines of He II, C II-IV, N III and V, O VI, Si III-IV, and Al III superposed on a continuum which is blue in the UV and nearly flat in the FUV. Like ORFEUS spectra of AM Her, the O VI doublet is resolved into broad and narrow emission components. Consistent with its behavior in the optical, the FUV and UV continuum flux densities, the FUV and UV broad emission line fluxes, and the radial velocity of the O VI broad emission component all vary on the spin phase of the white dwarf, with the maximum of the FUV and UV continuum and broad emission line flux light curves coincident with maximum blueshift of the broad O VI emission component. On the binary phase, the broad dip in the EUV light curve is accompanied by strong eclipses of the UV emission lines and by variations in both the flux and radial velocity of the O VI narrow emission component. The available data are consistent with the accretion funnel being the source of the FUV and UV continuum and the O VI broad emission component, and the white dwarf being the source of the O VI narrow emission component.

  20. Crystal phase identification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Michael, Joseph R. (Albuquerque, NM); Goehner, Raymond P. (Albuquerque, NM); Schlienger, Max E. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for determining the crystalline phase and crystalline characteristics of a sample. This invention provides a method and apparatus for unambiguously identifying and determining the crystalline phase and crystalline characteristics of a sample by using an electron beam generator, such as a scanning electron microscope, to obtain a backscattered electron Kikuchi pattern of a sample, and extracting crystallographic and composition data that is matched to database information to provide a quick and automatic method to identify crystalline phases.

  1. Comprehensive Evaluation of the Geothermal Resource Potential within the Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation Phase III Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noel, Donna

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project integrated state-of-the-art exploration technologies with a geologic framework and reservoir modeling to ultimately determine the efficacy of future geothermal production within the PLPT reservation. The information gained during this study should help the PLPT to make informed decisions regarding construction of a geothermal power plant. Additional benefits included the transfer of new technologies and geothermal data to the geothermal industry and it created and/or preserved nearly three dozen jobs accordance with the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. A variety of tasks were conducted to achieve the above stated objectives. The following are the tasks completed within the project: 1. Permitting 2. Shallow temperature survey 3. Seismic data collection and analysis 4. Fracture stress analysis 5. Phase I reporting Permitting 7. Shallow temperature survey 8. Seismic data collection and analysis 9. Fracture stress analysis 10. Phase I reporting 11. Drilling two new wells 12. Borehole geophysics 13. Phase II reporting 14. Well testing and geochemical analysis 15. Three-dimensional geologic model 16. Three-dimensional reservoir analysis 17. Reservation wide geothermal potential analysis 18. Phase III reporting Phase I consisted of tasks 1 – 5, Phase II tasks 6 – 8, and Phase III tasks 9 – 13. This report details the results of Phase III tasks. Reports are available for Phase I, and II as separate documents.

  2. Flexoelectric blue phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G P Alexander; J M Yeomans

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the occurence and properties of liquid crystal phases showing two dimensional splay and bend distortions which are stabilised by flexoelectric interactions. These phases are characterised by regions of locally double splayed order separated by topological defects and are thus highly analogous to the blue phases of cholesteric liquid crystals. We present a mean field analysis based upon the Landau--de Gennes Q-tensor theory and construct a phase diagram for flexoelectric structures using analytic and numerical results. We stress the similarities and discrepancies between the cholesteric and flexoelectric cases.

  3. Thermodynamically Stable Blue Phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Castles; S. M. Morris; E. M. Terentjev; H. J. Coles

    2011-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We show theoretically that flexoelectricity stabilizes blue phases in chiral liquid crystals. Induced internal polarization reduces the elastic energy cost of splay and bend deformations surrounding singular lines in the director field. The energy of regions of double twist is unchanged. This in turn reduces the free energy of the blue phase with respect to that of the chiral nematic phase, leading to stability over a wider temperature range. The theory explains the discovery of large temperature range blue phases in highly flexoelectric "bimesogenic" and "bent-core" materials, and predicts how this range may be increased further.

  4. Holographic Magnetic Phase Transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilad Lifschytz; Matthew Lippert

    2009-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We study four-dimensional interacting fermions in a strong magnetic field, using the holographic Sakai-Sugimoto model of intersecting D4 and D8 branes in the deconfined, chiral-symmetric parallel phase. We find that as the magnetic field is varied, while staying in the parallel phase, the fermions exhibit a first-order phase transition in which their magnetization jumps discontinuously. Properties of this transition are consistent with a picture in which some of the fermions jump to the lowest Landau level. Similarities to known magnetic phase transitions are discussed.

  5. Phase 1 -- 4

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Requirements" " " "Phase Two - Initial Project Development" "Replace Std Task 2-1","DO RFP Development - On Site Consultation","FEMP Services will provide technical consultation...

  6. The socio-technical construction of precision bombing : a study of shared control and cognition by humans, machines, and doctrine during World War II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Mara, Raymond P. (Raymond Patrick)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation examines the creation and initial use of the precision bombing system employed by the United States Army Air Forces during World War II in the opening phase of the Combined Bomber Offensive against Germany. ...

  7. Disposal site-selection technical appendix. Phase 2. (North and South Puget Sound)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kendall, D.; Jamison, D.; Malek, J.; Ehlers, P.

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a technical appendix to both the Proposed Management Plan Report and the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Puget Sound Dredged Disposal Analysis (PSDDA) Phase II study covering north and south Puget Sound. Results of disposal-site-selection studies for Phase II of PSDDA, are summarized herein. Phase II includes the southern portion of Puget Sound south of the Tacoma Narrows and the northern portion of Puget Sound north of Admiralty Inlet to the U.S./Canadian border and west to Port Angeles. DSWG's task in Phase II was to identify suitable unconfined, open-water disposal sites. This technical appendix summarizes the process by which DSWG carried out its task. Each site includes a 900-foot radius, 58-acre surface disposal zone within which all dredged material must be released. Each of the dispersive sites includes a 1,500-foot radius, 162-acre surface disposal zone within which all dredgfed material must be released. The capacities of the nondispersive disposal sites in the Phase II area are estimated to be several times the probable volume of dredged material projected for disposal through the year 2000.

  8. UPVG phase 2 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Utility PhotoVoltaic Group (UPVG), supported by member dues and a grant from the US Department of Energy, has as its mission the acceleration of the use of cost-effective small-scale and emerging large-scale applications of photovoltaics for the benefit of electric utilities and their customers. Formed in October, 1992, with the support of the American Public Power Association, Edison Electric Institute, and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, the UPVG currently has 90 members from all sectors of the electric utility industry. The UPVG`s efforts as conceived were divided into four phases: Phase 0--program plan; Phase 1--organization and strategy development; Phase 2--creating market assurance; and Phase 3--higher volume purchases. The Phase 0 effort developed the program plan and was completed early in 1993. The Phase 1 goal was to develop the necessary background information and analysis to lead to a decision as to which strategies could be undertaken by utilities to promote greater understanding of PV markets and achieve increased volumes of PV purchases. This report provides the details of the UPVG`s Phase 2 efforts to initiate TEAM-UP, its multiyear, 50-MW hardware initiative.

  9. Evolving Gaits for the Lynxmotion Hexapod II Robot Computer Science, Worcester Polytechnic Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Gary B.

    Autonomous robots can perform tasks that would be dangerous for humans. Examples of these tasks are mineEvolving Gaits for the Lynxmotion Hexapod II Robot DAVID TOTH Computer Science, Worcester://cs.conncoll.edu/parker ABSTRACT Gait generation for hexapod robots can be accomplished with a two-phase process, whereby leg

  10. Evolving Gaits for the Lynxmotion Hexapod II Robot Computer Science, Worcester Polytechnic Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Gary B.

    Autonomous robots can perform tasks that would be dangerous for humans. Examples of these tasks are mineEvolving Gaits for the Lynxmotion Hexapod II Robot DAVID TOTH Computer Science, Worcester://cs.conncoll.edu/parker ABSTRACT Gait generation for hexapod robots can be accomplished with a two­phase process, whereby leg

  11. DIVALENT LANTHANIDE CHEMISTRY; BIS (PENTAMETHYLCYCLOPENTADIENYL) EUROPIUM(II) AND YTTERBIUM(II) DERIVATIVES: CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF BIS(PENTAMETHYLCYCLOPENTADIENYL) YTTERBIUM (II)TETRAHYDROFURAN HEMI (TOLUENE) AT 176K

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilley, T.Don

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PENTAMETHYL CYCLOPENTADIENYL)EUROPIUM(II) AND YTTERBIUM(II)pentamethylcyclopentadienide and europium trichloride inbiscyclopentadienyl- europium and ~ytterbium, respectively,

  12. Trabajo Practico 4 Calculo II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morin, Pedro

    Trabajo Pr´actico 4 C´alculo II 2do semestre 2007 (1) Calcular a partir de la definici´on de instante en que el tanque se vac´ia completamente? (4) La distancia (en metros) recorrida por un auto de

  13. Tech Area II: A history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ullrich, R. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the history of the major buildings in Sandia National Laboratories` Technical Area II. It was prepared in support of the Department of Energy`s compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act. Technical Area II was designed and constructed in 1948 specifically for the final assembly of the non-nuclear components of nuclear weapons, and was the primary site conducting such assembly until 1952. Both the architecture and location of the oldest buildings in the area reflect their original purpose. Assembly activities continued in Area II from 1952 to 1957, but the major responsibility for this work shifted to other sites in the Atomic Energy Commission`s integrated contractor complex. Gradually, additional buildings were constructed and the original buildings were modified. After 1960, the Area`s primary purpose was the research and testing of high-explosive components for nuclear weapons. In 1994, Sandia constructed new facilities for work on high-explosive components outside of the original Area II diamond-shaped parcel. Most of the buildings in the area are vacant and Sandia has no plans to use them. They are proposed for decontamination and demolition as funding becomes available.

  14. Robotics II June 10, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Luca, Alessandro

    Robotics II June 10, 2014 Exercise 1 Consider a planar 3R robot with unitary link lengths as in Fig. 1. Taking into account the robot redundancy, a velocity control scheme is active so as to track desired end-effector position trajectories while trying to locally maximize the minimum Cartesian distance

  15. Assignment II Saha & Boltzmann equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spoon, Henrik

    Assignment II Saha & Boltzmann equations January 21, 2002 This assignment is meant to give you some practical experience in using the Saha and Boltzmann equations that govern the level populations in atoms;s =kT the partition function of ionization stage r. The Saha equation: N r+1 N r = 2U r+1 U r P e #18

  16. Mittwoch, 28.05.2014 Zeit H17, NW II H18, NW II H20, NW II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ullmann, G. Matthias

    Beliefs and Fracking Gebäude Audimax 09:40 (Gebäudewechsel Audimax -> NW II) 10:00 "Hydrogeologie von

  17. Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application Proposed Data Elements for PARS II Web Application More Documents &...

  18. The two phase commit protocol simulation and analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bokil, Anupam

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IDENTIFICATION II. A Failures in a. Distributed DBMS 10 HI ATOIYIIC COMMITMENT HI. A Uncertainty Period . HI. B Blocking HI C Independent Recovery 17 17 IU THE TWO PHASE COMMIT PROTOCOL V111 CHAPTER Pa, ge IV. A Timeout Actions 21 IV. B Recovery..., 55 LIST OF TABLES TABLE Page Comparison of three versions of the two phase comniit CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION A database management system(DBMS) consists of a collection of interrelated, persis- tent data. and a set of programs to access this data...

  19. Mg II Selected Absorbers: Ionization structures and a Survey of Weak Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher W. Churchill

    1997-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    First results from a study of high ionization absorption properties in roughly 30 Mg II absorption selected galaxies are presented. We have tested for correlations of Mg II, C IV, Si IV, N V, and O VI equivalent widths with the galaxy properties and Mg II gas kinematics. The results are suggestive of multi-phase halos with little to no global ionization gradient with impact parameter. C IV may arise in both the Mg II - Lyman alpha clouds and a high ionization "halo" traced by O VI. We also report on an unbiased survey for weak Mg II systems using HIRES/Keck spectra. At = 0.9, we find dN/dz = 1.6 +/- 0.1 for 0.02 = -0.3 +/- 0.4 measured for the sample. We suggest that weak Mg II absorbers comprise a substantial yet-to-be explored population. If weak systems select the LSB and/or dwarf galaxy population, then the weakest Mg II absorbers may provide one of the most sensitive tracers of chemical enrichment and evolution of the UV background from z = 2 to z = 0.

  20. Swift Progress on NSLS-II Booster

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Get an inside look around the booster ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source II. The booster is part of the injector complex for NSLS-II, now under construction at Brookhaven Lab.

  1. Photon Sciences | NSLS-II Beamline Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BNL People National Synchrotron Light Source II Home About NSLS-II Overview Storage Ring Parameters NSLS: A History Strategic Plan (PDF) For Users & Staff PASS User Guide Proposal...

  2. PERFORMANCE OF DIPOLE MAGNETS IN HELIUM II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Althaus, R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Pressurized Superfluid Helium", EX5 40 11th InternationalOF DIPOLE MAGNETS IN HELIUM II R. Althaus, S. Cacpi, W.S.OF DIMLE NMMETS IN HELIUM II* R. Althaus, S. Caspl, W.S.

  3. Geometric Phase in Vacuum Instability:APPLICATIONS in Quantum Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. P. Datta

    1993-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Three different methods viz. i) a perturbative analysis of the Schr\\"odinger equation ii) abstract differential geometric method and iii) a semiclassical reduction of the Wheeler-Dewitt equation, relating Pancharatnam phase to vacuum instability are discussed. An improved semiclassical reduction is also shown to yield the correct zeroth order semicalssical Einstein equations with backreaction. This constitutes an extension of our earlier discussions on the topic

  4. FGD systems: What utilities chose in phase 1 and what they might choose in phase 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    South, D.W.; Bailey, K.A.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Title IV (acid rain) of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 is imposing new limitations on the emission of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) from electric power plants. The Act requires utilities to develop compliance plans to reduce these emissions, and indications are that these plans will dramatically alter traditional operating procedures. A key provision of the SO{sub 2} control program defined in Title IV is the creation of a system of emission allowances, with utilities having, the option of complying by adjusting system emissions and allowance holdings. The central focus of this paper is the identification of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) control options being implemented by the electric utility industry, current compliance trends, synergistic control issues and a discussion of the implications of Phase I decisions for Phase II.

