Sample records for mph controlled dry

  1. ABBREVIATION KEY: EMPH EXECUTIVE MPH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grishok, Alla

    FULL-TIME MANAGEMENT CMPH COLUMBIA MPH GLOBAL GLOBAL HEALTH POLICY & MANAGEMENT HPM DEPARTMENT 6 HAVE YOU HEARD? 7 HPM EVENTS RECAP 8 HPM GOALS 11 HPM HIGHLIGHTS 12 Better Health Systems and quality HPM's expertise in analyzing US health policy in studying other countries' health systems while

  2. Implementing Strategies for Drying and Pressing Wood Without Emissions Controls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sujit Banerjee; Terrance Conners

    2007-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Drying and pressing wood for the manufacture of lumber, particleboard, oriented strand board (OSB), veneer and medium density fiberboard (MDF) release volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the atmosphere. These emissions require control equipment that are capital-intensive and consume significant quantities of natural gas and electricity. The objective of our work was to understand the mechanisms through which volatile organic compounds are generated and released and to develop simple control strategies. Of the several strategies developed, two have been implemented for OSB manufacture over the course of this study. First, it was found that increasing final wood moisture by about 2-4 percentage points reduced the dryer emissions of hazardous air pollutants by over 70%. As wood dries, the escaping water evaporatively cools the wood. This cooling tapers off wood when the wood is nearly dry and the wood temperature rises. Thermal breakdown of the wood tissue occurs and VOCs are released. Raising the final wood moisture by only a few percentage points minimizes the temperature rise and reduces emissions. Evaporative cooling also impacts has implications for VOC release from wood fines. Flaking wood for OSB manufacture inevitable generates fines. Fines dry out rapidly because of their high surface area and evaporative cooling is lost more rapidly than for flakes. As a result, fines emit a disproportionate quantity of VOCs. Fines can be reduced in two ways: through screening of the green furnish and through reducing their generation during flaking. The second approach is preferable because it also increased wood yield. A procedure to do this by matching the sharpness angle of the flaker knife to the ambient temperature was also developed. Other findings of practical interests are as follows: Dielectric heating of wood under low-headspace conditions removes terpenes and other extractives from softwood; The monoterpene content in trees depend upon temperature and seasonal effects; Method 25A emissions from lumber drying can be modeled from a knowledge of the airflow through the kiln; A heat transfer model shows that VOCs released during hot-pressing mainly originate from the surface of the board; and Boiler ash can be used to adsorb formaldehyde from air streams.

  3. WELCOME DAY MS/PhD and MPH Prospective Students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    for Public Health Javier Nieto, MD, PhD, MPH Chair, Department of Population Health Sciences 9:30 UW Population Health Distinguished Alumni Lecture (1325 HSLC) Christopher T. Sempos, PhD, Director, Population student by sitting in on this required MPH course, taught by Director, Tom Oliver, PhD, MHA. Class runs

  4. Monitoring and controlling moisture during carpet and textile drying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, J.W.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial dryer/moisture control is usually performed by feedback type systems, i.e., sensors indirectly measure moisture content (MC) of the product after it leaves the dryer, or exhaust temperature from the last zone is used as an indicator of the existing MC. Such a control system is inherently weak because of the {open_quotes}after-the-fact{close_quotes} nature of the MC data. A feedback system may be improved by adding feedforward loops to handle disturbances to the system, e.g., variations in entering MC and feed rate. Such additions to the control system are expensive and require higher expertise for operating and maintaining. If the MC of the product could be measured inside the dryer, a control system could be offered that would be superior to feedback/feedforward types. This has not been possible up to this time because no MC sensor was capable of withstanding the atmosphere inside dryers. Moreover, the sample size would not have been large enough to be representative.

  5. Diabetes A Growing Epidemic Michael McKee, MD, MPH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Steven A.

    Diabetes ­ A Growing Epidemic Michael McKee, MD, MPH March 28, 2013 #12;Goals Diabetes Introduction Types of Diabetes Testing Prevention Treatments #12;In Memory of Benno Houver Bernd "Benno" Houver (1973-2013) #12;Diabetes Info 25.8 million people in the USA (8.3%) have diabetes ~25% of people with diabetes do

  6. Poster Presentations Marcella Alsan, MD, MPH, PhD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    15 Poster Presentations Marcella Alsan, MD, MPH, PhD The direct and indirect effects of mass vaccination: Evidence from the 1985 Turkish campaign Michele Barry, MD; Stephen Luby, MD; Nancy Federspiel, PhD Global Health Fellows and Scholars Consortium Cynthia M. Castro, PhD; Abby C. King, PhD; Marcia Stefanick

  7. UT MPH STUDENT SURVEY (2013) 1 Master of Public Health Student Survey (2013)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Planning & Administration will be referred to by its new title, Health Policy and Management. SurveyUT MPH STUDENT SURVEY (2013) 1 Master of Public Health Student Survey (2013) The University of Tennessee An anonymous electronic survey of MPH students was completed in April 2013. The survey

  8. Integrated dry NO{sub x}/SO{sub 2} emissions control system calcium-based dry sorbent injection. Test report, April 30--November 2, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiomoto, G.H.; Smith, R.A.; Muzio, L.J. [Fossil Energy Research Corp., Laguna Hills, CA (United States); Hunt, T. [Public Service Company of Colorado, Denver, CO (United States)

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE sponsored Integrated Dry NO{sub x}SO{sub 2} Emissions Control System program, which is a Clean Coal Technology III demonstration, is being conducted by Public Service Company of Colorado. The test site is Arapahoe Generating Station Unit 4, which is a 100 MWe, down-fired utility boiler burning a low sulfur Western coal. The project goal is to demonstrate up to 70 percent reductions in NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} emissions through the integration of: (1) down-fired low-NO{sub x} burners with overfire air; (2) Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) for additional NO{sub x} removal; and (3) dry sorbent injection and duct humidification for SO{sub 2} removal. The effectiveness of the integrated system on a high-sulfur coal will also be investigated. This report documents the fifth phase of the test program, where the performance of the dry sorbent injection of calcium was evaluated as an SO{sub 2} removal technique. Dry sorbent injection with humidification was performed downstream of the air heater (in-duct). Calcium injection before the economizer was also investigated. The in-duct calcium sorbent and humidification retrofit resulted in SO{sub 2} reductions of 28 to 40 percent, with a Ca/S of 2, and a 25 to 30{degrees}F approach to adiabatic saturation temperature. The results of the economizer calcium injection tests were disappointing with less than 10 percent SO{sub 2} removal at a Ca/S of 2. Poor sorbent distribution due to limited access into the injection cavity was partially responsible for the low overall removals. However, even in areas of high sorbent concentration (local Ca/S ratios of approximately 6), SO{sub 2} removals were limited to 30 percent. It is suspected that other factors (sorbent properties and limited residence times) also contributed to the poor performance.

  9. Investigation and Demonstration of Dry Carbon-Based Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jim Butz; Terry Hunt

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Public Service Company of Colorado and ADA Technologies, Inc. have performed a study of the injection of activated carbon for the removal of vapor-phase mercury from coal-fired flue gas streams. The project was completed under contract to the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, with contributions from EPRI and Public Service Company. The prime contractor for the project was Public Service Company, with ADA Technologies as the major subcontractor providing technical support to all aspects of the project. The research and development effort was conducted in two phases. In Phase I a pilot facility was fabricated and tests were performed using dry carbon-based sorbent injection for mercury control on a coal-fired flue gas slipstream extracted from an operating power plant. Phase II was designed to move carbon injection technology towards commercial application on coal-fired power plants by addressing key reliability and operability concerns. Phase II field work included further development work with the Phase I pilot and mercury measurements on several of PSCo's coal-fired generating units. In addition, tests were run on collected sorbent plus fly ash to evaluate the impact of the activated carbon sorbent on the disposal of fly ash. An economic analysis was performed where pilot plant test data was used to develop a model to predict estimated costs of mercury removal from plants burning western coals. Testing in the pilot plant was undertaken to quantify the effects of plant configuration, flue gas temperature, and activated carbon injection rate on mercury removal. All three variables were found to significantly impact the mercury removal efficiency in the pilot. The trends were clear: mercury removal rates increased with decreasing flue gas temperature and with increasing carbon injection rates. Mercury removal was much more efficient with reverse-gas and pulse-jet baghouse configurations than with an ESP as the particulate control device. The native fly ash of the host unit provided significant mercury removal capacity, so that the activated carbon sorbent served as an incremental mercury removal mechanism. Tests run to characterize the waste product, a combination of fly ash and activated carbon on which mercury was present, showed that mercury and other RCRA metals of interest were all below Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) regulatory limits in the leachate. The presence of activated carbon in the fly ash was shown to have an effect on the use of fly ash as an additive in the manufacture of concrete, which could limit the salability of fly ash from a plant where activated carbon was used for mercury control.

  10. Control on (234 U) in lake water: A study in the Dry Valleys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    .V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Uranium isotopes; Dry Valleys; Antarctica; Weathering; Lake chemistry 1 isotopes. The supply of 234 U is therefore limited by decay of 238 U, suggesting that the two uranium

  11. Nitrogen Control in Electric Arc Furnace Steelmaking by DRI (TRP 0009)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Gordon A. Irons

    2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrogen is difficult to remove in electric arc furnace (EAF) steelmaking, requiring the use of more energy in the oxygen steelmaking route to produce low-nitrogen steel. The objective of this work was to determine if the injection of directly reduced iron (DRI) fines into EAFs could reduce the nitrogen content by creating fine carbon monoxide bubbles that rinse nitrogen from the steel. The proposed work included physical and chemical characterization of DRI fines, pilot-scale injection into steel, and mathematical modeling to aid in scale-up of the process. Unfortunately, the pilot-scale injections were unsuccessful, but some full-scale data was obtained. Therefore, the original objectives were met, and presented in the form of recommendations to EAF steelmakers regarding: (1) The best composition and size of DRI fines to use; (2) The amount of DRI fines required to achieve a specific reduction in nitrogen content in the steel; and (3) The injection conditions. This information may be used by steelmakers in techno-economic assessments of the cost of reducing nitrogen with this technology.

  12. California Health eQuality Advisory Committee Kenneth W. Kizer, M.D., M.P.H. -Chair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    States, Inc. Thomas Williams, Dr.P.H., M.B.A. President and Chief Executive Officer Integrated Healthcare. Scott, M.D., M.P.H., Ex officio Chief Medical Information Officer California Department of Health CareCalifornia Health eQuality Advisory Committee Kenneth W. Kizer, M.D., M.P.H. - Chair Distinguished

  13. The MPH Faculty -Department of Family Medicine & Public Health Sciences Joel Ager, PhD Division of Population Health Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    The MPH Faculty - Department of Family Medicine & Public Health Sciences Joel Ager, PhD Division of Population Health Sciences Bengt Arnetz, MD, PhD, MPH Director, Div. of Occupational & Environ. Health Judith Arnetz, PhD Division of Occupational & Environmental Health David Bassett, PhD Graduate Student Officer

  14. Dry effluent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brady, J.D. (Anderson, 2000 Inc., Peachtree City, GA (US))

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The available choices of pollution control systems depend on what is being burned and how stringent the regulations are. The common systems are gas cooling by a waste heat boiler or an air-air heat exchanger followed by fabric filtration or electrostatic precipitation for particulate removal; alkaline spray absorbers followed by fabric filters (dry scrubbers) for particulate and acid gas removal; wet scrubbers for simultaneous particulate and acid gas removal, and; the newest - spray evaporation, followed by wet scrubbing for particulate and acid gas removal. Each has advantages and each has disadvantages. This paper discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the spray evaporator and wet scrubber combination.

  15. Coupling Multi-Component Models with MPH on Distributed MemoryComputer Architectures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Yun; Ding, Chris

    2005-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A growing trend in developing large and complex applications on today's Teraflop scale computers is to integrate stand-alone and/or semi-independent program components into a comprehensive simulation package. One example is the Community Climate System Model which consists of atmosphere, ocean, land-surface and sea-ice components. Each component is semi-independent and has been developed at a different institution. We study how this multi-component, multi-executable application can run effectively on distributed memory architectures. For the first time, we clearly identify five effective execution modes and develop the MPH library to support application development utilizing these modes. MPH performs component-name registration, resource allocation and initial component handshaking in a flexible way.

  16. Integrated dry NO{sub x}/SO{sub 2} emissions control system. Final report, Volume 1: Public design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, T.; Hanley, T.J.

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)/Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) and the Public Services Company of Colorado (PSCo) signed the cooperative agreement for the Integrated Dry NO{sub x}/SO{sub 2} Emissions Control System in March 1991. This project integrates various combinations of five existing and emerging technologies onto a 100 MWe, down-fired, load-following unit that burns pulverized coal. The project is expected to achieve up to 70% reductions in both oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions. Various combinations of low-NO{sub x} burners (LNBs), overfire air (OFA) ports, selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR), dry sorbent injection (DSI) using both calcium- and sodium-based reagents, and flue-gas humidification are expected to integrate synergistically and control both NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} emissions better than if each technology were used alone. For instance, ammonia emissions from the SNCR system are expected to reduce NO{sub 2} emissions and allow the DSI system (sodium-based reagents) to achieve higher removals of SO{sub 2}. Unlike tangentially or wall-fired units, down-fired require substantial modification to their pressure parts to retrofit LNBs and OFA ports, substantially increasing the cost of retrofit. Conversely, the retrofitting of SNCR, DSI, or humidification systems does not require any major boiler modifications and are easily retrofitted to all boiler types. However, existing furnace geometry and flue-gas temperatures can limit their placement and effectiveness. In particular, SNCR requires injecting the SNCR chemicals into the furnace where the temperature is within a very narrow temperature range.

  17. Field evaluation of natural gas and dry sorbent injection for MWC emissions control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wohadlo, S.; Abbasi, H.; Cygan, D. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)] Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), in cooperation with the Olmsted Waste-to-Energy Facility (OWEF) and with subcontracted engineering services from the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER), has completed the detailed engineering and preparation of construction specifications for an Emissions Reduction Testing System (ERTS). The ERTS has been designed for retrofit to one of two 100-ton/day municipal waste combustors at the OWEF, located in Rochester, Minnesota. The purpose of the retrofit is to conduct a field evaluation of a combined natural gas and sorbent injection process (IGT`s METHANE de-TOX{sup SM}, IGT Patent No. 5,105,747) for reducing the emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), hydrochloric acid (HCI), oxides of sulfur (SO{sub x}), carbon monoxide (CO), total hydrocarbons (THC), and chlorinated hydrocarbons (dioxin/furans). In addition, the design includes modifications for the control of heavy metals (HM). Development of the process should allow the waste-to-energy industry to meet the Federal New Source Performance Standards for these pollutants at significantly lower costs when compared to existing technology of Thermal deNO{sub x} combined with spray dryer scrubber/fabric filters. Additionally, the process should reduce boiler corrosion and increase both the thermal and power production efficiency of the facility.

  18. Integrated dry NO{sub x}/SO{sub 2} emissions control system: integrated system test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R.A.; Muzio, L.J. [Fossil Energy Research Corp., Laguna Hills, CA (United States); Hunt, T. [Public Service Co. of Colorado, Denver, CO (United States)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE sponsored Integrated Dry NO{sub x}/SO{sub 2} Emissions Control System Program, is a Clean Coal Technology III demonstration, being conducted by Public Service Company of Colorado. The test site is Arapahoe Generating Station Unit 4, a 100 MWe, down-fired utility boiler burning a low-sulfur Western coal. The project goal is to demonstrate up to 70 percent reductions in NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} emissions through the integration of: (1) down-fired low NO{sub x} burners with overfire air; (2) Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) for additional NO{sub x} removal; and (3) Dry Sorbent Injection (DSI) and duct humidification for SO{sub 2} removal. This report documents the final phase of the test program, in which the overall performance of the integrated system was evaluated. Previous testing has shown that the goal of 70 percent NO{sub x} removal was easily achieved with the combination of low-NO{sub x} burners, overfire air, and urea-based SNCR. Similarly, the ability of the sodium-based DSI system to achieve 70 percent SO{sub 2} removal was also demonstrated previously. The integrated tests demonstrated the synergistic benefit of operating the SNCR and sodium-based DSI systems concurrently. With the automatic control system set to limit the NH{sub 3} emissions to less than 8 ppm, the NO{sub 2} emissions from the sodium-based DSI system were reduced by nominally 50 percent compared to operation with the DSI system alone. Comparably, the combined operation reduced NH{sub 3} emissions, as reflected by a higher urea injection rate for a fixed NH{sub 3} emission limit. With combined DSI and SNCR operation, an ammonia odor problem was encountered around the Unit 4 ash silo (this did not occur with the SNCR system operated alone at comparable NH{sub 3} slip levels). This odor problem is attributed to the sodium changing the rate at which NH{sub 3} is released from the ash when it is wetted for truck transport to the disposal site.

  19. The mineral content of water as a variable in the quality control of reconstituted non-fat dry milk products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kapsalis, John G.

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ...................... ....... 57 2 Treatment of Water and Reconstituted Milk (Mixed Commercial Lactic Cultures)........................... 16 3 The Effect of NaCl and CaS0^.2H20 of Synthetic Water on the Renneting Time and Curd Characteristics of Reconstituted Nonfat Dry... of Synthetic Water on the Renneting Time and Curd Char? acteristics of Reconstituted Nonfat Dry Milk........... 64 6 The Effect of CaCl2 and NallCC^ of Synthetic Water on the Renneting Time and Curd Characteristics of Reconstituted Nonfat Dry Milk...

  20. Control of Sulfur Dioxide Emissions from Pulverized Coal-Fired Boilers by Dry Removal with Lime and Limestone Sorbants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, M. H.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pulverized coal-fired boiler equipment. These are: (1) coal cleaning to remove pyritic sulfur, (2) conventional wet, nonregenerable scrubbing with alkaline slurry and solution processes, and (3) dry processes which involve direct introduction of lime...

  1. Critical Analysis of Dry Storage Temperature Limits for Zircaloy-Clad Spent Nuclear Fuel Based on Diffusion Controlled Cavity Growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, T.A.; Rosen, R.S.; Kassner, M.E.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interim dry storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) rods is of critical concern because a shortage of existing SNF wet storage capacity combined with delays in the availability of a permanent disposal repository has led to an increasing number of SNF rods being placed into interim dry storage. Safe interim dry storage must be maintained for a minimum of twenty years according to the Standard Review Plan for Dry Cask Storage Systems [1] and the Code of Federal Regulations, 10 CFR Part 72 [2]. Interim dry storage licensees must meet certain safety conditions when storing SNF rods to ensure that there is a ''very low probability (e.g. 0.5%) of cladding breach during long-term storage'' [1]. Commercial SNF typically consists of uranium oxide pellets surrounded by a thin cladding. The cladding is usually an {alpha}-zirconium based alloy know as ''Zircaloy''. In dry storage, the SNF rods are confined in one of several types of cask systems approved by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). ''The cask system must be designed to prevent degradation of fuel cladding that results in a type of cladding breach, such as axial-splits or ductile fracture, where irradiated UO{sub 2} particles may be released. In addition, the fuel cladding should not degrade to the point where more than one percent of the fuel rods suffer pinhole or hairline crack type failure under normal storage conditions [1].'' The NRC has approved two models [3,4] for use by proposed dry storage licensees to determine the maximum initial temperature limit for nuclear fuel rods in dry storage that supposedly meet the above criteria and yield consistent temperature limits. Though these two models are based on the same fundamental failure theory, different assumptions have been made including the choice of values for material constants in the failure equation. This report will examine and compare the similarities and inconsistencies of these two models. It will illustrate some of the shortcomings of the current models and suggest modifications as well as some experiments that should be started in the near future. This report will also discuss changes in the current NRC standards with regard to the adoption of a strain-based model to be used to determine maximum allowable temperatures of the SNF.

  2. 2013 Dry Bean Research Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page 1 2013 Dry Bean Research Report Black Bean Color Retention and White Mold Control in Narrow Row Production Systems Michigan Dry Edible Bean Production Research Advisory Board #12;Page 2 The Michigan Bean Commission was awarded a grant from the MDARD Specialty Crop Block Grant Program-Farm Bill

  3. Controlling X-rays With Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glover, Ernie

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Author Contributions TEG, MPH, AB, SHS, LY contributed todesign of the experiment. TEG, MPH, BR were responsible forcontrol laser performance. TEG, MPH, SHS, TKA, JVT, EPK, BK,

  4. Drying Foods at Home Safely Drying Herbs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    jars, freezer bags, and airtight plastic containers. Like other foods dried at home, dried herbs in an airtight container and store in a cool, dry, and dark place. Recommended containers include glass canning

  5. Proof of concept testing of an integrated dry injection system for SO sub x /NO sub x control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helfritch, D.J.; Bortz, S.J. (Research-Cottrell, Inc., Somerville, NJ (United States). Environmental Services and Technologies Div.); Beittel, R. (Riley Stoker Corp., Worcester, MA (United States))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the subscale test program were designed to provide sorbent and additive selection guidance, and, in so doing, supply answers to the questions posed in the preceding section. The objectives are: Identify the best commercial hydrate sorbent and the best enhanced hydrate sorbent from a list of nine types, based upon S0{sub 2} removal at Ca/S=2. Determine the relative effectiveness of sodium sesquicarbonate versus sodium bicarbonate for S0{sub 2} and NO{sub x} control over the temperature range of 200{degrees}F--400{degrees}F. Identify the best NO{sub 2} suppressing additive among the group of ammonia, urea, and activated carbon.

  6. Proof of concept testing of an integrated dry injection system for SO sub x /NO sub x control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helfritch, D.J.; Bortz, S.J. (Research-Cottrell, Inc., Somerville, NJ (United States). Environmental Services and Technologies Div.); Beittel, R. (Riley Stoker Corp., Worcester, MA (United States))

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the subscale test program were designed to provide sorbent and additive selection guidance, and, in so doing, supply answers to the questions posed in the preceding section. The objectives are: Identify the best commercial hydrate sorbent and the best enhanced hydrate sorbent from a list of nine types, based upon S0{sub 2} removal at Ca/S=2. Determine the relative effectiveness of sodium sesquicarbonate versus sodium bicarbonate for S0{sub 2} and NO{sub x} control over the temperature range of 200{degrees}F--400{degrees}F. Identify the best NO{sub 2} suppressing additive among the group of ammonia, urea, and activated carbon.

  7. ORIGINAL PAPER Social Networks Help Control Hypertension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Social Networks Help Control Hypertension Fadia T. Shaya, PhD, MPH;1 Viktor V administered within social networks on the improvement of hypertension in 248 African Americans compared with historical controls. Patients formed clusters with peers and attended monthly hypertension education sessions

  8. Integrated dry NO{sub x}/SO{sub 2} emissions control system sodium-based dry sorbent injection test report. Test period: August 4, 1993--July 29, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R.A.; Shimoto, G.H.; Muzio, L.J. [Fossil Energy Research Corp., Laguna Hills, CA (United States)] [Fossil Energy Research Corp., Laguna Hills, CA (United States); Hunt, T. [Public Service Co. of Colorado, Denver, CO (United States)] [Public Service Co. of Colorado, Denver, CO (United States)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The project goal is to demonstrate up to 70% reductions in NOx and SO{sub 2} emissions through the integration of: (1) down-fired low-NOx burners with overfire air; (2) Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) for additional NOx removal; and (3) dry sorbent injection and duct humidification for SO{sub 2} removal. This report documents the sixth phase of the test program, where the performance of dry sorbent injection with sodium compounds was evaluated as a SO{sub 2} removal technique. Dry sorbent injection was performed in-duct downstream of the air heater (ahead of the fabric filter), as well as at a higher temperature location between the economizer and air heater. Two sodium compounds were evaluated during this phase of testing: sodium sesquicarbonate and sodium bicarbonate. In-duct sodium injection with low levels of humidification was also investigated. This sixth test phase was primarily focused on a parametric investigation of sorbent type and feed rate, although boiler load and sorbent preparation parameters were also varied.

  9. Proof of concept testing of an integrated dry injection system for SO{sub 2}/NO{sub x} control. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helfritch, D.J.; Bortz, S.J. [Research-Cottrell, Inc., Somerville, NJ (United States); Beittel, R. [Riley Stoker Corp., Worcester, MA (United States)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The integrated Dry Injection Process (IDIP) consists of combustion modification using low NO{sub x} burners to reduce NO{sub x} emissions, dry injection of hydrated line at economizer temperatures for primary capture of SO{sub 2}, dry injection of a commercial grade sodium bicarbonate at the air heater exit for additional SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal, and humidification for precipitator conditioning. IDIP offers the potential for simultaneously achieving 90% SO{sub 2} removal, and 65% NO{sub x} removal from a high sulfur flue gas. The process is well suited for new or retrofit applications since it can be incorporated within existing economizer and downstream ductwork. Subscale tests were performed in order to identify the best calcium and sodium sorbents. These tests involved the injection of calcium hydroxide and sodium sorbents at various points of the flue gas system downstream of a 0.25 MM BTU/hr. coal fired combustor, and the gas residence times, cooling rates and temperatures were comparable to those found for full-scale utility boilers. These tests verified that a high surface area hydrated lime provides maximum sorbent utilization and identified an alcohol-water hydrated lime as yielding the highest surface area and the best SO{sub 2} removal capability. The tests also identified sodium bicarbonate to be somewhat more effective than sodium sesquicarbonate for SO{sub 2} removal. The proof of concept demonstration was conducted on the large combustor at the Riley Stoker Research Facility in Worcester, MA. When economically compared to conventional limestone slurry scrubbing on a 300 MW plant, the dry injection process shows lower capital cost but higher operating cost. Hydrated lime injection can be less costly than limestone scrubbing when two or more of the following conditions exist: plant is small (less than 100MW); yearly operating hours are small (less than 3000); and the remaining plant lifetime is small (less than 10 years).

  10. Dry Process Electrode Fabrication

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    with good mechanical properties - Loading approaching targets - Process parameter optimization necessary to make thinner films with better density characteristics Images of dry...

  11. Transporting Dry Ice

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Requirements for Shipping Dry Ice IATA PI 904 Source: Reg of the Day from ERCweb 2006 Environmental Resource Center | 919-469-1585 | webmaster@ercweb.com http:...

  12. Cooking with Dry Beans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the nutritonal value and safe storage of dry beans, a commodity food. It also offers food preparation ideas....

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: DRI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DRI ECIS-Princeton Power Systems, Inc.: Demand Response Inverter On March 19, 2013, in DETL, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Energy Surety, Facilities, Grid Integration,...

  14. Development of advanced, dry, SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} emission control technologies for high-sulfur coal. Final report, April 1, 1993--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amrhein, G.T.

    1994-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Dry Scrubbing is a common commercial process that has been limited to low- and medium-sulfur coal applications because high-sulfur coal requires more reagent than can be efficiently injected into the process. Babcock & Wilcox has made several advances that extend dry scrubbing technologies to higher sulfur coals by allowing deposit-free operation at low scrubber exit temperatures. This not only increases the amount of reagent that can be injected into the scrubber, but also increases SO{sub 2} removal efficiency and sorbent utilization. The objectives of this project were to demonstrate, at pilot scale, that advanced, dry-scrubbing-based technologies can attain the performance levels specified by the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments for SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions while burning high-sulfur coal, and that these technologies are economically competitive with wet scrubber systems. The use of these technologies by utilities in and around Ohio, on new or retrofit applications, will ensure the future of markets for high-sulfur coal by creating cost effective options to coal switching.

  15. Dry Process Electrode Fabrication

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Ratecapacity match cathode 12 8. Down-select low cost anode process 50% vs baseline capex + opex 13 9. Scale cathode film to support task 16 10 m 17 10. Lab prototype cell dry...

  16. Freeze drying method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coppa, Nicholas V. (Malvern, PA); Stewart, Paul (Youngstown, NY); Renzi, Ernesto (Youngstown, NY)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for freeze drying in which a solution, which can be a radioactive salt dissolved within an acid, is frozen into a solid on vertical plates provided within a freeze drying chamber. The solid is sublimated into vapor and condensed in a cold condenser positioned above the freeze drying chamber and connected thereto by a conduit. The vertical positioning of the cold condenser relative to the freeze dryer helps to help prevent substances such as radioactive materials separated from the solution from contaminating the cold condenser. Additionally, the system can be charged with an inert gas to produce a down rush of gas into the freeze drying chamber to also help prevent such substances from contaminating the cold condenser.

  17. Freeze drying apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coppa, Nicholas V. (Malvern, PA); Stewart, Paul (Youngstown, NY); Renzi, Ernesto (Youngstown, NY)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for freeze drying in which a solution, which can be a radioactive salt dissolved within an acid, is frozen into a solid on vertical plates provided within a freeze drying chamber. The solid is sublimated into vapor and condensed in a cold condenser positioned above the freeze drying chamber and connected thereto by a conduit. The vertical positioning of the cold condenser relative to the freeze dryer helps to help prevent substances such as radioactive materials separated from the solution from contaminating the cold condenser. Additionally, the system can be charged with an inert gas to produce a down rush of gas into the freeze drying chamber to also help prevent such substances from contaminating the cold condenser.

  18. Vapor Transport in Dry Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gee, Glendon W.; Ward, Anderson L.

    2001-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Water-vapor movement in soils is a complex process, controlled by both diffusion and advection and influenced by pressure and thermal gradients acting across tortuous flow paths. Wide-ranging interest in water-vapor transport includes both theoretical and practical aspects. Just how pressure and thermal gradients enhance water-vapor flow is still not completely understood and subject to ongoing research. Practical aspects include dryland farming (surface mulching), water harvesting (aerial wells), fertilizer placement, and migration of contaminants at waste-sites. The following article describes the processes and practical applications of water-vapor transport, with emphasis on unsaturated (dry) soil systems.

  19. Cooking with Dried Potatoes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    make a tasty vegetable dish. For added flavor, you can add salt and pepper along with small amounts of grated cheese, margarine or butter. Be careful: Adding large amounts of cheese, butter or margarine can turn a low-fat vegetable, such as potatoes..., into a high-fat dish. How to store them Store packages of dried potatoes in a cool, dry, place. After the package is opened, store the potatoes in an airtight container. Store cooked potatoes in a covered dish in the refrigerator. Use within 3 days...

  20. Cooling Dry Cows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stokes, Sandra R.

    2000-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    , little work has been done on the responses of cooling cows in this period. The dry period is particularly crucial because it involves regen- eration of the mammary gland and rapid fetal growth. This is also when follicles begin develop- ing and maturing...

  1. Will Amazonia Dry Out? Magnitude and Causes of Change from IPCC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Ning

    drying under global warming when the dry season southern Amazon basin is under the control of subtropical as a result of deforestation and land-use change. Should this direct human impact continue at present rates

  2. amazon dry-season climate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    should remain largely stable because rainfall in the core of the basin drying under global warming when the dry season southern Amazon basin is under the control of subtropical...

  3. Standard practice for qualification and acceptance of boron based metallic neutron absorbers for nuclear criticality control for dry cask storage systems and transportation packaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This practice provides procedures for qualification and acceptance of neutron absorber materials used to provide criticality control by absorbing thermal neutrons in systems designed for nuclear fuel storage, transportation, or both. 1.2 This practice is limited to neutron absorber materials consisting of metal alloys, metal matrix composites (MMCs), and cermets, clad or unclad, containing the neutron absorber boron-10 (10B). 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  4. Proof of concept testing of an integrated dry injection system for SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} control. Quarterly technical progress report, July--September 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helfritch, D.J.; Bortz, S.J. [Research-Cottrell, Inc., Somerville, NJ (United States). Environmental Services and Technologies Div.; Beittel, R. [Riley Stoker Corp., Worcester, MA (United States)

    1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the subscale test program were designed to provide sorbent and additive selection guidance, and, in so doing, supply answers to the questions posed in the preceding section. The objectives are: Identify the best commercial hydrate sorbent and the best enhanced hydrate sorbent from a list of nine types, based upon S0{sub 2} removal at Ca/S=2. Determine the relative effectiveness of sodium sesquicarbonate versus sodium bicarbonate for S0{sub 2} and NO{sub x} control over the temperature range of 200{degrees}F--400{degrees}F. Identify the best NO{sub 2} suppressing additive among the group of ammonia, urea, and activated carbon.

  5. Proof of concept testing of an integrated dry injection system for SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} control. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helfritch, D.J.; Bortz, S.J. [Research-Cottrell, Inc., Somerville, NJ (United States). Environmental Services and Technologies Div.; Beittel, R. [Riley Stoker Corp., Worcester, MA (United States)

    1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the subscale test program were designed to provide sorbent and additive selection guidance, and, in so doing, supply answers to the questions posed in the preceding section. The objectives are: Identify the best commercial hydrate sorbent and the best enhanced hydrate sorbent from a list of nine types, based upon S0{sub 2} removal at Ca/S=2. Determine the relative effectiveness of sodium sesquicarbonate versus sodium bicarbonate for S0{sub 2} and NO{sub x} control over the temperature range of 200{degrees}F--400{degrees}F. Identify the best NO{sub 2} suppressing additive among the group of ammonia, urea, and activated carbon.

  6. Drying of fiber webs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warren, David W. (9253 Glenoaks Blvd., Sun Valley, CA 91352)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and an apparatus for high-intensity drying of fiber webs or sheets, such as newsprint, printing and writing papers, packaging paper, and paperboard or linerboard, as they are formed on a paper machine. The invention uses direct contact between the wet fiber web or sheet and various molten heat transfer fluids, such as liquified eutectic metal alloys, to impart heat at high rates over prolonged durations, in order to achieve ambient boiling of moisture contained within the web. The molten fluid contact process causes steam vapor to emanate from the web surface, without dilution by ambient air; and it is differentiated from the evaporative drying techniques of the prior industrial art, which depend on the uses of steam-heated cylinders to supply heat to the paper web surface, and ambient air to carry away moisture, which is evaporated from the web surface. Contact between the wet fiber web and the molten fluid can be accomplished either by submersing the web within a molten bath or by coating the surface of the web with the molten media. Because of the high interfacial surface tension between the molten media and the cellulose fiber comprising the paper web, the molten media does not appreciately stick to the paper after it is dried. Steam generated from the paper web is collected and condensed without dilution by ambient air to allow heat recovery at significantly higher temperature levels than attainable in evaporative dryers.

  7. Drying of fiber webs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warren, D.W.

    1997-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and an apparatus are disclosed for high-intensity drying of fiber webs or sheets, such as newsprint, printing and writing papers, packaging paper, and paperboard or linerboard, as they are formed on a paper machine. The invention uses direct contact between the wet fiber web or sheet and various molten heat transfer fluids, such as liquefied eutectic metal alloys, to impart heat at high rates over prolonged durations, in order to achieve ambient boiling of moisture contained within the web. The molten fluid contact process causes steam vapor to emanate from the web surface, without dilution by ambient air; and it is differentiated from the evaporative drying techniques of the prior industrial art, which depend on the uses of steam-heated cylinders to supply heat to the paper web surface, and ambient air to carry away moisture, which is evaporated from the web surface. Contact between the wet fiber web and the molten fluid can be accomplished either by submersing the web within a molten bath or by coating the surface of the web with the molten media. Because of the high interfacial surface tension between the molten media and the cellulose fiber comprising the paper web, the molten media does not appreciatively stick to the paper after it is dried. Steam generated from the paper web is collected and condensed without dilution by ambient air to allow heat recovery at significantly higher temperature levels than attainable in evaporative dryers. 6 figs.

  8. 2010 Dry Bean Research Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010 Dry Bean Research Report Assessment of Narrow Row Technology Michigan Dry Edible Bean Production RESEARCH ADVISORY BOARD #12;The Michigan Bean Commission was awarded a grant from the MDA Technology for the Michigan Dry Bean Industry". Expected outcomes from this project are: 1. Identification

  9. 2012 Dry Bean Research Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012 Dry Bean Research Report Assessment of Narrow Row Technology Michigan Dry Edible Bean Production Research Advisory Board #12;The Michigan Bean Commission was awarded a grant from the MDA Technology for the Michigan Dry Bean Industry". Expected outcomes from this project are: 1. Identification

  10. Drying Rough Rice in Storage.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorenson, J. W. Jr.; Crane, L. E.

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drying. Rough Rice in Storage Ih AGRf""' TURP YPERIMENT STAT10 I. TEXAS SUMMARY Research was conducted at the Rice-Pasture Experiment Station near Beaumont during 7 crop years (1952-53 through 1958-59) to determine the engineering problems... and the practicability of dry- ing rough rice in storage in Texas. Drying rice in storage means drying rice in the same bin in which it is to be stored. Rough rice, with initial moisture contents of 15.0 to 23.0 percent, was dried at depths of 4 to 10 feet...

  11. Method of drying articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Janney, M.A.; Kiggans, J.O. Jr.

    1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of drying a green particulate article includes the steps of: (a) Providing a green article which includes a particulate material and a pore phase material, the pore phase material including a solvent; and (b) contacting the green article with a liquid desiccant for a period of time sufficient to remove at least a portion of the solvent from the green article, the pore phase material acting as a semipermeable barrier to allow the solvent to be sorbed into the liquid desiccant, the pore phase material substantially preventing the liquid desiccant from entering the pores. 3 figs.

  12. Method of drying articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Janney, Mark A. (Knoxville, TN); Kiggans, Jr., James O. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of drying a green particulate article includes the steps of: a. Providing a green article which includes a particulate material and a pore phase material, the pore phase material including a solvent; and b. contacting the green article with a liquid desiccant for a period of time sufficient to remove at least a portion of the solvent from the green article, the pore phase material acting as a semipermeable barrier to allow the solvent to be sorbed into the liquid desiccant, the pore phase material substantially preventing the liquid desiccant from entering the pores.

  13. Integrated Ingredients Dehydrated Agricultural Drying Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ingredients Dehydrated Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Integrated Ingredients Dehydrated Agricultural Drying Low...

  14. Moisture Distribution and Flow During Drying of Wood and Fiber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zink-Sharp, Audrey; Hanna, Robert B.

    2001-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    New understanding, theories, and techniques for moisture flow and distribution were developed in this research on wood and wood fiber. Improved understanding of the mechanisms of flake drying has been provided. Observations of flake drying and drying rate curves revealed that rate of moisture loss consisted of two falling rate periods and no constant rate drying period was observed. Convective heat transfer controls the first period, and bound water diffusion controls the second period. Influence of lower drying temperatures on bending properties of wood flakes was investigated. Drying temperature was found to have a significant influence on bending stiffness and strength. A worksheet for calculation of the energy required to dry a single strandboard flake was developed but has not been tested in an industrial setting yet. A more complete understanding of anisotropic transverse shrinkage of wood is proposed based on test results and statistical analysis. A simplified mod el of a wood cell's cross-section was drawn for calculating differential transverse shrinkage. The model utilizes cell wall thickness and microfibrillar packing density and orientation. In spite of some phenomena of cell wall structure not yet understood completely, the results might explain anisotropic transverse shrinkage to a major extent. Boundary layer theory was found useful for evaluating external moisture resistance during drying. Simulated moisture gradients were quire comparable to the actual gradients in dried wood. A mathematical procedure for determining diffusion and surface emission coefficients was also developed. Thermal conductivity models of wood derived from its anatomical structure were created and tested against experimental values. Model estimations provide insights into changes in heat transfer parameters during drying. Two new techniques for measuring moisture gradients created in wood during drying were developed. A new technique that utilizes optical properties of cobalt chloride was developed for nondestructive determination of surface moisture content. Fundamental new understanding of drying characteristics in wood and fiber has been provided that can be used by researchers to improve drying of wood and fiber. The three techniques for measuring moisture content and gradients provided in this study are efficient, practical, and economical - easy to apply by industry and researchers. An energy consumption worksheet is provided as a first step toward reducing energy consumed during drying of lumber and strandboard flakes. However, it will need additional verification and testing.

  15. On the dry deposition of submicron particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wesely, M. L.

    1999-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The air-surface exchange of particles can have a strong role in determining the amount, size, and chemical composition of particles in the troposphere. Here the authors consider only dry processes (deposition processes not directly aided by precipitation) and mostly address particles less than about 2 {micro}m in diameter (often referred to as submicron particles because most of such particles are less than 1 {micro}m in diameter). The processes that control the dry exchange of particulate material between the atmosphere and the surface of the Earth are numerous, highly varied, and sometimes poorly understood. As a result, determining which of the surface processes to parameterize or simulate in modeling the tropospheric mass budget of a particulate substance can be a significant challenge. Dry deposition, for example, can be controlled by a combination of Brownian diffusion, impaction, interception, and gravitational settling, depending on the size of the particles, the roughness of the surface on both micrometeorological and microscopic scales, the geometrical structure of vegetative canopies, and other surface characteristics such as wetness. Particles can be added to the lower atmosphere by resuspension from land surfaces and sea spray. The roles of rapid gas-to-particle conversion and growth or shrinkage of particles as a result of water condensation or evaporation in the lower few meters of the atmosphere can also have a significant impact on particle concentrations in the lower atmosphere. Here, a few micrometeorological observations and inferences on particle air-surface exchange are briefly addressed.

  16. Dry-Mass Sensing for Microfluidics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, T; Knowles, T P J

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an approach for interfacing an electromechanical sensor with a microfluidic device for the accurate quantification of the dry mass of analytes within microchannels. We show that depositing solutes onto the active surface of a quartz crystal microbalance by means of an on-chip microfluidic spray nozzle and subsequent solvent removal provides the basis for the real-time determination of dry solute mass. Moreover, this detection scheme does not suffer from the decrease in the sensor quality factor and the viscous drag present if the measurement is performed in a liquid environment, yet allows solutions to be analysed. We demonstrate the sensitivity and reliability of our approach by controlled deposition of nanogram levels of salt and protein from a micrometer-sized channel.

  17. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Technical Safety Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRAHN, D.E.

    1999-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs) for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility define acceptable conditions, safe boundaries, bases thereof, and management or administrative controls required to ensure safe operation. Controls required for public safety, significant defense-in-depth, significant worker safety, and for maintaining radiological and toxicological consequences below risk evaluation guidelines are included.

  18. High-intensity drying processes: Impulse drying. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orloff, D.I.; Phelan, P.M.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments were conducted on a sheet-fed pilot-scale shoe press to compare impulse drying and double-felted pressing. Both an IPST (Institute of Paper Science and Technology) ceramic coated and Beloit Type A press roll were evaluated for lienrboard sheet structures having a wide range of z-direction permeability. Purpose was to find ways of correcting sheet sticking problems observed in previous pilot-scale shoe press experiments. Results showed that impulse drying was superior to double felted pressing in both press dryness and in important paper physical properties. Impulse drying critical temperature was found to depend on specific surface of the heated layer of the sheet, thermal properties of the press roll surface, and choice of felt. Impulse drying of recycled and two-ply liner was demonstrated for both Southern Pile and Douglas fir-containing furnishes.

  19. Spent fuel drying system test results (second dry-run)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klinger, G.S.; Oliver, B.M.; Abrefah, J.; Marschman, S.C.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks have been detected in the basins and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site (WHC 1995). Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 7.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of the second dry-run test, which was conducted without a fuel element. With the concurrence of project management, the test protocol for this run, and subsequent drying test runs, was modified. These modifications were made to allow for improved data correlation with drying procedures proposed under the IPS. Details of these modifications are discussed in Section 3.0.

  20. Textile Drying Via Wood Gasification 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGowan, T. F.; Jape, A. D.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was carried out to investigate the possibility of using wood gas as a direct replacement for natural gas in textile drying. The Georgia Tech updraft gasifier was used for the experimental program. During preliminary tests, the 1 million...

  1. Textile Drying Via Wood Gasification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGowan, T. F.; Jape, A. D.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was carried out to investigate the possibility of using wood gas as a direct replacement for natural gas in textile drying. The Georgia Tech updraft gasifier was used for the experimental program. During preliminary tests, the 1 million...

  2. Dry Processing of Used Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. M. Goff; M. F. Simpson

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dry (non-aqueous) separations technologies have been used for treatment of used nuclear fuel since the 1960s, and they are still being developed and demonstrated in many countries. Dry technologies offer potential advantages compared to traditional aqueous separations including: compactness, resistance to radiation effects, criticality control benefits, compatibility with advanced fuel types, and ability to produce low purity products. Within the Department of Energy’s Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, an electrochemical process employing molten salts is being developed for recycle of fast reactor fuel and treatment of light water reactor oxide fuel to produce a feed for fast reactors. Much of the development of this technology is based on treatment of used Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) fuel, which is metallic. Electrochemical treatment of the EBR-II fuel has been ongoing in the Fuel Conditioning Facility, located at the Materials and Fuel Complex of Idaho National Laboratory since 1996. More than 3.8 metric tons of heavy metal of metallic fast reactor fuel have been treated using this technology. This paper will summarize the status of electrochemical development and demonstration activities with used nuclear fuel, including high-level waste work. A historic perspective on the background of dry processing will also be provided.

  3. Criticality Safety Evaluation Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facilities Process Water Handling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KESSLER, S.F.

    2000-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the criticality concerns associated with process water handling in the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. The controls and limitations on equipment design and operations to control potential criticality occurrences are identified.

  4. Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Geothermal Food Processors Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal...

  5. Self drying roofs: What! No dripping!

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desjarlais, A.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Many roofs are replaced because water accumulates in portions of the roofing system.These accumulations can cause dripping, accelerated membrane failure, poor thermal performance, the threat of structural decay, and the depreciation of building assets. Traditionally, the roofing industry has been concerned with controlling the inflow of water into the roof. An example of this strategy would be the development of a more reliable membrane. However, roof membranes inevitably leak. For this reason, the roof design strategy of the future must be concerned with controlling water outflow. The requirements of this type of roof system are described. Under normal operating conditions (no leaks), the total moisture content of a self-drying roof system shall not increase with time and condensation shall not occur under the membrane during winter uptake. Moisture vapor movement by convection must be eliminated and the flow of water by gravity through imperfections in the roof system must be controlled. After a leak has occurred, no condensation on the upper surface of the deck shall be tolerated and the water introduced by the leak must be dissipated to the building interior in a minimum amount of time. Finite difference computer modeling is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the design. The impact of deck and insulation permeance, climate, leaks, and wintertime water uptake are simulated. A database of simulations is qualitatively described; this database will be used in future work to produce a simplified means of assessing the design parameters of a self-drying roof system.

  6. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Technical Safety Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRAHN, D.E.

    2000-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs) for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility define acceptable conditions, safe boundaries, bases thereof, and management or administrative controls required to ensure safe operation during receipt of multi-canister overpacks (MCOs) containing spent nuclear fuel. removal of free water from the MCOs using the cold vacuum drying process, and inerting and testing of the MCOs before transport to the Canister Storage Building. Controls required for public safety, significant defense in depth, significant worker safety, and for maintaining radiological and toxicological consequences below risk evaluation guidelines are included.

  7. Spent fuel drying system test results (first dry-run)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klinger, G.S.; Oliver, B.M.; Abrefah, J.; Marschman, S.C.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The water-filled K-Basins in the Hanford 100 Area have been used to store N-Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) since the 1970s. Because some leaks in the basin have been detected and some of the fuel is breached due to handling damage and corrosion, efforts are underway to remove the fuel elements from wet storage. An Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) has been developed to package, dry, transport, and store these metallic uranium fuel elements in an interim storage facility on the Hanford Site. Information required to support the development of the drying processes, and the required safety analyses, is being obtained from characterization tests conducted on fuel elements removed from the K-Basins. A series of whole element drying tests (reported in separate documents, see Section 7.0) have been conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on several intact and damaged fuel elements recovered from both the K-East and K-West Basins. This report documents the results of the first dry-run test, which was conducted without a fuel element. The empty test apparatus was subjected to a combination of low- and high-temperature vacuum drying treatments that were intended to mimic, wherever possible, the fuel treatment strategies of the IPS. The data from this dry-run test can serve as a baseline for the first two fuel element tests, 1990 (Run 1) and 3128W (Run 2). The purpose of this dry-run was to establish the background levels of hydrogen in the system, and the hydrogen generation and release characteristics attributable to the test system without a fuel element present. This test also serves to establish the background levels of water in the system and the water release characteristics. The system used for the drying test series was the Whole Element Furnace Testing System, described in Section 2.0, which is located in the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL, 327 Building). The test conditions and methodology are given in section 3.0, and the experimental results provided in Section 4.0. These results are further discussed in Section 5.0.

  8. DRI Renewable Energy Center (REC) (NV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoekman, S. Kent; Broch, Broch; Robbins, Curtis; Jacobson, Roger; Turner, Robert

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this project was to utilize a flexible, energy-efficient facility, called the DRI Renewable Energy Experimental Facility (REEF) to support various renewable energy research and development (R&D) efforts, along with education and outreach activities. The REEF itself consists of two separate buildings: (1) a 1200-ft2 off-grid capable house and (2) a 600-ft2 workshop/garage to support larger-scale experimental work. Numerous enhancements were made to DRI's existing renewable power generation systems, and several additional components were incorporated to support operation of the REEF House. The power demands of this house are satisfied by integrating and controlling PV arrays, solar thermal systems, wind turbines, an electrolyzer for renewable hydrogen production, a gaseous-fuel internal combustion engine/generator set, and other components. Cooling needs of the REEF House are satisfied by an absorption chiller, driven by solar thermal collectors. The REEF Workshop includes a unique, solar air collector system that is integrated into the roof structure. This system provides space heating inside the Workshop, as well as a hot water supply. The Workshop houses a custom-designed process development unit (PDU) that is used to convert woody biomass into a friable, hydrophobic char that has physical and chemical properties similar to low grade coal. Besides providing sufficient space for operation of this PDU, the REEF Workshop supplies hot water that is used in the biomass treatment process. The DRI-REEF serves as a working laboratory for evaluating and optimizing the performance of renewable energy components within an integrated, residential-like setting. The modular nature of the system allows for exploring alternative configurations and control strategies. This experimental test bed is also highly valuable as an education and outreach tool both in providing an infrastructure for student research projects, and in highlighting renewable energy features to the public.

  9. Anionic Salt Programs for Close-Up Dry Cows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stokes, Sandra R.

    1998-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Dairy farmers can improve long-term milk production by having a well-managed program for dry cows during the last 3 weeks before calving. This publication explains how an anionic salt program can help control subclinical hypocalcemia and "droopy cow...

  10. ABBREVIATION KEY EMPH EXECUTIVE MPH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Qiao

    FULLTIME MANAGEMENT FTP FULLTIME POLICY GLOBAL GLOBAL HEALTH POLICY & MANAGEMENT HPM HAVE YOU HEARD 13 HPM HIGHLIGHTS 16 Practicum Day "understand how public health% of fulltime students entering HPM have never worked in a professional setting. To prepare students to enter

  11. ABBREVIATION KEY EMPH EXECUTIVE MPH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grishok, Alla

    HPM DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH POLICY & MANAGEMENT MSPH MAILMAN SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH PTM Fall 2013 ISSUE 4 A Health Policy & Management Newsletter IN THIS ISSUE: HPM PAST & PRESENT 1 ALUMNI PROFILE 6 FACULTY CORNER 8 HAVE YOU HEARD 9 BOOK NOOK 10 HPM HIGHLIGHTS 11

  12. ABBREVIATION KEY EMPH EXECUTIVE MPH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Ning

    -TIME MANAGEMENT FTP FULL-TIME POLICY GLOBAL GLOBAL HEALTH POLICY & MANAGEMENT HPM DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH POLICY: WELCOME 1 MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIR 2 HPM HEALTHCARE 3 CONFERENCE STUDENT SPOTLIGHT 4 ALUMNI PROFILE 5 and your work in the healthcare field. HPM also has an important network of current students and alumni. We

  13. ABBREVIATION KEY EMPH EXECUTIVE MPH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Ning

    & MANAGEMENT HPM DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH POLICY & MANAGEMENT MSPH MAILMAN SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH |COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY May 2013 ISSUE 3 A Health Policy & Management Newsletter IN THIS ISSUE: HPM Q&A WITH SUSAN COHEN 9 FACULTY CORNER 11 HAVE YOU HEARD 12 HPM HIGHLIGHTS 14 HPM

  14. mph_hpca_revise.dvi

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, , (Energy97 UpperJointmoveLINQ PIA, Office of

  15. Coupling dry deposition to vegetation phenology in the Community Earth System Model: Implications for the simulation of surface O[subscript 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Val?Martin, M.

    Dry deposition is an important removal process controlling surface ozone. We examine the representation of this ozone loss mechanism in the Community Earth System Model. We first correct the dry deposition parameterization ...

  16. Climatology of katabatic winds in the McMurdo dry valleys, southern Victoria Land, Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fountain, Andrew G.

    Climatology of katabatic winds in the McMurdo dry valleys, southern Victoria Land, Antarctica of katabatic winds largely controls winter (June to August) temperatures, increasing 1°C per 1% increase of katabatic winds in the McMurdo dry valleys, southern Victoria Land, Antarctica, J. Geophys. Res., 109, D

  17. Computer controlled feed delivery system for feed trucks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holt, Gregory Alan

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of 11. 2 km/h (7 mph), a delivery rate of 13. 3 kg/m (9 Ibs/ft) and a constant cross-sectional area of 4. 1 m~ (44 ft~), the floor chains must move the feed to the dispersing cylinders at a rate of 1. 66 m/min (5. 46 fpm). This rate exceeds... proportional directional control valve (Continental Hydraulics model EDO3M and model ECM-3-L2-A-X-A, Figures 12 and 13, respectively). AMPLIFIER CARD OP-AMP S PROPORTIONAL CONTROL VALVE GRCLND SPEED SENSOR Figure 9. Schematic drawing of the bed...

  18. Nonlinear Dynamics of Dry Friction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franz-Josef Elmer

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamical behavior caused by dry friction is studied for a spring-block system pulled with constant velocity over a surface. The dynamical consequences of a general type of phenomenological friction law (stick-time dependent static friction, velocity dependent kinetic friction) are investigated. Three types of motion are possible: Stick-slip motion, continuous sliding, and oscillations without sticking events. A rather complete discussion of local and global bifurcation scenarios of these attractors and their unstable counterparts is present.

  19. Drying and Storing Sorghum Grain.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutchison, J. E.

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drying and Storing Sorghum Grain W. S. ALLEN AND J. W. SORENSON. JR.* lead to insect. niold and heat damage in stored grain. They cause most of the problems encountered in storing grain. High moisture may result from leak- age of outside... moisture through hin walls or from placing high-moisture grain in storage. If the following recornrnendations and procedures are followed. sorghum grain can be stored safely. The! are based on research conducted at Beeville by the Texas Agricultural...

  20. Compton Dry-Cask Imaging System

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Compton-Dry Cask Imaging Scanner is a system that verifies and documents the presence of spent nuclear fuel rods in dry-cask storage and determines their isotopic composition without moving or opening the cask. For more information about this project, visit http://www.inl.gov/rd100/2011/compton-dry-cask-imaging-system/

  1. Compton Dry-Cask Imaging System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Compton-Dry Cask Imaging Scanner is a system that verifies and documents the presence of spent nuclear fuel rods in dry-cask storage and determines their isotopic composition without moving or opening the cask. For more information about this project, visit http://www.inl.gov/rd100/2011/compton-dry-cask-imaging-system/

  2. Drying and Storing Cooperative Extension Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    . Sunflowers Joseph P. Harner Extension Agriculture Engineer The fire hazard is DECREASED when the fan can draw for attachment to the drying fan. Guidelines for drying sunflowers are: 1. 2. 3. 4. Use good housekeeping practices. Clean up around the dryer and in the plenum chamber daily. Do not over dry. Ensure continuous

  3. Dry Transfer Systems for Used Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brett W. Carlsen; Michaele BradyRaap

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential need for a dry transfer system (DTS) to enable retrieval of used nuclear fuel (UNF) for inspection or repackaging will increase as the duration and quantity of fuel in dry storage increases. This report explores the uses for a DTS, identifies associated general functional requirements, and reviews existing and proposed systems that currently perform dry fuel transfers. The focus of this paper is on the need for a DTS to enable transfer of bare fuel assemblies. Dry transfer systems for UNF canisters are currently available and in use for transferring loaded canisters between the drying station and storage and transportation casks.

  4. Drying Fruits and Vegetables at Home.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Putnam, Peggy H.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that are responsible for their maturation, or their becoming ripe. These enzymes cause color and flavor changes, some of which may become more extensive when food surfaces are cut and exposed to air. The changes con tinue during drying and storage unless the enzyme... in recommendations for treatment before dry ing, for methods of drying, for temperatures and length of drying time, and for conditioning prior to storage. You may have to use the "trial and error" approach in finding out which drying technique works best for your...

  5. Microwave drying of ferric oxide pellets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pickles, C.A.; Xia, D.K. [Queens` Univ., Kingston, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of microwave energy for the drying of ferric oxide pellets has been investigated and evaluated. It is shown that the microwave drying rates are much higher than those observed in the conventional process. Also there is some potential for improved quality of the product. As a stand-alone technology it is unlikely that microwave drying would be economical for pellets due to the low cost of conventional fuels. However, based on an understanding of the drying mechanisms in the conventional process and in the microwave process, it is shown that microwave-assisted drying offers considerable potential. In this hybrid process, the advantages of the two drying techniques are combined to provide an improved drying process.

  6. Dry-cleaning of graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Algara-Siller, Gerardo [Central Facility for Electron Microscopy, Group of Electron Microscopy of Materials Science, Ulm University, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, Ulm 89081 (Germany); Department of Chemistry, Technical University Ilmenau, Weimarer Strasse 25, Ilmenau 98693 (Germany); Lehtinen, Ossi; Kaiser, Ute, E-mail: ute.kaiser@uni-ulm.de [Central Facility for Electron Microscopy, Group of Electron Microscopy of Materials Science, Ulm University, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, Ulm 89081 (Germany); Turchanin, Andrey [Faculty of Physics, University of Bielefeld, Universitätsstr. 25, Bielefeld 33615 (Germany)

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of the structural and electronic properties of graphene in its pristine state are hindered by hydrocarbon contamination on the surfaces. Also, in many applications, contamination reduces the performance of graphene. Contamination is introduced during sample preparation and is adsorbed also directly from air. Here, we report on the development of a simple dry-cleaning method for producing large atomically clean areas in free-standing graphene. The cleanness of graphene is proven using aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron spectroscopy.

  7. Dry melting of high albite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anovitz, L.M.: Blencoe, J.G.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The properties of albitic melts are central to thermodynamic models for synthetic and natural granitic liquids. The authors have analyzed published phase-equilibrium and thermodynamic data for the dry fusion of high albite to develop a more accurate equation for the Biggs free energy of this reaction to 30 kbar and 1,400 C. Strict criteria for reaction reversal were sued to evaluate the phase-equilibrium data, and the thermodynamic properties of solid and liquid albite were evaluated using the published uncertainties in the original measurements. Results suggest that neither available phase-equilibrium experiments nor thermodynamic data tightly constrain the location of the reaction. Experimental solidus temperatures at 1 atm range from 1,100 to 1,120 C. High-pressure experiments were not reversed completely and may have been affected by several sources of error, but the apparent inconsistencies among the results of the various experimentalists are eliminated when only half-reversal data are considered. Uncertainties in thermodynamic data yield large variations in permissible reaction slopes. Disparities between experimental and calculated melting curves are, therefore, largely attributable to these difficulties, and there is no fundamental disagreement between the available phase-equilibrium and thermodynamic data for the dry melting of albite. Consequently, complex speciation models for albitic melts, based on the assumption that these discrepancies represent a real characteristic of the system, are unjustified at this time.

  8. Inclined fluidized bed system for drying fine coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cha, Chang Y. (Golden, CO); Merriam, Norman W. (Laramie, WY); Boysen, John E. (Laramie, WY)

    1992-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal is processed in an inclined fluidized bed dryer operated in a plug-flow manner with zonal temperature and composition control, and an inert fluidizing gas, such as carbon dioxide or combustion gas. Recycled carbon dioxide, which is used for drying, pyrolysis, quenching, and cooling, is produced by partial decarboxylation of the coal. The coal is heated sufficiently to mobilize coal tar by further pyrolysis, which seals micropores upon quenching. Further cooling with carbon dioxide enhances stabilization.

  9. Freeze-drying bovine spermatozoa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faris, Harvey Lee

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~~to t~ roi'ipxg QQ ca dry ai gjuu QQjQigog aud ta Qst~~co cho ~~grso Qg 86lhVdratiea KXpkos Q~Kd Wlthstsud?. V~4MK Qhaersat9ZBE3 Vora used apprs~w~~~ a%oct@ a8 virious uaistma Eoroko as assess hot~& driad. OC WQQ QVBSd Chat horaous gQ Sud 2' hours...KK Hmm 'tiaao ZXZ"d. XnCEICno ~. ?n~ cpa~ Vms::Hach. . UIadpicoKdSq. X6, ESP& S&~o~c. L947, Tha Eccaaacii"cLBCII @IE HacCai. 'La Ljy Uqrlaj. ':. J? QvaacaL EELaoabiaKagyp X. " HSR;. K7p EESCKQ~~UZp g. 8 X956. ParCELU HaIILaa Saciemi HHCaC THicaa...

  10. Wet/dry cooling tower and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glicksman, Leon R. (Lynnfield, MA); Rohsenow, Warren R. (Waban, MA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wet/dry cooling tower wherein a liquid to-be-cooled is flowed along channels of a corrugated open surface or the like, which surface is swept by cooling air. The amount of the surface covered by the liquid is kept small compared to the dry part thereof so that said dry part acts as a fin for the wet part for heat dissipation.

  11. Using and Storing Nonfat Dry Milk Nonfat dry milk is convenient to store, easy to use and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in a cool, dry place. s Dry milk products are very sensitive to temperature and humidity. The area where your dry milk is stored should be kept as cool as possible. s Dry milk will absorb moisture and odorsUsing and Storing Nonfat Dry Milk Nonfat dry milk is convenient to store, easy to use

  12. Photocatalytic properties of titania pillared clays by different drying methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Z.; Zhu, H.Y.; Lu, G.Q.; Greenfield, P.F. [Univ. of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Univ. of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photocatalysts based on titania pillared clays (TiO{sub 2} PILCs) have been prepared through a sol-gel method. Different drying methods, air drying (AD), air drying after ethanol extraction (EAD), and supercritical drying (SCD) have been employed and found to have significant effects on the photocatalytic efficiency of the resultant catalysts for the oxidation of phenol in water. Titania pillared clay (TiO{sub 2} PILC) obtained by SCD has the highest external and micropore surface area, largest amount and smallest crystallite size of anatase, and exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity. Furthermore, silica titania pillared clay (SiO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2} PILC) after SCD, titania coated TiO{sub 2} PILC (SCD) and SiO{sub 2}-TiO{sub 2} PILC (SCD) were synthesized to study the key factors controlling the photocatalytic activity. It is concluded that the dispersion of nanometer-sized anatase on the surface of the PILC particles and the suspensibility of the particles are the most important factors for high photocatalytic efficiency.

  13. Cold vacuum drying system conceptual design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradshaw, F.W.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the activities involved in the removal of the SNF from the leaking basins and to place it in stable dry storage.

  14. FINAL REPORT: Transformational electrode drying process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claus Daniel, C.; Wixom, M. (A123 Systems, Inc.)

    2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This report includes major findings and outlook from the transformational electrode drying project performance period from January 6, 2012 to August 1, 2012. Electrode drying before cell assembly is an operational bottleneck in battery manufacturing due to long drying times and batch processing. Water taken up during shipment and other manufacturing steps needs to be removed before final battery assembly. Conventional vacuum ovens are limited in drying speed due to a temperature threshold needed to avoid damaging polymer components in the composite electrode. Roll to roll operation and alternative treatments can increase the water desorption and removal rate without overheating and damaging other components in the composite electrode, thus considerably reducing drying time and energy use. The objective of this project was the development of an electrode drying procedure, and the demonstration of processes with no decrease in battery performance. The benchmark for all drying data was an 80°C vacuum furnace treatment with a residence time of 18 – 22 hours. This report demonstrates an alternative roll to roll drying process with a 500-fold improvement in drying time down to 2 minutes and consumption of only 30% of the energy compared to vacuum furnace treatment.

  15. Cold vacuum drying facility design requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the detailed design requirements for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. Process, safety, and quality assurance requirements and interfaces are specified.

  16. Cooking with Non-fat Dry Milk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the nutritional value and safe storage of non-fat dry milk, a commodity food. It also offers food preparation ideas....

  17. Precipitation scavenging, dry deposition, and resuspension. Volume 2: dry deposition and resuspension

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruppacher, H.R.; Semanin, R.G.; Slinn, W.G.N.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Papers are presented under the headings: dry deposition of gases, dry deposition of particles, wind erosion, plutonium deposition and resuspension, air-sea exchange, tropical and polar, global scale, and future studies.

  18. EFFECT OF MECHANICAL CONDITIONING ON THIN-LAYER DRYING OF ENERGY SORGHUM (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian J. Bonner; Kevin L. Kenney

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cellulosic energy varieties of Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench show promise as a bioenergy feedstock, however, high moisture content at the time of harvest results in unacceptable levels of degradation when stored in aerobic conditions. To safely store sorghum biomass for extended periods in baled format, the material must be dried to inhibit microbial growth. One possible solution is allowing the material to dry under natural in-field conditions. This study examines the differences in thin-layer drying rates of intact and conditioned sorghum under laboratory-controlled temperatures and relative humidity levels (20 degrees C and 30 degrees C from 40% to 85% relative humidity), and models experimental data using the Page’s Modified equation. The results demonstrate that conditioning drastically accelerates drying times. Relative humidity had a large impact on the time required to reach a safe storage moisture content for intact material (approximately 200 hours at 30 degrees C and 40% relative humidity and 400 hours at 30 degrees C and 70% relative humidity), but little to no impact on the thin-layer drying times of conditioned material (approximately 50 hours for all humidity levels < 70% at 30 degrees C). The drying equation parameters were influenced by temperature, relative humidity, initial moisture content, and material damage, allowing drying curves to be empirically predicted. The results of this study provide valuable information applicable to the agricultural community and to future research on drying simulation and management of energy sorghum.

  19. Drying analysis of a multiphase, porous-flow experiment in fractured volcanic tuff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bixler, N.E.; Eaton, R.R.; Russo, A.J.

    1987-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A submeter-scale drying experiment has been analyzed using a finite element, multiphase-flow code. In the experiment, an initially wet cylindrical core of fractured volcanic tuff was dried by blowing dry nitrogen over the ends. Our model discretely accounts for three primary fractures that may be present in the core, as indicated by measurements of porosity and saturation. We show that vapor transport is unimportant in the interior of the core; the rate of drying is controlled by transport of liquid water to the ends of the core, where it can evaporate and escape into the dry environment outside. By using previous experimental results to estimate apparent spatial variations in permeability along the core, good agreement between measured and calculated drying rates was achieved. However, predicted saturation profiles were much smoother that those measured experimentally, presumably because of centimeter-scale inhomogeneities in the core sample. Our results indicate that water is transported chiefly as liquid from the interior to the edges of the core, where it evaporates and escapes out the ends. Thus, liquid-phase transport controls the overall drying rate. 18 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  20. An experimental investigation of high temperature, high pressure paper drying

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Kamal Raoji

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    % moisture removed oven dried mass of handsheet, g mass of handsheet after drying test, g mass of handsheet before drying test, g relative moisture removed from handsheet moisture removed by drying, % initial moisture (im) initial handsheet sample mass..., and the effects on the paper sheet and drying felt can be detrimental. Elevated temperatures reduce water viscosity which permits reduced resistance to water flow in the sheet. Pressing with a drying temperature of 95 C gives increased drying capacity, reduced...

  1. Infrared Dry-peeling Technology for Tomatoes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Infrared Dry-peeling Technology for Tomatoes Saves Energy Energy Efficiency Research Office PIER This research will use infrared heating technology for peeling tomatoes. Infrared dry peeling, a device, producing less wastewater and preserving product quality. Infrared drypeeling is expected to reduce

  2. Cooking and Using Dried Beans and Peas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooking and Using Dried Beans and Peas Beans and peas are good for you Beans and peas beans with rice or corn to provide high quality complete protein. If you are on a special diet, remember that beans and peas are low in sodium and fat. How to store dried beans and peas Store beans and peas

  3. Growing Dry Beans for an Emerging Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, Nancy J.

    Growing Dry Beans for an Emerging Market JOIN US FOR AN EVENING WITH JACK LAZOR, OF BUTTERWORKS FARM AND JOE BOSSEN, OF VERMONT BEAN CRAFTERS APRIL 10TH , 2012, 6:15-8PM AT THE KELLOGG-HUBBARD LIBRARY EAST MONTPELIER ROOM 135 MAIN ST., MONTPELIER, VT 05602 Jack Lazor has grown dry beans for local

  4. Inspection of Used Fuel Dry Storage Casks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis C. Kunerth; Tim McJunkin; Mark McKay; Sasan Bakhtiari

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulates the storage of used nuclear fuel, which is now and will be increasingly placed in dry storage systems. Since a final disposition pathway is not defined, the fuel is expected to be maintained in dry storage well beyond the time frame originally intended. Due to knowledge gaps regarding the viability of current dry storage systems for long term use, efforts are underway to acquire the technical knowledge and tools required to understand the issues and verify the integrity of the dry storage system components. This report summarizes the initial efforts performed by researchers at Idaho National Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory to identify and evaluate approaches to in-situ inspection dry storage casks. This task is complicated by the design of the current storage systems that severely restrict access to the casks.

  5. Hot Dry Rock; Geothermal Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The commercial utilization of geothermal energy forms the basis of the largest renewable energy industry in the world. More than 5000 Mw of electrical power are currently in production from approximately 210 plants and 10 000 Mw thermal are used in direct use processes. The majority of these systems are located in the well defined geothermal generally associated with crustal plate boundaries or hot spots. The essential requirements of high subsurface temperature with huge volumes of exploitable fluids, coupled to environmental and market factors, limit the choice of suitable sites significantly. The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) concept at any depth originally offered a dream of unlimited expansion for the geothermal industry by relaxing the location constraints by drilling deep enough to reach adequate temperatures. Now, after 20 years intensive work by international teams and expenditures of more than $250 million, it is vital to review the position of HDR in relation to the established geothermal industry. The HDR resource is merely a body of rock at elevated temperatures with insufficient fluids in place to enable the heat to be extracted without the need for injection wells. All of the major field experiments in HDR have shown that the natural fracture systems form the heat transfer surfaces and that it is these fractures that must be for geothermal systems producing from naturally fractured formations provide a basis for directing the forthcoming but, equally, they require accepting significant location constraints on HDR for the time being. This paper presents a model HDR system designed for commercial operations in the UK and uses production data from hydrothermal systems in Japan and the USA to demonstrate the reservoir performance requirements for viable operations. It is shown that these characteristics are not likely to be achieved in host rocks without stimulation processes. However, the long term goal of artificial geothermal systems developed by systematic engineering procedures at depth may still be attained if high temperature sites with extensive fracturing are developed or exploited. [DJE -2005

  6. Acoustically enhanced heat exchange and drying apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bramlette, T.T.; Keller, J.O.

    1987-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat transfer drying apparatus includes an acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber for receiving material to be dried. The chamber includes a first heat transfer gas inlet, a second heat transfer gas inlet, a material inlet, and a gas outlet which also serves as a dried material and gas outlet. A non-pulsing first heat transfer gas source provides a first drying gas to the acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber through the first heat transfer gas inlet. A valveless, continuous second heat transfer gas source provides a second drying gas to the acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber through the second heat transfer gas inlet. The second drying gas also generates acoustic waves which bring about acoustical coupling with the gases in the acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber. The second drying gas itself oscillates at an acoustic frequency of approximately 180 Hz due to fluid mechanical motion in the gas. The oscillations of the second heat transfer gas coupled to the first heat transfer gas in the acoustically augmented heat transfer chamber enhance heat and mass transfer by convection within the chamber. 3 figs.

  7. Advanced wet-dry cooling tower concept

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snyder, Troxell Kimmel

    The purpose of this years' work has been to test and analyze the new dry cooling tower surface previously developed. The model heat transfer test apparatus built last year has been instrumented for temperature, humidity ...

  8. Cold vacuum drying facility design requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irwin, J.J.

    1997-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This release of the Design Requirements Document is a complete restructuring and rewrite to the document previously prepared and released for project W-441 to record the design basis for the design of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility.

  9. Dry cooling: Perspectives on future needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guyer, E.C. (Yankee Scientific, Inc., Ashland, MA (United States))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The factors that can be expected to determine the future role of dry cooling in the United States electric power generation industry are identified and characterized. Focus is primarily on the issues of water availability for the electric power industry and the environmental impacts of evaporative cooling systems. The question of future water availability is addressed in terms of both limitations and opportunities facing the industry. A brief review of the status of dry cooling applications is provided. Included is a summary of an extensive survey of electric utility industry perspectives on the future requirements and role for dry cooling. Some regional assessments of the expected future requirements for this technology are also provided. Conclusions are a qualitative characterization of the expected future role of dry cooling in the electric power industry. 72 refs., 7 figs., 13 tabs.

  10. Dry Cask Storage Study Feb 1989

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report on the use of dry-cask-storage technologies at the sites of civilian nuclear power reactors has been prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE} in response to the requirements of...

  11. Resuspension and dry deposition research needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The author concludes that better predictive models are needed for the signifcant health, ecological, and economic impacts of resuspended particles and their subsequent dry deposition. Both chemical and radioactive aerosols are discussed. (PSB)

  12. High strength air-dried aerogels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coronado, Paul R.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for the preparation of high strength air-dried organic aerogels. The method involves the sol-gel polymerization of organic gel precursors, such as resorcinol with formaldehyde (RF) in aqueous solvents with R/C ratios greater than about 1000 and R/F ratios less than about 1:2.1. Using a procedure analogous to the preparation of resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) aerogels, this approach generates wet gels that can be air dried at ambient temperatures and pressures. The method significantly reduces the time and/or energy required to produce a dried aerogel compared to conventional methods using either supercritical solvent extraction. The air dried gel exhibits typically less than 5% shrinkage.

  13. Compression of cooked freeze-dried carrots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macphearson, Bruce Alan

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to precompression characteristics (Brockmann, 1966). Hsmdy (1962) found that acceptable, compressed and freeze-dried spinach could be obtained by plasticizing the product to a moisture content of 9X before compression. Ishler (1962) reported that spraying... the dehydrated food before compression with either water, glycerine or propylene glycol produced bars with excellent rehydra- tion characteristics. He recommended spraying freeze-dried cellu- lar foods to 5-13X moisture, compressing, and redrying to lees than...

  14. Determination of Water Saturation in Relatively Dry Porous Media...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Saturation in Relatively Dry Porous Media Using Gas-phase Tracer Tests. Determination of Water Saturation in Relatively Dry Porous Media Using Gas-phase Tracer Tests....

  15. Wet-dry cooling demonstration. Test results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allemann, R.T.; DeBellis, D.E.; Werry, E.V.; Johnson, B.M.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large-scale test of dry/wet cooling using the ammonia phase-change system, designated the Advanced Concepts Test (ACT), has been operated at Pacific Gas and Electric Company's Kern Station at Bakersfield, California. The facility is capable of condensing 60,000 lbs/h of steam from a small house turbine. Two different modes of combining dry and evaporative cooling have been tested. One uses deluge cooling in which water is allowed to flow over the fins of the dry (air-cooled) heat exchanger on hot days; the other uses a separate evaporative condenser in parallel to the dry heat exchanger. A third mode of enhancing the dry cooling system, termed capacitive cooling has been tested. In this system, the ammonia-cooled steam condenser is supplemented by a parallel conventional water-cooled condenser with water supplied from a closed system. This water is cooled during off-peak hours each night by an ammonia heat pump which rejects heat through the ACT Cooling Tower. If operated over the period of a year, each of the wet/dry systems would use only 25% of the water normally required to reject this heat load in an evaporative cooling tower. The third would consume no water, the evaporative cooling being replaced by the delayed cooling of the closed system water supply.

  16. Steam atmosphere drying exhaust steam recompression system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Becker, F.E.; Smolensky, L.A.; Doyle, E.F.; DiBella, F.A.

    1994-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a heated steam atmosphere drying system comprising dryer in combination with an exhaust recompression system which is extremely energy efficient and eliminates dangers known to air dryers. The system uses superheated steam as the drying medium, which recirculates through the system where its heat of evaporation and heat of compression is recovered, thereby providing a constant source of heat to the drying chamber. The dryer has inlets whereby feedstock and superheated steam are fed therein. High heat transfer and drying rates are achieved by intimate contact of the superheated steam with the particles being dried. The dryer comprises a vessel which enables the feedstock and steam to enter and recirculate together. When the feedstock becomes dry it will exit the dryer with the steam and become separated from the steam through the use of a curvilinear louver separator (CLS). The CLS enables removal of fine and ultrafine particles from the dryer. Water vapor separated from the particles in the CLS as superheated steam, may then be recovered and recirculated as steam through the use of a compressor to either directly or indirectly heat the dryer, and a heat exchanger or a heater to directly provide heat to the dryer. This system not only provides a very efficient heat transfer system but results in a minimum carry-over of ultrafine particles thereby eliminating any explosive hazard. 17 figures.

  17. Steam atmosphere drying exhaust steam recompression system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Becker, Frederick E. (Reading, MA); Smolensky, Leo A. (Concord, MA); Doyle, Edward F. (Dedham, MA); DiBella, Francis A. (Roslindale, MA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a heated steam atmosphere drying system comprising dryer in combination with an exhaust recompression system which is extremely energy efficient and eliminates dangers known to air dryers. The system uses superheated steam as the drying medium, which recirculated through the system where its heat of evaporation and heat of compression is recovered, thereby providing a constant source of heat to the drying chamber. The dryer has inlets whereby feedstock and superheated steam are fed therein. High heat transfer and drying rates are achieved by intimate contact of the superheated steam with the particles being dried The dryer comprises a vessel which enables the feedstock and steam to enter recirculate together. When the feedstock becomes dry it will exit the dryer with the steam and become separated from the steam through the use of a curvilinear louver separator (CLS). The CLS enables removal of fine and ultrafine particles from the dryer. Water vapor separated from the particles in the CLS as superheated steam, may then be recovered and recirculated as steam through the use of a compressor to either directly or indirectly heat the dryer, and a heat exchanger or a heater to directly provide heat to the dryer. This system not only provides a very efficient heat transfer system but results in a minimum carry-over of ultrafine particles thereby eliminating any explosive hazard.

  18. Rate of drying and stresses in the first period of drying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kowalski, S.J.; Rybicki, A.

    2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents a computer simulated processes and illustrate how the drying induced stresses are influenced by the rate of drying. It is shown that the moisture transport coefficient, and thus the rate of drying, depends on the thermal state of the drying material, defined by the wet-bulb temperature. Through these simulated processes one can observe the evolution of the moisture content and stress distributions during drying at constant, but in each process different, wet-bulb temperatures. A convective drying process of a bar with rectangular cross-section is considered as example, and a two-dimensional initial-boundary value problem is solved numerically with the use of the finite element method. The numerical results are visualized in spatial diagrams.

  19. Modeling of Coal Drying before Pyrolysis Damintode Kolani1, a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Modeling of Coal Drying before Pyrolysis Damintode Kolani1, a , Eric Blond1, b , Alain Gasser1 Forbach, France a damintode.kolani@univ-orleans.fr, b eric.blond@univ-orleans.fr Keywords: coal, drying: drying process and pyrolysis of coal. A heat and mass transfer model was developed to simulate the drying

  20. Demand dries up for gasohol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullen, T.

    1987-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Facing consumer skepticism, political controversy and aggressive antigasohol advertising campaigns, Louisiana's largest marketers of gasohol - Texaco, Tenneco Oil and Time Saver, a chain of convenience stores - have quit the market. Within a 10-day period, all three unexpectedly announced that they were dropping gasohol (90% gasoline, 10% ethanol) and going back to pumping regular and premium gasoline. Stung by that news, Louisiana's infant ethanol industry has battened down the hatches. Ethanol producers have formed a loosely knit organization called the Renewable Fuels Assn. of Louisiana and are now busy planning a Mar. 9 launch of a new drive to try to reverse negative attitudes about gasohol. Until then, producers are not saying anything, avers Pamela McGinity, an executive with Shepherd Oil (Jennings, La.) which owns a 35-million-gal/year ethanol plant. The program is financed by a state motor fuels tax on gasohol sales and is controlled by the Louisiana legislature on a year-by-year basis. The program barely survived a recent special session, and many observers predict the state legislature will not renew the subsidies.