  5. Ti (II) Mediated Reactions in Organic Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Jeff S.

    ' #12;Generation of Ti(II) from Ti(IV) · Bercaw accessed and characterized the first Ti'X -X Generation of Ti(II) via Reductive Alkylation · Ti(IV) converted to Ti(II) via reductive/Acetylene Functionalizations · Reductive Couplings #12;Advantages of Titanium · Titanium (IV) reagents are cheap and readily

  6. Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a series of three interlocking imaging and spectroscopic surveys, carried out over an eight-year period with a dedicated 2.5m telescope located at Apache Point Observatory in Southern New Mexico. The SDSS Supernova Survey was one of those three components of SDSS and SDSS-II, a 3-year extension of the original SDSS that operated from July 2005 to July 2008. The Supernova Survey was a time-domain survey, involving repeat imaging of the same region of sky every other night, weather permitting. The primary scientific motivation was to detect and measure light curves for several hundred supernovae through repeat scans of the SDSS Southern equatorial stripe 82 (about 2.5? wide by ~120? long). Over the course of three 3-month campaigns SDSS-II SN discovered and measured multi-band lightcurves for ~500 spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia supernovae in the redshift range z=0.05-0.4. In addition, the project harvested a few hundred light curves for SNe Ia and discovered about 80 spectroscopically confirmed core-collapse supernovae (supernova types Ib/c and II).

  7. Nickel (II)-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in human proximal tubule cells through a ROS- and mitochondria-mediated pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yi-Fen; Shyu, Huey-Wen [Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences and Biotechnology, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences and Biotechnology, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chang, Yi-Chuang [Department of Nursing, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Nursing, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Tseng, Wei-Chang [Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences and Biotechnology, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences and Biotechnology, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Huang, Yeou-Lih [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Lin, Kuan-Hua; Chou, Miao-Chen; Liu, Heng-Ling [Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences and Biotechnology, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences and Biotechnology, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chang-Yu, E-mail: mt037@mail.fy.edu.tw [Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences and Biotechnology, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences and Biotechnology, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nickel compounds are known to be toxic and carcinogenic in kidney and lung. In this present study, we investigated the roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondria in nickel (II) acetate-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in the HK-2 human renal cell line. The results showed that the cytotoxic effects of nickel (II) involved significant cell death and DNA damage. Nickel (II) increased the generation of ROS and induced a noticeable reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Analysis of the sub-G1 phase showed a significant increase in apoptosis in HK-2 cells after nickel (II) treatment. Pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) not only inhibited nickel (II)-induced cell death and DNA damage, but also significantly prevented nickel (II)-induced loss of MMP and apoptosis. Cell apoptosis triggered by nickel (II) was characterized by the reduced protein expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL and the induced the protein expression of Bad, Bcl-Xs, Bax, cytochrome c and caspases 9, 3 and 6. The regulation of the expression of Bcl-2-family proteins, the release of cytochrome c and the activation of caspases 9, 3 and 6 were inhibited in the presence of NAC. These results suggest that nickel (II) induces cytotoxicity and apoptosis in HK-2 cells via ROS generation and that the mitochondria-mediated apoptotic signaling pathway may be involved in the positive regulation of nickel (II)-induced renal cytotoxicity.

  8. LCLS-II New Instruments Workshops Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baradaran, Samira; Bergmann, Uwe; Durr, Herrmann; Gaffney, Kelley; Goldstein, Julia; Guehr, Markus; Hastings, Jerome; Heimann, Philip; Lee, Richard; Seibert, Marvin; Stohr, Joachim; /SLAC; ,

    2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The LCLS-II New Instruments workshops chaired by Phil Heimann and Jerry Hastings were held on March 19-22, 2012 at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The goal of the workshops was to identify the most exciting science and corresponding parameters which will help define the LCLS-II instrumentation. This report gives a synopsis of the proposed investigations and an account of the workshop. Scientists from around the world have provided short descriptions of the scientific opportunities they envision at LCLS-II. The workshops focused on four broadly defined science areas: biology, materials sciences, chemistry and atomic, molecular and optical physics (AMO). Below we summarize the identified science opportunities in the four areas. The frontiers of structural biology lie in solving the structures of large macromolecular biological systems. Most large protein assemblies are inherently difficult to crystallize due to their numerous degrees of freedom. Serial femtosecond protein nanocrystallography, using the 'diffraction-before-destruction' approach to outrun radiation damage has been very successfully pioneered at LCLS and diffraction patterns were obtained from some of the smallest protein crystals ever. The combination of femtosecond x-ray pulses of high intensity and nanosized protein crystals avoids the radiation damage encountered by conventional x-ray crystallography with focused beams and opens the door for atomic structure determinations of the previously largely inaccessible class of membrane proteins that are notoriously difficult to crystallize. The obtained structures will allow the identification of key protein functions and help in understanding the origin and control of diseases. Three dimensional coherent x-ray imaging at somewhat lower resolution may be used for larger objects such as viruses. The chemistry research areas of primary focus are the predictive understanding of catalytic mechanisms, with particular emphasis on photo- and heterogeneous catalysis. Of particular interest is the efficient conversion of light to electrical or chemical energy, which requires understanding the non-adiabatic dynamics of electronic excited states. Ultrafast x-ray scattering presents an excellent opportunity to investigate structural dynamics of molecular systems with atomic resolution, and x-ray scattering and spectroscopy present an excellent opportunity to investigating the dynamics of the electronic charge distribution. Harnessing solar energy to generate fuels, either indirectly with photovoltaics and electrochemical catalysis or directly with photocatalysts, presents a critical technological challenge that will require the use of forefront scientific tools such as ultrafast x-rays. At the center of this technical challenge is the rational design of efficient and cost effective catalysts. Important materials science opportunities relate to information technology applications, in particular the transport and storage of information on increasingly smaller length- and faster time-scales. Of interest are the understanding of the intrinsic size limits associated with the storage of information bits and the speed limits of information or bit processing. Key questions revolve about how electronic charges and spins of materials can be manipulated by electric and magnetic fields. This requires the exploration of speed limits subject to the fundamental conservation laws of energy and linear and angular momentum and the different coupling of polar electric and axial magnetic fields to charge and spin. Of interest are novel composite materials, including molecular systems combining multi electric and magnetic functionality. Ultrafast x-rays offer the required probing speed, can probe either the charge or spin properties through polarization control and through scattering and spectroscopy cover the entire energy-time-momentum-distance phase space. In the field of atomic and molecular science, LCLS II promises to elucidate the fundamental interactions among electrons and between electrons and nuclei, and to explore the fron

  9. Requirements and Design Requirements Phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Razak, Saquib

    at a time. #12;Unit 24 8 Design Phase The next step in the SDLC is the Design phase which translates

  10. Jefferson Lab's Trim Card II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trent Allison; Sarin Philip; C. Higgins; Edward Martin; William Merz

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) uses Trim Card I power supplies to drive approximately 1900 correction magnets. These trim cards have had a long and illustrious service record. However, some of the employed technology is now obsolete, making it difficult to maintain the system and retain adequate spares. The Trim Card II is being developed to act as a transparent replacement for its aging predecessor. A modular approach has been taken in its development to facilitate the substitution of sections for future improvements and maintenance. The resulting design has been divided into a motherboard and 7 daughter cards which has also allowed for parallel development. The Trim Card II utilizes modern technologies such as a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and a microprocessor to embed trim card controls and diagnostics. These reprogrammable devices also provide the versatility to incorporate future requirements.

  11. Trabajo Practico 1 Calculo II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morin, Pedro

    Trabajo Pr´actico 1 C´alculo II 2do semestre 2007 (1) Hallar las ecuaciones de las rectas que pasan, 3) (c) L : x = 3 P : (1, 5) (d) L : y = 2 P : (2, 1) (9) Calcular la distancia entre P y Q de) Hallar la distancia entre la recta L y el punto P (y graficar): (a) L : 2x - y + 1 = 0 P : (1, 5) (b) L

  12. Trabajo Practico 5 Calculo II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morin, Pedro

    Trabajo Pr´actico 5 C´alculo II 2do semestre 2007 (1) Encontrar el valor de c en el teorema del). (a) Hallar una f´ormula para la altura y(t) y una para la distancia horizontal x(t). (La bala se´ormula que indique la distancia horizontal recorrida por la bala antes de alcanzar el suelo (la f

  13. Topaz II preliminary safety assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, A.C. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)); Standley, V. (Air Force Phillips Laboratory, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87110 (United States)); Voss, S.S. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)); Haskin, E. (Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Department, Institute for Nuclear Power Studies, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87110 (United States))

    1993-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) decided to investigate the possibility of launching a Russian Topaz II space nuclear power system. A preliminary safety assessment was conducted to determine whether or not a space mission could be conducted safely and within budget constraints. As part of this assessment, a safety policy and safety functional requirements were developed to guide both the safety assessment and future Topaz II activities. A review of the Russian flight safety program was conducted and documented. Our preliminary safety assessment included a top level event tree, neutronic analysis of normal and accident configurations, an evaluation of temperature coefficients of reactivity, a reentry and disposal analysis, and analysis of postulated launch abort impact accidents, and an analysis of postulated propellant fire and explosion accidents. Based on the assessment, it appears that it will be possible to safely launch the Topaz II system in the U.S. with some possible system modifications. The principal system modifications will probably include design changes to preclude water flooded criticality and to assure intact reentry.

  14. Abstracts of Phase 1 awards, (fiscal year) 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contained in this booklet are abstracts of the Phase I awards made in Fiscal Year 1987 under the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program in the Department of Energy (DOE). The program is designed for implementation in a three-phase process, with Phase I determining the scientific or technical merit and feasibility of ideas proposed for investigation. The period of performance in this initial phase is relatively brief, typically about 6 months, and the awards are limited to $50,000. Phase II is the principal research or research and development effort, and the awards are as high as $500,000 for work to be performed in periods of up to 2 years. Phase III is the commercial application. The 111 Phase I projects described were selected in a highly competitive process from a total of 942 proposals received in response to the 1987 Solicitation. They cover the fields of chemistry, materials, control systems, plant natural products, instrumentation, nuclear medicine, health and environmental effects, high energy physics, particle accelerators, nuclear physics, plasma diagnostics and confinement, fusion energy systems, robotics and remote systems, nuclear reactors, space nuclear power, fuel cycle, decontamination/decommissioning, commputers in nuclear plants, coal, enhanced oil recovery/tar sands, fossil energy, photovoltaics, solar thermal, ceramics for heat engines, and industrial separation, conversion and recovery processes. (DLC)

  15. Effects of chronic receptor blockade on intracardiac angiotensin II and aldosterone content in an angiotensin II-infused model of hypertension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conte, Debra Ann

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    II in Angiotensin II-Infused Rats. Hypertension 27: 658-662,II Augmentation in Angiotensin II-Infused Rats. HypertensionII in angiotensin II- infused rats. Experimental Biology and

  16. Electroweak phase transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, G.W.

    1991-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytic treatment of the one Higgs doublet, electroweak phase transition is given. The phase transition is first order, occurs by the nucleation of thin walled bubbles and completes at a temperature where the order parameter, {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle}{sub T} is significantly smaller than it is when the origin becomes absolutely unstable. The rate of anomalous baryon number violation is an exponentially function of {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle}{sub T}. In very minimal extensions of the standard model it is quite easy to increase {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle}{sub T} so that anomalous baryon number violation is suppressed after completion of the phase transition. Hence baryogenesis at the electroweak phase transition is tenable in minimal of the standard model. In some cases additional phase transitions are possible. For a light Higgs boson, when the top quark mass is sufficiently large, the state where the Higgs field has a vacuum expectation value {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle} = 246 GeV is not the true minimum of the Higgs potential. When this is the case, and when the top quark mass exceeds some critical value, thermal fluctuations in the early universe would have rendered the state {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle} = 246 GeV unstable. The requirement that the state {l_angle}{phi}{r_angle} = 246 GeV is sufficiently long lived constrains the masses of the Higgs boson and the top quark. Finally, we consider whether local phase transitions can be induced by heavy particles which act as seeds for deformations in the scalar field.

  17. Electroweak phase transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, G.W.

    1991-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytic treatment of the one Higgs doublet, electroweak phase transition is given. The phase transition is first order, occurs by the nucleation of thin walled bubbles and completes at a temperature where the order parameter, {l angle}{phi}{r angle}{sub T} is significantly smaller than it is when the origin becomes absolutely unstable. The rate of anomalous baryon number violation is an exponentially function of {l angle}{phi}{r angle}{sub T}. In very minimal extensions of the standard model it is quite easy to increase {l angle}{phi}{r angle}{sub T} so that anomalous baryon number violation is suppressed after completion of the phase transition. Hence baryogenesis at the electroweak phase transition is tenable in minimal of the standard model. In some cases additional phase transitions are possible. For a light Higgs boson, when the top quark mass is sufficiently large, the state where the Higgs field has a vacuum expectation value {l angle}{phi}{r angle} = 246 GeV is not the true minimum of the Higgs potential. When this is the case, and when the top quark mass exceeds some critical value, thermal fluctuations in the early universe would have rendered the state {l angle}{phi}{r angle} = 246 GeV unstable. The requirement that the state {l angle}{phi}{r angle} = 246 GeV is sufficiently long lived constrains the masses of the Higgs boson and the top quark. Finally, we consider whether local phase transitions can be induced by heavy particles which act as seeds for deformations in the scalar field.

  18. Viscosity near phase transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonio Dobado; Felipe J. Llanes-Estrada; Juan M. Torres-Rincon

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Probably the most enticing observation in theoretical physics during the last decade was the discovery of the great amount of consequences obtained from the AdS/CFT conjecture put forward by Maldacena. In this work we review how this correspondence can be used to address hydrodynamic properties such as the viscosity of some strongly interacting systems. We also employ the Boltzmann equation for those systems closer to low-energy QCD, and argue that this kind of transport coefficients can be related to phase transitions, in particular the QGP/hadronic phase transition studied in heavy ion collisions.

  19. Perturbations to $?-?$ Symmetry, Leptogenesis and Lepton Flavour Violation with Type II Seesaw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manikanta Borah; Debasish Borah; Mrinal Kumar Das; Sudhanwa Patra

    2014-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the possibility of generating non-zero reactor mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by perturbing the $\\mu-\\tau$ symmetric neutrino mass matrix. The leading order $\\mu-\\tau$ symmetric neutrino mass matrix originates from type I seesaw mechanism whereas the perturbations to $\\mu-\\tau$ symmetry originate from type II seesaw term. We consider four different realizations of $\\mu-\\tau$ symmetry: Bimaximal Mixing(BM), Tri-bimaximal Mixing (TBM), Hexagonal Mixing (HM) and Golden Ratio Mixing (GRM) all giving rise to $\\theta_{13} = 0, \\theta_{23} = \\frac{\\pi}{4}$ but different non-zero values of solar mixing angle $\\theta_{12}$. We assume a minimal $\\mu-\\tau$ symmetry breaking type II seesaw mass matrix as a perturbation and calculate the neutrino oscillation parameters as a function of type II seesaw strength. We then consider the origin of non-trivial leptonic CP phase in the charged lepton sector and calculate the lepton asymmetry arising from the lightest right handed neutrino decay by incorporating the presence of both type I and type II seesaw. We constrain the type II seesaw strength as well as leptonic CP phase (and hence the charged lepton sector) by comparing our results with experimental neutrino oscillation parameters as well as Planck bound on baryon to photon ratio. Finally, we extend our analysis on lepton flavour violating decays like $\\mu \\to e \\gamma$ and $\\mu \\to eee$ due to exchange of TeV scale Higgs triplet scalar within the low scale type II seesaw framework. The branching ratios for these lepton flavour processes are examined with the small type II perturbation term $\\omega$ and the estimated values are very close to the experimental bound coming from current search experiments.