  1. Method and apparatus for drying web

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orloff, David I. (Atlanta, GA); Kloth, Gerald R. (Kennesaw, GA); Rudemiller, Gary R. (Paducah, KY)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a method and apparatus for drying a web of paper utilizing impulse drying techniques. In the method of the invention for drying a paper web, the paper web is transported through a pair of rolls wherein at least one of the rolls has been heated to an elevated temperature. The heated roll is provided with a surface having a low thermal diffusivity of less than about 1.times.10.sup.-6 m.sup.2 /s. The surface material of the roll is preferably prepared from a material selected from the group consisting of ceramics, polymers, glass, inorganic plastics, composite materials and cermets. The heated roll may be constructed entirely from the material having a low thermal diffusivity or the roll may be formed from metal, such as steel or aluminum, or other suitable material which is provided with a surface layer of a material having a low thermal diffusivity.

  2. Tropical dry-forest mammals of Palo Verde: Ecology and conservation in a changing landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoner, Kathryn E.; Timm, Robert M.

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More than 114 species of mammals originally were present in Costa Rica’s tropical dry forest, and perhaps 110 species are still found there today. Bats are the most diverse group, with more than 66 species, followed by 11 species of rodents, 7 species of marsupials, 6 species in the weasel family, 5 species of cats, 3 species in the raccoon family, 3 species of primates, 3 species of artiodactyls, 2 species of canids, 2 species of xenarthrans (edentates), 1 rabbit, and 1 tapir. Costa Rica has no endemic dry forest mammals. The species that have been extirpated from this region were either highly prized game species that have been eliminated by overhunting (white-lipped peccaries) or were specialists that either feed on specific foods or have very specific habitat requirements that have been eliminated by habitat destruction. In Costa Rica 10 of the 13 mammal species recognized as endangered and 7 of the 14 found in reduced populations are found within tropical dry forest habitat. Mammals that inhabit tropical dry forest areas must be capable of dealing with high temperatures, low precipitation in the dry season, and large fluctuations in the availability of food resources during the year. Most mammals of the dry forest can be characterized as resident generalists that shift their diets in order to utilize seasonally available food resources; as resident specialists that forage on insects, seeds, or fruit and nectar; or as migrants that occupy dry forests only seasonally and move to other habitats during periods of low food availability in their foraging area in search of food sources in other areas. Bats, some of which serve as pollinators and seed dispersers, are important components of the dry forest fauna. Some species of bats change habitats within the dry forest or migrate into and out of the dry forest seasonally. Hunting has been, and continues to be, an important threat to most large mammals in dry forest habitats. As early as 1880, large numbers of deer skins were exported from Costa Rica to Europe, the majority of which came from Guanacaste. Illegal poaching is still a serious problem in the protected areas of Guanacaste. Throughout Mesoamerica, deforestation to create pastures and, in recent years, for crop cultivation has negatively affected many populations of tropical dry forest mammals. Approximately 50% of the 250,000 ha area in the lower Tempisque Basin had been deforested by 1956 and by 1970 most of the dry forest had been converted into pastureland. The spread of introduced African grasses and seasonal fires have continued to eliminate mature dry forest in northern Costa Rica in the last decades. Contamination by pesticides from agricultural fields has become a serious threat to the mammalian fauna in the region. The use of cattle as a management tool also threatens the mammalian fauna in tropical dry forest due to their affect on the natural vegetation. Cattle were reintroduced into Parque Nacional Palo Verde in the 1980s in an attempt to control the rapidly expanding cattails in the marsh, which were eliminating habitat for aquatic birds. However, cattle have been ineffective at controlling cattails, and overgrazing of tree seedlings has hindered regeneration of the forest because cattle graze selectively on seedlings of native species. The mammals of the tropical dry forest are among the most poorly known of any of the bioclimatic life zones. Conservation measures for this endangered fauna should include expanded research, training and educational programs for park personnel, economic alternatives, and sustainable development. In addition, efforts should be made for the creation of additional protected areas with buffer zones and for the development of natural regeneration programs.... contaminación por pesticidas en los campos agrícolas se ha convertido en una seria amenaza para los mamíferos de la región. El uso de ganado como herramienta de manejo también es una amenaza para la fauna de mamíferos en el bosque tropical seco debido a su...

  3. Dry etching method for compound semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shul, R.J.; Constantine, C.

    1997-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A dry etching method is disclosed. According to the present invention, a gaseous plasma comprising, at least in part, boron trichloride, methane, and hydrogen may be used for dry etching of a compound semiconductor material containing layers including aluminum, or indium, or both. Material layers of a compound semiconductor alloy such as AlGaInP or the like may be anisotropically etched for forming electronic devices including field-effect transistors and heterojunction bipolar transistors and for forming photonic devices including vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, edge-emitting lasers, and reflectance modulators. 1 fig.

  4. Annotated Bibliography for Drying Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rebecca E. Smith

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Internationally, the nuclear industry is represented by both commercial utilities and research institutions. Over the past two decades many of these entities have had to relocate inventories of spent nuclear fuel from underwater storage to dry storage. These efforts were primarily prompted by two factors: insufficient storage capacity (potentially precipitated by an open-ended nuclear fuel cycle) or deteriorating quality of existing underwater facilities. The intent of developing this bibliography is to assess what issues associated with fuel drying have been identified, to consider where concerns have been satisfactorily addressed, and to recommend where additional research would offer the most value to the commercial industry and the U. S. Department of Energy.

  5. Adsorptive Drying of Organic Liquids- An Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, S.; Humphrey, J. L.; Fair, J. R.

    (which is very heat sensitive and can poly merize in the presence of adsorbents) by freeze drying at -20 0 C and centrifuging the ice crystals. The water oontent was reduced from 700 ppm to 1~0 ppm. Pervaporation One of the recent advances... at The University of Texas at Austin will also be given. INTRODUCTION In the process industries it is often necessary to dry fluids before they can be processed further. For example, if a liquid is to be subjected to cryo genic conditions, its frost point must...

  6. Hog Fuel Drying Using Vapour Recompression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azarniouch, M. K.; MacEachen, I.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    complicated and capital intensive drying process, yields a product of approximately 15% moisture, which due to its particle size, may only be burnt in suspension. iii) From an energy standpotnt the processes are inefficient as only a fractton... fuel. TR.e evaporated moisture is sep rated from the dried hog fuel-oil slurry n 768 ESL-IE-84-04-133 Proceedings from the Sixth Annual Industrial Energy Technology Conference Volume II, Houston, TX, April 15-18, 1984 l'ltlwr d separate vessel...

  7. Dry-Mass Sensing for Microfluidics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, T.; White, D. A.; Knowles, T. P. J.

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Dry-Mass Sensing for Microfluidics T. Mu¨ller,1 D. A. White,1 and T. P. J. Knowles1, a) Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, Cambridge CB2 1EW, United Kingdom (Dated: 25 November 2014) We present an approach... for interfacing an electromechanical sensor with a microfluidic device for the accurate quantification of the dry mass of analytes within microchannels. We show that depositing solutes onto the active surface of a quartz crystal microbalance by means of an on...

  8. Acoustically enhanced heat exchange and drying apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bramlette, T. Tazwell (Livermore, CA); Keller, Jay O. (Oakland, CA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat transfer apparatus includes a first chamber having a first heat transfer gas inlet, a second heat transfer gas inlet, and an outlet. A first heat transfer gas source provides a first gas flow to the first chamber through the first heat transfer gas inlet. A second gas flow through a second chamber connected to the side of the first chamber, generates acoustic waves which bring about acoustical coupling of the first and second gases in the acoustically augmented first chamber. The first chamber may also include a material inlet for receiving material to be dried, in which case the gas outlet serves as a dried material and gas outlet.

  9. Self-protection in dry recycle technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hannum, W.H.; Wade, D.; Stanford, G.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to the INFCE conclusions, the U.S. undertook development of a new dry fuel cycle. Dry recycle processes have been demonstrated to be feasible. Safeguarding such fuel cycles will be dramatically simpler than the PUREX fuel cycle. At every step of the processes, the materials meet the {open_quotes}spent-fuel standard.{close_quotes} The scale is compatible with collocation of power reactors and their recycle facility, eliminating off-site transportation and storage of plutonium-bearing materials. Material diverted either covertly or overtly would be difficult (relative to material available by other means) to process into weapons feedstock.

  10. Dry etching method for compound semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shul, Randy J. (Albuquerque, NM); Constantine, Christopher (Safety Harbor, FL)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dry etching method. According to the present invention, a gaseous plasma comprising, at least in part, boron trichloride, methane, and hydrogen may be used for dry etching of a compound semiconductor material containing layers including aluminum, or indium, or both. Material layers of a compound semiconductor alloy such as AlGaInP or the like may be anisotropically etched for forming electronic devices including field-effect transistors and heterojunction bipolar transistors and for forming photonic devices including vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers, edge-emitting lasers, and reflectance modulators.

  11. Controlling Fleas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merchant, Michael E.; Robinson, James V.

    2006-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Controlling Fleas Mike Merchant and James Robinson* F leas are small, wingless insects that feed on the blood of animals and people. Americans spend about $9 billion a year controlling fleas ? one of the biggest expenses for pet owners. In Texas... pet bedding regularly and vacuum thoroughly. Vacuuming removes up to 30 per- cent of the larvae and up to 60 percent of flea eggs from a carpet, as well as the larvae?s food supply of dried blood. Vacuum under furniture, cushions, chairs, beds...

  12. A New Concept in Dryer Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, J. W.

    A new drying model originally derived for thin-wood veneer and successfully applied to the control of a veneer Jet Dryer may be extended for use in controlling the drying of such diverse products as textiles, dog food, pulp and paper, sawdust...

  13. Method for dry etching of transition metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashby, Carol I. H. (Edgewood, NM); Baca, Albert G. (Albuquerque, NM); Esherick, Peter (Albuquerque, NM); Parmeter, John E. (Albuquerque, NM); Rieger, Dennis J. (Tijeras, NM); Shul, Randy J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for dry etching of transition metals. The method for dry etching of a transition metal (or a transition metal alloy such as a silicide) on a substrate comprises providing at least one nitrogen- or phosphorous-containing .pi.-acceptor ligand in proximity to the transition metal, and etching the transition metal to form a volatile transition metal/.pi.-acceptor ligand complex. The dry etching may be performed in a plasma etching system such as a reactive ion etching (RIE) system, a downstream plasma etching system (i.e. a plasma afterglow), a chemically-assisted ion beam etching (CAIBE) system or the like. The dry etching may also be performed by generating the .pi.-acceptor ligands directly from a ligand source gas (e.g. nitrosyl ligands generated from nitric oxide), or from contact with energized particles such as photons, electrons, ions, atoms, or molecules. In some preferred embodiments of the present invention, an intermediary reactant species such as carbonyl or a halide ligand is used for an initial chemical reaction with the transition metal, with the intermediary reactant species being replaced at least in part by the .pi.-acceptor ligand for forming the volatile transition metal/.pi.-acceptor ligand complex.

  14. Undesired drying of concrete and cement paste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    Undesired drying of concrete and cement paste is a nightmare for any construction engineer of the concrete or cement paste surface. Inspired by the art of molecular cooking a team of TU Delft scientists for instance sodium alginates. When sprayed on the surface of concrete or cement paste, a rapid chemical

  15. Hot-dry-rock geothermal resource 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiken, G.; Goff, F.; Cremer, G. (ed.)

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work performed on hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal resource evaluation, site characterization, and geophysical exploration techniques is summarized. The work was done by region (Far West, Pacific Northwest, Southwest, Rocky Mountain States, Midcontinent, and Eastern) and limited to the conterminous US.

  16. Spent fuel integrity during dry storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKinnon, M.A.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information on spent fuel integrity is of interest in evaluating the impact of long-term dry storage on the behavior of spent fuel rods. Spent fuel used during cask performance tests at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) offers significant opportunities for confirmation of the benign nature of long-term dry storage. The cask performance tests conducted at INEL included visual observation and ultrasonic examination of the condition of cladding, fuel rods, and fuel assembly hardware before dry storage and consolidation of the fuel; and a qualitative determination of the effect of dry storage and fuel consolidation on fission gas release from the spent fuel rods. A variety of cover gases and cask orientations were used during the cask performance tests. Cover gases included vacuum, nitrogen, and helium. The nitrogen and helium backfills were sampled and analyzed to detect leaking spent fuel rods. At the conclusion of each performance test, periodic gas sampling was conducted on each cask as part of a surveillance and monitoring activity. Continued surveillance and monitoring activities are being conducted for intact fuel in a CASTOR V/21 cask and for consolidated fuel in a VSC-17 cask. The results of the gas sampling activities are reported in this paper.

  17. Hog Fuel Drying Using Vapour Recompression 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azarniouch, M. K.; MacEachen, I.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A continuous hog fuel drying pilot plant based on the principle of mixing hog fuel with a hot oil (e.g., crude tall oil) as the heat transfer medium, and recirculating the suspension through a steam heated exchanger was designed, built...

  18. Cold Vacuum Drying facility fire protection system design description (SYS 24)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PITKOFF, C.C.

    1999-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) fire protection system (FPS). The FPS provides fire detection, suppression, and loss limitation for the CVDF structure, personnel, and in-process spent nuclear fuel. The system provides, along with supporting interfacing systems, detection, alarm, and activation instrumentation and controls, distributive piping system, isolation valves, and materials and controls to limit combustibles and the associated fire loadings.

  19. RELEASE OF DRIED RADIOACTIVE WASTE MATERIALS TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KOZLOWSKI, S.D.

    2007-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical basis document was developed to support RPP-23429, Preliminary Documented Safety Analysis for the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (PDSA) and RPP-23479, Preliminary Documented Safety Analysis for the Contact-Handled Transuranic Mixed (CH-TRUM) Waste Facility. The main document describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins to the representative accidents involving the release of dried radioactive waste materials from the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) and to the associated represented hazardous conditions. Appendices D through F provide the technical basis for assigning risk bins to the representative dried waste release accident and associated represented hazardous conditions for the Contact-Handled Transuranic Mixed (CH-TRUM) Waste Packaging Unit (WPU). The risk binning process uses an evaluation of the frequency and consequence of a given representative accident or represented hazardous condition to determine the need for safety structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls. A representative accident or a represented hazardous condition is assigned to a risk bin based on the potential radiological and toxicological consequences to the public and the collocated worker. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers because credible hazardous conditions with the potential for significant facility worker consequences are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR-level controls regardless of their estimated frequency. The controls for protection of the facility workers are described in RPP-23429 and RPP-23479. Determination of the need for safety-class SSCs was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses, as described below.

  20. Non-Linear Drying Diffusion and Viscoelastic Drying Shrinkage Modeling in Hardened Cement Pastes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leung, Chin K.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    modeling with an average diffusion coefficient and with determined viscoelastic parameters from creep tests agreed well compared to the shrinkage data from experiments, indicating that drying shrinkage of cement paste may be considered as a poroviscoelastic...

  1. Non-Linear Drying Diffusion and Viscoelastic Drying Shrinkage Modeling in Hardened Cement Pastes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leung, Chin K.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    of diffusion rate over short drops of ambient relative humidity. Techniques to determine drying isotherms prior to full equilibration of mass loss, as well as converting mass loss into concentration of water vapor were developed. Using the measured water vapor...

  2. 1997 DRY BEAN VARIETY CANNING TRIALS MICHIGAN DRY BEAN PRODUCTION RESEARCH ADVISORY BOARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1997 DRY BEAN VARIETY CANNING TRIALS MICHIGAN DRY BEAN PRODUCTION RESEARCH ADVISORY BOARD Rating 1=poor, 2=fair, 3=good, 4=above average, 5=excellent NAVY LIGHT RED KIDNEY BEANS VARIETY GRATIOT HURON 8.4 3.3 ASG96YT8 2.1 1.8 DARK RED KIDNEY BEANS ASG96YT37 3.4 2.1 VARIETY MONTCALM BAY 7 YEAR AVE ASG96YT

  3. Human factors engineering report for the cold vacuum drying facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IMKER, F.W.

    1999-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to present the results and findings of the final Human Factors Engineering (HFE) technical analysis and evaluation of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). Ergonomics issues are also addressed in this report, as appropriate. This report follows up and completes the preliminary work accomplished and reported by the Preliminary HFE Analysis report (SNF-2825, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Human Factors Engineering Analysis: Results and Findings). This analysis avoids redundancy of effort except for ensuring that previously recommended HFE design changes have not affected other parts of the system. Changes in one part of the system may affect other parts of the system where those changes were not applied. The final HFE analysis and evaluation of the CVDF human-machine interactions (HMI) was expanded to include: the physical work environment, human-computer interface (HCI) including workstation and software, operator tasks, tools, maintainability, communications, staffing, training, and the overall ability of humans to accomplish their responsibilities, as appropriate. Key focal areas for this report are the process bay operations, process water conditioning (PWC) skid, tank room, and Central Control Room operations. These key areas contain the system safety-class components and are the foundation for the human factors design basis of the CVDF.

  4. Operation of dry-cleaned and agglomerated precompaction system (DAPS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, Shigemi; Okanishi, Kazuya; Kikuchi, Akio; Yamamura, Yuichi

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to reduce the manufacturing cost of coke, it is necessary to reduce mainly (1) the material cost and (2) operating cost. Both of these costs can be reduced by lowering the moisture of charging coal. Because dust generation increases with decreasing moisture of charging coal, however, the lower limit of charging coal moisture in the existing coke-oven equipment was about 5%, which yielded good results in coal moisture control (CMC) equipment. Nippon Steel has furthered the development of techniques for lowering the moisture of charging coal as far as possible in the existing coke ovens and has recently succeeded in developing a dry-cleaned and agglomerated precompaction system (DAPS) and incorporating this system in commercial production equipment. In this system, a coal preparation process is undertaken that involves separating coal fines, which cause dust generation, from dried charging coal and agglomerating them. The equipment incorporating this system was installed in the No. 3 and No. 4 coke batteries at Oita Works and brought into full-scale operation in September 1992. The equipment has since been operating smoothly.

  5. Horizontal modular dry irradiated fuel storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischer, Larry E. (Los Gatos, CA); McInnes, Ian D. (San Jose, CA); Massey, John V. (San Jose, CA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A horizontal, modular, dry, irradiated fuel storage system (10) includes a thin-walled canister (12) for containing irradiated fuel assemblies (20), which canister (12) can be positioned in a transfer cask (14) and transported in a horizontal manner from a fuel storage pool (18), to an intermediate-term storage facility. The storage system (10) includes a plurality of dry storage modules (26) which accept the canister (12) from the transfer cask (14) and provide for appropriate shielding about the canister (12). Each module (26) also provides for air cooling of the canister (12) to remove the decay heat of the irradiated fuel assemblies (20). The modules (26) can be interlocked so that each module (26) gains additional shielding from the next adjacent module (26). Hydraulic rams (30) are provided for inserting and removing the canisters (12) from the modules (26).

  6. Wall Drying in Hot and Humid Climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boone, K.; Weston, T.; Pascual, X.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WALL DRYING IN HOT AND HUMID CLIMATES Kimdolyn Boone Theresa Weston, PhD Xuaco Pascual Product Development Engineer Building Scientist Field Services Engineer E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company Richmond, VA ABSTRACT... time based on the varying weather conditions. Constant interior conditions of 70?F and 55% RH were chosen. This corresponds to typical interior temperatures and a high level of moisture production within the house. This was chosen as a worse...

  7. Cold Vacuum Drying Facility hazard analysis report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krahn, D.E.

    1998-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) hazard analysis to support the CVDF phase 2 safety analysis report (SAR), and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, and implements the requirements of US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.

  8. PULSE DRYING EXPERIMENT AND BURNER CONSTRUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert States

    2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Non steady impingement heat transfer is measured. Impingement heating consumes 130 T-BTU/Yr in paper drying, but is only 25% thermally efficient. Pulse impingement is experimentally shown to enhance heat transfer by 2.8, and may deliver thermal efficiencies near 85%. Experimental results uncovered heat transfer deviations from steady theory and from previous investigators, indicating the need for further study and a better theoretical framework. The pulse burner is described, and its roll in pulse impingement is analyzed.

  9. Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.C.; Hendron, R.H.; Murphy, H.D.; Wilson, M.G.

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During Fiscal Year 1987, emphasis in the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program was on preparations for a Long-Term Flow Test'' of the Phase II'' or Engineering'' hot dry rock energy system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. A successful 30-day flow test of the system during FY86 indicated that such a system would produce heat at a temperature and rate that could support operation of a commercial electrical power plant. However, it did not answer certain questions basic to the economics of long-term operation, including the rate of depletion of the thermal reservoir, the rate of water loss from the system, and the possibility of operating problems during extended continuous operation. Preparations for a one-year flow test of the system to answer these and more fundamental questions concerning hot dry rock systems were made in FY87: design of the required surface facilities; procurement and installation of some of their components; development and testing of slimline logging tools for use through small-diameter production tubing; research on temperature-sensitive reactive chemical tracers to monitor thermal depletion of the reservoir; and computer simulations of the 30-day test, extended to modeling the planned Long-Term Flow Test. 45 refs., 34 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Transfer of hot dry rock technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.C.

    1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program has focused worldwide attention on the facts that natural heat in the upper part of the earth's crust is an essentially inexhaustible energy resource which is accessible almost everywhere, and that practical means now exist to extract useful heat from the hot rock and bring it to the earth's surface for beneficial use. The Hot Dry Rock Program has successfully constructed and operated a prototype hot, dry rock energy system that produced heat at the temperatures and rates required for large-scale space heating and many other direct uses of heat. The Program is now in the final stages of constructing a larger, hotter system potentially capable of satisfying the energy requirements of a small, commercial, electrical-generating power plant. To create and understand the behavior of such system, it has been necessary to develop or support the development of a wide variety of equipment, instruments, techniques, and analyses. Much of this innovative technology has already been transferred to the private sector and to other research and development programs, and more is continuously being made available as its usefulness is demonstrated. This report describes some of these developments and indicates where this new technology is being used or can be useful to industry, engineering, and science.

  11. Summary Report for Capsule Dry Storage Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOSEPHSON, W S

    2003-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    There are 1.936 cesium (Cs) and strontium (Sr) capsules stored in pools at the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). These capsules will be moved to dry storage on the Hanford Site as an interim measure to reduce risk. The Cs/Sr Capsule Dry Storage Project (CDSP) is conducted under the assumption the capsules will eventually be moved to the repository at Yucca Mountain, and the design criteria include requirements that will facilitate acceptance at the repository. The storage system must also permit retrieval of capsules in the event vitrification of the capsule contents is pursued. A cut away drawing of a typical cesium chloride (CsCI) capsule and the capsule property and geometry information are provided in Figure 1.1. Strontium fluoride (SrF{sub 2}) capsules are similar in design to CsCl capsules. Further details of capsule design, current state, and reference information are given later in this report and its references. Capsule production and life history is covered in WMP-16938, Capsule Characterization Report for Capsule Dry Storage Project, and is briefly summarized in Section 5.2 of this report.

  12. Environmental Health Specialty Track Curriculum MPH Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    525 Occupational Safety Management 3 ENVH 540 Ergonomics 3 ENVH 541 Industrial Hygiene 3 ENVH 542 Management 3 ENVH 570 Industrial Environmental Management 3 ENVH 722 Advanced Industrial Hygiene 3 MPHO 691

  13. Community Academic Profile Nancy Plauth, MD, MPH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, James

    maintenance organization: Preventive services and resource use. Journal of General Internal Medicine (Abstract SD. Non ­users of primary care within a health maintenance organization: preventive services Publications Plauth AE, Pearson SD. Non-users of primary care within a health maintenance organization

  14. Roles of Dry Friction in Fluctuating Motion of Adiabatic Piston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomohiko G. Sano; Hisao Hayakawa

    2014-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The motion of an adiabatic piston under dry friction is investigated to clarify the roles of dry friction in non-equilibrium steady states. We clarify that dry friction can reverse the direction of the piston motion and causes a discontinuity or a cusp-like singularity for velocity distribution functions of the piston. We also show that the heat fluctuation relation is modified under dry friction.

  15. Heat-transfer characteristics of a dry and wet/dry advanced condenser for cooling towers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fricke, H.D.; McIlroy, K.; Webster, D.J.

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An EPRI-funded, experimental evaluation of two types of advanced, air-cooled ammonia condensers for a phase-change dry/wet cooling system for electric power plants is described. Condensers of similar design, but much bigger, are being tested in a 15 MWe demonstration plant at the Pacific Gas and Electric Kern Power Station in Bakersfield, California. These condensers, featuring different air-side augmentation, were tested in Union Carbide's ammonia phase-change pilot plant (0.3 MWe). The first unit consisted of the Curtiss-Wright integral shaved-fin extruded aluminum tubing designed for dry operation. Heat transfer and air-side pressure loss characteristics were measured under varying air face velocities (600 to 1000 FPM) and initial temperature differences, ITD (20 to 60/sup 0/F). Overall heat transfer coefficients (based on air-side surface), U, ranged between 7.0 to 8.6 Btu/hr ft/sup 2/ F. The second configuration constituted the Hoterv aluminum plate-fin/tube assembly of which two different sizes (5 ft/sup 2/ and 58 ft/sup 2/ frontal area) were performance tested; in both dry and wet modes at 200 to 800 FPM air face velocities, ITD's of 10 to 60/sup 0/F and at water deluge rates up to 3.0 gpm/ft. of core width. In the dry mode, U's ranged from 7.0 to 12.0 Btu/hr ft/sup 2/ F. Increasing water deluge greatly enhanced the heat rejection capacity over dry operation - as high as 4 times, depending on operating conditions. This deluge augmentation was greater for lower air relative humidities and lower ITD's. A brief description of the recently completed ammonia phase-change dry/wet-dry cooling demonstration plant at the Kern Power Station concludes this document.

  16. Dry friction avalanches: Experiment and theory Sergey V. Buldyrev,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buldyrev, Sergey

    Dry friction avalanches: Experiment and theory Sergey V. Buldyrev,1 John Ferrante,2 and Fredy R and theoretical models are presented supporting the conjecture that dry friction stick-slip is described by self in systems presenting stick-slip due to dry friction has been under scrutiny 11 . Experimental evidence

  17. 11 The Prandtl-Tomlinson Model for Dry Photodetector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    11 The Prandtl-Tomlinson Model for Dry Friction Cantilever Photodetector Laser Beam 11-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010 #12;156 11 The Prandtl-Tomlinson Model for Dry Friction model." Prandtl considered properties of dry friction. Actually, we must apply a minimum force to the body so that a mac- roscopic

  18. Torsion Spring Oscillator with Dry Friction Eugene I. Butikov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butikov, Eugene

    by viscous and dry (Coulomb) friction are investigated analytically and with the help of computer simulations-state oscillations. 1. Introduction Mechanical vibration systems with combined viscous and dry (Coulomb) friction. Even the simplest dry friction model, the Coulomb friction, can explain the principal peculiarities

  19. Torsion Spring Oscillator with Dry Friction Eugene Butikov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butikov, Eugene

    at investigation of free oscillations of a torsion spring pendulum damped by dry (Coulomb) friction. An idealizedTorsion Spring Oscillator with Dry Friction Manual Eugene Butikov Annotation. The manual includes as a prerequisite for the virtual lab "Torsion Spring Oscillator with Dry Friction." The manual includes also a set

  20. Review of Drying Methods for Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Large, W.S.

    1999-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    SRTC is developing technology for direct disposal of aluminum spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The development program includes analyses and tests to support design and safe operation of a facility for ''road ready'' dry storage of SNF-filled canisters. The current technology development plan includes review of available SNF drying methods and recommendation of a drying method for aluminum SNF.

  1. Modified Dry Grind Ethanol Process Vijay Singh1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modified Dry Grind Ethanol Process Vijay Singh1 , Kent D. Rausch1 *, Ping Yang2 , Hosein Shapouri3-265-0697). #12;Modified Dry Grind Ethanol Process ­ University of Illinois 2 Table of Contents 1. Introductory.....................................................................................................7 3.2. Dry Grind Ethanol

  2. Project W-441, cold vacuum drying facility design requirements document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Neill, C.T.

    1997-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This document has been prepared and is being released for Project W-441 to record the design basis for the design of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. This document sets forth the physical design criteria, Codes and Standards, and functional requirements that were used in the design of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. This document contains section 3, 4, 6, and 9 of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements Document. The remaining sections will be issued at a later date. The purpose of the Facility is to dry, weld, and inspect the Multi-Canister Overpacks before transport to dry storage.

  3. Hot dry rock venture risks investigation:

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study assesses a promising resource in central Utah as the potential site of a future commerical hot dry rock (HDR) facility for generating electricity. The results indicate that, if the HDR reservoir productivity equals expectations based on preliminary results from research projects to date, a 50 MWe HDR power facility at Roosevelt Hot Springs could generate power at cost competitive with coal-fired plants. However, it is imperative that the assumed productivity be demonstrated before funds are committed for a commercial facility. 72 refs., 39 figs., 38 tabs.

  4. Lithographic dry development using optical absorption

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olynick, Deirdre; Schuck, P. James; Schmidt, Martin

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel approach to dry development of exposed photo resist is described in which a photo resist layer is exposed to a visible light source in order to remove the resist in the areas of exposure. The class of compounds used as the resist material, under the influence of the light source, undergoes a chemical/structural change such that the modified material becomes volatile and is thus removed from the resist surface. The exposure process is carried out for a time sufficient to ablate the exposed resist layer down to the layer below. A group of compounds found to be useful in this process includes aromatic calixarenes.

  5. Cold Vacuum Drying Facility - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccessAlamosCharacterization2Climate,CobaltCold Vacuum Drying

  6. Dry lake reveals evidence of Southwestern 'megadroughts'

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract ManagementDiscovering HowAna MooreDrought-induced treeDry lake

  7. Dry Creek Ventures | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential MicrohydroDistrict ofDongjin Semichem CoDow CorningDrive5Drum)Dry

  8. Dry Process Electrode Fabrication | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197E TDrew Bittner About Us Drew BittnerHomeDry Process

  9. dry-regen | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, , ., ..., ,+ .-detonation7 ComparisonDry Regenerable

  10. Economics of dry FGD by sorbent injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naulty, D.J.; Hooper, R.G.; McDowell, D.A.; Scheck, R.W.

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The body of information in this paper is directed to engineers involved in desulfurization of boiler flue gas. The problems of wet scrubbing SO/sub 2/ from power plant flue gases have been well documented. The utility industry has been interested in developing new processes that would overcome problems associated with wet slurry systems. While spray dryer technology for FGD may alleviate many of these problems, this concept has problems as well. Dry injection FGD takes the development process one step further to a totally dry system, thus eliminating the difficulties of wet slurry handling. The concept of using the fabric filter as a chemical contactor for the SO/sub 2/ absorption was proposed in the late 1960s by Chaffee and Hill. In the early 1970s, Superior Oil Company, Wheelabrator Frye, Carborundum, and others investigated the use of nahcolite for SO/sub 2/ removal. Nahcolite is a natural occurring sodium bicarbonate found in great quantities in the oil shale regions of Colorado. In general, these developments were found viable in certain circumstances, but commercialization was hampered by the lack of nahcolite suppliers.

  11. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Donald W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

  12. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, D.W.

    1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid inventory of the reservoir. 4 figs.

  13. Heat Transfer Performance of a Dry and Wet / Dry Advanced Cooling Tower Condenser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fricke, H. D.; Webster, D. J.; McIlroy, K.; Bartz, J. A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an EPRI-funded experimental evaluation of advanced air-cooled ammonia condensers for a phase. Change dry/wet cooling system for power plants. Two condenser surfaces with different air-side augmentation were tested in an ammonia...

  14. Mathematical and experimental modelling of heat pump assisted microwave drying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiguo Jia (Univ. of Queensland (Australia))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drying is one of the most energy intensive operations in industry and agriculture. In the quest to increase drying efficiency and product quality, new technologies and methods are constantly being sought. Of these technologies, heat pump assisted drying and microwave drying have proved to be the most promising contenders. In order to achieve a better understanding and provide a computer design tool for heat pump assisted convective and microwave drying, both mathematical modelling and experimental investigations of heat pump assisted microwave dryers have been undertaken in this study. A mathematical model has been developed to predict the steady-state performance of a heat pump assisted continuous microwave dryer, with emphasis on the simulation of heat and mass transfer processes in the evaporator and drying chamber. The model is intend to serve as a design tool in the study of heat pump dryers. To achieve the optimum design, the influences of the key design and operating parameters, as well as the comparison of different drying configurations, have been examined. Based on investigation results, several methods have been proposed to improve the performance of heat pump assisted microwave drying, such as the use of a recuperator. To validate the above mathematical model, extensive drying tests using foam rubber as the test material have been conducted on a prototype heat pump assisted microwave dryer. The prototype heat pump input power was 5 kW with a maximum microwave input power of 10 kW. The experimental performance data confirmed the veracity of the simulation model. The experimental results on drying test materials indicate that with careful design heat pump assisted microwave drying is comparable to convective drying in energy consumption while with a much higher drying speed.

  15. Dynamics of Dry Friction: A Numerical Investigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. F. Lim; Kan Chen

    1998-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform extended numerical simulation of the dynamics of dry friction, based on a model derived from the phenomenological description proposed by T. Baumberger et al.. In the case of small deviation from the steady sliding motion, the model is shown to be equivalent to the state- and rate-dependent friction law which was first introduced by Rice and Ruina on the basis of experiments on rocks. We obtain the dynamical phase diagram that agrees well with the experimental results on the paper-on-paper systems. In particular, the bifurcation between stick-slip and steady sliding are shown to change from a direct (supercritical) Hopf type to an inverted (subcritical) one as the driving velocity increases, in agreement with the experiments.

  16. Dry lubricant films for aluminum forming.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, J.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.

    1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    During metal forming process, lubricants are crucial to prevent direct contact, adhesion, transfer and scuffing of workpiece materials and tools. Boric acid films can be firmly adhered to the clean aluminum surfaces by spraying their methanol solutions and provide extremely low friction coefficient (about 0.04). The cohesion strengths of the bonded films vary with the types of aluminum alloys (6061, 6111 and 5754). The sheet metal forming tests indicate that boric acid films and the combined films of boric acid and mineral oil can create larger strains than the commercial liquid and solid lubricants, showing that they possess excellent lubricities for aluminum forming. SEM analyses indicate that boric acid dry films separate the workpiece and die materials, and prevent their direct contact and preserve their surface qualities. Since boric acid is non-toxic and easily removed by water, it can be expected that boric acid films are environmentally friendly, cost effective and very efficient lubricants for sheet aluminum cold forming.

  17. Safety Aspects of Dry Spent Fuel Storage and Spent Fuel Management - 13559

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Botsch, W.; Smalian, S.; Hinterding, P. [TUV NORD Nuclear c/o TUV NORD EnSys Hannover GmbH and Co.KG, Dept. Radiation Protection and Waste Disposal, Am TueV 1, 30519 Hannover (Germany)] [TUV NORD Nuclear c/o TUV NORD EnSys Hannover GmbH and Co.KG, Dept. Radiation Protection and Waste Disposal, Am TueV 1, 30519 Hannover (Germany); Voelzke, H.; Wolff, D.; Kasparek, E. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing Division 3.4 Safety of Storage Containers Unter den Eichen 44-46, 12203 Berlin (Germany)] [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing Division 3.4 Safety of Storage Containers Unter den Eichen 44-46, 12203 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dry storage systems are characterized by passive and inherent safety systems ensuring safety even in case of severe incidents or accidents. After the events of Fukushima, the advantages of such passively and inherently safe dry storage systems have become more and more obvious. As with the storage of all radioactive materials, the storage of spent nuclear fuel (SF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) must conform to safety requirements. Following safety aspects must be achieved throughout the storage period: - safe enclosure of radioactive materials, - safe removal of decay heat, - securing nuclear criticality safety, - avoidance of unnecessary radiation exposure. The implementation of these safety requirements can be achieved by dry storage of SF and HLW in casks as well as in other systems such as dry vault storage systems or spent fuel pools, where the latter is neither a dry nor a passive system. Furthermore, transport capability must be guaranteed during and after storage as well as limitation and control of radiation exposure. The safe enclosure of radioactive materials in dry storage casks can be achieved by a double-lid sealing system with surveillance of the sealing system. The safe removal of decay heat must be ensured by the design of the storage containers and the storage facility. The safe confinement of radioactive inventory has to be ensured by mechanical integrity of fuel assembly structures. This is guaranteed, e.g. by maintaining the mechanical integrity of the fuel rods or by additional safety measures for defective fuel rods. In order to ensure nuclear critically safety, possible effects of accidents have also to be taken into consideration. In case of dry storage it might be necessary to exclude the re-positioning of fissile material inside the container and/or neutron moderator exclusion might be taken into account. Unnecessary radiation exposure can be avoided by the cask or canister vault system itself. In Germany dry storage of SF in casks fulfills both transport and storage requirements. Mostly, storage facilities are designed as concrete buildings above the ground, but due to regional constraints, one storage facility has also been built as a rock tunnel. The decay heat is always removed by natural air flow; further technical equipment is not needed. The removal of decay heat and shielding had been modeled and calculated by state-of-the-art computer codes before such a facility has been built. TueV and BAM present their long experience in the licensing process for sites and casks and inform about spent nuclear fuel management and issues concerning dry storage of spent nuclear fuel. Different storage systems and facilities in Germany, Europe and world-wide are compared with respect to the safety aspects mentioned above. Initial points are the safety issues of wet storage of SF, and it is shown how dry storage systems can ensure the compliance with the mentioned safety criteria over a long storage period. The German storage concept for dry storage of SF and HLW is presented and discussed. Exemplarily, the process of licensing, erection and operation of selected German dry storage facilities is presented. (authors)

  18. Curing and drying effects upon the quality of Spanish peanuts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aristizabal, Leon

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Treatments . Atmospheric Drying Pr ewa s hing Vacuum Drying Air Separation Roasting Chemical Analyses Moisture Content Oil Content Reducing Sugars Physical Analyses Surface Color Percent Transmittance of the Oil Tenure . Density Organoleptic... PEANUTS 48 Table Pa ge THE EFFECTS OF VACUUM DRYING TREAT- MENTS ON THE ORGANOLEPTIC AND PHYSICAL ATTRIBUTES OF IMMATURE (I) AND MATURE (M) SPANISH PEANUTS 52 10 SIMPLE CORRELATIONS AMONG THE CHEMICAL, PHYSICA L AND ORGANOLEPTIC ATTRIBUTES...

  19. High Burnup Dry Storage Cask Research and Development Project...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    potentially significant impact on nuclear plant licensing and operations. While dry storage of lower burnup SNF less than 45 gigawatt days per metric ton uranium (GWD MTU)...

  20. antarctic dry valley: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UK b Department of Geological Sciences and Institute.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Uranium isotopes; Dry Valleys; Antarctica; Weathering; Lake chemistry 1 isotopes. The supply...

  1. antarctic dry valleys: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UK b Department of Geological Sciences and Institute.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Uranium isotopes; Dry Valleys; Antarctica; Weathering; Lake chemistry 1 isotopes. The supply...

  2. Reservoir Investigations on the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal System...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mexico- Tracer Test Results Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Reservoir Investigations on the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal System,...

  3. aerosol dry deposition: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    43 Drying and deposition of poly(ethylene oxide) droplets determined by Pclet number Condensed Matter (arXiv) Summary: We report results of a detailed experimental...

  4. atmospheric dry deposition: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    water vapor, and we confirm such predictions in a numerical model. There have been a number 38 Dual nitrate isotopes in dry deposition: Utility for partitioning NOx source...

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Dry Process Electrode Fabrication

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Navitas Systems at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about dry process electrode...

  6. Membranes and MEAs for Dry, Hot Operating Conditions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    durability and performance characteristics making them useful in stationary fuel cell applications. Membranes and MEA's for Dry, Hot Operating Conditions - Kick off 4 3...

  7. Water volume okay; early runoff leads to dry year declaration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water-volume-okay-early-runoff-leads-to-dry-year-declaration Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives...

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Dry Process Electrode Fabrication

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Navitas Systems at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about dry process electrode...

  9. Gas Composition Transients in the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PACKER, M.J.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Calculations with plotted results presented as confirmation bases for selected problems involving the prediction of transient gas compositions during Cold Vacuum Drying Operations.

  10. ,"New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves Extensions (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release...

  11. ,"New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves New Field Discoveries (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013...

  12. ,"New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves Acquisitions (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release...

  13. ,"New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves Estimated Production (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013...

  14. ,"New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Decreases (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013...

  15. ,"New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release...

  16. ,"New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013 ,"Release...

  17. ,"New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2013...

  18. air dried soil: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    102 Concentration, size distribution, and dry deposition rate of particle-associated metals in the Los Angeles region University of California eScholarship Repository Summary:...

  19. Hydrogen storage materials and method of making by dry homogenation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jensen, Craig M. (Kailua, HI); Zidan, Ragaiy A. (Honolulu, HI)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dry homogenized metal hydrides, in particular aluminum hydride compounds, as a material for reversible hydrogen storage is provided. The reversible hydrogen storage material comprises a dry homogenized material having transition metal catalytic sites on a metal aluminum hydride compound, or mixtures of metal aluminum hydride compounds. A method of making such reversible hydrogen storage materials by dry doping is also provided and comprises the steps of dry homogenizing metal hydrides by mechanical mixing, such as be crushing or ball milling a powder, of a metal aluminum hydride with a transition metal catalyst. In another aspect of the invention, a method of powering a vehicle apparatus with the reversible hydrogen storage material is provided.

  20. Assigning a Value to Dried Distillers' Grains as a Protein Supplement in Cattle Consuming Low-Quality Forage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambo, Zachary Joseph

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    control (NC), which received no supplement. The first factor consisted of 4 levels of supplemental protein provided at 52, 104, 156, and 208 mg N/kg BW. The second factor consisted of one of three supplemental protein sources, cottonseed meal (CSM), dried...

  1. Effects of digestive infusions of volatile fatty acids or glucose on food intake in lactating or dry cows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Effects of digestive infusions of volatile fatty acids or glucose on food intake in lactating lactating (30 kg of milk/d) and 3 non pregnant dry dairy cows. The effect of each energetic infusion) control solutions of VFA and glucose treatments were infused at the same vol, pH and osmolarity

  2. Use of a BCD for compaction control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yanfeng

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compaction of soil is essential in the construction of highways, airports, buildings, and bridges. Typically compaction is controlled by measuring the dry density and the water content of the compacted soil and checking that target values have been...

  3. Penetration rate prediction for percussive drilling via dry friction model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krivtsov, Anton M.

    Penetration rate prediction for percussive drilling via dry friction model Anton M. Krivtsov a of percussive drilling assuming a dry friction mechanism to explain the experimentally observed drop in pene as a frictional pair, and this can generate the pattern of the impact forces close to reality. Despite quite

  4. Biomass Logistics and Particle Technology Group Purdue Improved Drying

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    to maintain quality of grain in storage. n Farmers primarily depended on open air solar drying after logistics Grain & pest management Pre-Harvest losses from: Insect, molds and birds Harvesting & handling of PICS, technology Open Air Solar Drying of Maize in Ejura Market, Ashanti Region, Ghana #12;4 Chronology

  5. Horizontal Air Flow Drying Foods at Home Safely

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horizontal Air Flow Drying Foods at Home Safely Choosing a Food Dehydrator Drying is one. The thermostat should go up to 160 degrees F. The unit should have a fan or blower for air circulation. Mesh purposes. Types of Dehydrators There are two main types of dehydrators: those with vertical air flow

  6. How to make dried blood dots for genetic studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schall, Joseph J.

    How to make dried blood dots for genetic studies If a vertebrate is in-hand, and blood being taken, it is easy to make both a blood smear and dried blood dots. Modern research on malaria parasites demands that BOTH a blood smear and blood samples be taken. Blood can be stored in lysis buffers of various kinds

  7. RISO-M-2438 Dry deposition and resuspension of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CO RISO-M-2438 2 S Dry deposition and resuspension of particulate matter in city environments N 1984 få #12;RISØ-M-2438 DRY DEPOSITION AND RESUSPENSION OF PARITUCLATE NATTER IN CITY ENVIRONMENTS N.O. Jensen Abstract. The report describes, mostly in qualitative terms, the deposition and resuspension

  8. Deposition and corrosion phenomena on aluminum surfaces under deluged dry cooling-tower condisions. Interim report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheeler, K.R.; May, R.P.; Douglas, J.G.; Tylczak, J.H.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deposition and corrosion on aluminum heat exchanger surfaces resulting from deluge in wet/dry cooling towers is simulated in a laboratory Corrosion/Deposition Loop (CDL). Heat exchanger deposition buildup was found to be linearly dependent on concentration factor and number of wet/dry cycles. Deionized water rising after deluge reduced rate of deposition. Laboratory data obtained from CDL relates directly to operation of the Advanced Concepts Test (ACT) demonstration cooling tower. Technology transferable to ACT shows that deposition from supersaturated solution can be effectively controlled by attention to water chemistry, pH, water conditioning, and good heat transfer design. The additional mechanism of deposition by water film evaporation is effectively managed by soft water rinsing and uniform surface wetting. Exposure of a model TRANE surface (the ACT wet/dry exchanger) produced short-term deposition extrapolating to 0.011 mm buildup in three years. Studies continue to verify 4X as maximum cycles of concentration through control of water chemistry and rinsing after deluge. Deluge water used at ACT facility is sufficiently aggressive to warrant use of Alclad to extend tube service life.

  9. Heat transfer modeling of dry spent nuclear fuel storage facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.Y.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present work was undertaken to provide heat transfer model that accurately predicts the thermal performance of dry spent nuclear fuel storage facilities. One of the storage configurations being considered for DOE Aluminum-clad Spent Nuclear Fuel (Al-SNF), such as the Material and Testing Reactor (MTR) fuel, is in a dry storage facility. To support design studies of storage options a computational and experimental program has been conducted at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The main objective is to develop heat transfer models including natural convection effects internal to an interim dry storage canister and to geologic codisposal Waste Package (WP). Calculated temperatures will be used to demonstrate engineering viability of a dry storage option in enclosed interim storage and geologic repository WP and to assess the chemical and physical behaviors of the Al-SNF in the dry storage facilities. The current paper describes the modeling approaches and presents the computational results along with the experimental data.

  10. Heat Transfer Modeling of Dry Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.Y.

    1999-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The present work was undertaken to provide heat transfer model that accurately predicts the thermal performance of dry spent nuclear fuel storage facilities. One of the storage configurations being considered for DOE Aluminum-clad Spent Nuclear Fuel (Al-SNF), such as the Material and Testing Reactor (MTR) fuel, is in a dry storage facility. To support design studies of storage options a computational and experimental program has been conducted at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The main objective is to develop heat transfer models including natural convection effects internal to an interim dry storage canister and to geological codisposal Waste Package (WP). Calculated temperatures will be used to demonstrate engineering viability of a dry storage option in enclosed interim storage and geological repository WP and to assess the chemical and physical behaviors of the Al-SNF in the dry storage facilities. The current paper describes the modeling approaches and presents the computational results along with the experimental data.

  11. MPH CURRICULUM: The following represent the MPH core courses and the current range of available elective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajlich, Vaclav

    of Pharmacy and Health Sciences in industrial hygiene and toxicology, hazardous material handling in Anthropology, Business Administration, Health Economics, Health Education and Promotion, Industrial Hygiene

  12. MPH CURRICULUM: The following represent the MPH core courses and the current range of available elective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    of Pharmacy and Health Sciences in industrial hygiene and toxicology, hazardous material handling and Promotion, Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology, International Health, Nursing, Political Science, Psychology

  13. The US Hot Dry Rock project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendron, R.H.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hot Dry Rock geothermal energy project began in the early 1970's with the objective of developing a technology to make economically available the large ubiquitous thermal energy of the upper earth crust. The program has been funded by the Department of Energy (and its predecessors) and for a few years with participation by West Germany and Japan. An energy reservoir was accessed by drilling and hydraulically fracturing in the precambrian basement rock outside the Valles Caldera of north-central New Mexico. Water was circulated through the reservoir (Phase I, 1978-1980) producing up to 5 MWt at 132/sup 0/C. A second (Phase II) reservoir has been established with a deeper pair of holes and an initial flow test completed producing about 10 MWt at 190/sup 0/C. These accomplishments have been supported and paralleled by developments in drilling, well completion and instrumentation hardware. Acoustic or microseismic fracture mapping and geochemistry studies in addition to hydraulic and thermal data contribute to reservoir analyses. Studies of some of the estimated 430,000 quads of HDR resources in the United States have been made with special attention focused on sites most advantageous for early development.

  14. DRY TRANSFER FACILITY WORKER DOSE ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.S. Tang

    2004-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this calculation is to estimate radiation doses received by personnel working in the Dry Transfer Facility No.1 (DTF-1) performing operations to receive transportation casks, transfer wastes, prepare waste packages, and ship out loaded waste packages and empty casks. Doses received by workers due to maintenance operations are also included in this revision. The specific scope of work contained in this calculation covers both collective doses and individual worker group doses on an annual basis, and includes the contributions due to external and internal radiation from normal operation, excluding the remediation area of the building. The results of this calculation will be used to support the design of the DTF-1 and to provide occupational dose estimates for the License Application. The calculations contained in this document were developed by Environmental and Nuclear Engineering of the Design and Engineering Organization and are intended solely for the use of the Design and Engineering Organization in its work regarding facility operation. Yucca Mountain Project personnel from the Environmental and Nuclear Engineering should be consulted before use of the calculations for purposes other than those stated herein or use by individuals other than authorized personnel in the Environmental and Nuclear Engineering.

  15. Wet to dry crossover and a flow vortex-lattice in active nematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doostmohammadi, Amin; Thampi, Sumesh P; Yeomans, Julia M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Active systems, from bacterial suspensions to vibrated granular matter, are continuously driven out of equilibrium by local injection of energy from their constituent elements. The energy input leads to exotic behaviour such as collective motion, pattern formation, topological defects and active turbulence, but theories that link the different manifestations of activity across systems and length scales are lacking. Here we unify two different classes of active matter by using friction as a control parameter to interpolate between wet active systems, whose behaviour is dominated by hydrodynamics, and dry active matter where any flow is screened. At the wet-dry crossover, we find a novel lattice of flow vortices interleaved with an ordered network of topological defects which arises from the competition between friction and viscous dissipation. Our results contribute to understanding the physics of matter operating out-of-equilibrium, with its potential in the design of active micro- and nano-machines.

  16. Wet to dry crossover and a flow vortex-lattice in active nematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin Doostmohammadi; Michael Adamer; Sumesh P. Thampi; Julia M. Yeomans

    2015-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Active systems, from bacterial suspensions to vibrated granular matter, are continuously driven out of equilibrium by local injection of energy from their constituent elements. The energy input leads to exotic behaviour such as collective motion, pattern formation, topological defects and active turbulence, but theories that link the different manifestations of activity across systems and length scales are lacking. Here we unify two different classes of active matter by using friction as a control parameter to interpolate between wet active systems, whose behaviour is dominated by hydrodynamics, and dry active matter where any flow is screened. At the wet-dry crossover, we find a novel lattice of flow vortices interleaved with an ordered network of topological defects which arises from the competition between friction and viscous dissipation. Our results contribute to understanding the physics of matter operating out-of-equilibrium, with its potential in the design of active micro- and nano-machines.

  17. Dry, portable calorimeter for nondestructive measurement of the activity of nuclear fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beyer, Norman S. (Elmhurst, IL); Lewis, Robert N. (Clarendon Hills, IL); Perry, Ronald B. (Hinsdale, IL)

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The activity of a quantity of heat-producing nuclear fuel is measured rapidly, accurately and nondestructively by a portable dry calorimeter comprising a preheater, an array of temperature-controlled structures comprising a thermally guarded temperature-controlled oven, and a calculation and control unit. The difference between the amounts of electric power required to maintain the oven temperature with and without nuclear fuel in the oven is measured to determine the power produced by radioactive disintegration and hence the activity of the fuel. A portion of the electronic control system is designed to terminate a continuing sequence of measurements when the standard deviation of the variations of the amount of electric power required to maintain oven temperature is within a predetermined value.

  18. Thermal Analysis of a Dry Storage Concept for Capsule Dry Storage Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOSEPHSON, W S

    2003-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    There are 1,936 cesium (Cs) and strontium (Sr) capsules stored in pools at the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). These capsules will be moved to dry storage on the Hanford Site as an interim measure to reduce risk. The Cs/Sr Capsule Dry Storage Project is conducted under the assumption that the capsules will eventually be moved to the repository at Yucca Mountain, and the design criteria include requirements that will facilitate acceptance at the repository. The storage system must also permit retrieval of capsules in the event that vitrification of the capsule contents is pursued. The Capsule Advisory Panel (CAP) was created by the Project Manager for the Hanford Site Capsule Dry Storage Project (CDSP). The purpose of the CAP is to provide specific technical input to the CDSP; to identify design requirements; to ensure design requirements for the project are conservative and defensible; to identify and resolve emerging, critical technical issues, as requested; and to support technical reviews performed by regulatory organizations, as requested. The CAP will develop supporting and summary documents that can be used as part of the technical and safety bases for the CDSP. The purpose of capsule dry storage thermal analysis is to: (1) Summarize the pertinent thermal design requirements sent to vendors, (2) Summarize and address the assumptions that underlie those design requirements, (3) Demonstrate that an acceptable design exists that satisfies the requirements, (4) Identify key design features and phenomena that promote or impede design success, (5) Support other CAP analyses such as corrosion and integrity evaluations, and (6) Support the assessment of proposed designs. It is not the purpose of this report to optimize or fully analyze variations of postulated acceptable designs. The present evaluation will indicate the impact of various possible design features, but not systematically pursue design improvements obtainable through analysis refinements and/or relaxation of conservatisms. However, possible design improvements will be summarized for future application. All assumptions and related design features, while appropriate for conceptual designs, must be technically justified for the final design. The pertinent thermal design requirements and underlying assumptions are summarized in Section 1.3. The majority of the thermal analyses, as described in Sections 4.2 and 4.3, focus on an acceptable conceptual design arrived at by refinement of a preliminary but unacceptable design. The results of the subject thermal analyses, as presented in Section 4.0, satisfy items 3 and 4 above.

  19. Structural Sensitivity of Dry Storage Canisters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Karri, Naveen K.; Adkins, Harold E.; Hanson, Brady D.

    2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This LS-DYNA modeling study evaluated a generic used nuclear fuel vertical dry storage cask system under tip-over, handling drop, and seismic load cases to determine the sensitivity of the canister containment boundary to these loads. The goal was to quantify the expected failure margins to gain insight into what material changes over the extended long-term storage lifetime could have the most influence on the security of the containment boundary. It was determined that the tip-over case offers a strong challenge to the containment boundary, and identifies one significant material knowledge gap, the behavior of welded stainless steel joints under high-strain-rate conditions. High strain rates are expected to increase the material’s effective yield strength and ultimate strength, and may decrease its ductility. Determining and accounting for this behavior could potentially reverse the model prediction of a containment boundary failure at the canister lid weld. It must be emphasized that this predicted containment failure is an artifact of the generic system modeled. Vendor specific designs analyze for cask tip-over and these analyses are reviewed and approved by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Another location of sensitivity of the containment boundary is the weld between the base plate and the canister shell. Peak stresses at this location predict plastic strains through the whole thickness of the welded material. This makes the base plate weld an important location for material study. This location is also susceptible to high strain rates, and accurately accounting for the material behavior under these conditions could have a significant effect on the predicted performance of the containment boundary. The handling drop case was largely benign to the containment boundary, with just localized plastic strains predicted on the outer surfaces of wall sections. It would take unusual changes in the handling drop scenario to harm the containment boundary, such as raising the drop height or changing the impact angle. The seismic load case was derived from the August 23, 2011 earthquake that affected the North Anna power station. The source of the data was a monitoring station near Charlottesville, Virginia, so the ground motion is not an exact match. Stresses on the containment boundary were so low, even from a fatigue standpoint, that the seismic load case is generally not a concern. Based on this study, it is recommended that high strain rate testing of welded stainless steel test samples be pursued to define the currently unknown material behavior. Additional modeling is recommended to evaluate specific dry storage cask system designs subjected to tip-over loads using a high level of model detail. Additional modeling of the canister interior components (basket, fuel assemblies, etc.) is also recommended, to evaluate the feasibility of fuel retrievability after a tip-over incident. Finally, additional modeling to determine how much degradation a system could undergo and still maintain the integrity of the confinement barrier should be performed.

  20. Kinetics of the clay roofing tile convection drying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, S. (Univ. of Osijek (Croatia). Faculty of Food Technology); Skansi, D. (Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia). Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology); Sokele, M. (Croatian Post and Telecommunications, Zagreb (Croatia). Telecommunications Center)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kinetics of the convection drying process of flat tile has been investigated experimentally in an industrial tunnel dryer. Several velocities of wet tile movement through the dryer were tested to obtain maximum allowable drying rate curve. As there are various models to describe the kinetics of convection drying, finding a model that would fairly well approximate the kinetics of the whole drying process was part of the research. Especially the polynomial and exponential models were tested. It was found that exponential model of the type: B(t) = (a[minus]B[sub e])[center dot]EXP([minus]bt[sup 2])+B[sub e], ([minus]dB(t)/dt) = 2bt(B(t)[minus]B[sub e]) significantly correlates the kinetics of the whole tile drying process. Applying the maximum allowable drying rate curve obtained for flat tile in the first period of drying, a grapho-analytic model for the optimal conducting of the process has been developed.

  1. Energy-efficient regenerative liquid desiccant drying process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ko, Suk M. (Huntsville, AL); Grodzka, Philomena G. (Huntsville, AL); McCormick, Paul O. (Athens, AL)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to the use of desiccants in conjunction with an open oop drying cycle and a closed loop drying cycle to reclaim the energy expended in vaporizing moisture in harvested crops. In the closed loop cycle, the drying air is brought into contact with a desiccant after it exits the crop drying bin. Water vapor in the moist air is absorbed by the desiccant, thus reducing the relative humidity of the air. The air is then heated by the used desiccant and returned to the crop bin. During the open loop drying cycle the used desiccant is heated (either fossil or solar energy heat sources may be used) and regenerated at high temperature, driving water vapor from the desiccant. This water vapor is condensed and used to preheat the dilute (wet) desiccant before heat is added from the external source (fossil or solar). The latent heat of vaporization of the moisture removed from the desiccant is reclaimed in this manner. The sensible heat of the regenerated desiccant is utilized in the open loop drying cycle. Also, closed cycle operation implies that no net energy is expended in heating drying air.

  2. Steam atmosphere drying concepts using steam exhaust recompression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiBella, F.A. (TECOGEN, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States))

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the US industrial drying accounts for approximately 1.5 quads of energy use per year. Annual industrial dryer expenditures are estimated to be in the $500 million range. Industrial drying is a significant energy and monetary expense. For the thermal drying processes in which water is removed via evaporation from the feedstock, attempts have been made to reduce the consumption of energy using exhaust waste heat recovery techniques, improved dryer designs, or even the deployment of advanced mechanical dewatering techniques. Despite these efforts, it is obvious that a large amount of thermal energy is often still lost if the latent heat of evaporation from the evaporated water cannot be recovered and/or in some way be utilized as direct heat input into the dryer. Tecogen Inc. is conducting research and development on an industrial drying concept. That utilizes a directly or indirectly superheated steam cycle atmosphere with exhaust steam recompression to recover the latent heat in the exhaust that would otherwise be lost. This approach has the potential to save 55 percent of the energy required by a conventional air dryer. Other advantages to the industrial dryer user include: A 35-percent reduction in the yearly cost per kg[sub evap] to dry wet feedstock, Reduced airborne emissions, Reduced dry dust fire/explosion risks, Hot product not exposed to oxygen thus, the product quality is enhanced, Constant rate drying in steam atmosphere, Reduced dryer size and cost, Reduced dryer heat losses due to lower dryer inlet temperatures. Tecogen has projected that the steam atmosphere drying system is most suitable as a replacement technology for state-of-the-art spray, flash, and fluidized bed drying systems. Such systems are utilized in the food and kindred products; rubber products; chemical and allied products; stone, clay, and glass; textiles; and pulp and paper industrial sectors.

  3. Steam atmosphere drying concepts using steam exhaust recompression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiBella, F.A. [TECOGEN, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States)

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the US industrial drying accounts for approximately 1.5 quads of energy use per year. Annual industrial dryer expenditures are estimated to be in the $500 million range. Industrial drying is a significant energy and monetary expense. For the thermal drying processes in which water is removed via evaporation from the feedstock, attempts have been made to reduce the consumption of energy using exhaust waste heat recovery techniques, improved dryer designs, or even the deployment of advanced mechanical dewatering techniques. Despite these efforts, it is obvious that a large amount of thermal energy is often still lost if the latent heat of evaporation from the evaporated water cannot be recovered and/or in some way be utilized as direct heat input into the dryer. Tecogen Inc. is conducting research and development on an industrial drying concept. That utilizes a directly or indirectly superheated steam cycle atmosphere with exhaust steam recompression to recover the latent heat in the exhaust that would otherwise be lost. This approach has the potential to save 55 percent of the energy required by a conventional air dryer. Other advantages to the industrial dryer user include: A 35-percent reduction in the yearly cost per kg{sub evap} to dry wet feedstock, Reduced airborne emissions, Reduced dry dust fire/explosion risks, Hot product not exposed to oxygen thus, the product quality is enhanced, Constant rate drying in steam atmosphere, Reduced dryer size and cost, Reduced dryer heat losses due to lower dryer inlet temperatures. Tecogen has projected that the steam atmosphere drying system is most suitable as a replacement technology for state-of-the-art spray, flash, and fluidized bed drying systems. Such systems are utilized in the food and kindred products; rubber products; chemical and allied products; stone, clay, and glass; textiles; and pulp and paper industrial sectors.

  4. Meat Alternate Cookery: Eggs, Nuts, Soybeans, Dried Beans and Peas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweeten, Mary K.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sources of B vitamins . Nuts, because of the high fat content, are more readily digested if eaten in combination with cereals, vegetables or fruits . Dried beans and peas make nourishing dishes which are very filling. These legumes are good sources... . Soybeans are the best vegetable protein source to re place meat. Dry soybeans contain 1 V2 times as much protein as other dried beans and 11 times as much fat. Soybeans are limited in one of the essential amino acids so they must be combined...

  5. M P H D E G R E E P R O G R A M

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrol, MPH Faculty Member; Mandy Kastner, MPH Student Racquel Racadio, MPH Student; Jessica Gillis, MPH

  6. Insights into the historical construction of species-rich Mesoamerican seasonally dry tropical forests: the diversification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Mark

    Insights into the historical construction of species-rich Mesoamerican seasonally dry tropical, Mesoamerica, niche conservatism, seasonally dry tropical forests. Summary · Mesoamerican arid biomes epitomize the vast species richness of Meso- american seasonally dry tropical forests (SDTFs), and to evaluate

  7. Drilling Complete on Australian Hot Dry Rock Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The first commercial attempt to create a commercial geothermal power plant using hot dry rock technology reached a crucial milestone on January 22, when a production well successfully reached its target depth.

  8. Technical and economical considerations of new DRI melting process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ito, Shuzo; Tokuda, Koji; Sammt, F.; Gray, R.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The new DRI melting process can effectively and economically produce high quality molten iron. This process utilizes hot charging of DRI directly from a reduction furnace into a dedicated new melting furnace. The molten iron from this DRI premelter can be charged into a steelmaking furnace, such as an electric arc furnace (EAF), where the molten iron, together with other iron sources, can be processed to produce steel. Alternatively the molten iron can be pigged or granulated for off-site merchant sales. Comprehensive research and development of the new process has been conducted including operational process simulation, melting tests using FASTMET DRI, slag technology development, and refractory corrosion testing. This paper describes the process concept, its operational characteristics and further applications of the process.

  9. Managing Aging Effects on Dry Cask Storage Systems for Extended...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Electric Grid Workshop, April 19-20, 2011 Before the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy and Power Effects of Multiple Drying Cycles on HBU PWR Cladding Alloys...

  10. Disneyland’s Dry Cleaning Gets an Energy Efficient Upgrade

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As the provider of laundry and dry cleaning services for Disneyland Resort’s costumes and hospitality supply items, L&N Costume and Linen Service knows a little something about both quantity and quality.

  11. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Diesel Generator Fire Protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SINGH, G.

    2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the Fire Protection and Detection System installed by Project W-441 (Cold Vacuum Drying Facility and Diesel Generator Building) functions as required by project specifications.

  12. Precipitation scavenging, dry deposition, and resuspension. Volume 2. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruppacher, H.R.; Semonin, R.G.; Slinn, W.G.N.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume 2 of these proceedings contains papers on dry deposition and resuspension of airborne pollutants. Items within the scope of EDB have been entered separately into the data base. (ACR)

  13. ,"New York Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"2262015 9:22:39 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NA1160SNY2"...

  14. Supply chain management in the dry bulk shipping industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, Bryan E. (Bryan Edward)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is intended to show the importance of supply chain management in the dry-bulk shipping industry. A hypothetical company, the Texas Grain and Bakery Corporation, was created. The values and calculations used are ...

  15. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Thomas Nelson

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes research conducted between April 1, 2004 and June 30, 2004 on the preparation and use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from flue gas. Support materials and supported sorbents were prepared by spray drying. Sorbents consisting of 20 to 50% sodium carbonate on a ceramic support were prepared by spray drying in batches of approximately 300 grams. The supported sorbents exhibited greater carbon dioxide capture rates than unsupported calcined sodium bicarbonate in laboratory tests. Preliminary process design and cost estimation for a retrofit application suggested that costs of a dry regenerable sodium carbonate-based process could be lower than those of a monoethanolamine absorption system. In both cases, the greatest part of the process costs come from power plant output reductions due to parasitic consumption of steam for recovery of carbon dioxide from the capture medium.

  16. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility, Diesel Generator Fire Protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, G

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the Fire Protection and Detection System installed by Project W-441 (Cold Vacuum Drying Facility and Diesel Generator Building) functions as required by project specifications.

  17. Drying studies for corroded DOE aluminum plate fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lords, R.E.; Windes, W.E. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Crepeau, J.C.; Sidwell, R.W. [Idaho Univ., Idaho Falls, ID (United States) Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) currently stores a wide variety of spent nuclear fuel. The fuel was originally intended to be stored underwater for a short period of thermal cooling, then removed and reprocessed. However, it has been stored underwater for much longer thank originally anticipated. During this time dust and airborne desert soil have entered the oldest INEL pool, accumulating on the fuel. Also, the aluminum fuel cladding has corroded compromising the exposed surfaces of the fuel. Plans are now underway to move some the the more vulnerable aluminum plate type fuels into dry storage in an existing vented and filtered fuel storage facility. In preparation for dry storage of the fuel a drying and canning station is being built at the INEL. The two primary objectives of this facility are to determine the influence of corrosion products on the drying process and to establish temperature distribution inside the canister during heating.

  18. New Technology Successes for Paper Drying

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aue, J.; Pierce, S.; Grabner, K.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2003. The DMS is designed around four modules. Each module provides a unique view of the dryer operation to assist the operator with running the machine. 1. Supervisory Dryer Control Module The heart of the Dryer Management System... is the Supervisory Dryer Management Module. Anti-flooding logic, grade change logic, thermo compressor anti-choke logic, differential pressure adjustment based on siphon curves, automatic system start-up and shutdown and sheet break turndown are incorporated...

  19. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IRWIN, J.J.

    2000-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) is to achieve the earliest possible removal of free water from Multi-Canister Overpacks (MCOs). The MCOs contain metallic uranium SNF that have been removed from the 100K Area fuel storage water basins (i.e., the K East and K West Basins) at the US. Department of Energy Hanford Site in Southeastern Washington state. Removal of free water is necessary to halt water-induced corrosion of exposed uranium surfaces and to allow the MCOs and their SNF payloads to be safely transported to the Hanford Site 200 East Area and stored within the SNF Project Canister Storage Building (CSB). The CVDF is located within a few hundred yards of the basins, southwest of the 165KW Power Control Building and the 105KW Reactor Building. The site area required for the facility and vehicle circulation is approximately 2 acres. Access and egress is provided by the main entrance to the 100K inner area using existing roadways. The CVDF will remove free. water from the MCOs to reduce the potential for continued fuel-water corrosion reactions. The cold vacuum drying process involves the draining of bulk water from the MCO and subsequent vacuum drying. The MCO will be evacuated to a pressure of 8 torr or less and backfilled with an inert gas (helium). The MCO will be sealed, leak tested, and then transported to the CSB within a sealed shipping cask. (The MCO remains within the same shipping Cask from the time it enters the basin to receive its SNF payload until it is removed from the Cask by the CSB MCO handling machine.) The CVDF subproject acquired the required process systems, supporting equipment, and facilities. The cold vacuum drying operations result in an MCO containing dried fuel that is prepared for shipment to the CSB by the Cask transportation system. The CVDF subproject also provides equipment to dispose of solid wastes generated by the cold vacuum drying process and transfer process water removed from the MCO back to the K Basins.

  20. GEOLOGY O F THE NORTHERN PCIRT O F DRY MOUNTAXN,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    GEOLOGY O F THE NORTHERN PCIRT O F DRY MOUNTAXN, SOUTHERN UASCSTCH H Q - W T A X H E i i - UT&H #12;BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY RESEARCH STUDIES Geology Seri,es Vol. 3 No. 2 April, 1956 GEOLOGY OF THE NORTHERN Department of Gedogy Provo, Utah #12;GEOLOGY OF THE NORTHERN PART OF DRY MOUNTAIN, SOUTHERN WASATCH M O U N

  1. Dry scrubber reduces SO sub 2 in calciner flue gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, G.W. (Refining Consulting Services, Englewood, CO (US)); Roderick, D. (Western Slope Refining Co., Fruita, CO (US)); Nastri, A. (NATEC Resources Inc., Dallas, TX (US))

    1991-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the installation of a dry sulfur dioxide scrubber for an existing petroleum coke calciner at its Fruita, Colo., refinery. The dry scrubbing process was developed by the power industry to help cope with the acid rain problem. It is the first application of the process in an oil refinery. The process could also remove SO{sub 2} from the flue gas of a fluid catalytic cracker, fluid coker, or other refinery sources.

  2. National Level Co-Control Study of the Targets for Energy Intensity and Sulfur Dioxide in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing bed depth Improve ignition oven efficiency Emission Optimized Sintering (EOS ® ) Other measures Coke Making Coal moisture control Coke dry quenching (

  3. Water quality investigation of Kingston Fossil Plant dry ash stacking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bohac, C.E.

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Changing to a dry ash disposal systems at Kingston Fossil Plant (KFP) raises several water quality issues. The first is that removing the fly ash from the ash pond could alter the characteristics of the ash pond discharge to the river. The second concerns proper disposal of the runoff and possibly leachate from the dry ash stack. The third is that dry ash stacking might change the potential for groundwater contamination at the KFP. This report addresses each of these issues. The effects on the ash pond and its discharge are described first. The report is intended to provide reference material to TVA staff in preparation of environmental review documents for new ash disposal areas at Kingston. Although the investigation was directed toward analysis of dry stacking, considerations for other disposal options are also discussed. This report was reviewed in draft form under the title Assessment of Kingston Fossil Plant Dry Ash Stacking on the Ash Pond and Groundwater Quality.'' 11 refs., 3 figs., 18 tabs.

  4. Hot dry rock energy: Hot dry rock geothermal development program. Progress report. Fiscal year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salazar, J.; Brown, M. [eds.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extended flow testing at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock (HDR) test facility concluded in Fiscal Year 1993 with the completion of Phase 2 of the long-term flow test (LTFT) program. As is reported in detail in this report, the second phase of the LTFT, although only 55 days in duration, confirmed in every way the encouraging test results of the 112-day Phase I LTFT carried out in Fiscal Year 1992. Interim flow testing was conducted early in FY 1993 during the period between the two LTFT segments. In addition, two brief tests involving operation of the reservoir on a cyclic schedule were run at the end of the Phase 2 LTFT. These interim and cyclic tests provided an opportunity to conduct evaluations and field demonstrations of several reservoir engineering concepts that can now be applied to significantly increase the productivity of HDR systems. The Fenton Hill HDR test facility was shut down and brought into standby status during the last part of FY 1993. Unfortunately, the world`s largest, deepest, and most productive HDR reservoir has gone essentially unused since that time.

  5. Linear Extrusion 400 Tons/Day Dry Solids Pump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth Sprouse; David Matthews

    2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) has developed an innovative gasifier concept that uses rocket engine experience to significantly improve gasifier performance, life, and cost compared to current state-of-the-art systems. The PWR gasifier concept uses a compact and highly efficient (>50%) dry solids pump that has excellent availability (>99.5%). PWR is currently developing this dry solids pump under a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cooperative agreement. The conceptual design on two dry solids pumps were completed under this agreement and one pump concept was selected for preliminary design. A preliminary design review (PDR) of the selected pump was presented on September 20, 2007 to PWR management and numerous technical specialists. Feedback from the PDR review team has been factored into the design and a Delta-PDR was held on April 9, 2008.

  6. Spent nuclear fuel project cold vacuum drying facility operations manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1999-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the Operations Manual for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). The Manual was developed in conjunction with HNF-SD-SNF-SAR-002, Safety Analysis Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Phase 2, Supporting Installation of Processing Systems (Garvin 1998) and, the HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-002, 1997, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements, Rev. 3a. The Operations Manual contains general descriptions of all the process, safety and facility systems in the CVDF, a general CVD operations sequence, and has been developed for the SNFP Operations Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved.

  7. Standard review plan for dry cask storage systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Standard Review Plan (SRP) For Dry Cask Storage Systems provides guidance to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff in the Spent Fuel Project Office for performing safety reviews of dry cask storage systems. The SRP is intended to ensure the quality and uniformity of the staff reviews, present a basis for the review scope, and clarification of the regulatory requirements. Part 72, Subpart B generally specifies the information needed in a license application for the independent storage of spent nuclear fuel and high level radioactive waste. Regulatory Guide 3.61 {open_quotes}Standard Format and Content for a Topical Safety Analysis Report for a Spent Fuel Dry Storage Cask{close_quotes} contains an outline of the specific information required by the staff. The SRP is divided into 14 sections which reflect the standard application format. Regulatory requirements, staff positions, industry codes and standards, acceptance criteria, and other information are discussed.

  8. Alternative barrier layers for surface covers in dry climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stormont, J.C.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface covers are one of the most widespread remediation and waste management options in all climates. Barrier layers to limit percolation through cover systems are principal features of engineered, multi-component cover designs. Conventional barrier layer components developed for humid climates have limitations in dry climates. One alternative barrier layer is a capillary barrier, which consists of a fine-over-coarse soil arrangement. The capacity of capillary barrier to laterally divert downward moving water is the key to their success. Another alternative is a dry barrier, in which atmospheric air is circulated through a coarse layer within the cover to remove water vapor. Incorporating a coarse layer which stores water for subsequent removal by air flow reduces the requirements for the air flow velocity and increases the applicability of the dry barrier.

  9. Saving for dry days: Aquifer storage and recovery may help 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H2O | pg. 2 Saving for dry days Story by Kathy Wythe tx H2O | pg. 3 Aquifer storage and recovery may help With reoccurring droughts and growing population, Texas will always be looking for better ways to save or use water. Some water... suppliers in Texas are turning to aquifer storage and recovery. During the dry summer of 2008, the San Antonio Water System (SAWS) had enough assets in its ?bank? (of water) to make with- drawals to meet the needs of its customers. The water bank...

  10. Nevada Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996) in DelawareTotal ConsumptionThousand CubicfromDry NaturalDry

  11. Missouri Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,CubicWithdrawals6,992 6,895Vehicle FuelFeet)(Dollars 2012DryDry

  12. Final Report - Membranes and MEA's for Dry, Hot Operating Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamrock, Steven J.

    2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this program was to develop a new Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) which can operate under hotter, dryer conditions than the state of the art membranes today and integrate it into a Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA). These MEA's should meet the performance and durability requirements outlined in the solicitation, operating under low humidification conditions and at temperatures ranging from -20���ºC to 120���ºC, to meet 2010 DOE technical targets for membranes. This membrane should operate under low humidification conditions and at temperatures ranging from -20���ºC to 120���ºC in order to meet DOE HFCIT 2010 commercialization targets for automotive fuel cells. Membranes developed in this program may also have improved durability and performance characteristics making them useful in stationary fuel cell applications. The new membranes, and the MEA�¢����s comprising them, should be manufacturable at high volumes and at costs which can meet industry and DOE targets. This work included: A) Studies to better understand factors controlling proton transport within the electrolyte membrane, mechanisms of polymer degradation (in situ and ex situ) and membrane durability in an MEA; B) Development of new polymers with increased proton conductivity over the range of temperatures from -20���ºC to 120���ºC and at lower levels of humidification and with improved chemical and mechanical stability; C) Development of new membrane additives for increased durability and conductivity under these dry conditions; D) Integration of these new materials into membranes and membranes into MEA�¢����s, including catalyst and gas diffusion layer selection and integration; E) Verification that these materials can be made using processes which are scalable to commercial volumes using cost effective methods; F) MEA testing in single cells using realistic automotive testing protocols. This project addresses technical barriers A (Durability) and C (Performance) from the Fuel Cells section of the 2005 Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year R&D Plan. In the course of this four-year program we developed a new PEM with improved proton conductivity, chemical stability and mechanical stability. We incorporated this new membrane into MEAs and evaluated performance and durability.

  13. Drying of a model soil P. Faure, P. Coussot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    depend on the paste structure. With a kaolin suspension the CRP lasts down to very low water densities plays a critical role in agriculture: an inadequate water supply may limit crop production, and soilDrying of a model soil P. Faure, P. Coussot Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Navier, Champs sur

  14. STUDIES OF THE DYNAMICS OF DRY-FRICTION-DAMPED BLADE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    STUDIES OF THE DYNAMICS OF DRY-FRICTION-DAMPED BLADE ASSEMBLIES by J er^ome Guillen A dissertation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 2.3 Multi-DOF systems with a single friction damper . . . . . . . 20 2.3.1 System model with multiple friction dampers . . . . . . 31 2.5 Conclusion

  15. Evaluation of the Technical Basis for Extended Dry Storage and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -- Executive Summary U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board December 2010 #12;U.S.U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Authors This report was prepared for the U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board.NWTRB.GOV ii #12;Extended Dry Storage and Transportation of Used Nuclear Fuel U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical

  16. Fire Hazard Analysis for the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHNSON, B.H.

    1999-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This Fire Hazard Analysis assesses the risk from fire within individual fire areas in the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility at the Hanford Site in relation to existing or proposed fire protection features to ascertain whether the objectives of DOE Order 5480.7A Fire Protection are met.

  17. Ethanol production with dilute acid hydrolysis using partially dried lignocellulosics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Quang A. (Chesterfield, MO); Keller, Fred A. (Lakewood, CO); Tucker, Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO)

    2003-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of converting lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol, comprising hydrolyzing lignocellulosic materials by subjecting dried lignocellulosic material in a reactor to a catalyst comprised of a dilute solution of a strong acid and a metal salt to lower the activation energy (i.e., the temperature) of cellulose hydrolysis and ultimately obtain higher sugar yields.

  18. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Design Basis Accident Analysis Documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PIEPHO, M.G.