  20. Ii.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    sponsorship of the Materials Division of ASME in conjunction with the Mechanical Metallurgy Committee of AIME. Personne l Connecte d with Contract 1. Professor ial Staff: J....

  1. II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ I 1' . _ .t.fiom/ I'l7aa

  2. II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell:F E ,"^ I 1' . _ .t.fiom/ I'l7aa

  3. II

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 3400, U.S.MajorMarketsNov-14 Dec-14Has Hydrocarbon, a 1 Inths

  4. II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthNrr-osams ADMIN551 - g 76 IA//)

  5. Physical Chemistry II Spring 2007 Physical Chemistry II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Entropy and spontaneity. Calculation and measurement of entropy changes. IV. Free energy and spontaneity Chapter 22 Gibbs and Helmholtz free energies and the natural direction of processes. V. Phase behavior Chapter 19 Heat, work, and thermodynamic energy. The First Law and chemical reactions. III. Entropy

  6. Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emissions boiler system. Phase II subsystem test design and plan - an addendum to the Phase II RD & T Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shortly after the year 2000 it is expected that new generating plants will be needed to meet the growing demand for electricity and to replace the aging plants that are nearing the end of their useful service life. The plants of the future will need to be extremely clean, highly efficient and economical. Continuing concerns over acid rain, air toxics, global climate changes, ozone depletion and solid waste disposal are expected to further then regulations. In the late 1980`s it was commonly believed that coal-fired power plants of the future would incorporate either some form of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) or first generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBS) technologies. However, recent advances In emission control techniques at reduced costs and auxiliary power requirements coupled with significant improvements In steam turbine and cycle design have clearly indicated that pulverized coal technology can continue to be competitive In both cost and performance. In recognition of the competitive potential for advanced pulverized coal-fired systems with other emerging advanced coal-fired technologies, DOE`s Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) began a research and development initiative In late 1990 named, Combustion 2000, with the intention of preserving and expanding coal as a principal fuel In the Generation of electrical power. The project was designed for two stages of commercialization, the nearer-term Low Emission Boiler System (LEBS) program, and for the future, the High Performance Power System (HIPPS) program. B&W is participating In the LEBS program.

  7. Phase change compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions containing crystalline, straight chain, alkyl hydrocarbons as phase change materials including cementitious compositions containing the alkyl hydrocarbons neat or in pellets or granules formed by incorporating the alkyl hydrocarbons in polymers or rubbers; and polymeric or elastomeric compositions containing alkyl hydrocarbons.

  8. Phase change compositions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH); Griffen, Charles W. (Mason, OH)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions containing crystalline, long chain, alkyl hydrocarbons as phase change materials including cementitious compositions containing the alkyl hydrocarbons neat or in pellets or granules formed by incorporating the alkyl hydrocarbons in polymers or rubbers; and polymeric or elastomeric compositions containing alkyl hydrocarbons.

  9. Integrated monitoring and surveillance system demonstration project: Phase I accomplishments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aumeier, S.E.; Walters, B.G.; Crawford, D.C. [and others

    1997-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors present the results of the Integrated Monitoring and Surveillance System (IMSS) demonstration project Phase I efforts. The rationale behind IMSS development is reviewed and progress in each of the 5 basic tasks is detailed. Significant results include decisions to use Echelon LonWorks networking protocol and Microsoft Access for the data system needs, a preliminary design for the plutonium canning system glovebox, identification of facilities and materials available for the demonstration, determination of possibly affected facility documentation, and a preliminary list of available sensor technologies. Recently imposed changes in the overall project schedule and scope are also discussed and budgetary requirements for competition of Phase II presented. The results show that the IMSS demonstration project team has met and in many cases exceeded the commitments made for Phase I deliverables.

  10. Luz II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther, Oklahoma: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,NorthLuz II

  11. Aegir II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindeySanta Clara,Addington,Admire,CABiomass, RenewableAegir II

  12. ARM - RHUBC II Science Objectives

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP :ProductsVaisala CL51Instruments Related Links RHUBC-II Home

  13. ARM - RHUBC II Science Team

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP :ProductsVaisala CL51Instruments Related Links RHUBC-II HomeTeam

  14. II. GENERAL COMPLIANCE SUPPLEMENT INTRODUCTION

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov.Energy02.pdf7 OPAM Flash2011-37EnergySubmit ait'sII. GENERAL COMPLIANCE

  15. Harvest II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJumpEnergyStrategy | OpenHalfWindHartland WindHarvest II

  16. Limon II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano,LakefrontLighthouse Solar WestchesterLimnia Inc JumpII

  17. Cimarron II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png El CER esDataset CountryChoosEV Jump to:ChrysalixI JumpII

  18. HELIOPHYSICS II. ENERGY CONVERSION PROCESSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudson, Hugh

    and radiation page 2 2 Observations of solar and stellar eruptions, flares, and jets 3 2.1 Introduction 3 2 of a solar flare 11 2.3.1 Flare luminosity and mechanical energy 11 2.3.2 The impulsive phase (hard X Energization of trapped particles 46 10 In situ detection of energetic particles 47 11 Radiative signatures

  19. Dense Heterogeneous Continuum Model of Two-Phase Explosion Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhl, A L; Bell, J B

    2010-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A heterogeneous continuum model is proposed to describe the dispersion of a dense Aluminum particle cloud in an explosion. Let {alpha}{sub 1} denote the volume fraction occupied by the gas and {alpha}{sub 2} the fraction occupied by the solid, satisfying the volume conservation relation: {alpha}{sub 1} + {alpha}{sub 2} = 1. When the particle phase occupies a non-negligible volume fraction (i.e., {alpha}{sub 2} > 0), additional terms, proportional to {alpha}{sub 2}, appear in the conservation laws for two-phase flows. These include: (i) a particle pressure (due to particle collisions), (ii) a corresponding sound speed (which produces real eigenvalues for the particle phase system), (iii) an Archimedes force induced on the particle phase (by the gas pressure gradient), and (iv) multi-particle drag effects (which enhance the momentum coupling between phases). These effects modify the accelerations and energy distributions in the phases; we call this the Dense Heterogeneous Continuum Model. A characteristics analysis of the Model equations indicates that the system is hyperbolic with real eigenvalues for the gas phase: {l_brace}v{sub 1}, v{sub 1} {+-} {alpha}{sub 1}{r_brace} and for the 'particle gas' phase: {l_brace}v{sub 2}, v{sub 2} {+-}{alpha}{sub 2}{r_brace} and the particles: {l_brace}v{sub 2}{r_brace}, where v{sub i} and {alpha}{sub i} denote the velocity vector and sound speed of phase i. These can be used to construct a high-order Godunov scheme to integrate the conservation laws of a dense heterogeneous continuum.

  20. Domain growth in cholesteric blue phases: hybrid lattice Boltzmann simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Henrich; D. Marenduzzo; K. Stratford; M. E. Cates

    2009-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we review a hybrid lattice Boltzmann algorithm to solve the equations of motion of cholesteric liquid crystals. The method consists in coupling a lattice Boltzmann solver for the Navier-Stokes equation to a finite difference method to solve the dynamical equations governing the evolution of the liquid crystalline order parameter. We apply this method to study the growth of cholesteric blue phase domains, within a cholesteric phase. We focus on the growth of blue phase II and on a thin slab geometry in which the domain wall is flat. Our results show that, depending on the chirality, the growing blue phase is either BPII with no or few defects, or another structure with hexagonal ordering. We hope that our simulations will spur further experimental investigations on quenches in micron-size blue phase samples. The computational size that our hybrid lattice Boltzmann scheme can handle suggest that large scale simulations of new generation of blue phase liquid crystal device are within reach.

  1. ROYAUME DU MAROC Universit Hassan II -Casablanca

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ROYAUME DU MAROC Université Hassan II - Casablanca Faculté des Science Ben M'sik Casablanca UFR'Sik, Université Hassan II, Casablanca, Maroc Président BENNAMARA Ahmed Professeur à la Faculté des Sciences Ben M'Sik, Université Hassan II, Casablanca, Maroc Rapporteur TALBI Mohammed Professeur à la Faculté des Sciences Ben M

  2. Topaz II preliminary safety assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, A.C. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Standley, V. (Air Force Phillips Laboratory, Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Voss, S.S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Haskin, E. (New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) decided to investigate the possibility of launching a Russian Topaz 11 space nuclear power system. A preliminary safety assessment was conducted to determine whether or not a space mission could be conducted safely and within budget constraints. As part of this assessment, a safety policy and safety functional requirements were developed to guide both the safely assessment and future Topaz II activities. A review of the Russian flight safety program was conducted and documented. Our preliminary safety assessment included a top level event tree, neutronic analysis of normal and accident configurations, an evaluation of temperature coefficients of reactivity, a reentry and disposal analysis, and analysis of postulated launch abort impact accidents, and an analysis of postulated propellant fire and explosion accidents. Based on the assessment, it appears that it will be possible to safely launch the Topaz II system in the US with some possible system modifications. The principal system modifications will probably include design changes to preclude water flooded criticality and to assure intact reentry.

  3. Concrete Pour in NSLS-II Ring

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Bruno Semon

    2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The mezzanine floor of the ring building tunnel for NSLS-II was completed when the last concrete was placed in February 2011.

  4. Mass Spectrometer: Single Particle (SPLAT II) | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nano- and micro-scales. SPLAT II's applications include but are not limited to climate, air pollution, human health, bioterrorism, and emerging nanotechnologies. Portability is a...

  5. Septiembre 2002 Calculo Numerico II (4o

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quirós, Fernando

    Septiembre 2002 C´alculo Num´erico II (4o de Matem´aticas) 1er semestre 1. Responder razonadamente

  6. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    proteins (a protease), is implicated in numerous cellular processes including the degradation of the endogenous satiety agent cholecystokinin-8, making TPP II a target in the...

  7. BNL Photon Sciences | About NSLS-II

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    challenges at the nanoscale: Clean and Affordable Energy NSLS-II can image highly reactive gold nanoparticles inside porous hosts and under real reaction conditions. This...

  8. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    endogenous satiety agent cholecystokinin-8, making TPP II a target in the treatment of obesity. To gain insight into this molecular machine's mechanisms of activation and...

  9. Energy Efficient Aluminum Production - Pilot-Scale Cell Tests - Final Report for Phase I and Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Christini

    1999-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A cermet anode that produces oxygen and a cathode material that is wetted by aluminum can provide a dimensionally stable inter-electrode distance in the Hall-Heroult cell. This can be used to greatly improve the energy and/or productivity efficiencies. The concept, which was developed and tested, uses a system of vertically interleaved anodes and cathodes. The major advantage of this concept is the significant increase in electrochemical surface area compared to a horizontal orientation of anode and cathode that is presently used in the Hall-Heroult process. This creates an additional advantage for energy reduction of 1.3 kWh/lb or a 20% productivity improvement. The voltages obtained in an optimized cell test met the energy objectives of the project for at least two weeks. An acceptable current efficiency was never proven, however, during either pilot scale or bench scale tests with the vertical plate configuration. This must be done before a vertical cell can be considered viab le. Anode corrosion rate must be reduced by at least a factor of three in order to produce commercial purity aluminum. It is recommended that extensive theoretical and bench scale investigations be done to improve anode materials and to demonstrate acceptable current efficiencies in a vertical plate cell before pilot scale work is continued.

  10. Sperry Low Temperature Geothermal Conversion System, Phase 1 and Phase II. Final report. Volume III. Systems description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, H.B.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major fraction of hydrothermal resources that have the prospect of being economically useful for the generation of electricity are in the 300/sup 0/F to 425/sup 0/F temperature range. Cost-effective conversion of the geothermal energy to electricity requires the conception and reduction to practice of new ideas to improve conversion efficiency, enhance brine flow, reduce plant costs, increase plant availability, and shorten the time between investment and return. The problems addressed during past activities are those inherent in the geothermal environment, in the binary fluid cycle, in the difficulty of efficiently converting the energy of a low-temperature resource, and in geothermal economics. Explained in detail in this document, some of these problems are: the energy expended by the down-hole pump; the difficulty in designing reliable down-hole equipment; fouling of heat-exchanger surfaces by geothermal fluids; the unavailability of condenser cooling water at most geothermal sites; the large portion of the available energy used by the feed pump in a binary system; the pinch effect - a loss in available energy in transferring heat from water to an organic fluid; flow losses in fluids that carry only a small amount of useful energy to begin with; high heat-exchanger costs - the lower the temperature interval of the cycle, the higher the heat exchanger costs in $/kW (actually, more than inversely proportional); the complexity and cost of the many auxiliary elements of proposed geothermal plants; and the unfortunate cash flow vs. investment curve caused by the many years of investment required to bring a field into production before any income is realized.

  11. Solar Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production from Water Using a Dual Bed Photosystem - Phase I Final Report and Phase II Proposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clovis A. Linkous; Darlene K. Slattery

    2000-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we are attempting to perform the highly efficient storage of solar energy in the form of H{sub 2} via photocatalytic decomposition of water. While it has been demonstrated that H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} can be evolved from a single vessel containing a single suspended photocatalyst (Sayama 1994; 1997), we are attempting to perform net water-splitting by using two photocatalysts immobilized in separate containers, or beds. A schematic showing how the device would work is shown.

  12. Sperry Low Temperature Geothermal Conversion System, Phase I and Phase II. Volume V. Component development. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, C.; McBee, W.; Matthews, H.B.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fundamental inventions which motivate this program are system concepts centered on a novel heat engine cycle and the use of downwell heat exchange. Here, the primary emphasis is on downwell hardware. The only surface equipment included is the surface portion of the instrumentation and control systems. Downwell instrumentation is reported. Downwell conduits and techniques for installing, connecting and sealing them are covered. The downwell turbine-pump unit (TPU) is a critical component since it is relatively inaccessible and operates in a hostile environment. Its development is reported. The TPU for the gravity-head system requires a different type of turbine because of the large flow-rate through it and the small pressure difference across it. The design study for a Francis turbine to meet these requirements is reported. A feature of these systems is use of a downwell heat exchanger. There were extensive studies of tube-bundle configuration, tube-sheet seals, structural integrity, and flow and heat transfer, as well as the research on welded connections and sliding elastomeric seals. Another innovative component in these systems is the enthalpy recovery unit (ERU). This direct-contact heat exchanger compensates for under-cooling in the condenser and superheat in the main turbine exhaust.