    1999-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the detailed accident analysis to support HNF-3553, Annex B, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report, ''Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR).'' All assumptions, parameters and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the FSAR.

  19. Radiation budget changes with dry forest clearing in temperate Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    Radiation budget changes with dry forest clearing in temperate Argentina J A V I E R H O U S P A N, Argentina, Catedra de Climatologia Agricola, Facultad de Ciencias Agropecuarias, Universidad Nacional de Entre Rios, Oro Verde, Argentina Abstract Land cover changes may affect climate and the energy balance

  20. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Electrical System Design Description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BRISBIN, S.A.

    1999-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a technical explanation of the design and operation of the electrical system for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. This document identifies the requirements, and the basis for the requirements and details on how the requirements have been implemented in the design and construction of the facility. This document also provides general guidance for the surveillance, testing, and maintenance of this system.

  1. Tropical mountain cradles of dry forest diversity Christopher W. Dick*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    * *Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Apartado 0843-03092, Balboa, Panama´; and Department of Ecology radiated at vastly different times, so fo- cus on a single taxon would be mislead- ing. On the side of rain- ple, the dry forest legume clade Leu- caena underwent endemic radiation in southwest Mexico beginning

  2. EFFECT OF DRYING CONDITIONS OF DEHYDRATED LUCERNE ON GROWTH PERFORMANCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    EFFECT OF DRYING CONDITIONS OF DEHYDRATED LUCERNE ON GROWTH PERFORMANCES OF RABBITS RECEIVING DIETS CONTAINING LUCERNE F. LEBAS, J. DOLZ Annie ESPAIGNET* Marie-Oaude COUSIN e G. SARDI Station de Recherches sur * Station expérimentale de l'I. T. C. F., 91920 Boigneville In 1972, 18 different adjustments of the lucerne

  3. Precipitation scavenging, dry deposition, and resuspension. Volume 1. Precipitation scavenging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruppacher, H.R.; Semonin, R.G.; Slinn, W.G.N. (eds.)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These two volumes contain papers prepared for and presented at the Fourth International Conference on Precipitation Scavenging, Dry Deposition, and Resuspension (the Chamberlain Meeting) held during 29 November to 3 December, 1982 in Santa Monica, California. Papers presented are abstracted separately.

  4. Seismic Behavior of Spent Fuel Dry Cask Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaukat, Syed K. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555-0001 (United States); Luk, Vincent K. [Sandia National Laboratories, PO Box 5800. Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-0744 (United States)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is conducting a research program to investigate technical issues concerning the dry cask storage systems of spent nuclear fuel by conducting confirmatory research for establishing criteria and review guidelines for the seismic behavior of these systems. The program focuses on developing 3-D finite element analysis models that address the dynamic coupling of a module/cask, a flexible concrete pad, and an underlying soil/rock foundation, in particular, the soil-structure-interaction. Parametric analyses of the coupled models are performed to include variations in module/cask geometry, site seismicity, underlying soil properties, and cask/pad interface friction. The analyses performed include: 1) a rectangular dry cask module typical of Transnuclear West design at a site in Western USA where high seismicity is expected; 2) a cylindrical dry cask typical of Holtec design at a site in Eastern USA where low seismicity is expected; and 3) a cylindrical dry cask typical of Holtec design at a site in Western USA with medium high seismicity. The paper includes assumptions made in seismic analyses performed, results, and conclusions. (authors)

  5. TECHNICAL POLLUTION PREVENTION GUIDE FOR DRY BULK TERMINALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Practices 24 4.4 4.5 Pollutants 26 4.4.1 Fugitive Dust 26 4.4.2 Commodity Spillage 27 4.4.3 Oil, lubricant#12;TECHNICAL POLLUTION PREVENTION GUIDE FOR DRY BULK TERMINALS IN THE LOWER FRASER BASIN DOE FRAP 1996-19 Prepared for: Enviromnent Canada Environmental Protection Fraser Pollution Abatement North

  6. Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Stack Air Sampling System Qualification Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.

    2001-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents tests that were conducted to verify that the air monitoring system for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility ventilation exhaust stack meets the applicable regulatory criteria regarding the placement of the air sampling probe, sample transport, and stack flow measurement accuracy.

  7. Using HPM-Sampling to Drive Dynamic Compilation Dries Buytaert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eeckhout, Lieven

    Using HPM-Sampling to Drive Dynamic Compilation Dries Buytaert Andy Georges Michael Hind Matthew the frequently executed methods. We de- scribe and comprehensively evaluate HPM-sampling, a sim- ple) that addresses the aforementioned limitations. We show that HPM-sampling is more accurate; has low overhead

  8. Mathematical modeling of impingement drying of corn tortillas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braud, Louise Marie

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    than 50'C) (Pang, 1997). Yoshida and Hyodo (1966) studied the use of superheated steam in drying potato slices. They found that at equivalent flow rates (15 kg/hr) and temperatures (350'C) evaporation was faster with superheated steam than with air...

  9. Hot-dry-rock geothermal-energy development program. Annual report, fiscal year 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.C.; Ponder, G.M. (comps.)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During fiscal year 1981, activities of the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development Program were concentrated in four principal areas: (1) data collection to permit improved estimates of the hot dry rock geothermal energy resource base of various regions of the United States and of the United States as a whole, combined with detailed investigations of several areas that appear particularly promising either for further energy extraction experiments or for future commercial development; (2) successful completion of a 9-month, continuous, closed-loop, recirculating flow test in the enlarged Phase I System at Fenton Hill, New Mexico - a pressurized-water heat-extraction loop developed in low-permeability granitic rock by hydraulic fracturing; (3) successful completion at a depth of 4084 m (13,933 ft) of well EE-3, the production well of a larger, deeper, and hotter, Phase II System at Fenton Hill. Well EE-3 was directionally drilled with control of both azimuth and inclination. Its inclined section is about 380 m (1250 ft) vertically above the injection well, EE-2, which was completed in FY80; and (4) supporting activities included new developments in downhole instrumentation and equipment, geochemical and geophysical studies, rock-mechanics and fluid-mechanics investigations, computer analyses and modeling, and overall system design. Under an International Energy Agency agreement, the New Energy Development Organization, representing the Government of Japan has joined Kernforschungsanlage-Juelich GmbH, representing the Federal Republic of Germany, and the US Department of Energy as an active participant in the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock Project.

  10. Assessment of technologies for constructing self-drying low-slope roofs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyle, D.M.; Desjarlais, A.O.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Issues associated with removing excessive moisture from low-slope roofs have been assessed. The economic costs associated with moisture trapped in existing roofs have been estimated. The evidence suggests that existing moisture levels cause approximately a 40% overall reduction in the R-value of installed roofing insulation in the United States. Excess operating costs are further increased by a summertime heat transfer mode unique to wet insulation, caused by the daily migration of water within the roof. By itself, this effect can increase peak electrical demand for air conditioning by roughly 15 W/m{sup 2} of roofing, depending on the type of insulation. This effect will increase peak demand capacity required of utilities in any geographic region (e.g., 900 MW in the South). A simple formula has been derived for predicting the effect that self-drying roofs can have upon time-averaged construction costs. It is presumed that time-averaged costs depend predominantly upon (1) actual service life and (2) the likelihood that the less expensive recover membranes can be installed safely over old roofs. For example, an increase in service life from 15 to 20 years should reduce the current cost of roofing ($12 billion/year) by 21%. Another simple formula for predicting the reroofing waste volume indicates that an increase in service life from 15 to 20 years might reduce the current estimated 0.4 billion ft{sup 3}/year of waste by 25%. A finite-difference computer program has been used to study the flow of heat and moisture within typical existing roofs for a variety of US climates. Nearly all publicly available experimental drying data have been consulted. The drying times for most existing low-slope roofs in the United States are controlled largely climate and the permeability of the structural deck to water vapor.

  11. Dry Storage of Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel - 13321

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, T.M.; Dunsmuir, M.D.; Leduc, D.R.; Severynse, T.F.; Sindelar, R.L. [Savannah River National Laboratory (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory (United States); Moore, E.N. [Moore Nuclear Energy, LLC (United States)] [Moore Nuclear Energy, LLC (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spent fuel from domestic and foreign research reactors is received and stored at the Savannah River Site's L Area Material Storage (L Basin) Facility. This DOE-owned fuel consists primarily of highly enriched uranium in metal, oxide or silicide form with aluminum cladding. Upon receipt, the fuel is unloaded and transferred to basin storage awaiting final disposition. Disposition alternatives include processing via the site's H Canyon facility for uranium recovery, or packaging and shipment of the spent fuel to a waste repository. A program has been developed to provide a phased approach for dry storage of the L Basin fuel. The initial phase of the dry storage program will demonstrate loading, drying, and storage of fuel in twelve instrumented canisters to assess fuel performance. After closure, the loaded canisters are transferred to pad-mounted concrete overpacks, similar to those used for dry storage of commercial fuel. Unlike commercial spent fuel, however, the DOE fuel has high enrichment, very low to high burnup, and low decay heat. The aluminum cladding presents unique challenges due to the presence of an oxide layer that forms on the cladding surface, and corrosion degradation resulting from prolonged wet storage. The removal of free and bound water is essential to the prevention of fuel corrosion and radiolytic generation of hydrogen. The demonstration will validate models predicting pressure, temperature, gas generation, and corrosion performance, provide an engineering scale demonstration of fuel handling, drying, leak testing, and canister backfill operations, and establish 'road-ready' storage of fuel that is suitable for offsite repository shipment or retrievable for onsite processing. Implementation of the Phase I demonstration can be completed within three years. Phases II and III, leading to the de-inventory of L Basin, would require an additional 750 canisters and 6-12 years to complete. Transfer of the fuel from basin storage to dry storage requires integration with current facility operations, and selection of equipment that will allow safe operation within the constraints of existing facility conditions. Examples of such constraints that are evaluated and addressed by the dry storage program include limited basin depth, varying fuel lengths up to 4 m, (13 ft), fissile loading limits, canister closure design, post-load drying and closure of the canisters, instrument selection and installation, and movement of the canisters to storage casks. The initial pilot phase restricts the fuels to shorter length fuels that can be loaded to the canister directly underwater; subsequent phases will require use of a shielded transfer system. Removal of the canister from the basin, followed by drying, inerting, closure of the canister, and transfer of the canister to the storage cask are completed with remotely operated equipment and appropriate shielding to reduce personnel radiation exposure. (authors)

  12. Simulation of spray drying in superheated steam using computational fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frydman, A.; Vasseur, J.; Ducept, F.; Sionneau, M.; Moureh, J.

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a numerical simulation and experimental validation of a spray dryer using superheated steam instead of air as drying medium, modeled with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. The model describes momentum, heat and mass transfer between two phases--a discrete phase of droplets, and a continuous gas phase--through a finite volume method. For the simulation, droplet size distribution is represented by 6 discrete classes of diameter, fitting to the experimental distribution injected from the nozzle orifice, taking into account their peculiar shrinkage during drying. This model is able to predict the most important features of the dryer: fields of gas temperature and gas velocity inside the chamber, droplets trajectories and eventual deposits on to the wall. The results of simulation are compared to a pilot scale dryer, using water. In the absence of risk of power ignition in steam, the authors have tested rather high steam inlet temperature (973K), thus obtaining a high volumic efficiency. The model is validated by comparison between experimental and predicted values of temperature inside the chamber, verifying the coupling between the 3 different types of transfer without adjustment. This type of model can be used for chamber design, or scale up. Using superheated steam instead of air in a spray dryer can allow a high volumic evaporation rate (20 k.h.m{sup 3}), high energy recovery and better environment control.

  13. Dry Friction Avalanches: Experiment and Robin Hood model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergey V. Buldyrev; John Ferrante; Fredy R. Zypman

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents experimental evidence and theoretical models supporting that dry friction stick-slip is described by self-organized criticality. We use the data, obtained with a pin-on-disc tribometer set to measure lateral force to examine the variation of the friction force as a function of time. We study nominally flat surfaces of aluminum and steel. The probability distribution of force jumps follows a power law with exponents $\\mu$ in the range 2.2 -- 5.4. The frequency power spectrum follows a $1/{f^\\alpha}$ pattern with $\\alpha$ in the range 1 -- 2.6. In addition, we present an explanation of these power-laws observed in the dry friction experiments based on the Robin Hood model of self organized criticality. We relate the values of the exponents characterizing these power laws to the critical exponents $D$ an $\

  14. Dry soldering with hot filament produced atomic hydrogen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panitz, Janda K. G. (Edgewood, NM); Jellison, James L. (Albuquerque, NM); Staley, David J. (Los Lunas, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for chemically transforming metal surface oxides to metal that is especially, but not exclusively, suitable for preparing metal surfaces for dry soldering and solder reflow processes. The system employs one or more hot, refractory metal filaments, grids or surfaces to thermally dissociate molecular species in a low pressure of working gas such as a hydrogen-containing gas to produce reactive species in a reactive plasma that can chemically reduce metal oxides and form volatile compounds that are removed in the working gas flow. Dry soldering and solder reflow processes are especially applicable to the manufacture of printed circuit boards, semiconductor chip lead attachment and packaging multichip modules. The system can be retrofitted onto existing metal treatment ovens, furnaces, welding systems and wave soldering system designs.

  15. Dry soldering with hot filament produced atomic hydrogen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panitz, J.K.G.; Jellison, J.L.; Staley, D.J.

    1995-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is disclosed for chemically transforming metal surface oxides to metal that is especially, but not exclusively, suitable for preparing metal surfaces for dry soldering and solder reflow processes. The system employs one or more hot, refractory metal filaments, grids or surfaces to thermally dissociate molecular species in a low pressure of working gas such as a hydrogen-containing gas to produce reactive species in a reactive plasma that can chemically reduce metal oxides and form volatile compounds that are removed in the working gas flow. Dry soldering and solder reflow processes are especially applicable to the manufacture of printed circuit boards, semiconductor chip lead attachment and packaging multichip modules. The system can be retrofitted onto existing metal treatment ovens, furnaces, welding systems and wave soldering system designs. 1 fig.

  16. Dry Transfer Facility #1 - Ventilation Confinement Zoning Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.D. Draper

    2005-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this analysis is to establish the preliminary Ventilation Confinement Zone (VCZ) for the Dry Transfer Facility (DTF). The results of this document is used to determine the air quantities for each VCZ that will eventually be reflected in the development of the Ventilation Flow Diagrams. The calculations contained in this document were developed by D and E/Mechanical-HVAC and are intended solely for the use of the D and E/Mechanical-HVAC department in its work regarding the HVAC system for the Dry Transfer Facility. Yucca Mountain Project personnel from the D and E/Mechanical-HVAC department should be consulted before use of the calculation for purposes other than those stated herein or used by individuals other than authorized personnel in D and E/Mechanical-HVAC department.

  17. Process and apparatus for indirect-fired heating and drying

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbasi, Hamid Ali; Chudnovsky, Yaroslav

    2005-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for heating flat or curved surfaces comprising injecting fuel and oxidant along the length, width or longitudinal side of a combustion space formed between two flat or curved plates, transferring heat from the combustion products via convection and radiation to the surface being heated on to the material being dried/heated, and recirculating at least 20% of the combustion products to the root of the flame.

  18. Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry, Regenerable Sorbents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Green; Thomas O. Nelson; Brian S. Turk; Paul D. Box; Raghubir P. Gupta

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes research conducted between January 1, 2006, and March 31, 2006, on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal combustion flue gas. An integrated system composed of a downflow co-current contact absorber and two hollow screw conveyors (regenerator and cooler) was assembled, instrumented, debugged, and calibrated. A new batch of supported sorbent containing 15% sodium carbonate was prepared and subjected to surface area and compact bulk density determination.

  19. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Electrical System Design Description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SINGH, G.

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This system design description (SDD) provides a technical explanation of the design and operation of the electrical system for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). This SDD also identifies the requirements, and the basis for the requirements and details on how the requirements have been implemented in the design and construction of the facility. This SDD also provides general guidance for the surveillance, testing, and maintenance of this system.

  20. A laboratory study of the activities of dried rumen microorganisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harbers, Leniel Henry

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . cal pro? ceases vere made in this study to determine the ~ ~ activity of dried rumen microorganisms. . 'ellulose d1- gestion vas studied by employing a yurified cellulose preparation as a substrate and determination of the changes in concentration... the conditions of these experiments. There vere~ hovevsr~ bacteria present in the dr1ed rumen preparations vhich vere capable of hydro- lysing carboxymethyl cellulose. A method of detsrming "cellulose d1gestion" using a soluble cellulose derivative as a...

  1. Drum drying of black liquor using superheated steam impinging jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiravi, A.H.; Mujumdar, A.S.; Kubes, G.J. [McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel drum dryer for black liquor utilizing multiple impinging jets of superheated steam was designed and built to evaluate the performance characteristics and effects of various operating parameters thereon. Appropriate ranges of parameters such as steam jet temperature and velocity were examined experimentally to quantify the optimal operating conditions for the formation of black liquor film on the drum surface as well as the drying kinetics.

  2. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Hazards Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CROWE, R.D.

    2000-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) Hazard Analysis to support the CVDF Final Safety Analysis Report and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports,'' and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, ''Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.''

  3. 7-forming, superconducting filaments through bicomponent dry spinning

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tuominen, Olli P. (Ogden, UT); Morgan, Carol W. (Asheville, NC); Burlone, Dominick A. (Asheville, NC); Blankenship, Keith V. (Asheville, NC)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fibers which contain potentially superconducting material are dry spun by the steps of preparing a suspension of potentially superconducting powder in a thickened solvent; preparing a solution of fiber-forming polymer; supplying the suspension and the solution to a spinning apparatus; in the spinning apparatus, arranging the solution and the suspension in a bicomponent arrangement; extruding the arranged solution and suspension from a spinneret as a bicomponent filament; and removing the solvent from the filament.

  4. Modeling a Dry Etch Process for Large-Area Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buss, R.J.; Hebner, G.A.; Ruby, D.S.; Yang, P.

    1999-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been considerable interest in developing dry processes which can effectively replace wet processing in the manufacture of large area photovoltaic devices. Environmental and health issues are a driver for this activity because wet processes generally increase worker exposure to toxic and hazardous chemicals and generate large volumes of liquid hazardous waste. Our work has been directed toward improving the performance of screen-printed solar cells while using plasma processing to reduce hazardous chemical usage.

  5. The effect of drying on the heating value of biomass fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Pablo Gregorio

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been some speculation as to whether or not biomass fuels (such as feedlot manure) may lose volatile matter during the drying process. Since current standards state that heating value analysis may be performed before or after drying...

  6. The effect of drying treatment on the n-alkane analysis M Olivn, K Osoro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    38 and lucerne hay samples (n = 33) were prepared for the alkane analysis by two procedures : freeze-dried faeces and herbage (lucerne hay) samples. Therefore oven-drying would not affect on the estimation

  7. The Impacts of Dry-Storage Canister Designs on Spent Nuclear...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The Impacts of Dry-Storage Canister Designs on Spent Nuclear Fuel Handling, Storage, Transportation, and Disposal in the U.S. The Impacts of Dry-Storage Canister Designs on Spent...

  8. Safe Advantage on Dry Interim Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romanato, L.S. [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em S.Paulo, Brazilian Navy Technological Center, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper aims to present the advantages of dry cask storage in comparison with the wet storage (cooling water pools) for SNF. When the nuclear fuel is removed from the core reactor, it is moved to a storage unit and it wait for a final destination. Generally, the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) remains inside water pools within the reactors facility for the radioactive activity decay. After some period of time in pools, SNF can be sent to a definitive deposition in a geological repository and handled as radioactive waste or to reprocessing facilities, or still, wait for a future solution. Meanwhile, SNF remains stored for a period of time in dry or wet facilities, depending on the method adopted by the nuclear power plant or other plans of the country. Interim storage, up to 20 years ago, was exclusively wet and if the nuclear facility had to be decommissioned another storage solution had to be found. At the present time, after a preliminary cooling of the SNF elements inside the water pool, the elements can be stored in dry facilities. This kind of storage does not need complex radiation monitoring and it is safer then wet one. Casks, either concrete or metallic, are safer, especially on occurrence of earthquakes, like that occurred at Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power plant, in Japan on July 16, 2007. (authors)

  9. Dry Creek salt dome, Mississippi Interior Salt basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montgomery, S.L.; Ericksen, R.L.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent drilling of salt dome flanks in the Mississippi Salt basin has resulted in important new discoveries and the opening of a frontier play. This play is focused on gas/condensate reserves in several Cretaceous formations, most notably the Upper Cretaceous Eutaw and lower Tuscaloosa intervals and Lower Cretaceous Paluxy and Hosston formations. As many as eight domes have been drilled thus far; sandstones in the upper Hosston Formation comprise the primary target. Production has been as high as 3-5 Mcf and 500-1200 bbl of condensate per day, with estimated ultimate reserves in the range of 0.2 to 1.5 MBOE (million barrels oil equivalent) per well. As typified by discovery at Dry Creek salt dome, traps are related to faulting, unconformities, and updip loss of permeability. Previous drilling at Dry Creek, and in the basin generally, avoided the flank areas of most domes, due to geologic models that predicted latestage (Tertiary) piercement and breached accumulations. Recent data from Dry Creek and other productive domes suggest that growth was episodic and that piercement of Tertiary strata did not affect deeper reservoirs charged with hydrocarbons in the Late Cretaceous.

  10. Precision directional drilling of hot-dry-rock geothermal production well EE-3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carden, R.S.; Rowley, J.C.; Helmick, C.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The deviated directional drilling of the hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal production well EE-3 (Energy Extraction No. 3) was successfully completed on August 1981. The injection well, EE-2, previously had been drilled with its lower part at an inclination of 35/sup 0/ to the vertical. It reached an on-line depth of 15,292 feet and its bottom-hole temperature was 608/sup 0/F (320/sup 0/C). The production well EE-3 was required to be drilled 1200 feet (370 m) above and parallel to the injection well. This necessitated high precision, controlled-trajectory directional drilling operations. The directional drilling of EE-3 was accomplished within the required tolerances at a depth of 13,933 feet and a bottom-hole temperature of 580/sup 0/F (280/sup 0/C).

  11. Low VOC drying of lumber and wood panel products. Progress report No. 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, W.; Yan, H.; Hooda, U.; Wild, M.P.; Banerjee, S. [Inst. of Paper Science and Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)] [Inst. of Paper Science and Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Shmulsky, R.; Thompson, A.; Ingram, L.; Conners, T. [Mississippi State Univ., MS (United States)] [Mississippi State Univ., MS (United States)

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was initiated by an Institute of Paper Science and Technology finding that heating softwood in a low-headspace environment removed much of the VOCs without removing the water. This offered the possibility of removing VOCs from wet wood, capturing them as a product, and then drying the VOC-depleted wood conventionally with little or no VOC controls. Two means of low-headspace heating were explored: steam and radiofrequency (RF). It was found in the previous year, that while both steam and RF were able to drive out VOCs, steam was impracticably slow for lumber. Hence the effect of RF or microwave on wood was the principal focus of the work reported here. Finally, in order to understand the mechanism of VOC release, the transport of the VOCs in wood was studied, together with the seasonal effects that influence VOC concentration in trees.

  12. Factors affecting the recovery of bacteria in freeze-dried model systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Custer, Carl Steven

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cellulose, and subsequently freeze-dried. The influences of the rate of freezing, time and atmosphere of storage, position of the bacteria within the model system and condition of incubation upon the survival and metabolic injury of the freeze-dried... storage. The type of atmosphere in which freeze-dried preparations were stored was important to bacterial survival. Nitrogen was less damaging to freeze-dried cells than air. Strata studies indicated that the viable bacterial population density...

  13. The effect of cultivar and maturity on the quality of freeze-dried carrots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schadle, Edward Richard

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    plasticize freeze-dried foods to moisture levels of 5 to $0/: 1. Spraying the freeze-dried product until the desired level of moisture is reached. 2. Stopping the freeze drying operation when the product reaches the desired moisture level. 3. A11owing... freeze-dried foods to equilibrate in a humidified chamber until the material absorbs the desired amount of moisture. Curry (1974) found a significant increase in rehydration using the equilibrium method of plasticization over the spraying method...

  14. Extending dry storage of spent LWR fuel for 100 years.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Einziger, R. E.

    1998-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of delays in closing the back end of the fuel cycle in the U.S., there is a need to extend dry inert storage of spent fuel beyond its originally anticipated 20-year duration. Many of the methodologies developed to support initial licensing for 20-year storage should be able to support the longer storage periods envisioned. This paper evaluates the applicability of existing information and methodologies to support dry storage up to 100 years. The thrust of the analysis is the potential behavior of the spent fuel. In the USA, the criteria for dry storage of LWR spent fuel are delineated in 10 CFR 72 [1]. The criteria fall into four general categories: maintain subcriticality, prevent the release of radioactive material above acceptable limits, ensure that radiation rates and doses do not exceed acceptable levels, and maintain retrievability of the stored radioactive material. These criteria need to be considered for normal, off-normal, and postulated accident conditions. The initial safety analysis report submitted for licensing evaluated the fuel's ability to meet the requirements for 20 years. It is not the intent to repeat these calculations, but to look at expected behavior over the additional 80 years, during which the temperatures and radiation fields are lower. During the first 20 years, the properties of the components may change because of elevated temperatures, presence of moisture, effects of radiation, etc. During normal storage in an inert atmosphere, there is potential for the cladding mechanical properties to change due to annealing or interaction with cask materials. The emissivity of the cladding could also change due to storage conditions. If there is air leakage into the cask, additional degradation could occur through oxidation in breached rods, which could lead to additional fission gas release and enlargement of cladding breaches. Air in-leakage could also affect cover gas conductivity, cladding oxidation, emissivity changes, and excessive creep and mechanical property changes. Postulated accident scenarios would be the same for 20-year or 100-year storage, because they are mostly governed by operational or outside events, and not by the cask or fuel. Analyses of accident scenarios during extended dry storage could be impacted by fuel and cask changes that would result from the extended period of storage. Overall, the results of this work indicate that, based on fuel behavior, spent fuel at burnups below {approximately}45 GWd/MTU can be dry stored for 100 years. Long-term storage of higher burnup fuel or fuels with newer cladding will require the determination of temperature limits based on evaluation of stress-driven degradation mechanisms of the cladding.

  15. Sludge drying reed beds: a full and pilot-scales study for activated sludge treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Sludge drying reed beds: a full and pilot-scales study for activated sludge treatment S. Troesch.troesch@cemagref.fr, dirk.esser@sint.fr Abstract Sludge drying reed beds have been used for dewatering and mineralization of sludge since the beginning of the 90's, but their insufficient performances in terms of Dry Matter [DM

  16. On the rate-independent limit of systems with dry friction and small viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mielke, Alexander

    On the rate-independent limit of systems with dry friction and small viscosity Messoud A. Efendiev of this work is to present a model which is able to account for viscous as well as for dry-friction effects slow time scale, in which viscous transitions are seen as instantaneous jumps. However, effects of dry

  17. Firstpassage time of Brownian motion with dry friction Yaming Chen 1, # and Wolfram Just 1, +

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Just, Wolfram

    First­passage time of Brownian motion with dry friction Yaming Chen 1, # and Wolfram Just 1, + 1­smooth stochastic model, namely Brownian motion with dry friction, using two di#erent but closely related approaches on the other. For the simple case containing only dry friction, a phase transi­ tion phenomenon in the spectrum

  18. An analytical approach to codimension2 sliding bifurcations in the dry friction oscillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An analytical approach to codimension­2 sliding bifurcations in the dry friction oscillator M In this paper, we consider analytically sliding bifurcations of periodic orbits in the dry friction oscillator] for a detailed account of these bifurcations in the case of periodic orbits. The dry friction oscillator

  19. An analytical approach to codimension-2 sliding bifurcations in the dry friction oscillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    An analytical approach to codimension-2 sliding bifurcations in the dry friction oscillator M consider analytically sliding bifurcations of periodic orbits in the dry friction oscillator. The system of periodic orbits. The dry friction oscillator is a very good example of a nonsmooth system containing

  20. Dry Friction and Impact Dynamics in Railway Vehicles Dan Erik Petersen Mark Hoffmann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dry Friction and Impact Dynamics in Railway Vehicles Dan Erik Petersen Mark Hoffmann c973539 c Piotrowski. This model successfully takes into account damping due to dry friction in the suspension links due to dry friction. The wheelsets are constrained by guidance structures of the freight wagon

  1. LETTER doi:10.1038/nature13202 Classical shear cracks drive the onset of dry frictional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fineberg, Jay

    LETTER doi:10.1038/nature13202 Classical shear cracks drive the onset of dry frictional motion Ilya contactsdefiningafrictionalinterface3,4 . Therearea varietyofviews on how best to describe the onset of dry frictional motion the interface. We investigated the onset of dry frictional motion by per- forming simultaneous high

  2. Experimental study of friction noise of dry contact under light load

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le-Bot, Alain

    Experimental study of friction noise of dry contact under light load A. Le Bot ­ H. Ben Abdelounis of friction noise radiated from the contact area of two sliding solids. The domain of interest is dry contact, that is the friction sound aris- ing when two dry and rough surfaces are rubbed on each other under light normal load

  3. Torsion Spring Oscillator with Dry Friction Summary of the Principal Formulas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butikov, Eugene

    Torsion Spring Oscillator with Dry Friction ­ Problems Summary of the Principal Formulas The differential equation of motion of an oscillator acted upon by dry friction: J ¨ = -D( + m) for > 0, J ¨ = -D cases in which the effects either of viscous friction or of dry friction predominate: a = 4m T = 4 m

  4. Effect of air-drying of Acacia cyanophylla Lindl. leaves on intake and digestion by sheep

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Effect of air-drying of Acacia cyanophylla Lindl. leaves on intake and digestion by sheep H Abdouli-dried. The aim of the present study was to compare fresh to air-dried leaves for their intake, digestibility to the diets for the first 15 days and intake, digestibility and rumen fermentation parameters were measured

  5. Rain splash of dry sand revealed by high-speed imaging and sticky paper splash targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rain splash of dry sand revealed by high-speed imaging and sticky paper splash targets David Jon by raindrop impacts. We use high-speed imaging of drop impacts on dry sand to describe the drop (2007), Rain splash of dry sand revealed by high-speed imaging and sticky paper splash targets, J

  6. A first French assessment of population exposure to tetrachloroethylene from small dry cleaning facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    such as the dry cleaning machine technology (fitted or unfitted with a carbon adsorber) and the ventilation (air that only a few percent of these machines are equipped with a carbon adsorber, CA, to capture PCE vapours buildings housing a dry cleaning facility. These studies involved dry cleaning machines fitted with a Carbon

  7. THE CONVERSION OF BIOMASS TO ETHANOL USING GEOTHERMAL ENERGY DERIVED FROM HOT DRY ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    97505 THE CONVERSION OF BIOMASS TO ETHANOL USING GEOTHERMAL ENERGY DERIVED FROM HOT DRY ROCK between a hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy source and the power requirements for the conversion -- geothermal energy derived from the vast resource of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) in our country, and biomass

  8. TOWARDS OBJECTIVE DESIGN OF DRY DAMS AT WATERSHED SCALE: HOW TO TAKE INTO ACCOUNT THE SPATIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    21 TOWARDS OBJECTIVE DESIGN OF DRY DAMS AT WATERSHED SCALE: HOW TO TAKE INTO ACCOUNT THE SPATIAL, the best location for 1 or 3 dry dams). To take into account the spatial variability of the rainfall, we, following subcatchments delineation. A dry dam can be placed at the outlet of any unit. Such a simple model

  9. Numerical analysis of a one-dimensional elastodynamic model of dry friction and unilateral contact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renard, Yves - Pôle de Mathématiques, Institut National des Sciences Appliquées de Lyon

    .e. hyperbolic) model with dry friction. Since we consider a Coulomb friction law with a slip velocity dependentNumerical analysis of a one-dimensional elastodynamic model of dry friction and unilateral contact in the numerical analysis of more elaborated dynamic purely elastic problems with dry friction. Ó 2001 Elsevier

  10. Preharvest Treatment Options for Dry Edible Beans Christy Sprague, Associate Professor and Weed Extension Specialist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preharvest Treatment Options for Dry Edible Beans Christy Sprague, Associate Professor and Weed by earlier weed management practices and "green" stems or leaves of dry bean plants can be a major problem be used for preharvest treatments in dry beans. These products are Gramoxone Inteon 2SL (paraquat

  11. "Indian Rancherie on Dry Creek": An Early 1850s Indian Village on the Sacramento and San Joaquin County Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farris, Glenn

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I "Indian Rancherie on Dry Creek": An Early 185Ds IndianIndian Rancherie on Dry Creek." Cahfomia Pictorial Letterimage of the rancheria on Dry Creek with a commentary relat-

  12. Assessment of an active dry barrier for a landfill cover system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stormont, J.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ankeny, M.D.; Burkhard, M.E.; Tansey, M.K.; Kelsey, J.A. [Stephens (Daniel B.) and Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dry barrier is a layer of geologic material that is dried by air flow. An active dry barrier system can be designed, installed, and operated as part of a landfill cover system. An active system uses blowers and fans to move air through a high-permeability layer within the cover system. Depending principally on the air-flow rate, it is possible for a dry barrier to remove enough water to substantially reduce the likelihood of water percolating through the cover system. If a material with a relatively great storage capacity, such as processed tuff, is used as the coarse layer, then the efficiency of the dry barrier will be increased.

  13. Drying by Cavitation and Poroelastic Relaxations in Porous Media with Macroscopic Pores Connected by Nanoscale Throats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olivier Vincent; David A. Sessoms; Erik J. Huber; Jules Guioth; Abraham D. Stroock

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the drying dynamics of porous media with two pore diameters separated by several orders of magnitude. Nanometer-sized pores at the edge of our samples prevent air entry, while drying proceeds by heterogeneous nucleation of vapor bubbles (cavitation) in the liquid in micrometer-sized voids within the sample. We show that the dynamics of cavitation and drying are set by the interplay of the deterministic poroelastic mass transport in the porous medium and the stochastic nucleation process. Spatio-temporal patterns emerge in this unusual reaction-diffusion system, with temporal oscillations in the drying rate and variable roughness of the drying front.

  14. Demonstrating the Safety of Long-Term Dry Storage - 13468

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCullum, Rod [Nuclear Energy Institute, 1201 F St. NW, Washington, DC, 20004 (United States)] [Nuclear Energy Institute, 1201 F St. NW, Washington, DC, 20004 (United States); Brookmire, Tom [Dominion Energy, 5000 Dominion Boulevard Glen Allen, VA 23060 (United States)] [Dominion Energy, 5000 Dominion Boulevard Glen Allen, VA 23060 (United States); Kessler, John [Electric Power Research Institute, 1300 West W.T. Harris Boulevard, Charlotte, NC 28262 (United States)] [Electric Power Research Institute, 1300 West W.T. Harris Boulevard, Charlotte, NC 28262 (United States); Leblang, Suzanne [Entergy, 1340 Echelon Parkway, Jackson, MS 39211 (United States)] [Entergy, 1340 Echelon Parkway, Jackson, MS 39211 (United States); Levin, Adam [Exelon, 4300 Winfield Road, Warrenville, IL 60555 (United States)] [Exelon, 4300 Winfield Road, Warrenville, IL 60555 (United States); Martin, Zita [Tennessee Valley Authority, 1101 Market Street, Chattanooga, TN 37402 (United States)] [Tennessee Valley Authority, 1101 Market Street, Chattanooga, TN 37402 (United States); Nesbit, Steve [Duke Energy, 550 South Tryon Street, Charlotte, NC 28202 (United States)] [Duke Energy, 550 South Tryon Street, Charlotte, NC 28202 (United States); Nichol, Marc [Nuclear Energy Institute, 1201 F St. NW Washington DC, 2004 (United States)] [Nuclear Energy Institute, 1201 F St. NW Washington DC, 2004 (United States); Pickens, Terry [Xcel Energy, 414 Nicollet Mall, Minneapolis, MN 55401 (United States)] [Xcel Energy, 414 Nicollet Mall, Minneapolis, MN 55401 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial nuclear plants in the United States were originally designed with the expectation that used nuclear fuel would be moved directly from the reactor pools and transported off site for either reprocessing or direct geologic disposal. However, Federal programs intended to meet this expectation were never able to develop the capability to remove used fuel from reactor sites - and these programs remain stalled to this day. Therefore, in the 1980's, with reactor pools reaching capacity limits, industry began developing dry cask storage technology to provide for additional on-site storage. Use of this technology has expanded significantly since then, and has today become a standard part of plant operations at most US nuclear sites. As this expansion was underway, Federal programs remained stalled, and it became evident that dry cask systems would be in use longer than originally envisioned. In response to this challenge, a strong technical basis supporting the long term dry storage safety has been developed. However, this is not a static situation. The technical basis must be able to address future challenges. Industry is responding to one such challenge - the increasing prevalence of high burnup (HBU) used fuel and the need to provide long term storage assurance for these fuels equivalent to that which has existed for lower burnup fuels over the past 25 years. This response includes a confirmatory demonstration program designed to address the aging characteristics of HBU fuel and set a precedent for a learning approach to aging management that will have broad applicability across the used fuel storage landscape. (authors)

  15. Viability of Existing INL Facilities for Dry Storage Cask Handling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randy Bohachek; Charles Park; Bruce Wallace; Phil Winston; Steve Marschman

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report evaluates existing capabilities at the INL to determine if a practical and cost effective method could be developed for opening and handling full-sized dry storage casks. The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) CPP-603, Irradiated Spent Fuel Storage Facility, provides the infrastructure to support handling and examining casks and their contents. Based on a reasonable set of assumptions, it is possible to receive, open, inspect, remove samples, close, and reseal large bolted-lid dry storage casks at the INL. The capability can also be used to open and inspect casks that were last examined at the TAN Hot Shop over ten years ago. The Castor V/21 and REA-2023 casks can provide additional confirmatory information regarding the extended performance of low-burnup (<45 GWD/MTU) used nuclear fuel. Once a dry storage cask is opened inside CPP-603, used fuel retrieved from the cask can be packaged in a shipping cask, and sent to a laboratory for testing. Testing at the INL’s Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) can occur starting with shipment of samples from CPP-603 over an on-site road, avoiding the need to use public highways. This reduces cost and reduces the risk to the public. The full suite of characterization methods needed to establish the condition of the fuel exists and MFC. Many other testing capabilities also exist at MFC, but when those capabilities are not adequate, samples can be prepared and shipped to other laboratories for testing. This report discusses how the casks would be handled, what work needs to be done to ready the facilities/capabilities, and what the work will cost.

  16. The Drying Rates of Raw Paint Oils: A Comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brock, Frank Peterson

    1913-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    * 55. Conclusions * 56. B I B L I O G R A P H Y , 1898 C. Boettinger. Phenomena of Drying of Linseed Oil and the Influence of Pigments thereon. Chem. Zeit., 1898, 22, 558 ( Jour. Soc of Chem. Ind., 1898, 17, 932). 1899 Anon. The Absorption... (Preliminary Report) Jour. Am- Chem. S o c , 1903, 25, 826-836. ( Jour. S o c Chem. Ind., 1903, 22, 1095. 1906 Henry R. Procter and W. E. Holmes. The Oxida­ tion of Oils. Jour. Soc of Chem. Ind. 1905, 24, 1287-1290. (Chem. Soc Abstracts, 1906, i, 136. M...

  17. Impes modeling of volumetric dry gas reservoirs with mobile water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forghany, Saeed

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    . For abnormally or geopressured reservoirs, pressure gradients often approach values equal to the overburden pressure gradient (i.e., ~1.0 psi/ft). 8, 9 Among these types of dry gas reservoirs, in this study we will focus on volumetric reservoir. 1... properties of a given reservoir?s gas and water can handle pressures starting from standard conditions up to 4,000 psi and the units for this table are tabulated in Table 3.1. Table 3.1- Units for the PVT properties used in the input file Pressure...

  18. Evaluation of mixing characteristics of corn dry masa flours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lobeira Massu, Rodrigo

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by loyd . Roon (Chair of Com ' ee) Ronald L. Richter (Member) Ralph D. Waniska (Member) ert Almeida-Dominguez (Member) ry Acu (Chair, Food Science and Technology Faculty) E. C. A. Rung (Head... of the embryonic axis and the scutellum which functions as a nutritive organ for the embryo. The germ makes up 10-12% of the kernel dry weight. About 85'/o of the lipids in corn are in the germ which has a lipid concentration of 30-38'%%d . Mos t lipid sar e fre...

  19. Dried Citrus Pulp in Beef Cattle Fattening Rations.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, J. M. (John McKInley)

    1942-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    occurred in the milk during the feeding trials in question. They also observed that Florida dairymen have fed a considerable quantity of fresh citrus pulp to dairy cows and heifers and that the fermenting product tended to impart a slight flavor...- T 1 I I TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR College Station, Texas BULLETIS NO. 613 JULY 1949 DRIED CITRUS PULP IN BEEF CATTLE FATTENING RATIONS J. H. JONES, R. A. HALL E. 31. NEAL, J. H. JONES Division of Range...

  20. Dry, reconstituted, and early harvested sorghum grain for finishing cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parrett, Ned Albert

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    upon a number of, factors such as diameter& length and revolving speed of the auger. A steady flow of dry grain and water must be maintained into the mixing auger in order to obtain proper and uniform water application. For a given installation... commenced. Reconstituting was accomplish . d by making use of a 70-foot auger conveyor, nine inches in diameter (Figure li. Water was added by metering into a one inch line located above the auger. Grain flow rate was regulated by use of a variable...

  1. Saving for dry days: Aquifer storage and recovery may help

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    underground storage (MUS) of recoverable water. The Committee on Sustainable Underground Storage of Recoverable Water uses MUS ?to denote purposeful recharge of water into an aquifer system for intended recovery and use as an element of long-term water...tx H2O | pg. 2 Saving for dry days Story by Kathy Wythe tx H2O | pg. 3 Aquifer storage and recovery may help With reoccurring droughts and growing population, Texas will always be looking for better ways to save or use water. Some water...

  2. Tenderness, flavor, and yield assessments of dry-aged beef

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laster, Megan Ann

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    , vacuum packaged, and imediately frozen. These steaks served as the baseline for tendernes and flavor asesments. The remaining subprimals (n=288) (6 replications x 2 grade groups x 3 subprimals x 4 aging periods x 2 aging treatments) were randomly 7... and reweighed (out of bag weight). In order for a purge loss value to be calculated, vacuum package bags then were washed, dried, and weighed. Using the band saw, ribeye rolls were cut into 2.54 cm-thick Bef Ribeye Steaks Lip-On BI (U.P.C. #1197) (refered...

  3. Probability analysis of dry-day sequences in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milne, Robert James

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the manuscript. I also appreciate the help oi Mr. Robert Orton, Texas State Climatolo- gist, during the initial planning of this research, and to Miss Carolyn Hugo, who patiently typed the manuscript. My deepest gratitude is due my wife, DeLane, and son, Robb... was d t Number of years of record and P(D /D ) Number of ears that the t th and t-1 th da s were dr t t-1 Number of years that the (t-1)th day was dry Statistical analysis has been used for a number of years to de- scribe the occurrence...

  4. U.S. Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSS A-Zandofpoint motional%^602SWPAChargeDry

  5. U.S. Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSS A-Zandofpoint motional%^602SWPAChargeDryArea:

  6. Alaska--Onshore Natural Gas Dry Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion CubicPotentialNov-14 Dec-14 Jan-1538,469 39,194 39,008Dry

  7. Arkansas Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion CubicPotentialNov-14Sales (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Dry

  8. Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves Adjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (MillionAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry

  9. Utah Dry Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan FebIncreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Dry Natural

  10. Utah Dry Natural Gas Reserves Sales (Billion Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan FebIncreases (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Dry

  11. Nevada Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYearWithdrawals (MillionYear Jan(Dollars perfromDry

  12. Dry Lake II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision| Open EnergyProjectDraper, Utah: Energy(Webinar) |Dry

  13. Jan 28 Primary Productivity: Controls, Patterns, Consequences Yucatan, Mexico, Dry Subtropical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    coming around to better integrate energy flow into thinking on population and community ecology History Central Surinam Reserve, Wet Tropical Grand Teton NP, Wyoming, Temperate Coniferous #12;Primary

  14. Role of ruminal and oropharyngeal signals in the control of food intake by dry cows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    was performed with timothy grass hay and a second one with lucerne hay. Lucerne hay is known to be more

  15. Tungsten silicide and tungsten polycide anisotropic dry etch process for highly controlled dimensions and profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bashir, Rashid

    dimensions and profiles R. Bashir,a),b) A. E. Kabir,b) F. Hebert,c) and C. Brackenb) National Semiconductors. In many applications a spacer needs to be formed on the polycide sidewall Fig. 1 . Undesirable undercutting can re- sult in nonideal spacer formation for further device fabrica- tion. Tungsten silicide

  16. randy Davis, an MPH Bstudent in the Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nurse Anesthesia Program at the LSUHSC School of Nursing has been approved by the Council on Accreditation of Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs (COA). The Nurse Anesthesia program at LSUHSC's nursing Anesthesia program approved See Nursing, page 2 Brandy Davis & Carol Solomon Dr. Melinda Sothern #12;2 Dr

  17. MASTER OF PUBLIC HEALTH (MPH) www.usask.ca/sph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peak, Derek

    and Reform · PUBH 864 ­ Health Care Ethics and Law · PUBH 898 ­ Special Topics: Health Economics · PUBH 898 Protection · PUBH 808 ­ Introduction to Health Care Management · PUBH 809 ­ Field Epidemiology · PUBH 832 in Addictions · PUBH 852 ­ Canada's Health Care Systems · PUBH 853 ­ Seminar in Health Care Organizational

  18. THE COMBINED DMD/MPH PROGRAM AT TUFTS UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennett, Daniel

    : When I was a new dentist, I started out in a public health hospital. I provided care to a population of people. On the job: My job touches both public health and management: public health in that the ADA's purpose includes improving the public's oral health, and management in that I convert a strategic plan

  19. Concurrent Single-Executable CCSM with MPH Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Yun; Ding, Chris H.Q.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Journal of High Performance Computing Applications, Vol.19,Journal of High Performance Computing Applications, Vol.19,Journal of High Performance Computing Applications, Vol.19,

  20. Joint Degree Program Giang T. Nguyen, MD, MPH, MSCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushman, Frederic

    ! Physical Activity Programming #12;Medical Director of a Level 3 Patient-Centered Medical Home · Penn Family health is the science and art of protecting and improving the health of communities. · It involves Immunization programs Outbreak investigationsDomestic violence prevention Seat belt design Lead testing

  1. Joint Degree Program Giang T. Nguyen, MD, MPH, MSCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushman, Frederic

    -Centered Medical Home · Penn Family Care · Urban Family Medicine Office · 45 providers, 2 offices · Admissions at 2 health is the science and art of protecting and improving the health of communities. · It involves Outbreak investigationsDomestic violence prevention Seat belt design Lead testing and abatement Cancer

  2. Dry oxidation and fracture of LWR spent fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahn, T.M.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report evaluates the characteristics of oxidation and fracture of light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel in dry air. It also discusses their effects on radionuclide releases in the anticipated high-level waste repository environment. A sphere model may describe diffusion-limited formation of lower oxides, such as U{sub 4}O{sub 9}, in the oxidation of the spent fuel (SF) matrix. Detrimental higher oxides, such as U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, may not form at temperatures below a threshold temperature. The nucleation process suggests that a threshold temperature exists. The calculated results regarding fracture properties of the SF matrix agree with experimental observations. Oxidation and fracture of Zircaloy may not be significant under anticipated conditions. Under saturated or unsaturated aqueous conditions, oxidation of the SF matrix is believed to increase the releases of Pu-(239+240), Am-(241+243), C-14, Tc-99, I-129, and Cs-135. Under dry conditions, I-129 releases are likely to be small, unlike C-14, in lower oxides; Cl-36, Tc-99, I-129, and Cs-135 may be released fast in higher oxides. 79 refs.

  3. The Relation Between Dry Vortex Merger and Tropical Cyclone Genesis over the Atlantic Ocean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Shu-Hua; Liu, Yi-Chin

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A strong, convective African tropical disturbance has a greater chance to develop into a Tropical 23 Depression (TD) if it merges with a shallow, dry vortex (D-vortex) from the north of the African 24 easterly jet (AEJ) after leaving the western coast. Using 11-year reanalysis data we found that the 25 western tip of a vortex strip at northwestern Africa can serve as dry vortices for the D-vortex 26 merger if it shifts southward. Another source of D-vortices is the westward propagating lows 27 along the southern edge of the Saharan air. The D-vortex merger process occurred for 63.5% of 28 tropical cyclones (TCs) or developing systems over the main development region of the Atlantic 29 Ocean, while it occurred for 54% of non-developing systems. TC genesis could be largely 30 controlled by the large-scale environment, but the differences in characteristics of vortices 31 associated with the D-vortex merger between developing and non-developing systems could 32 potentially help determine their destinies; in general, developing systems were dominated by a 33 more intense and moist south vortex, while non-developing systems were dominated by a north 34 vortex which was more intense, drier, and larger in size. Analysis also shows that 74% of intense 35 developing systems were involved with the D-vortex merger process. More attention needs to be 36 paid to the D-vortex merger and the characteristics of those vortices as they can play significant 37 roles or have a strong indication in Atlantic TC genesis.

  4. Integrated Temperature and Humidity Control: A Unique Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shah, D. J.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During hot and humid periods, a comfortable indoor environment can be attained only by controlling both the dry-bulb temperature and the humidity in the space. Conventional thermostats control the ON/OFF status of a cooling plant to maintain only...

  5. Mathematical modelling for the drying method and smoothing drying rate using cubic spline for seaweed Kappaphycus Striatum variety Durian in a solar dryer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M Ali, M. K., E-mail: majidkhankhan@ymail.com, E-mail: eutoco@gmail.com; Ruslan, M. H., E-mail: majidkhankhan@ymail.com, E-mail: eutoco@gmail.com [Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Muthuvalu, M. S., E-mail: sudaram-@yahoo.com, E-mail: jumat@ums.edu.my; Wong, J., E-mail: sudaram-@yahoo.com, E-mail: jumat@ums.edu.my [Unit Penyelidikan Rumpai Laut (UPRL), Sekolah Sains dan Teknologi, Universiti Malaysia Sabah, 88400 Kota Kinabalu, Sabah (Malaysia); Sulaiman, J., E-mail: ysuhaimi@ums.edu.my, E-mail: hafidzruslan@eng.ukm.my; Yasir, S. Md., E-mail: ysuhaimi@ums.edu.my, E-mail: hafidzruslan@eng.ukm.my [Program Matematik dengan Ekonomi, Sekolah Sains dan Teknologi, Universiti Malaysia Sabah, 88400 Kota Kinabalu, Sabah (Malaysia)

    2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The solar drying experiment of seaweed using Green V-Roof Hybrid Solar Drier (GVRHSD) was conducted in Semporna, Sabah under the metrological condition in Malaysia. Drying of sample seaweed in GVRHSD reduced the moisture content from about 93.4% to 8.2% in 4 days at average solar radiation of about 600W/m{sup 2} and mass flow rate about 0.5 kg/s. Generally the plots of drying rate need more smoothing compared moisture content data. Special cares is needed at low drying rates and moisture contents. It is shown the cubic spline (CS) have been found to be effective for moisture-time curves. The idea of this method consists of an approximation of data by a CS regression having first and second derivatives. The analytical differentiation of the spline regression permits the determination of instantaneous rate. The method of minimization of the functional of average risk was used successfully to solve the problem. This method permits to obtain the instantaneous rate to be obtained directly from the experimental data. The drying kinetics was fitted with six published exponential thin layer drying models. The models were fitted using the coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}), and root mean square error (RMSE). The modeling of models using raw data tested with the possible of exponential drying method. The result showed that the model from Two Term was found to be the best models describe the drying behavior. Besides that, the drying rate smoothed using CS shows to be effective method for moisture-time curves good estimators as well as for the missing moisture content data of seaweed Kappaphycus Striatum Variety Durian in Solar Dryer under the condition tested.

  6. On the velocity-strengthening behavior of dry friction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bar-Sinai, Yohai; Brener, Efim A; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The onset of frictional instabilities, e.g. earthquakes nucleation, is intimately related to velocity-weakening friction, in which the frictional resistance of interfaces decreases with increasing slip velocity. While this frictional response has been studied extensively, much less attention has been given to steady-state velocity-strengthening friction, in spite of its importance for various aspects of frictional phenomena such as the propagation speed of interfacial rupture fronts and the amount of stored energy released by them. In this note we suggest that a crossover from steady-state velocity-weakening friction at small slip velocities to steady-state velocity-strengthening friction at higher velocities might be a generic feature of dry friction. We further argue that while thermally activated rheology naturally gives rise to logarithmic steady-state velocity-strengthening friction, a crossover to stronger-than-logarithmic strengthening might take place at higher slip velocities, possibly accompanied by...

  7. Composition/bandgap selective dry photochemical etching of semiconductor materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashby, C.I.H.; Dishman, J.L.

    1985-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a method of selectively photochemically dry etching a first semiconductor material of a given composition and direct bandgap Eg/sub 1/ in the presence of a second semiconductor material of a different composition and direct bandgap Eg/sub 2/, wherein Eg/sub 2/ > Eg/sub 1/, said second semiconductor material substantially not being etched during said method. The method comprises subjecting both materials to the same photon flux and to the same gaseous etchant under conditions where said etchant would be ineffective for chemical etching of either material were the photons not present, said photons being of an energy greater than Eg/sub 1/ but less than Eg/sub 2/, whereby said first semiconductor material is photochemically etched and said second material is substantially not etched.

  8. Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry Regenerable Sorbents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Nelson; David Green; Paul Box; Raghubir Gupta; Gennar Henningsen

    2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Regenerable sorbents based on sodium carbonate (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) can be used to separate carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal-fired power plant flue gas. Upon thermal regeneration and condensation of water vapor, CO{sub 2} is released in a concentrated form that is suitable for reuse or sequestration. During the research project described in this report, the technical feasibility and economic viability of a thermal-swing CO{sub 2} separation process based on dry, regenerable, carbonate sorbents was confirmed. This process was designated as RTI's Dry Carbonate Process. RTI tested the Dry Carbonate Process through various research phases including thermogravimetric analysis (TGA); bench-scale fixed-bed, bench-scale fluidized-bed, bench-scale co-current downflow reactor testing; pilot-scale entrained-bed testing; and bench-scale demonstration testing with actual coal-fired flue gas. All phases of testing showed the feasibility of the process to capture greater than 90% of the CO{sub 2} present in coal-fired flue gas. Attrition-resistant sorbents were developed, and these sorbents were found to retain their CO{sub 2} removal activity through multiple cycles of adsorption and regeneration. The sodium carbonate-based sorbents developed by RTI react with CO{sub 2} and water vapor at temperatures below 80 C to form sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) and/or Wegscheider's salt. This reaction is reversed at temperatures greater than 120 C to release an equimolar mixture of CO{sub 2} and water vapor. After condensation of the water, a pure CO{sub 2} stream can be obtained. TGA testing showed that the Na{sub 2}CO3 sorbents react irreversibly with sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and hydrogen chloride (HCl) (at the operating conditions for this process). Trace levels of these contaminants are expected to be present in desulfurized flue gas. The sorbents did not collect detectable quantities of mercury (Hg). A process was designed for the Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-based sorbent that includes a co-current downflow reactor system for adsorption of CO{sub 2} and a steam-heated, hollow-screw conveyor system for regeneration of the sorbent and release of a concentrated CO{sub 2} gas stream. An economic analysis of this process (based on the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory's [DOE/NETL's] 'Carbon Capture and Sequestration Systems Analysis Guidelines') was carried out. RTI's economic analyses indicate that installation of the Dry Carbonate Process in a 500 MW{sub e} (nominal) power plant could achieve 90% CO{sub 2} removal with an incremental capital cost of about $69 million and an increase in the cost of electricity (COE) of about 1.95 cents per kWh. This represents an increase of roughly 35.4% in the estimated COE - which compares very favorable versus MEA's COE increase of 58%. Both the incremental capital cost and the incremental COE were projected to be less than the comparable costs for an equally efficient CO{sub 2} removal system based on monoethanolamine (MEA).

  9. CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Raghubir P. Gupta; Alejandro Lopez-Ortiz; Douglas P. Harrison; Ya Liang

    2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrobalance studies of calcination and carbonation of sodium bicarbonate materials were conducted at Louisiana State University. Calcination in an inert atmosphere was rapid and complete at 120 C. Carbonation was temperature dependent, and both the initial rate and the extent of reaction were found to decrease as temperature was increased between 60 and 80 C. A fluidization test apparatus was constructed at RTI and two sodium bicarbonate materials were fluidized in dry nitrogen at 22 C. The bed was completely fluidized at between 9 and 11 in. of water pressure drop. Kinetic rate expression derivations and thermodynamic calculations were conducted at RTI. Based on literature data, a simple reaction rate expression, which is zero order in carbon dioxide and water, was found to provide the best fit against reciprocal temperature. Simulations based on process thermodynamics suggested that approximately 26 percent of the carbon dioxide in flue gas could be recovered using waste heat available at 240 C.

  10. Removal of impurities from dry scrubbed fluoride enriched alumina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuh, L. [ABB Corporate Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Wedde, G. [ABB Environmental, Oslo (Norway)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The pot-gas from an aluminum electrolytic cell is cleaned by a dry scrubbing process using fresh alumina as a scrubbing agent. This alumina is enriched with fluorides and trace impurities in a closed loop system with the pots. The only significant removal of the impurities is due to metal tapping. An improved technique has been developed that is more effective than earlier stripper systems. The impurity-rich fine fraction (< 10 {micro}m) of the enriched alumina is partly attached to the coarser alumina. That attachment has to be broken. Selective impact milling under special moderate conditions and air classifying have shown to be a cost effective process for the removal of impurities. For iron (Fe) and phosphorus (P) about 30--70% can be removed by the separation of 0.5--1% of the alumina. Full scale tests have successfully confirmed these results.

  11. On the chemical composition of Titan's dry lakebed evaporites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cordier, Daniel; Ferreira, Abel

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Titan, the main satellite of Saturn, has an active cycle of methane in its troposphere. Among other evidence for a mechanism of evaporation at work on the ground, dry lakebeds have been discovered. Recent Cassini infrared observations of these empty lakes have revealed a surface composition poor in water ice compared to that of the surrounding terrains --- suggesting the existence of organic evaporites deposits. The chemical composition of these possible evaporites is unknown. In this paper, we study evaporite composition using a model that treats both organic solids dissolution and solvent evaporation. Our results suggest the possibility of large abundances of butane and acetylene in the lake evaporites. However, due to uncertainties of the employed theory, these determinations have to be confirmed by laboratory experiments.

  12. Physical stability of spray dried solid dispersions of amorphous tolfenamic acid and polyvinylpyrolidone K30

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thybo, Pia

    2006-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Droplet-Gas Contact mixing and flow pattern Drying of Droplets moisture / volatiles evaporation (~ 10 sec.) Product Recovery separation of particles from the gas GPEN October 2006 Side 8 Pia Thybo The Danish University of Pharmaceutical Sciences... Formation of surface GPEN October 2006 Side 11 Pia Thybo The Danish University of Pharmaceutical Sciences Schematic picture of spray drying process Feed Heater 2 fluid nozzle Feed flow Nozzle gas flow Drying chamber Cyclone Collection vessel Bag filter...

  13. Data on production and use of DRI: World and U. S. [Direct Reduced Iron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, H.B.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper will present data on the production and use direct-reduced iron (DRI) worldwide, focusing primarily on its use in the United States. The author is indebted to the Midrex Corporation for the data on world production of DRI. The U.S. data is his own and he will explain later how it was collected. He uses the term DRI to include all forms of direct-reduced iron, whether briquettes, pellets or lump.

  14. The effect of maturation on the quality of freeze-dried compressed carrots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennet, Richard Guy

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    agents allowing the vegetative cell walls to be compressed without serious fragmentation. Three techniques have been used to effectively plasticize freeze-dried foods to moisture levels from 5/o 20$ (Lamps 1967)t 1. Spraying the freeze-dried product...THE EFFECT OF MATURATION ON THE QUALITY OF FREEZE-DRIED COMPRESSED CARROTS A Thesis by RICHARD GUY BENNET Approved as to style and content bye Charm Committee Head of Department ember Member August 1976 ABSTRACT The Effect Of Maturation...

  15. Land application uses for dry FGD by-products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigham, J.; Dick, W.; Forster, L.; Hitzhusen, F.; McCoy, E.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)); Haefner, R. (Geological Survey, Columbus, OH (United States). Water Resources Div.)

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1990 amendments to the Clean Air Act have spurred the development of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes, several of which produce a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction products containing sulfates and sulfites, and coal fly ash. Presently FGD by-product materials are treated as solid wastes and must be landfilled. However, landfill sites are becoming more scarce and tipping fees are constantly increasing. It is, therefore, highly desirable to find beneficial reuses for these materials provided the environmental impacts are minimal and socially acceptable. Phase 1 results of a 4 and 1/2 year study to demonstrate large volume beneficial uses of FGD by-products are reported. The purpose of the Phase 1 portion of the project was to characterize the chemical, physical, mineralogical and engineering properties of the FGD by-product materials obtained from various FGD technologies being developed in the state of Ohio. Phase 1 also involved the collection of baseline economic data related to the beneficial reuse of these FGD materials. A total of 58 samples were collected and analyzed. In summary Phase 1 results revealed that FGD by-product materials are essentially coal fly ash materials diluted with unreacted sorbent and reaction products. High volume beneficial reuses will depend on the economics of their substituting for existing materials for various types of applications (e.g. as an agricultural liming material, soil borrow for highway embankment construction, and reclamation of active and abandoned surface coal mines). Environmental constraints to the beneficial reuse of dry FGD byproduct materials, based on laboratory and leachate studies, seem to be less than for coal fly ash.

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Advanced Drying Process for Lower Manufacturing Cost of Electrodes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Lambda Technologies at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about advanced drying process...

  17. Bibliography of the geological and geophysical aspects of hot dry rock geothermal resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiken, G.; Sayer, S.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the first issue of an annual compilation of references that are useful to the exploration, understanding and development of the hot dry rock geothermal resource.

  18. New quality index based on dry matter and acidity proposed for Hayward kiwifruit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gayle Crisosto, Gayle Crisosto; Hasey, Janine K; Zegbe, Jorge A; Crisosto, Carlos H

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nondestructive internal quality assessment of kiwifruitOur proposed dry matter quality index would segregate outkiwifruit of low con- sumer quality either harvested early

  19. Factors affecting the quality of freeze-dried and compressed spinach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisakowsky, Eugene Edward

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    critical to the preparation of freeze-dried and compressed spinach. REVIEW OF LITERATURE Freeze-Drying Freeze-drying, also designated as sublimation drying or lyphilization, is the removal of water as a vapor from a frozen substance under vaccuum... on the quality of 27 diff- erent raw materials. According to Winton (1935) the average chemical composition of spinach is as follows: water, 91. 3X; protein, 2. 1%; fat, 0. 35; nitrogen free extract, 3. 2/; fiber, 1. 9%; and ash, 2. 15. Giese (1930) found...

  20. Geometry for web microwave heating or drying to a desired profile in a waveguide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Habeger, Jr., Charles C.; Patterson, Timothy F.; Ahrens, Frederick W.

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A microwave heater and/or dryer has a nonlinear or curvilinear relative slot profile geometry. In one embodiment, the microwave dryer has at least one adjustable field modifier making it possible to change the geometry of the heater or dryer when drying different webs. In another embodiment, the microwave dryer provides more uniform drying of a web when the field modifier is adjusted in response to a sensed condition of the web. Finally, a method of microwave heating and/or drying a web achieves a uniform heating and/or drying profile.

  1. Instrumented, Shielded Test Canister System for Evaluation of Spent Nuclear Fuel in Dry Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sindelar, R.L.

    1999-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the development of an instrumented, shielded test canister system to store and monitor aluminum-based spent nuclear duel under dry storage conditions.

  2. Dose Rates for Various Loading Patterns of Spent Fuel Assemblies in a Dry Cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenquin, Urban P. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shielding calculations were performed to assess the impact of loading various combinations of spent fuel on dose rates and fuel temperature in a dry storage cask.

  3. ,"New York Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic...

  4. Development of Diagnostic Rules for a Dry Bulb Economizer Mixed Air Loop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Underwood, D.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    knowledge base for a two fan variable air volume (VAV) air handling unit. Rules for the mixed air loop with a dry bulb economizer are presented....

  5. ,"Texas Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePrice Sold toDryDryDry NaturalCrude Oil + LeaseDry

  6. USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward K. Levy; Hugo Caram; Zheng Yao; Gu Feng

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the fourth Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture, prior to firing in a pulverized coal boiler. A description is given of the equipment, instrumentation and procedures being used for the fluidized bed drying experiments. Experimental data were obtained during this last quarter on the effects of particle size on drying rate for a North Dakota lignite. Other experiments looked at drying a PRB coal. The tests comparing drying rates with lignite particles of different diameters were carried out with particle top sizes from 2 to 9.5 mm and covered a range of air velocities. The results show that drying rate increased with air velocity, but that, within the accuracy of the data, the data for all four particle size distributions follow the same curve. This suggests the higher drying rates associated with the larger particles are due to higher air velocities and not to any inherently different drying rates due to particle size. The drying data with the PRB coal show qualitatively similar behavior to that observed with lignite. However, quantitative comparisons of the drying rate data obtained so far for the two coals show the PRB dried at rates which were 14 to 20 percent lower than the lignite, for comparable process conditions. The equilibrium relationship between relative humidity and coal moisture was refined using a correction for temperature. This reduced the scatter in the coal moisture versus relative humidity data and improved the predictions made with the first principle drying model.

  7. Dream controller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheng, George Shu-Xing; Mulkey, Steven L; Wang, Qiang; Chow, Andrew J

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for intelligently controlling continuous process variables. A Dream Controller comprises an Intelligent Engine mechanism and a number of Model-Free Adaptive (MFA) controllers, each of which is suitable to control a process with specific behaviors. The Intelligent Engine can automatically select the appropriate MFA controller and its parameters so that the Dream Controller can be easily used by people with limited control experience and those who do not have the time to commission, tune, and maintain automatic controllers.

  8. Advanced control strategies for fluidized bed dryers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siettos, C.I.; Kiranoudis, C.T.; Bafas, G.V.

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Generating the best possible control strategy comprises a necessity for industrial processes, by virtue of product quality, cost reduction and design simplicity. Three different control approaches, namely an Input-Output linearizing, a fuzzy logic and a PID controller, are evaluated for the control of a fluidized bed dryer, a typical non-linear drying process of wide applicability. Based on several closed loop characteristics such as settling times, maximum overshoots and dynamic performance criteria such as IAE, ISE and ITAE, it is shown that the Input-Output linearizing and the fuzzy logic controller exhibit a better performance compared to the PID controller tuned optimally with respect to IAE, for a wide range of disturbances; yet, the relevant advantage of the fuzzy logic over the conventional nonlinear controller issues upon its design simplicity. Typical load rejection and set-point tracking examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  9. An efficient scheme on wet/dry transitions for Shallow Water Equations with friction Christophe Berthona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coudière, Yves

    An efficient scheme on wet/dry transitions for Shallow Water Equations with friction Christophe discrepancy between both source terms comes from their relevance in dry regions. Indeed, the friction term the friction source terms in the shallow-water model. Such additional source terms are known to be very stiff

  10. MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF THE DYNAMICS OF DRY-FRICTION-DAMPED STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF THE DYNAMICS OF DRY-FRICTION-DAMPED STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS by Olivier J . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.2.1 Nonlinear methods for the analysis of friction-damped systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 II. HYBRID FREQUENCY-TIME DOMAIN METHODS FOR THE ANALYSIS OF COMPLEX STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS WITH DRY

  11. Digestive efficiency and dry-matter digestibility in Steller sea lions fed herring, pollock, squid, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Digestive efficiency and dry-matter digestibility in Steller sea lions fed herring, pollock, squid, and salmon D.A.S. Rosen and A.W. Trites Abstract: Dry-matter digestibility and energy digestive efficiency-matter digestibility (DMD) and digestive efficiency (DE) were measured using the energy and manganese concentration

  12. Dry Chamber Wall Thermo-Mechanical Behavior and Lifetime under IFE Cyclic Energy Deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    assessment of dry chamber wall based on ion and photon spectra from a new direct-drive target proposed by NRLDry Chamber Wall Thermo-Mechanical Behavior and Lifetime under IFE Cyclic Energy Deposition Lifetime is a key issue for the IFE dry chamber wall configuration. Past studies, such as SOMBRERO

  13. SOLAR UPGRADE OF METHANE USING DRY REFORMING IN DIRECT CONTACT BUBBLE REACTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    process of a solar reformer of dry methane reforming was proposed to operate in a temperature range of 600SOLAR UPGRADE OF METHANE USING DRY REFORMING IN DIRECT CONTACT BUBBLE REACTOR Khalid Al-Ali 1 including lower melting point, thermal and chemical stability, acting simultaneously as heat transport

  14. Stochastic modeling of hourly dry-bulb and wet-bulb temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, D.E.; Woeste, F.E.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A stochastic model of hourly dry-bulb and wet-bulb temperatures was developed. The periodic variations over the course of a year were estimated by least-square approximation. A multisite Markov model was used to simulate the stochastic nature of the data. These two models were combined to simulate years of hourly dry-bulb and wet-bulb temperatures.

  15. agronomie: agriculture and environment Dry matter accumulation and seed yield in faba bean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    agronomie: agriculture and environment Dry matter accumulation and seed yield in faba bean ( Vicia; Fifteen genotypes of spring faba bean, differing in flowering earliness, in growth habit (one determinate = faba bean / genetic variability / dry matter accumulation / yield / yield components / early indicator

  16. 2009 DRY BEAN YIELD TRIALS J.D. Kelly, E. Wright, N. Blakely, and J. Heilig

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 2009 DRY BEAN YIELD TRIALS J.D. Kelly, E. Wright, N. Blakely, and J. Heilig Crop and Soil Sciences The bean breeding program was relocated to a new 250 acre research farm, Saginaw Valley Research in small and medium-sized market classes, the Cooperative Dry Bean, and the Midwest Regional Performance

  17. Ecology and Management of the Western Bean Cutworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in Corn and Dry Beans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    Ecology and Management of the Western Bean Cutworm (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in Corn and Dry Beans Lansing MI 48824. J. Integ. Pest Mngmt. 1(1): 2010; DOI: 10.1603/IPM10003 ABSTRACT. The western bean mainly on corn and dry beans. The historical geographic range of the western bean cutworm covered

  18. CONTENT ANR @ MSU AgBioResearch 1999 DRY BEAN VARIETY CANNING TRIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SKIP TO CONTENT ANR @ MSU AgBioResearch Home Bean Info Beet Info Directions History InfoVideos Links 1999 DRY BEAN VARIETY CANNING TRIALS MICHIGAN DRY BEAN PRODUCTION RESEARCH ADVISORY BOARD Rating 1=poor, 2=fair, 3=good, 4=above average, 5=excellent NAVY LIGHT RED KIDNEY BEANS VARIETY GRATIOT HURON 10

  19. CONTENT ANR @ MSU AgBioResearch 2000 DRY BEAN VARIETY CANNING TRIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SKIP TO CONTENT ANR @ MSU AgBioResearch Home Bean Info Beet Info Directions History InfoVideos Links 2000 DRY BEAN VARIETY CANNING TRIALS MICHIGAN DRY BEAN PRODUCTION RESEARCH ADVISORY BOARD Rating 1=poor, 2=fair, 3=good, 4=above average, 5=excellent NAVY LIGHT RED KIDNEY BEANS VARIETY GRATIOT HURON 10

  20. 2013 DRY BEAN YIELD TRIALS J.D. Kelly, E. Wright, N. Blakely, and J. Heilig

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 2013 DRY BEAN YIELD TRIALS J.D. Kelly, E. Wright, N. Blakely, and J. Heilig Plant, Soil and Microbial Sciences The dry bean breeding program initiated its fifth season on the new 320 acre Saginaw ten years. The drought resulted in overall lower yields but allowed for selection of those bean lines

  1. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility General Service Helium System Design Description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SHAPLEY, B.J.

    2000-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this System Design Description (SDD) is to describe the characteristics of the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility general service helium system. The general service helium system is a general service facility process support system, but does include safety-class structures, systems and components (SSCs) providing protection to the offsite public. The general service helium system also performs safety-significant functions that provide protection to onsite workers. The general helium system essential function is to provide helium (He) to support process functions during all phases of facility operations. General service helium is used to purge the cask and the MCO in order to maintain their internal atmospheres below hydrogen flammability concentrations. The general service helium system also supplies helium to purge the process water conditioning (PWC) lines and components and the vacuum purge system (VPS) vacuum pump. The general service helium system, if available following an Safety Class Instrument and Control System (SCIC) Isolation and Purge (IS0 and PURGE) Trip, can provide an alternate general service helium system source to supply the Safety-Class Helium (SCHe) System.

  2. Method for predicting dry mechanical properties from wet wood and standing trees

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meglen, Robert R.; Kelley, Stephen S.

    2003-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for determining the dry mechanical strength for a green wood comprising: illuminating a surface of the wood to be determined with light between 350-2,500 nm, the wood having a green moisture content; analyzing the surface using a spectrometric method, the method generating a first spectral data, and using a multivariate analysis to predict the dry mechanical strength of green wood when dry by comparing the first spectral data with a calibration model, the calibration model comprising a second spectrometric method of spectral data obtained from a reference wood having a green moisture content, the second spectral data correlated with a known mechanical strength analytical result obtained from a reference wood when dried and having a dry moisture content.

  3. Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry, Regenerable Sorbents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Green; Thomas O. Nelson; Brian S. Turk; Paul D. Box; Andreas Weber; Raghubir P. Gupta

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes research conducted between October 1, 2005, and December 31, 2005, on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from flue gas from coal combustion. A field test was conducted to examine the extent to which RTI's supported sorbent can be regenerated in a heated, hollow screw conveyor. This field test was conducted at the facilities of a screw conveyor manufacturer. The sorbent was essentially completely regenerated during this test, as confirmed by thermal desorption and mass spectroscopy analysis of the regenerated sorbent. Little or no sorbent attrition was observed during 24 passes through the heated screw conveyor system. Three downflow contactor absorption tests were conducted using calcined sodium bicarbonate as the absorbent. Maximum carbon dioxide removals of 57 and 91% from simulated flue gas were observed at near ambient temperatures with water-saturated gas. These tests demonstrated that calcined sodium carbonate is not as effective at removing CO{sub 2} as are supported sorbents containing 10 to 15% sodium carbonate. Delivery of the hollow screw conveyor for the laboratory-scale sorbent regeneration system was delayed; however, construction of other components of this system continued during the quarter.

  4. On the velocity-strengthening behavior of dry friction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yohai Bar-Sinai; Robert Spatschek; Efim A. Brener; Eran Bouchbinder

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The onset of frictional instabilities, e.g. earthquakes nucleation, is intimately related to velocity-weakening friction, in which the frictional resistance of interfaces decreases with increasing slip velocity. While this frictional response has been studied extensively, less attention has been given to steady-state velocity-strengthening friction, in spite of its potential importance for various aspects of frictional phenomena such as the propagation speed of interfacial rupture fronts and the amount of stored energy released by them. In this note we suggest that a crossover from steady-state velocity-weakening friction at small slip velocities to steady-state velocity-strengthening friction at higher velocities might be a generic feature of dry friction. We further argue that while thermally activated rheology naturally gives rise to logarithmic steady-state velocity-strengthening friction, a crossover to stronger-than-logarithmic strengthening might take place at higher slip velocities, possibly accompanied by a change in the dominant dissipation mechanism. We sketch a few physical mechanisms that may account for the crossover to stronger-than-logarithmic steady-state velocity-strengthening and compile a rather extensive set of experimental data available in the literature, lending support to these ideas.

  5. WIPP Remote Handled Waste Facility: Performance Dry Run Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burrington, T. P.; Britain, R. M.; Cassingham, S. T.

    2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Remote Handled (RH) TRU Waste Handling Facility at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was recently upgraded and modified in preparation for handling and disposal of RH Transuranic (TRU) waste. This modification will allow processing of RH-TRU waste arriving at the WIPP site in two different types of shielded road casks, the RH-TRU 72B and the CNS 10-160B. Washington TRU Solutions (WTS), the WIPP Management and Operation Contractor (MOC), conducted a performance dry run (PDR), beginning August 19, 2002 and successfully completed it on August 24, 2002. The PDR demonstrated that the RHTRU waste handling system works as designed and demonstrated the handling process for each cask, including underground disposal. The purpose of the PDR was to develop and implement a plan that would define in general terms how the WIPP RH-TRU waste handling process would be conducted and evaluated. The PDR demonstrated WIPP operations and support activities required to dispose of RH-TRU waste in the WIPP underground.

  6. Prospects for hot dry rock in the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, M.E.; Murphy, H.D.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy program is a renewable energy program that can contribute significantly to the nation's balanced and diversified energy mix. The program was reviewed five times in the past three years. Three of these reviews were done by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and a fourth was conducted by the National Research Council at the request of DOE. In addition, HDR was evaluated in the Energy Research Advisory Board's Solid Earth Sciences Report. Recent economic studies for HDR have been performed by Bechtel National, Inc., the Electric Power Research Institute, and the United Kingdom. These studies are reviewed in light of recent progress at Fenton Hill in reducing drilling costs, and mapping and in identifying drilling targets. All of the attention focused on HDR has resulted in evaluating the way in which HDR fits within the nation's energy mix and in estimating when HDR will contribute to energy security. To establish a framework for evaluating the future of HDR, the status and progress of HDR are reviewed and the remaining Fenton Hill program is outlined. Recommendations are also made for follow-on activities that will lead to achieving full development of HDR technologies in the appropriate time frame.

  7. Oven rack having integral lubricious, dry porcelain surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ambrose, Jeffrey A; Mackiewicz-Ludtka, Gail; Sikka, Vinod K; Qu, Jun

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A lubricious glass-coated metal cooking article capable of withstanding repeated heating and cooling between room temperature and at least 500.degree. F. without chipping or cracking the glass coating, wherein the glass coating includes about 0.1 to about 20% by weight of a homogeneously distributed dry refractory lubricant material having a particle size less than about 200 .mu.m. The lubricant material is selected from the group consisting of carbon; graphite; boron nitride; cubic boron nitride; molybdenum (FV) sulfide; molybdenum sulfide; molybdenum (IV) selenide; molybdenum selenide, tungsten (IV) sulfide; tungsten disulfide; tungsten sulfide; silicon nitride (Si.sub.3N.sub.4); TiN; TiC; TiCN; TiO.sub.2; TiAlN; CrN; SiC; diamond-like carbon; tungsten carbide (WC); zirconium oxide (ZrO.sub.2); zirconium oxide and 0.1 to 40 weight % aluminum oxide; alumina-zirconia; antimony; antimony oxide; antimony trioxide; and mixtures thereof.

  8. Atmospheric particulate emissions from dry abrasive blasting using coal slag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhaskar Kura; Kalpalatha Kambham; Sivaramakrishnan Sangameswaran; Sandhya Potana [University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA (United States). Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal slag is one of the widely used abrasives in dry abrasive blasting. Atmospheric emissions from this process include particulate matter (PM) and heavy metals, such as chromium, lead, manganese, nickel. Quantities and characteristics of PM emissions depend on abrasive characteristics and process parameters. Emission factors are key inputs to estimate emissions. Experiments were conducted to study the effect of blast pressure, abrasive feed rate, and initial surface contamination on total PM (TPM) emission factors for coal slag. Rusted and painted mild steel surfaces were used as base plates. Blasting was carried out in an enclosed chamber, and PM was collected from an exhaust duct using U.S. Environment Protection Agency source sampling methods for stationary sources. Results showed that there is significant effect of blast pressure, feed rate, and surface contamination on TPM emissions. Mathematical equations were developed to estimate emission factors in terms of mass of emissions per unit mass of abrasive used, as well as mass of emissions per unit of surface area cleaned. These equations will help industries in estimating PM emissions based on blast pressure and abrasive feed rate. In addition, emissions can be reduced by choosing optimum operating conditions. 40 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Recent VOC Control Test Data for a Reactive VOC Converter- Scrubber System for Non-Thermal Control of VOCs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinness, M.

    by their very nature represent a reduced fire hazard compared to dry filter booth systems. NFPA (National Fire Protection Agency) fire safety codes require the use of fire suppression automatic sprinklers on dry filter booths but not on water wash booths...Recent VOC Control Test Data for a Reactive VOC Converter Scrubber System for Non-Thermal Control of VOCs Mike McGinness VP-R&D EcoShield Environmental Systems, Inc. Houston, Texas ABSTRACT HAP (Hazardous Air Pollutant) and VOC (Volatile...