  13. Phase modulated multiphoton microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karki, Khadga Jung; Pullerits, Tonu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the modulation of the phases of the laser beams of ultra-short pulses leads to modulation of the two photon fluorescence intensity. The phase modulation technique when used in multi-photon microscopy can improve the signal to noise ratio. The technique can also be used in multiplexing the signals in the frequency domain in multi-focal raster scanning microscopy. As the technique avoids the use of array detectors as well as elaborate spatiotemporal multiplexing schemes it provides a convenient means to multi-focal scanning in axial direction. We show examples of such uses. Similar methodology can be used in other non-linear scanning microscopies, such as second or third harmonic generation microscopy.

  14. Phase Change | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPOPetroleum Reserves Vision, Mission and1ProposalPhase

  15. Theory of Polar Blue Phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaikh M. Shamid; David W. Allender; Jonathan V. Selinger

    2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In liquid crystals, if flexoelectric couplings between polar order and director gradients are strong enough, the uniform nematic phase can become unstable to formation of a modulated polar phase. Previous theories have predicted two types of modulation, twist-bend and splay-bend; the twist-bend phase has been found in recent experiments. Here, we investigate other types of modulation, using lattice simulations and Landau theory. In addition to twist-bend and splay-bend, we also find polar blue phases, with 2D or 3D modulations of both director and polar order. We compare polar blue phases with chiral blue phases, and discuss opportunities for observing them experimentally.

  16. Modeling the free energy surfaces of electron transfer in condensed phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matyushov, Dmitry

    PROOF COPY 509037JCP Modeling the free energy surfaces of electron transfer in condensed phases analytical solution for the ET free energy surfaces demonstrates the following features: i the range of ET reaction coordinates is limited by a one-sided fluctuation band, ii the ET free energies are infinite

  17. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, Solar Neutrino Measurement from the Second Phase of the Super-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokyo, University of

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, IRVINE Solar Neutrino Measurement from the Second Phase of the Super-Kamiokande . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 2.3.3 GALLEX/GNO & SAGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 2.3.4 Super-Kamiokande Solar Neutrino Data . . . . . . . . . . . 30 3 THE SUPER-KAMIOKANDE-II DETECTOR 34 3.1 Experiment

  18. State-of-the-Art and Outlook: Thermal Properties of Phase Change Wallboard Rooms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, G.; Liang, R.; Li, G.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Envelope Technologies for Building Energy Efficiency Vol.II-2-4 State-of-the Art and Outlook: Thermal Properties of Phase Change Wallboard Rooms1 Guohui Feng Ruobing Liang Li Gang Ph.D. Professor...

  19. Phase-space geometry of the generalized Langevin equation Thomas Bartsch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    used to model the influence of a heat bath upon a reactive system. This equation will here be studied of coupled ordinary differential equations, and the fundamental geometric structures in phase space the dynamics, (ii) a stochastic force, and (iii) a dissipative friction force. The latter two forces

  20. Trace element geochemistry of ordinary chondrite chondrules: the type I/type II chondrule dichotomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacquet, Emmanuel; Gounelle, Matthieu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report trace element concentrations of silicate phases in chondrules from LL3 ordinary chondrites Bishunpur and Semarkona. Results are similar to previously reported data for carbonaceous chondrites, with rare earth element (REE) concentrations increasing in the sequence olivine ~ 10 K/h) than type I chondrules. Appreciable Na concentrations (3-221 ppm) are measured in olivine from both chondrule types; type II chondrules seem to have behaved as closed systems, which may require chondrule formation in the vicinity of protoplanets or planetesimals. At any rate, higher solid concentrations in type II chondrule forming regions may explain the higher oxygen fugacities they record compared to type I chondrules. Type I and type II chondrules formed in different environments and the correlation between high solid concentrations and/or oxygen fugacities with rapid cooling rates is a key constraint that chondrule formation models must account for.

  1. The synthesis and characterization of zinc(II) and copper(II) diphosphonatoalkanes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Deirdre I.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ZINC(II) AND COPPER(II) DIPHOSPHONATOALKANES A Thesis by DEIRDRE I. ARNOLD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2000 Major Subject: Chemistry THE SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ZINC(II) AND COPPER(II) DIPHOSPHONATOALKANES A Thesis by DEIRDRE I. ARNOLD Submitted to Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  2. TPOP-II: Tritium Fueling at a Re P. W. Fisher and M. J. Gouge Oak Ridge National Labora

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TPOP-II: Tritium Fueling at a Re Scale P. W. Fisher and M. J. Gouge Oak Ridge National Labora properties of extruded t repeating single-stage pneumatic pellet injector, called the Tritium-Proof-o Phase at the Los Alamos Nati Laboratory Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA). About 38 g of tritium utilized

  3. Lead(ii) Detection An Exceptionally Selective Lead(ii)-Regulatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Chuan

    Lead(ii) Detection An Exceptionally Selective Lead(ii)-Regulatory Protein from Ralstonia Metallidurans: Development of a Fluorescent Lead(ii) Probe** Peng Chen, Bill Greenberg, Safiyh Taghavi, Christine Romano, Daniel van der Lelie, and Chuan He* Lead contamination is a serious threat to human health

  4. Reservoir analysis study: Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Elk Hills Field, Kern County, California: Phase 3 report, Recommended additional reservoir engineering analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The basis for completion of the Phase III tasks above were the reports of Phases I and II and the associated backup material. The Phase II report was reviewed to identify the major uncertainties in all of the reserve assignments. In addition to the Proved, Probable and Possible reserves of Phase II, ''potential reserves'' or those associated with a greater degree of risk than the Possible reserves included in the Phase II report, were also identified based on the work performed by Bergeson through the Phase II reporting date. Thirty-three specific studies were identified to address the major Phase II reserve uncertainties or these potential reserves. These studies are listed in Table 1 and are grouped by the Elk Hills pool designation. The basis and need for each study are elaborated in the discussion which follows. Where possible, the need for the study was quantified by associating the study with a particular reserve estimate which would be clarified by the analysis. This reserve value was either the Probable or Possible reserves which were being studied, the potential reserves that were identified, or simply the uncertainty inherent in the proved reserves as identified in the study purpose. The costs associated with performing the study are also shown in Table 1 and were estimated based on Bergeson's knowledge of the Elk Hills reservoirs and data base following Phases I and II, as well as the company's experience in performing similar studies in other fields. The cost estimates are considered reasonable for general budgeting purposes, but may require refinement prior to actual initiation of these studies. This is particularly true for studies involving field testing to obtain additional log, core or test information as the cost of such items is not considered in this report. 51 figs., 46 tabs.

  5. Certification report for final closure of Y-12 Centralized Sanitary Landfill II, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report represents the Geotek Engineering Company, Inc., (Geotek) record of activities to support certification of final closure Of the subject Y-12 Centralized Sanitary Landfill II. Ex as noted herein, final closure of the landfill was completed in accordance with the Y-12 Centralized Sanitary Landfill 11 Closure/Post Closure Plan, Revision 2, submitted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) on April 14, 1992, and approved by TDEC on May 27, 1994 (the ``Closure Plan``). minor modification to the Closure Plan allowing partial closure of the Y-12 Centralized Sanitary Landfill II (Phase 1) was approved by TDEC on August 3, 1994. The Phase I portion of the closure for the subject landfill was completed on March 25, 1995. A closure certification report entitled Certification Report for Partial Closure of Y-12 Centralized Sanitary Landfill II was submitted to Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., (LMES) on March 28, 1995. The final closure represents the completion of the closure activities for the entire Y-12 Centralized Sanitary Landfill II Site. The contents of this report and accompanying certification are based on observations by Geotek engineers and geologists during closure activities and on review of reports, records, laboratory test results, and other information furnished to Geotek by LMES.

  6. Characterizing the V-band light-curves of hydrogen-rich type II supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Joseph P.; González-Gaitán, Santiago; Hamuy, Mario; Gutiérrez, Claudia P.; Antezana, Roberto; De Jaeger, Thomas; Förster, Francisco; González, Luis [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Stritzinger, Maximilian D.; Contreras, Carlos [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Olivares E, Felipe [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Avda. Republica 252, Santiago (Chile); Phillips, Mark M.; Campillay, Abdo; Castellón, Sergio; Hsiao, Eric [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); Schulze, Steve [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontifícia Universidad Católica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Bolt, Luis [Argelander Institut für Astronomie, Universität Bonn, Auf dem Hügel 71, D-53111 Bonn (Germany); Folatelli, Gastón [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (IPMU), University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Freedman, Wendy L. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Krzemi?ski, Wojtek, E-mail: janderso@eso.org [N. Copernicus Astronomical Center, ul. Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warszawa (Poland); and others

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of the diversity of V-band light-curves of hydrogen-rich type II supernovae. Analyzing a sample of 116 supernovae, several magnitude measurements are defined, together with decline rates at different epochs, and time durations of different phases. It is found that magnitudes measured at maximum light correlate more strongly with decline rates than those measured at other epochs: brighter supernovae at maximum generally have faster declining light-curves at all epochs. We find a relation between the decline rate during the 'plateau' phase and peak magnitudes, which has a dispersion of 0.56 mag, offering the prospect of using type II supernovae as purely photometric distance indicators. Our analysis suggests that the type II population spans a continuum from low-luminosity events which have flat light-curves during the 'plateau' stage, through to the brightest events which decline much faster. A large range in optically thick phase durations is observed, implying a range in progenitor envelope masses at the epoch of explosion. During the radioactive tails, we find many supernovae with faster declining light-curves than expected from full trapping of radioactive emission, implying low mass ejecta. It is suggested that the main driver of light-curve diversity is the extent of hydrogen envelopes retained before explosion. Finally, a new classification scheme is introduced where hydrogen-rich events are typed as simply 'SN II' with an 's {sub 2}' value giving the decline rate during the 'plateau' phase, indicating its morphological type.

  7. SWAMI II technology transfer plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, C.R.; Peterson, K.D.; Harpring, L.J.; Immel, D.M.; Jones, J.D.; Mallet, W.R.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Thousands of drums of radioactive/hazardous/mixed waste are currently stored at DOE sites throughout US; they are stored in warehouse facilities on an interim basis, pending final disposition. Recent emphasis on anticipated decommissioning of facilities indicates that many more drums of waste will be generated, requiring additional storage. Federal and state regulations dictate that hazardous waste covered by RCRA be inspected periodically for container degradation and to verify inventories. All known DOE waste storage facilities are currently inspected manually. A system to perform robotic inspection of waste drums is under development by the SRTC Robotics Group of WSRC; it is called the Stored Waste Autonomous Mobile Inspector (SWAMI). The first version, SWAMI I, was developed by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) as a proof of principle system for autonomous inspection of drums in a warehouse. SWAMI I was based on the Transitions Research Corporation (TRC) HelpMate mobile robot. TRC modified the Helpmate to navigate in aisles of drums. SRTC added subsystems to SWAMI I to determine its position in open areas, read bar code labels on the drums up to three levels high, capture images of the drums and perform a radiation survey of the floor in the aisles. The radiation survey was based on SRTC patented technology first implemented on the Semi-Intelligent Mobile Observing Navigator (SIMON). The radiation survey is not essential for the inspection of drums, but is an option that can increase the utility and effectiveness of SWAMI in warehouses with radioactive and/or mixed waste. All the sensors on SWAMI I were fixed on the vehicle. From the success of SWAMI I, a second version, SWAMI II, was developed; it will be evaluated at Fernald and tested with two other mobile robots. Intent is to transfer the technology developed for SWAMI I and II to industry so that it can supply additional units for purchase for drum inspection.

  8. Berry-Phase induced Heat Pumping and its Impact on the Fluctuation Theorem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ren, Jie; Li, Baowen

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Applying adiabatic, cyclic two parameter modulations we investigate quantum heat transfer across an anharmonic molecular junction contacted with two heat baths. We demonstrate that the pumped heat typically exhibits a Berry phase effect in providing an additional geometric contribution to heat flux. Remarkably, a robust fractional quantized geometric phonon response is identified as well. The presence of this geometric phase contribution in turn causes a breakdown of the fluctuation theorem of the Gallavotti-Cohen type for quantum heat transfer. This can be restored only if (i) the geometric phase contribution vanishes and if (ii) the cyclic protocol preserves the detailed balance symmetry.

  9. Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration - Phase I Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William L. Osborn, Susan Petty, Trenton T. Cladouhos, Joe Iovenitti, Laura Nofziger, Owen Callahan, Douglas S. Perry and Paul L. Stern

    2011-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase I of the Newberry Volcano Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) Demonstration included permitting, community outreach, seismic hazards analysis, initial microseismic array deployment and calibration, final MSA design, site characterization, and stimulation planning. The multi-disciplinary Phase I site characterization supports stimulation planning and regulatory permitting, as well as addressing public concerns including water usage and induced seismicity. A review of the project'Ã?Â?Ã?Â?s water usage plan by an independent hydrology consultant found no expected impacts to local stakeholders, and recommended additional monitoring procedures. The IEA Protocol for Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems was applied to assess site conditions, properly inform stakeholders, and develop a comprehensive mitigation plan. Analysis of precision LiDAR elevation maps has concluded that there is no evidence of recent faulting near the target well. A borehole televiewer image log of the well bore revealed over three hundred fractures and predicted stress orientations. No natural, background seismicity has been identified in a review of historic data, or in more than seven months of seismic data recorded on an array of seven seismometers operating around the target well. A seismic hazards and induced seismicity risk assessment by an independent consultant concluded that the Demonstration would contribute no additional risk to residents of the nearest town of La Pine, Oregon. In Phase II of the demonstration, an existing deep hot well, NWG 55-29, will be stimulated using hydroshearing techniques to create an EGS reservoir. The Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration is allowing geothermal industry and academic experts to develop, validate and enhance geoscience and engineering techniques, and other procedures essential to the expansion of EGS throughout the country. Successful development will demonstrate to the American public that EGS can play a significant role in reducing foreign energy dependence, and provide clean, renewable, baseload geothermal power generation in the State of Oregon.

  10. Organizational Setting II.A External

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scharfstein, Daniel

    Chapter II Organizational Setting II.A External CEPH Criterion The School shall be an integral part to professional schools in that institution #12;External Organizational Setting CEPH Expected Documentation 1 bodies (other than CEPH) to which the institution responds 2 An organizational chart of the University

  11. LABORATORY II ENERGY AND ELECTRIC CIRCUITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LABORATORY II ENERGY AND ELECTRIC CIRCUITS Lab II - 1 It is often useful to study physical. An electric circuit illustrates how energy can be transformed within a system, transferred to different parts it is the electric charge that transports the energy from one place in the system to another

  12. CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Bezier Curves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Jing

    B inin i - = - = - CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Properties · End point interpolation. · Basis inin uu i n uu 0 )1()]1([1 CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Recursive Computation: The De Casteljau uu i n uu i n uB n i n i iniini inin i - - - -- - +-= - - - +- - = - = #12;CSC6870

  13. Multi-phasing CFD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stosic, Zoran V. [Framatome ANP GmbH, P.O. Box 3220, 91050 Erlangen (Germany); Stevanovic, Vladimir D. [University of Belgrade, Kraljice Marije 16, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro (Yugoslavia)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computational fluid dynamics for multiphase flows is an emerging field. Due to the complexity and divergence of multiphase thermal and hydraulic problems, further development of multiphase flow modelling, closure laws and numerical methods is needed in order to achieve the general purpose and optimised CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) methods, which will be applicable to the wide variety of multiphase flow problems. In the paper, an original approach to the various aspects of multiphase CFD modelling is presented. It is based on the multi-fluid modelling approach, development of necessary closure laws and derivation of appropriate numerical methods for efficient governing equations solution. Velocity and pressure fields are solved with the SIMPLE (Semi-Implicit Method for Pressure-Linked Equations) type pressure-corrector method developed for the multiphase flow conditions. For the solution of scalar parameters transport equations both implicit and explicit methods are presented. The implicit method is suitable for steady state, slow transients and problems without the sharp fronts propagation. Explicit method is developed in order to predict scalar parameters fronts propagation, as well as phase interface tracking problems. The challenge towards the multiphase flow solution on both the macro and micro level is presented in order to perform multiphase CFD simulations and analyses of multiphase flows in complex geometry of nuclear power plant components, such as nuclear fuel rod bundles thermal-hydraulics. Presented methodology and obtained CFD results comprise micro-scale phenomena of phases' separation, interface tracking, heated surfaces dry-out and critical heat flux occurrence, as well as macro-scale transport and distributions of phase volumes. (authors)

  14. TRUPACT-II Operating and Maintenance Instructions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Waste Isolation Division

    1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to provide the technical requirements for preparation for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of a Transuranic Package Transporter Model II (TRUPACT-II) Shipping Package and directly related components. This document complies with the minimum requirements as specified in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9218. In the event there is a conflict between this document and the TRUPACT-II SARP, the TRUPACT-II SARP shall govern. TRUPACT-II C of C number 9218 states, ''... each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application.'' It further states, ''... each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the application.'' Chapter 9 of the TRUPACT-II SARP charges the Westinghouse Electric Corporation Waste Isolation Division (WID) with assuring that the TRUPACT-II is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. To meet this requirement and verify consistency of operations when loading and unloading the TRUPACT-II on the trailer, placing a payload in the packaging, unloading the payload from the packaging, or performing maintenance, the U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Area Office (U.S. DOE/CAO) finds it necessary to implement the changes that follow. This TRUPACT-II maintenance document represents a change to previous philosophy regarding site specific procedures for the use of the TRUPACT-II. This document details the instructions to be followed to consistently operate and maintain the TRUPACT-II. The intent of these instructions is to ensure that all users of the TRUPACT-II follow the same or equivalent instructions. Users may achieve this intent by any of the following methods: (1) Utilizing these instructions as is, or (2) Attaching a site-specific cover page/letter to this document stating that these are the instructions to be used at their location, or (3) Sites may prepare their own document using the steps in this document word-for-word, in-sequence, including Notes and Cautions. Site specific information may be included as deemed necessary. Submit the document to WID National TRU Programs for approval. Any revision made subsequent to WID TRU Program's approval shall be reviewed and approved by WID TRU Programs. A copy of the approval letter from WID National TRU Programs should be available for audit purposes. Users shall develop site-specific procedures addressing leak testing, preoperational activities, quality assurance, hoisting and rigging, and radiation health physics to be used in conjunction with the instructions contained in this document. Users desiring to recommend changes to this document may submit their recommendations to the WID National TRU Programs for evaluation. If approved, the change(s) will be incorporated into this document for use by all TRUPACT-II users. User sites will be audited to this document to ensure compliance within one year from the effective date of this revision. This document discusses operating instructions, required inspections and maintenance for the following: TRUPACT-II packaging, and Miscellaneous packaging, special tools, and equipment. Packaging and payload handling equipment and transport trailers have been specifically designed for use with the TRUPACT-II Packaging. This document discusses the required instructions for use of the following equipment in conjunction with the TRUPACT-II Packaging: TRUPACT-II Mobile Loading Unit (MLU), Adjustable Center-of-Gravity Lift Fixture (ACGLF), and TRUPACT-II Transport Trailer. Attachment E contains the various TRUPACT-II packaging interface control drawings, leak-test and vent-port tool drawings, ACGLF drawings, and tie-down drawings that identify the various system components.

  15. NGNP PHASE I REVIEW

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferApril 1,(EAC)TABLEChallenges| Department of EnergyFriday,NGNP PHASE I

  16. Advanced Communication and Control for Distributed Energy Resource Integration: Phase 2 Scientific Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BPL Global

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research project is to demonstrate sensing, communication, information and control technologies to achieve a seamless integration of multivendor distributed energy resource (DER) units at aggregation levels that meet individual user requirements for facility operations (residential, commercial, industrial, manufacturing, etc.) and further serve as resource options for electric and natural gas utilities. The fully demonstrated DER aggregation system with embodiment of communication and control technologies will lead to real-time, interactive, customer-managed service networks to achieve greater customer value. Work on this Advanced Communication and Control Project (ACCP) consists of a two-phase approach for an integrated demonstration of communication and control technologies to achieve a seamless integration of DER units to reach progressive levels of aggregated power output. Phase I involved design and proof-of-design, and Phase II involves real-world demonstration of the Phase I design architecture. The scope of work for Phase II of this ACCP involves demonstrating the Phase I design architecture in large scale real-world settings while integrating with the operations of one or more electricity supplier feeder lines. The communication and control architectures for integrated demonstration shall encompass combinations of software and hardware components, including: sensors, data acquisition and communication systems, remote monitoring systems, metering (interval revenue, real-time), local and wide area networks, Web-based systems, smart controls, energy management/information systems with control and automation of building energy loads, and demand-response management with integration of real-time market pricing. For Phase II, BPL Global shall demonstrate the Phase I design for integrating and controlling the operation of more than 10 DER units, dispersed at various locations in one or more Independent System Operator (ISO) Control Areas, at an aggregated scale of more than 1 MW, to provide grid support. Actual performance data with respect to each specified function above is to be collected during the Phase II field demonstration. At a minimum, the Phase II demonstration shall span one year of field operations. The demonstration performance will need to be validated by the target customer(s) for acceptance and subsequent implementation. An ISO must be involved in demonstration planning and execution. As part of the Phase II work, BPL Global shall develop a roadmap to commercialization that identifies and quantifies the potential markets for the integrated, aggregated DER systems and for the communication and control technologies demonstrated in Phase I. In addition, the roadmap must identify strategies and actions, as well as the regional and national markets where the aggregated DER systems with communication and control solutions will be introduced, along with a timeline projected for introduction into each identified market. In Phase I of this project, we developed a proof-of-concept ACCP system and architecture and began to test its functionality at real-world sites. These sites had just over 10 MW of DERs and allowed us to identify what needed to be done to commercialize this concept. As a result, we started Phase II by looking at our existing platform and identified its strengths and weaknesses as well as how it would need to evolve for commercialization. During this process, we worked with different stakeholders in the market including: Independent System Operators, DER owners and operators, and electric utility companies to fully understand the issues from all of the different perspectives. Once we had an understanding of the commercialized ACCP system, we began to document and prepare detailed designs of the different system components. The components of the system with the most significant design improvements were: the on-site remote terminal unit, the communication technology between the remote site and the data center, and the scalability and reliability of the data center application.

  17. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Parking Lot Lighting at T.J.Maxx in Manchester, NH Phase I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myer, Michael; Goettel, Russell T.

    2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A report describing the process and results of replacing existing parking lot lighting, looking at a LED option with occupancy sensors, and conventional alternates. Criteria include payback, light levels, occupant satisfaction. This report is Phase I of II. Phase I deals with initial installation.

  18. Magnetic field-induced phase transformation and variant reorientation in Ni2MnGa and NiMnCoIn magnetic shape memory alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karaca, Haluk Ersin

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to reveal the governing mechanisms responsible for the magnetic field-induced i) martensite reorientation in Ni2MnGa single crystals, ii) stress-assisted phase transformation in Ni2MnGa single crystals and iii) phase...

  19. Nonionic diethanolamide amphiphiles with isoprenoid-type hydrocarbon chains: thermotropic and lyotropic liquid crystalline phase behaviour

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sagnella, Sharon M.; Conn, Charlotte E.; Krodkiewska, Irena; Drummond, Calum J. (CSIRO/MSE)

    2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermotropic and lyotropic liquid crystalline phase behaviour of a series of diethanolamide amphiphiles with isoprenoid-type hydrocarbon chains (geranoyl, H-farnesoyl, and phytanoyl) has been investigated. When neat, both H-farnesoyl and phytanoyl diethanolamide form a smectic liquid crystalline structure at sub-zero temperatures. In addition, all three diethanolamides exhibit a glass transition temperature at around -73 C. Geranoyl diethanolamide forms a lamellar crystalline phase with a lattice parameter of 17.4 {angstrom} following long term storage accompanied by the loss of the glass transition. In the presence of water, H-farnesoyl and phytanoyl diethanolamide form lyotropic liquid crystalline phases, whilst geranoyl diethanolamide forms an L{sub 2} phase. H-farnesoyl diethanolamide forms a fluid lamellar phase (L{sub {alpha}}) at room temperature and up to {approx} 40 C. Phytanoyl diethanolamide displays a rich mesomorphism forming the inverse diamond (Q{sub II}{sup D}) and gyroid (Q{sub II}{sup G}) bicontinuous cubic phases in addition to an L{sub {alpha}} phase.

  20. Photospheric magnitude diagrams for type II supernovat: A promising tool to compute distances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodríguez, Ósmar; Clocchiatti, Alejandro; Hamuy, Mario, E-mail: olrodrig@astro.puc.cl [Millennium Institute of Astrophysics, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile)

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop an empirical color-based standardization for Type II supernovae (SNe II), equivalent to the classical surface brightness method given in Wesselink. We calibrate this standardization using SNe II with host galaxy distances measured using Cepheids, and a well-constrained shock breakout epoch and extinction due to the host galaxy. We estimate the reddening with an analysis of the B – V versus V – I color-color curves, similar to that of Natali et al. With four SNe II meeting the above requirements, we build a photospheric magnitude versus color diagram (similar to an H-R diagram) with a dispersion of 0.29 mag. We also show that when using time since shock breakout instead of color as the independent variable, the same standardization gives a dispersion of 0.09 mag. Moreover, we show that the above time-based standardization corresponds to the generalization of the standardized candle method of Hamuy and Pinto for various epochs throughout the photospheric phase. To test the new tool, we construct Hubble diagrams for different subsamples of 50 low-redshift (cz < 10{sup 4} km s{sup –1}) SNe II. For 13 SNe within the Hubble flow (cz {sub CMB} > 3000 km s{sup –1}) and with a well-constrained shock breakout epoch we obtain values of 68-69 km s{sup –1} Mpc{sup –1} for the Hubble constant and a mean intrinsic scatter of 0.12 mag or 6% in relative distances.

  1. Polymer dynamics in the depinned phase: metastability with logarithmic barriers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pietro Caputo; Hubert Lacoin; Fabio Martinelli; François Simenhaus; Fabio Lucio Toninelli

    2010-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the stochastic evolution of a (1 + 1)-dimensional polymer in the depinned regime. At equilibrium the system exhibits a double well structure: the polymer lies(essentially) either above or below the repulsive line. As a consequence one expects a metastable behavior with rare jumps between the two phases combined with a fast thermalization inside each phase. However the energy barrier between these two phases is only logarithmic in the system size L and therefore the two relevant time scales are only polynomial in L with no clear-cut separation between them. The whole evolution is governed by a subtle competition between the diffusive behavior inside one phase and the jumps across the energy barriers. In particular the usual scenario in which the tunneling time coincides with the exponential of the energy barrier breaks down. Our main results are: (i) a proof that the mixing time of the system lies between L^{5/2} and L^{5/2+2}; (ii) the identification of two regions associated with the positive and negative phase of the polymer together with the proof of the asymptotic exponentiality of the tunneling time between them with rate equal to a half of the spectral gap.

  2. PARS II Data Quality Memorandum from Deputy Secretary Poneman...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    PARS II Data Quality Memorandum from Deputy Secretary Poneman (June 19, 2012) PARS II Data Quality Memorandum from Deputy Secretary Poneman (June 19, 2012) PARS II Data Quality.pdf...

  3. array ii comparing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I I I I IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII I II I I I II I I I II I I 292 STEAM RECEIVER MODELS FOR SOLAR DISH CONCENTRATORS: TWO MODELS COMPARED Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization...

  4. Phase diagram of chiral and diquark condensates at finite temperature and density in the 2-dimensional Gross Neveu model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiroaki Kohyama

    2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct the phase diagram of the chiral and diquark condensates at finite temperature and density in the 1+1 dimensional (2D) two flavor massless Gross Neveu model. The resultant phase diagram shows (I) the chiral condensed phase at low temperature and density, (II) the diquark condensed phase at low temperature and high density, and (III) the chiral and diquark coexisting phase at low temperature and intermediate density. This phase structure is also seen in the 3D Gross Neveu model and the 4D Nambu Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model. Thus the phase diagrams of the chiral and diquark condensates in the NJL-type models do not change qualitatively in 2D, 3D and 4D.

  5. Management plan report. Unconfined open-water disposal of dredged material. Phase 2. (North and south puget sound)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the findings of Phase II of the Puget Sound Dredged Disposal Analysis (PSDDA), a comprehensive study of unconfined dredged material disposal in deep waters of Puget Sound. The study was undertaken as a cooperative effort by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the State of Washington Departments of Natural Resources (DNR) and Ecology (Ecology). A management plan for the Phase II area (North and South Puget Sound) is presented which identifies selected unconfined, open-water disposal sites, evaluation procedures for dredged material being considered for disposal at these sites, and site management considerations including environmental monitoring.

  6. Radiological Release Accident Investigation Report - Phase 1...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Radiological Release Accident Investigation Report - Phase 1 Radiation Report Radiological Release Accident Investigation Report - Phase 1 Radiation Report Phase 1 of this accident...

  7. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels II...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Steels II Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels II 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

  8. aerosols ii particle: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    27 PARTICLE FLUX CALCULATION-II Sergei Striganov Physics Websites Summary: PARTICLE FLUX CALCULATION-II Sergei Striganov Fermilab May 10, 2006 12;Detector positions 12 (p>18...

  9. Managing Category I and II Asbestos-Containing Materials During...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Managing Category I and II Asbestos-Containing Materials During Decontamination and Demolition Managing Category I and II Asbestos-Containing Materials During Decontamination and...