  10. AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Behavior of Phosphorus in DRI/HBI During Electric Furnace Steelmaking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard J. Frueham; Christopher P. Manning cmanning@bu.edu

    2001-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Many common scrap substitutes such as direct reduced iron pellets (DRI), hot briquetted iron (HBI), iron carbide, etc., contain significantly higher levels of phosphorus steelmaking for the production of higher quality steels, control of phosphorus levels in the metal will become a concern. This study has developed a more complete understanding of the behavior of phosphorus in DRI during EAF steelmaking, through a thorough investigation of the kinetics and thermodynamics of phosphorus transfer in the EAF based upon laboratory and plant experiments and trials. Laboratory experiments have shown that phosphorus mass transfer between oxide and metallic phases within commercial direct reduced iron pellets occurs rapidly upon melting according to the local equilibrium for these phases. Laboratory kinetic experiments indicate that under certain conditions, phosphorus mass transfer between slag and metal is influenced by dynamic phenomena, which affect the mass transfer coefficient for the reaction and/or the slag metal interfacial area. Plant trials were conducted to directly evaluate the conditions of mass transfer in the electric furnace and to determine the effects of different scrap substitute materials upon the slag chemistry, the behavior of phosphorus in the steel, and upon furnace yield. The data from these trials were also used to develop empirical models for the slag chemistry and furnace temperature as functions of time during a single heat. The laboratory and plant data were used to develop a numerical process model to describe phosphorus transfer in the EAF

  11. Pulmonary function and symptoms of Nigerian workers exposed to carbon black in dry cell battery and tire factories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oleru, U.G.; Elegbeleye, O.O.; Enu, C.C.; Olumide, Y.M.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The pulmonary function and symptoms of 125 workers exposed to carbon black in dry cell battery and tire manufacturing plants were investigated. There was no significant difference in the pulmonary function of the subjects in the two plants. There was good agreement in the symptoms reported in the two different factories: cough with phlegm production, tiredness, chest pain, catarrh, headache, and skin irritation. The symptoms also corroborate those reported in the few studies on the pulmonary effects of carbon black. The suspended particulate levels in the dry cell battery plant ranged from 25 to 34 mg/m/sup 3/ and the subjects with the highest probable exposure level had the most impaired pulmonary function. The pulmonary function of the exposed subjects was significantly lower than that of a control, nonindustrially exposed population. The drop in the lung function from the expected value per year of age was relatively constant for all the study subgroups but the drop per year of duration of employment was more severe in the earlier years of employment. This study has underscored the need for occupational health regulations in the industries of developing countries.

  12. Impact of solvents and supercritical CO{sub 2} drying on the morphology and structure of polymer-based biofilms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Causa, Andrea; Acierno, Domenico; Filippone, Giovanni [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, dei Materiali e della Produzione Industriale, Università di Napoli Federico II, Piazzale V. Tecchio, 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Salerno, Aurelio; Domingo, Concepción [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Barcelona (ICMAB-CSIC), Campus de la UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present work, two-dimensional systems based on biodegradable polymers such as poly(?-caprolactone) (PCL), poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and polylactic acid (PLA) are fabricated by means of a sustainable approach which consists in inducing phase separation in solutions of such polymers and “green” solvents, namely ethyl lactate (EL) and ethyl acetate (EA). The extraction of the solvent is promoted by a controlled drying process, which is performed in either air or supercritical CO{sub 2}. The latter can indeed act as both an antisolvent, which favors the deposition of the polymer by forming a mixture with EL and EA, and a plasticizing agent, whose solvation and transport properties may considerably affect the microstructure and crystallinity of the polymer films. The morphological, topographical and crystalline properties of the films are tailored through a judicial selection of the materials and the processing conditions and assessed by means of thermal analyses, polarized optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and confocal interferometric microscopy. The results show that the morphological and crystalline properties of the films are strongly dependent on the choice of both the polymer/solvent system and the operating conditions during the drying step. In particular, the morphological, topographical and thermal properties of films prepared starting from highly crystalline polymers, namely PCL and PEO, are greatly affected by the crystallization of the material. Conversely, the less crystalline PLA forms almost completely amorphous films.

  13. Hot dry rock geothermal energy. Draft final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This second EPRI workshop on hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy, held in May 1994, focused on the status of worldwide HDR research and development and used that status review as the starting point for discussions of what could and should be done next: by U.S. federal government, by U.S. industry, by U.S. state governments, and by international organizations or through international agreements. The papers presented and the discussion that took place indicate that there is a community of researchers and industrial partners that could join forces, with government support, to begin a new effort on hot dry rock geothermal development. This new heat mining effort would start with site selection and confirmatory studies, done concurrently. The confirmatory studies would test past evaluations against the most current results (from the U.S. site at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, and from the two sites in Japan, the one in Russia, and the two in western Europe) and the best models of relevant physical and economic aspects. Site selection would be done in the light of the confirmatory studies and would be influenced by the need to find a site where success is probable and which is representative enough of other sites so that its success would imply good prospects for success at numerous other sites. The test of success would be circulation between a pair of wells, or more wells, in a way that confirmed, with the help of flow modeling, that a multi-well system would yield temperatures, flows and lifetimes that support economically feasible power generation. The flow modeling would have to have previously achieved its own confirmation from relevant data taken from both heat mining and conventional hydrothermal geothermal experience. There may be very relevant experience from the enhancement of ''hot wet rock'' sites, i.e., sites where hydrothermal reservoirs lack, or have come to lack, enough natural water or steam and are helped by water injected cold and produced hot. The new site would have to be selected in parallel with the confirmatory studies because it would have to be modeled as part of the studies and because its similarity to other candidate sites must be known well enough to assure that results at the selected site are relevant to many others. Also, the industry partners in the joint effort at the new site must be part of the confirmatory studies, because they must be convinced of the economic feasibility. This meeting may have brought together the core of people who can make such a joint effort take place. EPRI sponsored the organization of this meeting in order to provide utilities with an update on the prospects for power generation via heat mining. Although the emerging rules for electric utilities competing in power generation make it very unlikely that the rate-payers of any one utility (or small group of utilities) can pay the differential to support this new heat mining research and development effort, the community represented at this meeting may be able to make the case for national or international support of a new heat mining effort, based on the potential size and economics of this resource as a benefit for the nation as a whole and as a contribution to reduced emissions of fossil CO{sub 2} worldwide.

  14. soluble fish proteins obtained by enzymatic treatment of fresh fish offals dried according to the Hatmaker or Spray methods. Six artificial milks were made by dry pelleting of either cow skim-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    to the Hatmaker or Spray methods. Six artificial milks were made by dry pelleting of either cow skim- milk powder

  15. High Efficiency Liquid-Desiccant Regenerator for Air Conditioning and Industrial Drying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew Lowenstein

    2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Over 2 quads of fossil fuels are used each year for moisture removal. This includes industrial and agricultural processes where feedstocks and final products must be dried, as well as comfort conditioning of indoor spaces where the control of humidity is essential to maintaining healthy, productive and comfortable working conditions. Desiccants, materials that have a high affinity for water vapor, can greatly reduce energy use for both drying and dehumidification. An opportunity exists to greatly improve the competitiveness of advanced liquid-desiccant systems by increasing the efficiency of their regenerators. It is common practice within the chemical process industry to use multiple stage boilers to improve the efficiency of thermal separation processes. The energy needed to regenerate a liquid desiccant, which is a thermal separation process, can also be reduced by using a multiple stage boiler. In this project, a two-stage regenerator was developed in which the first stage is a boiler and the second stage is a scavenging-air regenerator. The only energy input to this regenerator is the natural gas that fires the boiler. The steam produced in the boiler provides the thermal energy to run the second-stage scavenging-air regenerator. This two-stage regenerator is referred to as a 1?-effect regenerator. A model of the high-temperature stage of a 1?-effect regenerator for liquid desiccants was designed, built and successfully tested. At nominal operating conditions (i.e., 2.35 gpm of 36% lithium chloride solution, 307,000 Btu/h firing rate), the boiler removed 153 lb/h of water from the desiccant at a gas-based efficiency of 52.9 % (which corresponds to a COP of 0.95 when a scavenging-air regenerator is added). The steam leaving the boiler, when condensed, had a solids concentration of less than 10 ppm. This low level of solids in the condensate places an upper bound of about 6 lb per year for desiccant loss from the regenerator. This low loss will not create maintenance problems nor will it significantly increase operating expenses. An energy balance on the boiler showed that heat loss through the insulated jacket was 10%. This value is much higher than the 2% to 5% that is typical of most boilers and indicates a need to better insulate the unit. With insulation that brings jacket losses down to 5%, a 1?-effect regenerator that uses this boiler as its high-temperature stage will have a gas-based COP of 1.05. The estimated cost to manufacture a 300-lb/h, 1?-effect regenerator at 500 units per year is $17,140. Unfortunately, the very high cost for natural gas that now prevails in the U.S. makes it very difficult for a gas-fired LDAC to compete against an electric vapor-compression air conditioner in HVAC applications. However, there are important industrial markets that need very dry air where the high price of natural gas will encourage the sale of a LDAC with the 1?-effect regenerator since in these markets it competes against less efficient gas-fired desiccant technologies. A manufacturer of industrial dehumidification equipment is now negotiating a sales agreement with us that would include the 1?-effect regenerator.

  16. Lead and other metals in dried fish from Nigerian markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okoye, C.O.B. (Univ. of Nigeria, Nsukka (Nigeria))

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nigerian economy had remarkable industrial growth between 1970 and 1980 and industrialization and urbanization have been sustained albeit at a slower rate. Nevertheless, waste management remains grossly underdeveloped. Environmental concern is only a recent phenomenon, resulting thus far in the launching of a monthly clean-up campaign in 1984 and the establishment of the Federal Environmental Protection Agency (FEPA) in 1988. The level of public awareness has not been encouraging. The indiscriminate discharge of largely untreated factory and urban effluents has continued. Streets and home surroundings become littered soon after clean-up exercises. Inadequate facilities contribute to the unwholesome situation. Refuse collecting centers are mostly without any holding containers, and solid wastes, the focus of the monthly clean-up, are left on the bare ground. Heavy automobile traffic and high lead content of the local automobile fuels have not helped matters. Heavy metals in the human environment are of global concern. In developed countries, limits of concentrations in fish and other foods have been set to safeguard public health, but Nigeria has yet to set any standards because of lack of baseline data. Within the last decade, scientists have been reporting on heavy metal levels in fish from the aquatic environment of Nigeria. Among the metals, lead was the most prominent, with a mean value comparable to the set limits in Great Britain and New Zealand. The present study was aimed at further establishing the levels of contamination in fish by lead and other metals in the Nigerian aquatic systems. Smoke-dried fish, being the most consumed by the local population, was chosen for the survey on the levels of cadmium, cobalt, copper, chromium, iron, manganese, lead and zinc. Possible surface contamination arising from observed poor handling practices was also investigated. 18 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  17. Hot Dry Rock energy annual report fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winchester, W.W. [ed.; Duchane, D.V.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hot Dry Rock technology took a giant leap forward this year as the long-awaited long-term flow test (LTFT) of the Phase 2 HDR reservoir at Fenton Hill got underway. Energy was produced on a twenty-four hour a day basis for a continuous period of nearly four months of steady-state testing. Hot water was brought to the surface at 90--100 gallons per minute (gpm) with temperatures of 180{degrees}C (356{degrees}F) and higher. During that time, the HDR plant achieved an on-line record of 98.8%. Surface temperature measurements and temperature logging deep within the wellbore confirmed that no decline in the average temperature of fluid produced from the reservoir occurred. Tracer experiments indicated that flow paths within the reservoir were undergoing continuous change during the test. Remarkably, it appeared that longer flow paths carried a larger proportion of the flow as the test proceeded, while more direct fluid pathways disappeared or carried a significantly reduced flow. In sum, access to hot rock appeared to improve over the span of the test. Water losses during the test averaged 10--12% and showed a slow long-term decline. These results confirmed what had been previously discovered in static pressurization testing: Water consumption declines significantly during extended operation of an HDR reservoir. In combination with a recent demonstration by the Japanese that water losses can be greatly reduced by the proper placement of multiple production wells, the recent results at Fenton Hill have effectively demonstrated that excessive water consumption should not be an issue for a properly engineered HDR facility at a well chosen site.

  18. Hot Dry Rock energy annual report fiscal year 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duchane, D.V.; Winchester, W.W.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hot Dry Rock technology took a giant leap forward this year as the long-awaited long-term flow test (LTFT) of the Phase II HDR reservoir at Fenton Hill got underway. Energy was produced on a twenty-four hour a day basis for a continuous period of nearly four months of steady-state testing. Hot water was brought to the surface at 90-100 gallons per minute (gpm) with temperatures of 180[degrees]C (356[degrees]F) and higher. During that time, the HDR plant achieved an on-line record of 98.8%. Surface temperature measurements and temperature logging deep within the wellbore confirmed that no decline in the average temperature of fluid produced from the reservoir occurred. Tracer experiments indicated that flow paths within the reservoir were undergoing continuous change during the test. Remarkably, it appeared that longer flow paths carried a larger proportion of the flow as the test proceeded, while more direct fluid pathways disappeared or carried a significantly reduced flow. In sum, access to hot rock appeared to improve over the span of the test. Water losses during the test averaged 10-12% and showed a slow long-term decline. These results confirmed what had been previously discovered in static pressurization testing: Water consumption declines significantly during extended operation of an HDR reservoir. In combination with a recent demonstration by the Japanese that water losses can be greatly reduced by the proper placement of multiple production wells, the recent results at Fenton Hill have effectively demonstrated that excessive water consumption should not be an issue for a properly engineered HDR facility at a well chosen site.

  19. Process and composition for drying of gaseous hydrogen halides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tom, Glenn M. (New Milford, CT); Brown, Duncan W. (Wilton, CT)

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for drying a gaseous hydrogen halide of the formula HX, wherein X is selected from the group consisting of bromine, chlorine, fluorine, and iodine, to remove water impurity therefrom, comprising: contacting the water impurity-containing gaseous hydrogen halide with a scavenger including a support having associated therewith one or more members of the group consisting of: (a) an active scavenging moiety selected from one or more members of the group consisting of: (i) metal halide compounds dispersed in the support, of the formula MX.sub.y ; and (ii) metal halide pendant functional groups of the formula -MX.sub.y-1 covalently bonded to the support, wherein M is a y-valent metal, and y is an integer whose value is from 1 to 3; (b) corresponding partially or fully alkylated compounds and/or pendant functional groups, of the metal halide compounds and/or pendant functional groups of (a); wherein the alkylated compounds and/or pendant functional groups, when present, are reactive with the gaseous hydrogen halide to form the corresponding halide compounds and/or pendant functional groups of (a); and M being selected such that the heat of formation, .DELTA.H.sub.f of its hydrated halide, MX.sub.y.(H.sub.2 O).sub.n, is governed by the relationship: .DELTA.H.sub.f .gtoreq.n.times.10.1 kilocalories/mole of such hydrated halide compound wherein n is the number of water molecules bound to the metal halide in the metal halide hydrate. Also disclosed is an appertaining scavenger composition and a contacting apparatus wherein the scavenger is deployed in a bed for contacting with the water impurity-containing gaseous hydrogen halide.

  20. Design of a dry sump lubrication system for a Honda® CBR 600 F4i engine for Formula SAE applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farkhondeh, Ehsan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dry sump lubrication system for a Formula SAE race car was designed and manufactured in order to gain the various advantages this type of system affords. A dry sump system stores oil in an external tank and pumps it ...

  1. Doping suppression and mobility enhancement of graphene transistors fabricated using an adhesion promoting dry transfer process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheol Shin, Woo; Hun Mun, Jeong; Yong Kim, Taek; Choi, Sung-Yool; Jin Cho, Byung, E-mail: bjcho@kaist.edu, E-mail: tskim1@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Electrical Engineering, Graphene Research Center, KAIST, 373-1 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Taeshik; Kim, Taek-Soo, E-mail: bjcho@kaist.edu, E-mail: tskim1@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Graphene Research Center, KAIST, 373-1 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Graphene Research Center, KAIST, 373-1 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the facile dry transfer of graphene synthesized via chemical vapor deposition on copper film to a functional device substrate. High quality uniform dry transfer of graphene to oxidized silicon substrate was achieved by exploiting the beneficial features of a poly(4-vinylphenol) adhesive layer involving a strong adhesion energy to graphene and negligible influence on the electronic and structural properties of graphene. The graphene field effect transistors (FETs) fabricated using the dry transfer process exhibit excellent electrical performance in terms of high FET mobility and low intrinsic doping level, which proves the feasibility of our approach in graphene-based nanoelectronics.

  2. ,"Texas State Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePrice Sold toDryDryDry NaturalCrudeGas,Crude Oil

  3. Multiobjective optimization of the dry electric discharge machining process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    information on the optimum operating conditions. A number of performance variables such as material removal pressure and spindle speed. A Pareto­optimal front was then obtained using NSGA II. Analysis of the front place through the process of controlled spark generation. It is one of the most popular non

  4. Brownian motion with dry friction: Fokker-Planck Hugo Touchette, Erik Van der Straeten, and Wolfram Just

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Just, Wolfram

    Brownian motion with dry friction: Fokker-Planck approach Hugo Touchette, Erik Van der Straeten Gennes, in which there is a solid-solid or dry friction force acting on a Brownian particle in addition-dependent Fokker-Planck equation. Exact results are found for the case where only dry friction acts on the particle

  5. Short-time Dynamics of Frictional Strength in Dry Friction O. Ben-David, G. Cohen and J. Fineberg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fineberg, Jay

    Short-time Dynamics of Frictional Strength in Dry Friction O. Ben-David, G. Cohen and J. Fineberg interface that separates two PMMA blocks in dry frictional contact. At applied shear forces significantly weakening 1. Introduction The short-time dynamics of dry friction are of fundamental interest in fields

  6. Short-time Dynamics of Frictional Strength in Dry Friction O. Ben-David and J. Fineberg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fineberg, Jay

    Short-time Dynamics of Frictional Strength in Dry Friction O. Ben-David and J. Fineberg The Racah that separates two PMMA blocks in dry frictional contact. At applied shear forces significantly below the static The short-time dynamics of dry friction are of fundamental interest in fields ranging from hard drive disk

  7. On large deviation properties of Brownian motion with dry friction Yaming Chen 1, # and Wolfram Just 1, +

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Just, Wolfram

    On large deviation properties of Brownian motion with dry friction Yaming Chen 1, # and Wolfram with dry friction, including quantitative measures to characterize deviation from Gaussian behaviour to dry friction as an illustrative example where explicit expressions for the distribution of functionals

  8. Adapting Dry Cask Storage for Aging at a Geologic Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Sanders; D. Kimball

    2005-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Aging System is a crucial part of operations at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository in the United States. Incoming commercial SNF that does not meet thermal limits for emplacement will be aged on outdoor pads. U.S. Department of Energy SNF will also be managed using the Aging System. Proposed site-specific designs for the Aging System are closely based upon designs for existing dry cask storage (DCS) systems. This paper evaluates the applicability of existing DCS systems for use in the SNF Aging System at Yucca Mountain. The most important difference between existing DCS facilities and the Yucca Mountain facility is the required capacity. Existing DCS facilities typically have less than 50 casks. The current design for the aging pad at Yucca Mountain calls for a capacity of over 2,000 casks (20,000 MTHM) [1]. This unprecedented number of casks poses some unique problems. The response of DCS systems to off-normal and accident conditions needs to be re-evaluated for multiple storage casks. Dose calculations become more complicated, since doses from multiple or very long arrays of casks can dramatically increase the total boundary dose. For occupational doses, the geometry of the cask arrays and the order of loading casks must be carefully considered in order to meet ALARA goals during cask retrieval. Due to the large area of the aging pad, skyshine must also be included when calculating public and worker doses. The expected length of aging will also necessitate some design adjustments. Under 10 CFR 72.236, DCS systems are initially certified for a period of 20 years [2]. Although the Yucca Mountain facility is not intended to be a storage facility under 10 CFR 72, the operational life of the SNF Aging System is 50 years [1]. Any cask system selected for use in aging will have to be qualified to this design lifetime. These considerations are examined, and a summary is provided of the adaptations that must be made in order to use DCS technologies successfully at a geologic repository.

  9. Effect of residual stress on the life prediction of dry storage canisters for used nuclear fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, Bradley P. (Bradley Patrick)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Used nuclear fuel dry storage canisters will likely be tasked with holding used nuclear fuel for a period longer than originally intended. Originally designed for 20 years, the storage time will likely approach 100 years. ...

  10. Few-Layer Graphene as a Dry Lubricant | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Few-Layer Graphene as a Dry Lubricant Technology available for licensing: Graphene layers act as a two-dimensional nanomaterial and form a conformal protective coating on sliding...

  11. THE DYNAMICS OF A RAILWAY WAGON WHEEL SET WITH DRY FRICTION DAMPING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    stick-slip and hysteresis in our model of the dry friction and assume that Coulomb's friction law holds-rail interaction and this simplicity might be a contributing factor to the derailments. In this article a more

  12. The River Runs Dry: Examining Water Shortages in the Yellow River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zusman, Eric

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Runs Dry: Examining Water Shortages in the Yellow Riverof the severity of water shortages in the river’s basin. Ina median level of runoff water shortages in the basin would

  13. Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation of Dry-grind Highly Digestible Grain Sorghum Lines for Ethanol Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernandez, Joan R.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential of high digestible grain sorghum (HDGS) with a modified starch protein endosperm matrix to replace corn in ethanol production was investigated using dry grind simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF). Preliminary...

  14. Spray drying and attrition behavior of iron catalysts for slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carreto Vazquez, Victor Hugo

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes results of a study aimed at developing and evaluating attrition resistant iron catalysts prepared by spray drying technique. These catalysts are intended for Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis in a slurry bubble column reactor...

  15. Operations to be Performed in the Waste Package Dry Remediation Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman E. Cole; Randy K. Elwood

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Describes planned and proposed operations for remediating damaged and/or out-of-compliance waste packages, casks, DPCs, overpacks, and containers at the Yucca Mountain Dry Transfer Facility.

  16. Regulators Experiences in Licensing and Inspection of Dry Cask Storage Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baggett, S.; Brach, E.W. [Spent Fuel Project Office, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555 (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), through the combination of a rigorous licensing and inspection program, ensures the safety and security of dry cask storage. NRC authorizes the storage of spent fuel at an independent spent fuel storage installation (ISFSI) under two licensing options: site-specific licensing and general licensing. In July 1986, the NRC issued the first site-specific license to the Surry Nuclear Power Plant in Virginia authorizing the interim storage of spent fuel in a dry storage cask configuration. Today, there are over 30 ISFSIs currently licensed by the NRC with over 700 loaded dry casks. Current projections identify over 50 ISFSIs by the year 2010. No releases of spent fuel dry storage cask contents or other significant safety problems from the storage systems in use today have been reported. This paper discusses the NRC licensing and inspection experiences. (authors)

  17. Evaluation of "Dry Year Option" Water Transfers from Agricultural to Urban Use 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.; Jones, Lonnie L.; Lacewell, Ronald D.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigated the economics of an Edwards Aquifer region "dry-year option" buyout directed toward decreasing agricultural water use in an effort to augment springflow. The research involved several phases. First, we applied crop growth...

  18. CONTENT ANR @ MSU AgBioResearch Planting Recommendations for Dry Edible Beans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SKIP TO CONTENT ANR @ MSU AgBioResearch Home Bean Info Beet Info Directions History InfoVideos Links Planting Recommendations for Dry Edible Beans Market Class Variety Maturity Plants/Seeds/ Seeds

  19. CONTENT ANR @ MSU AgBioResearch Michigan Dry Bean Crop Protection Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SKIP TO CONTENT ANR @ MSU AgBioResearch Home Bean Info Beet Info Directions History InfoVideos Links Michigan Dry Bean Crop Protection Products Common Chemical Name Brand Name Company Crop Use Seed

  20. Rock-Water Interactions in the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Rock-Water Interactions in the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems I. Fluid...

  1. Rock-Water Interactions in the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Rock-Water Interactions in the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems II....

  2. Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  3. The dependence of the dry friction threshold on rupture dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-David, Oded

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The static friction coefficient between two materials is considered to be a material constant. We present experiments demonstrating that the ratio of shear to normal force needed to move contacting blocks can, instead, vary systematically with controllable changes in the external loading configuration. Large variations in both the friction coefficient and consequent stress drop are tightly linked to changes in the rupture dynamics of the rough interface separating the two blocks.

  4. Impulse Drying of Paper: A Review of Recent Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orloff, D. I.

    complicated by the occurrence of sheet delamination [4-6]. Research at the Institute of Paper Science and Technology (IPST) has demonstrated that ceramic coated press rolls have the potential for controlling heat transfer to the wet sheet, thereby... conditions close to the present limits of support technology. Technical issues associated with the use of longer press shoes, higher press loads, higher internal press roll temperatures, and mOre durable felt designs will need to be addressed. Transfer...

  5. Dry low combustion system with means for eliminating combustion noise

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Verdouw, Albert J.; Smith, Duane; McCormick, Keith; Razdan, Mohan K.

    2004-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A combustion system including a plurality of axially staged tubular premixers to control emissions and minimize combustion noise. The combustion system includes a radial inflow premixer that delivers the combustion mixture across a contoured dome into the combustion chamber. The axially staged premixers having a twist mixing apparatus to rotate the fluid flow and cause improved mixing without causing flow recirculation that could lead to pre-ignition or flashback.

  6. Kinetic extruder - a dry pulverized solid material pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyer, John W. (Palo Alto, CA); Bonin, John H. (Sunnyvale, CA); Daniel, Jr., Arnold D. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus are shown for the continuous feeding of pulverized material to a high pressure container. A rotor is located within the high pressure container. The pulverized material is fed from a feed hopper through a stationary feed pipe to a vented spin-up chamber to a plurality of two-stage sprues mounted in the rotor. Control nozzles downstream from the sprues meter the flow of coal through the sprues.

  7. Kinetic extruder - a dry pulverized solid material pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyer, J. W.; Bonin, J. H.; Daniel, A. D. Jr.

    1983-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus are shown for the continuous feeding of pulverized material to a high pressure container. A rotor is located within the high pressure container. The pulverized material is fed from a feed hopper through a stationary feed pipe to a vented spin-up chamber to a plurality of two-stage sprues mounted in the rotor. Control nozzles downstream from the sprues meter the flow of coal through the sprues. 19 figs.

  8. CLOSURE REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT165: AREA 25 AND 26 DRY WELL AND WASH DOWN AREAS, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) documents the closure activities for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 165, Area 25 and 26 Dry Well and Washdown Areas, according to the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996. CAU 165 consists of 8 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 25 and 26 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is located approximately 105 kilometers (65 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, nevada. Site closure activities were performed according to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP)-approved Corrective Action Plan (CAP) for CAU 165. CAU 165 consists of the following CASs: (1) CAS 25-07-06, Train Decontamination Area; (2) CAS 25-07-07, Vehicle Washdown; (3) CAS 25-20-01, Lab Drain Dry Well; (4) CAS 25-47-01, Reservoir and French Drain; (5) CAS 25-51-02, Drywell; (6) CAS 25-59-01, Septic System; (7) CAS 26-07-01, Vehicle Washdown Station; and (8) CAS 26-59-01, Septic System. CAU 165, Area 25 and 26 Dry Well and Washdown Areas, consists of eight CASs located in Areas 25 and 26 of the NTS. The approved closure alternatives included No Further Action, Clean Closure, and Closure in Place with Administrative Controls.

  9. Specific gravities and dry weight relationships of planted slash pine (Pinus elliottii Engelm.) in East Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Anthony Laurence

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . , Texas ASM University; Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. David M, Moehring In this study wood specific gravity values of 220 plantation grown slash pine (Pinus elliottii Engelm. ) trees growing in East Texas were calculated and related to tree... parameters. Also tree dry weight (DW) relationships with tree parameters were determined and dry weight tables calculated. Average specific gravity values of cores and disks at breast height and tree specific gravities respectively were 0. 457, 0. 493...

  10. Cold vacuum drying proof of performance (first article testing) test results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCCRACKEN, K.J.

    1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents and details the test results of the first of a kind process referred to as Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD). The test results are compiled from several months of testing of the first process equipment skid and ancillary components to de-water and dry Multi-Canister Overpacks (MCO) filled with Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF). The tests results provide design verifications, equipment validations, model validation data, and establish process parameters.

  11. MICHIGAN IS #1 ORGANIC DRY BEAN PRODUCER Black beans #1 class produced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;MICHIGAN IS #1 ORGANIC DRY BEAN PRODUCER ¢ Black beans #1 class produced ¢ Need to maximize Lansing, MI) ¢ Split plot design Main plot= Cover crop (4) Sub-plot= Bean variety (4) IMPACT OF COVER CROPS ON ORGANIC DRY BEANS #12;2010 2011 J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D Clover Radish

  12. Spent Nuclear Fuel Dry Transfer System Cold Demonstration Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, Max R; McKinnon, M. A.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spent nuclear fuel dry transfer system (DTS) provides an interface between large and small casks and between storage-only and transportation casks. It permits decommissioning of reactor pools after shutdown and allows the use of large storage-only casks for temporary onsite storage of spent nuclear fuel irrespective of reactor or fuel handling limitations at a reactor site. A cold demonstration of the DTS prototype was initiated in August 1996 at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The major components demonstrated included the fuel assembly handling subsystem, the shield plug/lid handling subsystem, the cask interface subsystem, the demonstration control subsystem, a support frame, and a closed circuit television and lighting system. The demonstration included a complete series of DTS operations from source cask receipt and opening through fuel transfer and closure of the receiving cask. The demonstration included both normal operations and recovery from off-normal events. It was designed to challenge the system to determine whether there were any activities that could be made to jeopardize the activities of another function or its safety. All known interlocks were challenged. The equipment ran smoothly and functioned as designed. A few "bugs" were corrected. Prior to completion of the demonstration testing, a number of DTS prototype systems were modified to apply lessons learned to date. Additional testing was performed to validate the modifications. In general, all the equipment worked exceptionally well. The demonstration also helped confirm cost estimates that had been made at several points in the development of the system.

  13. Moisture effects in low-slope roofs: Drying rates after water addition with various vapor retarders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pedersen, C.R. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark); Petrie, T.W. [Marquette Univ., Milwaukee, WI (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Courville, G.E.; Desjarlais, A.O.; Childs, P.W.; Wilkes, K.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tests have been conducted in the Large Scale Climate Simulator (LSCS) of the US. Building Envelope Research Center at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to investigate downward drying rates of various unvented, low-slope roof systems. A secondary objective was to study heat flow patterns so as to understand how to control latent heat effects on impermeable heat flux transducers. Nine test sections were tested simultaneously. The sections had a p deck above fibrous-glass insulation and were examples of cold-deck systems. These five sections had various vapor retarder systems on a gypsum board ceiling below the insulation. The other four sections had a lightweight insulating concrete deck below expanded polystyrene insulation and the same vapor retarder systems, and were examples of warm-deck systems. The cold-deck systems had materials that were relatively permeable to water vapor, while the materials in the warm-deck systems were less permeable. All test sections were topped by an impermeable roofing membrane. The test sections were instrumented with thermocouples between all layers and with small heat flux transducers at the bottom and top of the fibrous-glass insulation and in the middle of the expanded polystyrene insulation. Two different kinds of moisture probes were used to qualitatively monitor the movement of the moisture. The heat flux measurements showed that heat conduction dominates the system using impermeable insulation materials, with only a slight increase due to increased thermal conductivity of wet expanded polystyrene. There was significant transfer of latent heat in the test sections with permeable insulation, causing the peak heat fluxes to increase by as much as a factor of two. With temperatures imposed that are typical of summer days, latent heat transfer associated with condensation and evaporation of moisture in the test sections was measured to be as important as the heat transfer by conduction.

  14. Wet-dry cooling demonstration: A transfer of technology: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allemann, R.T.; Johnson, B.M.; Werry, E.V.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wet-dry cooling using the ammonia phase-change system, designated the Advanced Concepts Test, was tested on a large-scale at Pacific Gas and Electric Company's Kern Station at Bakersfield, California. The facility is capable of condensing 60,000 lb/h of steam from a small house turbine. Two different modes of combining dry and evaporative cooling were tested. One uses deluge cooling in which water is allowed to flow over the fins of the dry (air-cooled) heat exchanger on hot days; the other uses a separate evaporative condenser in parallel to the dry heat exchanger. A third mode of enhancing the dry-cooling system, termed capacitive cooling, was tested. In this system, the ammonia-cooled steam condenser is supplemented by a parallel conventional water-cooled condenser with water supplied from a closed system. This water is cooled during off-peak hours each night by an ammonia heat pump that rejects heat through the cooling tower. If operated over the period of a year, each of the wet-dry systems would use only 25% of the water normally required to reject this heat load in an evaporative cooling tower. The third would consume no water, the evaporative cooling being replaced by the delayed cooling of the closed system water supply.

  15. Documentation of the DRI Model of the US economy, December 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) uses models of the US economy developed by Data Resources, Inc. (DRI) for conducting policy analyses, preparing forecasts for the Annual Energy Outlook, the Short-Term Energy Outlook, and related analyses in conjunction with EIA`s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) and its other energy market models. Both the DRI Model of the US Economy and the DRI Personal Computer Input-Output Model (PC-IO){sup 2} were developed and are maintained by DRI as proprietary models. This report provides documentation, as required by EIA standards for the use of proprietary models; describes the theoretical basis, structure and functions of both DRI models; and contains brief descriptions of the models and their equations. Appendix A describes how the two large-scale models documented here are used to support the macroeconomic and interindustry modeling associated with the National Energy Modeling System. Appendix B is an article by Stephen McNees of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston on ``How Large are Economic Forecast Errors.`` This article assesses the forecast accuracy of a number of economic forecasting models (groups) and is attached as an independent assessment of the forecast accuracy of the DRI Model of the US Economy.

  16. Foreign experience on effects of extended dry storage on the integrity of spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, K.J.; Mitchell, S.J.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of a survey of foreign experience in dry storage of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors that was carried out for the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The report reviews the mechanisms for degradation of spent fuel cladding and fuel materials in dry storage, identifies the status and plans of world-wide experience and applications, and documents the available information on the expected long-term integrity of the dry-stored spent fuel from actual foreign experience. Countries covered in this survey are: Argentina, Canada, Federal Republic of Germany (before reunification with the former East Germany), former German Democratic Republic (former East Germany), France, India, Italy, Japan, South Korea, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and the former USSR (most of these former Republics are now in the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS)). Industrial dry storage of Magnox fuels started in 1972 in the United Kingdom; Canada began industrial dry storage of CANDU fuels in 1980. The technology for safe storage is generally considered to be developed for time periods of 30 to 100 years for LWR fuel in inert gas and for some fuels in oxidizing gases at low temperatures. Because it will probably be decades before countries will have a repository for spent fuels and high-level wastes, the plans for expanded use of dry storage have increased significantly in recent years and are expected to continue to increase in the near future.

  17. Foreign experience on effects of extended dry storage on the integrity of spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, K.J.; Mitchell, S.J.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of a survey of foreign experience in dry storage of spent fuel from nuclear power reactors that was carried out for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). The report reviews the mechanisms for degradation of spent fuel cladding and fuel materials in dry storage, identifies the status and plans of world-wide experience and applications, and documents the available information on the expected long-term integrity of the dry-stored spent fuel from actual foreign experience. Countries covered in this survey are: Argentina, Canada, Federal Republic of Germany (before reunification with the former East Germany), former German Democratic Republic (former East Germany), France, India, Italy, Japan, South Korea, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and the former USSR (most of these former Republics are now in the Commonwealth of Independent States [CIS]). Industrial dry storage of Magnox fuels started in 1972 in the United Kingdom; Canada began industrial dry storage of CANDU fuels in 1980. The technology for safe storage is generally considered to be developed for time periods of 30 to 100 years for LWR fuel in inert gas and for some fuels in oxidizing gases at low temperatures. Because it will probably be decades before countries will have a repository for spent fuels and high-level wastes, the plans for expanded use of dry storage have increased significantly in recent years and are expected to continue to increase in the near future.

  18. Improvement of industrial drying of natural rubber through analysis of heat and mass transfers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naon, B.; Berthomieu, G.; Benet, J.C.; Saix, C. [Univ. Montpellier II (France). Laboratoire de Mecanique et Genie Civil

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis is presented of convective drying of natural rubber in granule form. Exploitation of the mathematical model developed from analysis of internal transfers requires determination of the drying rate and the energy exchange coefficient between the material and the drying air. This was performed using a portable laboratory dryer at the production site, avoiding the problem of changes in the material during transport. Analysis of the drying kinetics of material in thin layers led to modelling the drying rate at the temperatures, rates and relative humidity values encountered in industrial dryers. The energy exchange coefficient was found by measurement of air and granule temperatures. Thick layer trials showed the suitability of the model for simulation of changes in moisture content and temperature of air and granules in a granular environment. The study as a whole led to the development of a computer program for simulating a zone dryer. This software can be used to optimize the management of an industrial natural rubber drying installation.

  19. The Evolution of Dry Spent Fuel Storage in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGough, M.S. [Duratek Inc., 695 Bamesley Lane, Alpharetta, GA 30022 (United States); Bland, D.W. [TriVis, Inc., 1001 Yeager Parkway, Pelham, AL 35124 (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the evolution of Dry Spent Fuel storage technology and application in the United States. Dating back to the legislation signed by Jimmy Carter on April 7, 1977, to outlaw spent fuel reprocessing, the nations spent fuel pools are gradually becoming filled to capacity. This has necessitated the development of new technologies to store spent fuel in dry casks, predominantly at nuclear power plant sites, awaiting the availability of the federal repository at Yucca Mountain. Site-specific conditions and changes in types of fuel being discharged from reactors have driven a constant evolution of technologies to support this critical need. This paper provides an overview of those changes, which have influenced the evolution of dry storage technology. Focus is provided more towards current technology and cask loading practices, as opposed to those technologies, which are no longer in heavy use. Detailed pictorial material is presented showing the loading sequences of various systems in current use. This paper provides a critical primer on Dry Spent Fuel Storage technology. It provides anyone who is new to dry storage, or who is contemplating initiating dry storage at a nuclear plant site, with useful background and history upon which to build programmatic decisions. (authors)

  20. Moving zone Marangoni drying of wet objects using naturally evaporated solvent vapor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Britten, Jerald A. (Oakley, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A surface tension gradient driven flow (a Marangoni flow) is used to remove the thin film of water remaining on the surface of an object following rinsing. The process passively introduces by natural evaporation and diffusion of minute amounts of alcohol (or other suitable material) vapor in the immediate vicinity of a continuously refreshed meniscus of deionized water or another aqueous-based, nonsurfactant rinsing agent. Used in conjunction with cleaning, developing or wet etching application, rinsing coupled with Marangoni drying provides a single-step process for 1) cleaning, developing or etching, 2) rinsing, and 3) drying objects such as flat substrates or coatings on flat substrates without necessarily using heat, forced air flow, contact wiping, centrifugation or large amounts of flammable solvents. This process is useful in one-step cleaning and drying of large flat optical substrates, one-step developing/rinsing and drying or etching/rinsing/drying of large flat patterned substrates and flat panel displays during lithographic processing, and room-temperature rinsing/drying of other large parts, sheets or continuous rolls of material.