  10. Joint estimation of phase and phase diffusion for quantum metrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mihai D. Vidrighin; Gaia Donati; Marco G. Genoni; Xian-Min Jin; W. Steven Kolthammer; M. S. Kim; Animesh Datta; Marco Barbieri; Ian A. Walmsley

    2014-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase estimation, at the heart of many quantum metrology and communication schemes, can be strongly affected by noise, whose amplitude may not be known, or might be subject to drift. Here, we investigate the joint estimation of a phase shift and the amplitude of phase diffusion, at the quantum limit. For several relevant instances, this multiparameter estimation problem can be effectively reshaped as a two-dimensional Hilbert space model, encompassing the description of an interferometer phase probed with relevant quantum states -- split single-photons, coherent states or N00N states. For these cases, we obtain a trade-off bound on the statistical variances for the joint estimation of phase and phase diffusion, as well as optimum measurement schemes. We use this bound to quantify the effectiveness of an actual experimental setup for joint parameter estimation for polarimetry. We conclude by discussing the form of the trade-off relations for more general states and measurements.

  11. Solid Waste Operations Complex W-113, Detail Design Report (Title II). Volume 1: Title II design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solid Waste Retrieval Facility--Phase 1 (Project W113) will provide the infrastructure and the facility required to retrieve from Trench 04, Burial ground 4C, contact handled (CH) drums and boxes at a rate that supports all retrieved TRU waste batching, treatment, storage, and disposal plans. This includes (1) operations related equipment and facilities, viz., a weather enclosure for the trench, retrieval equipment, weighing, venting, obtaining gas samples, overpacking, NDE, NDA, shipment of waste and (2) operations support related facilities, viz., a general office building, a retrieval staff change facility, and infrastructure upgrades such as supply and routing of water, sewer, electrical power, fire protection, roads, and telecommunication. Title I design for the operations related equipment and facilities was performed by Raytheon/BNFL, and that for the operations support related facilities including infrastructure upgrade was performed by KEH. These two scopes were combined into an integrated W113 Title II scope that was performed by Raytheon/BNFL. Volume 1 provides a comprehensive narrative description of the proposed facility and systems, the basis for each of the systems design, and the engineering assessments that were performed to support the technical basis of the Title II design. The intent of the system description presented is to provide WHC an understanding of the facilities and equipment provided and the A/E`s perspective on how these systems will operate.

  12. Berry Phase in Neutrino Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao-Gang He; Xue-Qian Li; Bruce H. J. McKellar; Yue Zhang

    2005-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the Berry phase in neutrino oscillations for both Dirac and Majorana neutrinos. In order to have a Berry phase, the neutrino oscillations must occur in a varying medium, the neutrino-background interactions must depend on at least two independent densities, and also there must be CP violation if the neutrino interactions with matter are mediated only by the standard model W and Z boson exchanges which implies that there must be at least three generations of neutrinos. The CP violating Majorana phases do not play a role in generating a Berry phase. We show that a natural way to satisfy the conditions for the generation of a Berry phase is to have sterile neutrinos with active-sterile neutrino mixing, in which case at least two active and one sterile neutrinos are required. If there are additional new CP violating flavor changing interactions, it is also possible to have a non-zero Berry phase with just two generations.

  13. q < 1 discharges in Tokapole II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osborne, T. H.; Dexter, R. N.; Prager, S. C.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations are reported of discharges in which safety factor q values are obtained as low as 0.4 in Tokapole II, a tokamak with a four-node poloidal divertor configuration.

  14. NSLS-II Transport Line Progress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fliller R. P.; Wahl, W.; Anderson, A.; Benish, B.; DeBoer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Heese, R.; Hseuh, H.-C.; Hu, J.-P.; Johanson, M.P.; Kosciuk, B.N.; Padrazo, D.; Roy, K.; Shaftan, T.; Singh, O.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.

    2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a state-of-the-art 3-GeV third generation light source currently under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The NSLS-II injection system consists of a 200 MeV linac, a 3-GeV booster synchrotron and associated transfer lines. The first part of the Linac to Booster Transport (LBT) line has been installed for linac commissioning. This part includes all components necessary to commission the NSLS-II linac. The second part of this transport line is undergoing installation. Initial results of hardware commissioning will be discussed. The Booster to Storage Ring (BSR) transport line underwent a design review. The first part of the BSR transport line, consisting of all components necessary to commission the booster will be installed in 2012 for booster commissioning. We report on the final design of the BSR line along with the plan to commission the booster.

  15. NDCX-II project commencing at LBNL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, Alex

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Department of Energy prepared by LBNL under Contract No. DE-NDCX-II project commencing at LBNL Alex Friedman, LLNL,and Joe Kwan, LBNL Construction is beginning on the second

  16. Advanced topics in control systems theory II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nesic, Dragan

    Advanced topics in control systems theory II Lecture notes from FAP 2005 Editors: Antonio Lor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 1.8.2 Inverted Pendulum.4 The desired energy function Hd with kv = 0. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 1.5 Closed-loop responses

  17. PEP-II Status and Outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wienands, H.U.; Biagini, M.E.; Decker, F.J.; Donald, M.H.; Ecklund, S.; Fisher, A.; Holtzapple, R.L.; Iverson, R.H.; Krejcik, P.; Kulikov, A.V.; Meyer, T.; Nelson, J.; Novokhatski, A.; Reichel, I.; Sullivan, M.; Seeman, J.T.; Turner, J.; /SLAC; Steier, C.; Zisman, M.S.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    PEP-II/BABAR are presently in their second physics run. With machine and detector performance and reliability at an all-time high, almost 51 fb{sup -1} have been integrated by BABAR up to mid-October 2001. PEP-II luminosity has reached 4.4 x 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} and our highest monthly delivered luminosity has been above 6 pb{sup -1}, exceeding the performance parameters given in the PEP-II CDR by almost 50%. The increase compared to the first run in 2000 has been achieved by a combination of beam-current increase and beam-size decrease. In this paper we will summarize the PEP-II performance and the present limitations as well as our plans to further increase machine performance.

  18. Blade System Design Study. Part II, final project report (GEC).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, Dayton A. (DNV Global Energy Concepts Inc., Seattle, WA)

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Low Wind Speed Turbine program, Global Energy Concepts LLC (GEC)1 has studied alternative composite materials for wind turbine blades in the multi-megawatt size range. This work in one of the Blade System Design Studies (BSDS) funded through Sandia National Laboratories. The BSDS program was conducted in two phases. In the Part I BSDS, GEC assessed candidate innovations in composite materials, manufacturing processes, and structural configurations. GEC also made recommendations for testing composite coupons, details, assemblies, and blade substructures to be carried out in the Part II study (BSDS-II). The BSDS-II contract period began in May 2003, and testing was initiated in June 2004. The current report summarizes the results from the BSDS-II test program. Composite materials evaluated include carbon fiber in both pre-impregnated and vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) forms. Initial thin-coupon static testing included a wide range of parameters, including variation in manufacturer, fiber tow size, fabric architecture, and resin type. A smaller set of these materials and process types was also evaluated in thin-coupon fatigue testing, and in ply-drop and ply-transition panels. The majority of materials used epoxy resin, with vinyl ester (VE) resin also used for selected cases. Late in the project, testing of unidirectional fiberglass was added to provide an updated baseline against which to evaluate the carbon material performance. Numerous unidirectional carbon fabrics were considered for evaluation with VARTM infusion. All but one fabric style considered suffered either from poor infusibility or waviness of fibers combined with poor compaction. The exception was a triaxial carbon-fiberglass fabric produced by SAERTEX. This fabric became the primary choice for infused articles throughout the test program. The generally positive results obtained in this program for the SAERTEX material have led to its being used in innovative prototype blades of 9-m and 30-m length, as well as other non-wind related structures.

  19. Method for aqueous phase reactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elliott, Douglas C. (Richland, WA); Hart, Todd R. (Kennewick, WA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for converting liquid organic material in a mixture into a product utilizing a catalyst in the form of a plurality of porous particles wherein each particle is a support having nickel metal catalytic phase or reduced nickel deposited thereon in a first dispersed phase and an additional metal deposited onto the support in a second dispersed phase. The additional metal is effective in retarding or reducing agglomeration or sintering of the nickel metal catalytic phase without substantially affecting the catalytic activity, thereby increasing the life time of the catalyst.

  20. n-Linear Algebra of type II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. B. Vasantha Kandasamy; Florentin Smarandache

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book is a continuation of the book n-linear algebra of type I and its applications. Most of the properties that could not be derived or defined for n-linear algebra of type I is made possible in this new structure: n-linear algebra of type II which is introduced in this book. In case of n-linear algebra of type II we are in a position to define linear functionals which is one of the marked difference between the n-vector spaces of type I and II. However all the applications mentioned in n-linear algebras of type I can be appropriately extended to n-linear algebras of type II. Another use of n-linear algebra (n-vector spaces) of type II is that when this structure is used in coding theory we can have different types of codes built over different finite fields whereas this is not possible in the case of n-vector spaces of type I. Finally in the case of n-vector spaces of type II, we can obtain n-eigen values from distinct fields; hence, the n-characteristic polynomials formed in them are in distinct different fields. An attractive feature of this book is that the authors have suggested 120 problems for the reader to pursue in order to understand this new notion. This book has three chapters. In the first chapter the notion of n-vector spaces of type II are introduced. This chapter gives over 50 theorems. Chapter two introduces the notion of n-inner product vector spaces of type II, n-bilinear forms and n-linear functionals. The final chapter suggests over a hundred problems. It is important that the reader is well-versed not only with linear algebra but also n-linear algebra of type I.

  1. Research, development and demonstration of a fuel cell/battery powered bus system. Phase 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1990-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose of the Phase I effort was to demonstrate feasibility of the fuel cell/battery system for powering a small bus (under 30 ft or 9 m) on an urban bus route. A brassboard powerplant was specified, designed, fabricated, and tested to demonstrate feasibility in the laboratory. The proof-of-concept bus, with a powerplant scaled up from the brassboard, will be demonstrated under Phase II.

  2. Phase II Trial of Hypofractionated IMRT With Temozolomide for Patients With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reddy, Krishna [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Damek, Denise [Department of Neurology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Neurology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Gaspar, Laurie E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Ney, Douglas [Department of Neurology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Neurology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Waziri, Allen; Lillehei, Kevin [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Stuhr, Kelly; Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Chen Changhu, E-mail: changhu.chen@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To report toxicity and overall survival (OS) in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) treated with hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (hypo-IMRT) with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ). Methods and Materials: Patients with newly diagnosed GBM after biopsy or resection and with adequate performance status and organ or bone marrow function were eligible for this study. Patients received postoperative hypo-IMRT to the surgical cavity and residual tumor seen on T1-weighted brain MRI with a 5-mm margin to a total dose of 60 Gy in 10 fractions (6 Gy/fraction) and to the T2 abnormality on T2-weighted MRI with 5-mm margin to 30 Gy in 10 fractions (3 Gy/fraction). Concurrent TMZ was given at 75 mg/m{sup 2}/day for 28 consecutive days. Adjuvant TMZ was given at 150 to 200 mg/m{sup 2}/day for 5 days every 28 days. Toxicities were defined using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: Twenty-four patients were treated, consisting of 14 men, 10 women; a median age of 60.5 years old (range, 27-77 years); and a median Karnofsky performance score of 80 (range, 60-90). All patients received hypo-IMRT and concurrent TMZ according to protocol, except for 2 patients who received only 14 days of concurrent TMZ. The median number of adjuvant TMZ cycles was 6.5 (range, 0-14).With a median follow-up of 14.8 months (range, 2.7-34.2 months) for all patients and a minimum follow-up of 20.6 months for living patients, no instances of grade 3 or higher nonhematologic toxicity were observed. The median OS was 16.6 months (range, 4.1-35.9 months). Six patients underwent repeated surgery for suspected tumor recurrence; necrosis was found in 50% to 100% of the resected specimens. Conclusion: In selected GBM patients, 60 Gy hypo-IMRT delivered in 6-Gy fractions over 2 weeks with concurrent and adjuvant TMZ is safe. OS in this small cohort of patients was comparable to that treated with current standard of care therapy.

  3. DOE SBIR Phase II Final Technical Report - Assessing Climate Change Effects on Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whiteman, Cameron; Capps, Scott

    2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Specialized Vertum Partners software tools were prototyped, tested and commercialized to allow wind energy stakeholders to assess the uncertainties of climate change on wind power production and distribution. This project resulted in three commercially proven products and a marketing tool. The first was a Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) based resource evaluation system. The second was a web-based service providing global 10m wind data from multiple sources to wind industry subscription customers. The third product addressed the needs of our utility clients looking at climate change effects on electricity distribution. For this we collaborated on the Santa Ana Wildfire Threat Index (SAWTi), which was released publicly last quarter. Finally to promote these products and educate potential users we released “Gust or Bust”, a graphic-novel styled marketing publication.

  4. CLINICAL INVESTIGATION Prostate A PHASE I/II TRIAL OF GEFITINIB GIVEN CONCURRENTLY WITH RADIOTHERAPY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemminki, Akseli

    Purpose: To estimate the safety and tolerability of daily administration of 250 mg of gefitinib given. A dose of 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/day) was administered to the tumor, prostate, and seminal vesicles, followed patients varies from 30% to 90% in different series. Despite increased awareness and earlier diagnosis

  5. R-MCJ10042201-1A_PADT_PhaseII-report-final

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Mark Christian

    2010-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The thrust of this R&D effort was to develop technology that serves the SOFC industry and help developers in this industry to succeed. In particular this project focused on fluid handling equipment that supported the SOFC stack. Two devices were developed: the Hot Anode Recycle Blower (HARB) blower which will serve hot anode gas requirements in FutureGen demonstration units, and the small multi stage (SMS) blower which will serve warm anode and cathode gas requirements for SOFC and other fuel cell industries.

  6. Electric Vehicle Communications Standards Testing and Validation - Phase II: SAE J2931/1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, Richard M.; Gowri, Krishnan

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Vehicle to grid communication standards enable interoperability among vehicles, charging stations and utility providers and provide the capability to implement charge management. Several standards initiatives by the Society of Automobile Engineers (SAE), International Standards Organization and International Electrotechnical Commission (ISO/IEC), and ZigBee/HomePlug Alliance are developing requirements for communication messages and protocols. Recent work by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in collaboration with SAE and automobile manufacturers has identified vehicle to grid communication performance requirements and developed a test plan as part of SAE J2931/1 committee work. This laboratory test plan was approved by the SAE J2931/1 committee and included test configurations, test methods, and performance requirements to verify reliability, robustness, repeatability, maximum communication distance, and authentication features of power line carrier (PLC) communication modules at the internet protocol layer level. The goal of the testing effort was to select a communication technology that would enable automobile manufacturers to begin the development and implementation process. The EPRI/Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) testing teams divided the testing so that results for each test could be presented by two teams, performing the tests independently. The PNNL team performed narrowband PLC testing including the Texas Instruments (TI) Concerto, Ariane Controls AC-CPM1, and the MAXIM Tahoe 2 evaluation boards. The scope of testing was limited to measuring the vendor systems communication performance between Electric Vehicle Support Equipment (EVSE) and plug-in electric vehicles (PEV). The testing scope did not address PEV’s CAN bus to PLC or PLC to EVSE (Wi-Fi, cellular, PLC Mains, etc.) communication integration. In particular, no evaluation was performed to delineate the effort needed to translate the IPv6/SEP2.0 messages to PEV’s CAN bus. The J2931/1 laboratory test results were presented to the SAE membership on March 20-22, 2012. The SAE committee decided to select HomePlug GreenPHY (HPGP) as the communication technology to use between the PEV and EVSE. No technology completely met all performance requirements. Both the MAXIM Tahoe 2 and TI Concerto met the 100Kbps throughput requirement, are estimated to meet the latency measurement performance, and met the control pilot impairment requirements. But HPGP demonstrated the potential to provide a data throughput rate of 10x of the requirement and either met or showed the potential to meet the other requirements with further development.

  7. Carbon Prices during the EU ETS Phase II: Dynamics and Volume Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Université Paris Dauphine Abstract The European Union Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS) is the largest emissions trading scheme to date. This article summarizes the principle elements behind the trading system of reducing CO2 emissions and achieving the Kyoto Protocol target. The European Union Emissions Trading Scheme

  8. Near-term electric test vehicle ETV-2. Phase II. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A unique battery-powered passenger vehicle has been developed that provides a significant improvement over conventional electric vehicle performance, particularly during stop-and-go driving. The vehicle is unique in two major respects: (1) the power system incorporates a flywheel that stores energy during regenerative braking and makes possible the acceleration capability needed to keep up with traffic without reducing range to unacceptable values; and (2) lightweight plastic materials are used for the vehicle unibody to minimize weight and increase range. These features were analyzed and demonstrated in an electric test vehicle, ETV-2. Characteristics of this vehicle are summarized. Information is presented on: vehicle design, fabrication, safety testing, and performance testing; power system design and operation; flywheel; battery pack performance; and controls and electronic equipment. (LCL)

  9. DOE Awards Two Small Business Innovation Research Phase II Grants for Solid-State Lighting Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has awarded two Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grants targeting advances in solid-state lighting (SSL) technology. The SBIR program seeks to increase...

  10. Flexible Link Continual Reassessment Methods for Trivariate Binary Outcome Phase I/II Trials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlin, Bradley P.

    , or power function, to model the relationship between the dose levels and the true toxicity probabilities (O'Quigley from excessive doses and proposed by Faries (1994), Goodman et al. (1995), and O'Quigley and Shen (1996 al. (1994), O'Quigley et al. (2001), Braun (2002), and Thall and Cook (2004). One class of approaches

  11. A Framework for a General Purpose Intelligent Control System for Particle Accelerators. Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Robert Westervelt; Dr. William Klein; Dr. Michael Kroupa; Eric Olsson; Rick Rothrock

    1999-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Vista Control Systems, Inc. has developed a portable system for intelligent accelerator control. The design is general in scope and is thus configurable to a wide range of accelerator facilities and control problems. The control system employs a multi-layer organization in which knowledge-based decision making is used to dynamically configure lower level optimization and control algorithms.

  12. Phase space dynamics of triaxial collapse: II. Universal evolution of axis ratios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nadkarni-Ghosh, Sharvari

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In paper I of this series, we examined triaxial collapse in terms of the dynamics of eigenvalues of three important tensors: the Hessian of the gravitational potential, the tensor of velocity derivatives and the deformation tensor. The first paper focussed on the joint gravity-velocity dynamics and here we focus on the deformation tensor, which is directly related to the axes' evolution. We examine the evolution of the minor to major and intermediate to major axes ratios ($s$ and $q$) and the triaxiality parameter $T$ as function of mass scale and redshift. We find that the ellipticity and prolateness increase with decreasing mass scale and decreasing redshift. These trends, while in agreement with previous analytic studies, contradict numerical simulations. Nevertheless, we find that a suitable transformation of $s$, motivated by the scaling used in recent analysis of the Millennium XXL simulations by Bonamigo {\\it et al} (2014), has a universal log-normal distribution function that matches their numerical r...

  13. Low-Temperature Phase Diagrams of Quantum Lattice Systems. II. Convergent Perturbation Expansions and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey-Bellet, Luc

    the perturbation tV lifts the degeneracy of the groundstate energy of H0. The purpose of the unitary conjugation. The Hamiltonians of such systems have the form H = H0 + tV, where H0 is a classical Hamiltonian, V is a quantum

  14. LowTemperature Phase Diagrams of Quantum Lattice Systems. II. Convergent Perturbation Expansions and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    finite order ? 1 in t) and to understand how the perturbation tV lifts the degeneracy of the groundstate or bosonic lattice gases. The Hamiltonians of such systems have the form H = H 0 + tV; where H 0

  15. Development of a Hydrologic Characterization Technology for Fault Zones Phase II 2nd Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karasaki, Kenzi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    interwell response to drilling, well-tests, long-termcores from deep drilling, and additional well data fromresponses of different wells to drilling and pump tests will

  16. Fluor Hanford Integrated Safety Management System Phase II Verification Vol 1 & Vol 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PARSONS, J.E.

    2000-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to conducting work efficiently and in a manner that ensures protection of the workers, public, and environment. DOE policy mandates that safety management systems be used to systematically integrate safety into management and work practices at all levels while accomplishing mission goals in an effective and efficient manner. The purpose of the Fluor Hanford (FH) Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) verification was to determine whether FH's ISM system and processes are sufficiently implemented to accomplish the goal of ''Do work safely.'' The purpose of the DOE, Richland Operations Office (RL) verification was to determine whether RL has established processes that adequately describe RL's role in safety management and if those processes are sufficiently implemented.

  17. DOE-ER-46139-Phase II-Final-Report-Tritt-2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry M. Tritt (PI)

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This proposal emphasizes investigations of the thermal and electrical transport properties of new and novel solid-state materials, with the specific goal of achieving higher efficiency solid-state thermoelectric materials. This program will continue to build a very strong collaborative research effort between researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ONRL) and Clemson University. We propose three new faculty hires and major equipment purchases in order to further enhance our level of national recognition. We will be positioned for competition for major non-EPSCoR DOE and DOD funding (i.e. NSF-Materials Research Center) and able to address many other areas of DOE and national importance. Graduate and undergraduate students will be extensively involved in this project, spending significant time at ORNL, thus gaining important training and educational opportunities. We will also include an outreach program to bring in outside students and faculty. An External Advisory Board of distinguished scientists will provide oversight to the program.

  18. Application of the SULF-X process to coal conversion and utilization. Phase II final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shapiro, E.; Bramer, H.C.; New, R.A.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pittsburgh Environmental and Energy Systems, Inc. contracted with the Department of Energy to demonstrate the efficacy of an iron sulfide flue gas treatment system (FGT) for removing sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) and nitrogen oxides (NO/sub x/) and to correlate process variables to system performance. Laboratory and bench-scale testing was conducted with the SULF-X process, using both synthesized gas and actual flue gas from a coal-fired furnace. Laboratory tests resulted in 95% SO/sub 2/ removal and up to 95% NO/sub x/ removal. The bench-scale system demonstrated similar SO/sub 2/ removal efficiencies, but achieved only 39% NO/sub x/ removal due to relatively high oxygen concentrations in the flue gas and insufficient liquid-gas interfacial area within the absorber. Elemental sulfur was recovered during the regeneration steps. Total capital investment for the SULF-X system was estimated to be $91 to $103 per kilowatt (electric), compared to $90/kw for sodium solution scrubbing, $78 to $83/kw for magnesia slurry scrubbing and $74/kw for limestone slurry scrubbing. Annual operating costs for the SULF-X system were estimated to be 5.44 to 6.90 mills per kilowatt-hour, compared to 4.96 to 5.22 for sodium, 3.68 to 3.99 for magnesia and 3.73 to 4.25 for limestone. 6 references, 6 figures, 9 tables.

  19. Phase II Final Project Report SBIR Project: "A High Efficiency PV to Hydrogen Energy System"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slade, A; Turner, J; Stone, K; McConnell, R

    2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The innovative research conducted for this project contributed greatly to the understanding of generating low-cost hydrogen from solar energy. The project’s research identified two highly leveraging and complementary pathways. The first pathway is to dramatically increase the efficiency of converting sunlight into electricity. Improving solar electric conversion efficiency directly increases hydrogen production. This project produced a world record efficiency for silicon solar cells and contributed to another world record efficiency for a solar concentrator module using multijunction solar cells. The project’s literature review identified a second pathway in which wasted heat from the solar concentration process augments the electrolysis process generating hydrogen. One way to do this is to use a “heat mirror” that reflects the heat-producing infrared and transmits the visible spectrum to the solar cells; this also increases solar cell conversion efficiency. An economic analysis of this concept confirms that, if long-term concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) and solid-oxide electrolyzer cost goals can be achieved, hydrogen will be produced from solar energy cheaper than the cost of gasoline. The potential public benefits from this project are significant. The project has identified a potential energy source for the nation’s future electricity and transportation needs that is entirely “home grown” and carbon free. As CPV enter the nation’s utility markets, the opportunity for this approach to be successful is greatly increased. Amonix strongly recommends further exploration of this project’s findings.

  20. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) project Integrated Safety Management System phase I and II Verification Review Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CARTER, R.P.

    1999-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) commits to accomplishing its mission safely. To ensure this objective is met, DOE issued DOE P 450.4, Safety Management System Policy, and incorporated safety management into the DOE Acquisition Regulations ([DEAR] 48 CFR 970.5204-2 and 90.5204-78). Integrated Safety Management (ISM) requires contractors to integrate safety into management and work practices at all levels so that missions are achieved while protecting the public, the worker, and the environment. The contractor is required to describe the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) to be used to implement the safety performance objective.

  1. EA-1831: Phase II ICCS Initiative Funding Award for Calera Corporation, Moss Landing, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds for a project that would receive flue gas from the gas-fired Moss Landing, CA power plant and capture CO2 for permanent storage in a cementitious substitute material and process useless byproducts into useable chemicals. NOTE: This EA has been cancelled. NEPA coverage for this project is now a CX as of 9/17/2012.

  2. Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Planning Phase II, Dworshak Reservoir, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, H. Jerome; Martin, Robert C.

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 directed that measures be implemented to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by development and operation of hydropower projects on the Columbia River System. This Act created the Northwest Power Planning Council, which in turn developed the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. This program established a four-part process: wildlife mitigation status reports; wildlife impact assessments; wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement plans; and implementation of protection, mitigation, and enhancement projects. This mitigation plan for the Dworshak Reservoir Hydroelectric Facility was developed to fulfill requirements of Sections 1003(b)(2) and (3) of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Specific objectives of wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning for Dworshak Reservoir included: quantify net impacts to target wildlife species affected by hydroelectric development and operation of Dworshak Dam and Reservoir; develop protection, mitigation, and enhancement goals and objectives for the target wildlife species; recommend protection, mitigation, and enhancement actions for the target wildlife species; and coordination of project activities. 46 refs., 4 figs., 31 tabs.

  3. Advanced turbine systems phase II - conceptual design and product development. Final report, August 1993--July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Energy Strategy (NES) calls for a balanced program of greater energy efficiency, use of alternative fuels, and the environmentally responsible development of all U.S. energy resources. Consistent with the NES, a Department of Energy (DOE) program has been created to develop Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS). The technical ATS requirements are based upon two workshops held in Greenville, SC that were sponsored by DOE and hosted by Clemson University. The objective of this 8-year program, managed jointly by DOE`s Office of Fossil Energy, and, Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy, is to develop natural-gas-fired base load power plants that will have cycle efficiencies greater than 60%, lower heating value (LHV), be environmentally superior to current technology, and also be cost competitive. The program will include work to transfer advanced technology to the coal- and biomass-fueled systems being developed in other DOE programs.

  4. PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert Calderon

    2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The commercialization path of the Calderon technology for making a feedstock for steelmaking with assistance from DOE initially focused on making coke and work was done which proved that the Calderon technology is capable of making good coke for hard driving blast furnaces. U.S. Steel which participated in such demonstration felt that the Calderon technology would be more meaningful in lowering the costs of making steel by adapting it to the making of iron--thus obviating the need for coke. U.S. Steel and Calderon teamed up to jointly work together to demonstrate that the Calderon technology will produce in a closed system iron units from iron concentrate (ore) and coal competitively by eliminating pelletizing, sintering, coking and blast furnace operation. If such process steps could be eliminated, a huge reduction in polluting emissions and greenhouse gases (including CO{sub 2}) relating to steelmaking would ensue. Such reduction will restructure the steel industry away from the very energy-intensive steelmaking steps currently practiced and drastically reduce costs of making steel. The development of a technology to lower U.S. steelmaking costs and become globally competitive is a priority of major importance. Therefore, the development work which Calderon is conducting presently under this Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy becomes more crucial than ever. During the 3rd quarter of 2005 which the present report covers, virtually all the effort to advance the Calderon technology to make iron units was concentrated towards forming a team with a steelmaker who needs both iron units in the form of hot metal and a substitute for natural gas (SNG), both being major contributors to higher costs in steelmaking. Calderon felt that a very good candidate would be Steel Dynamics (SDI) by virtue that it operates a rotary hearth facility in Butler, Indiana that uses large amounts of natural gas to reduce briquettes made from ore and coal that they subsequently melt in a submerged arc furnace that is a large consumer of electric power. This facility is operated as a division of SDI under the name of Iron Dynamics (IDI). It is no secret that IDI has had and still has a great number of operational problems, including high cost for natural gas.

  5. IWater Processing and Waste Management SystemsIntegrated System Health Management 2007 Phase II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and other sources. It may serve as a backup processor for one or more existing water recovery systems unit drying prototype to for the recovery and recycle of water from concentrated waste water recovery system surfaces. The process is suitable for dewatering brine from the vapor compression distillation processor

  6. Michigan Technological Center for Nanostructured and Lightweight Materials in the Department of Chemical Engineering (Phase II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullins, M.; Rogers, T.; King, J.; Holles, J.; Keith, J.; Heiden, P.; Cornilsen, B.; Allen, J.

    2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Summaries of the followings tasks are given in this report: Task 1 - Lightweight, Thermally Conductive Bipolar Plates for Improved Thermal Management in Fuel Cells; Task 2 - Exploration of pseudomorphic nanoscale overlayer bimetallic catalysts; Task 3 - Hybrid inorganic/organic polymer nanocomposites; Task 4 - Carbonaceous Monolithic Electrodes for Fuel Cells and Rechargeable Batteries; and Task 5 - Movement and Freeze of Water in Fuel Cell Electrodes.

  7. SBIR/STTR Phase II Release 1 Award Winners Announced, Includes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    metal bipolar plates for low cost manufacturing. Performance and cost targets of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) have been revised to enhance commercialization...

  8. Enertech 2-kW high-reliability wind system. Phase II. Fabrication and testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cordes, J A; Johnson, B A

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-reliability wind machine rated for 2 kW in a 9 m/s wind has been developed. Activities are summarized that are centered on the fabrication and testing of prototypes of the wind machine. The test results verified that the wind machine met the power output specification and that the variable-pitch rotor effectively controlled the rotor speed for wind speeds up to 50 mph. Three prototypes of the wind machine were shipped to the Rocky Flats test center in September through November of 1979. Work was also performed to reduce the start-up wind speed. The start-up wind speed to the Enertech facility has been reduced to 4.5 m/s.