  1. Moving zone Marangoni drying of wet objects using naturally evaporated solvent vapor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Britten, J.A.

    1997-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A surface tension gradient driven flow (a Marangoni flow) is used to remove the thin film of water remaining on the surface of an object following rinsing. The process passively introduces by natural evaporation and diffusion of minute amounts of alcohol (or other suitable material) vapor in the immediate vicinity of a continuously refreshed meniscus of deionized water or another aqueous-based, nonsurfactant rinsing agent. Used in conjunction with cleaning, developing or wet etching application, rinsing coupled with Marangoni drying provides a single-step process for (1) cleaning, developing or etching, (2) rinsing, and (3) drying objects such as flat substrates or coatings on flat substrates without necessarily using heat, forced air flow, contact wiping, centrifugation or large amounts of flammable solvents. This process is useful in one-step cleaning and drying of large flat optical substrates, one-step developing/rinsing and drying or etching/rinsing/drying of large flat patterned substrates and flat panel displays during lithographic processing, and room-temperature rinsing/drying of other large parts, sheets or continuous rolls of material. 5 figs.

  2. Building America Best Practices Series, Volume 9: Builders Challenge Guide to 40% Whole-House Energy Savings in the Hot-Dry and Mixed-Dry Climates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, Michael C.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Hefty, Marye G.; Williamson, Jennifer L.; Ruiz, Kathleen A.; Bartlett, Rosemarie; Love, Pat M.

    2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This best practices guide is the ninth in a series of guides for builders produced by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building America Program. This guide book is a resource to help builders design and construct homes that are among the most energy-efficient available, while addressing issues such as building durability, indoor air quality, and occupant health, safety, and comfort. With the measures described in this guide, builders in the hot-dry and mixed-dry climates can achieve homes that have whole house energy savings of 40% over the Building America benchmark (a home built to mid-1990s building practices roughly equivalent to the 1993 Model Energy Code) with no added overall costs for consumers. These best practices are based on the results of research and demonstration projects conducted by Building America’s research teams. The guide includes information for managers, designers, marketers, site supervisors, and subcontractors, as well as case studies of builders who are successfully building homes that cut energy use by 40% in the hot-dry and mixed-dry climates.

  3. Dry Kraft Pulping at Ambient Pressure for Cost Effective Energy Saving and Pollution Deduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yulin Deng; Art Ragauskas

    2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Sponsored by the DOE Industrial Energy Efficiency Grand Challenge program, our research team at the Georgia Institute of Technology conducted laboratory studies and confirmed the concept of making wood pulp using a dry pulping technology. This technology is a new process different from any prior pulping technology used in Kraft and CTMP pulping. Three different kinds of dry pulping methods were investigated. (a) Dry Pulping at Atmospheric Pressure: The first one is to dry and bake the pretreated woodchips in a conventional oven at atmospheric pressure without the use of a catalyst. (b) Dry Pulping at Reduced Pressure: The second method is to dry the pretreated woodchips first in a vacuum oven in the presence of anthraquinone (AQ) as a pulping catalyst, followed by baking at elevated temperature. (c) Liquid Free Chemical Pulping, LFCP. The third method is to first remove the free water of pretreated woodchips, followed by dry pulping using a conventional Kraft pulping digester with AQ and triton as additives. Method one: Experimental results indicated that Dry Pulping at Atmospheric Pressure could produce pulp with higher brightness and lower bulk than conventional Kraft pulp. However, tensile strength of the acquired pulp is much lower than traditional Kraft pulp, and their Kappa number and energy consumption are higher than conventional Kraft pulp. By fully analyzing the results, we concluded that wood fibers might be damaged during the drying process at elevated temperature. The main reason for wood fiber damage is that a long drying time was used during evaporation of water from the woodchips. This resulted in an un-uniform reaction condition on the woodchips: the outside layer of the woodchips was over reacted while inside the woodchips did not reacted at all. To solve this problem, dry pulping at reduced pressure was investigated. Method two: To achieve uniform reaction throughout the entire reaction system, the water inside the pretreated woodchips was evaporated first under vacuum condition at low temperature. Then, the dry woodchips were baked at high temperature (120-130 C) at atmospheric pressure. The qualities of the pulp made with this method were improved compared to that made with method one. The pulp shows higher brightness and lower bulk than Kraft pulping. The tensile strength is significantly higher than the pulp made from the first method. Although the pulp is stronger than that of TMP pulp, it is still lower than conventional Kraft fiber. Method Three: The third dry method was done in a Kraft pulping digester at elevated pressure but without free liquid in the digester. With this method, pulp that has almost the same qualities as conventional Kraft pulp could be produced. The screen yield, Kappa number, fiber brightness, pulp strength and pulp bulk are almost identical to the conventional Kraft pulp. The key advantages of this dry pulping method include ca. 55 % of cooking energy saved during the pulping process, as high as 50 wt% of NaOH saving as well as 3 wt% of Na2S saving comparing to Kraft one. By analyzing fiber properties, yields, chemical and energy consumptions, we concluded that the dry pulping method based on Liquid Free Chemical Pulping, LFCP, could be very attractive for the pulp and paper industry. More fundamental studies and scale up trials are needed to fully commercialize the technology. We expect to conduct pilot trials between 12 to 24 months of period if the DOE or industry can provide continual research funding. Based on the technology we demonstrated in this report, several pilot trial facilities in the United States will be available after small modifications. For example, the Herty Foundation in Savannah, Georgia is one of these potential locations. DOE funding for continuous study and final lead to commercialization of the technique is important.

  4. Site characterization summary report for dry weather surface water sampling upper East Fork Poplar Creek characterization area Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes activities associated with conducting dry weather surface water sampling of Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This activity is a portion of the work to be performed at UEFPC Operable Unit (OU) 1 [now known as the UEFPC Characterization Area (CA)], as described in the RCRA Facility Investigation Plan for Group 4 at the Oak- Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee and in the Response to Comments and Recommendations on RCRA Facility Investigation Plan for Group 4 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Volume 1, Operable Unit 1. Because these documents contained sensitive information, they were labeled as unclassified controlled nuclear information and as such are not readily available for public review. To address this issue the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published an unclassified, nonsensitive version of the initial plan, text and appendixes, of this Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation (RFI) Plan in early 1994. These documents describe a program for collecting four rounds of wet weather and dry weather surface water samples and one round of sediment samples from UEFPC. They provide the strategy for the overall sample collection program including dry weather sampling, wet weather sampling, and sediment sampling. Figure 1.1 is a schematic flowchart of the overall sampling strategy and other associated activities. A Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPJP) was prepared to specifically address four rounds of dry weather surface water sampling and one round of sediment sampling. For a variety of reasons, sediment sampling has not been conducted and has been deferred to the UEFPC CA Remedial Investigation (RI), as has wet weather sampling.

  5. Manure Harvesting Frequency: The Key to Feedyard Dust Control in a Summer Drought

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auvermann, Brent W.; Parker, David B.; Sweeten, John M.

    2000-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Summer drought can make dust control in feedyards more challenging than usual. Supplemental water may not keep pace with daily evaporation. The key to dust control is managing the depth of dry manure in the pens by harvesting manure more frequently...

  6. Dry synthesis of lithium intercalated graphite powders and carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sacci, Robert L [ORNL; Adamczyk, Leslie A [ORNL; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Herein we describe the direct synthesis of lithium intercalated graphite by heating under vacuum or ball milling under pressurized Ar(g). Both methods allow for stoichometric control of Li-C ratio in batter-grade graphites and carbon fibers prior formation of a solid electrolyte interphase. The products' surface chemistries, as probed by XPS, suggest that LiC6 are extremely reactive with trace amounts of moisture or oxygen. The open circuit potential and SEM data show that the reactivity of the lithiated battery-grade graphite and the carbon fiber can be related to the density of edge/defect sites on the surfaces. Preliminary results of spontaneous SEI formation on Li-graphite in electrolyte are also given.

  7. Project Controls

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Project controls are systems used to plan, schedule, budget, and measure the performance of a project/program. The cost estimation package is one of the documents that is used to establish the baseline for project controls. This chapter gives a brief description of project controls and the role the cost estimation package plays.

  8. Improved Formulations for Air-Surface Exchanges Related to National Security Needs: Dry Deposition Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Droppo, James G.

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Homeland Security and others rely on results from atmospheric dispersion models for threat evaluation, event management, and post-event analyses. The ability to simulate dry deposition rates is a crucial part of our emergency preparedness capabilities. Deposited materials pose potential hazards from radioactive shine, inhalation, and ingestion pathways. A reliable characterization of these potential exposures is critical for management and mitigation of these hazards. A review of the current status of dry deposition formulations used in these atmospheric dispersion models was conducted. The formulations for dry deposition of particulate materials from am event such as a radiological attack involving a Radiological Detonation Device (RDD) is considered. The results of this effort are applicable to current emergency preparedness capabilities such as are deployed in the Interagency Modeling and Atmospheric Assessment Center (IMAAC), other similar national/regional emergency response systems, and standalone emergency response models. The review concludes that dry deposition formulations need to consider the full range of particle sizes including: 1) the accumulation mode range (0.1 to 1 micron diameter) and its minimum in deposition velocity, 2) smaller particles (less than .01 micron diameter) deposited mainly by molecular diffusion, 3) 10 to 50 micron diameter particles deposited mainly by impaction and gravitational settling, and 4) larger particles (greater than 100 micron diameter) deposited mainly by gravitational settling. The effects of the local turbulence intensity, particle characteristics, and surface element properties must also be addressed in the formulations. Specific areas for improvements in the dry deposition formulations are 1) capability of simulating near-field dry deposition patterns, 2) capability of addressing the full range of potential particle properties, 3) incorporation of particle surface retention/rebound processes, and. 4) development of dry deposition formulations applicable to urban areas. Also to improve dry deposition modeling capabilities, atmospheric dispersion models in which the dry deposition formulations are imbedded need better source-term plume initialization and improved in-plume treatment of particle growth processes. Dry deposition formulations used in current models are largely inapplicable to the complex urban environment. An improved capability is urgently needed to provide surface-specific information to assess local exposure hazard levels in both urban and non-urban areas on roads, buildings, crops, rivers, etc. A model improvement plan is developed with a near-term and far-term component. Despite some conceptual limitations, the current formulations for particle deposition based on a resistance approach have proven to provide reasonable dry deposition simulations. For many models with inadequate dry deposition formulations, adding or improving a resistance approach will be the desirable near-term update. Resistance models however are inapplicable aerodynamically very rough surfaces such as urban areas. In the longer term an improved parameterization of dry deposition needs to be developed that will be applicable to all surfaces, and in particular urban surfaces.

  9. Drying results of K-Basin fuel element 0309M (Run 3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliver, B.M.; Klinger, G.S.; Abrefah, J.; Marschman, S.C.; MacFarlan, P.J.; Ritter, G.A.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An N-Reactor outer fuel element that had been stored underwater in the Hanford 100 Area K-West Basin was subjected to a combination of low- and high-temperature vacuum drying treatments. These studies are part of a series of tests being conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on the drying behavior of spent nuclear fuel elements removed from both the K-West and K-East Basins. The drying test series was designed to test fuel elements that ranged from intact to severely damaged. The fuel element discussed in this report was removed from K-West canister 0309M during the second fuel selection campaign, conducted in 1996, and has remained in wet storage in the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL, 327 Building) since that time. The fuel element was broken in two pieces, with a relatively clean fracture, and the larger piece was tested. A gray/white coating was observed. This was the first test of a damaged fuel element in the furnace. K-West canisters can hold up to seven complete fuel assemblies, but, for purposes of this report, the element tested here is designated as Element 0309M. Element 0309M was subjected to drying processes based on those proposed under the Integrated Process Strategy, which included a hot drying step.

  10. Robust Spring Drying in the Southwestern U.S. and Seasonal Migration of Wet/Dry Patterns in a Warmer Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Yang; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Lu, Jian; Liu, Ying; Huang, Maoyi; Qian, Yun

    2014-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This study compares climate simulations over the United States produced by a regional climate model with the driving global climate simulations as well as a large multi-model ensemble of global climate simulations to investigate robust changes in water availability (precipitation (P) – evapotranspiration (E)). A robust spring dry signal across multiple models is identified in the Southwest that results from a decrease in P and an increase in E in the future. In the boreal winter and summer, the prominent changes in P – E are associated with a north – south dipole pattern, while in spring, the prominent changes in P – E appear as an east – west dipole pattern. The progression of the north – south and east – west dipole patterns through the seasons manifests clearly as a seasonal “clockwise” migration of wet/dry patterns, which is shown to be a robust feature of water availability changes in the US consistent across regional and global climate simulations.

  11. Spent fuel dry storage technology development: fuel temperature measurements under imposed dry storage conditions (I kW PWR spent fuel assembly)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unterzuber, R.; Wright, J.B.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A spent fuel assembly temperature test under imposed dry storage conditions was conducted at the Engine Maintenance Assembly and Disassembly (E-MAD) facility on the Nevada Test Site in support of spent fuel dry storage technology development. This document presents the test data and results obtained from an approximately 1.0 kW decay heat level PWR spent fuel assembly. A spent fuel test apparatus was designed to utilize a representative stainless steel spent fuel canister, a canister lid containing internal temperature instrumentation to measure fuel cladding temperatures, and a carbon steel liner that encloses the canister and lid. Electrical heaters along the liner length, on the lid, and below the canister are used to impose dry storage canister temperature profiles. Temperature instrumentation is provided on the liner and canister. The liner and canister are supported by a test stand in one of the large hot cells (West Process Cell) inside E-MAD. Fuel temperature measurements have been performed using imposed canister temperature profiles from the electrically heated and spent fuel drywell tests being conducted at E-MAD as well as for four constant canister temperature profiles, each with a vacuum, helium and air backfill. Computer models have been utilized in conjunction with the test to predict the thermal response of the fuel cladding. Computer predictions are presented, and they show good agreement with the test data.

  12. Notes on the efficacy of wet versus dry screening of fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valentim, B.; Hower, J.C.; Flores, D.; Guedes, A. [Center and Department of Geology, Oporto (Portugal)

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The methodology used to obtain fly ash subsamples of different sizes is generally based on wet or dry sieving methods. However, the worth of such methods is not certain if the methodology applied is not mentioned in the analytical procedure. After performing a fly ash mechanical dry, sieving, the authors compared those results with the ones obtained by laser diffraction on the same samples and found unacceptable discrepancies. A preliminary, study of a wet sieving analysis carried out on an economizer fly ash sample showed that this method was more effective than the dry sieving. The importance of standardizing the way samples are handled, pretreated and presented to the instrument of analysis are suggested and interlaboratory reproducibility trials are needed to create a common standard methodology to obtain large amounts of fly ash size fraction subsamples.

  13. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IRWIN, J.J.

    2000-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the Operations Manual for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). The Manual was developed in conjunction with HNF-SD-SNF-SAR-002, Safety Analysis Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Phase 2, Supporting Installation of the Processing Systems (Garvin 1998) and, the HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-002, 1997, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements, Rev. 3a. The Operations Manual contains general descriptions of all the process, safety and facility systems in the CVDF, a general CVD operations sequence, and has been developed for the spent nuclear fuel project (SNFP) Operations Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved.

  14. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1999-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the Operations Manual for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). The Manual was developed in conjunction with HNF-553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report Annex B--Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. The HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-002, 1999, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements, Rev. 4, and the CVDF Final Design Report. The Operations Manual contains general descriptions of all the process, safety and facility systems in the CVDF, a general CVD operations sequence and references to the CVDF System Design Descriptions (SDDs). This manual has been developed for the SNFP Operations Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved.

  15. Comparison of particle size of cracking catalyst determined by laser light scattering and dry sieve methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dishman, K.L.; Doolin, P.K.; Hoffman, J.F. (Ashland Petroleum Co., Ashland, KY (United States))

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of interconversion of dry sieve and laser light scattering particle size values has been developed for cracking catalysts. Values obtained by light scattering techniques were consistently larger than those obtained by dry sieve analysis. The differences were primarily due to lack of sphericity of the particles. The particle size distribution determined by light scattering techniques was based on an average particle diameter. Conversely, the sieve measured the smallest diameter of the particle which can pass through the opening. Microscopic examination of commercial cracking catalysts confirmed their nonuniformity. The sphericity of the catalyst particles decreased as particle size increased. Therefore, the divergence between the laser light scattering and dry sieving value became greater as the catalyst particle size increased.

  16. Spent nuclear fuel project cold vacuum drying facility vacuum and purge system design description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the System Design Description (SDD) for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) Vacuum and Purge System (VPS) . The SDD was developed in conjunction with HNF-SD-SNF-SAR-O02, Safety Analysis Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Phase 2, Supporting Installation of Processing Systems (Garvin 1998), The HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-002, 1998, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements, and the CVDF Design Summary Report. The SDD contains general descriptions of the VPS equipment, the system functions, requirements and interfaces. The SDD provides references for design and fabrication details, operation sequences and maintenance. This SDD has been developed for the SNFP Operations Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved.

  17. Spent nuclear fuel project cold vacuum drying facility process water conditioning system design description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the System Design Description (SDD) for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) Process Water Conditioning (PWC) System. The SDD was developed in conjunction with HNF-SD-SNF-SAR-002, Safety Analysis Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Phase 2, Supporting Installation of Processing Systems (Garvin 1998), the HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-O02, 1998, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements, and the CVDF Design Summary Report. The SDD contains general descriptions of the PWC equipment, the system functions, requirements and interfaces. The SDD provides references for design and fabrication details, operation sequences and maintenance. This SDD has been developed for the SNFP Operations Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved.

  18. High Burnup Dry Storage Cask Research and Development Project, Final Test Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    EPRI is leading a project team to develop and implement the first five years of a Test Plan to collect data from a SNF dry storage system containing high burnup fuel.12 The Test Plan defined in this document outlines the data to be collected, and the storage system design, procedures, and licensing necessary to implement the Test Plan.13 The main goals of the proposed test are to provide confirmatory data14 for models, future SNF dry storage cask design, and to support license renewals and new licenses for ISFSIs. To provide data that is most relevant to high burnup fuel in dry storage, the design of the test storage system must mimic real conditions that high burnup SNF experiences during all stages of dry storage: loading, cask drying, inert gas backfilling, and transfer to the ISFSI for multi-year storage.15 Along with other optional modeling, SETs, and SSTs, the data collected in this Test Plan can be used to evaluate the integrity of dry storage systems and the high burnup fuel contained therein over many decades. It should be noted that the Test Plan described in this document discusses essential activities that go beyond the first five years of Test Plan implementation.16 The first five years of the Test Plan include activities up through loading the cask, initiating the data collection, and beginning the long-term storage period at the ISFSI. The Test Plan encompasses the overall project that includes activities that may not be completed until 15 or more years from now, including continued data collection, shipment of the Research Project Cask to a Fuel Examination Facility, opening the cask at the Fuel Examination Facility, and examining the high burnup fuel after the initial storage period.

  19. Comparison of small mammal species diversity near wastewater outfalls, natural streams, and dry canyons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymer, D.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Biggs, J.R. [Ewing Technical Design, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wide range of plant and wildlife species utilizes water discharged from facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The purpose of this study was to compare nocturnal small mammal communities at wet areas created by wastewater outfalls with communities in naturally created wet and dry areas. Thirteen locations within LANL boundaries were selected for small mammal mark-recapture trapping. Three of these locations lacked surface water sources and were classified as {open_quotes}dry,{close_quotes} while seven sites were associated with wastewater outfalls ({open_quotes}outfall{close_quotes} sites), and three were located near natural sources of surface water ({open_quotes}natural{close_quotes} sites). Data was collected on site type (dry, outfall or natural), location, species trapped, and the tag number of each individual captured. This data was used to calculate mean number of species, percent capture rate, and species diversity at each type of site. When data from each type of site was pooled, there were no significant differences in these variables between dry, outfall, and natural types. However, when data from individual sites was compared, tests revealed significant differences. All sites in natural areas were significantly higher than dry areas in daily mean number of species, percent capture rate, and species diversity. Most outfall sites were significantly higher than dry areas in all three variables tested. When volume of water from each outfall site was considered, these data indicated that the number of species, percent capture rate, and species diversity of nocturnal small mammals were directly related to the volume of water at a given outfall.

  20. Method of aeration disinfecting and drying grain in bulk and pretreating seeds and a transverse blow silo grain dryer therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Danchenko, Vitaliy G. (Dnipropetrovsk, UA); Noyes, Ronald T. (Stillwater, OK); Potapovych, Larysa P. (Dnipropetrovsk, UA)

    2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Aeration drying and disinfecting grain crops in bulk and pretreating seeds includes passing through a bulk of grain crops and seeds disinfecting and drying agents including an ozone and air mixture and surrounding air, subdividing the disinfecting and drying agents into a plurality of streams spaced from one another in a vertical direction, and passing the streams at different heights through levels located at corresponding heights of the bulk of grain crops and seeds transversely in a substantially horizontal direction.

  1. Effect of petroleum oil, pesticides, PCBs and other environmental contaminants on the hatchability of Artemia salina dry eggs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuwabara, K.; Nakamura, A.; Kashimoto, T.

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Artemia salina Leach is well-known as the brine shrimp used as tropical fish food and its dry eggs are easily obtained at a pet-shop at any season. One or two days after placing the dry eggs into salt water, the nauplius larvae of Artemia begins to hatch. In this paper, the methodlogy on a hatchability test for environmental contaminants and their effects on the dry egg hatchabilities are presented.

  2. USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; Ursla Levy; John Sale; Nenad Sarunac

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the twelfth Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture using power plant waste heat, prior to firing the coal in a pulverized coal boiler. During this last Quarter, the development of analyses to determine the costs and financial benefits of coal drying was continued. The details of the model and key assumptions being used in the economic evaluation are described in this report and results are shown for a drying system utilizing a combination of waste heat from the condenser and thermal energy extracted from boiler flue gas.

  3. The economic effects of liberalized U.S.-Mexico dry onion trade 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gillis, Melanie

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    +AN ', q~~ ~x qsio, v~ ~P /~fjp ~/CM:~ y: . ~/~~~: . "~c'r, THE ECONOMIC EFFECTS OF LIBERALIZED U. S. -MEXICO DRY ONION TRADE A Thesis by MELANIE GILLIS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A8r M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1993 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics THE ECONOMIC EFFECTS OF LIBERALIZED U. S. -MEXICO DRY ONION TRADE A Thesis by MELANIE GILLIS r ed as to style and content by: I g...

  4. Coal deposit characterization by gamma-gamma density/percent dry ash relationships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, David Scott

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Density/Ash Relationship . APPLICATION OF THE GAMMA-GAMMA DENSITY/PERCENT DRY ASH RELATIONSHIPS The Density/Ash Relationship of a South Texas Lignite Deposit Characterization of a South Texas Lignite Deposit CONCLUSIONS REFERENCES. 52 53 53 53... 58 64 67 6g 80 87 LIST OF TABLES TABLE I Coal Classification by Rank. 2 Common Minerals in Coal. 3 Results of Linear Regression Analyses for a South Texas Lignite Deposit. 4 Variability of Geophysica11y-Derived Percent Dry Ash Values...

  5. Drying and Its Effects on the Milling Characteristics of Sorghum Grain.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1949-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and feed during the war years, and the development of varieties suitable for combine harvesting have caused a big increase in the Texas sorghum grain acreage since 1940. This increase has been greatest in South Texas where the humidity of the atmosphere... is high. When the grain is mature enough for combine harvesting, it usually contains too much moisture to be stored safely in bags or bulk. The need for more information on artificial drying and the milling characteristics of artificiaIIy-dried sorghum...

  6. Eddy conductivity in and near dry cold fronts in the layer, 70 to 1270 feet 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conlan, Edward Francis

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EDDY CONDUCTIVITY IN AND NEAR DRY COLD FRONTS IN THE LAYER, 70 TO 1270 FEET A Thesis By EDWARD FRANCIS CONLAN Captain, USAF Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1965 Major Subject: METEOROLOGY EDDY CONDUCTIVITY IN AND NEAR DRY COLD FRONTS IN THE LAYER) 70 TO 1270 FEET A Thesis By EDWARD FRANCIS CONLAN Captain, USAF Approved as to style and content by: i J 8~. . c6~h arrmanf o...

  7. Measurement of Atmospheric Sea Salt Concentration in the Dry Storage Facility of the Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masumi Wataru; Hisashi Kato; Satoshi Kudo; Naoko Oshima; Koji Wada [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry - CRIEPI (Japan); Hirofumi Narutaki [Electric Power Engineering Systems Co. Ltd. (Japan)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spent nuclear fuel coming from a Japanese nuclear power plant is stored in the interim storage facility before reprocessing. There are two types of the storage methods which are wet and dry type. In Japan, it is anticipated that the dry storage facility will increase compared with the wet type facility. The dry interim storage facility using the metal cask has been operated in Japan. In another dry storage technology, there is a concrete overpack. Especially in USA, a lot of concrete overpacks are used for the dry interim storage. In Japan, for the concrete cask, the codes of the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers and the governmental technical guidelines are prepared for the realization of the interim storage as well as the code for the metal cask. But the interim storage using the concrete overpack has not been in progress because the evaluation on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the canister is not sufficient. Japanese interim storage facilities would be constructed near the seashore. The metal casks and concrete overpacks are stored in the storage building in Japan. On the other hand, in USA they are stored outside. It is necessary to remove the decay heat of the spent nuclear fuel in the cask from the storage building. Generally, the heat is removed by natural cooling in the dry storage facility. Air including the sea salt particles goes into the dry storage facility. Concerning the concrete overpack, air goes into the cask body and cools the canister. Air goes along the canister surface and is in contact with the surface directly. In this case, the sea salt in the air attaches to the surface and then there is the concern about the occurrence of the SCC. For the concrete overpack, the canister including the spent fuel is sealed by the welding. The loss of sealability caused by the SCC has to be avoided. To evaluate the SCC for the canister, it is necessary to make clear the amount of the sea salt particles coming into the storage building and the concentration on the canister. In present, the evaluation on that point is not sufficient. In this study, the concentration of the sea salt particles in the air and on the surface of the storage facility are measured inside and outside of the building. For the measurement, two sites of the dry storage facility using the metal cask are chosen. This data is applicable for the evaluation on the SCC of the canister to realize the interim storage using the concrete overpack. (authors)

  8. Factors affecting the recovery of bacteria in freeze-dried model systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Custer, Carl Steven

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FACTORS AFFECTING THE RECOVERY OF BACTERIA IN FREEZE-DRIED NODEL SYSTENS A Thesis by CARL STEVEN CUSTER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&N University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for tbe degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1970' Najor Subject: Food Technology FACTORS AFFECTING THE RECOVERY OF BACTERIA IN FREEZE-DRIED MODEL SYSTEMS A Thesis CARL STEVEN CUSTER Approved as to sty1e and content by: Chairman of Com tee) Head of Departme (Member) (Member) (Member...

  9. Spent-fuel dry-storage testing at E-MAD (March 1978-March 1982)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unterzuber, R.; Milnes, R.D.; Marinkovich, B.A.; Kubancsek, G.M.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From March 1978 through March 1982, spent fuel dry storage tests were conducted at the Engine Maintenance, Assembly and Disassembly (E-MAD) facility on the Nevada Test Site to confirm that commercial reactor spent fuel could be encapsulated and passively stored in one or more interim dry storage cell concepts. These tests were: electrically heated drywell, isolated and adjacent drywell, concrete silo, fuel assembly internal temperature measurement, and air-cooled vault. This document presents the test data and results as well as results from supporting test operations (spent fuel calorimetry and canister gas sampling).

  10. The effect of artificial drying temperature on the quality of early harvested pecan kernels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLean, Roy William

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    process was complete, the pecans were shelled, sealed in 8303 cans under 27inHg vacuum, and stored at 0 F until analyses were performed. Sixty whole kernels were randomly selected from each sample, objectively evaluated for color and then cold pressed... harvesting entails shaking the tree after the husks have split and allowing them to dry naturally. Once the nuts 10 were dried, they were shelled and sealed in ()303 cans, sealed under vacuum and stored at 0 F until analyses were performed. Methods...

  11. Drying: a comparison of radial jet reattachment and standard in-line jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habetz, Darren Keith

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DRYING; A COMPARISON OF RADIAL JET REATTACHMENT AND STANDARD IN-LINE JETS A Thesis by DARREN KEITH HABETZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1991 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering DRYING; A COMPARISON OF RADIAL JET REATTACHMENT AND STANDARD IN-LINE JETS A Thesis by DARREN KEITH HABETZ Approved as to style and content by: i2, 4. ~~. Robert H. Page (Chair...

  12. ,"Colorado Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;Net WithdrawalsWellheadNaturalDryCoalbed Methane Proved+Dry

  13. ,"New Mexico Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids, Expected Future7,Dry Natural GasCoalbed MethaneDry

  14. Ground Control

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Control Also inside this issue: Special Science Call Projects Underway Two Postdoc Opportunities Announced Brown Carbon Review Paper Published Understanding Metal Reduction...

  15. Dry gas zone, Elk Hills Field, Kern County, California: General reservoir study: Engineering data, effective August 1, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This reservoir study of the dry gas zone of Elk Hills Field is a data compilation with information relating to well: completion; production; pressure; and back pressure. (JF)

  16. Concentration, size distribution, and dry deposition rate of particle-associated metals in the Los Angeles region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Jeong-Hee H; Sabin, L D; Schiff, K C; Stolzenbach, K D

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the result of cyclical resuspension and deposition of dustNRI; Dry Deposition Velocity; Resuspension; Image Analysis;upon contact without resuspension, the deposition velocity

  17. ,"Texas - RRC District 6 Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources andPlant Liquids,+ LeasePrice Sold toDry NaturalDryDryDry Natural Gas

  18. Treatment of septage in sludge drying reed beds: a case study on pilot-scale beds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Treatment of septage in sludge drying reed beds: a case study on pilot-scale beds S. Troesch***, A systems by local authorities. This will result in a large increase of the quantity of sludge from septic to treat this sludge because they may have reached their nominal load or they are not so numerous in rural

  19. Heat and Mass Transfer Modeling of Dry Gases in the Cathode of PEM Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stockie, John

    Heat and Mass Transfer Modeling of Dry Gases in the Cathode of PEM Fuel Cells M.J. Kermani1 J and N2, through the cathode of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell is studied numerically) an energy equation, written in a form that has enthalpy as the dependent variable. Keywords: PEM fuel cells

  20. DELETERIOUS EXPANSION OF CEMENT PASTE SUBJECTED TO WET-DRY CYCLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ·I CEMENT PASTE SUBJECTED TO WET-DRY CYCLES John A. Wells*, Emmanuel K with five cements produced in different regions of Canada. Test specimens with nominal diameters of 25 mm program show that cement paste specimens exhibit significant differences in the magnitude of expansion

  1. Dry friction between laser-patterned surfaces: Role of alignment, structural wavelength and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mueser, Martin

    1 Dry friction between laser-patterned surfaces: Role of alignment, structural wavelength.gachot@mx.uni-saarland.de Abstract The ability to tune friction by tailoring surface topographies at micron length scales friction between laser-textured surfaces. Line-like laser patterns with varying structural wavelengths

  2. Tribol Lett Thermal -Induced Wear Mechanisms of Sheet Nacre in Dry Friction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Tribol Lett 1 Thermal - Induced Wear Mechanisms of Sheet Nacre in Dry Friction Philippe Stempfléa on the wear of sheet nacre by the assessment of the thermal component of the friction with a scanning thermal because the friction-induced thermal component is not sufficient for degrading the organic matrices

  3. Land application uses for dry flue gas desulfurization by-products: Phase 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dick, W.; Bigham, J.; Forster, R.; Hitzhusen, F.; Lal, R.; Stehouwer, R.; Traina, S.; Wolfe, W.; Haefner, R.; Rowe, G.

    1999-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    New flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbing technologies create a dry, solid by-product material consisting of excess sorbent, reaction product that contains sulfate and sulfite, and coal fly ash. Generally, dry FGD by-products are treated as solid wastes and disposed in landfills. However, landfill sites are becoming scarce and tipping fees are constantly increasing. Provided the environmental impacts are socially and scientifically acceptable, beneficial uses via recycling can provide economic benefits to both the producer and the end user of the FGD. A study titled ''Land Application Uses for Dry Flue Gas Desulfurization By-Products'' was initiated in December, 1990 to develop and demonstrate large volume, beneficial uses of FGD by-products. Phase 1 and Phase 2 reports have been published by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA. Phase 3 objectives were to demonstrate, using field studies, the beneficial uses of FGD by-products (1) as an amendment material on agricultural lands and on abandoned surface coal mine land, (2) as an engineering material for soil stabilization and raid repair, and (3) to assess the environmental and economic impacts of such beneficial uses. Application of dry FGD by-product to three soils in place of agricultural limestone increased alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and corn (Zea may L.) yields. No detrimental effects on soil and plant quality were observed.

  4. Nutr Cancer . Author manuscript Freeze-dried ham promotes azoxymethane-induced mucin-depleted foci

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Nutr Cancer . Author manuscript Page /1 9 Freeze-dried ham promotes azoxymethane-induced mucin and red meat consumption is associated with the risk of colorectal cancer. Meta-analyses have suggested that the risk associated with processed meat is higher. Most processed meats are cured and cooked, which leads

  5. Stable isotope fractionation by thermal diffusion through partially molten wet and dry silicate rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bindeman, Ilya N.

    isotope redistribution by thermal diffusion leading to enrichment of light isotopes at the hot endStable isotope fractionation by thermal diffusion through partially molten wet and dry silicate 2012 Editor: T.M. Harrison Keywords: thermal diffusion hydrogen isotope separation oxygen isotopes

  6. Dry Chamber Wall Thermo-Mechanical Behavior and Lifetime under IFE Cyclic Energy Deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    provided a more detailed assessment of dry chamber wall based on ion and photon spectra from a new direct much faster than the ions and would reach the chamber wall within about 20 ns in the case without protective gas. The ions take longer to reach the chamber wall. As an example, a simple estimate of the ion

  7. IFSA, Kyoto, Japan, September 2001 1 Dry Chamber Wall Thermo-Mechanical Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffray, A. René

    assessment of dry chamber wall [6] based on ion and photon spectra from new direct-drive target from NRL [3 for an Example Case Without a Protective Chamber Gas #12;IFSA, Kyoto, Japan, September 2001 8 Photon and Ion Time of Temporal Distribution for Photons and Ions Based on Direct Drive Spectrum and 6.5 m Chamber without

  8. MCM LTER METADATA FILE TITLE: Lake ice thickness in the McMurdo Dry Valleys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priscu, John C.

    MCM LTER METADATA FILE TITLE: Lake ice thickness in the McMurdo Dry Valleys ABSTRACT: Ice thickness was measured from the bottom of the ice cover to the piezometric water level and to the top of the ice cover-2360 achiuchiolo@montana.edu VARIABLES: Location Name, Location Code, Limno Run, Collection Date, z-water, z-ice, z

  9. Vadose zone transport in dry forests of central Argentina: Role of land use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    on residual moisture flux approach (cumulative chloride versus cumulative water curves) suggested maximum of water below root zone, displacement of solutes, and rising water tables, affecting, in most extreme 78% to 99% of the chloride stock was leached, and total water storage was 30% higher than in the dry

  10. Strength and drying shrinkage of slag paste activated by sodium carbonate and reactive MgO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Fei; Gu, Kai; Al-Tabbaa, Abir

    2015-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    for ?3 days followed by oven drying at 60 °C before microstructural analysis. The samples were then further ground to pass through a 75 micron sieve prior to XRD tests and TGA. XRD was carried out on a Siemens D5000 X-ray diffractometer using a...

  11. Energy Independence: A Dry Hole? ---Experts Across Political Spectrum Challenge 'Emotionally Compelling' Slogan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Energy Independence: A Dry Hole? --- Experts Across Political Spectrum Challenge 'Emotionally BE addicted to oil, but many of its politicians are addicted to "energy independence" -- which may be among, perhaps warming up for another presidential campaign, gave a speech calling for energy independence

  12. Classification of transportation packaging and dry spent fuel storage system components according to importance to safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConnell, J.W., Jr; Ayers, A.L. Jr; Tyacke, M.J. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a graded approach for classification of components used in transportation packaging and dry spent fuel storage systems. This approach provides a method for identifying, the classification of components according to importance to safety within transportation packagings and dry spent fuel storage systems. Record retention requirements are discussed to identify the documentation necessary to validate that the individual components were fabricated in accordance with their assigned classification. A review of the existing regulations pertaining to transportation packagings and dry storage systems was performed to identify current requirements The general types of transportation packagings and dry storage systems were identified. Discussions were held with suppliers and fabricators of packagings and storage systems to determine current practices. The methodology used in this report is based on Regulatory Guide 7.10, Establishing Quality Assurance Programs for Packaging Used in the Transport of Radioactive Material. This report also includes a list of generic components for each of the general types of transportation packagings and spent fuel storage systems. The safety importance of each component is discussed, and a classification category is assigned.

  13. Movements of Palearctic and Afrotropical bird species during the dry season (NovemberFebruary) within Nigeria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Villiers, Marienne

    ­February) within Nigeria WILL CRESSWELL1, MARK BOYD2 & MATT STEVENS1 1AP Leventis Ornithological Research Institute, Jos, Nigeria & School of Biology, University of St Andrews, Fife, Scotland. wrlc@st-and.ac.uk 2Afrotropical bird species during the dry season (November­February) within Nigeria. pp. 18­28. In: Harebottle, D

  14. Rehydration kinetics of freeze-dried carrots F.J. Vergeldt a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    different thermal pre-treatments. Water ingress at room temperature is measured in real time by in situ MRI" and this also negatively impacts market growth. Currently, rational optimization of drying processes is impeded shelf-life and provide convenience to the consumer. However, market growth is impeded by the relative

  15. In situ ruminal dry matter and crude protein degradation of various forbs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    In situ ruminal dry matter and crude protein degradation of various forbs RG Ramirez, N Garcia (DM) and crude protein (CP) of 13 commonly available native forbs. Forbs evaluated were Coldenia. barbigerum (80). Crude protein digestion rate (/h) was highest in P. maculosa (0.17), S. filicaulis (0.12), Z

  16. Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development in the USA David Duchane and Donald Brown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Development in the USA by David Duchane and Donald Brown Los of the world's store of geothermal energy. The real potential for growth in the use of geothermal energy lies-engineered geothermal reservoir in hot, crystalline rock by the application of hydraulic fracturing techniques

  17. Dry purification of aspirational air in coke-sorting systems with wet slaking of coke

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.F. Trembach; A.G. Klimenko [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Coke transportation after wet slaking is accompanied by the release of dust in the production building and in the surrounding atmosphere. Wet methods are traditionally used to purify very humid air. Giprokoks has developed designs for highly efficient dry dust-removal methods in such conditions.

  18. EXPERIMENTAL VERIFICATION OF THE LOAD-FOLLOWING POTENTIAL OF A HOT DRY ROCK GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EXPERIMENTAL VERIFICATION OF THE LOAD-FOLLOWING POTENTIAL OF A HOT DRY ROCK GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR. The objective of this cyclic load-following experiment was to investigate the performance of the reservoir, this series of cyclic flow tests is referred to as the Load-Following Experiment, with the objective

  19. Climate change -a drying up of hydropower investment? Dr Gareth Harrison and Professor Bert Whittington

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Gareth

    Climate change - a drying up of hydropower investment? Dr Gareth Harrison and Professor Bert capital may not favour hydropower given that hydro capital costs are relatively high and payback periods financial return than the public sector, traditionally the main source of funds for hydropower development

  20. 640 CEREAL CHEMISTRY Quick Fiber Process: Effect of Mash Temperature, Dry Solids,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    640 CEREAL CHEMISTRY Quick Fiber Process: Effect of Mash Temperature, Dry Solids, and Residual Germ on using ethanol in alternative fuels. Be- sides being the clean alternative to MTBE in the gasoline market, use of ethanol saves the consumers from 2 to 5¢/gal of gasoline purchased (Renewable Fuels Association