  9. Tuscarora Phase II SEA DOE DRAFT September 2014 DOE/EA-1849-S...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Using the factors shown in Table 5, which are average values for all types of geothermal power plants and which overestimate the emissions from binary plants, the project's...

  10. Development of a Hydrologic Characterization Technology for Fault Zones Phase II 2nd Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karasaki, Kenzi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Original seismic reflection survey interpretation for SR-1(Original seismic reflection survey interpretation for SR-1(seismic reflection profiling along three survey lines north and south of the LBNL site. One interpretation

  11. Development of a Hydrologic Characterization Technology for Fault Zones Phase II 2nd Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karasaki, Kenzi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Original seismic reflection survey interpretation for SR-1(Original seismic reflection survey interpretation for SR-1(and seismic reflection profiling along three survey lines north and south of the LBNL site. One interpretation

  12. R and D for improved efficiency small steam turbines. Phase II. Second quarterly technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The detailed design of a radial inflow steam turbine (RIT) comprised of two radial inflow turbine stages driving a common bull gear/output shaft designed for rated speeds of 70,000 rpm and 52,500 rpm, respectively, is described. Details are presented on: aerodynamic design; high speed rotors; high speed rotor bearings; high speed rotor sealing; gearing; output shaft; static structure; and predicted performance. (MCW)

  13. Radionuclide Retention Mechanisms in Secondary Waste-Form Testing: Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Um, Wooyong; Valenta, Michelle M.; Chung, Chul-Woo; Yang, Jungseok; Engelhard, Mark H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Parker, Kent E.; Wang, Guohui; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate candidate stabilization technologies that have the potential to successfully treat liquid secondary waste stream effluents produced by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). WRPS is considering the design and construction of a Solidification Treatment Unit (STU) for the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) at Hanford. The ETF, a multi-waste, treatment-and-storage unit that has been permitted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), can accept dangerous, low-level, and mixed wastewaters for treatment. The STU needs to be operational by 2018 to receive secondary liquid waste generated during operation of the WTP. The STU will provide the additional capacity needed for ETF to process the increased volume of secondary waste expected to be produced by WTP. This report on radionuclide retention mechanisms describes the testing and characterization results that improve understanding of radionuclide retention mechanisms, especially for pertechnetate, {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} in four different waste forms: Cast Stone, DuraLith alkali aluminosilicate geopolymer, encapsulated fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) product, and Ceramicrete phosphate bonded ceramic. These data and results will be used to fill existing data gaps on the candidate technologies to support a decision-making process that will identify a subset of the candidate waste forms that are most promising and should undergo further performance testing.

  14. Comparison of Carbon and Hi-Z Primary Collimators for the LHC Phase II Collimation System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, Lewis; /SLAC; Markiewicz, Thomas; /SLAC; Smith, Jeffrey; /SLAC; Assmann, Ralph; /CERN; Bracco, Chiara; /CERN; Weiler, Thomas; /Karlsruhe, Inst. Technol.

    2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A current issue with the LHC collimation system is single-diffractive, off-energy protons from the primary collimators that pass completely through the secondary collimation system and are absorbed immediately downbeam in the cold magnets of the dispersion suppressor section. Simulations suggest that the high impact rate could result in quenching of these magnets. We have studied replacing the 60 cm primary graphite collimators, which remove halo mainly by inelastic strong interactions, with 5.25 mm tungsten, which remove halo mainly by multiple coulomb scattering and thereby reduce the rate of single-diffractive interactions that cause losses in the dispersion suppressor.

  15. Automated array assembly. Phase II. Final report, October 1977-December 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Aiello, R. V.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The philosophy of this project was to establish an experimental process line starting with 3-in.-diameter silicon wafers and consisting of junction formation using POCl/sub 3/ gaseous diffusion, screen-printed thick-film metallization, reflow solder interconnect, and double-glass lamination panel assembly. This experimental production line produced a sufficient number of solar cells to demonstrate the technological readiness of each of those process steps. Variations (of each process) were made to set limits on the usable range of each process step and to determine the interaction with adjoining steps. Inspections, measurements, and tests were included to determine the output requirement characteristics of each step, obtain statistical variations, and evaluate the performance of the solar cells and panels. A description of this work, which was conducted from October 1977 through December 1978, is given. This was followed by an 18-month study in which three manufacturing sequences synthesized from the previous work and from studies conducted by other participants in the LSA program were exercised. The objectives were to assess the compatibility between process steps for each sequence, to generate sufficient data for comparative SAMICS cost analysis, and to make recommendations of the suitability of one or more of these sequences for the large-scale automated production of solar cells within the cost goal of $0.70/pW. The detailed experimental results of this study are described, followed by SAMICS cost analysis, recommendations, and conclusions.

  16. Wireless Roadside Inspection Phase II Tennessee Commercial Mobile Radio Services Pilot Test Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL; Siekmann, Adam [ORNL

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) Wireless Roadside Inspection (WRI) Program is researching the feasibility and value of electronically assessing truck and bus driver and vehicle safety at least 25 times more often than is possible using only roadside physical inspections. The WRI program is evaluating the potential benefits to both the motor carrier industry and to government. These potential benefits include reduction in accidents, fatalities and injuries on our highways and keeping safe and legal drivers and vehicles moving on the highways. WRI Pilot tests were conducted to prototype, test and demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of electronically collecting safety data message sets from in-service commercial vehicles and performing wireless roadside inspections using three different communication methods. This report summarizes the design, conduct and results of the Tennessee CMRS WRI Pilot Test. The purpose of this Pilot test was to demonstrate the implementation of commercial mobile radio services to electronically request and collect safety data message sets from a limited number of commercial vehicles operating in Tennessee. The results of this test have been used in conjunction with the results of the complimentary pilot tests to support an overall assessment of the feasibility and benefits of WRI in enhancing motor carrier safety (reduction in accidents) due to increased compliance (change in motor carrier and driver behavior) caused by conducting frequent safety inspections electronically, at highway speeds, without delay or need to divert into a weigh station

  17. NATURAL GAS HYDRATES STORAGE PROJECT PHASE II. CONCEPTUAL DESIGN AND ECONOMIC STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.E. Rogers

    1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE Contract DE-AC26-97FT33203 studied feasibility of utilizing the natural-gas storage property of gas hydrates, so abundantly demonstrated in nature, as an economical industrial process to allow expanded use of the clean-burning fuel in power plants. The laboratory work achieved breakthroughs: (1) Gas hydrates were found to form orders of magnitude faster in an unstirred system with surfactant-water micellar solutions. (2) Hydrate particles were found to self-pack by adsorption on cold metal surfaces from the micellar solutions. (3) Interstitial micellar-water of the packed particles were found to continue forming hydrates. (4) Aluminum surfaces were found to most actively collect the hydrate particles. These laboratory developments were the bases of a conceptual design for a large-scale process where simplification enhances economy. In the design, hydrates form, store, and decompose in the same tank in which gas is pressurized to 550 psi above unstirred micellar solution, chilled by a brine circulating through a bank of aluminum tubing in the tank employing gas-fired refrigeration. Hydrates form on aluminum plates suspended in the chilled micellar solution. A low-grade heat source, such as 110 F water of a power plant, circulates through the tubing bank to release stored gas. The design allows a formation/storage/decomposition cycle in a 24-hour period of 2,254,000 scf of natural gas; the capability of multiple cycles is an advantage of the process. The development costs and the user costs of storing natural gas in a scaled hydrate process were estimated to be competitive with conventional storage means if multiple cycles of hydrate storage were used. If more than 54 cycles/year were used, hydrate development costs per Mscf would be better than development costs of depleted reservoir storage; above 125 cycles/year, hydrate user costs would be lower than user costs of depleted reservoir storage.

  18. River Protection Project Integrated safety management system phase II verification review plan - 7/29/99

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SHOOP, D.S.

    1999-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this review is to verify the implementation status of the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) for the River Protection Project (RPP) facilities managed by Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (FDH) and operated by Lockheed Martin Hanford Company (LMHC). This review will also ascertain whether within RPP facilities and operations the work planning and execution processes are in place and functioning to effectively protect the health and safety of the workers, public, environment, and federal property over the RPP life cycle. The RPP ISMS should support the Hanford Strategic Plan (DOERL-96-92) to safely clean up and manage the site's legacy waste and deploy science and technology while incorporating the ISMS central theme to ''Do work safely'' and protect human health and the environment.

  19. Ocean thermal energy conversion power system development. Final design report: PSD-I, Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The PSD-I program provides a heat exchanger sytem consisting of an evaporator, condenser and various ancillaries with ammonia used as a working fluid in a closed simulated Rankine cycle. It is to be installed on the Chepachet Research Vessel for test and evaluation of a number of OTEC concepts in a true ocean environment. It is one of several test articles to be tested. Primary design concerns include control of biofouling, corrosion and erosion of aluminum tubes, selection of materials, and the development of a basis for scale-up to large heat exchangers so as to ultimately demonstrate economic feasibility on a commercial scale. The PSD-I test article is devised to verify thermodynamic, environmental, and mechanical performance of basic design concepts. The detailed design, development, fabrication, checklist, delivery, installation support, and operation support for the Test Article Heat Exchangers are described. (WHK)

  20. EIS-0129: New England/Hydro-Quebec 450 kV Transmission Line Interconnection- Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Economic Regulatory Administration issued this EIS to explore the impacts of amending Presidential Permit PP-76 to allow the Vermont Electrical Company to operate at power levels above those stipulated in the permit and to build additional transmission facilities to distribute the increased power.

  1. assessor-blinded phase ii: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are performed and compared to a reference case. These modifications concern the size distribution, i.e. the number of sections, and physical processes, i.e. coagulation,...

  2. EA-1849-S-1: FONSI and Final Tuscarora Phase II Generating Facility, Elko

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S.ContaminationJuly 2011D APPENDIXKahukuCounty,ColoradoAprilAir

  3. EA-1849-S1: Phase II Facility - Ormat Tuscarora Geothermal Power Plant in

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S.ContaminationJuly 2011D APPENDIXKahukuCounty,ColoradoAprilAirTuscarora, NV |

  4. Process Development for CIGS Based Thin Film Photovoltaics Modules, Phase II Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Britt, J.; Wiedeman, S.; Albright, S.

    2000-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    As a technology partner with NREL, Global Solar Energy (GSE) has initiated an extensive and systematic plan to accelerate the commercialization of thin-film photovoltaics (PV) based on copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS). The distinguishing feature of the GSE manufacturing process is the exclusive use of lightweight, flexible substrates. GSE has developed the technology to fabricate CIGS photovoltaics on both stainless-steel and polymer substrates. CIGS deposited on flexible substrates can be fabricated into either flexible or rigid modules. Low-cost, rigid PV panels for remote power, bulk/utility, telecommunication, and rooftop applications have been produced by affixing the flexible substrate to an inexpensive rigid panel by lamination or adhesive. Stainless-steel-based PV modules are fabricated by a novel interconnect method that avoids the use of wires or foils and soldered connections. In the case of polymer-based PV modules, the continuous roll is not sectioned into individual panels until the module buss and power leads are attached. Roll-to-roll vacuum deposition has several advantages that translate directly to reduced capital costs, greater productivity, improved yield, greater reliability, lower maintenance, and a larger volume of PV material. In combination with roll-to-roll processing, GSE has developed evaporation deposition operations that enable low-cost and high-efficiency CIGS modules. The CIGS deposition process relies heavily on effusion source technology developed at GSE, and solving numerous problems was an integral part of the source development effort. Cell interconnection for thin-film CIGS modules on a polyimide substrate presents a considerable challenge.

  5. The Impact of an Inaccurate Diagnostic Biomarker on Phase II Clinical Trials in The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

    , Carpinteria, CA) was developed to specifically direct Trastuzumab (Herceptin, Genentech, South San Francisco

  6. FY 2014 Phase II Release 2+ EERE Awards | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of YearFLASH2011-17-OPAMDepartmentofofForewordin Target CapsulesFYIII

  7. FY 2014 SBIR Phase II Release 3 Awards | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of YearFLASH2011-17-OPAMDepartmentofofForewordin Target

  8. OVAI Contract Report #2012-43 PHASE II ARCHAEOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF SIX HISTORIC

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartment of Order No.of Energy251News ORSSABTESTIMONY

  9. 4.2.1 GRED Drilling Award- GRED III Phase II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Windthe Commission | OpenDevelopment GuideMexico20082008GRED

  10. Ponnequin phase I and II (PSCo) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BV Jump to: navigation, searchPocatelloIII Wind Farm

  11. ICFT- An Initial Closed-Loop Flow Test of the Fenton Hill Phase II HDR

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia, California:ProjectProgramsAlterationAl.,GRCReservoir |

  12. Phase I Report U.S. DOE GRED II Program | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompanyPCNInformation USPerseus| Open EnergyU.S. DOE GRED

  13. Phase I Report, Us Doe Gred Ii Program | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompanyPCNInformation USPerseus| Open EnergyU.S. DOE

  14. Tuscarora Phase II SEA DOE November 2014 DOE/EA-1849-S-1 SUPPLEMENTAL ENVIRONMENTAL

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssuesEnergyTransportation WorkDecember 28, 2004 PartTurning on the

  15. Llano Estacado Wind Ranch at Texico phase II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf KilaueaInformation Other AlternativePark,Cedar JumpNew York:

  16. 48C Phase II Advanced Energy Manufacturing Tax Credit Program Fact Sheet |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of BadTHEEnergyReliability2015 Peer Review.EPA2 U.S.C.31,

  17. 48C Phase II Advanced Energy Manufacturing Tax Credit Program Selections |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of BadTHEEnergyReliability2015 Peer Review.EPA2 U.S.C.31,Department

  18. PHASE II REMEDIAL INVESTlGATlOE FORMER AMCHITKA ARMY AIR BASE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1 8 7 +NewAugust 4,P -.,. ~ *PANEL

  19. Three phase downhole separator process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cognata, Louis John (Baytown, TX)

    2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Three Phase Downhole Separator Process (TPDSP) is a process which results in the separation of all three phases, (1) oil, (2) gas, and (3) water, at the downhole location in the well bore, water disposal injection downhole, and oil and gas production uphole.

  20. Phase transition towards strange matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Gulminelli; Ad. R. Raduta; M. Oertel

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The phase diagram of a system constituted of neutrons and $\\Lambda$-hyperons in thermal equilibrium is evaluated in the mean-field approximation. It is shown that this simple system exhibits a complex phase diagram with first and second order phase transitions. Due to the generic presence of attractive and repulsive couplings, the existence of phase transitions involving strangeness appears independent of the specific interaction model. In addition we will show under which conditions a phase transition towards strange matter at high density exists, which is expected to persist even within a complete treatment including all the different strange and non- strange baryon states. The impact of this transition on the composition of matter in the inner core of neutron stars is discussed.